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Sample records for 2-d seismic profiles

  1. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  2. Surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and radon transform forward multiple modeling methods applied to 2D multi-channel seismic profiles from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic profiles and other geophysical data (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland, where the water depths vary from 30 m to over 3 km. Multiples occur when seismic energy is trapped in a layer and reflected from an acoustic interface more than once. Various kinds of multiples occur during seismic data acquisition. These depend on the ray-path the seismic energy follows through the layers. One of the most common multiples is the surface related multiple, which occurs due to strong acoustic impedance contrast between the air and water. The reflected seismic energy from the water surface is trapped within the water column, thus reflects from the seafloor multiple times. Multiples overprint the primary reflections and complicate data interpretation. Both surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and forward parabolic radon transform multiple modeling methods were necessary to attenuate the multiples. SRME is applied to shot gathers starting with the near offset interpolation, multiple estimation using water depths, and subtracting the model multiple from the shot gathers. This method attenuated surface related multiple energy, however, peg-leg multiples remained in the data. The parabolic radon transform method minimized the effect of these multiples. This method is applied to normal moveout (NMO) corrected common mid-point gathers (CMP). The CMP gathers are fitted or modeled with curves estimated from the reference offset, moveout range, moveout increment parameters. Then, the modeled multiples are subtracted from the data. Preliminary outputs of these two methods show that the surface related

  3. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  4. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  5. 2D reflection seismic investigations in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, E.; Malehmir, A.; Heikkinen, P.; Heinonen, S.; Kukkonen, I.

    2012-04-01

    In 2007, 2D reflection seismic survey was conducted in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE (platinum group elements) deposit, northern Finland as a part of the HIRE (High Resolution Reflection Seismics for Ore Exploration 2007-2010) project of the Geological Survey of Finland. The Kevitsa 2D seismic survey consists of four connected survey lines, each approximately 6-8 km long. The survey lines traverse the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusive complex and partly also the geological units surrounding it, thus providing an insight to the structural make-up of the complex. The aim of the survey was to delineate the overall shape and basal contact of the Kevitsa ultramafic intrusive complex at depth, to study the seismic response of the disseminated Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, and to potentially find indications for new ore deposits. Herein, we present results from processing and interpretation of the Kevitsa 2D reflection seismic data. In the data processing sequence, specific focus was given to finding optimal CDP-line geometries for the crooked-line survey profiles, and to detailed velocity analysis. We also conducted a simplified cross-dip analysis to assess the potential cross-profile dips of the reflectors, however, application of the cross-dip corrections was found to be unnecessary, and our conventional processing sequence involving prestack DMO corrections followed by poststack migration resulted in high-quality images of the subsurface. The seismic sections presented in this work reveal a detailed reflectivity structure of the uppermost 5 kilometers. The known Kevitsa deposit was found to have a specific seismic signature, and the seismic images were used to establish previously unknown shape and extent of the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusive complex, thus providing a framework for effective future exploration in the area. Interestingly, the data reveal complex internal reflectivity structure within the intrusion, suggesting multiple levels of intrusion within the pre

  6. Chicxulub Peak Ring Characteristics from 2D Reflection Seismic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Cervantes, K.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Gulick, S.

    2007-05-01

    Since 1980's research interest over Chicxulub crater located SE Gulf of Mexico, has grown not only because its relationship with the K-P(Cretaseous -Paleogene) extinction but because of its size (diameter ~ 200 km) and grade of preservation. Based on results from several surveys using different geophysical methods, Chicxulub has been classified as a multiring crater. A topographic high rising from crater floor was first recognized as the Chicxulub peak ring on four 1996 reflection seismic profiles but the low density of this data set made impossible to describe on detail this structure. Recently, during 2005 we carried out a marine survey acquiring 29 profiles. A grid located over the central marine portion of the crater was conformed by eleven profiles 80 km long oriented WSW-ENE and ten 25 km long NW-SE. Data was recorded on 480 channels spaced 12.5 cm on a 6 km streamer and air guns were shot every 50 m allowing us to image the earth up to 14 s TWTT. This new data set along with the 1996 profiles allow us to build up the first 3D image of Chicxulub peak ring as well as to analyze some important features of this ring. Results show that the peak ring lays down closer to the surface and the crater rim on its NW portion where it rises more abruptly from the crater floor reaching up to 430 m. Based on the information of the radial lines this characteristics change in clockwise direction being opposite on the NE. The relationship between the peak ring and other Chicxulub structures,such as the slump blocks and the dipping reflector, change as well in the same direction indicating that the peak ring is displaced to the NW. These asymmetries could be related to the process of formation of the peak ring as a result of: a)an asymmetric collapse of the central uplift which has been proved not to be related to impact direction, b) displacement of the central uplift towards the transient cavity rim or c)heterogeneities on impact surface predating the impact.

  7. Research of CRP-based irregular 2D seismic acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Yin, Cheng; He, Guang-Ming; Chen, Ai-Ping; Jing, Long-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Seismic exploration in the mountainous areas of western Chinese is extremely difficult because of the complexity of the surface and subsurface, which results in shooting difficulties, seismic data with low signal-to-noise ratio, and strong interference. The complexity of the subsurface structure leads to strong scattering of the reflection points; thus, the curved-line acquisition method has been used. However, the actual subsurface structural characteristics have been rarely considered. We propose a design method for irregular acquisition based on common reflection points (CRP) to avoid difficult-to-shoot areas, while considering the structural characteristics and CRP positions and optimizing the surface-receiving line position. We arrange the positions of the receiving points to ensure as little dispersion of subsurface CRP as possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic data. We verify the applicability of the method using actual data from a site in Sichuan Basin. The proposed method apparently solves the problem of seismic data acquisition and facilitates seismic exploration in structurally complex areas.

  8. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  9. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  10. 2D seismic residual statics derived from refraction interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Refraction traveltimes have long been applied for deriving long-wavelength statics solutions. These traveltimes are also applied for the derivation of residual statics, but they must be sufficiently accurate at short wavelengths. In this study, we present a seismic residual statics method that applies interferometric theory to produce four stacked virtual refraction gathers with a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. These gathers are composed of forward and backward virtual refraction gathers for receivers and shots. By picking the first arrivals on these four gathers followed by the application of a set of refraction equations, reliable residual statics solutions can be derived. This approach can help deal with noisy data and also avoid using traveltime picks from shot gathers. We demonstrate the approach by applying it to synthetic data as well as real data.

  11. Bernoulli-based random undersampling schemes for 2D seismic data regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rui; Zhao, Qun; She, De-Ping; Yang, Li; Cao, Hui; Yang, Qin-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Seismic data regularization is an important preprocessing step in seismic signal processing. Traditional seismic acquisition methods follow the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, whereas compressive sensing (CS) provides a fundamentally new paradigm to overcome limitations in data acquisition. Besides the sparse representation of seismic signal in some transform domain and the 1-norm reconstruction algorithm, the seismic data regularization quality of CS-based techniques strongly depends on random undersampling schemes. For 2D seismic data, discrete uniform-based methods have been investigated, where some seismic traces are randomly sampled with an equal probability. However, in theory and practice, some seismic traces with different probability are required to be sampled for satisfying the assumptions in CS. Therefore, designing new undersampling schemes is imperative. We propose a Bernoulli-based random undersampling scheme and its jittered version to determine the regular traces that are randomly sampled with different probability, while both schemes comply with the Bernoulli process distribution. We performed experiments using the Fourier and curvelet transforms and the spectral projected gradient reconstruction algorithm for 1-norm (SPGL1), and ten different random seeds. According to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between the original and reconstructed seismic data, the detailed experimental results from 2D numerical and physical simulation data show that the proposed novel schemes perform overall better than the discrete uniform schemes.

  12. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  13. Experimental validation of 2D profile photoresist shrinkage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Self, Andy; Ferry, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex

    2011-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in allowing the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. These smaller feature sizes will also require the use of thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in SEMATECH's CD-SEM Unified Specification. In other associated works, we first developed a 1-D model for resist shrinkage for the bottom linewidth and then a 2-D profile model that accounted for shrinkage of all aspects of a trapezoidal profile along a given linescan. A fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized and shaped features. In the 1-D case, calibration of the parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam was all that was required to fit the models to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. The later 2-D model included improvements for solving the CD shrinkage in thin photoresists, which is now of great interest for upcoming realistic lithographic processing to explore the change in resist profile with electron dose and to predict the influence of initial resist profile on shrinkage characteristics. The 2-D model also included shrinkage due to both the primary

  14. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  15. 2D seismic data processing for straight lines in the loess plateaus in Fuxian of Shanbei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minjie; Chen, Yequan; Zhang, Hai; Pang, Shangming; Deng, Guozhen

    2005-01-01

    The crooked seismic lines along valleys were irregular previously in Fuxian of Shanbei, showing an irregular branch in plane, and hard to complete close grids. Therefore, it’s difficult to conduct reservoir inversion of 2D seismic data. In 2001, Zhongyuan Oilfield Company carried out the study on field acquisition methods and seismic processing technology in Fuxian. Straight lines were passing through plateaus and formed seismic grids by using flexible geometry with variable linear bins. Data processing involved model-inversion based refraction static correction, surface consistent amplitude compensation, deconvolution, and pre-stack noise attenuation. As the result, seismic data with a high fidelity was provided for the subsequent reservoir predictions, small-amplitude structure interpretation and integrative geologic study. Because all lines were jointed to form grids, comprehensive interpretation of reservoir inversion could be finally implemented by using the pseudo logging method to control lines without wells.

  16. Multi-method determination of continuous 2D velocity profiles from the surface to 1 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterie, S.; Miller, R. D.; Ivanov, J.; Schwenk, J.; Bailey, B. L.; Schwarzer, J.; Markiewicz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Compressional and shear reflection data provide critical measurements of velocity and attenuation that are necessary for numerical simulations of site response from earthquake energy and seismic investigations to lithologic and pore characterizations. Imperative for accurate site response models is a seismic velocity model extending from the surface to the depth of interest that is representative of the true subsurface. In general, no seismic method can be used to characterize the shallowest (< 30 m) and deepest (30 m to 1 km) portions of the subsurface in a single pass with a consistent set of equipment and acquisition parameters. With four unique seismic surveys targeting different portions of the subsurface and different components of the seismic wavefield, we were able to build a comprehensive dataset that facilitated continuous 2D velocity profiles. The upper kilometer underlying our study site consists of Lake Bonneville lucustrine sediments and post-Bonneville alluvium and colluvium from the nearby Wasatch Front in north central Utah (Eardley, 1938; Hintze, 2005). Four unique seismic surveys were acquired along each of two 1.5 km lines located approximately 3 km apart. Data for tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) were acquired with a bungee accelerated weight drop and 4.5 Hz compressional geophones. P-wave and S-wave reflection data were acquired with an IVI minivib 1 and 28 Hz compressional and 14 Hz SH geophones, respectively. P-wave and S-wave velocities from the surface to 30 m were determined using tomography and MASW, respectively. Stacking velocities of reflections on common midpoint gathers from the vibroseis data were used to determine Vp and Vs from approximately 30 m to nearly 1 km below ground surface. Each Vp and Vs dataset were merged to generate continuous interval and average velocity profiles. The sutured velocity cross-sections were produced for both P- and S-waves in a fashion not previously described in the

  17. Modelling of a coal seam of the deposit Đurđevik (BiH) by means of 2D reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenović, Siniša; Urošević, Milovan; Sretenović, Branislav; Cvetkov, Vesna; Životić, Dragana

    2016-06-01

    A low cost 2D reflection seismic survey was used to map the continuity of the main seams as well as the numerous faults at the Đurđevik sub-bituminous coal deposit (BiH). A 24-channel seismic data acquisition system was available for this survey. The natural high reflectivity of the coal seams and a favourable geometry of seismic profiles enabled the identification and correlation of major faults across the area. Rugged terrain presented challenges to both data acquisition and processing. Stacks of acceptable quality were obtained only after the application of surface consistent statics and careful application of multi-channel filtering. A set of recorded 2D lines was interpreted in a 3D environment. Inferred structural elements disrupting the seam continuity were identified and were in agreement with available drilling results and mine workings. The result of this work was used to reduce mining hazards and also to help optimise mine planning.

  18. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  19. 2-D TFPF based on Contourlet transform for seismic random noise attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xian; Li, Yue; Zhuang, Guanghai; Zhang, Chao; Han, Xue

    2016-06-01

    The time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) algorithm is useful for attenuating seismic random noise. Conventional TFPF processes each channel of the seismic record independently with a fixed window length (WL), which is a one-dimensional algorithm due to filtering along the channel direction. However, the fixed WL is not appropriate for all frequency components at the same time, so using this technique cannot preserve the reflected signals effectively. Also, Conventional TFPF ignores the spatial characteristics of reflection events, resulting in poor continuity of seismic events and serious loss of the correlation among channels. Here we introduce a new spatiotemporal method, called two-dimensional (2-D) TFPF based on Contourlet transform, which considers spatial correlation and improves the performance of the TFPF. Regarding the event as the contour in an image and using Contourlet transform (CT) to the record, we can find the optimal radial filtering trace which best matches the event, and then sample the record to extract signals along the trace. In this way, frequencies of sampled signals are low and similar. After applying the TFPF along the trace instead of along each channel, the estimation bias is decreased due to the low frequency. Moreover, using the same WL is suitable as a result of similar frequencies. Experiments on synthetic models and the field data illustrate that the new method performs well in random noise attenuation and reflection event preservation.

  20. A nearly analytic exponential time difference method for solving 2D seismic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Dinghui; Song, Guojie

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a nearly analytic exponential time difference (NETD) method for solving the 2D acoustic and elastic wave equations. In this method, we use the nearly analytic discrete operator to approximate the high-order spatial differential operators and transform the seismic wave equations into semi-discrete ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Then, the converted ODE system is solved by the exponential time difference (ETD) method. We investigate the properties of NETD in detail, including the stability condition for 1-D and 2-D cases, the theoretical and relative errors, the numerical dispersion relation for the 2-D acoustic case, and the computational efficiency. In order to further validate the method, we apply it to simulating acoustic/elastic wave propagation in multilayer models which have strong contrasts and complex heterogeneous media, e.g., the SEG model and the Marmousi model. From our theoretical analyses and numerical results, the NETD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively by using the displacement and gradient to approximate the high-order spatial derivatives. In addition, because NETD is based on the structure of the Lie group method which preserves the quantitative properties of differential equations, it can achieve more accurate results than the classical methods.

  1. Geomorphological relationships through the use of 2-D seismic reflection data, Lidar, and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesce, Meghan Elizabeth

    Barrier Islands are crucial in protecting coastal environments. This study focuses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, located within the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Barrier Island complex. It is one of many islands serving as natural protection for NGOM ecosystems and coastal cities. The NGOM barrier islands formed at 4 kya in response to a decrease in rate of sea level rise. The morphology of these islands changes with hurricanes, anthropogenic activity, and tidal and wave action. This study focuses on ancient incised valleys and and the impact on island morphology on hurricane breaches. Using high frequency 2-D seismic reflection data four horizons, including the present seafloor, were interpreted. Subaerial portions of Dauphin Island were imaged using Lidar data and aerial imagery over a ten-year time span, as well as historical maps. Historical shorelines of Dauphin Island were extracted from aerial imagery and historical maps, and were compared to the location of incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection data. Erosion and deposition volumes of Dauphin Island from 1998 to 2010 (the time span covering hurricanes Ivan and Katrina) in the vicinity of Katrina Cut and Pelican Island were quantified using Lidar data. For the time period prior to Hurricane Ivan an erosional volume of 46,382,552 m3 and depositional volume of 16,113.6 m3 were quantified from Lidar data. The effects of Hurricane Ivan produced a total erosion volume of 4,076,041.5 m3. The erosional and depositional volumes of Katrina Cut being were 7,562,068.5 m3 and 510,936.7 m3, respectively. More volume change was found within Pelican Pass. For the period between hurricanes Ivan and Katrina the erosion volume was 595,713.8 m3. This was mostly located within Katrina Cut. Total deposition for the same period, including in Pelican Pass, was 15,353,961 m3. Hurricane breaches were compared to ancient incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection results. Breaches from hurricanes from 1849

  2. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  3. 2-D Gaussian beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    An approach for true-amplitude seismic beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in 2-D anisotropic elastic media is presented and discussed. Here, the recovered true-amplitude function is a scattering potential. This approach is a migration procedure based on the weighted summation of pre-stack data. The true-amplitude weights are computed by applying Gaussian beams (GBs). We shoot a pair of properly chosen GBs with a fixed dip and opening angles from the current imaging point towards an acquisition system. This pair of beams is used to compute a true-amplitude selective image of a rapid velocity variation. The total true-amplitude image is constructed by superimposing selective images computed for a range of available dip angles. The global regularity of the GBs allows one to disregard whether a ray field is regular or irregular. P- and S-wave GBs can be used to handle raw multicomponent data without separating the waves. The use of anisotropic GBs allows one to take into account the anisotropy of the background model.

  4. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  5. Quaternary Deformation History of the Palos Verdes Fault in San Pedro Bay using 3D and 2D Seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, A.; Mellors, R. J.; Legg, M.; Francis, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Palos Verdes fault has one of the highest slip rates of the Los Angeles basin structures. Using a combination of exploration industry 3-D seismic data and 2-D high-resolution profiles through San Pedro Bay, we are preparing detailed maps of the shallow geometry and deformation history of the Palos Verdes fault. By mapping prominent shallow reflection horizons, that represent important late Pliocene and Quaternary sedimentary sequences, we can estimate the Quaternary deformation history of this important fault zone and identify whether significant changes in tectonic style or rates of deformation have occurred that may affect estimates of earthquake potential in the southern California region. We have identified about six major seismic stratigraphic sequences in the Wilmington Graben east of the Palos Verdes fault zone representing the time period from Repettian (Pliocene) to late Quaternary. Three of these are in the shallow section and clearly imaged by the high-resolution profiles. One of the more significant features we observe regarding these sequences is that the uplift of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium, represented by sedimentary growth wedges adjacent to the fault zone, appears to stop and start. These changes in vertical deformation character may represent important local changes in the tectonic style along the fault zone. For constraints on lateral deformation history, we are attempting to identify possible meanders or other irregularities in the Los Angeles - San Gabriel river system that generally flows straight along the northeast flank of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium before plunging down the slope in the San Gabriel submarine canyon. Channel thalwegs and margins offset by the Palos Verdes fault zone would provide requisite piercing points for measuring right-slip since channels filled. Major segment boundaries, such as the 3-km long north-trending releasing bend and Beta oil field complex restraining bend structure may provide other important

  6. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  7. A novel simple procedure to consider seismic soil structure interaction effects in 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juan Diego; Gómez, Juan David; Restrepo, Doriam; Rivera, Santiago

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) effects for use in engineering practice. It is applicable to 2D structures subjected to vertically incident shear waves supported by homogenous half-spaces. The method is attractive since it keeps the simplicity of the spectral approach, overcomes some of the difficulties and inaccuracies of existing classical techniques and yet it considers a physically consistent excitation. This level of simplicity is achieved through a response spectra modification factor that can be applied to the free-field 5%-damped response spectra to yield design spectral ordinates that take into account the scattered motions introduced by the interaction effects. The modification factor is representative of the Transfer Function (TF) between the structural relative displacements and the free-field motion, which is described in terms of its maximum amplitude and associated frequency. Expressions to compute the modification factor by practicing engineers are proposed based upon a parametric study using 576 cases representative of actual structures. The method is tested in 10 cases spanning a wide range of common fundamental vibration periods.

  8. Monitoring of injected CO2 using the seismic full waveform inversion for 2-D elastic VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Shin, Y.; Moon, S.

    2014-12-01

    To monitor the injected CO2 in the subsurface, seismic monitoring techniques are extensively applied because of its high resolution. Among the seismic monitoring techniques, seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) has high applicability because it can delineate parameter changes by injected CO2. When seismic FWIs are applied, subsurface media can be generally assumed to be isotropic. However, most subsurface media are not isotropic, and shale is a representative anisotropic medium, particularly vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) medium, which is often encountered as a barrier to injected CO2. Thus, anisotropic properties of subsurface media are important for monitoring of injected CO2. For these issues, we need to consider anisotropy of subsurface media when seismic FWIs are applied as a monitoring tool for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed seismic FWI for 2-D elastic VTI media to investigate the effects of anisotropic properties in CO2 monitoring. For this numerical test, we assumed a geological model, which copies after one of CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We also applied seismic FWI algorithm for 2-D elastic isotropic media for comparison. From this comparison, we noticed that we can obtain more reliable results when we apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm. Numerical examples indicate that we should apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm rather than the isotropic FWI algorithm when we interpret seismic monitoring data acquired in anisotropic media to increase the success of monitoring for injected CO2. Our numerical results can also be used as references for real seismic monitoring of the Korea CO2 sequestration projects in the near future. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine

  9. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh, K.; Brown, L. D.

    2006-05-01

    Africa represents one of the true frontiers for systematic deep seismic reflection profiling of the type pioneered by COCORP, LITHOPROBE, BIRPS, DEKORP, and ECORS in the northern hemisphere. However, there have been a number of notable individual surveys that have sampled key components of the African lithosphere, and several systematic regional geophysical initiatives which suggest African is fertile ground for future efforts. Among the latter are the KRISP refraction/wide-angle program to probe the East African Rift system in the 1990's, the Kaapvaal Experiment to image the deep lithosphere with passive techniques and most recently the EAGLE active/passive experiments in the Afar. Examples of true multichannel deep reflection surveys to delineate crustal structure include the transects of the Limpopo Belt, a Neoarchean mobile zone that sutures the Kaapval and Zimbabwe cratons, deep oil prospecting surveys in the Nosop basin of southern Botswana that reveal dramatic basement reflectors off the NW margin of the Kaapvaal craton, and most recently deep vibroseis surveys within the Kaapvaal craton that indicate a crustal stack of tectonic slivers as well as tectonic shingling of the upper mantle. The passive margin of western Africa, with its strategic oil resources, has been a target of several deep studies using marine seismic surveys, including the PROBE initiative of the late 1980's and more recent deep surveys offshore Angola. Reprocessing of lines from oil exploration grids reveal Proterozoic mid-lower crustal features offshore of Ghana. Among the potentially rich targets for future surveys in Africa are the West African and Congo cratons and their suturing Pan-African (Neoproterozoic) mobile belts. This suite of cratonic lithosphere elements is largely largely untouched by modern high resolution seismic methodologies. New initiatives such as LEGENDS ( targeting the East African Orogen) and exploitation of existing oil industry seismic data for deep information

  10. Seismic wavefield propagation in 2D anisotropic media: Ray theory versus wave-equation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Hu, Guang-yi; Zhang, Yan-teng; Li, Zhong-sheng

    2014-05-01

    Despite the ray theory that is based on the high frequency assumption of the elastic wave-equation, the ray theory and the wave-equation simulation methods should be mutually proof of each other and hence jointly developed, but in fact parallel independent progressively. For this reason, in this paper we try an alternative way to mutually verify and test the computational accuracy and the solution correctness of both the ray theory (the multistage irregular shortest-path method) and the wave-equation simulation method (both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method) in anisotropic VTI and TTI media. Through the analysis and comparison of wavefield snapshot, common source gather profile and synthetic seismogram, it is able not only to verify the accuracy and correctness of each of the methods at least for kinematic features, but also to thoroughly understand the kinematic and dynamic features of the wave propagation in anisotropic media. The results show that both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method are able to yield the same results even for complex anisotropic media (such as a fault model); the multistage irregular shortest-path method is capable of predicting similar kinematic features as the wave-equation simulation method does, which can be used to mutually test each other for methodology accuracy and solution correctness. In addition, with the aid of the ray tracing results, it is easy to identify the multi-phases (or multiples) in the wavefield snapshot, common source point gather seismic section and synthetic seismogram predicted by the wave-equation simulation method, which is a key issue for later seismic application.

  11. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  12. Re-processing and interpretation of 2D seismic data from the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Malehmir, Alireza; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh

    2012-05-01

    The Kristineberg mining area in the western part of the Skellefte ore district, northern Sweden, contains the largest massive sulphide deposit in the district. In 2003, two parallel seismic lines, Profiles 1 and 5, each about 25 km long and about 8 km apart were acquired in the Kristineberg area. The initial processing results were successful in imaging the large-scale structures of the area down to 12 km of the crust, but resulted in relatively poor seismic image near the mine. In this paper, we re-processed the seismic data along Profile 1 that crosses the mine. The main objective was to improve the seismic section near the mine for further correlation with new seismic data recently acquired in the area. The crooked-line acquisition geometry, very low fold coverage of less than 17, complex geology and sparse outcrops in the area made the data re-processing and interpretation challenging. Despite these challenges, significant improvement is observed in the seismic data, in terms of event continuity and resolution. Refraction static corrections allowed high frequencies to be retained, which improved the seismic section. The refraction static solution was manually checked and adjusted at every iteration to avoid unstable solutions. 3D visualization of the re-processed data with other seismic profiles recently acquired in the area allowed the seismic reflections to be correlated. The majority of the reflections are interpreted to originate from either fault zones or lithological contacts. A very shallow reflection correlates well with the location of the Kristineberg mineralized horizon.

  13. The influence of slope profile extraction techniques and DEM resolution on 2D rockfall simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Frattini, P.; Agliardi, F.; Crosta, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    The development of advanced 3D rockfall modelling algorithms and tools during the last decade has allowed to gain insights in the topographic controls on the quality and reliability of rockfall simulation results. These controls include DEM resolution and roughness, and depend on the adopted rockfall simulation approach and DEM generation techniques. Despite the development of 3D simulations, the 2D modelling approach still remains suitable and convenient in some cases. Therefore, the accuracy of high-quality 3D descriptions of topography must be preserved when extracting slope profiles for 2D simulations. In this perspective, this study compares and evaluates three different techniques commonly used to extract slope profiles from DEM, in order to assess their suitability and effects on rockfall simulation results. These methods include: (A) an "interpolated shape" method (ESRI 3D Analyst), (B) a raw raster sampling method (EZ Profiler), and (C) a vector TIN sampling method (ESRI 3D Analyst). The raster DEMs used in the study were all derived from the same TIN DEM used for method C. For raster DEM, the "interpolated shape" method (A) extracts the profile by bi-linear interpolating the elevation among the four neighbouring cells at each sampling location along the profile trace. The EZ Profiler extension (B) extracts the profile by sampling elevation values directly from the DEM raster grid at each sampling location. These methods have been compared to the extraction of profiles from TIN DEM (C), where slope profile elevations are directly obtained by sampling the TIN triangular facets. 2D rockfall simulations performed using a widely used commercial software (RocfallTM) with the different profiles show that: (1) method A and C provide similar results; (2) runout simulated using profiles obtained by method A is usually shorter than method C; (3) method B presents abrupt horizontal steps in the profiles, resulting in unrealistic runout. To study the influence of DEM

  14. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  15. A quasi 2D semianalytical model for the potential profile in hetero and homojunction tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, F.; Gnani, E.; Gnudi, A.; Reggiani, S.; Baccarani, G.

    2015-11-01

    A quasi 2D semianalytical model for the potential profile in hetero and homojunction tunnel FETs is developed and compared with full-quantum simulation results. It will be shown that the pure analytical solution perfectly matches results at high VDS. However, a coupling with the numerical solution of the 1D Poisson equation in the radial direction is necessary at low VDS, in order to properly account for the charge density in equilibrium with the drain contact. With such an approach we are able to correctly predict the potential profile for both the linear and saturation regimes.

  16. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  17. Skeleton-migration: Applications in deep crustal reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Vasudevan, K.

    2009-12-01

    The reflection geometry of the sub-surface is three-dimensional in character. A 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing would be the ideal modus operandi for true seismic interpretation. However, almost all deep-crustal reflection profiles recorded on land follow quasi-linear geometry, for economic reasons. Although conventional processing of the lines accommodates crooked-line geometry, the migration algorithms used to produce seismic images for interpretation are generally 2-D in nature. Consequently, the effects of 3-D geometry are not usually well-accounted for. For example, the out-of-plane reflections lead to mislocation errors that increase with recording time. The events may be mislocated by 10’s of km and show spurious apparent dip after migration. In order to circumvent these problems and to gain insight into 3-D structures, we present an easy-to-implement “Skeleton-migration” algorithm. The skeleton-migration method follows a two-step procedure. In the first step, we introduce a fast skeletonization of the final pre-processed stack to generate a digital catalogue containing a variety of event attributes including two-way travel times and location information in UTM co-ordinates. In the second step, we apply ray-based migration to the catalogue of events or two-way travel times of the 2-D stack using an appropriate velocity model for the crust and upper mantle. Since often we do not know a priori the strike direction of the reflectors, we have implemented a fast visualization-based optimization procedure to determine the strike. In subsequent steps, we use visualization methods to view and interpret the skeleton-migration results. We illustrate the usefulness of the method with examples from both the synthetic and deep crustal seismic reflection data. For the synthetic examples, we consider physical models corresponding to a point-scatterer, a synform, a fault and a subducting slab. In all these instances, we use an elastic Kirchhoff algorithm

  18. Seismic reflection profiling of Neoarchean cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velden, Arie Jan

    Deep seismic reflection data from the Superior and Slave cratons in Canada and the Yilgarn craton in Australia are processed with similar processing flows and display parameters to facilitate comparative analysis. The profiles are characterized by subhorizontal to shallowly dipping reflection fabrics in the crust and upper mantle. These reflection fabrics are interpreted as ˜2.8-2.6 Ga ductile structural fabrics associated with peak orogenesis that led to cratonization. A re-evaluation of the seismic data has led to alternative interpretations compared to those published previously. In western Ontario, at Red Lake, divergent reflection patterns are interpreted as products of mainly collisional tectonics rather than extensional tectonics, and at Pickle Lake, mantle reflections connect to a mapped suture and strikeslip fault system. In western Quebec, steep structures are interpreted on the north flank of the Opatica domain. In the Kalgoorlie area of western Australia, subhorizontal upper crustal reflections are interpreted as pre-deformational layers within anticlines. A new tectonic model is presented for the western Slave Province in which divergent reflections at Yellowknife are interpreted to be associated with convergence between the Snare arc and the central Slave basement complex. Reflections that project from the reflection Moho into the upper mantle are observed on all profiles and are interpreted as relict subduction zones and/or major terrane-bounding structures. Listric mid-crustal reflections resembling roofing shingles are interpreted as products of underthrusting and subcretion. Strike-slip faults are manifested as near-vertical zones of reflection truncations. Greenstone belts are often poorly reflective. These reflection patterns are consistent with tectonic models in which greenstone belts form adjacent to protocratons and are thickened by protocontinent-dipping subduction, tectonic underplating, formation of nappes, and thrust-and-fold structures

  19. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km all over the Japanese archipelago. Although it is equipped with short-period seismometers, we also can observe long-period seismic wave up to 100 s in periods for significantly large earthquakes. In this case, we may treat long-period seismic waves as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength rather than individual traces at stations. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct 2D wavefield and obtain its propagation properties from seismic gradiometry (SG) method. The SG estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients from discrete station record by the Taylor series approximation with an inverse problem. By using spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, we can obtain properties of propagating wave packet such as the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading and radiation pattern. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary condition, we may decompose the vector elastic 2D wavefield estimated by the SG into divergence and rotation components. First, we applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50 s) seismogram dataset computed by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout as a feasibility test. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are very well reproduced with average correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in this period range. Applications to a real large earthquakes show that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield are well reconstructed with additional information of arrival direction and its slowness. The reconstructed wavefield contained a clear contrast in slowness between body and surface waves, regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation which may be attributed to scattering. Slowness

  20. Analysis of Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using 2D seismic data and well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Ferhi, Issam; Bédir, Mourad; Youssef, Mohamed Ben; Gasmi, Mohamed; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a structural and depositional model of lower Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using detailed facies relations in outcrops, seismic reflection data, and wells. The study interval (called the "Aptian supersequence") is subdivided into four seismic sequences containing third-order sequences. Sequence architecture was strongly affected by syndepositional tectonic movements, which controlled sequence position and distribution. Specifically, the seismic sections show irregular distribution of different zones of subsidence and uplift. The observed structures identified through the detailed mapping suggest that lower Cretaceous rifting created depressions and grabens that filled with strata characterized by divergent reflectors striking against dipping growth faults. The Aptian-Albian unconformity ("crisis") marked a change of the extensional stress field from NNW-SSE to NE-SW induced rotation of blocks and an evolution of sedimentary basin filling related to the regional tectonic deformation. Local salt tectonic movement accentuated the formation of asymmetric depocenters. The salt ascended at the junction of master faults, resulting in cross-cutting of the strata and local reworking of Triassic evaporites in Aptian strata. Basinward to landward variations of the thickness and facies associated with strata pinch-outs and unconformities are related to the main synsedimentary tectonic events that were synchronous with salt tectonic movements. Triassic salt domes and salt intrusions along faults accentuated the border elevations between basin depocenters and uplifts. These sedimentary phenomena in central Tunisia are interpreted as causally related aspects of a local and global tectonic event during the Aptian.

  1. Comparative 2D BRT and seismic modeling of CO2 plumes in deep saline reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrey, Said Attia Al; Strahser, Matthias; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The multi-disciplinary research project 'CO2 MoPa' (modeling and parameterization of CO2 storage in deep saline formations for dimensions and risk analysis) deals, among others, with the parameterization of virtual subsurface storage sites to characterize rock properties with modeling of processes related to CCS in deep saline reservoirs. The geophysical task is to estimate the sensitivity and the resolution of reflection seismic and geoelectrical time-lapses in order to determine the propagation of CO2 within the sediments and the development of the CO2 reservoir. Compared with seismic, borehole electric resistivity tomography (BRT) has lower resolution, but its permanent installation and continuous monitoring can make it an economical alternative or complement. Seismic and geoelectric applications to quantify changes of intrinsic aquifer properties with time are justified by the lower density and velocity and the higher electric resistivity of CO2 in comparison to pore brine. We present here modeling results on scenarios with realistic parameters of deep saline formations of the German Basin (candidate for CCS). The study focuses on effects of parameters related to depth (temperature, pressure), petrophysics (salinity, porosity), plume dimensions/saturations and data acquisition, processing and inversions. Both methods show stronger effects with increasing brine salinity, CO2 reservoir thickness, porosity and CO2 saturation in the pores. Both methods have a pronounced depth dependence due to the pressure and temperature dependence of the velocities, densities and resistivities of the host rock, brine and CO2. Increasing depth means also decreasing frequencies of the seismic signal and hence weaker resolution. Because of the expected limited thickness of the CO2 reservoir, the reflections from its top and bottom will most likely interfere with each other, making it difficult to determine the exact dimensions of the reservoir. In BRT, the resulting resistivity

  2. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  3. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  4. Differential proteomic profiles from distinct Toxoplasma gondii strains revealed by 2D-difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyu; Zhao, Qunli; Das Singla, Lachhman; Min, Juan; He, Shenyi; Cong, Hua; Li, Ying; Su, Chunlei

    2013-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that infects mammals and birds. Human infection during pregnancy may cause severe damage to the fetus. Reactivation of latent infection in immunocompromised patients can cause life-threatening encephalitis. T. gondii strains are highly diverse but only a few lineages (Type I, II and III) are widely spread. In mouse model, Type I strains are highly virulent, whereas Type II and III strains are intermediately or non virulent. It is not clear how much quantitative difference exists in proteomic profiles among these distinct T. gondii lineages. In the present study, the proteomic profiles of T. gondii tachyzoites from these lineages were investigated by two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies. A total of 2321 protein spots were detected. Overall, the GT1 strain of Type I lineage and the strain PTG of Type II lineage have highly similar proteomic profiles and both are different from that of the CTG strain of Type III lineage. Eighty-four protein spots were differentially expressed by greater than 1.5-fold in relative abundance and 10 of them were identified to 7 T. gondii proteins in existing database. Investigation of the quantitative differences in proteomics among distinct T. gondii strains should facilitate our understanding of difference in biological processes and pathogenesis of distinct T. gondii genotypes, which will provide basic information to determine treatment regimen for different manifestation of toxoplasmosis. PMID:23340323

  5. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziman, M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Haimi, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data.

  6. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  7. A New Method for Detecting Goaf Area of Coal Mine :2D Microtremor Profiling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Ling, S.; Guo, H.; Shi, W.; Li, S.; Tian, B.

    2012-12-01

    A goaf area is referred to as a cavity where coal has been removed or mined out. These cavities will change the original geostress equilibrium of stratigraphic system and cause local geostress focusing or concentration. Consequently, the surrounding rock of a goaf may be deformed, fractured, displaced and caved resulting from the combined effect of gravity and geostress. In the cases of little or no effective mining control, widespread cracks, fractures and even subsidence of the rock mass above the goaf will not only lead to groundwater depletion, farmland destruction and deterioration of ecological environment, but also present a serious threat to the mining safety, engineering construction, and even people's lives and property. So, it is important to locate the boundary of the goaf and to evaluate its stability in order to provide the basis for comprehensive control in the latter period of mining. This article attempts to explore a new geophysical method - 2D microtremor profiling technique for goaf detection and mapping. 2D microtremor profiling technique is based on the microtremor array theory (Aki, 1957; Ling, 1994; Okada, 2003) utilizing spatial autocorrelation analysis to obtain Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves for apparent S-wave velocity (Vx) calculation (Ling & Miwa, 2006;Xu et al.,2012). A laterally continuous S-wave velocity section can then be obtained through data interpolation. The final result will be used for interpreting lateral changes in lithology and geological structures. Let's take a case study in Henan Province of China as an example. The coal seams in the survey area were about 150 ~ 250m deep. A triple-circular array was adopted for acquiring microtremor data, with the observation radius in 20, 40 and 80m, respectively, and a sampling the interval of 50m. We observed the following characteristics of the goaf area from the microtremor Vx section: (1) obvious low pseudo velocity anomaly corresponding to limestone layer below the goaf; (2

  8. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  9. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  10. Investigating the Sedimentary Structure of the Baza Basin (Southern Spain) using Seismic Reflection Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C. A.; Baumann-Wilke, M.; Stiller, M.; Gibert, L.; Jurado, M. J.; Scott, G. R.; Mertz, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Baza Basin is an intra-mountain evaporitic basin in Southern Spain. It is the largest of the Late Neogene continental basins of the Betic Cordillera. During the last 7 million years the basin alternately was flooded and fell dry. Therefore, up to 2.5 km thick lacustrine and ancillary continental deposits are found which provide an unique archive of climatic changes and paleo-climatic events. Plans exist to analyze the sedimentary record with regard to the paleo-climate in the Mediterranean as well as on a global scale within a scientific drilling project. In preparation for the future drilling activities, controlled-source seismic measurements are used to investigate the structure of the Baza Basin and to find local zones of neo-tectonic deformation bounding the basin to the west (Baza fault). In October 2013 a seismic reflection experiment was carried out in the center of the Baza Basin. A net of three 2D seismic profiles was arranged crossing the basin and the bounding fault system. A vibroseis source (two vibrators with 200 kN peak force each) was used with a source point distance of 60 m along each of the 18 km long profiles. Eight sweeps with a frequency range of 8 ­- 100 Hz were conducted at each source point. The seismic wavefield was recorded by a cable-free acquisition system of more than 330 continuously operating digital data recorders. The receivers were spread along the currently active profile with a spacing of 20 m. They were moved in a roll-along-configuration to mainly cover the near-field offsets of the source points. The seismic data of the three profiles were conventionally processed so far. Tomographic inversion of the first arrivals (P-waves) provide additional information. The images show the asymmetrical basin geometry. Several seismic sequences and the basement can be identified. Furthermore, the Baza fault system and a series of other - previously unknown - faults can be seen.

  11. Deep seismic reflection profiling and continental growth curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemperer, Simon L.

    1988-01-01

    The results of deep seismic reflection profiling is discussed which shows that the lower crust is prominently layered, in many continental areas, regardless of the age of the surface rocks. The seismic Moho is commonly shallower than the petrological Moho, leading to the question of the nature and origin of this prominent reflector in the deep crust. The lower crust is much less well defined in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic accreted terranes, suggesting possible differences in types of lower crusts.

  12. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  13. Simplified method of deep-tow seismic profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robb, James M.; Sylwester, Richard E.; Penton, Ronald

    1981-01-01

    To improve resolution of seismic-reflection profiles in continental slope water depths of 900 to 1500 m, a single hydrophone was towed about 150 m off the bottom to receive reflected signals from a surface-towed sparker sound source. That deep-towed hydrophone data show that valleys which appear V-shaped in records from a surface-towed hydrophone are flat-bottomed, and that subbottom reflections from an erosional unconformity can be much better resolved. The data produced by this technique are very hepful when used in conjunction with records from conventional surface-towed seismic-profiling equipment.

  14. Explosives for Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Explosive charges of various sizes were investigated for use in lunar seismic studies. Program logistics, and the specifications for procurement of bulk explosives are described. The differential analysis, thermal properties, and detonation velocity measurements on HNS/Teflon 7C 90/10 are reported along with the field tests of the hardware. It is concluded that nearly all large explosive charges crack after fabrication, from aging or thermal shock. The cracks do not affect the safety, or reliability of the explosives.

  15. Measurement of sediment and crustal thickness corrected RDA for 2D profiles at rifted continental margins: Applications to the Iberian, Gulf of Aden and S Angolan margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins and rifted continental margins requires a correction for the anomalous uplift or subsidence arising from mantle dynamic topography. Whilst different global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography may give a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, they differ substantially in the predicted amplitude and at shorter wavelengths. As a consequence the accuracy of predicted mantle dynamic topography is not sufficiently good to provide corrections for subsidence analysis. Measurements of present day anomalous subsidence, which we attribute to mantle dynamic topography, have been made for three rifted continental margins; offshore Iberia, the Gulf of Aden and southern Angola. We determine residual depth anomaly (RDA), corrected for sediment loading and crustal thickness variation for 2D profiles running from unequivocal oceanic crust across the continental ocean boundary onto thinned continental crust. Residual depth anomalies (RDA), corrected for sediment loading using flexural backstripping and decompaction, have been calculated by comparing observed and age predicted oceanic bathymetries at these margins. Age predicted bathymetric anomalies have been calculated using the thermal plate model predictions from Crosby & McKenzie (2009). Non-zero sediment corrected RDAs may result from anomalous oceanic crustal thickness with respect to the global average or from anomalous uplift or subsidence. Gravity anomaly inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction and sediment thickness from 2D seismic reflection data has been used to determine Moho depth, calibrated using seismic refraction, and oceanic crustal basement thickness. Crustal basement thicknesses derived from gravity inversion together with Airy isostasy have been used to correct for variations of crustal thickness from a standard oceanic thickness of 7km. The 2D profiles of RDA corrected for both sediment loading and non-standard crustal

  16. Development of a Geocryologic Model of Permafrost From 2D Inversion of IP Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, R.; Leblanc, A.

    2004-05-01

    Non-invasive investigation of permafrost along a planned route of pipeline, road or airstrip in cold regions involves the use of effective methods for detecting, characterizing, mapping and monitoring permafrost conditions on various spatial and temporal scales. Among the available near-surface geophysical methods, the electrical resistivity imaging is probably the most suitable method since the resistivity contrast between unfrozen and frozen ground can be one or two orders of magnitude. Induced polarization (IP) profiling was carried out to study the spatial distribution of ground ice in two permafrost mounds near Umiujaq in Nunavik, Canada. A dipole-dipole array was used to perform the IP profiling. Pseudo-sections of electrical resistivity and chargeability giving a misrepresented cross-section of the sub-surface were first draw. The inversion of IP profiling was also performed using DCIP2D developed by UBC-GIF for estimating the spatial distribution of electrical properties in the ground to create realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability cross-section. The inverse models show clearly the presence of ice-rich core in the permafrost mounds. The ice-rich cores are underlined by high resistivity values while the unfrozen zones show low resistivity values. The localisation of the permafrost table is highlighted by a strong contrast of resistivity while the permafrost base is marked by a transitional change in resistivity. In the hollow between the permafrost mounds, the models show low resistivity values characteristic of unfrozen zone. A synthetic resistivity sounding built from the most acceptable inverse model correlates well with electrical resistivity logging carried out in the permafrost mound during cone penetration tests. The inversion of IP profiling is fundamental for defining realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability. Electrical resistivity imaging is a appropriate near-surface geophysical method for permafrost

  17. Electron-beam induced photoresist shrinkage influence on 2D profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Allgair, John; Aguilar, Daniel Bellido; Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-Zvi, Mayaan; Adan, Ofer; Chirko, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. Also, such smaller feature sizes will require thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in ISMI's CD-SEM Unified Specification. A model for resist shrinkage, while derived elsewhere, was presented, that can be used to curve-fit to the shrinkage data resulting from multiple repeated measurements of resist features. Parameters in the curve-fit allow for metrics quantifying total shrinkage, shrinkage rate, and initial critical dimension (CD) before e-beam exposure. With these parameters and exhaustive measurements, a fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized features. This work was extended in yet another paper in which we presented a 1-D model for resist shrinkage that can be used to curve-fit to shrinkage curves. Calibration of parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam were all that were required to fit the model to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. In this paper, we extend this work yet again to a 2-D model of a trapezoidal photoresist profile. This model thus

  18. Circadian Profiling of the Arabidopsis Proteome Using 2D-DIGE

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani K.; Nomura, Yuko; Shi, Hua; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Clock-generated biological rhythms provide an adaptive advantage to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. To better elucidate the plant response to the circadian system, we surveyed protein oscillations in Arabidopsis seedlings under constant light. Using large-scale two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) the abundance of more than 1000 proteins spots was reproducibly resolved quantified and profiled across a circadian time series. A comparison between phenol-extracted samples and RuBisCO-depleted extracts identified 71 and 40 rhythmically-expressed proteins, respectively, and between 30 and 40% of these derive from non-rhythmic transcripts. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, photosynthesis, protein chaperones, and stress-mediated responses. The phasing of maximum expression for the cyclic proteins was similar for both datasets, with a nearly even distribution of peak phases across the time series. STRING clustering analysis identified two interaction networks with a notable number of oscillating proteins: plastid-based and cytosolic chaperones and 10 proteins involved in photosynthesis. The oscillation of the ABA receptor, PYR1/RCAR11, with peak expression near dusk adds to a growing body of evidence that intimately ties ABA signaling to the circadian system. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the importance of post-transcriptional circadian control of plant physiology and metabolism. PMID:27462335

  19. Seismic refraction profile in coral sea basin.

    PubMed

    Shor, G G

    1967-11-17

    A refraction profile near the south edge of Coral Sea Basin shows sediments, "second layer," and oceanic crust all thicker than normal for an oceanic station; normal mantle lies at a depth of 19 kilometers. PMID:17753600

  20. Comparison of conventional (100%), two dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data: Case histories from the Midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Schloeder, F.X. III

    1995-09-01

    The principal objective of seismic exploration is to determine three geologic parameters, the structural top, the bottom, and the lateral extent of an oil and gas reservoir. Conventional (100%) data is very efficient in locating the structural top and bottom of reservoirs. Two-dimensional (2D) common depth point (CDP) seismic data provides an immense improvement in seismic data quality over conventional (100%) data. This improvement enables the explorer to better visualize and map the reservoir in each direction of the seismic line. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic technology provides even more mappable data and capability. The explorer may visualize every imaginable direction and subtlety of a reservoir. This talk compares conventional (100%), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data from the Midcontinent. Case histories of the Douglass (Upper Pennsylvanian) in Texas, the Morrow (Lower Pennsylvanian) in Colorado, the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} (Mississippian) and the Hunton (Silurian-Devonian) in Oklahoma, and the Simpson (Ordovician) in Kansas will be discussed. Major and independent operators can maximize their exploration efforts by integrating existing data with three-dimensional (3D) technology and a solid geologic interpretation.

  1. Preliminary analysis of the Baranof Fan system, Gulf of Alaska, based on 2D seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVoir, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Reece, R.; Barth, G. A.; Childs, J. R.; Everson, E. D.; Hart, P. E.; Johnson, K. M.; Lester, W. R.; Sliter, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The Baranof Fan is a large marine sedimentary system in the eastern Gulf of Alaska, straddling the border between the U.S. and Canada. The volume of the Fan is estimated to be > 200,000 km3. Little is known about the depositional timing, the tectonic and morphologic processes influencing its development, or the role of channel aggradation and avulsion in its progression. Both tectonic and climatic transitions likely influenced the formation and evolution of the Fan, with events including the onset of northern hemisphere glaciation, the Mid-Pleistocene transition, the transport of the Yakutat Terrane along the southeast Alaskan margin, and the uplift of the Coast Mountains. 2D seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetry data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska in June 2011 aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth as a part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) program assessing potential opportunities under the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention. The purpose of the 2011 survey was to determine sediment thickness, velocity structure, stratigraphic architecture, and crustal structure on of the Gulf of Alaska seafloor in support of U.S. continental shelf maritime zone definition. The surveyed geologic features include the Surveyor and Baranof sedimentary systems, which control active sediment distribution in the Gulf of Alaska. Preliminary analysis of these data show four distinct buried channels throughout the mid to distal Baranof Fan, ranging in width from 5 - 9 km, which may have evolved into modern surface channels (ranging in width from 2 - 7 km) visible in both the seismic data and multibeam bathymetry. The location and trajectory of these buried channels, however, appears distinct from the modern Horizon and Mukluk Channels; the buried channels may have avulsed into the modern channel systems, or could possibly be older and now abandoned branches instrumental in building the westward part of the Fan. All of the imaged channels appear to be depositional

  2. Ultra-high-resolution marine 2D-3D seismic investigation of the Liman Tepe/Karantina Island archaeological site (Urla/Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, C.; Woelz, S.; Ersoy, Y.; Boyce, J.; Jokisch, T.; Wendt, G.; Rabbel, W.

    2009-05-01

    2D and 3D high-resolution seismic investigations were performed on submerged coastal archaeological sites at Iskele and near to Karantina Island in the Bay of Izmir in western Turkey. Tectonic subsidence of the coastline has submerged a number of archaeological features associated with an important Early Bronze Archaic settlement (Liman Tepe) and the classical Ionian city of Clazomenae. Seismic surveys were focused on imaging of an Archaic harbour structure and other submerged Hellenistic and Roman architectural features. Seismic data were acquired with the SEAMAP-3D ultra-high-resolution 3D marine seismic acquisition system developed for detailed archaeological site investigation. A 2D reconnaissance survey was performed over a 2 km 2 area around Karantina Island to evaluate the seismic penetrability and to locate sites for further 3D investigation. This survey predominantly revealed marine sediment layers covering the local bedrock, which is characterized by scattering of seismic energy showing its rocky nature. Two ultra-high-resolution 3D seismic surveys were performed. The first covered a 350 m × 30 m area in the modern harbour targeting a prominent Archaic harbour structure. The second was acquired across a 120 m × 40 m area on the southeast shore of the Karantina Island close to a Roman architectural feature. The 3D surveys were acquired with nominal line spacings of 1 m, using a 8 × 4 pseudo-rigid hydrophone array and a Boomer source firing at 3 Hz shot frequency. Automated processing of the seismic data using a portable Linux cluster provided stacked 3D seismic volumes with 25 cm × 25 cm bin size on-site. The 3D seismic survey of the harbour clearly imaged the submerged Archaic structure and the underlying sediment sequence. The seismic time slices reveal two seismic anomalies (2-3 m in diameter) in the harbour basin sediments. The 3D surveys southeast of Karantina identified a thicker marine sediment sequence overlying steeply dipping bedrock

  3. Investigating the sedimentary structure of the Baza Basin (Southern Spain) using seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann-Wilke, Maria; Haberland, Christian; Stiller, Manfred; Gibert, Luis; Jurado, Maria Jose; Scott, Gary

    2014-05-01

    The Baza Basin is an intra-mountain evaporitic basin in Southern Spain. It is the largest of the Late Neogene continental basins of the Betic Cordillera. During the last 7 million years the basin alternately was flooded and fell dry. Therefore, up to 2.5 km thick lacustrine and ancillary continental deposits are found which provide an unique archive of climatic changes and paleo-climatic events. An ICDP drilling project (LARSEI - LAcustrine Record of SE Iberia) proposes to drill the Baza Basin and to analyze the sedimentary record with regard to the paleo-climate in the Mediterranean as well as on a global scale. In preparation for the future drilling activities, controlled-source seismic measurements are used to investigate the structure of the Baza Basin and to find local zones of neo-tectonic deformation bounding the basin to the west (Baza fault). The aim of the seismic work is to provide structural information for the planned scientific drilling project. End of October 2013 a seismic reflection experiment was carried out in the center of the Baza Basin. A net of three 2D seismic profiles was arranged crossing the basin and the bounding fault system. A vibroseis source (two vibrators with 200 kN peak force each) was used with a source point distance of 60 m along each of the 18 km long profiles. Eight sweeps with a frequency range of 8 - 100 Hz were conducted at each source point. The seismic wavefield was recorded by a cable-free acquisition system of more than 330 continuously operating digital data recorders. The receivers were spread along the currently active profile with a spacing of 20 m. They were moved in a roll-along-configuration to mainly cover the near-field offsets of the source points. The seismic data of the three profiles were conventionally processed so far. We present current results of the ongoing seismic reflection processing with regard to the structure of the Baza Basin and the Baza fault system.

  4. Deducing the subsurface geological conditions and structural framework of the NE Gulf of Suez area, using 2-D and 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Hesham Shaker; Nakhla, Adel Mokhles

    2015-06-01

    An interpretation of the seismic data of Ras Budran and Abu Zenima oil fields, northern central Gulf of Suez, is carried out to evaluate its subsurface tectonic setting. The structural configuration, as well as the tectonic features of the concerned area is criticized through the study of 2D and 3D seismic data interpretation with the available geological data, in which the geo-seismic depth maps for the main interesting levels (Kareem, Nukhul, Matulla, Raha and Nubia Formations) are depicted. Such maps reflect that, the Miocene structure of Ras Budran area is a nearly NE-SW trending anticlinal feature, which broken into several panels by a set of NWSE and NE-SW trending faults. The Pre-Miocene structure of the studied area is very complex, where Ras Budran area consists of step faults down stepping to the south and southwest, which have been subjected to cross faults of NE-SW trend with lateral and vertical displacements.

  5. 2D Seismic interpretation of strike-slip faulting, salt tectonics, and Cretaceous unconformities, Atlas Mountains, central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Bédir, Mourad; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2005-11-01

    The Cretaceous deposits in central Tunisia blocks were studied by sequence stratigraphy, 2D seismic interpretation calibrated to the well and associated outcrop data. The constructing and comparing histories of the northern and southern blocks of the Gafsa master fault was the establishment of platform to basin stratigraphic configuration based on the major unconformity surfaces. Three important basin zones mark subsurface structures: Gafsa to the south, Souinia-Majoura to the northeast and Sidi Aïch-Mèjel Bel Abbès to the northwest. Basin depocenters and upthrown blocks are bounded by the N120° Gafsa and Majoura and N180° Sidi Ali Ben Aoun wrench fault salt-intruded tectonic corridors and subdivided by the associated N60° and N90° trending second-order fault corridors. The Mèjel Bel Abbès block is characterized by brittle structures associated with a deep asymmetric geometry that is organized into depressions and uplifts. Halokinesis of Triassic salt began in the Jurassic and continued during the Cretaceous periods. During extensional deformations, salt movement controlled sedimentation distribution and location of pre-compressional structures. During compressional deformations, salt remobilization accentuated the folded uplifts. The Triassic salt facies constitutes a level of decollement at the base of the Mesozoic deposits during the later displacements. The coeval dextral strike-slip motion along the three northwest-southeast bounding master faults (Gafsa, Sehib-Alima and Majoura-Mech) suggests a pull-apart opening of the Gafsa basin. Synchronous movements of the Gafsa first-order dextral strike-slip fault with the Sidi Ali Ben Aoun sinistral wrench fault caused formation of tectonic obstacles that are shown first by the sealed structures, then by development of the local compressive stress that caused formation of the south overturned folds and the syncline depressions. The transcurrent fault systems caused formation of Turonian and Senonian

  6. 2D Self-Similar Profile for Laser Beam Propagation in Medium with Saturating Multi-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.; Zakharova, Irina G.

    2016-02-01

    We study a self-similar mode of 2D laser beam propagation in media with multiphoton absorption (MA) taking into account a resonant nonlinearity and nonlinear absorption saturating. An analytical solution of the corresponding equations describing the problems under consideration is derived using an eigenvalue problem method generalization for soliton- like solution finding. The developed solution is used as incident beam profile and phase front for computer simulation of the 2D laser beam propagation. In particular, we demonstrate numerically that the laser beam propagation in a self-similar mode occurs within a certain distance, which depends on medium properties. Under certain relations between the nonlinear absorption and resonant nonlinearity, and cubic nonlinear response, we observe the super long distance of the beam propagation without any beam profile distributions.

  7. Mapping of active faults based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in offshore Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data analysis is considered as important tool for mapping of active tectonic faults, since seismic exploration methods on varied scales can image subsurface structures of different depth ranges. Mapping of active faults for the offshore area of Montenegro is performed in Petrel software, using reflection database consist of 2D profiles in length of about 3.500 kilometers and 311 square kilometers of 3D seismics, acquired from 1979 to 2003. Montenegro offshore area is influenced by recent tectonic activity with numerous faults, folded faults and over trusts. Based on reflection profiles analysis, the trust fault system offshore Montenegro is reveled, parallel to the coast and extending up to 15 kilometers from the offshore line. Then, the system of normal top carbonate fault planes is mapped and characterized on the southern Adriatic, with NE trending. The tectonic interpretation of the seismic reflection profiles in Montenegro point toward the existence of principally reverse tectonic forms in the carbonate sediments, covered by young Quaternary sandy sediments of thickness 1-3 kilometers. Also, reflective seismic data indicate the active uplifting of evaporite dome on about 10 kilometers of coastline.

  8. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium

    PubMed Central

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C.; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  9. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  10. Multicomponent, 3-D, and High-Resolution 2-D Seismic Characterization of Gas Hydrate Study Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W.; Lee, M. W.; Miller, J.

    2012-12-01

    High saturations of gas hydrates have been identified within coarse-grained sediments in the Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 lease blocks of the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. The thickness, lateral extent, and hydrate saturations in these deposits are constrained by geological and geophysical data and state-of-the-art logging-while-drilling information obtained in multiple boreholes at each site during a 2009 expedition. Presently lacking are multicomponent seismic data that can provide a thorough understanding of the in-situ compressional and shear seismic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediments. Such data may represent an important tool for future characterization of gas hydrate resources. To address this data gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will collaborate on a 20-day research expedition to acquire wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer and high-resolution vertical incidence 2-D seismic data at the study sites. In preparation for this mid-2013 expedition, we have analyzed existing industry 3-D seismic data, along with numerically modeled multicomponent data. The 3-D seismic data allow us to identify and rank specific survey targets and can be combined with the numerical modeling results to determine optimal survey line orientation and acquisition parameters. Together, these data also provide a more thorough understanding of the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  11. Smooth 2-D ocean sound speed from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion of seismic oceanography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, Tanya M.; Jun, Hyunggu; Rosado, Hayley; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    In seismic oceanography, processed images highlight small temperature changes, but inversion is needed to obtain absolute temperatures. Local search-based full waveform inversion has a lower computational cost than global search but requires accurate starting models. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data have little associated hydrographic data and the band-limited nature of seismic data makes extracting the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data inherently challenging. Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (LDI) can use rudimentary starting models without prior information about the medium. Data are transformed to the Laplace domain, and a smooth sound speed model is extracted by examining the zero and low frequency components of the damped wavefield. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of LDI for creating starting models suitable for more detailed inversions.

  12. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  13. 2D multi-parameter elastic seismic imaging by frequency-domain L1-norm full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is becoming a powerful and efficient tool to derive high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface. In the frequency-domain, computationally efficient FWI algorithms can be designed for wide-aperture acquisition geometries by limiting inversion to few discrete frequencies. However, FWI remains an ill-posed and highly non-linear data-fitting procedure that is sensitive to noise, inaccuracies of the starting model and definition of multiparameter classes. The footprint of the noise in seismic imaging is conventionally mitigated by stacking highly redundant multifold data. However, when the data redundancy is decimated in the framework of efficient frequency-domain FWI, it is essential to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to noise. The impact of the noise in FWI, when applied to decimated data sets, has been marginally illustrated in the past and least-squares minimisation has remained the most popular approach. We investigate in this study the sensitivity of frequency-domain elastic FWI to noise for realistic onshore and offshore synthetic data sets contaminated by ambient random white noise. Four minimisation functionals are assessed in the framework of frequency domain FWI of decimated data: the classical least-square norm (L2), the least-absolute-values norm (L1), and some combinations of both (the Huber and the so-called Hybrid criteria). These functionals are implemented in a massively-parallel, 2D elastic frequency-domain FWI algorithm. A two-level hierarchical algorithm is implemented to mitigate the non-linearity of the inversion in complex environments. The first outer level consists of successive inversions of frequency groups of increasing high-frequency content. This level defines a multi-scale approach while preserving some data redundancy by means of simultaneous inversion of multiple frequencies. The second inner level used complex-valued frequencies for data preconditioning. This preconditioning controls the

  14. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  15. Tool breakage detection from 2D workpiece profile using vision method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. K.; Ratnam, M. M.; Ahmad, Z. A.

    2016-02-01

    In-process tool breakage monitoring can significantly save cost and prevent damages to machine tool. In this paper, a machine vision approach was employed to detect the tool fracture in commercial aluminium oxide ceramic cutting tool during turning of AISI 52100 hardened steel. The contour of the workpiece profile was captured with the aid of backlighting during turning using a high-resolution DSLR camera with a shutter speed of 1/4000 s. The surface profile of the workpiece was extracted to sub-pixel accuracy using the invariant moment method. The effect of fracture in ceramic cutting tools on the surface profile signature of the machined workpiece using autocorrelation was studied. Fracture in the aluminum oxide ceramic tool was found to cause the peaks of autocorrelation function of the workpiece profile to decrease rapidly as the lag distance increased. The envelope of the peaks of the autocorrelation function was observed to deviate significantly from one another at different workpiece angles when the tool has fractured due to the continuous fracture of ceramic cutting insert during machining.

  16. Stratigraphic analysis of 3-D and 2-D seismic data to delineate porous carbonate debris flow in permian strata along the northwestern margin of the Midlan

    SciTech Connect

    Pacht, J.A.; Brooks, L.; Messa, F.

    1995-12-31

    Carbonate debris flow are very important plays in Leonard strata along the northwestern margin of the Midland Basin. Delineation of these strata, however, is difficult and detailed stratigraphic analysis of both 2D and 3D seismic data is important in reducing risk. Porous debris flows are best developed during lowstand time. When sea-level falls to a point at or below the shelf margin, sand to boulder-sized clasts created by reef-front erosion are funneled through slope gullies onto the base of the slope. Large debris flows exhibit well-defined mounds which downlap onto the sequence boundary. Many of these flows, however, are too thin to exhibit discrete reflections. 3D seismic data are used to define subtle changes in amplitude and frequency which suggest presence of porous strata. Along the northwest shelf, porous debris flows exhibit lower amplitude (dim spots) and lower frequency than surrounding strata. They are commonly developed immediately downdip of major slump scars.

  17. Improvement of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from micro rain radar using 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Roberto, N.; Gatlin, P.; Tokay, A.

    2016-03-01

    A measurement scheme aimed at investigating precipitation properties based on collocated disdrometer and profiling instruments is used in many experimental campaigns. Raindrop size distribution (RSD) estimated by disdrometer is referred to the ground level; the collocated profiling instrument is supposed to provide complementary estimation at different heights of the precipitation column above the instruments. As part of the Special Observation Period 1 of the HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) project, conducted between 5 September and 6 November 2012, a K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) were installed close to each other at a site in the historic center of Rome (Italy). The raindrop size distributions collected by 2D video disdrometer are considered to be fairly accurate within the typical sizes of drops. Vertical profiles of raindrop sizes up to 1085 m are estimated from the Doppler spectra measured by the micro rain radar with a height resolution of 35 m. Several issues related to vertical winds, attenuation correction, Doppler spectra aliasing, and range-Doppler ambiguity limit the performance of MRR in heavy precipitation or in convection, conditions that frequently occur in late summer or in autumn in Mediterranean regions. In this paper, MRR Doppler spectra are reprocessed, exploiting the 2DVD measurements at ground to estimate the effects of vertical winds at 105 m (the most reliable MRR lower height), in order to provide a better estimation of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from MRR spectra. Results show that the reprocessing procedure leads to a better agreement between the reflectivity computed at 105 m from the reprocessed MRR spectra and that obtained from the 2DVD data. Finally, vertical profiles of MRR-estimated RSDs and their relevant moments (namely median volume diameter and reflectivity) are presented and discussed in order to investigate the

  18. Seismic Images of the Crust across D-E Seismic Profile (TS04-Tsujal Project): Results of Reflection and Wide-Angle Seismic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Lopez Ortiz, J. Y.; Bartolome, R.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Danobeitia, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Escudero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a part of TSUJAL Project (Crustal characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block boundary and its implications for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment), a geophysical study has been carried out during February and March 2014 in western continental margin of Jalisco where seismic reflection, wide-angle seismic, bathymetry and potential fields (gravity and magnetism) data have been obtained. Eight land seismic stations vertical component and 4.5 Hz model TEXAN 125A (REFTEK), were deployed along an offshore-onshore seismic profile of 140 km length in SW-NE orientation. These stations registered, in continuous model, the airgun shots provided by RRS James Cook used for Multichannel Seismic Reflection data acquisition every 50 m of distance interval and total capacity of 5800 ci along seismic profile D-E (TS04). In the onshore region, these stations were deployed every 20 km from Pérula to Nacastillo (Jalisco, Mexico). The study region corresponds to onshore-offshore line limited by (18o 54'N, 105o 59'W) (19o 26'N, 105o7'W) coordinates. In this work, seismic images of the crust along a deep seismic profile of 140 km length are presented. These images provide new cortical information about the southern part of Rivera Plate, continental accretionary wedge and first kilometers of Jalisco Block continental zone.

  19. Dolphin: a tool for automatic targeted metabolite profiling using 1D and 2D (1)H-NMR data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Josep; Brezmes, Jesús; Mallol, Roger; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Vinaixa, Maria; Salek, Reza M; Correig, Xavier; Cañellas, Nicolau

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics is to obtain valuable metabolic information from large datasets of raw NMR spectra in a high throughput, automatic, and reproducible way. To date, established software packages used to match and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra remain mostly manually operated, leading to low resolution results and subject to inconsistencies not attributable to the NMR technique itself. Here, we introduce a new software package, called Dolphin, able to automatically quantify a set of target metabolites in multiple sample measurements using an approach based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques to overcome the inherent limitations of 1D (1)H-NMR spectra in metabolomics. Dolphin takes advantage of the 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy signal dispersion to avoid inconsistencies in signal position detection, enhancing the reliability and confidence in metabolite matching. Furthermore, in order to improve accuracy in quantification, Dolphin uses 2D NMR spectra to obtain additional information on all neighboring signals surrounding the target metabolite. We have compared the targeted profiling results of Dolphin, recorded from standard biological mixtures, with those of two well established approaches in NMR metabolomics. Overall, Dolphin produced more accurate results with the added advantage of being a fully automated and high throughput processing package. PMID:25370160

  20. Crustal structure of China from deep seismic sounding profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, S.; Mooney, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    More than 36,000 km of Deep Seismic Sounding (DSS) profiles have been collected in China since 1958. However, the results of these profiles are not well known in the West due to the language barrier. In this paper, we summarize the crustal structure of China with a new contour map of crustal thickness, nine representative crustal columns, and maps showing profile locations, average crustal velocity, and Pn velocity. The most remarkable aspect of the crustal structure of China is the well known 70+ km thickness of the crust of the Tibetan Plateau. The thick (45-70 km) crust of western China is separated from the thinner (30-45 km) crust of eastern China by the north-south trending seismic belt (105??E). The average crustal velocity of China ranges from 6.15 to 6.45 km/s, indicating a felsic-to-intermediate bulk crustal composition. Upper mantle (Pn) velocities are 8.0 ?? 0.2 km/s, equal to the global continental average. We interpret these results in terms of the most recent thermo-tectonic events that have modified the crust. In much of eastern China, Cenoxoic crustal extension has produced a thin crust with a low average crustal velocity, similar to western Europe and the Basin and Range Province, western USA. In western China, Mesozoic and Cenoxoic arc-continent and continent-continent collisions have led to crustal growth and thickening. Inferences on the process of crustal thickening are provided by the deep crustal velocity structure as determined by DSS profiles and other seismological studies. A high velocity (7.0-7.4 km/s) lower-crustal layer has been reported in western China only beneath the southernmost Tibetan Plateau. We identity this high-velocity layer as the cold lower crust of the subducting Indian plate. As the Indian crust is injected northward into the Tibetan lower crust, it heats and assimilates by partial melting, a process that results in a reduction in the seismic velocity of the lower crust in the central and northern Tibetan Plateau

  1. A robust economic technique for crosswell seismic profiling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Simmons, J.L. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to investigate a novel way to acquire crosswell tomographic data, that being to use a standard surface-positioned seismic energy source stationed inline with two wells that have downhole receiver arrays. This field technique differs from the traditional way that crosswell tomography is done, which requires that a downhole receiver array be in one well and that a downhole seismic source be in a second well. The purpose of the research effort was to evaluate the relative merits of the potential advantages and pitfalls of surface-source crosswell tomography, which some also refer to as twin-receiver-well crosswell tomography. The principal findings were: (1) surface-source crosswell tomography is a viable technology and can be used in appropriate reservoir conditions, (2) raypath modeling should be done to determine if the targeted interwell space is properly illuminated by surface-generated wavefields before proceeding to collect surface-source tomographic data, (3) crosswell data generated by a surface-based source are subject to a greater range of traveltime errors than are data generated by a downhole source, primarily due to shot statics caused by variable weathered layers, and (4) the accuracy and reliability of the interwell tomogram increase as more independent velocity information (sonic logs, velocity checkshots, vertical seismic profiles, downhole-source crosswell data) is available to constrain the inversion. The surface-source approach to crosswell tomography was evaluated by recording twin-receiver well data at the Texaco Borehole Test Site in Humble, Texas.

  2. Proteomic profiling of intact proteins using WAX-RPLC 2-D separations and FTICR mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Seema; Simpson, David C.; Tolic, Nikola; Jaitly, Navdeep; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the combination of weak anion exchange (WAX) fractionation and on-line reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation using a 12 T FTICR mass spectrometer for the detection of intact proteins from a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell lysate. 715 intact proteins were detected and the combined results from the WAX fractions and the unfractionated cell lysate were aligned using LC-MS features to facilitate protein abundance measurements. Protein identifications and post translational modifications were assigned for ~10% of the detected proteins by comparing intact protein mass measurements to proteins identified in peptide MS/MS analysis of an aliquot of the same fraction. Intact proteins were also detected for S. oneidensis lysates obtained from cells grown on 13C, 15N depleted media under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. This work aimed at optimizing intact protein detection for profiling proteins at a level that incorporates their modification complement. The strategy can be readily applied for measuring differential protein abundances, and provides a platform for high-throughput selection of biologically relevant targets for further characterization.

  3. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  4. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  5. Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction profiles; final project report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Blank, H.R.; Gettings, M.E.; Kohler, W.M.; Lamson, R.J.; Leone, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat-Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used: five on land, with most charges placed below the water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and detonated from a ship. Slightly more than 61 metric tons of explosives were used in 19 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by 100 newly-developed portable seismic stations deployed in approximately 200 km-long arrays for each firing. Each station consisted of a standard 2-Hz vertical component geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. In this final report, we fully document the field and data-processing procedures and present the final seismogram data set as both a digital magnetic tape and as record sections for each shot point. Record sections include a normalized set of seismograms, reduced at 6 km/s, and a true-amplitude set, reduced at 8 km/s, which have been adjusted for amplifier gain, individual shot size, and distance from the shot point. Appendices give recorder station and shot information, digital data set descriptions, computer program listings, arrival times used in the interpretation, and a bibliography of reports published as a result of this project. We used two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques in the data analysis, and our interpretation is based primarily on horizontally layered models. The Arabian Shield is composed, to first-order, of two layers, each about 20 km

  6. Well log and 2D seismic data character of the Wilcox Group in south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilcox Group is productive in updip areas of Texas and Louisiana from fluvial, deltaic, and near-shore marine shelf sandstones. The reported presence of porous sandstones at 29,000 feet within the Wilcox Group containing about 200 feet of gas in the Davy Jones 1 discovery well in the offshore Louisiana South Marsh Island area illustrates a sand-rich system developed during the Paleocene and early Eocene. This study describes some of the well log and reflection seismic data characteristics of the slope and basin-floor reservoirs with gas-discovery potential that may be in the area between the producing trend onshore Louisiana and the offshore discovery.

  7. Seismic-reflection profiles of the New Madrid seismic zone-data along the Mississippi River near Caruthersville, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Harding, S.T.; Russ, D.P.; Shedlock, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Three major seismic-reflection programs have been conducted by the USGS in the New Madrid seismic zone. The first program consisted of 32 km of conventional Vibroseis profiling designed to investigate the subsurface structure associated with scarps and lineaments in northwestern Tennessee (Zoback, 1979). A second, more extensive Vibroseis program collected about 250 km of data from all parts of the New Madrid seismic zone in Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee (Hamilton and Zoback, 1979, 1982; Zoback and others, 1980). The profiles presented here are part of the third program that collected about 240 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data from a boat along the Mississippi River between Osceola, Ark., and Wickliffe, Ky. (fig. 1). The data for profiles A, B, C, and D were collected between river miles 839-1/2 and 850-1/2 from near the Interstate-155 bridge to upstream of Caruthersville, Mo. (fig. 2). Profiles on this part of the river are important for three reasons: (1) they connect many of the land-based profiles on either side of the river, (2) they are near the northeast termination of a linear, 120km-long, northeast-southwest zone of seismicity that extends from northeast Arkansas to Caruthersville, Mo. (Stauder, 1982; fig. 1), and (3) they cross the southwesterly projection of the Cottonwood Grove fault (fig. 1), a fault having a substantial amount of vertical Cenozoic offset (Zoback and others, 1980).

  8. Transcriptional profiles of valvular interstitial cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene, on 2D hydrogels, or within 3D hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Kelly M.; Payne, Samuel Z.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) actively maintain and repair heart valve tissue; however, persistent activation of VICs to a myofibroblast phenotype can lead to aortic stenosis (Chen and Simmons, 2011) [1]. To better understand and quantify how microenvironmental cues influence VIC phenotype, we compared expression profiles of VICs cultured on/in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels to those cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), as well as fresh isolates. Here, we present both the raw and processed microarray data from these culture conditions. Interpretation of this data can be found in a research article entitled “Microarray analyses to quantify advantages of 2D and 3D hydrogel culture systems in maintaining the native valvular interstitial cell phenotype” (Mabry et al., 2015) [2]. PMID:26702427

  9. Amplitude blanking in seismic profiles from Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging of the deepest sedimentary section in Lake Baikal using multichannel seismic profiling was hampered by amplitude blanking that is regionally extensive, is associated with water depths greater than about 900 m and occurs at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km in association with the first water-bottom multiple. Application of a powerful multiple suppression technique improved the quality of occasional discontinuous, dipping primary reflections, but failed to substantially alter the non-reflective character of the blanking zone. Detailed analysis of amplitudes from original data and synthetic models show that the threshold for detecting primary energy in deep water of Lake Baikal occurs when the primary is about 14-20 dB less than the multiple energy. The blanking occurs because of anomalously low reflectivities of the deep sediments coupled with this 20 dB limitation in real data processing. The blanking cuts across seismic stratal boundaries, and is therefore probably unrelated to depositional lithologies. The deepest, early rift deposits, inferred to come from a mixed fluvial and lacustrine setting, do not easily explain the widespread and uniform character of the blanked deposits. More likely, blanking occurs because of processes or phenomena that physically alter the deposits, causing them to be non-reflective and/or highly attenuating. No single process explains all the observations, but a combination of diagenesis, overpressure, and the presence of dispersed free gas at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km, offer plausible and possible conditions that contribute to blanking. Copyright ?? 1996 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  11. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  12. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  13. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  14. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  15. Investigations on a robust profile model for the reconstruction of 2D periodic absorber lines in scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, H.; Richter, J.; Rathsfeld, A.; Bär, M.

    2010-09-01

    Scatterometry as a non-imaging indirect optical method in wafer metrology is applicable to lithography masks designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography , where light with wavelengths of about 13.5 nm is applied. The main goal is to reconstruct the critical dimensions (CD) of the mask, i.e., profile parameters such as line width, line height, and side-wall angle, from the measured diffracted light pattern and to estimate the associated uncertainties. The numerical simulation of the diffraction process for periodic 2D structures can be realized by the finite element solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. The inverse problem is expressed as a non-linear operator equation where the operator maps the sought mask parameters to the efficiencies of the diffracted plane wave modes. To solve this operator equation, the deviation of the measured efficiencies from the ones obtained computationally is minimized by a Gauss-Newton type iterative method. In the present paper, the admissibility of rectangular profile models for the evaluations of CD uniformity is studied. More precisely, several sets of typical measurement data are simulated for trapezoidal shaped EUV masks with different mask signatures characterized by various line widths, heights and side-wall angles slightly smaller than 90 degree. Using these sets, but assuming rectangular structures as the basic profiles of the numerical reconstruction algorithm, approximate line height and width parameters are determined as the critical dimensions of the mask. Finally, the model error due to the simplified shapes is analyzed by checking the deviations of the reconstructed parameters from their nominal values.

  16. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  17. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge-Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid-solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  18. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-15

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge–Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid–solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  19. Thermo-chemical structure of the lithospheric mantle underneath the Siberian craton inferred from long-range seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Kronrod, V. A.; Prokofyev, A. A.; Pavlenkova, N. I.

    2014-03-01

    Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic-geophysical approach and xenolith-based constraints, we map the 2-D seismic, thermal and density structure of the mantle beneath the Siberian craton along the long-range profiles (Craton, Kimberlite, Rift and Meteorite) carried out in Russia with peaceful nuclear explosions. Structural peculiarities of the cratonic mantle are manifested by changes in seismic velocities, the degree and nature of layering and the relief of seismic boundaries. The results predict appreciable lateral temperature variations within the root to a depth of about 200 km, which are the main cause of seismic velocity variations. We find that the cratonic mantle is 300-400 °C colder than the tectonically younger surrounding mantle in this depth range. At greater depths, lateral changes in temperatures have little effect implying that thermal heterogeneity rapidly decreases. The present-day geotherms pass close to the 32.5-35 mW m- 2 conductive models and suggest low mantle heat flow. Within the model resolution, the thickness of the thermal boundary layer, TBL (defined as the depth of the 1300 °C adiabat) beneath Siberia does not depend significantly on the composition and can be estimated as 300 ± 30 km; temperature at the base of the TBL is close to the 1450 ± 100 °C isotherm. Changes in the composition from depleted to fertile material reveal a negligible effect on seismic velocities, which are practically unresolved by seismic methods, but remain the most important factor for the density increase of the cratonic root. Density variations in the lower part of the root due to the chemical composition are greater than those caused by temperature. We find that both compositional and thermal anomalies are required to explain the Siberian mantle by a keel model consisting of depleted garnet peridotite at depths of 100 to 180 km and more fertile material at greater depths.

  20. A bird's eye view: the cognitive strategies of experts interpreting seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, C. E.; Butler, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geoscience is perhaps unique in its reliance on incomplete datasets and building knowledge from their interpretation. This interpretation basis for the science is fundamental at all levels; from creation of a geological map to interpretation of remotely sensed data. To teach and understand better the uncertainties in dealing with incomplete data we need to understand the strategies individual practitioners deploy that make them effective interpreters. The nature of interpretation is such that the interpreter needs to use their cognitive ability in the analysis of the data to propose a sensible solution in their final output that is both consistent not only with the original data but also with other knowledge and understanding. In a series of experiments Bond et al. (2007, 2008, 2011, 2012) investigated the strategies and pitfalls of expert and non-expert interpretation of seismic images. These studies focused on large numbers of participants to provide a statistically sound basis for analysis of the results. The outcome of these experiments showed that techniques and strategies are more important than expert knowledge per se in developing successful interpretations. Experts are successful because of their application of these techniques. In a new set of experiments we have focused on a small number of experts to determine how they use their cognitive and reasoning skills, in the interpretation of 2D seismic profiles. Live video and practitioner commentary were used to track the evolving interpretation and to gain insight on their decision processes. The outputs of the study allow us to create an educational resource of expert interpretation through online video footage and commentary with associated further interpretation and analysis of the techniques and strategies employed. This resource will be of use to undergraduate, post-graduate, industry and academic professionals seeking to improve their seismic interpretation skills, develop reasoning strategies for

  1. Estimation of raindrop drop size distribution vertical profile from simultaneous micro rain radar and 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Montopoli, Mario; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Gatlin, Patrick; Tokay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Experimental field campaigns of rain precipitation usually require the coexistence of several ground and satellite based observations in order to guarantee a more complete analysis of the collected case studies at the various spatial and temporal scales of interest. In the framework of the Ground Validation programme of the NASAA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, several climate regions of the Earth have been interested by various field campaigns involving experimental setup which include one or more ground based disdrometers and profilers. In such situation a typical implementation of the measurement scheme consists of a pair of K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) installed close each other. Since 2DVD estimates are referred to the ground level, the co-located MRR is supposed to provide complementary vertical profiles of drop size distribution (DSD) measurements. However, if not properly processed MRR and 2DVD raw data can lead to erroneous interpretations of the underlying microphysics. In this work, we investigate some typical issues occurring when dealing with MRR and 2DVD observations proposing techniques to ensure the adequate data quality required in typical field validation campaigns. More in detail, MRR is an affordable continuous wave frequency-modulated radar (CWFM) typically used at vertical incidence. In the MMR configuration used, DSD profiles are estimated from Doppler spectra determined by drops falling at different velocities and at different heights from 1000 meters almost up to the ground level with a vertical resolution of 35 meters and time resolution up to 10 seconds. The importance of the microphysical measurements from MRR are related to the effects of the vertical gradients of rain precipitation at the sub-resolution scale of the measurements based remote sensing instruments such as those provided by the dual frequency radar of GPM as well as by ground based weather radars

  2. Mapping the onshore/offshore crustal transition at the Westernmost Mediterranean from seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembrowski, Marcel; Gallart, Josep; Schimmel, Martin; Diaz, Jordi; Carbonell, Ramon; Gracia, Eulalia; Ranero, César; Schmaltz, Jörg; Thomas, Christine; El Ouai, Driss; Palomeras, Imma

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of the Western Mediterranean is strongly affected by the collision of the African and Eurasian plates. The plate boundary as seen from earthquakes is diffuse over a wide area extending north and south of Gibraltar strait. The Western end of the Mediterranean is delineated by the Gibraltar Arc System, comprising the arcuate Spanish Betic and Moroccan Rif Mountain Belts, together with the Alboran-Sea Basin in-between. The extension of the Alboran Basin which started from Late Eocene and which coexisted with the Africa -Europe conversion is still under debate and is one of the key points to constrain the evolution of the Western Mediterranean. This motivated our interest to map the still unknown crustal transition from the Betic-Rif chain into the Alboran Sea, taking advantage of the coincidence in time (October 2011) of two seismic experiments in the area, on land (Rifsis project) and at sea (Gassis-WestMed project). For this purpose we deployed several tens of seismic stations, both in Morocco and Spain, to record the air-gun shooting (every 50 m) of the Sarmiento de Gamboa Spanish vessel performing multichannel reflection profiles at the Alboran sea, and hence to extend these marine lines to wide-angle distances in-land. The airguns were calibrated for the near zero-offset marine reflection study and it turns out to be difficult to observe clear signals on the records in-land at offsets larger than about 70 km. The data has therefore been processed with a frequency-dependent lateral coherence filter to enhance coherent reflection/refraction signals through the frequency-dependent attenuation of incoherent noise and signals. This processing has permitted to track signals (seismic energy) up to more than 200 km on some profiles. Hence, a classical procedure of forward modeling (ray tracing approach) to fit the travel times of the identified wide-angle phases is now underway, taking advantage of the sedimentary/basement sequences inferred from the

  3. Selection of high-definition 2D virtual profiles with multiple RF pulse excitations along interleaved echo-planar k-space trajectories.

    PubMed

    Panych, L P; Oshio, K

    1999-02-01

    A method for spatially selective excitation of 2D RF profiles is reported. The method makes use of multiple shots to traverse interleaved echo-planar trajectories in 2D k space during each RF pulse excitation. Results from each of the interleaved excitations are summed, with the net effect being the excitation of a virtual profile. The method allows for the excitation of high-definition 2D profiles with standard gradient hardware. Signal to noise is enhanced by a factor equal to the square root of the number of interleaved excitations, compared with a single-shot excitation. Potential applications for volume-localized spectroscopy, functional MRI, and high-resolution reduced-field-of-view imaging are discussed. PMID:10080266

  4. Subsurface mapping in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic reflection profiling and potential-field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João; Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Granado, Isabel; Branch, Tim; Represas, Patrícia; Carabaneanu, Livia; Matias, Luís; Sousa, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts world-class massive sulphide deposits, such as Neves-Corvo in Portugal and Rio Tinto in Spain. In Portugal, the Palaeozoic Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) hosts these ore deposits, extending from the Grândola-Alcácer region to the Spanish border with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE trend. In the study area, between the Neves-Corvo mine region and Alcoutim (close to the Spanish border), the VSC outcrops only in a small horst near Alcoutim. Sparse exploration drill-hole data indicate that the depth to the top of the VSC varies from several 100 m to about 1 km beneath the Mértola Formation Flysch cover. Mapping of the VSC to the SE of Neves-Corvo mine is an important exploration goal and motivated the acquisition of six 2D seismic reflection profiles with a total length of approximately 82 km in order to map the hidden extension of the VSC. The data, providing information deeper than 10 km at some locations, were integrated in a 3D software environment along with potential-field, geological and drill-hole data to form a 3D structural framework model. Seismic data show strong reflections that represent several long Variscan thrust planes that smoothly dip to the NNE. Outcropping and previously unknown Late Variscan near-vertical faults were also mapped. Our data strongly suggest that the structural framework of Neves-Corvo extends south-eastwards to Alcoutim. Furthermore, the VSC top is located at depths that show the existence within the IPB of new areas with good potential to develop exploration projects envisaging the discovery of massive sulphide deposits of the Neves-Corvo type.

  5. FWT2D: A massively parallel program for frequency-domain full-waveform tomography of wide-aperture seismic data—Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbier, Florent; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean; Amestoy, Patrick; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series that describes a massively parallel code that performs 2D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-aperture seismic data for imaging complex structures. Full-waveform inversion methods, namely quantitative seismic imaging methods based on the resolution of the full wave equation, are computationally expensive. Therefore, designing efficient algorithms which take advantage of parallel computing facilities is critical for the appraisal of these approaches when applied to representative case studies and for further improvements. Full-waveform modelling requires the resolution of a large sparse system of linear equations which is performed with the massively parallel direct solver MUMPS for efficient multiple-shot simulations. Efficiency of the multiple-shot solution phase (forward/backward substitutions) is improved by using the BLAS3 library. The inverse problem relies on a classic local optimization approach implemented with a gradient method. The direct solver returns the multiple-shot wavefield solutions distributed over the processors according to a domain decomposition driven by the distribution of the LU factors. The domain decomposition of the wavefield solutions is used to compute in parallel the gradient of the objective function and the diagonal Hessian, this latter providing a suitable scaling of the gradient. The algorithm allows one to test different strategies for multiscale frequency inversion ranging from successive mono-frequency inversion to simultaneous multifrequency inversion. These different inversion strategies will be illustrated in the following companion paper. The parallel efficiency and the scalability of the code will also be quantified.

  6. Seismic response analysis of a tuff cliff by an effective stress non-linear 2D model approach: an example in Sorrento Peninsula, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fiore, V.; Angelino, A.; Buonocunto, F. P.; Rapolla, A.; Tarallo, D.

    2009-04-01

    We present a model to describe the behavior of a tuff cliff under the dynamic stress considering a law reference input motion. The studied area is located in the Sorrento Peninsula, a major Quaternary morpho-structural unit of the western flank of Southern Apennines. The peninsula forms a narrow and elevated mountain range (up to 1444 m) that separates two major embayments of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin and is characterized by a carbonate bedrock capped by pyroclastic deposits (i.e. "Campania Ignimbrite"), originated from the Campi Flegrei volcanic district. The occurrence of steep slopes and the high relief energy of the area, along with the marine erosion at the base of the coastal cliff creates favorable conditions for the occurrence of a generalized instability of the slopes that is manifested by tuff rock falls as prevailing landslide phenomena. These events are highly dangerous because of the sudden detachments of conspicuous volumes of rocks with high speed, especially when the rock fall initiates in the upper part of the slopes. Prediction of such landslides is difficult if not accompanied by accurate hydrogeologic and geotechnical monitoring and assessment. The geometry of our model is represented by a tuff cliff of 48 m height, covered by a 8 m thick volcaniclastic layer. At the base of the tuff cliff marine sand deposits occur. The geotechnical parameters used for the analysis were selected from the literature. We have used an effective stress non-linear 2D model to determine the dynamic stress field of our model. The effective stress non-linear algorithm uses the Direct Integration Method to compute the motion and excess pore-water pressures arising from inertial forces at user-defined time steps. The seismic response analysis was performed using the field shear stress generated by synthetic 1-30 Hz band-limited accelerogram. The finite elements mesh considered for the test problem was established by 395 element and 401 nodal point. Our results show a

  7. A preliminary study on using the radiochromic film for 2D beam profile QC/QA at the THOR BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Chen, Wei-Lin; Tsai, Pi-En; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-12-01

    The GAFCHROMIC(®) EBT2 dosimetry film has been studied as a rapid QC/QA tool for 2D dose profile mapping in the BNCT beam at THOR. The pixel values of the EBT2 film image were converted to the 2D dose profile using a dose calibration curve obtained by 6-MV X-ray. The reproducibility of the 2D dose profile measured using the EBT2 film in the PMMA phantom was preliminarily found to be acceptable with uncertainties within about ±2 to ±3.5%. It is found that the EBT2 measured dose profile consisted of both gamma-ray components and neutron contributions. Therefore, the dose profile measured using the EBT2 film is significantly different from the neutron flux profile measured using the indirect neutron radiography method. Further study of the influence of neutrons to the response of the EBT2 film is indispensible for the absolute dose profile determination in a BNCT beam. PMID:21570854

  8. 2D Dynamic Models of Subduction: Links between Surface Plate Motion and Deformation in the Transition Zone from Observations of Deep Slab Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of seismicity and seismic tomography provide constraints on the geometry of slabs within mantle, while compression/tension axis derived from moment tensor solutions provide constraints on the internal deformation of slabs. However, since these observations provide only a somewhat blurred or incomplete snapshot of the slab in time, it is difficult to directly relate these observations to the evolution of the slab geometry and the forces acting on and within the slab. In contrast, plate tectonic reconstructions provide time-dependent constraints on the surface motion of plates and the trench at subduction zones, which are related to the dynamical evolution of the slab. We use 2D geodynamical simulations of subduction to explore the relationship between dynamical process within the deforming slab and the observations of surface plate motion and the state-of-stress in slabs. Specifically we utilize models that include the extended Boussinesq approximation (shear heating and latent heat terms in the energy equation), a layered lithosphere with pyrolite, harzburgite and basalt/eclogite, compositionally-dependent phase transitions, and a composite rheology with yielding. The models employ a weak crustal layer that decouples the overriding and subducting plates and allows for dynamically determined trench motion. Here we show that, 1) multiple phase transitions increase slab folding, 2) ridge push significantly increases trench retreat, and 3) strength of the weak crustal layer influences slab detachment. Compared to past studies a more realistic treatment of the phase transitions makes trench retreat more difficult to generate: a weaker plate may encourage slab retreat but detaches once the slab tip crosses into the transition zone due to the rapid increase in slab density. As suggested by previous studies, slab folding within the transition zone changes the direction of forces on the slab and causes periodic changes from trench retreat to trench advance. We

  9. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  10. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  11. 3D constraints on a possible deep > 2.5 km massive sulphide mineralization from 2D crooked-line seismic reflection data in the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Bongajum, Emmanuel; Bellefleur, Gilles; Juhlin, Christopher; Tryggvason, Ari

    2009-12-01

    2D crooked-line seismic reflection surveys in crystalline environments are often considered challenging in their processing and interpretation. These challenges are more evident when complex diffraction signals that can originate from out-of-the-plane and a variety of geological features are present. A seismic profile in the Kristineberg mining area in northern Sweden shows an impressive diffraction package, covering an area larger than 25 km 2 in the subsurface at depths greater than 2.5 km. We present here a series of scenarios in which each can, to some extent, explain the nature of this extraordinarily large package of diffractions. Cross-dip analysis, diffraction imaging and modeling, as well as 3D processing of the crooked-line data provided constraints on the interpretation of the diffraction package. Overall, the results indicate that the diffraction package can be associated with at least four main short south-dipping diffractors in a depth range of 2.5-4.5 km. Candidate scenarios for the origin of the diffraction package are: (1) a series of massive sulphide deposits, (2) a series of mafic-ultramafic intrusions, (3) a major shear-zone and (4) multiple contact lithologies. We have also investigated the possible contribution of mode-converted scattered energy in the diffraction package using a modified converted-wave 3D prestack depth migration algorithm with the results indicating that a majority of the diffractions are P-wave diffractions. The 3D prestack migration of the data provided improved images of a series of steeply north-dipping mafic-ultramafic sill intrusions to a depth of about 4 km, where the diffractions appear to focus after the migration. The results and associated interpretations presented in this paper have improved our understanding of this conspicuous package of diffractions and may lead to re-evaluation of the 3D geological model of the Kristineberg mining area.

  12. Metabolite profile of a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D neuropathy: implications for disease mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Bais, Preeti; Beebe, Kirk; Morelli, Kathryn H; Currie, Meagan E; Norberg, Sara N; Evsikov, Alexei V; Miers, Kathy E; Seburn, Kevin L; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Bult, Carol J; Burgess, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous class of heritable polyneuropathies that result in axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D neuropathy (CMT2D) is caused by dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS). Mutations in the mouse Gars gene result in a genetically and phenotypically valid animal model of CMT2D. How mutations in GARS lead to peripheral neuropathy remains controversial. To identify putative disease mechanisms, we compared metabolites isolated from the spinal cord of Gars mutant mice and their littermate controls. A profile of altered metabolites that distinguish the affected and unaffected tissue was determined. Ascorbic acid was decreased fourfold in the spinal cord of CMT2D mice, but was not altered in serum. Carnitine and its derivatives were also significantly reduced in spinal cord tissue of mutant mice, whereas glycine was elevated. Dietary supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine improved gross motor performance of CMT2D mice, but neither acetyl-L-carnitine nor glycine supplementation altered the parameters directly assessing neuropathy. Other metabolite changes suggestive of liver and kidney dysfunction in the CMT2D mice were validated using clinical blood chemistry. These effects were not secondary to the neuromuscular phenotype, as determined by comparison with another, genetically unrelated mouse strain with similar neuromuscular dysfunction. However, these changes do not seem to be causative or consistent metabolites of CMT2D, because they were not observed in a second mouse Gars allele or in serum samples from CMT2D patients. Therefore, the metabolite 'fingerprint' we have identified for CMT2D improves our understanding of cellular biochemical changes associated with GARS mutations, but identification of efficacious treatment strategies and elucidation of the disease mechanism will require additional studies. PMID:27288508

  13. Metabolite profile of a mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy: implications for disease mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Preeti; Beebe, Kirk; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Currie, Meagan E.; Norberg, Sara N.; Evsikov, Alexei V.; Miers, Kathy E.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Bult, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous class of heritable polyneuropathies that result in axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system. Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy (CMT2D) is caused by dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS). Mutations in the mouse Gars gene result in a genetically and phenotypically valid animal model of CMT2D. How mutations in GARS lead to peripheral neuropathy remains controversial. To identify putative disease mechanisms, we compared metabolites isolated from the spinal cord of Gars mutant mice and their littermate controls. A profile of altered metabolites that distinguish the affected and unaffected tissue was determined. Ascorbic acid was decreased fourfold in the spinal cord of CMT2D mice, but was not altered in serum. Carnitine and its derivatives were also significantly reduced in spinal cord tissue of mutant mice, whereas glycine was elevated. Dietary supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine improved gross motor performance of CMT2D mice, but neither acetyl-L-carnitine nor glycine supplementation altered the parameters directly assessing neuropathy. Other metabolite changes suggestive of liver and kidney dysfunction in the CMT2D mice were validated using clinical blood chemistry. These effects were not secondary to the neuromuscular phenotype, as determined by comparison with another, genetically unrelated mouse strain with similar neuromuscular dysfunction. However, these changes do not seem to be causative or consistent metabolites of CMT2D, because they were not observed in a second mouse Gars allele or in serum samples from CMT2D patients. Therefore, the metabolite ‘fingerprint’ we have identified for CMT2D improves our understanding of cellular biochemical changes associated with GARS mutations, but identification of efficacious treatment strategies and elucidation of the disease mechanism will require additional studies. PMID:27288508

  14. Correlation of offshore seismic profiles with onshore New Jersey Miocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monteverde, D.H.; Miller, K.G.; Mountain, Gregory S.

    2000-01-01

    The New Jersey passive continental margin records the interaction of sequences and sea-level, although previous studies linking seismically defined sequences, borehole control, and global ??18O records were hindered by a seismic data gap on the inner-shelf. We describe new seismic data from the innermost New Jersey shelf that tie offshore seismic stratigraphy directly to onshore boreholes. These data link the onshore boreholes to existing seismic grids across the outer margin and to boreholes on the continental slope. Surfaces defined by age; facies, and log signature in the onshore boreholes at the base of sequences Kw2b, Kw2a, Kw1c, and Kw0 are now tied to seismic sequence boundaries m5s, m5.2s, m5.4s, and m6s, respectively, defined beneath the inner shelf. Sequence boundaries recognized in onshore boreholes and inner shelf seismic profiles apparently correlate with reflections m5, m5.2, m5.4, and m6, respectively, that were dated at slope boreholes during ODP Leg 150. We now recognize an additional sequence boundary beneath the shelf that we name m5.5s and correlate to the base of the onshore sequence Kw1b. The new seismic data image prograding Oligocene clinoforms beneath the inner shelf, consistent with the results from onshore boreholes. A land-based seismic profile crossing the Island Beach borehole reveals reflector geometries that we tie to Lower Miocene litho- and bio-facies in this borehole. These land-based seismic profiles image well-defined sequence boundaries, onlap and downlap truncations that correlate to Transgressive Systems Tracts (TST) and Highstand Systems Tracts (HST) identified in boreholes. Preliminary analysis of CH0698 data continues these system tract delineations across the inner shelf The CH0698 seismic profiles tie seismically defined sequence boundaries with sequences identified by lithiologic and paleontologic criteria. Both can now be related to global ??18O increases and attendant glacioeustatic lowerings. This integration of core

  15. Focused fluid-flow processes through high-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data from the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudon, Catherine; Gillet, Hervé; Cremer, Michel

    2013-04-01

    High-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data located in the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France, collected by the University of Bordeaux 1 (Cruises ITSAS 2, 2001; PROSECAN 3, 2006 and SARGASS, 2010) have recently been compiled. The survey area widely covers the Capbreton Canyon, which lies on the boundary between two major structural zones: the Aquitanian passive margin to the North, and the Basque-Cantabrian margin to the South which corresponds to the offshore Pyrenean front. The dataset revealed a large number of key seafloor features potentially associated with focused fluid-flow processes and subsurface sediment-remobilization. Focused fluid migration through sub-seabed sediments is a common phenomenon on continental margins worldwide and has widespread implications from both industrial and fundamental perspectives, from seafloor marine environmental issues to petroleum exploration and hazard assessments. Our study analyses the relationships between seafloor features, deeper structures and fluid migration through the Plio-Quaternary sedimentary pile. The geometrical characteristics, mechanisms of formation and kinematics of four main groups of seabed features have been investigated. (i) A 150km2 field of pockmarks can be observed on the Basque margin. These features are cone-shaped circular or elliptical depressions that are either randomly distributed as small pockmarks (diameter < 20m) or aligned in trains of large pockmarks (ranging from 200 to 600m in diameter) along shallow troughs leading downstream to the Capbreton Canyon. Seismic data show that most pockmarks reach the seabed through vertically staked V-shaped features but some are buried and show evidence of lateral migration through time. (ii) A second field of widely-spaced groups of pockmarks pierce the upper slope of the Aquitanian margin. These depressions are typically a few hundred meters in diameter and seem to be preferentially located in the troughs or on the stoss sides of

  16. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  17. Seismic study of the inner part of the Tyrrhenian basin from 2-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.; Guzman, M.; Grevemeyer, I.; Zitellini, N.

    2011-12-01

    Located between Italy, Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily the Tyrrhenian Sea is a Neogen back-arc basin formed by continental extension attributed to the southeastward rollback of the subducting Ionian plate. This triangle-shaped basin is an ideal place to study the evolution of extension process. The basin displays different states of extension along its length, finding from the early, low-extension episodes of continental rifting in the northern areas to the exhumation of the mantle in the deepest part of the basin. In order to study the nature of the crust and the 4D evolution of the Tyrrhenian basin, we have collected a survey of multichannel (MCS) and wide angle seismic (WAS) data. This survey was carried out into the framework of the MEDOC project during 2010 with the coordination of 2 research vessels, the R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa and the R/V Urania. During the experiment a total of 17 lines of MCS and 5 lines of WAS were acquired, with more than 100 deployments of both Ocean Bottom Hydrophones (OBH) and Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). The coordination with more than one team on land made possible to record data by land stations in Corsica, Sardinia and Italy. Here we present 2D P-wave velocity models with the velocity distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle and the geometry of the moho boundary, obtained by joint refraction and reflection tomography of WAS data. The data belong to lines recorded between Sardinia and Italy and Sardinia and Sicily. The data selected for the inversion consist in phases refracted through the crust and upper mantle (phases Pg and Pn) and reflected in the moho boundary (phases PmP). A detailed statistical uncertainty analysis will allow us to use seismic velocities to predict the petrology of the different domains recognized. The aim of this modeling effort is to identify the different crustal units across the basin in order to determine the transition between the continental little extended crust and the exhumed mantle.

  18. Design soil profiles for seismic analyses of AP600 plant standard design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostadan, F.; Gross, K.K.; Liu, C.I.T.; Orr, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    Future nuclear power plants are based on standard designs. For seismic qualification, a variety of subsurface conditions are considered in the design. While the soil properties play a significant role in the seismic responses, an unlimited number of site conditions can be postulated for analyses. In this paper, a systematic and effective approach is described to arrive at the design soil profiles for the AP600 nuclear plant.

  19. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  20. Apollo 14 and 16 Active Seismic Experiments, and Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Seismic refraction experiments were conducted on the moon by Apollo astronauts during missions 14, 16, and 17. Seismic velocities of 104, 108, 92, 114 and 100 m/sec were inferred for the lunar regolith at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites, respectively. These data indicate that fragmentation and comminution caused by meteoroid impacts has produced a layer of remarkably uniform seismic properties moonwide. Brecciation and high porosity are the probable causes of the very low velocities observed in the lunar regolith. Apollo 17 seismic data revealed that the seismic velocity increases very rapidly with depth to 4.7 km/sec at a depth of 1.4 km. Such a large velocity change is suggestive of compositional and textural changes and is compatible with a model of fractured basaltic flows overlying anorthositic breccias. 'Thermal' moonquakes were also detected at the Apollo 17 site, becoming increasingly frequent after sunrise and reaching a maximum at sunset. The source of these quakes could possibly be landsliding.

  1. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SEISMIC-REFRACTION PROFILE ACROSS THE SAN ANDREAS, SARGENT, AND CALAVERAS FAULTS, WEST-CENTRAL CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Colburn, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical studies of the upper crustal structure of west-central California are important for the further understanding of the geologic structure and tectonics in this seismically active region. In 1981, the United States Geological Survey recorded a seismic-refraction profile across the southern Santa Cruz Mountains in west-central California to examine the shallow velocity structure of this seismogenic region. This 40-km-long profile, which consisted of three shotpoints, extended northeastward from near Watsonville, California, to Coyote Lake, crossing the San Andreas, Sargent, and Calaveras faults. Refs.

  3. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in the Source Region of the 1923 Kanto Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Hirata, N.; Iwasaki, T.; Koketsu, K.; Ito, T.; Kasahara, K.; Ito, K.; Kawamura, T.; Ikawa, T.; Onishi, M.; Kawanaka, T.; Abe, S.

    2003-12-01

    The location and geometry of the source fault, and crustal velocity structure, provide the basic information for more precise estimation of strong ground motions with devastative earthquakes. The deep seismic profiling around Metropolitan Tokyo (Kanto area) began from 2002 under the project named `Regional Characterization of the Crust in Metropolitan Areas for Prediction of Strong Ground Motion' as five year's project. Deep seismic profiling was performed along the Sagami (Sagami 2003) and Tokyo Bay (Tokyo Bay 2003), to obtain an image of the source fault of the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M7.9), upper surface of the Philippine Sea plate, and deeper extension of inland active faults. In Sagami 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 75-km-long seismic line from the flank of the Hakone volcano to Tokyo Bay through the coast of Sagami Bay. The seismic source was four vibroseis trucks and air guns (1500 cu. inch). The seismic signals were recorded by geophones (10 Hz) on land along the coast with 20 33-km-long spread. The seismic data was processed by standard CMP-reflection method. The obtained seismic section portrays the east dipping reflectors beneath Odawara at depth ca. 4 km to Kamakura at depth ca. 13 km for 40-km-distance forming a narrow (< 1 km) concentrated zone of reflectors. The location and geometry of reflectors are almost coincidence with the source fault model (model II) proposed by MatsuOura et al. (1980) for the Kanto earthquake using a inverse method from geodetic data. Thus, it is interpreted that the source fault of the earthquake is in the narrow zone of the concentrated reflectors. The deeper extension of the Kozu-Matsuda Fault, showing the one of the highest slip rates (3 mm/y: vertical component) among active faults in Japan and was assessed high seismic risk, merges to the east dipping reflectors at ca. 6.5 km in depth beneath the Oiso hills. In the Tokyo Bay 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 71-km

  4. Homogenization of seismic surface wave profiling in highly heterogeneous improved ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Chien, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic surface wave profiling is gaining popularity in engineering practice for determining shear-wave velocity profile since the two-station SASW (Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave) was introduced. Recent developments in the multi-station approach (Multi-station Analysis of Surface Wave, MASW) result in several convenient commercial tools. Unlike other geophysical tomography methods, the surface wave method is essentially a 1-D method assuming horizontally-layered medium. Nevertheless, MASW is increasingly used to map lateral variation of S-wave velocity by multiple surveys overlooking the effect of lateral heterogeneity. MASW typically requires long receiver spread in order to have enough depth coverage. The accuracy and lateral resolution of 2-D S-wave velocity imaging by surface wave is not clear. Many geotechnical applications involves lateral variation in a scale smaller than the geophone spread and wave length. For example, soft ground is often improved to increase strength and stiffness by methods such as jet grouting and stone column which result in heterogeneous ground with improved columns. Experimental methods (Standard Penetration Test, sampling and laboratory testing, etc.) used to assess such ground improvement are subjected to several limitations such as small sampling volume, time-consuming, and cost ineffectiveness. It's difficult to assess the average property of the improved ground and the actual replacement ratio of ground improvement. The use of seismic surface wave method for such a purpose seems to be a good alternative. But what MASW measures in such highly heterogeneous improved ground remains to be investigated. This study evaluated the feasibility of MASW in highly heterogeneous ground with improved columns and investigated the homogenization of shear wave velocity measured by MASW. Field experiments show that MASW testing in such a composite ground behaves similar to testing in horizontally layered medium. It seems to measure some sort

  5. Deep seismic reflection profiling of the subduction megathrust across the Sagimi trough and Tokyo bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu; Saito, Hideo; Kawanaka, Taku; Hirata, Naoshi

    2010-05-01

    Beneath the metropolitan Tokyo, the Philippine Sea plate, in particular the fore arc portion of the Izu-Bonin island arc, has been subducted. Subduction megathrust beneath Tokyo generated M-8 class earthquakes, such as the 1923 Kanto (M7.9) and 1703 Genroku (M8.0) earthquakes. Due to the buyant subduction of the Izu-Bonin arc, the megathrust lies very shallow part of the crust. The Kozu-Matsuda fault, probable spray fault from the megathrust, emerged at the surface. In 2009, we acquired the deep seismic reflection data across the toe of the thrust system to reveal the connectivity of the probable spray fault to the megathrust. Together with the deep seismic section acquired in 2003, we show a 120-km-long deep seismic reflection profile from the front to 30 km in depth and discuss the geometry and characteristics of the thrust system. We performed deep seismic profiling across the Sagami trough for a 70-km-long seismic line in September 2009, using two ships for offshore seismic data acquisition: a gun-ship with a 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable and a 480 cu. inch air-gun. The seismic signals were recorded at Miura and Izu peninsulas located both ends of the seismic line. At both sides of the onshore line, off-line recorders were deployed along total 20-km-long seismic lines at a 50m interval. Seismic reflection data were acquired by different offset of ships making large-offset gathers. The northeast end of the seismic line connected with the 2003 Tokyo bay seismic line (Sato et al., 2005: Science). The obtained seismic sections portray the detailed geometry of the spray faults, suggesting an emergent thrust with 4 km thick landward dipping strata. It merges to the megathrust at 6-7 sec (TWT). Judging from the geometry of fault-related fold in the trough fill sediments, the tip of the megathrust is located at 3 sec (TWT) beneath the trough axis. According to the co-seismic crustal deformation, the slip of the 1923 Kanto

  6. Two lithospheric profiles across southern California derived from gravity and seismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romanyuk, T.; Mooney, W.D.; Detweiler, S.

    2007-01-01

    We present two detailed 2-D density transects for the crust and uppermost mantle across southern California using a linear gravity inversion technique. This technique parameterizes the crust and upper mantle as a set of blocks that are based on published geologic and seismic models. Each block can have a range of densities that are constrained where possible by borehole measurements, seismic velocities, and petrologic data. To further constrain the models, it is assumed that the lithosphere is close to isostatic equilibrium at both ends of the profiles, in the deep ocean and east of the Mojave Desert. We calculate the lithostatic pressure variations field for the whole cross section to rule out the geophysically insignificant solutions. In the linear equation, ?? = a + bV (V, seismic P-wave velocity; ??, density), which approximates the mantle density-velocity (??-V) relationship, different coefficients for b were evaluated. Lower coefficients (b 0.3) imply that other effects, such as composition and/or metamorphic changes, play an important role in the mantle. Density models were constructed with the coefficient b ranging from 0 to 0.6. The results indicate that a high b value in the mantle ??-V relationship is associated with less dense crust in the Mojave block and more dense crust in the Catalina schist block. In the less dense Mojave block, the average density of the whole crust is ???2.75 g/cm3, while that of the lower crust is ???2.72 g/cm3. These densities imply a high silica content in the crust, and a minor fraction of basic rock in the lower crust, or perhaps the absence of a basaltic layer altogether. By comparison, the average density of a typical continental stable platform is ???2.85 g/cm3. Models with higher b coefficients (0.5-0.6) are characterized by a large isostatic imbalance. On the other hand, lower b values (0-0.2) require a consolidated whole crust density in the Mojave Desert of ???2.78 g/cm3, and a lower crust density of ???2.89 g/cm3

  7. Investigation of blast-induced fracture in rock mass using reversed vertical seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D. H.; Wu, Y. K.

    2001-10-01

    The rock mass on quarry and pit wall surfaces is usually fractured during production blasting. Quantitative investigations of the fractured zones are needed for stabilization of the rock walls. In this study, the principle of reversed vertical seismic profiling (RVSP) was applied. A set of seismic geophones were arranged on the horizontal bench surface and seismic signals were generated along the vertical rock wall using a free-swinging hammer. The travel times of seismic rays were recorded and the P-wave velocities of the rock mass were analyzed using the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). A series of site tests have been carried out on the rock walls at a granite quarry that are characterized by fractures. The fracture depth at various locations on the wall surface is thereby determined. The results indicate that RVSP provides an easy and reliable method to quantitatively evaluate the blasting-induced fractures in the rock mass.

  8. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  9. A lithospheric seismic profile across northern Taiwan, from arc-continental collision to extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; McIntosh, K. D.; Lavier, L. L.; Wu, F. T.; Okaya, D. A.; Kuochen, H.

    2012-12-01

    waves and wide-angle Moho reflections. To improve our constraints on the crustal root beneath Taiwan and on the upper mantle seismic velocity structure we augment this data set with first-arriving phases from 52 local earthquakes that were recorded on the IRIS/PASSCAL instruments during the active-source seismic experiment. With this combined seismic data set we will develop a detailed seismic velocity model along a profile across northern Taiwan and the Ryukyu forearc.

  10. Reflection Profiles Extracted From Ambient-Noise Using Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganov, D.; Campman, X.; Verdel, A.; Wapenaar, K.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic Interferometry (SI) is the process of generating seismic traces from the crosscorrelation of existing traces. One application of SI is the retrieval of surface-wave arrivals between two passive stations at the Earth's surface from the crosscorrelation of ambient noise. Another application is the retrieval of body-wave reflections from the crosscorrelation of ambient noise recorded at the Earth's surface. Retrieved reflections would afford the construction of subsurface velocity models and subsurface reflection images with higher resolution than provided by surface-wave tomography. So far the extraction of body-wave reflections has proven to be more challenging. Several factors contribute to this difficulty: e.g., the difference in geometrical spreading between body and surface waves and the reliance on a random distribution of noise sources in the subsurface, as opposed to the ubiquitous and well-studied surface noise. We apply SI to ambient noise and further process the retrieved records to bring out reflections. Approximately 11 hours of noise were recorded in a desert in North Africa on 8 parallel lines with 50 m station spacing and 500 m spacing between the lines. Strong surface-wave energy, concentrated mainly below 6 Hz, was caused by traffic along a road bisecting the survey in the Northern section of the survey. We therefore first applied a low-cut frequency filter, followed by a frequency-wavenumber filter to remove remaining surface-wave noise. The corner frequency on the high end was 24 Hz. Next, the traces were energy normalized and then crosscorrelated. Despite the relatively short recording period, we retrieve coherent events. A comparison of virtual common- shot gathers (a response from one virtual shot recorded by all receivers on a line) with common-shot gathers from an active survey along the same line, shows that the retrieved events coincide with reflections in the active data. We further process virtual common-shot gathers using

  11. Crustal structure of the Eratosthenes Seamount, Cyprus and S. Turkey from an amphibian wide-angle seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, C.; Mechie, J.; Huebscher, C. P.; Gurbuz, C.; Nicolaides, S.; Weber, M. H.; Hall, J.; Louden, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    In March 2010, the project CoCoCo (incipient COntinent-COntinent COllision) recorded a 650 km long amphibian N-S wide-angle seismic profile, extending from the Eratosthenes Seamount (ESM) across Cyprus and southern Turkey to the Anatolian plateau. The aim of the project is to reveal the impact of the transition from subduction to continent-continent collision of the African plate with the Cyprus-Anatolian plate. A visual quality check, frequency analysis and filtering were applied to the seismic data and reveal a good data quality. Subsequent first break picking, finite-differences ray tracing and inversion of the offshore wide-angle data leads to a first-arrival tomographic model. This model reveals (1) P-wave velocities lower than 6.5 km/s in the crust, (2) a crustal thickness of about 25-30 km and (3) an upper crustal reflection at 5 km depth beneath the ESM. Two landshots on Turkey, also recorded on Cyprus, air gun shots south of Cyprus and geological (Mackenzie et al., 2006) and previous seismic information provide the data to derive a layered velocity model beneath the Anatolian plateau and for the ophiolite complex on Cyprus. Reflections provide evidence for a north-dipping plate subducting beneath Cyprus. The main features of this model are (1) an upper and lower crust with large lateral changes in velocity structure and thickness, (2) a Moho depth of about 45-50 km beneath the Anatolian plateau, (3) a shallow north-dipping subducting plate below Cyprus with an increasing dip and (4) a typical ophiolite sequence on Cyprus with a total thickness of about 14km. The offshore-onshore seismic data complete and improve the information about the velocity structure beneath Cyprus and the deeper part of the offshore tomographic model. Thus, the wide-angle seismic data provide detailed insights into the 2D-geometry and velocity structures of the uplifted and overriding Cyprus-Anatolian plate. Subsequent gravity modeling will be used to check and improve the velocity

  12. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E; Gamey, T Jeffrey; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies. PMID:15819938

  13. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  14. Continuous seismic reflection profiling of hydrogeologic features beneath New River, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, A.P.; Harned, D.A.; Berg, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    A medium-power, wide-frequency seismic system was used to collect more than 100 miles of continuous seismic reflection profiling data over a 4- day period along a 24-mile segment of the New River estuary and Intracoastal Waterway. The seismic reflection data were evaluated to determine the continuity of aquifer sediments and correlation with existing borehole geophysical well-log data at the Base. Results indicate that the Castle Hayne aquifer, the major source of freshwater for the military base and surrounding area, and deeper aquifers are continuous beds that gently dip to the southeast. However, immediately above the Castle Hayne aquifer, the survey showed that sediment beds are thin and discontinuous. This not only allows rainfall to more easily percolate and recharge the aquifer, but also makes the Castle Hayne more vulnerable to contamination.

  15. New insights on the Apricena Quaternary blind Fault (southern Italy) by high resolution seismic profiling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo; Varriale, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Blind faults pose a major threat in seismic areas and represent a crucial task in earthquake hazard assessment, because they cannot be easily detected by surface geological analyses. Seismic reflection methods, supported by other seismological and geophysical data, are the main tool used to detect active blind fault. However, quality of commercial reflection profiles is often inappropriate to face this issue in Southern Italy mainly because of the extreme structural complexity. Even good-quality profiles seldom bear a resolution and S/N ratio, within 1s TWT, sufficient to achieve detailed structural imaging at shallow depth, which is crucial to document recent activity and assess seismogenic potential of blind faults. These drawbacks can be overcome by high-resolution (HR) seismic reflection surveys. This study deals with HR reflection profiling targeting the Apricena blind Fault (AF), a ~30 km long, WNW trending, S-dipping fault located at the western margin of the Gargano Promontory. The subsurface geometry of the fault, that joins to the East the complex strike-slip Mattinata Fault System (MFS), is constrained by commercial profiles. The fault cuts across the Mesozoic-Tertiary Apulia carbonates and deforms the overlaying Plio-Pleistocene terrigenous sediments, at least up to Middle Pleistocene regressive deposits. Frequent acquisition gaps and an overall low quality hinder the imaging of shallower, more recent sequences, which could assess the hypothesis of recent activity and significant seismogenic potential proposed for the AF on the basis of geomorphic large-scale anomalies and felt reports of the 1627 Capitanata earthquake (Me 6.7). In order to improve shallow imaging, we acquired three HR SW-NE trending reflection profiles across the AF, in correspondence of the western, central and eastern fault strands. Seismic data were collected by using a HR vibrating seismic source (IVI-Minivib), appropriate for shallow reflection surveys, and an array of receivers

  16. Comparison of protein expression profiles between three Perkinsus spp., protozoan parasites of molluscs, through 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Boo, S; Chicano-Gálvez, E; Alhama, J; Barea, J L; Villalba, A; Cao, A

    2014-05-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of a wide range of marine molluscs worldwide, some of which have been responsible for heavy mollusc mortalities and dramatic economic losses. This study was performed with the aim of increasing the knowledge of Perkinsus spp. proteome. Proteins extracted from in vitro cultured cells of three species of this genus, P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki, were analysed using 2D electrophoresis. Four gels from each species were produced. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons among gels were performed with Proteamweaver software. Cluster analysis grouped the four gels of each Perkinsus sp.; furthermore, P. marinus and P. olseni gels were grouped in a cluster different from P. chesapeaki. Around 2000 spots of each species were considered, from which 213 spots were common to the 3 species; P. chesapeaki and P. marinus shared 310 spots, P. chesapeaki and P. olseni shared 315 spots and P. marinus and P. olseni shared 242 spots. A number of spots were exclusive of each Perkinsus species: 1161 spots were exclusive of P. chesapeaki, 1124 of P. olseni and 895 of P. marinus. A total of 84 spots, including common and species-specific ones, were excised from the gels and analysed using MALDI-TOF and nESI-IT (MS/MS) techniques. Forty-two spots were successfully sequenced, from which 28 were annotated, most of them clustered into electron transport, oxidative stress and detoxification, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, signal transduction, metabolic process and proteolysis. PMID:24607654

  17. Deep seismic profiling using off-line recorders, Miura Peninsula, Kanto, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, T.; Hirata, N.; Sato, H.; Onishi, M.; Noda, K.

    2003-12-01

    The deep seismic profiling around Metropolitan Tokyo (Kanto area) began from 2002 under the project named . The deep seismic profiling was performed along the Tokyo Bay (Tokyo Bay 2003) from July to August in 2003, to obtain an image of the source fault of the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M7.9), and deeper extension of inland active faults in Miura Peninsula. In the Tokyo Bay 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 71-km-long seismic line from the Miura Peninsula to Tokyo Bay, using digital-telemetry cable system, including ocean bottom cables. However, this seismic line at Miura Peninsula passes through the densely populated area and due to the cultural noise the low S/N ratio was expected. Keeping away from the noise along the cable-type receiver line, 51 off-line recorders with a 4.5 Hz and 3-compornent geophone were deployed at carefully selected, quiet receiver points. During 90 days continuous recording, seismic signals produced by four vibroseis trucks at 195 locations and air-guns (1500 cu. inch) at 4280 locations were recorded including ca. 150 of earthquakes. Judging from the preliminary receiver gathers, two later phases (A and B) are recognized. The later phase A, located at TWT (Two-way travel time) 4 to 5.5 sec., is interpreted as a reflection from the top of the Philippine Sea Plate. The later phase B at TWT 7 to 8 sec. corresponds to the deeper reflection under the Philippine Sea Plate, respectively.

  18. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  19. Personal identification by the comparison of facial profiles: testing the reliability of a high-resolution 3D-2D comparison model.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Cristina; Cantatore, Angela; Ciaffi, Romina; Gibelli, Daniele; Cigada, Alfredo; De Angelis, Danilo; Sala, Remo

    2012-01-01

    Identification from video surveillance systems is frequently requested in forensic practice. The "3D-2D" comparison has proven to be reliable in assessing identification but still requires standardization; this study concerns the validation of the 3D-2D profile comparison. The 3D models of the faces of five individuals were compared with photographs from the same subjects as well as from another 45 individuals. The difference in area and distance between maxima (glabella, tip of nose, fore point of upper and lower lips, pogonion) and minima points (selion, subnasale, stomion, suprapogonion) were measured. The highest difference in area between the 3D model and the 2D image was between 43 and 133 mm(2) in the five matches, always greater than 157 mm(2) in mismatches; the mean distance between the points was greater than 1.96 mm in mismatches, <1.9 mm in five matches (p < 0.05). These results indicate that this difference in areas may point toward a manner of distinguishing "correct" from "incorrect" matches. PMID:22074112

  20. Decoupling of deformation in the Upper Rhine Graben sediments. Seismic reflection and diffraction on 3-component Vertical Seismic Profiling (Soultz-sous-Forêts area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, Joachim; Diraison, Marc; Naville, Charles; Géraud, Yves; Schaming, Marc; Dezayes, Chrystel

    2010-07-01

    A contribution to the definition of the structural pattern of the Soultz-sous-Forêts EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) is presented here. After reprocessing, the PHN84J seismic reflection profile highlights the tilted blocks of the Merkwiller-Péchelbronn oilfield. In the Soultz-sous-Forêts horst, complex fault patterns are observed: the Hermerswiller normal fault flattens at depth and is rooted in decollements occurring in Triassic salt or clay series, while other steep normal faults affect underlying sedimentary formations and basement. Some methods for the exploitation of a seismic diffraction recorded by multi-component Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) are also illustrated to locate the diffractor without specific data processing. Polarisation and travel time analysis of a diffraction event recorded in the GPK1 borehole are analysed, and its exploitation combined with seismic reflection helps defining a tilted block geometry.

  1. Crustal Structure of Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China, from Seismic Refraction Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kan, R J; Hu, H X; Zeng, R S; Mooney, W D; McEvilly, T V

    1986-10-24

    Seismic refraction, profiles in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, define the crustal structure in an area of active tectonics on the southern end of the Himalaya-Burma arc. The crustal thickness ranges from 38 to 46 kilometers, and the relatively low mean crustal velocity indicates a crustal composition compatible with normal continental crust and consisting mainly of meta-sedimentary and silicic intrusive rocks, with little mafic or ultramafic component. This composition suggests a crustal evolution involving sedimentary processes on the flank of the Yangtze platform rather than the accretion of oceanic island arcs, as has been proposed. An anomalously low upper-mantle velocity observed on one profile but not on another at right angles to it may indicate active tectonic processes in the mantle or seismic anisotropy. PMID:17792016

  2. Some Seismic Profiles near the Western End of the Puerto Rico Trench.

    PubMed

    Northrop, J; Ransone, M

    1962-03-01

    A cooperative program of seismic refraction profiling was completed in the vicinity of the Puerto Rico Trench by Hudson Laboratories, Woods Hole, Lamont, and Texas A. & M. Profiles completed near the western end of the Trench were analyzed at Hudson Laboratories. Five seismic layers are indicated below the water layer. The thickness/velocity relationships are as follows: 5.1 km of 1.5 km/sec. (water); 1 km of 1.7 km/sec. (sediment); 1.5 km of 3 km/sec. (metamorphics?); 2 km of 5.5 km/sec. (basement); and 2 km of 7.1 km/sec. (high speed basement). Below these, typical Moho velocities of 8.1 km/sec. were measured. Total depth to Moho ranges from 9 to 12 km below sea level, the greatest variation occurring in the basement layers. The least depth was measured 65 miles north of the Puerto Rico Trench. PMID:19873544

  3. Some Seismic Profiles near the Western End of the Puerto Rico Trench

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John; Ransone, Morris

    1962-01-01

    A cooperative program of seismic refraction profiling was completed in the vicinity of the Puerto Rico Trench by Hudson Laboratories, Woods Hole, Lamont, and Texas A. & M. Profiles completed near the western end of the Trench were analyzed at Hudson Laboratories. Five seismic layers are indicated below the water layer. The thickness/velocity relationships are as follows: 5.1 km of 1.5 km/sec. (water); 1 km of 1.7 km/sec. (sediment); 1.5 km of 3 km/sec. (metamorphics?); 2 km of 5.5 km/sec. (basement); and 2 km of 7.1 km/sec. (high speed basement). Below these, typical Moho velocities of 8.1 km/sec. were measured. Total depth to Moho ranges from 9 to 12 km below sea level, the greatest variation occurring in the basement layers. The least depth was measured 65 miles north of the Puerto Rico Trench. PMID:19873544

  4. Crustal structure of Yunnan province, People's Republic of China, from seismic refraction profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kan, R.-J.; Hu, H.-X.; Zeng, R.-S.; Mooney, W.D.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1986-01-01

    Seismic refraction, profiles in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, define the crustal structure in an area of active tectonics, on the southern end of the Himalaya-Burma arc. The crustal thickness ranges from 38 to 46 kilometers, and the relatively low mean crustal velocity indicates a crustal composition compatible with normal continental crust and consisting mainly of meta-sedimentary and silicic intrusive rocks, with little mafic or ultramafic component. This composition suggests a crustal evolution involving sedimentary processes on the flank of the Yangtze platform rather than the accretion of oceanic island arcs, as has been proposed. An anomalously low upper-mantle velocity observed on one profile, but not on another at right angles to it may indicate active tectonic processes in the mantle or seismic anisotropy.

  5. IPOD-USGS multichannel seismic reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Markl, Rudi G.

    1977-01-01

    A 3,400-km-long multichannel seismic-reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was acquired commercially under contract to the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey. These data show evidence for massive erosion of the continental slope, diapirs at the base of the continental slope, and mantle reflections beneath the Hatteras Abyssal Plain.

  6. Notes on acquisition of high-resolution seismic profiles in southern Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snavely, P.D., Jr.; Gower, H.D.; Yount, J.C.; Pearl, J.E.; Tagg, A.R.; Lee, J.W.; Lander, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    Approximately 275 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were obtained in Puget Sound, Washington from the U.S. Geological Survey's research vessel DON J. MILLER from January 13 through 19, 1976. These data, recorded on microfilm, were obtained to provide information on the thickness and distribution of Quaternary deposits, to identify folds and faults that deform them, and to provide a basis for assessing geological environmental hazards.

  7. Digital continuous seismic reflection profiles of New Jersey inner shelf sand ridges

    SciTech Connect

    Waldner, J.S.; Henne, R.G. Jr. ); Sheridan, R.E.; Carey, J.S.; Ashley, G.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Digital continuous profiling seismic reflection data were collected along the three sand ridges of the inner continental shelf off New Jersey in August 1992. The acquisition system consisted of a conventional analog Geopulse system interfaced with a land-based digital signal-enhancement engineering seismograph. The Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to obtain a navigational accuracy within 5 meters after processing. The raw data exhibit seismic reflections from layers less than 1 meter thick. The seismic tracklines were correlated to Vibracores and known geologic stratigraphy. The data show early to late Holocene depositional sequences overlying a mid-Wisconsinan barrier system located at depths of 20 meters. The sand ridges occur as constructive features above an unconformity in an asymmetrical profile where cross bedding reflections downlap on the unconformity and dip gently seaward. Synthetic seismograms constructed from Vibracores show that these internal reflections are caused by interfaces between shelly gravel and medium sand. Digital profiles show processing enhancements including trace static correction, deconvolution, automatic gain scaling, weighted horizontal stacking and digital filtering in addition to color panels. Problems common to analog data, such as wave motion effects of surface sources, water bottom reverberation, multiple reflections, and bubble pulse width, are addressed by digital processing. The combination of the analog system with the land-based seismograph offers a less expensive technique for digital acquisition and processing, thus providing improved results over older analog data.

  8. High resolution seismic reflection survey in the Gulf of Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy. An example of preliminary interpretation of seismic profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aniello, Elena; di Fiore, Vincenzo; Sacchi, Marco; Rapolla, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    During the cruise CAFE_07 - Leg 3 conducted in the Gulf of Naples and Pozzuoli in January 2008, on board of the R/V URANIA of the CNR it was carried out the acquisition of a grid of ca. 800 km of high-resolution multichannel reflection seismic profiles (Sacchi et al., 2009; Di Fiore et al., 2009). The aim of the cruise was the understanding of the stratigraphic-structural setting of the Pozzuoli Bay area, with specific reference to the major offshore volcanic features, such as Nisida Bank, Pentapalummo Bank, M.Dolce-Pampano Bank and Miseno Bank and others. The Gulf of Pozzuoli is placed in the Volcanic district of Campi Flegrei, an area of active volcanism located at North West of Naples city, along the Tyrrhenian margin, in an extensional collapsed area called Campanian Plain, filled by siliciclastic, epiclastic and volcaniclastic sediments, deposited during Late Pliocene and Quaternary. Several studies present in literature suggest a relation between volcanic system of Campi Flegrei and faults system; in particular, at the Gulf of Pozzuoli we can observe some volcanic banks and submarine volcanic edifices, as Pentapalummo, Nisida and Miseno Banks, are aligned along the NE-SW trending Magnaghi-Sebeto fault line, that separates the Bay of Naples into two sectors: the first, at NW of the Bay, characterized by volcanism activity and magnetic anomalies and the second, at SE of the bay, involved only by sedimentary activity, with the exceptions of the circular anomalies in the offshore of Torre del Greco city (Bruno et al., 2003; Secomandi et al., 2003); other volcanic hights are instead positioned along NW-SE structural discontinuities (Bruno, 2004). The magnetic and gravimetric analysis of the Bay of Naples confirms the tectonic control of the Campanian volcanism: we can observe a good correspondence of high magnetic anomalies with the main volcanic structures at the North-Western side of the bay, just the Gulf of Pozzuoli, where both NE-SW and NW-SE normal faults

  9. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  10. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  11. Deep seismic soundings on the 1-AP profile in the Barents Sea: Methods and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakoulina, T. S.; Kashubin, S. N.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Profile 1-AP with a length of 1300 km intersects the Barents Sea from The Kola Peninsula to Franz Josef Land. The combined Common Depth Point (CDP) and Deep Seismic Sounding (DSS) seismic studies were carried out on this profile. The DSS measurements were conducted with the standalone bottom seismic stations with an interval of 5-20 km between them. The stations recorded the signals generated by the large air guns with a step of 250 m. Based on these data, the detailed P-velocity section of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle have been constructed for the entire profile and the S-velocity section for its southern part. The use of a variety of methods for constructing the velocity sections enabled us to assess the capabilities of each method from the standpoint of the highest reliability and informativity of the models. The ray tracing method yielded the best results. The 1-PR profile crosses two large basins—the South Barents and North Barents ones, with the thickness of the sediments increasing from 8 to 10 km in the south to 12-15 km in the north. The Earth's crust pertains to the continental type along the entire profile. Its thickness averages 32 to 36 km and only increases to 43 km at the boundary between the two basins. The distinct change in the wave field at this boundary suggests the presence of a large deep fault in this zone. The high-velocity blocks are revealed in the crust of the South Barents basin, whereas the North Barents crust is characterized by relatively low velocities.

  12. Seismic Reflection Profiles Image the Rodgers Creek Fault and Cotati Basin Beneath Urban Santa Rosa, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Langenheim, V. E.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Stephenson, W. J.; Odum, J. K.

    2008-12-01

    The USGS in collaboration with the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) group at the University of Texas, Austin, the Sonoma County Water Agency, the city of Santa Rosa, and with support from NSF, collected 13-km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data in two profiles on the Santa Rosa Plain. The purpose of this survey was to image basin structure and stratigraphy in this seismically-active area and to provide constraints for earthquake hazard assessment. We acquired the data using a 9,990 kg minivib I truck in P-wave mode, which swept from 15 to 120 Hz, along city streets and creek-side roads. The common- midpoint spacing of these data is 2.5 m while nominal fold is 36 traces. The Rodgers Creek fault, a northward extension of the Hayward fault which passes through the city of Santa Rosa, has not been imaged previously by seismic reflection data. The east-west trending Santa Rosa Creek profile images several faults including the steeply dipping Rodgers Creek fault as it passes near Doyle Elementary School. In this vicinity the fault zone appears to consist of at least two strands with a set of arched reflectors between them. West of the Rodgers Creek fault, and in general agreement with preexisting gravity data and geologic mapping, we interpret a sedimentary basin more than 1 km deep that underlies downtown Santa Rosa, which was heavily damaged in the 1906 earthquake. This basin shallows to the west as the profile crosses the southeastern side of Trenton Ridge, a concealed basement high. Reflectors within the basin show a thickening sequence of layered strata and apparent dips of about 10 degrees east in the 400 to 800 m depth range that decrease to about 1 degree at 50 m depth. These new data will help to constrain existing seismic velocity models for this area which currently show only flat-lying basin fill.

  13. Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, L.K.

    1987-05-01

    Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

  14. VSP (Vertical Seismic Profile) site characterization at NTS (Nevada Test Site)

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; McEvilly, T.V.; Michelini, A.

    1990-10-01

    In late 1989 a site characterization study using the Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) method was conducted as part of the On Site Seismic Yield (OSSY) experiment organized by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory as well UE-10 ITS {number sign}3 located in Yucca valley inside the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The OSSY experiment fired 10 and 100 lb explosive sources at several depths in the hole, with multiple 3-component receivers on the surface, to test the nature of seismic signal scaling with source size and the accuracy in the near field of source modeling algorithms. Shear-waves in particular are influenced strongly by both the source mechanism and the properties of the propagation path. The multi-component OSSY VSP (3-component receivers at several depths, with P, SV and SH surface sources) measured the seismic wave transmission separately for three source types. The VSP surface-source to borehole-receiver acquisition geometry was reversed in the subsequent explosion phase of the experiment in which the explosion-generated waves presumably experienced the same propagation effects as did the waves generated by the VSP sources. The OSSY VSP has progressed through data acquisition and processing to an initial interpretation in terms of P- and S-velocity structures. Preliminary result were presented at the 1990 meeting of the Seismological Society of America (Daley and McEvilly, 1990). This report is an overview of the data acquisition, processing and analysis to date, and on plans for the next of interpretation. 6 refs., 23 figs.

  15. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.M. . Dept. of Geophysics); Catchings, R.D.; Lutter, W.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all bad-data'' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method. The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via travel-time inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion. The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  16. Improvement of Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry Technology (CCMS) for the Profiling of Human Kinases by Combination with 2D LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Jenny J.; Graebner, Olivia; Dreger, Mathias; Glinski, Mirko; Baumgart, Sabine; Koester, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    An increasingly popular and promising field in functional proteomics is the isolation of proteome subsets based on small molecule-protein interactions. One platform approach in this field are Capture Compounds that contain a small molecule of interest to bind target proteins, a photo-activatable reactivity function to covalently trap bound proteins, and a sorting function to isolate captured protein conjugates from complex biological samples for direct protein identification by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). In this study we used staurosporine as a selectivity group for analysis in HepG2 cells derived from human liver. In the present study, we combined the functional isolation of kinases with different separation workflows of automated split-free nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Two different CCMS setups, CCMS technology combined with 1D LC-MS and 2D LC-MS, were compared regarding the total number of kinase identifications. By extending the chromatographic separation of the tryptic digested captured proteins from 1D LC linear gradients to 2D LC we were able to identify 97 kinases. This result is similar to the 1D LC setup we previously reported but this time 4 times less input material was needed. This makes CCMS of kinases an even more powerful tool for the proteomic profiling of this important protein family. PMID:21941435

  17. Crustal structure in the Kiruna area, northern Sweden, based on seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhojuntti, Niklas; Bergman, Stefan; Olsson, Sverker

    2013-04-01

    Northernmost Sweden is currently one of the most active mining areas in Europe. In order to better understand the regional three-dimensional crustal structure and to support deep ore exploration, we have acquired a 74 km long seismic reflection profile in the Kiruna area. The upper crust in this area is largely composed of various supracrustal units, which are dominated by metabasalts, acidic metavolcanics and clastic metasedimentary rocks, resting on an Archaean metagranitoid complex. All of these units have been intruded by plutonic rocks, and to variable degrees folded, sheared and metamorphosed, during the Svecokarelian orogeny. The profile crosses several steep ductile shear zones, some of which extend for hundreds of kilometres along strike. Many of the lithological contacts and deformation zones are expected to be seismically reflective. The profile is located only a few kilometres from the world's largest underground iron-ore mine in Kiruna, and closer to the profile there are several known ore bodies, some of which are active exploration targets. For the seismic recording we used approximately 350 geophones in split-spread configuration, at a separation of 25 m. The main seismic source was the Vibsist system (an impact source), which normally was employed at every geophone station. We also fired explosive charges (8-16 kg) at a few locations distributed along the profile to image deeper structures, although at very low resolution. Wireless seismometers were placed along and to the side of the profile, mainly in order to achieve better velocity control and to study out-of-the-plane reflections. Some mining blasts in Kiruna were also recorded. The upper crust in the area is quite reflective, most clearly demonstrated by the dynamite shot records. Some of the reflections appear to originate from steeply dipping structures. The dynamite shot records show a set of reflections at 3-4 s twt, corresponding to a depth of roughly 10 km, the explanation for which is

  18. Crustal structure of the Southern Rio Grande rift determined from seismic refraction profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinno, Y. A.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S. H.; Daggett, P. H.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a major cooperative seismic experiment, a series of seismic refraction profiles have been recorded in south-central New Mexico with the goal of determining the crustal structure in the southern Rio Grande rift. The data gathered greatly expand the seismic data base in the area, and consist of three interlocking regional profiles: a reversed E-W line across the rift, an unreversed N-S axial line, and an unreversed SW-SE line. The reversed E-W line shows no significant dip along the Moho (32 km thick crust) and a 7.7 km/s Pn velocity. Results from the N-S axial line and the NW-SE line indicate an apparent Pn velocity of 7.95 km/s and significant dip along the Moho with crustal thinning toward the south and southeast. When interpreted together, these data indicate a crustal thinning in the southern rift of 4-6 km with respect to the northern rift and the adjacent Basin and Range province, and establish the regional Pn velocity to be approximately 7.7 km/s. These results suggest that the Rio Grande rift can be identified as a crustal feature separate and distinct from the Basin and Range province.

  19. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  20. Deep structures beneath Karakoram Fault revealed by deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Gao, R.; Klemperer, S. L.; Kelly, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Karakoram fault is one of the most important structures in southwest Tibet, associated with the collision between India and Eurasia. In order to discover the deep structures of the Karakoram fault, SinoProbe has acquired a deep seismic reflection profiles with 110 km length across the Ayila Ri'gyu mountain in the southeast part of the Karakoram fault. Preliminary reflection images of the crustal structures of the Karakoram fault show that Moho reflections appear at 23 ~ 24 s (TWT) beneath deep seismic reflection line. Many north and south dipping reflections in the crust form v-shaped structures along the reflection line and suggest the Karakoram fault as a crustal scale. Beneath the Gangdese granite belt, there are many "bright-spot" reflections in the upper and middle crust

  1. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  2. Faulting at the Epicenter of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake Imaged by Seismic Reflection Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, M. C.; Beale, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    The 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake was one of the best-documented earthquakes of the 19th century. However, many basic questions remain concerning the geologic nature of the seismic source. Reprocessing of several seismic-reflection profiles collected almost thirty years ago in the epicentral area near Summerville is shedding new light on this problem. The study area is within the Atlantic Coastal Plain and is underlain by approximately 800 meters of Cretaceous and Cenozoic sediments. The basement is a Mesozoic terrane comprised of clastic sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The top of basement throughout the area is marked by a strong reflection due to the unconformable contact between Cretaceous sediments and a lower Jurassic basalt. The thickness of the Mesozoic section is unknown. Our initial work involved seismic reflection line VT-3b collected in 1981 by the Virginia Tech Regional Geophysics Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, along the Ashley River southeast of Summerville. VT-3b shows clear evidence of a down-to-the-east, steeply-dipping normal fault with approximately 200 m of vertical offset, displacing horizontally layered Lower Mesozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The overlying Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments show associated reverse displacement, resolved by the data to within 100 meters of the ground surface. This fault is associated with very intense diffracted energy, which led to its discovery. Two other near-vertical faults with down-to-the east offset of Lower Mesozoic units were imaged on VT-3b immediately to the northwest of the major fault. The location coincides with the epicenters of modern seismic activity, and maximum intensity mapped in 1886. The results of our more recent work with the remaining seismic profiles collected by Virginia Tech, USGS and COCORP in the Summerville area suggest that the faulting imaged on VT-3b is in the central portion of a graben within the Triassic-Jurassic basement

  3. Structure of Precambrian crust in the U. S. from COCORP deep seismic profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.D. )

    1992-01-01

    COCORP and industry seismic reflection profiles probing beneath the thin veneer of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the US mid-continent are mapping a complex, largely unknown three dimensional mosaic of major fault zones and sutures, a highly variable Moho, and extensive sequences of unexplored volcanic and/or sedimentary strata. Key features of the Precambrian suggested by COCORP and other deep profiling include: Pervasive, distributed reflectivity, often diffractive, dominating the middle and lower crust. Moho that is rarely reflective, usually evident as a downward transition of distributed crustal reflectivity into mantle transparency. Volcano-clastic filled graben of the late Proterozoic Keweenawan rift buried beneath Paleozoic strata in Kansas and Michigan. Extensive, subhorizontal Precambrian stratification in the upper crust beneath the east- central US and the Texas-Oklahoma border region, argued to be either an extensive volcano-clastic basin, a voluminous felsic volcanic outpouring or a major intrusive sill complex. Crustal penetrating, dipping reflection zones that mark known (Grenville front) or inferred (Cashocton zone, Trans-Hudson orogen) shear zones. Non-reflective ( ) basement beneath the Appalachian foreland suggesting transparent massifs'' that serve as collisional buttresses during terrane accretion. Deep structure is sometimes at odds with simple extrapolations of surface geology. Clearly deep seismic profiling has only begun to reveal the buried craton in the US. It is time for an integrated program for the systematic exploration of this special scientific frontier.

  4. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling for mapping shallow aquifers in Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Missimer, T.M.; Gardner, Richard Alfred

    1976-01-01

    High-resolution continuous seismic reflection profiling equipment was utilized to define the configuration of sedimentary layers underlying part of Lee County, Florida. About 45 miles (72 kilometers) of profile were made on the Caloosahatchee River Estuary and San Carlos Bay. Two different acoustic energy sources, a high resolution boomer and a 45-electrode high resolution sparker, both having a power input of 300 joules, were used to obtain both adequate penetration and good resolution. The seismic profiles show that much of the strata of middle Miocene to Holocene age apparently are extensively folded but not faulted. Initial interpretations indicate that: (1) the top of the Hawthorn Formation (which contains the upper Hawthorn aquifer) has much relief due chiefly to apparent folding; (2) the limestone, sandstone, and unconsolidated sand and phosphorite, which together compose the sandstone aquifer, appear to be discontinuous; (3) the green clay unit of the Tamiami Formation contains large scale angular beds dipping eastward; and (4) numerous deeply cut alluvium-filled paleochannels underlie the Caloosahatchee River. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Deformation of Mount Etna substrate as imaged by offshore seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argnani, Andrea; Mazzarini, Francesco; Bisson, Marina; Bonazzi, Claudia; Isola, Ilaria

    2010-05-01

    Despite the clear evidence of active flank dynamics that is affecting the eastern side of Mount Etna, the contribution of tectonic processes has not been yet understood. So far, the various models proposed to explain the observed flank deformation have been based on onshore structural data, coming from the volcanic edifice. The Ionian offshore of Mount Etna has been only recently investigated using multichannel seismic profiles, and offers the opportunity to image the structural features of the substrate of the unstable flank of the volcano. This contribution aims at describing the deformation located offshore Mount Etna using multichannel seismic profiles recently acquired during three seismic surveys (Argnani and Bonazzi, 2005; Pareschi et al., 2006; Argnani et al., 2009). These surveys total over 800 km of high resolution seismic profiles, with record length ranging between 3 and 6 seconds and spatial coverage varying from 16 to 48 folds. The flank deformation of Mount Etna appears to be laterally confined by two tectonic guidelines, trending roughly E-W, located to the north and south of the deforming flank; the northern guideline, in particular, takes the surface expression of a sharp fault (Pernicana Fault). Though often assumed that these boundary structures continue offshore as linear features, connected to a frontal thrust ramp (i.e., Borgia et al., 1992), the occurrence of this simple offshore structural system has not been imaged. In fact, seismic data show a remarkable degree of structural complexity offshore Mount Etna. The Pernicana Fault, for instance, is not continuing offshore as a sharp feature; rather, the deformation is expressed as ENE-WSW folds located very close to the coastline. It is possible that these tectonic structures might have affected the offshore of Mount Etna before the Pernicana Fault system was developed, less than 15 ka ago. The southern guideline of the collapsing eastern flank of the volcano is poorly expressed onshore, and

  6. A Look Inside the San Andreas fault at Parkfield Through Vertical Seismic Profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavarria, J.A.; Malin, P.; Catchings, R.D.; Shalev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby micro-earthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  7. Vertical seismic profile at Pike's Peak, Saskatchewan, Canada: turning rays and velocity anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newrick, Rachel T.; Lawton, Don C.

    2003-12-01

    First-arrival traveltimes from a multi-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) were used to estimate velocity anisotropy in the presence of a vertical velocity gradient. A numerical model consisting of two layers with vertical velocity gradients of 3.1 and 1.2 s-1, respectively, and global anisotropy parameters of ε=0.12±0.02 and δ=0.30±0.06 yielded first-arrival traveltimes that matched the observed traveltimes well. Shallow receivers were found to be crucial for constraining the vertical velocity field and for determining the parameters of anisotropy at depth.

  8. A look inside the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield through vertical seismic profiling.

    PubMed

    Chavarria, J Andres; Malin, Peter; Catchings, Rufus D; Shalev, Eylon

    2003-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby microearthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids. PMID:14657494

  9. Profiling of myelin proteins by 2D-gel electrophoresis and multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled to MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vanrobaeys, Frank; Van Coster, Rudy; Dhondt, Goedele; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef

    2005-01-01

    The myelin sheath is an electrically insulating layer that consists of lipids and proteins. It plays a key role in the functioning of the nervous system by allowing fast saltatory conduction of nerve pulses. Profiling of the proteins present in myelin is an indispensable prerequisite to better understand the molecular aspects of this dynamic, functionally active membrane. Two types of protein, the myelin basic protein and the proteolipid protein, account for nearly 85% of the protein content in myelin. Identification and characterization of the other "minor" proteins is, in this respect, a real challenge. In the present work, two proteomic strategies were applied in order to study the protein composition of myelin from the murine central nervous system. First, the protein mixture was separated by 2D-gel electrophoresis and, after spot excision and in-gel digestion, samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Via this approach, we identified 57 protein spots, corresponding to 38 unique proteins. Alternatively, the myelin sample was digested by trypsin and the resulting peptide mixture was further analyzed by off-line 2D-liquid chromatography. After the second-dimension separation (nanoLC), the peptides were spotted "on-line" onto a MALDI target and analyzed by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. We identified 812 peptides by MALDI MS/MS, representing 93 proteins. Membrane proteins, low abundant proteins, and highly basic proteins were all represented in this shotgun proteomic approach. By combining the results of both approaches, we can present a comprehensive proteomic map of myelin, comprising a total of 103 protein identifications, which is of utmost importance for the molecular understanding of white matter and its disorders. PMID:16335977

  10. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The "bulk" or "global" δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  11. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  12. A critical appraisal of asymptotic 3D-to-2D data transformation filters and the potential of complex frequency 2.5-D modeling in seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, L.; Greenhalgh, S. A.; Maurer, H. R.; Marelli, S.; Nuber, A.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is often based on forward modeling in the computationally attractive 2-D domain. Any solution of the 2-D cartesian wave equation inherently carries the implicit assumption of a line source extended in the out-of-plane medium invariant direction. This implies that the source energy in homogeneous media spreads over the surface of an approximately expanding cylinder, such that the wavefield amplitudes (at least in the far field) scale inversely with the square-root of distance. However, realistic point sources like explosives or airguns, fired in a 3-D medium, generate amplitudes that decay inversely with the first power of distance, since the wavefield expands quasi-spherically in all three dimensions. Usually, practitioners correct for this amplitude difference and the associated phase shift of π/4 by transforming the recorded 3-D field data to the approximate 2-D situation by using simplistic, asymptotic filter algorithms. Such filters operate on a square root of time-sample convolutional basis and implicitly assume straight ray paths and a constant velocity medium. The unsubstantiated usage of these asymptotic filters is in contradiction to their well known limitations. In this study, we present an extensive quantitative appraisal of 3D-to-2D data transformation procedures. Our analysis relies on a simple numerical modeling study, based on propagating 3-D and 2-D wavefields through 2-D media and comparing the true 2-D and the filtered 3-D synthetic data. It is shown that the filtering errors are moderate in purely acoustic situations but become substantial in complex media when arrivals overlap each other or ray paths deviate strongly from straight lines. Normalized root-mean-square deviations up to 5% and maximum relative time domain errors of up to 40% were found in high contrast media, when full elastic treatment was considered. In order to examine if this error translates into a deficient model reconstruction in full waveform

  13. Crustal shortening followed by extensional collapse of the Cordilleran orogenic belt in northwestern Montana: Evidence from vintage seismic reflection profiles acquired in the Swan Range and Swan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, B. S.; Speece, M. A.; Stickney, M. C.; Mosolf, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessing of one 24-fold (96 channel) and four 30-fold (120 channel) 2D seismic reflection profiles have revealed crustal scale reflections in the Swan Range and adjacent Swan River Valley of northwestern Montana. The five reprocessed profiles constitute 142.6 of the 303.3 linear km acquired in 1983-84 by Techo of Denver, Colorado. The four 30-fold profiles used helicopter-assisted dynamite shooting (Poulter method) and the 24-fold profile used the Vibroseis method. Acquisition parameters were state of the art for the time. The Swan Range lies east of the Rocky Mountain Trench and is part of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt where the Lewis thrust system emplaced a thick slab of Proterozoic Belt Supergroup strata eastward and over Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks during the Late Cretaceous to early Paleocene Laramide orogeny. Deeply drilled borehole data are absent within the study area; however, we generated a synthetic seismogram from the Arco-Marathon 1 Paul Gibbs well (total depth=5418 m), located approximately 70 km west of the reprocessed profiles, and correlated the well data to surface seismic profiles. Large impedance contrasts in the log data are interpreted to be tholeiitic Moyie sills within the Prichard Formation argillite (Lower Belt), which produce strong reflection events in regional seismic sections and result in highly reflective, east-dipping events in the reprocessed profiles. We estimate a depth of 10 km (3 to 3.5 seconds) to the basal detachment of the Lewis thrust sheet. The décollement lies within Belt Supergroup strata to the west of the Swan River Valley before contacting unreflective, west-dipping crystalline basement beneath the Swan Range--a geometry that results in a wedge of eastward-thinning, autochthonous Belt rocks. Distinct fault-plane signatures from the west-dipping, range-bounding Swan fault--produced by extensional collapse of the over-thickened Cordillera--are not successfully imaged. However, reflections from Cenozoic

  14. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  15. Deep seismic reflection profiling of sedimentary basins offshore Brazil: Geological objectives and preliminary results in the Sergipe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohriak, Webster Ueipass; Lira Rabelo, JoséHenrique; De Matos, Renato Darros; De Barros, Mozart C.

    1995-12-01

    The first deep seismic reflection profiles offshore Brazil were acquired in Campos Basin and processed to 10 s TWT in 1984. Starting in 1989, Petrobrás acquired an extensive data set of deep seismic profiles using special acquisition equipment capable of effectively penetrating through the sedimentary layers and imaging the whole crustal architecture. These deep (18 s TWT) seismic reflection profiles extend across the Atlantic-type marginal basins, from the platform to the deepwater province, presently considered frontier regions for petroleum exploration. This work addresses the geological objectives of a deep seismic profile in the Sergipe Basin and discusses the results obtained by integrating regional seismic, gravity and magnetic data. When combined, these data provide evidence that deep seismic reflectors observed in the Sergipe Basin are related to intracrustal-upper mantle structures rather than sedimentary features. The deep seismic reflection profile in the Sergipe Basin also suggests that, rather than a non-volcanic passive margin, the deepwater extension of this basin is marked by several magmatic structures, including thick wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors and volcanic plugs. These magmatic features are associated with basinforming processes resulting from lithospheric extension during the breakup of Gondwana in the Early Cretaceous and subsequent emplacement of oceanic crust. These results are compared to the crustal scale structures observed in the Campos Basin, in the southeastern margin of Brazil. The interpretation of the deep structure of these basins indicates that final separation between the South American and African plates formed passive margins characterized by different patterns of crustal attenuation underlying the rift blocks.

  16. Orogenic structure of the Eastern Alps, Europe, from TRANSALP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüschen, Ewald; Lammerer, Bernd; Gebrande, Helmut; Millahn, Karl; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Transalp Working Group

    2004-09-01

    The TRANSALP Group, comprising of partner institutions from Italy, Austria and Germany, acquired data on a 340 km long deep seismic reflection line crossing the Eastern Alps between Munich and Venice. Although the field work was split into four campaigns, between fall 1998 and summer 2001, the project gathered for the first time a continuous profile across the Alps using consistent field acquisition and data processing parameters. These sections span the orogen itself, at its broadest width, as well as the editor Fred Davey and the two adjacent basins. Vibroseis and explosion data, complementary in their depth penetration and resolution characteristics, were obtained along with wide-angle and teleseismic data. The profile shows a bi-vergent asymmetric structure of the crust beneath the Alpine axis which reaches a maximum thickness of 55 km, and 80-100 km long transcrustal ramps, the southward dipping 'Sub-Tauern-Ramp' and the northward-dipping 'Sub-Dolomites-Ramp'. Strongly reflective patterns of these ramps can be traced towards the north to the Inn Valley and towards the south to the Valsugana thrust belt, both of which show enhanced seismicity in the brittle upper crust. The seismic sections do not reveal any direct evidence for the presence of the Periadriatic Fault system, the presumed equivalent to the Insubric Line in the Western Alps. According to our new evolutionary model, the Sub-Tauern-Ramp is linked at depth with remnants of the subducted Penninic Ocean. The 'crocodile'-type model describes an upper/lower crustal decoupling and wedging of both the European and the Adriatic-African continents.

  17. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  18. Anatomy of Drift Ridges Revealed by Shallow Seismic Shear Wave Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ridges, up to 30 m high and generally oriented NE-SW across the Illinois Episode drift plain in southern Illinois, USA, have been variously interpreted as eskers, crevasse fills, moraines, and kames. The ice contact diamictons and sorted sediments that occur in these ridges are typically Illinois Episode in age and likely record the final melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet near its southernmost extent in the continental U.S. Shallow shear wave seismic profiles across several of these ridges help reveal their complex origins. Borehole control includes sediment cores with shear wave and natural gamma logs. The shear wave profiles reveal m-scale features of drift and bedrock over a depth range of 1 up to 100 m. Terrapin Ridge overlies a bedrock valley with drift up to 70 m thick. Dipping seismic reflectors on the stoss side are interpreted as imbricated till sheets, whereas horizontal reflectors on the lee side are interpreted as mainly outwash sediments over basal till and glacilacustrine sediment. Although most ridges were probably formed during the Illinois Episode, based on current data, the core of this particular ridge may be a remnant moraine from a pre-Illinois Episode glaciation.

  19. Comparison of Active and Passive Seismic Methods for Calculating Shear-wave Velocity Profiles: An Example from Hartford County, Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, S.; Lane, J. W.; Liu, L.; Thomas, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic hazard classifications have been developed for Hartford County, Connecticut based primarily on mapping of surficial materials and depositional environment using criteria specified by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). A study using near-surface seismic techniques to measure shear-wave velocities in Connecticut was initiated in support of broader seismic hazard mapping efforts undertaken by New England State Geologists. Thirty field sites in Hartford County representative of the range of mapped seismic hazard classes were chosen based on the availability of boring logs and adequate open space for the geophysical surveys. Because it can be difficult to acquire multi-channel seismic data in urban areas due to unwanted noise and open space restrictions, we also investigated the use of passive single-station seismometer measurements as a compact supplement and potential alternative to long-offset multi-channel measurements. Here we compare the results of active-source multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic methods to determine shear-wave velocity profiles and seismic hazard classification based on Vs30 in glacial sediments throughout Hartford County, Connecticut. HVSR-derived seismic resonances were used as a constraint during inversion of the MASW dispersion curve to reduce model misfit and improve model comparison to site lithology.

  20. Strike fault links mountain building from top to deep: evidence from the deep seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Wang, H.; Lu, Z.; Wang, C.; Klemperer, S. L.; Yin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of mountains was influenced by large-scale strike-slip faults in Tibet. At the south and north borders of the Tibetan Plateau, the Karakorum and Kunlun strike-slip faults cut the Himalayas and the Kunlun Mountains crust respectively. Based on the detection results of deep seismic reflection profiles, we report the structures of these strike-slip faults and shear deformation depth. The Karakoram fault and Indus-Yarlung suture (IYS) zone are two important structures in southwest and south Tibet, associated with the collision between India and Eurasia. SinoProbe has acquired two deep seismic reflection profiles with 210 km length. The northwestern profile spans 120 km and crosses the southeast part of the Karakoram fault where dextrally sheared mylonite and mylonitized gneiss-granite are exposed along the fault. The southeastern profile spans 90km and crosses the ophiolite belt of the western IYS. Our preliminary images show: Moho reflections appear at ~ 24 s (TWT) beneath both lines. Flower-structures imaged at the Karakoram fault zone are suggestive of strike-slip structure. There are significant differences in lower-crustal structure between the two lines. Many north and south dipping reflections in the lower crust form v-shaped structures along the northwest line. On the southeastern line, there are many north-dipping but few south-dipping reflections in the lower crust. Kunlun seismic profile crosses the active left-slip Kunlun fault, which is ~1000-km long and was inferred to merge downward with a continental subduction zone. The fault was initiated at 15-8 Ma, moved at a rate of 5-16 mm/year, and has a total slip of 65-120 km. The results of our seismic-reflection study across northeastern Tibet show that the actively deforming middle Tibetan crust is dominated by discrete sub-horizontal simple-shear zones that terminate the subvertical, left-slip Kunlun fault above. The flat shear zones appear to act as roof and floor thrusts of large duplex

  1. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  2. Biological activity profiles of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2, D3, D4, D7, and 24-epi-1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, N; Nakagawa, K; Kawamoto, Y; Tachibana, Y; Hayashi, T; Ozono, K; Okano, T

    1999-04-01

    We have synthesized several 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1alpha,25(OH)2D] derivatives and evaluated their biological activity in terms of their binding affinity for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), antiproliferative or differentiation-inducing effects on human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells, and transcriptional activity on a rat 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase gene promoter, including two vitamin D-responsive elements (VDREs), and human osteocalcin gene promoter, including a VDRE in transfected human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. Furthermore, human VDR- or retinoic acid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha)-mediated luciferase activities of the derivatives were also measured by a one-hybrid system in human epitheloid carcinoma, cervix HeLa cells and African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Binding affinity for VDR, bone-resorbing activity, antiproliferative and cell-differentiating effects, transactivation potencies on target genes and VDR- or RXR alpha-mediated gene regulations of 1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D4 were almost comparable to the effects of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 while 24-epi-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D7 were much less active than 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in these respects. This is the first report concerning biological assessment of 1alpha,25(OH)2D2, 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, 1alpha,25(OH)2D4, 24-epi-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 and 1alpha,25(OH)2D7 at the molecular level, especially with regards to the structural differences at the 24R- or 24S-methyl group and a double bond between carbons 22 and 23 in the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)2D derivatives. PMID:10328556

  3. POLCRUST - a deep reflection seismic profile across the Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterch, A.; Malinowski, M.; Maksym, A.; Probulski, J.; Majdański, M.; Narkiewicz, M.; Czuba, W.; Gaczyński, E.; Grad, M.; Janik, T.; Jankowski, L.; Środa, P.

    2012-04-01

    A 240-km long deep reflection seismic profile (called POLCRUST) has been recently acquired in SE Poland. It is the first regional reflection profile ever acquired in the country. It traverses major tectonic units of SE Poland: East European Craton (EEC) with the Lublin Basin, Paleozoic terranes forming the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) (e.g. the Malopolska Block) with the Carpathian Foredeep and finally the young Alpine orogen, i.e. the Carpathians. The data were acquired with state-of-the art parameters (30 m receiver spacing, 60 m shot spacing) and high CDP fold (175). Most of the sources were Vibroseis (4 trucks) with very high source effort (45 s long sweeps). Correlated record length was 30 s. During the reflection data acquisition we also deployed refraction-type recorders (single channel RefTek-125) every 1.2 km along the line in order to record Vibroseis shots and produce common-receiver gather with extended offset range. This piggy-back experiment resulted in seismic sections with offset up to 25-30 km, which is significantly above the nominal offset range of the reflection spread (10 km). Using the refraction measurements we build a first-break tomography model that was used in further seismic imaging. Reflection seismic data were processed commercially. Some post-stack in-house processing was implemented to enhance the deeper part of the data. Signal penetration limit was estimated to range from 20 s in the NE part (EEC) to ca. 15 s in the SW part (Carpathians). For the interpretation of the deep crustal structure we used data from the nearby refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles from the CELEBRATION 2000 experiment (profiles CEL05 and CEL11). Velocity models were used for in-house post-stack migration and depth-conversion of reflection data. The POLCRUST-01 profile portraits the whole sedimentary cover with an unprecedented resolution. For the first time, the full structural setting of the Lublin Basin can be traced. We imaged the extended crust

  4. Active Tectonics of off-Hokuriku, Central Japan, by two ships seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Abe, Susumu; Shiraishi, Kazuya

    2015-04-01

    Along the southern to eastern margin of the Sea of Japan, active faults are densely distributed. These submarine active faults produced tsunami disasters, such as 1983 Nihonkai-chubu earthquake (M7.7) and 1993 Hokkaido Nansei-oki earthquake (M7.8). To estimate tsunami hazards, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling to obtain the information of tsunami source faults, off-Hokuriku area in the central part of Honshu, Japan. The survey is carried out as a part of research project named "the integrated research project on seismic and tsunami hazards around the Sea of Japan" funded by MEXT. To obtain long offset data in busy marine activity area, we used two vessels; a gun-ship with 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable with 156 channels and 480 cu. inch air-gun. Common-midpoint reflection data were acquired using two ships at 4 km offset. The survey area consists of stretched continental crust associated with rifting and opening of the Sea of Japan in early Miocene and is marked by densely distributed syn-rift normal faults. Fault reactivation of normal faults as reverse faults is common. Two phases of fault reactivation are identified from the seismic sections after termination of opening of the Sea of Japan. One is the late Miocene NS trending shortening deformation. This is produced by NS-trending convergence of the Shikoku basin (15 Ma), which belongs to the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) to SW Japan at Nankai trough (Kimura et al., 2005). After the initiation of the subduction of PHS at Nankai trough, the strong shortening deformation is terminated and the fold-and-thrust belt was unconformably covered by sub-horizontal Pliocene sediments. Some horizons of unconformities represent multiple events of shortening driven from the subduction interface. Some normal faults reactivated as active strike-slip and reverse faults in Quaternary. Well observed example is the 2007 Noto peninsula earthquake (M6.8). The 2007 Noto peninsula

  5. Deep seismic investigation of crustal extensional structures in the Danish Basin along the ESTRID-2 profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrin, A.; Thybo, H.

    2008-05-01

    The crust and uppermost mantle in the Danish Basin are investigated by modelling the P-wave velocity distribution along the north-south trending seismic profile ESTRID-2. Seismic tomography and ray inversion modelling demonstrate a variable depth to the top of the crystalline crust, from ~10 km in the northern part of the profile, to ~2 km depth in the southernmost part. The crystalline crust shows very high P-wave velocity in the central part of the profile, with ~6.7 km s-1 at depths as shallow as 12 km, and ~7.3-7.5 km s-1 in the lowermost crust. These values confirm previous results obtained along the orthogonal ESTRID-1 profile and the Eugeno-S profile 2. This high velocity zone in the middle to lower crust is interpreted as a mafic intrusion, which explains a positive gravity anomaly of ~50 mGal (Silkeborg Gravity High). The total length of the intrusion is at least 80 km in the east-west direction and ~25- 35 km in the north-south direction. The estimated thickness of the intrusion, from its top to the Moho level is ~18-20 km, which gives a total minimum volume of ~40-50 000 km3. The reflectivity properties of the Moho discontinuity are variable along the profile. Below the intrusion, the PmP signal is very weak, due to the small velocity contrast between the lowermost crust (~7.4 km s-1) and uppermost mantle (~7.6-7.7 km s-1). The main Moho reflection has a `reverberative' character to the south of the intrusion. This feature is interpreted by layering at the Moho level, possibly due to magmatic underplating. The occurrence of a large crustal mafic intrusion associated with magmatic underplating may be related to extensional/transtensional tectonism in the Tornquist Fan area in the Late Palaeozoic. The extensional event probably caused the opening of a plumbing system for intrusion of mantle derived magma into the crust. The ascending magma may have been injected at upper-middle crustal levels and, during the late phases of the development, `squeezed

  6. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  7. Review of recent results from continental deep seismic profiling in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleby, Bruce R.; Drummond, Barry J.; Korsch, Russell J.; Willcox, J. Barry; O'Brien, Geoffrey W.; Wake-Dyster, Kevin D.

    1994-04-01

    The Australian Geological Survey Organisation regularly collects 450-500 km of onshore deep seismic reflection data and up to 4500 km offshore each year in Australia. These recordings are made in a wide range of tectonic provinces, including, in the last few years, late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic intracontinental and Palaeozoic-Mesozoic-Cenozoic continental margin extensional basins, moderately deformed Palaeozoic transtensional basins and compressional fold belts, and Archaean greenstone terranes. Several of these provinces are major petroleum exploration provinces, whereas others contain significant mineral deposits. The primary purpose of the deep seismic profiling program is to resolve the tectonic history of the Australian continent, and thereby to encourage exploration for hydrocarbons and mineral resources in Australia. On the northwest Australian continental margin, major basin systems including the Bonaparte Basin, formed as a result of complex interactions since the Carboniferous, involving episodes of extension followed by strike-slip movements and inversion, which reactivated both the primary extensional and ancient basement structures. Off southeastern Australia, basins such as the Gippsland Basin formed as part of a linked transtensional system related to movement on a common mid-crustal detachment complex. On continental Australia, the Bowen Basin, in the northeast, was deformed by thrust faults that root in a major E-dipping detachment that flattens in the middle crust. The Cobar Basin, in the southeast, is a case where the seismic data support a detachment model in which the upper plate displacement vector can be calculated by plate reconstructions linking the geometry of the detachment surface with that of the basin. The greenstone terranes within the Eastern Goldfields region of Western Australia show crustal-scale fault systems that are planar and steep dipping, more in keeping with those interpreted in data from other Precambrian provinces rather than

  8. Seismic reflection profile of the Blake Ridge near sites 994, 995, and 997: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Drury, Rebecca M.

    1996-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles near Sites 994, 995, and 997 were collected with seismic sources that provide maximum resolution with adequate power to image the zone of gas hydrate stability and the region direction beneath it. The overall structure of the sediment drift deposit that constitutes the Blake Ridge consists of southwestward-dipping strata. These strata are approximately conformal to the seafloor on the southwest side of the ridge and are truncated by erosion on the northeast side. A bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) marks the velocity contrast between gas hydrate-bearing sediment and regions containing free gas beneath the zone of gas hydrate stability. The BSR is strong and continuous near the ridge crest but becomes discontinuous on the flanks, where concentration of gas is reduced and dipping strata pass through the level of the base o fgas hydrate stability or the strata are disrupted by faults. Seismic reflection amplitudes appear to be reduced in the region of gas hydrate formation compared to normal amplitudes. A faulted zone ~0.5-0.6 s thick parallels reflections from strata. We infer that this may represent a formerly gas hydrate-bearing zone that was faulted because of a breakdown of hydrate near its phase limit (at the base of the zone). Strong reflections at the top of the faulted zone are caused by free-gas acccumulation at Site 994. Similar strong reflections probably are caused by free-gas accumulations where the top of the faulted zone rises above the BSR, although this would require local free gas within the hydrate-stable zone.

  9. A Methodology to Seperate and Analyze a Seismic Wide Angle Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Wolfgang; Kopp, Heidrun

    2010-05-01

    General solutions of inverse problems can often be obtained through the introduction of probability distributions to sample the model space. We present a simple approach of defining an a priori space in a tomographic study and retrieve the velocity-depth posterior distribution by a Monte Carlo method. Utilizing a fitting routine designed for very low statistics to setup and analyze the obtained tomography results, it is possible to statistically separate the velocity-depth model space derived from the inversion of seismic refraction data. An example of a profile acquired in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone reveals the effectiveness of this approach. The resolution analysis of the structural heterogeneity includes a divergence analysis which proves to be capable of dissecting long wide-angle profiles for deep crust and upper mantle studies. The complete information of any parameterised physical system is contained in the a posteriori distribution. Methods for analyzing and displaying key properties of the a posteriori distributions of highly nonlinear inverse problems are therefore essential in the scope of any interpretation. From this study we infer several conclusions concerning the interpretation of the tomographic approach. By calculating a global as well as singular misfits of velocities we are able to map different geological units along a profile. Comparing velocity distributions with the result of a tomographic inversion along the profile we can mimic the subsurface structures in their extent and composition. The possibility of gaining a priori information for seismic refraction analysis by a simple solution to an inverse problem and subsequent resolution of structural heterogeneities through a divergence analysis is a new and simple way of defining a priori space and estimating the a posteriori mean and covariance in singular and general form. The major advantage of a Monte Carlo based approach in our case study is the obtained knowledge of velocity

  10. Crustal Structure across Northeastern Tibet from Seismic Wide Angle Reflection/Refraction Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuyun; Liu, Baofeng; Duan, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    The 2010 Yushu earthquake, located at 33.2°N, 96.6°E at a focal depth of 14 km, was one of the largest earthquakes experienced in the west China since the 2008 Ms8.0 Wenchuan earthquake. This earthquake was one of a series of large recent earthquakes resulting from the northward-moving Indian plate as it uplifts the Tibetan block and causes the eastward extrusion of the Bayan Har active sub-block (Zhang, et al, 2003). A 550 km-long wide-angle reflection/refraction profile which is the densest active source profile in Tibet Plateau up to now executed during July and August 2010. This experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of crust and uppermost mantle beneath the North Tibet Plateau. This seismic profile extends from the Qang Tang block in Central Tibet, through the Bayan Har block, and into the west Qinling fold. We observed clear Pn phase, refraction Phase from mantle in Tibet Plateau. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile. The final velocity model reveals large variations both in structure and velocity, and is demonstrated that a particular model has minimum structure. We find the deepest Moho is deeper than 70 km in Yushu basin and Qang Tang block, and the shallowest Moho is around 60 km in north part of Bayan Har block. This unusual crust thickness with respect to the continental average value of 41 km (Christensen and Mooney, 1995) indicates that the Bayan Har crust may have thickened either homogeneously or by tectonic superposition. Our crustal model also shows that the Bayan Har Moho segment appears indeed as the southward geometrical continuation and this may indicates the Bayan Har Moho would hence extend further south than the location of the Jinsha suture at the surface. We also observe the presence of one low velocity layer or anomalous body in the middle crust along the profile, which may suggest the

  11. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  12. Differences in the Upper Mantle Structure between 'Hot' and 'Cold' Areas in North America based on USArray Seismic Data along California - Virginia Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dec, M.; Sroda, P.; Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M. K.; Perchuc, E.

    2013-12-01

    calculation of a 2D model along the profile using forward and inversion approach. We distinguish three parts in our profile: western - tectonically active, central cratonic - stable one and eastern - tectonically active. The New Madrid Seismic Zone is characterized by an anomalous structure in the lower lithosphere at the offset ~2500km. Very interesting part of the studied area is the marginal part of North American Craton, which separates two tectonically different areas. The seismic P- and S-wave velocity models were inverted for temperature using different mantle composition and anelasticity models. The modelling results are in agreement with those obtained for the strength and the elastic thickness of the lithosphere.

  13. Revealing the deeper structure of the end-glacial Pärvie fault system in northern Sweden by seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, O.; Juhlin, C.; Ask, M.; Lund, B.

    2015-02-01

    Fault scarps that extend up to 155 km and have offsets of tens of meters at the surface are present in the northern parts of Finland, Norway and Sweden. These fault scarps are inferred to have formed during earthquakes with magnitudes up to 8 at the time of the last deglaciation. The Pärvie fault system represents the largest earthquake so far documented in northern Scandinavia, both in terms of its length and its calculated magnitude. It is also the longest known glacially induced fault in the world. Present-day microearthquakes occur along the length of the fault scarp on the eastern side of the scarp, in general agreement with an east dipping main fault. In the central section of the fault, where there is a number of subsidiary faults east of the main fault, it has been unclear how the earthquakes relate to the faults mapped at the surface. A seismic profile across the Pärvie Fault system acquired in 2007, with a mechanical hammer as a source, showed a good correlation between the surface mapped faults and moderate to steeply dipping reflectors. The most pronounced reflector could be mapped to about 3 km depth. In an attempt to map the fault system to deeper levels, a new 22 km long 2-D seismic profile which followed the 2007 line was acquired in June 2014. For deeper penetration an explosive source with a maximum charge size of 8.34 kg in 20 m deep shot holes was used. Reflectors can now be traced to deeper levels with the main 65° east dipping fault interpreted as a weakly reflective structure. As in the previous profile, there is a pronounced strongly reflective 60° west dipping structure present to the east of the main fault that can now be mapped to about 8 km depth. Extrapolations of the main and subsidiary faults converge at a depth of about 11.5 km where current earthquake activity is concentrated, suggesting their intersection has created favorable conditions for seismic stress release. Based on the present and previous seismic reflection data

  14. Two dimensional restoration of seismic reflection profiles from Mozambique: technique for assessing rift extension histories

    SciTech Connect

    Iliffe, J.E.; Debuyl, M.; Kendall, C.G.St.C.; Lerche, I.

    1986-05-01

    Seismic reflection data from offshore Mozambique between longitudes 25/sup 0/ and 26/sup 0/ and latitudes 34/sup 0/ and 35/sup 0/ reveals a V-shaped rift, the apex of which points northward, toward the coast. This study retraces the rift's extensional history by geometric reconstruction of seismic profiles, selected perpendicular to tectonic strike. Depth conversions are performed, followed by bed length and volume balancing to test the interpretations and calculate a total extension value for the extension factor. The sediments are then backstripped in sedimentary sequences, restoring the increments of throw on faults accordingly. After each sequence is removed, the sediments are decompacted in an attempt to recover the original volume prior to the sequence deposition. The extension factor is again calculated. This process is repeated down the sequences until the result is the pre-rift state of the basin. This analysis results in an extension estimate for each sequence-time increment, as a percentage of the total extension. From this method, a detailed crustal extension history is deduced, which, when coupled to the thermal history from subsidence backstripping and paleoheatflow studies, could be used in the basin analysis assessment of the oil potential of this and other rifts.

  15. Bright Spots, Structure, and Magmatism in Southern Tibet from INDEPTH Seismic Reflection Profiling

    PubMed

    Brown; Zhao; Nelson; Hauck; Alsdorf; Ross; Cogan; Clark; Liu; Che

    1996-12-01

    INDEPTH seismic reflection profiling shows that the decollement beneath which Indian lithosphere underthrusts the Himalaya extends at least 225 kilometers north of the Himalayan deformation front to a depth of approximately 50 kilometers. Prominent reflections appear at depths of 15 to 18 kilometers near where the decollement reflector apparently terminates. These reflections extend north of the Zangbo suture to the Damxung graben of the Tibet Plateau. Some of these reflections have locally anomalous amplitudes (bright spots) and coincident negative polarities implying that they are produced by fluids in the crust. The presence of geothermal activity and high heat flow in the regions of these reflections and the tectonic setting suggest that the bright spots mark granitic magmas derived by partial melting of the tectonically thickened crust. PMID:8939852

  16. A simple deep-towed vertical array for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R.; Nuppenau, V.; Weigel, W.; Wong, H. K.

    1986-06-01

    A simple, low cost, deep-towed system for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling is described. It consists of a vertical array with two hydrophones having a separation of 2.2 m and rigidly mounted onto streamlined tow bodies. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is attained by simple stacking of the hydrophone outputs after signal conditioning and travel time corrections. The suppression of side echoes and surface reflections is achieved by an analog procedure which in effect improves the directional characteristics of the array. A circuit for automatic gain control is included to enhance weak signals as well as to suppress ringing. Results in Kiel Bay and over the crest of the Jan Mayen Ridge (northern Atlantic) suggest that this simple vertical array may supplement air gun systems better than conventional, surface pinger-type equipment.

  17. Estimating the Depth of Stratigraphic Units from Marine Seismic Profiles Using Nonstationary Geostatistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chihi, Hayet; Galli, Alain; Ravenne, Christian; Tesson, Michel; Marsily, Ghislain de

    2000-03-15

    The object of this study is to build a three-dimensional (3D) geometric model of the stratigraphic units of the margin of the Rhone River on the basis of geophysical investigations by a network of seismic profiles at sea. The geometry of these units is described by depth charts of each surface identified by seismic profiling, which is done by geostatistics. The modeling starts by a statistical analysis by which we determine the parameters that enable us to calculate the variograms of the identified surfaces. After having determined the statistical parameters, we calculate the variograms of the variable Depth. By analyzing the behavior of the variogram we then can deduce whether the situation is stationary and if the variable has an anisotropic behavior. We tried the following two nonstationary methods to obtain our estimates: (a) The method of universal kriging if the underlying variogram was directly accessible. (b) The method of increments if the underlying variogram was not directly accessible. After having modeled the variograms of the increments and of the variable itself, we calculated the surfaces by kriging the variable Depth on a small-mesh estimation grid. The two methods then are compared and their respective advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as their fields of application. These methods are capable of being used widely in earth sciences for automatic mapping of geometric surfaces or for variables such as a piezometric surface or a concentration, which are not 'stationary,' that is, essentially, possess a gradient or a tendency to develop systematically in space.

  18. Deglaciation of the Central Lake Superior Basin Imaged by High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, S. M.; Breckenridge, A. J.; Wattrus, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lake Superior basin experienced multiple episodes of glaciation, resulting in a variety of glacial deposits and landforms, most of which date to the final retreat of Laurentide ice from the basin. Prominent among these features are moraines and thick glacial lacustrine varve sequences in the central part of the lake. Because these features are now beneath deep water, they can be well imaged by modern marine seismic-reflection methods, providing a variety of insights into glacial processes and history. Two prominent moraines occur east of Isle Royale, and other morainal deposits exist. The prominent moraines are as much as 75 m high, asymmetric, and locally concave down-ice in plan view. They are steeper up-ice than down, but vary in morphology along strike. Air-gun seismic-reflection data show that the moraines are underlain by thick, acoustically massive deposits (till) over a smooth bedrock surface, and that, in front of the moraines, the till grades laterally into increasingly stratified deposits interpreted as glacial lacustrine outwash. Such lateral relations between till and outwash are rarely displayed so well in natural exposures. The moraines relate to the Marquette advance of the Laurentide ice sheet, but they are difficult to directly correlate with the terrestrial deposits used to define that advance. Overlying the till and moraines is a thick sequence of glacial lacustrine varves, which are well imaged by high-resolution CHIRP seismic-reflection profiles. Although the CHIRP data cannot resolve even the thickest of the individual varves, the section comprises distinct acoustic packages. The CHIRP data show that the base of the varve sequence becomes younger to the northeast, the direction of ice retreat. Throughout the varved sequence are lenses of acoustically massive material and local features interpreted as iceberg plow marks, which are especially concentrated at one horizon. Limited 3-D seismic data show the curvilinear plan view of the plough

  19. Improved results by combining reflection seismic profiling with diving wave tomography; three case histories on hi-res hybrid seismic surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, D.; Frei, W.

    2003-04-01

    The performance of high resolution reflection seismic surveys is questionable in areas with poorly defined acoustic impedance contrasts at shallow depths, but is unparalleled for delineating complex structures at greater depths. The salient feature of the diving wave tomography technique is the detailed mapping capability of the velocity field in the near surface depth range, whereas, its resolving power degrades rapidly with increasing depth. We have, for both methods, combined the efforts for the data acquisition and processing with the main objective to compensate the disadvantages of either technique by the benefits of the other. An equally important objective was to render the method routinely applicable in the cost sensitive environment of geotechnical / environmental engineering. The appropriate choice of acquisition parameters is crucial to achieve the spatial data density and recording geometry requirements by either evaluation method. Three case histories illustrate the practical use of the hybrid seismic surveying technique to characterize the shallow subsurface in the depth range of a few tenths of meters. The first example deals with the mapping of subsurface structures in close proximity to a ground failure in an urban environment. Here, both methods produce pieces of information of equivalent importance for the final outcome of the survey. They are truly complementary, since each one alone provides only an incomplete image of the subsurface. The second case study focuses on the determination of the ground water barrier beneath fluviatile sediments contaminated by toxic waste fluids. In the presence of poorly defined acoustic impedance contrasts within the sediments and at the boundary to the intensely weathered Tertiary bedrock, the information provided by the diving wave tomography technique reveals the surface topography of the bedrock with considerably greater precision than the combination of bore holes with solely reflection seismic profiling

  20. Gravity, magnetic, and high-precision relocated seismicity profiles suggest a connection between the Hayward and Calaveras Faults, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. A.; Simpson, R. W.; Graymer, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.

    2004-07-01

    Gravity, magnetic, and seismicity data profiled across the Hayward Fault Zone were generated as part of ongoing studies to help determine the geologic and tectonic setting of the San Francisco Bay region. These data, combined with previous geophysical studies that indicate that the Hayward Fault Zone dips 75°NE near San Leandro and follows a preexisting structure, reveal a possible direct connection between the seismogenic portion of the Hayward and Calaveras Faults at depth. Although the relocated seismicity data are regional in nature, they suggest that the dip of the Hayward Fault Zone may vary from near vertical in the northwestern part of the fault to about 75°NE at San Leandro in the central part of the fault to about 50°NE in the southeastern part of the fault. Gravity and magnetic data, profiled across the Hayward Fault Zone, were processed using standard geophysical techniques. Cross sections of high-precision relocated hypocenters were constructed along each profile from the northwestern to the southeastern end of the Hayward Fault Zone. Profiles and cross sections are referenced to Pinole Point, where the Hayward Fault enters San Pablo Bay, and are spaced 2.5 km apart. Topographic profiles shown on the seismicity cross sections were generated using U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5-min, 30-m digital elevation models. Relocation of seismicity data was accomplished using a regional double-difference method. The double-difference method incorporates ordinary travel time measurements and cross correlation of P and S wave differential travel time measurements. Relative locations between earthquakes have hypocentral errors of about 100 m horizontally and 250 m vertically. Absolute location uncertainties were not determined but are probably dramatically improved compared to the USGS's Northern California Seismic Network catalog data.

  1. Velocity-density models of the Earth's crust and upper mantle from the quartz, Craton, and Kimberlite superlong seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, T. P.; Pavlenkova, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    The unique deep seismic studies carried out in Russia with the use of nuclear explosions provided the possibility to identify the detailed structure of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, and transition zone to the lower mantle to a depth of 700 km in a huge territory of North Eurasia. It is shown that seismic velocities in the upper mantle mainly reflect its temperature regime. The gravity modeling along these profiles showed the absence of a direct relationship between seismic velocity and density. The Siberian Craton, which is marked with a low heat flow and high-velocity mantle, has lower density. The upper mantle of the East European Platform, with almost the same heat flow, is characterized by the highest densities and seismic velocities. Within the West Siberian Plate, high heat flow, lower seismic velocities, and increased density in the upper mantle are revealed. This combination of seismic velocities and densities suggests different composition of the upper mantle beneath the studied structures with the depleted upper mantle beneath the Siberian Craton.

  2. Mapping the megathrust beneath the northern Gulf of Alaska using wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Fisher, M.A.; Plafker, G.; Moses, M.J.; Taber, J.J. ); Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the northern Gulf of Alaska and Prince William Sound, wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiling, earthquake studies, and laboratory measurements of physical properties are used to determine the geometry of the Prince William and Yakutat terranes, and the subducting Pacific plate. In this complex region, the Yakutat terrane is underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane, and both terranes are interpreted to be underlain by the Pacific plate. Wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles recorded along 5 seismic lines are used to unravel this terrane geometry. Modeled velocities in the upper crust of the Prince William terrane (to 18-km depth) agree closely with laboratory velocity measurements of Orca Group phyllites and quartzofeldspathic graywackes (the chief components of the Prince William terrane) to hydrostatic pressures as high as 600 MPa (6 KBAR). An interpretation consistent with these data extends the Prince William terrane to at least 18-km depth. A landward dipping reflection at depths of 16--24 km is interpreted as the base of the Prince William terrane. This reflector corresponds to the top of the Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity and is interpreted as the megathrust. Beneath this reflector is a 6.9-km/s refractor, that is strongly reflective and magnetic, and is interpreted to be gabbro in Eocene age oceanic crust of the underthrust Yakutat terrane. Both wide-angle seismic and magnetic anomaly data indicate that the Yakutat terrane has been underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane for at least a few hundred kilometers. Wide-angle seismic data are consistent with a 9 to 10[degree] landward dip of the subducting Pacific plate, distinctly different from the inferred average 3 to 4[degree] dip of the overlying 6.9-km/s refractor and Wadati-Benioff seismic zone. The preferred interpretation of the geophysical data is that one composite plate, composed of the Pacific and Yakutat plates, is subducting beneath southern Alaska.

  3. The brain gene expression profile of dopamine D2/D3 receptors and associated signaling proteins following amphetamine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Calipari, E S; Beveridge, T J R; Jones, S R; Chen, R

    2015-10-29

    Persistent neuroadaptations following chronic psychostimulant exposure include reduced striatal dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) levels. The signaling of D2Rs is initiated by Gαi/o proteins and terminated by regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins. The purpose of this study is to examine the association of the drug taking behavior and gene expression profile of D2/D3Rs, and their associated signaling proteins in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) using a rodent model of amphetamine (AMPH) self-administration. Rats were allowed to self-administer AMPH (0.187 mg/kg/infusion for a maximum of 40 injections in 6h daily sessions) for 5 days during which rats showed an escalated rate of AMPH intake across days. AMPH self-administration induced profound brain region-dependent alterations of the targeted genes. There was a positive correlation of the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of RGS10 between the VTA and the NAc in the control animals, which was abolished by AMPH self-administration. AMPH self-administration also produced a negative correlation of the mRNA levels of RGS7 and RGS19 between the two brain regions, which was not present in the control group. Furthermore, AMPH taking behavior was associated with changes in certain gene expression levels. The mRNA levels of RGS2 and RGS4 in both the VTA and NAc were positively correlated with the rate of AMPH intake. Additionally, the rate of AMPH intake was also positively correlated with RGS10 and negatively correlated with RGS17 and the short form of D2Rs mRNA level in the VTA. Although there were significant changes in the mRNA levels of RGS7 and RGS8 in the NAc, none of these measures were correlated with the rate of AMPH intake. The present study suggested that short-term AMPH self-administration produced pronounced changes in the VTA that were more associated with AMPH taking behavior than changes in the NAc. PMID:26321241

  4. First results of a new seismic profile across the southwestern Alps, CIFALPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Paul, Anne; Solarino, Stefano; Aubert, Coralie; Zheng, Tianyu; Salimbeni, Simone; Guillot, Stéphane; Wang, Qingchen; Ai, Yinshuang; Zangelmi, Pierre; He, Yumei; Lainé, Romain; Chen, Ling; Xu, Weiwei; Lin, Wei; Margheriti, Lucia; Pondrelli, Silvia; Zhu, Rixiang

    2013-04-01

    Though the Alps is the most studied mountain belt by geologists, a number of questions on its dynamics remain open due to the lack of detailed data on its lithospheric and sublithospheric structure. This is particular true for the very arcuate southwestern part of the belt. In order to improve images of the crust and upper mantle beneath the southwestern Alps, we (IGGCAS, ISTerre and INGV) have installed a temporary broadband seismic array across the belt from the Rhone valley (France) to the Po plain (Italy). The main sub-array of the CIFALPS (China-Italy-France Alps seismic survey) project is a 350-km long roughly linear profile of 46 stations trending WSW-ENE from Bollène (France) to north of Alessandria (Italy). Its average station spacing is smaller than 10 km, with a densification to 5 km in the internal Alps. Nine additional temporary stations located ~40 km to the north and south of the main profile complement the permanent broadband networks to improve the 3-D constraints on the deep structures. Stations are equipped with Nanometrics Taurus data acquisition systems, and Trillium 120P/A, CMG3-ESP or CMG40T broadband sensors. The array was installed in the summer of 2012 and will be operated at least to April 2013. Quality-control analysis of the 4 to 5 months of data recorded till December 2012 shows that data quality is good, especially on the vertical component. We used this first part of the dataset to compute receiver functions, estimate shear-wave splitting from SKS phases and Rayleigh wave velocity dispersion from ambient noise correlations. A preliminary common-conversion point migrated receiver function section displays a strong Moho P-to-S conversion beneath the western end of the profile, which weakens gradually from west to east. The European Moho can hardly be traced beneath the internal Alps. As expected, the complex crustal structure of the internal zones leads to intricate converted phases. We confirm that the major fast polarization

  5. Seismic Refraction Profiles Across Shear Zones: What Can We Expect To See ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, H.-M.; Levander, A. R.

    In recent years more high-resolution refraction / wide-angle reflection data sets have been recorded to elucidate our picture of the Earth. For the 1999 seismic refraction/ wide-angle reflection CDROM profile more than 1200 stations were deployed be- tween New Mexico and Wyoming (Southern Rocky Mountain Region) at an average receiver spacing of 800m. A ray tracing code was used to analyse the data set. Though we have a good velocity model for the crust with a vertical resolution of less than 1km for the sediments and circa 2km at Moho depths, explaing more than 90% of the travel time data, we still find features we cannot explain by ray tracing only. One of those is the influence of shear zones on seismic sections. It is well known that the CDROM profile crosses many shear zones which formed in Phanerozoic time or even earlier. Therefore we test this idea in the following study. A two-dimensional visco-elastic finite-difference code was used to calculate synthetic seismogramms. Several models were created. The shear zone was realized as an elongate tabular body with velocities reduced at a constant percentage relative to the positive linear velocity gradient back- ground model. Variable parameters were the thickness of the shear zone, the relative location to the source, the dip angle and the velocity reduction within the shear zone relative to the background model. Recorder spacing was chosen to be comparable to the CDROM wide-angle data set and the source was located along the profile. Beside the normal first arrivals the synthetic seismogramms show diffuse arrivals between the front and back shear zone reflections. The time difference between front and back reflections depends on the shear zone thickness and the amplitudes on the velocity contrast. This band of arrivals comes in steeply crossing other reflections, thus creat- ing ambiguties in the data. A small influence on the first arrivals is seen as well, but might not be resolvable in field data. Varying

  6. Crustal Structure across The Southwest Longmenshan Fault Zone from Seismic Wide Angle Reflection/Refraction Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuyun; Wang, Shuaijun; Duan, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    The Lushan eathquake, which epicenter and focal depth were at 30.308° N, 102.888° E, and 14.0 km, is the latest intense earthquake occurring in the southwest section of the Longmenshan fault zone after the Ms 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008. According to the emergency field observations, the slip distribution of the Lushan earthquake was concentrated at the hypocenter, and did not rupture to the surface(Chen et al, 2013). The rupture history constrained by inverting waveforms showed that the causative fault plane of the Lushan event is apparently not a simple extension of either the Pengguan fault or the Beichuan fault that ruptured during the 2008 Mw 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake. The focal mechanism using the Cut and Paste algorithm showed this event occurred on a high dip-angle fault, but its dip angle is not steep enough to rupture the surface. All these research is not independent on the heterogeneous crust structure of the Longmenshan fault zone. A 450 km-long wide-angle reflection/refraction profile executed during September and October 2013. This experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Southwest Longmenshan fault zone. This seismic profile extends from the west Sichuan Plain, through the Longmenshan Fault zone, and into the west Sichuan Plateau. We observed clear Pg, refraction Phase from the upper crust, Pi1/Pi2/Pi3, reflection/refraction Phase from intra-crust, PmP, reflection from the Moho boundary, and the Pn phase, refraction Phase from uppermost mantle. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile. The final velocity model reveals large variations both in structure and velocity, and is demonstrated that a particular model has minimum structure. The model shows the crustal thickness of the region is very variable. The Moho topography varies more than 10km in the southwest

  7. Creating realistic models and resolution assessment in tomographic inversion of wide-angle active seismic profiling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupina, T.; Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2009-04-01

    We consider questions of creating structural models and resolution assessment in tomographic inversion of wide-angle active seismic profiling data. For our investigations, we use the PROFIT (Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling) algorithm which was tested earlier with different datasets. Here we consider offshore seismic profiling data from three areas (Chile, Java and Central Pacific). Two of the study areas are characterized by subduction zones whereas the third data set covers a seamount province. We have explored different algorithmic issues concerning the quality of the solution, such as (1) resolution assessment using different sizes and complexity of synthetic anomalies; (2) grid spacing effects; (3) amplitude damping and smoothing; (4) criteria for rejection of outliers; (5) quantitative criteria for comparing models. Having determined optimal algorithmic parameters for the observed seismic profiling data we have created structural synthetic models which reproduce the results of the observed data inversion. For the Chilean and Java subduction zones our results show similar patterns: a relatively thin sediment layer on the oceanic plate, thicker inhomogeneous sediments in the overlying plate and a large area of very strong low velocity anomalies in the accretionary wedge. For two seamounts in the Pacific we observe high velocity anomalies in the crust which can be interpreted as frozen channels inside the dormant volcano cones. Along both profiles we obtain considerable crustal thickening beneath the seamounts.

  8. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  9. Large-Scale, Virtual Seismic Profiles: New Technique and Results from Tibet and Northern China (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Yu, C.; Ning, J.; Tseng, T.

    2010-12-01

    We developed a new approach of constructing deep-penetrating seismic profiles using earthquake-sources and successfully applied this technique over distances of up to 1,000 km in two geologically important regions. Along a north-south trending profile across southern and central Tibet, there are significant, regional variations in crustal thickness under near-constant elevation (~ 5 km above sea-level) over a distance of 550 km. The crust is as thick as 75 km in southern Tibet but shoals to just over 60 km under the Qiangtang terrane in central Tibet where the deviation from Airy isostasy is equivalent to a thickness of over 10 km in missing crust. Northward thinning of crust occurs gradually over a distance of about 200 km where mechanical deformation, instead of pervasive magmatism, also seems to have disrupted the crust-mantle interface. Over a distance of nearly 1,000 km, an east-west trending profile, extending over the North China craton, across the active Shanxi rift, and over the Ordos plateau, also reveals intriguing changes in crustal thickness, almost by a factor of two over a distance of only about 100 km, which do not correlate well with topography. These examples demonstrate the power of this new approach which has some unique advantages: 1) Deep-penetration is virtually certain given the broadband nature and great power of earthquake-sources, and very large amplitude of wide-angle reflections, 2) low cost of operations, 3) negligible impact on the environment during field deployment, and 4) the same dataset is valuable for many other applications for basic research.

  10. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiling on the R/V Maurice Ewing during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Clayton, Robert W.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Sliter, Ray; McRaney, John K.; Gardner, James V.; Keene, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    -beam swath Hydrosweep bathymetry, magnetics, and gravity data. In this report, we describe the equipment and procedures used to acquire multichannel seismic-reflection and other geophysical data aboard the Ewing, provide a detailed cruise narrative, discuss the reduction of the data, and present near-trace constant offset seismic sections of the acquired profiles.

  11. Early origins of the Caribbean plate from deep seismic profiles across the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the maritime zones of Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Colombia covers a combined area of 500,000 km2, and is one of the least known equatorial Cretaceous-Cenozoic carbonate regions remaining on Earth. The purpose of this study is to describe the Cretaceous to Recent tectonic and stratigraphic history of the deep water Nicaraguan Rise, and to better understand how various types of crustal blocks underlying the Eocene to Recent carbonate cover fused into a single, larger Caribbean plate known today from GPS studies. We interpreted 8700 km of modern, deep-penetration 2D seismic data kindly provided by the oil industry, tied to five wells that penetrated Cretaceous igneous basement. Based on these data, and integration with gravity, magnetic and existing crustal refraction data, we define four crustal provinces for the offshore Nicaraguan Rise: 1) Thicker (15-18 km) Late Cretaceous Caribbean ocean plateau (COP) with rough, top basement surface; 2) normal (6-8 km) Late Cretaceous COP with smooth top basement surface (B") and correlative outcrops in southern Haiti and Jamaica; 3) Precambrian-Paleozoic continental crust (20-22 km thick) with correlative outcrops in northern Central America; and 4) Cretaceous arc crust (>18 km thick) with correlative outcrops in Jamaica. These strongly contrasting basement belts strike northeastward to eastward, and were juxtaposed by latest Cretaceous-Paleogene northward and northwestward thrusting of Caribbean arc over continental crust in Central America, and the western Nicaraguan Rise (84 to 85 degrees west). A large Paleogene to recent, CCW rotation of the Caribbean plate along the Cayman trough faults and into its present day location explains why terranes in Central America and beneath the Nicaraguan Rise have their present, anomalous north-east strike. Continuing, present-day activity on some of these crustal block boundaries is a likely result of intraplate stresses imposed by the surrounding

  12. Signatures of periodicity and randomness in the angular emission profile of a 2-D on-average periodic optofluidic random laser.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Shivakiran Bhaktha, B N

    2015-11-01

    Angle-dependent emission from a dye infiltrated 2-D on-average periodic structured optofluidic random laser is studied. Distinct signatures of periodicity and randomness are observed in the angle-resolved emission spectra of the device. Emission patterns composed of concentric ellipses are observed on transverse excitation of the device, attributed to the in-plane diffraction of light by a 2-D square lattice. The effect of randomness on the emission spectra is demonstrated by a highly resolved angle-dependent spectral scan of a single diffraction fringe. Finally, we conclude that the randomness in the size of the scatterers resolves the random lasing modes angularly. PMID:26512491

  13. A bayesian approach for determining velocity and uncertainty estimates from seismic cone penetrometer testing or vertical seismic profiling data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pidlisecky, A.; Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional processing methods for seismic cone penetrometer data present several shortcomings, most notably the absence of a robust velocity model uncertainty estimate. We propose a new seismic cone penetrometer testing (SCPT) data-processing approach that employs Bayesian methods to map measured data errors into quantitative estimates of model uncertainty. We first calculate travel-time differences for all permutations of seismic trace pairs. That is, we cross-correlate each trace at each measurement location with every trace at every other measurement location to determine travel-time differences that are not biased by the choice of any particular reference trace and to thoroughly characterize data error. We calculate a forward operator that accounts for the different ray paths for each measurement location, including refraction at layer boundaries. We then use a Bayesian inversion scheme to obtain the most likely slowness (the reciprocal of velocity) and a distribution of probable slowness values for each model layer. The result is a velocity model that is based on correct ray paths, with uncertainty bounds that are based on the data error. ?? NRC Research Press 2011.

  14. MULTI-FOLD, SEISMIC-STYLE TDEM INDUCTION OFFSET PROFILING AT KENTLAND FARMS, VA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazlauskas, E. M.; Weiss, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    An outstanding question in Valley and Ridge geology is the geomorphological history and hydrologic framework of the New River terraces. And while depth to bedrock on the upper terraces remains unknown, knowledge of the bedrock interface is key to addressing two specific issues: What is the geometry and connectivity of karst features such as sinkholes and what is the structure and depositional history of these terraces? To answer these questions, Kentland Farms (located in the Valley and Ridge of Southwest Virginia) has been chosen as the study site for its exceptional development of terrace deposits, nearly unrestricted access to its grounds, sparse vegetation coverage, and numerous sinkholes with a clear topographic expression. The Kentland Farms study area is characterized by heavily weathered, fluvial terrace deposits ranging from a few meters thickness to an estimated 70 m, overlying a karstic, Cambrian aged Elbrook Formation limestone. The terrace deposits consist of weathered clay units of varying composition with interbedded cobble and gravel horizons. The nature of the underlying bedrock coupled with the complex structure of the terrace deposits present difficulties in location of the bedrock interface. Due to complicated geology, a novel, multi-fold, seismic-style, Time Domain Electromagnetic (TDEM) induction survey was conducted in order to provide a more robust data set than a traditional common offset survey as well as to increase lateral resolution. This approach consists of taking multiple transmitter “shots” at a fixed position with a spread of receiver locations at fixed offset intervals (10m in this survey). The procedure is then repeated by moving the transmitter one interval at a time until the line is complete. 1-D inversions generated by using different transmitter-receiver offsets were analyzed to create a set of laterally constrained vertical profiles. In addition, multi-fold, seismic-style TDEM induction offset profiling allowed for

  15. Moho depth variations beneath China continent from deep seismic sounding profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jiwen; Zhang, Zhongjie; Zhang, Yongqian; Pi, Jiaolong; Deng, Yangfan; Zhang, Xiankang; Wang, Chunyong; Gao, Rui; Liu, Cai

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of Moho depth and crustal structure are required to study and explore the deep process and coupling response of the formation of mountains, basins, rocks and disasters. In the past half century, the geophysicists in China have completed more than 130 seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles with a total length of 60000km and 11 global geosciences transections (GGT) in China. In this study, we aim to make a systematic research into the Moho depth and crustal structure in China based on the data of velocity models of the crust and upper mantle derived from these more than 130 wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in the last 50 years in China and the surrounding areas. With advanced interpolation technique, we obtain Moho map and average P-wave velocity model, and then make the study on the variations in Moho depth and crustal structure in different tectonics in the East Asia. According to our research results, the resultant Moho depth ranges within 10 and 80 km, and is featured with the deepest Moho discontinuity of about 70-85km beneath Tibetan plateau formed by ongoing continent-continent collision; and relatively constant 30-35 km beneath the eastern North China craton enduring destruction of Lithosphere destruction. Also, we analyzed the average crustal thickness of the consolidated crust beneath the three cratons in China, which is characterized by a gradual thickening from east to west with the values of 29~47 km beneath North-China craton (east), 30~56 km beneath Yangtze craton (south) and 42~59 km beneath Tarim craton (west). In addition, there are three major fold tectonic units in the continental domain and the adjacent oceanic areas, namely the Tethyan-Himalayan zone (south and west), the Paleo-Asian zone (northwest and northeast) and the Circum-Pacific zone (east), which in turn are subdivided into 15 orogenic zones. The Moho depth in these 15 orogenic zones is quite different, too.

  16. Chemical analysis of solid materials by a LIMS instrument designed for space research: 2D elemental imaging, sub-nm depth profiling and molecular surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B.; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Direct quantitative chemical analysis with high lateral and vertical resolution of solid materials is of prime importance for the development of a wide variety of research fields, including e.g., astrobiology, archeology, mineralogy, electronics, among many others. Nowadays, studies carried out by complementary state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Glow Discharge Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GD-TOF-MS) or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide extensive insight into the chemical composition and allow for a deep understanding of processes that might have fashioned the outmost layers of an analyte due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Nonetheless, these investigations typically employ equipment that is not suitable for implementation on spacecraft, where requirements concerning weight, size and power consumption are very strict. In recent years Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) has re-emerged as a powerful analytical technique suitable not only for laboratory but also for space applications.[1-3] Its improved performance and measurement capabilities result from the use of cutting edge ultra-short femtosecond laser sources, improved vacuum technology and fast electronics. Because of its ultimate compactness, simplicity and robustness it has already proven to be a very suitable analytical tool for elemental and isotope investigations in space research.[4] In this contribution we demonstrate extended capabilities of our LMS instrument by means of three case studies: i) 2D chemical imaging performed on an Allende meteorite sample,[5] ii) depth profiling with unprecedented sub-nm vertical resolution on Cu electrodeposited interconnects[6,7] and iii) preliminary molecular desorption of polymers without assistance of matrix or functionalized substrates.[8] On the whole

  17. The application of vertical seismic profiling and cross-hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Tura, M.A.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1990-01-01

    In order to obtain the necessary characterization for the storage of nuclear waste, much higher resolution of the features likely to affect the transport of radionuclides will be required than is normally achieved in conventional surface seismic reflection used in the exploration and characterization of petroleum and geothermal resources. Because fractures represent a significant mechanical anomaly seismic methods using are being investigated as a means to image and characterize the subsurface. Because of inherent limitations in applying the seismic methods solely from the surface, state-of-the-art borehole methods are being investigated to provide high resolution definition within the repository block. Therefore, Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and cross-hole methods are being developed to obtain maximum resolution of the features that will possible affect the transport of fluids. Presented here will be the methods being developed, the strategy being pursued, and the rational for using VSP and crosshole methods at Yucca Mountain. The approach is intended to be an integrated method involving improvements in data acquisition, processing, and interpretation as well as improvements in the fundamental understanding of seismic wave propagation in fractured rock. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Down-hole seismic survey system with fiber-optic accelerometer sensor array for 3-dimensions vertical seismic profile (3D-VSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qilin; Wang, Liwei; Pang, Meng; Tu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Min; Liao, Yanbiao

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrated a down-hole seismic survey system that can be applied in three dimensions vertical seismic profile (VSP) detection in petroleum exploration. The results of experiments show that the system has a dynamic measurement range of 80db (ratio of maximum to minimum value) and the total delay for signal collection, process and communication is less than 200ms @ 2k bit sample rates. An array consisting of six fiber-optic accelerometers (receivers) is applied in this system. Each receiver is comprised of three fiber-optic Michelson interferometers. In order to meet the requirements of high precision and real-time measurement, the high-speed DSP chips are employed to realize the algorithms of signal filters and Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation to obtain the seismic information. Multi-ARM CPUs are introduced into the system to design the fiber-optic accelerometer array controller and the receiver array local bus that are used for real-time data communication between the multi-level receivers and controller. The system interface for traditional ELIS Down-hole Instrument Bus (EDIB) is designed by the use of FPGA so that our system can attach to EDIB and cooperate with other instruments. The design and experiments of the system are given in this paper in detail.

  19. Seismic anisotropy in gas-hydrate- and gas-bearing sediments on the Blake Ridge, from a walkaway vertical seismic profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pecher, I.A.; Holbrook, W.S.; Sen, M.K.; Lizarralde, D.; Wood, W.T.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Dillon, William P.; Hoskins, H.; Stephen, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of anisotropy in marine sediments using walkaway vertical seismic profiles from the Blake Ridge, offshore South Carolina. We encountered transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical symmetry axis in a gas-hydrate-bearing unit of clay and claystone with Thomsen parameters ?? = 0.05 ?? 0.02 and ?? = 0.04 ?? 0.06. TI increased to ?? = 0.16 ?? 0.04 and ?? = 0.19 ?? 0.12 in the underlying gas zone. Rock physics modeling suggests that the observed TI is caused by a partial alignment of clay particles rather than high-velocity gas-hydrate veins. Similarly, the increase of TI in the gas zone is not caused by thin low-velocity gas layers but rather, we speculate, by the sharp contrast between seismic properties of an anisotropic sediment frame and elongated gas-bearing pore voids. Our results underscore the significance of anisotropy for integrating near-vertical and wide-angle seismic data.

  20. Saudi Arabian seismic-refraction profile: A traveltime interpretation of crustal and upper mantle structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, W.D.; Gettings, M.E.; Blank, H.R.; Healy, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle compressional-wave velocity structure across the southwestern Arabian Shield has been investigated by a 1000-km-long seismic refraction profile. The profile begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, trends southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan, and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, and six shot points were used, including one in the Red Sea. Two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques, used to analyze amplitude-normalized record sections indicate that the Arabian Shield is composed, to first order, of two layers, each about 20 km thick, with average velocities of about 6.3 km/s and 7.0 km/s, respectively. West of the Shield-Red Sea margin, the crust thins to a total thickness of less than 20 km, beyond which the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain are interpreted to be underlain by oceanic crust. A major crustal inhomogeneity at the northeast end of the profile probably represents the suture zone between two crustal blocks of different composition. Elsewhere along the profile, several high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust correlate with mapped gneiss domes, the most prominent of which is the Khamis Mushayt gneiss. Based on their velocities, these domes may constitute areas where lower crustal rocks have been raised some 20 km. Two intracrustal reflectors in the center of the Shield at 13 km depth probably represent the tops of mafic intrusives. The Mohorovic??ic?? discontinuity beneath the Shield varies from a depth of 43 km and mantle velocity of 8.2 km/s in the northeast to a depth of 38 km and mantle velocity of 8.0 km/s depth in the southwest near the Shield-Red Sea transition. Two velocity discontinuities occur in the upper mantle, at 59 and 70 km depth. The crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Arabian Shield is

  1. Seismic-reflection profiles of the central part of the Clarendon-Linden fault system of western New York in relation to regional seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fakundiny, R.H.; Pomeroy, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Geological and geophysical research in upstate New York, with few exceptions, has not definitively associated seismicity with specific Proterozoic basement or Paleozoic bedrock structures. The central part of the Clarendon-Linden fault system (CLFS) between Batavia and Dale, NY is one of those exceptions where seismicity has been studied and has been spatially associated with structure. The CLFS is either a complex system of long faults with associated shorter branches and parallel segments, or a region of many short faults aligned north-south from the Lake Ontario shore southward to Allegany County, NY. Interpretation of 38 km of Vibroseis and approximately 56 km of conventional seismic-reflection data along 13 lines suggests that the CLFS is a broad zone of small faults with small displacements in the lower Paleozoic bedrock section that is at least 77 km long and 7-17 km wide and spatially coincident with a northtrending geophysical (combined aeromagnetic and gravity) lineament within the basement. The relative offset across the faults of the system is more than 91 m near Attica, NY. The CLFS is the expression of tectonic crustal adjustments within the Paleozoic rock above the boundary of two basement megablocks of differing petrologic provinces and differing earthquake characteristics that forms the eastern side of the Elzevir-Frontenac boundary zone. Deep seismic-reflection profiles display concave-eastward listric faults that probably merge at depth near the mid-crustal boundary layer. An interpretive vertical section provides the setting for refined definitions of the CLFS, its extensions at depth and its relation to seismicity. Most modern seismicity in western New York and the Niagara Peninsula of Ontario occurs in apparent patterns of randomly dispersed activity. The sole exception is a line of seven epicenters of small earthquakes that trend east from Attica, NY into the Rochester basement megablock. Earthquakes may be triggered at the intersections of

  2. Seismotectonics and Seismic Structure of the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean - Constraints from Local Earthquake Monitoring and Seismic Refraction and Wide-Angle Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchters, W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Ranero, C. R.; Villasenor, A.; Booth-Rea, G.; Gallart, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Alboran Basin is located in the western-most Mediterranean Sea and is surrounded by the Gibraltar-Betic and Rif orogenic arc. Geological evidence suggests that the most important phase of formation started in the early-to-mid-Miocene. Currently two conflicting models are discussed for its formation: One model proposes contractive tectonics producing strike-slip faults and folds with sedimentation occurring in synclinal basins and in regions of subsidiary extension in transtensional fault segments. A second model proposes slab roll back that caused contraction at the front of the arc and coeval overriding plate bending and extension and associated arc magmatism. However, this phase has been partially masked by late Miocene to present contractive structures, caused by the convergence of Africa and Iberia. Two German/Spanish collaborative research projects provided excellent new seismological and seismic data. Onshore/offshore earthquake monitoring received a wealth of local earthquake data to study seismotectonics and yielded the average 1D velocity structure of the Alboran/Betics/Rif domain. In the Alboran Basin most earthquakes occur below 20 km along a diffuse fault zone, crossing the Alboran Sea from the Moroccan to the Spanish coast. Further, earthquakes along the northern portion of the Alboran Ridge show thrust mechanisms and compression roughly normal to the vector of plate convergence between Africa and Iberia. A 250 km long seismic refraction and wide-angle profile was acquired coincident with the existing multi-channel seismic (MCS) ESCI-Alb2 line using the German research vessel Meteor. Shots fired with a 64-litre airgun array were recorded on 24 ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) and ocean-bottom hydrophone (OBH) stations. The profile run roughly along the axis of the basin, circa 65 km off the coast of Morocco, north of the Alboran Ridge. It continues in an ENE direction to end north of the Algeria coast. Using seismic tomography we mapped the crustal

  3. Structure and evolution of the seismically active Ostler Fault Zone (New Zealand) based on interpretations of multiple high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Fiona M.; Ghisetti, Francesca; Kaiser, Anna E.; Green, Alan G.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Gorman, Andrew R.

    2010-12-01

    To improve our understanding of active faulting away from the main plate boundary on New Zealand's South Island, we have acquired high resolution seismic data across the Ostler Fault Zone Twelve 1.2 km long lines perpendicular to fault strike and a 1.6 km long crossline were collected in a region of the MacKenzie Basin where surface mapping delineates significant complexity in the form of two non-overlapping reverse fault strands separated by a transfer zone characterised by multiple smaller strands and increased folding. Interpretation of the resultant images includes a 45-55° west-dipping principal fault and two 25-30° west-dipping subsidiary faults, one in the hanging wall and one in the footwall of the principal fault. The geologically mapped complexities are shown to be caused by shallow variations in the structure of the principal fault, which breaks the surface in the north and south but not within the transfer zone, where it forms a triangle zone with associated backthrusting and minor faulting. These complexities only extend to ~ 300 m depth. Structures below this level are markedly simpler and much more 2D in nature, with the principal fault strand extending over a much longer distance than the individual strands observed at the surface. Since longer faults are susceptible to larger earthquakes than shorter ones, seismic hazard at the study site may be higher than previously thought. Multiple surface fault strands that give way to a single more major stand at relatively shallow depths may be a common feature of segmented fault systems. The deepest layered reflections at our site are consistent with the presence of a Late Cretaceous (?)-Tertiary basin underlying the present-day MacKenzie Basin. Structural restoration of the seismic images back to the base of Quaternary fluvioglacial terraces and back to the top of a Late Pliocene-Pleistocene fluviolacustrine unit indicate that compression was initiated prior to the Late Pliocene and that it has continued

  4. Multichannel seismic profiles collected by the Teledyne Exploration Company in 1977 south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Lewis E.; Dillon, William P.

    1981-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) collected approximately 3,700 km of multichannel-seismic reflection profiles (lines TD-1 – TD-6) south of Cape Hatteras on the continental margin (fig. 1). Those profiles were collected between August 15 and October 30, 1977, under U.S.G.S. contract number 14-08-0001-16209 by the Teledyne Exploration Company. The released data include copies of the original records, velocity scans, track charts, and field tapes.

  5. A Seismic Reflection Profiling Survey of Lake Toba, Sumatra, Indonesia: Preliminary Findings from the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.; Dolan, M. T.; Halsor, S. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Liu, J.; Nasution, A.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Toba lies within the giant Toba Caldera that last erupted 74,000 years ago. In its early history, Lake Toba may have covered about 1800 km2, possibly reaching depths of 750 m. The central portion of the 100 x 30 km caldera has since been uplifted to form the asymmetrical Samosir Island resurgent dome (60 x 20 km). Its upper surface dips gently to the west while its eastern margin consists of a series of parallel normal faults with total displacement of at least 1100 m. Several lava domes have been emplaced along these faults as well as the southwestern caldera ring fracture. At least 30 m of laminated tuffaceous sand and silt, diatomaceous clay, diatomites, and volcanic ash cover Samosir Island and sediments up to 100 m have been reported. In an effort to understand the post-collapse sedimentation, structural, volcanic, and resurgent histories of the caldera, we conducted a 14 day seismic reflection profiling survey of Lake Toba in July/August 2012. An EdgeTech SB-512i "chirp" sonar unit was towed across about 900 km of transect lines. Signal penetration was not affected by water depth, which sometimes exceeded 500 m, but was often reduced by adverse tow conditions or strong stratigraphic reflectors, and occasionally lost altogether possibly due to gas pockets in the sediments. In areas of flat-lying or gently sloping lake bottom, about 10-30 m of lake sediments was typically detected. Along the steep caldera bounding faults and the faulted eastern margin of the Samosir resurgent dome virtually no sediments were detected. However, up to 90 m of laminated sediments were apparent on the crest and gently sloping submerged portions of Samosir. These thick sedimentary sequences showed distinct marker horizons with evidence of faulting, folding, sliding, and slumping. Local unconformities or onlapping sequences demonstrated discrete sedimentary episodes. Several subaqueous lava domes were discovered that uplifted, folded, and sometimes truncated the sedimentary

  6. Basin formation and inversion of the back-arc, Niigata basin, central Japan: New insight from deep seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Susumu; Kawai, Nobuo; Saito, Hideo; Kato, Naoko; Shiraishi, Kazuya; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Fukasawa, Hikaru; Inaba, Mitsuru

    2010-05-01

    Associated with the opening of the Japan Sea, rift-basins have been developed along the Japan Sea coast of northern Honshu. The Niigata basin, central Japan, is one of the such basins and filled by thick (< 8 km) Neogene sediments. By subsequent convergence since the Pliocene, an arc-parallel fold-and-thrust-belt has been developed along the Miocene rift-basins. In this belt devastative earthquakes, such as 1964 Niigata (M7.4), 2004 Chuetsu (M6.8) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki (M6.8) earthquakes, occurred by reverse faulting. Due to thick Neogene sediments, relationship between active faults/folds at near the surface and deep-sited seismogenic source faults is poorly understood. To reveal the crustal structure, in particular geometry of source faults, onshore-offshore integrated deep seismic profiling was undertaken along the two seismic lines in 2008 and 2009. The 2009 Aizu-Sado seismic line is a 135-km-long, onshore-offshore seismic line across Niigata basin and Sado island, which is located in the eastern part of Japan Sea. The 2008 Sanjo-Yahiko seismic line (Sato et al., 2009) is located 20 km south of the seismic line and trending parallel to it. The seismic source was air-gun (3020 cu. inch), four vibroseis trucks and explosives (< 200kg). Along the Sado strait, seismic data was acquired using two-ships to make large offset shot gather. Seismic signals were recorded by ocean bottom cables, cable-connected-recording system and offline recorders, forming a maximum 2400 channels receiver array. The basin fill consists of early to middle Miocene volcaniclastic rocks and overlying Neogene sedimentary rocks showing upward coarsening facies deposited under bathyal to fluvial environment. Main features of basin development, such as early Miocene normal faulting, associated with the formation of Japan Sea, and shortening deformation since Pliocene, are well demonstrated on the seismic sections. Particularly, boundary between pre-Tertiary meta-sedimentary rocks and Miocene

  7. Subsurface structure along the eastern marginal fault zone of Yokote Basin by Seismic reflection profiling studies, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagohara, K.; Imaizumi, T.; Echigo, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Sato, H.

    2005-12-01

    Typical reverse faults, which are known as Senya earthquake faults appeared along the western foot of the Mahiru Mountains, associated with The Rikuu Earthquake (Mj7.2) of 1896 in Northeast Japan. Eastern marginal fault zone of the Yokote Basin consist of four main surface ruptures, about 35 km long, Obonai fault, Shiraiwa fault, Ota fault and Senya fault, depending on their continuity and strike (Matsuda et al., 1980). We carried out the seismic reflection profiling across these faults (Kawaguchi03 Seismic line, Unjono04 Seismic line and Kotaki05 Seismic line) to clarify the subsurface structure of these reverse fault system based on the data of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology and furthermore, to discuss the timing of migration of the thrusting from the range front to the basin margin. The seismic source was mini-vibrator trucks, with 20seconds of 10-100Hz signals at 10m or 5m intervals. The sweep signals were recorded by a digital telemetry system (GDAPS-4a) with 10 Hz geophones. The obtained seismic reflection data were processed by conventional Common mid-point (CMP) methods, including post-stack migration and depth conversion. The resulting seismic reflection profile reveals a thrust structure beneath these areas. At the Center of Senya hills there are two thrusts and one high angle reverse fault (1997 Seismic Line). Senya fault is an active frontal emergent thrust with flat and ramp structure. Although, the high angle reverse fault, located along the foot of the range is a short-cut branching fault from the Senya fault in the central part of the Senya hill (Sato et al., 1998), in the Unjono04 seismic line, the depth of the flat and ramp structure gradually shallow in the north part of the Senya hill, where the flexure scarp accompanied with antithetic faults formed on the fluvial terraces. In the Kawaguchi03 seismic line, the concealed fault, 0.5km below the surface, branched from the master Ota fault, form a flexure scarplet on the alluvial fan

  8. An active footwall shortcut thrust revealed by seismic reflection profiling: a case study of the Futaba fault, northern Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Higashinaka, Motonori; Kurashimo, Eiji; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu

    2013-04-01

    The Futaba fault is located along the Pacific cast of southern part of Northern Honshu and continues at least 100 km. Based on tectonic morphological research, its central part show the active tectonic features. Due to the effect of M9 Tohoku Oki earthquake 2011, the evaluation of Coulomb stress changes on the fault surface is concerned for the assess of seismic hazards. To investigate the deep geometry of seismogenic source fault and basic crustal structure, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling along the 58-km-long seismic line across the Futaba fault. The seismic data were obtained using four vibroseis trucks and 1164 channel recorders. The seismic section portrays the half graben filled by 1000-m-thick lower Miocene fluvial sediments, suggesting that the Futaba fault reactivated as a west dipping normal fault during the early Miocene associated with opening of the Sea of Japan. On the hanging wall of the Miocene normal fault, Mesozoic metamorphic rocks are cropping out forming a narrow range parallel to the fault. On the footwall of this range, footwall shortcut thrust is clearly identified by the deformation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments on the seismic section. The deeper extension of the Futaba fault can be traced down to 4.5 seconds (TWT) and sub-horizontal reflectors are developed around 6-7 seconds (TWT). The dip angle of the Futaba fault in the seismogenic zone is about 45 degrees. The footwall shortcut thrust was formed at the shallow high-angle part of the Futaba fault as a low-angle (30 degrees) reverse fault. The formation of half graben is limited along the northern part of this fault system. The footwall shortcut thrust was developed along a 40-km-long segment only accompanied with the Miocene half graben. The southern segment of the surface trace of the Futaba fault suggests a straight geometry may represent a change in dip angle.

  9. Mechanics of tidally driven fractures in Europa's ice shell and implications for seismic and radar profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Makris, N. C.

    2005-12-01

    through the entire brittle layer with horizontal length on the order of the brittle layer thickness. This mechanism yields an apparent propagation speed that is consistent with the 3 km/h crack propagation speed necessary to generate cycloids in current kinematic models [1,2]. An implication of this model is that the level of seismic activity should be higher by orders of magnitude in the presence of an ocean. High correlation is then expected between the level of seismic activity and the tidal period in the presence but not in the absence of an ocean. The cracks associated with cycloids that fully penetrate the brittle layer should be at least 106 times more energetic than the shallow, roughly 100-m deep, surface cracks. We show that this greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio for the type of seismic profiling discussed in [6] if fully penetrating cracks are used as sources of opportunity. Although Europa's ice is likely highly porous, the size of vacuous pores is likely on the order of a millimeter. Since the pore size is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than the ice-penetrating radar wavelength, our calculations show that porosity-induced scattering should not be significant. [1] Hoppa et al. 1999, Science 285. [2] Crawford et al. 2005, LPSC XXXVI #2042. [3] Weeks and Cox 1984, Ocean Sci. Eng. 9. [4] Pappalardo et al. 1999, J. Geophys. Res. 97. [5] Crawford and Stevenson 1988, Icarus 73. [6] Lee et al. 2003, Icarus 165.

  10. Geophysical Investigation of Avon Valley, West-Central Montana, using Gravity and Seismic Reflection Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knatterud, L.; Mosolf, J.; Speece, M. A.; Zhou, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Avon Valley and adjacent mountains in west-central Montana lie within the Lewis and Clark Line, a major system of WNW-striking faults and folds that transect the more northerly structural grain of the northern Rockies and represent alternating episodes of transtensional and transpressional deformation. The northwest-trending valley has been previously interpreted as an extensional half graben filled with Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits; however, little-to-no geophysical constraints on basin architecture or the thickness of Tertiary fill have been reported. A major northwest-striking fault with significant normal displacement clearly bounds the valley to the northeast, juxtaposing Tertiary sedimentary deposits against Proterozoic-Mesozoic units deformed by shortening structures and crosscut by Cretaceous granitic intrusions. Tertiary volcanic deposits unconformably overlying faulted and folded Phanerozoic-Proterozoic sequences in the eastern Garnet Range bound the valley to the southwest, but in the past no faults had been mapped along this margin. New mapping by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) has identified a system of high-angle, northwest- and northeast-striking, oblique-slip faults along the southwest border of the Avon calling into question if the valley is a half, full, or asymmetrical graben. Geophysical data has recently been acquired by Montana Tech to help define the structural architecture of the Avon Valley and the thickness of its Tertiary fill. Gravity data and a short seismic reflection profile have been collected and a preliminary interpretation of these data indicates a half graben with a series of normal faults bounding the western side of the valley. Ongoing gravity data collection throughout 2014 should refine this interpretation by better defining the bedrock-Tertiary interface at depth.

  11. Ground magnetic studies along a regional seismic-reflection profile across Bare Mountain, Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Ground magnetic data were collected along a 26-km-long regional seismic-reflection profile in southwest Nevada that starts in the Amargosa Desert, crosses Bare Mountain, Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain, and ends in Midway Valley. Parallel ground magnetic profiles were also collected about 100 m to either side of the western half of the seismic-reflection line. The magnetic data indicate that the eastern half of Crater Flat is characterized by closely-spaced faulting (1--2 km) in contrast to the western half of Crater Flat. Modeling of the data indicates that the Topopah Spring Tuff is offset about 250 m on the Solitario Canyon fault and about 50 m on the Ghost Dance fault. These estimates of fault offset are consistent with seismic-reflection data and geologic mapping. A broad magnetic high of about 500--600 nT is centered over Crater Flat. Modeling of the magnetic data indicates that the source of this high is not thickening and doming of the Bullfrog Tuff, but more likely lies below the Bullfrog Tuff. Possible source lithologies for this magnetic high include altered argillite of the Eleana Formation, Cretaceous or Tertiary intrusions, and mafic sills.

  12. Temporal correlation patterns in pre-seismic electromagnetic emissions reveal distinct complexity profiles prior to major earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Balasis, George; Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    In the last years, continuous recordings of electromagnetic emissions from geophysical observatories have been recognized to exhibit characteristic fluctuation patterns prior to some major earthquakes. To further evaluate and quantify these findings, this work presents a detailed assessment of the time-varying correlation properties of such emissions during the preparatory phases preceding some recent earthquakes in Greece and Italy. During certain stages before the earthquakes' occurrences, the electromagnetic variability profiles are characterized by a marked increase in the degree of organization of fluctuations, which allow developing hypotheses about the underlying physical mechanisms. Based on the preparatory phases of selected seismic events, the information provided by different statistical properties characterizing complementary aspects of the time-varying complexity based on temporal correlations is systematically assessed. The obtained results allow further insights into different pre-seismic stages based on the variability of electromagnetic emissions, which are probably associated with distinct geophysical processes.

  13. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  14. Bathymetric and Seismic-Reflection Profiles Hint at the Origins of Medicine Lake, CA (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Barth, G. A.; Childs, J. R.; Hart, P. E.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Ramsey, D. W.; Robinson, J. E.; Phillips, R. L.; Starratt, S. W.; Barron, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Bathymetric and acoustic surveys (in 1999), combined with vibracore sampling of lake-bottom sediments (in 2000) reveal much about the latest Pleistocene and Holocene history of Medicine Lake, a 2 km x 1 km, closed-basin lake at the top of Medicine Lake volcano, 40 km SW of Tulelake, CA. Forty high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles show a prominent reflector interpreted as the volcanic landform (primarily lavas) that would have existed prior to lake formation. A total of 1560 travel-time picks for this reflector reveal the topography of the lake basement. A representative seismic velocity through the sedimentary lake fill is estimated to be 2200 +/- 200m/s based on quantitative analysis of diffraction hyperbolae observed in this single-channel data set. Converting travel-time picks with this interval velocity, volcanic "bedrock" lies between ~ 5 and 85 m below the lake surface (currently 2036 masl) and 1 to 60 m beneath the lake floor. The topography of the horizon is a linear trough with a 70° trend, slightly askew of the 100° trend of the lake itself. The trough is filled partially with 30 x 106 m3 of material, about 2 times that of the lake volume itself. Over 90% of this lake-basin fill is presumed to be locally derived glacial till and landslide deposits; it is very poorly bedded, and contain numerous slumps. It is thickest at the middle of the trough, adjacent to a prominent landslide and crudely defined glacial cirques and fill deposits off of Medicine Mountain, to the south. The top 1-2 m of lake-fill is Holocene sediments, consisting primarily of organic diatomaceous debris interlayered with thin beds of tephra from Medicine Lake volcano, Mazama and (likely) Mt. Shasta. The lake-bottom bathymetry (water-sediment interface) shows a circular hole at the east end of the lake. The hole appears to be part of the larger trough, but has not yet been filled with sediment/landslide deposits. There is no evidence for creation of the hole through venting or

  15. Seismic and density heterogeneities of lithosphere beneath Siberia: Evidence from the Craton long-range seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, E. A.; Suvorov, V. D.; Pavlov, E. V.; Mishenkina, Z. R.

    2015-03-01

    The estimate of seismic lithosphere thickness in Siberia remains controversial in spite of long-range controlled-source data available from peaceful nuclear explosions (PNE). Published models of layered upper mantle based on this evidence fail to unambiguously constrain the asthenospheric depth. The observed velocity changes may be due either to vertical layering or to lateral heterogeneity, which are difficult to discriminate because of large (1000 km) PNE spacing. Among the upper mantle models, obtained with reference to Moho velocities derived from higher-resolution chemical explosion data, we focus especially on lateral density heterogeneity. The model reveals three velocity layers, with velocities 8.0-8.5 km/s in Layer 1, 8.6-8.7 km/s in Layer 2, and ∼8.5 km/s in Layer 3. Layers 2, which varies strongly in thickness, may consist of dense eclogite, judging by the high velocities. Its base may correspond to the base of the lithosphere underlain by the lower-velocity asthenospheric material of Layer 3. The lateral variations in velocity within Layer 1 and in thickness of Layer 2 correlate with major tectonic units: the West Siberian basin, the Tunguska basin with the Permian-Triassic continental flood basalts (the large igneous province of Siberian Traps), as well as the Vilyui basin and the Yakutian kimberlite province. Isostasy in the West Siberian and Vilyui basins results in thick sediments and thin crust, while the large depths of the basement and the intra-crustal discontinuity in the Tunguska basin isostatically compensate the elevated surface topography due to voluminous lavas. The magmatism left its imprint in the mantle as an attenuated "eclogitic layer" beneath the Tunguska basin. However, the available data are still insufficient to understand the exact causes of this attenuation, because mantle conditions may have changed during the elapsed 250 m.y. since then.

  16. Incoming sediments and its deformation observed on high resolution seismic profiles in the northern Japan Trench axis region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Fujie, G.; Strasser, M.; Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Usami, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Japan Trench axis area has been intensively investigated since the 2011 Tohoku earthquake because the large slip reached to the vicinity of the trench axis. We have conducted three high resolution seismic cruises in the northern part of the Japan Trench axis region. The trench area between 38 - 40 N was covered by 81 E-W seismic lines with 2 - 4 km line interval. A 1200 m-long, 192 channel streamer cable and a cluster gun array with volume of 320 - 380 inch3 were used for these surveys. Post-stack time migrated sections provide detailed image of sediments above the subducting Pacific plate and its deformation by the bending-related normal faults on the outer trench slope, thrust faults and possible slope failures in the trench axis and inner trench slope. The deformation style of the sediments in the trench axis shows variation along the trench strike. To the south of the survey area in 38 - 39 N, the trench axis shows imbricate thrust-and-fold packages, which could be related to the interaction between the frontal prism toe and horst-graben structure. To the north around 40 N, the trench axis is located on a horst, and frontal thrust and imbricate structure are clearly observed on the seismic profiles. Around 39.5 N, the trench inner slope is very steep. It is suggested that slope failures as rotational slumps have occurred in this area. The trench axis is filled by slump deposits and debris with chaotic acoustic characteristics, which is similar with that in the seaward portion of the frontal prism. Seismic profiles on the outer trench slope show the variation on the thickness of the incoming sediments along the trench strike. It is thick, ~ 500 ms, in the northern part of the survey area around 40 N, and it is ~ 250 ms in the southern part around 38 N. The thickness is varied in the area between 38.5 - 39.5 N, and is very thin at 39.5 N. Sediments on the trench outer slope basically conformably cover the igneous basement of the Pacific plate and they were

  17. The NKG2D Ligands RAE-1δ and RAE-1ε Differ with Respect to Their Receptor Affinity, Expression Profiles and Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cédile, Oriane; Popa, Natalia; Pollet-Villard, Frédéric; Garmy, Nicolas; Ibrahim, El Chérif; Boucraut, José

    2010-01-01

    Background RAE-1 is a ligand of the activating receptor NKG2D expressed by NK cells, NKT, γδT and some CD8+T lymphocytes. RAE-1 is overexpressed in tumor cell lines and its expression is induced after viral infection and genotoxic stress. We have recently demonstrated that RAE-1 is expressed in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) from C57BL/6 mice. RAE-1 is also expressed in vitro by neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) and plays a non-immune role in cell proliferation. The C57BL/6 mouse genome contains two rae-1 genes, rae-1δ and rae-1ε encoding two different proteins. The goals of this study are first to characterize the in vivo and in vitro expression of each gene and secondly to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their respective expression, which are far from known. Principal Findings We observed that Rae-1δ and Rae-1ε transcripts are differentially expressed according to tissues, pathological conditions and cell lines. Embryonic tissue and the adult SVZ mainly expressed Rae-1δ transcripts. The NSPCs derived from the SVZ also mainly expressed RAE-1δ. The interest of this result is especially related to the observation that RAE-1δ is a weak NKG2D ligand compared to RAE-1ε. On the contrary, cell lines expressed either similar levels of RAE-1δ and RAE-1ε proteins or only RAE-1ε. Since the protein expression correlated with the level of transcripts for each rae-1 gene, we postulated that transcriptional regulation is one of the main processes explaining the difference between RAE-1δ and RAE-1ε expression. We indeed identified two different promoter regions for each gene: one mainly involved in the control of rae-1δ gene expression and the other in the control of rae-1ε expression. Conclusions/Significance RAE-1δ and RAE-1ε differ with respect to their function and the control of their expression. Immune function would be mainly exerted by RAE-1ε and non-immune function by RAE-1δ. PMID:20976056

  18. Lithosphere structure of the west Qinling orogenic belt revealed by deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2009-12-01

    The west Qinling orogen located in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, is transformation zone between the N-S-trending and E-W-trending tectonics in the Chinese continent. Further study of the fine crust structure of the west Qinling orogen and its relationships with surrounding basins have very important significance for understanding tectonic response of the northeastern margin of the plateau about collision convergence of the Indian block and Asian block and learning formation and evolution of the plateau. In 2009, we reprocessed the data of the Tangke-Hezuo deep seismic reflection profiles collected in 2004 across the west Qinling orogen and the northern Songpan block. The new results show the lithosphere fine structure of the west Qinling orogen. Reflection features indicate that an interface at 6.0-7.0s (TWT) divided the crust into the upper and lower crust, whose structural style and deformation are totally different. Integrating geological data, we deduce that the interface at 6.0-7.0s (depth with 18-21 km) was the basement detachment, which made deformation decoupled of the upper and lower crust. The multi-layered reflections in the upper crust reveal the sedimentary covers of the west Qinling orogen, disclose the thickness of the various structure layer and deformation degree, and provide a basis for the prospective evaluation of a multi-metallic mineral and energy exploration. The north dipping strong reflection characteristics of the lower crust in the west Qinling orogen constituted imbricate structure, such imbricate structural features provide seismology evidence for researching the west Qinling thrusting toward the northern Songpan block, and have great significance for studying formation and evolution of the Songpan-Garze structure. Moho reflections are observed around 17.0-17.2s, characterized by nearly horizontal reflections, which implies the west Qinling orogen underwent an intense extension post orogeny caused the lithosphere

  19. Deep seismic studies of conjugate profiles from the Nova Scotia - Moroccan and the Liguro-Provencal margin pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Biari, Y.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Philippe, S.; Schnabel, M.; Moulin, M.; Louden, K. E.; Funck, T.; Reichert, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of conjugate passive margins provides information about rifting styles, opening of an ocean and formation of it's associated sedimentary basins. In order to distinguish between tectonic inheritance and structures directly related to rifting of passive margins conjugate profiles have to be acquired on margins on diverse locations and different ages. In this study we use new and existing reflection and wide-angle seismic data from two margin pairs, the 200 Ma year old Nova-Scotia - Morocco margin pair and the only 20 Ma Gulf of Lions - Sardinia margin pair. On both margin pairs wide-angle seismic data combined with reflection seismic data were acquired on conjugate profiles on sea and extended on land. Forward modelling of the deep crustal structure along the four transects indicates that a high velocity zone (HVZ) (> 7.2 km/s) is present at the base of the lower crust on all four margins along the ocean-continental transition zone (OCT). This may represent either exhumed upper mantle material or injection of upper mantle material into proto-oceanic crust at the onset of sea-floor spreading. However the width of the HVZ might strongly differ between conjugates, which may be the result of tectonic inheritance, for example the presence of ancient subduction zones or orogens. Both margin pairs show a similar unthinned continental crustal thickness. Crustal thinning and upper-to-lower crustal thickness vary between margin pairs, but remain nearly symmetric on conjugate profiles and might therefore depend on the structure and mechanical properties of the original continental crust. For the Mediterranean margin pair, the oceanic crust is similar on both sides, with a thickness of only 4-5 km. For the Atlantic margin pair, oceanic crustal thickness is higher on the Moroccan Margin, a fact that can be explained by either asymmetric spreading or by the volcanic underplating, possibly originating from the Canary Hot Spot.

  20. Deep Seismic Reflection Profiles Reveal The Crust Structures Beneath Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt and Its Neighboring Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H.; Gao, R.; Keller, R. G.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Li, H.; Xiong, X.; Guo, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Xing'an-Mongolia orogenic belt (XMOB) as the eastern part of the CAOB (Central Asian Orogenic Belt) is one of the remarkably reworked and crustal accretionary belts during the Phanerozoic in the world. It is located between the northern margin of the North China craton and the southern margin of the Siberia craton and is characterized by large-scale Mesozoic magmatism, and forms a key part of the NE-trending Mesozoic magmatic belt in East China. Therefore, it will be of great importance to study the contact relationship between these blocks, which will prodive important information on the study of mineralization and assessment of earthquake disaster. A major problem with all previous publications on Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic belt was the lack of a seismic section which could potentially image the zone or the dominant vergence of crustal structures at depth. In the view of above, deep seismic profiling data acquisition finished in last three years and the newly processing seismic reflection profiles in this belt were possible under the support of SinoProbe project and China Geological Survey. As we not only focuse on the deep structures of crust, but also carry about the relationships between the shallow reflection fabrics with surface geology. Therefore, different with oil industrial data accquistion, we develop some deep seismic reflection techniques such as three levels of explosive shots were adopted for enough energy reflected from all crust, long offset with single side length of 15 km on symmetrical for the modeling of shallow crust by use of tomographic method, meanwhile we share the shots large than 500 kg with seismic refraction survey line providing more rays for modeling deep velocity strucutre. The seismic reflection data were mainly using the seismic processing package ProMAX and the CGG processing system, following the processing steps with special methods such as tomographic inversion static corrections, surface-consistent amplitude compensation

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  2. Structure of northeastern New Mexico from deep seismic reflection profiles: Implications for the Proterozoic tectonic evolution of southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshete, Tefera Gashu

    2001-09-01

    Previous geologic, geochronologic, structural, isotope, and xenolith studies have shown that the Precambrian rocks of northern New Mexico belong to the Yavapai and Mazatzal provinces. The boundary between the provinces is a wide zone defined on its northern edge by the northern extent of 1.65 Ga deformation and southern edge by the southern most extent of Yavapai crust (pre-1.7 Ga). However, the nature of the Precambrian province boundary at depth, its evolution through time, and the tectonic processes that affected the interior of these provinces, are not well understood. In order to obtain new information concerning these problems, processing and interpretation of reflection seismic data was conducted on data collected during the 1999 Continental Dynamics-Rocky Mountain (CD-ROM) project and data obtained from industry. In this study I present new information on the crustal structure of northern New Mexico provided by processing and interpretation of three seismic reflection profiles (NM-1, TB-1 and TB-2).The seismic data present evidence for Precambrian crustal growth and amalgamation, followed by subsequent reactivation of Precambrian structures. A seismic profile and gravity modeling across the NM-1 show a strongly reflective high-density (2850 kg-m-3) dome-shaped body in the middle to lower crust. On the basis of the absence of a hanging-wall antiform, the occurrence of normal sense of deflection of reflectors in the footwall, possibly Moho pullup, and geological information such as an exposed Proterozoic extensional shear zone in the Sandia Mountains, this feature is interpreted to represent a 1.4 Ga? extensional shear zone which resulted in rotation of ˜1.65 Ga imbricate thrust zones. Layered reflectivity directly below the top of Precambrian basement on profiles TB-1 and the eastern part of TB-2, based on geophysical and geological information from nearby areas is interpreted as a sequence of ˜1.4 Ga volcanic and sedimentary rocks within the Proterozoic

  3. Crustal Structure across The North China Craton from long-range seismic wide angle reflection/refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuyun; Jia, Shixu; Duan, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    The North China Craton (NCC) is the oldest craton in China, which formed around 2.5Ga and had a 200 km thick lithosphere during the Paleozoic. The cratonic lithosphere of NCC has experienced strong thinning since the Mesozoic. In the past 30 years, a lot of excellent research about NCC have provided some different tectonic models, however, carton destruction is a sophisticated process. Though there have been many deep seismic sounding profiles in North China, but none of them is long enough to sample the complete section of thinned and preserved Craton. Recent long range seismic wide angle reflection/refraction experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of lithosphere. A 1500 km long wide angle reflection/refraction profile was completed in 2009. Our long range profile extends from west end of Ordos Plateau, across Shanxi Plateau, Taihang Mountains, to Luxi Uplift. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile crossed whole the north China craton. The model shows the crustal thickness of the region is very variable. The Moho topography varies more than 10km in the Central part of the north China craton. In particular, the crust appears the thinnest in the North China Plain, where the crust consists of very thick upper-mid crust and very thin lower crust, and the lower crust is with a lower velocity (~6.8km/s). The Moho dip with thinner lower crust beneath the Shanxi plateau may support the Central NCC has been affected at some time since its formation in the Archean. Furthermore, the TFZ is manifested in the deep structure. Our model provide the seismic evidences supporting that the TFZ extend deep into the uppermost mantle. It is the hypothesis that TFZ is a major channel for asthenosphere upwelling accompanying the tectonic extension and lithospheric reactivation in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic time. The different structural features may

  4. Deep structure of the Algerian margin offshore Great Kabylie: Preliminary results of an offshore-onshore seismic profile (SPIRAL campaign)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafik, Aidi; Abd el Karim, Yelles; Marie-Odile, Beslier; Frauke, Klingelhoefer; Philippe, Schnurle; Rabah, Bracene; Hamou, Djellit; Audrey, Galve; Laure, Schenini; Françoise, Sage; Abdallah, Bounif Mohand ou; Philippe, Charvis

    2013-04-01

    In October-November 2009 the Algerian-French SPIRAL research program (Sismique Profonde et Investigation Régionale du Nord de l'ALgérie) was conducted onboard the R/V Atalante in order to understand the deep structure and tectonic history of the Algerian Margin using multichannel and wide-angle seismic data. An extensive dataset was acquired along five regional transects off Algeria, from Arzew Bay to the west, to Annaba to the east. The profiles range from 80 to 180 km long and around 40 ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed on each profile. All profiles were extended on land up to 125 km by land-stations to better constrain the structure of the margin and the nature of the ocean-continent transition zone. We present the preliminary results from modeling of deep and superficial structures in the central Algerian margin, more precisely in the region of the Great Kabylie where a N-S transect of combined wide-angle data using a set of 40 OBS (ocean bottom seismometer) and 24 on-land seismological stations and reflection seismic data was acquired. The profile with a total length of about 260 km (140 km offshore and approximately 124 km onshore), crosses from the north to south the Algeria-Provence Basin, the central Algerian Margin and onshore the geological unit of the Great Kabylie that represents the Kabylides block and the transitional zone between the internal zone (Kabylides) and the external zone in the central Algeria. The network (OBS and seismological stations), recorded 1031 low frequency air gun shots in order to ensure good penetration in the crust. Travel time tomography of first arrivals time of OBS data has yielded a preliminary model of P wave velocities along the profile. In the oceanic domain, a relatively thin crust of about 5 km thickness was imaged overlying a mantle characterized by seismic velocities of about 8 km/s, and covered by a thin sedimentary layer of about 2 km thickness. For the study of the sedimentary cover near the margin

  5. Orphan Basin crustal structure from a dense wide-angle seismic profile - Tomographic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watremez, Louise; Lau, K. W. Helen; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Louden, Keith E.; Karner, Garry D.

    2014-05-01

    Orphan Basin is located on the eastern margin of Canada, offshore of Newfoundland and East of Flemish Cap. It is an aborted continental rift formed by multiple episodes of rifting. The crustal structure across the basin has been determined by an earlier refraction study using 15 instruments on a 550 km long line. It shows that the continental crust was extended over an unusually wide region but did not break apart. The crustal structure of the basin thus documents stages in the formation of a magma-poor rifted margin up to crustal breakup. The OBWAVE (Orphan Basin Wide-Angle Velocity Experiment) survey was carried out to image crustal structures across the basin and better understand the processes of formation of this margin. The spacing of the 89 recording stations varies from 3 to 5 km along this 500-km-long line, which was acquired along a pre-existing reflection line. The highest resolution section corresponds to the part of the profile where the crust was expected to be the thinnest. We present the results from a joint tomography inversion of first and Moho reflected arrival times. The high data density allows us to define crustal structures with greater detail than for typical studies and to improve the understanding of the processes leading to the extreme stretching of continental crust. The final model was computed following a detailed parametric study to determine the optimal parameters controlling the ray-tracing and the inversion processes. The final model shows very good resolution. In particular, Monte Carlo standard deviations of crustal velocities and Moho depths are generally < 50 m/s and within 1 km, respectively. In comparison to the velocity models of typical seismic refraction profiles, results from the OBWAVE study show a notable improvement in the resolution of the velocity model and in the level of detail observed using the least a priori information possible. The final model allows us to determine the crustal thinning and variable structures

  6. Matching high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity profiling to infer the shallow structure of Solfatara Volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo; Gresse, Marceau; Maraio, Stefano; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Di Fiore, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Two coincident high-resolution seismic reflection and electrical resistivity profiles were acquired in the Solfatara tuff cone in May and November 2014, along with CO2 flux and surface temperature measurements. The acquired data are a subset of the MedSuV - RICEN dataset, which also includes a wider series of time-lapse geophysical and geochemical experiments carried out within Solfatara volcano, with the aim of studying changes in the properties of the medium at small scales through repeated high-resolution multi-parameter observations over time. Seismic reflection data were processed using the Common-Reflection-Surface stack, a fast and cost-effective alternative to standard reflection processing which allows to greatly improve signal-to-noise ratio in settings where structural complexity and high levels of ambient noise make it challenging to obtain a reliable seismic image. The reflection profiles provide the first high-resolution seismic images of Solfatara crater, depicting an asymmetrical structure filled by volcanoclastic sediments and whose bottom is found at about 400 ms TWT. Seismic data also display several narrow zones with distinctive anomalous of very low amplitude located in several areas within the crater, which were interpreted as gas chimneys created by intersection of NE- and NW-trending sets of sub-vertical fault and fractures and filled by fluids (both in gas and liquid phases) escaping from the deeper hydrothermal source. The imaged degassing pathways terminate against a strong horizontal reflector at about 100 ms TWT. Just above those structural pathways, electric data show the presence of a dome-shaped electrically conductive structure, buried in the centre of the volcano at a minimum depth of 50 m and interpreted as the upper end of the hydrothermal plume. The plume projection at the surface of the crater matches with high CO2 flux and soil temperature anomalies. Our results provide a solid framework to constrain the near

  7. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High resolution reflection seismic profiling over the Møre- Trøndelag Fault Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, E.; Nasuti, A.; Juhlin, C.

    2009-04-01

    Two seismic profiles, each extending 7 - 8 km, were recorded in June 2008, as a part of a detailed and integrated geological- geophysical study on the Møre- Trøndelag Fault Complex (MTFC). The 300 km long and 50 km wide MTFC is one of the most prominent fault zones of Norway. Offshore it separates the North Sea basin system from the Møre and Vøring basins. It strikes ENE - WSW and onshore parallels the south central Norwegian coast. The MTFC probably formed during the Scandian orogeny (Grønlie and Roberts, 1989), although an older precursor fault may have existed, and is still active today (Olesen et al. 2004). It has been reactivated several times and, therefore, contains a variety of fault rocks. Four main phases of activity along the MTFC have been revealed reflecting the collapse of the Caledonian mountain chain followed by Permian rifting and later Late Jurassic rifting of the northern North Sea (Gabrielsen et al. 1999) and finally the Cenozoic uplift of the Norwegian mountains with offshore basins subsiding (Faleide et al. 2002, Redfield et al. 2005). The MTFC has strongly influenced the shape of offshore basins, as well as the onshore landscape, and is still affecting the regional stress pattern. The seismic study and the future integrated models are, therefore, of interest to offshore hydrocarbon exploration, as well as land planning and natural hazard assessment in Mid-Norway and will also generate new knowledge on fault mechanics. The two seismic profiles were located on each side of the Tingvollfjord in the vicinity of Meisingset. A VIBSIST 1000 mechanical hammer was used as a source. 28 Hz single geophones were placed 20 m apart. Source points also had a nominal spacing of 20 m with 240 - 300 channels recorded using a SERCEL 408UL recording system with a sample rate of 1 ms. The aim was to image structures in the upper crust down to a depth of 4 km. Processing of the seismic data has been challenging, due to the crookedness of the profiles and the

  9. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  10. Shallow seismic reflection profiling over a Mylonitic Shear Zone, Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NE Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawman, Robert B.; Ahmed, Hishameldin O.

    Seismic reflection profiling carried out with a sledgehammer source has imaged Tertiary extensional structures over a depth range of 45-500 m within lower plate rocks of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex. The 400-m CMP profile straddles an exposed contact between tectonic slices of dolomitic marble and metaquartzite emplaced by low-angle ductile-brittle normal faulting. Subhorizontal reflections from layering within the tectonic slices give way at 160 ms (160-220 m depth) to reflections that dip 15-45° to the east, in contrast with dips indicated in a poorly imaged segment of a coincident regional seismic line but in agreement with dips of foliation mapped for nearby up-plunge exposures of a late Proterozoic - early Cambrian sequence of metaquartzites, marbles, schists, and granitic rocks that forms the bulk of the underlying shear zone. Differences with the regional profile are attributed to the higher frequencies (30-100 Hz) generated by the smaller hammer source and the enhanced lateral resolution provided by the straighter profile and much smaller shot-receiver offsets (46-157 m) contributing to the stack for each CMP. The results suggest that the near-surface, east-dipping component of the anastomozing shear zone extends at least 2 km farther east than previously interpreted. Rough estimates of interval velocities (1500-4500 m/s) inferred from stacking velocities are consistent with velocities of mylonitic rocks measured perpendicular to foliation at low confining pressures when the effects of macroscopic fractures and joints are taken into account. Peaks in amplitude spectra of stacked traces suggest long-wavelength components of layering resolved at scales from 5-8 m (depth: 50 m) to 15-25 m (depth: 500 m).

  11. A crustal model of the ultrahigh-pressure Dabie Shan orogenic belt, China, derived from deep seismic refraction profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Zeng, Rong-Sheng; Mooney, W.D.; Hacker, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new crustal cross section through the east-west trending ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) Dabie Shan orogenic belt, east central China, based on a 400-km-long seismic refraction profile. Data from our profile reveal that the cratonal blocks north and south of the orogen are composed of 35-km-thick crust consisting of three layers (upper, middle, and lower crust) with average seismic velocities of 6.0±0.2 km/s, 6.5±0.1 km/s, and 6.8±0.1 km/s. The crust reaches a maximum thickness of 41.5 km beneath the northern margin of the orogen, and thus the present-day root beneath the orogen is only 6.5 km thick. The upper mantle velocity is 8.0±0.1 km/s. Modeling of shear wave data indicate that Poisson's ratio increases from 0.24±0.02 in the upper crust to 0.27±0.03 in the lower crust. This result is consistent with a dominantly felsic upper crustal composition and a mafic lower crustal composition within the amphibolite or granulite metamorphic facies. Our seismic model indicates that eclogite, which is abundant in surface exposures within the orogen, is not a volumetrically significant component in the middle or lower crust. Much of the Triassic structure associated with the formation of the UHP rocks of the Dabie Shan has been obscured by post-Triassic igneous activity, extension and large-offset strike-slip faulting. Nevertheless, we can identify a high-velocity (6.3 km/s) zone in the upper (<5 km depth) crustal core of the orogen which we interpret as a zone of ultrahigh-pressure rocks, a north dipping suture, and an apparent Moho offset that marks a likely active strike-slip fault.

  12. Offshore active faults of the Mikata fault zone in Fukui, Japan, revealed by high-resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sakamoto, I.; Takino, Y.; Murakami, F.; Hosoya, T.; Usami, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mikata fault zone are located in coastal and shallow sea area off Fukui Prefecture, West Japan. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Tokai University conducted, as part of MEXT 2013 nearshore active fault survey project, a high-resolution multi-channel seismic survey using Boomer and a 12-channel streamer cable, acoustic profiling survey using parametric sub-bottom profiler and shallow-sea offshore drilling, in order to clarify distribution and activity of the Mikata fault zone. The seismic reflection surveys identified four reflection surfaces as vertical displacement markers in the post-glacial deposits at a depth ranging from ca. 4.5m to ca. 17m below the sea bottom on the downthrown side. We estimated the age of each marker reflection surface by using the C14 age and others from 4m-long core obtained on the downthrown side of fault and the sea level change in the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene around Japan. The results of these surveys have revealed that the fault system was reactivated three times since the latest Pleistocene. The vertical slip rate and average recurrence interval of the fault system are estimated at ca. 0.8-1.0 m/ky and 2,000-3,800 years, respectively.

  13. Report of reprocessing of reflection seismic profile X-5 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, John J.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic reflection profile X-5 exhibits a 7,700 ft long anomalous zone of poor quality to nonexistent reflections between shotpoints 100 and 170, compared to the high-quality, flat-lying, coherent reflections on either side. Results from drill holes in the area suggest 'layer cake' geology with no detectable abnormalities such as faults present. In an attempt to determine whether the anomalous zone of the seismic profile is an artifact or actually indicates a geologic condition, the data were extensively reprocessed using state-of-the-art processing techniques and the following conclusions were made: 1. The field-recorded data in the anomalous zone are of poor quality due to surface conditions and recording parameters used. 2. Reprocessing shows reflectors throughout the anomalous zone at all levels. However, it cannot prove that the reflectors are continuous throughout the anomalous zone. 3. Significant improvement in data quality may be achieved if the line is reshot using carefully determined recording parameters.

  14. Orphan Basin crustal structure from a dense wide-angle seismic profile - layered modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. W. Helen; Watremez, Louise; Louden, Keith E.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Karner, Garry D.

    2014-05-01

    The Orphan Basin is a large, deep water basin to the east of Newfoundland and northwest of Flemish Cap, Canada. It contains a considerably wide series of rift basins that provides an excellent opportunity to study continental crustal deformations under varying degrees of extension. We present a 500-km-long P-wave velocity model across the complete rift system of the Orphan Basin, from Flemish Cap to the Bonavista Platform, using high-resolution refraction and wide-angle reflection data from 89 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS). This layered model builds on a first-arrival traveltime tomography model (Watremez et al., this session) and is formed using additional constraints from a coincident multichannel seismic reflection profile, gravity data and borehole data from three wells. The layered model helps detail deep sediment and crustal variations across this wide region of extended continental crust. The sedimentary section contains post-rift Tertiary (vp~1.7-3.5 km/s) and syn-rift Cretaceous and Jurassic (vp~4-5.4 km/s) layers within both the eastern and the western sub-basins, separated by three basement highs, suggesting that the two sub-basins may have opened during a single, extended rifting event. The crust is composed of three layers with vp of 5.4-6.1, 6.1-6.5 and 6.3-7.1 km/s of highly variable combined thicknesses, from 32 km beneath Flemish Cap and the Bonavista Platform to <10 km beneath both western and eastern sub-basins. The shape of the crustal thinning appears highly asymmetrical across the two sub-basins. Flemish Cap crust thins westward within the eastern sub-basin into a narrow zone (35 km) of hyperextended crust (<10 km thick) beneath an 8-km-deep sedimentary basin. In contrast, the Bonavista Platform crust thins eastward within the western sub-basin into a wider zone (116 km) of hyperextended crust. Separating the two rift basins is a central section with two distinctive zones of thicker (10-16 km) crust, where muted topography characterizes the

  15. Comparative Proteomics Profile of Lipid-Cumulating Oleaginous Yeast: An iTRAQ-Coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiahua; Feng, Huixing; Lee, Jaslyn; Ning Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular lipid in oleaginous yeast cells has been studied for providing an alternative supply for energy, biofuel. Numerous studies have been conducted on increasing lipid content in oleaginous yeasts. However, few explore the mechanism of the high lipid accumulation ability of oleaginous yeast strains at the proteomics level. In this study, a time-course comparative proteomics analysis was introduced to compare the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with two oleaginous yeast strains, Cryptococcus albidus and Rhodosporidium toruloides at different lipid accumulation stages. Two dimensional LC-MS/MS approach has been applied for protein profiling together with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labelling method. 132 proteins were identified when three yeast strains were all at early lipid accumulation stage; 122 and 116 proteins were found respectively within cells of three strains collected at middle and late lipid accumulation stages. Significantly up-regulation or down-regulation of proteins were experienced among comparison. Essential proteins correlated to lipid synthesis and regulation were detected. Our approach provides valuable indication and better understanding for lipid accumulation mechanism from proteomics level and would further contribute to genetic engineering of oleaginous yeasts. PMID:24386479

  16. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  17. Comparison between an in-house 1D profile correction method and a 2D correction provided in Varian's PDPC Package for improving the accuracy of portal dosimetry images.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Maritza A; Davis, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    While commissioning Varian's Portal Dose Image Prediction (PDIP) algorithm for portal dosimetry, an asymmetric radial response in the portal imager due to backscatter from the support arm was observed. This asymmetric response led to differences on the order of 2%-3% for simple square fields (< 20 × 20 cm2) when comparing the measured to predicted portal fluences. A separate problem was that discrepancies of up to 10% were seen in measured to predicted portal fluences at increasing off-axis distance (> 10 cm). We have modified suggested methods from the literature to provide a 1D correction for the off-axis response problem which adjusts the diagonal profile used in the portal imager calibration. This inherently cannot fix the 2D problem since the PDIP algorithm assumes a radially symmetric response and will lead to some uncertainty in portal dosimetry results. Varian has recently released generic "2D correction" files with their Portal Dosimetry Pre-configuration (PDPC) package, but no independent testing has been published. We present the comparison between QA results using the Varian correction method to results using our 1D profile correction method using the gamma passing rates with a 3%, 3 mm criterion. The average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates for nine fixed-field IMRT fields at gantry 0° using our profile correction method were 98.1%, 93.7%, and 99.8%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 98.4%, 93.1%, and 99.8%. For four RapidArc fields, the average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates using our correction method were 99.6%, 99.4%, and 99.9%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 99.8%, 99.5%, and 99.9%. The average gamma pass rates for both correction methods are quite similar, but both show improvement over the uncorrected results. PMID:26103173

  18. Origin of deep crystal reflections: seismic profiling across high-grade metamorphic terranes in Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.; Milkereit, B.; Percival, J.; Davidson, A.; Parrish, R.; Cook, F.; Geis, W.; Cannon, W.; Hutchinson, D.; West, G.; Clowes, R.

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the origin of deep crustal reflections LITHOPROBE has sponsored or co-sponsored Seismic reflection surveys across tracts of high-grade metamorphic rock in the Archean Superior craton, the Proterozoic Grenville orogen and the Phanerozoic Cordilleran orogen. Common to these three diverse terranes are near-surface zones of prominent Seismic reflectivity that are typically associated with velocity discontinuities at highly strained contacts between gneissic rocks of varying lithology. At some locations the reflective layering resulted from transposition and rearrangement of previously layered rocks (stratified assemblages, sills, etc.), whereas in other regions it was generated by extreme attenuation, stretching and ductile flow of weakly layered or irregularly organized rocks. It seems likely that compositionally layered gneissic rock is a common source of reflections in the deep crust, with reflections originating at lithological boundaries and zones of mylonite. ?? 1990.

  19. A complementary study of the Surprise Valley fault using a high-resolution shallow seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell-Hills, A.; Thompson, M.; Dhar, M.; Louie, J.; Egger, A.; van Buer, N.; Vow, B.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2008-12-01

    Despite a lack of large historical earthquakes, the Surprise Valley fault system in northeastern California is presumed to be seismically active based on the presence of numerous Holocene fault scarps and a fault- controlled geothermal system. The Surprise Valley fault is believed to be similar to historically active basin and range faults such as the Dixie Valley fault in central Nevada. A 5-m-deep paleoseismic trench across the main fault revealed a steeply-dipping (~68 degrees) normal fault, while a vibrator reflection profile located a few kilometers north of the trench imaged a much more shallowly dipping normal fault (~25-30 degrees) at 0.5-1.0 km depth. It is unclear from these data if the steeply dipping fault exposed in the trench soles into the more shallowly dipping fault at depth, or if the currently active fault cuts the fault imaged in the reflection profile. In June of 2008, we conducted a 200-m-long high-resolution shallow reflection profile across the fault at the location of the paleoseismic trench in order to further constrain the geometry of the currently active range-front fault. The survey was conducted with a 48-channel seismograph, a 16-lb sledge, and 48 groups of six 100-Hz phones each, spaced at 2-m intervals. Optimization of P-wave arrival times for a tomographic image of the upper 50 meters shows velocities ranging from 1000 to 2500 m/s. Preliminary reflection processing, together with the optimized velocity section, suggests that the fault dips at an angle of 60 degrees in the upper 40 meters, and may suggest an antithetic fault in the hanging wall. The unprocessed data display strong reflections at depths to 200 meters. A detailed understanding of the dip angle of the Surprise Valley fault will impact the ongoing geothermal development and the assessment of seismic hazard in the area, both of which will vary based on the angle of the active fault system.

  20. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  1. Continuous recording of seismic signals in Alpine permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, H.; Krainer, K.; Staudinger, M.; Brückl, E.

    2009-04-01

    Over the past years various geophysical methods were applied to study the internal structure and the temporal variation of permafrost whereof seismic is of importance. For most seismic investigations in Alpine permafrost 24-channel equipment in combination with long data and trigger cables is used. Due to the harsh environment source and geophone layouts are often limited to 2D profiles. With prospect for future 3D-layouts we introduce an alternative of seismic equipment that can be used for several applications in Alpine permafrost. This study is focussed on controlled and natural source seismic experiments in Alpine permafrost using continuous data recording. With recent data from an ongoing project ("Permafrost in Austria") we will highlight the potential of the used seismic equipment for three applications: (a) seismic permafrost mapping of unconsolidated sediments, (b) seismic tomography in rock mass, and (c) passive seismic monitoring of rock falls. Single recording units (REFTEK 130, 6 channels) are used to continuously record the waveforms of both the seismic signals and a trigger signal. The combination of a small number of recording units with different types of geophones or a trigger allow numerous applications in Alpine permafrost with regard to a high efficiency and flexible seismic layouts (2D, 3D, 4D). The efficiency of the light and robust seismic equipment is achieved by the simple acquisition and the flexible and fast deployment of the (omni-directional) geophones. Further advantages are short (data and trigger) cables and the prevention of trigger errors. The processing of the data is aided by 'Seismon' which is an open source software project based on Matlab® and MySQL (see SM1.0). For active-source experiments automatic stacking of the seismic signals is implemented. For passive data a program for automatic detection of events (e.g. rock falls) is available which allows event localization. In summer 2008 the seismic equipment was used for the

  2. Vertical Seismic Profiling at riser drilling site in the rupture area of the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake, Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, R.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    A series of scientific drilling expeditions is in operation in the Nankai Trough to reveal the faulting mechanism of the magathrust earthquakes, through clarifying composition, fine structure, mechanical behavior, and environmental variables of the seismogenic faults. In the studied area, extensive seismic surveys for site characterization have been made to image detailed geometry of the fault complex in the accretionary prism as well as Vp distribution around the faults. Although these previous surveys provided invaluable information for understanding seismotectonic processes in this subduction zone, more complete knowledge is needed to be acquired to predict dynamic behavior of the faults, such as geometrical irregularities in short wavelength, Vs and seismic attenuation which are sensitive to fluid distribution in and around fault zones. It is expected that estimation of these parameters would be improved considerably by a seismic exploration using a vertical array of seismographs installed in a deep borehole (VSP: vertical seismic profiling). In July 2009, we made a VSP at one of the drilling sites located just above the rupture area of the 1994 Tonankai Earthquake (M 8.1), during the IODP Exp.319. The well site of our VSP was made by the riser drilling of D/V Chikyu. The seismic array, lowered from Chikyu into the hole, was composed of a three-component accelerometer and vertical separation of the array elements was 15.12 m. The VSP was composed of offset VSP and zero-offset VSP. In the offset VSP, a tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei was shot along one straight line (walk-away VSP) and another circular line (walk-around VSP) and seismic signals were recorded by an array consisting of 16 elements installed from 907 to 1,135 m in depth from seafloor. The object of the walk-away VSP is to obtain fine image of the faults using reflection arrivals with less attenuation. It is also expected to obtain spatial variation of Vs from arrival time tomography of

  3. Structural interpretation and physical property estimates based on COAST 2012 seismic reflection profiles offshore central Washington, Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. I.; Tobin, H. J.; Everson, E. D.; Fortin, W.; Holbrook, W. S.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has a history of large magnitude earthquakes, but a near-total lack of plate interface seismicity, making the updip limit of the seismogenic zone difficult to locate. In addition, the central Cascadia accretionary prism is characterized by an extremely low wedge taper angle, landward vergent initial thrusting, and a flat midslope terrace between the inner and outer wedges, unlike most other accretionary prisms (e.g. the Nankai Trough, Japan). The Cascadia Open Access Seismic Transect (COAST) lines were shot by R/V Marcus Langseth in July of 2012 off central Washington to image this subduction zone. Two trench-parallel and nine trench-perpendicular lines were collected. In this study, we present detailed seismic interpretation of both time- and depth-migrated stacked profiles, focused on elucidating the deposition and deformation of both pre- and syn-tectonic sediment in the trench and slope. Distribution and timing of sediments and their deformation is used to unravel the evolution of the wedge through time. Initially, interpretation of the time-sections is carried out to support the building of tomographic velocity models to aid in the pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) of selected lines. In turn, we use PSDM velocity models to estimate porosity and pore pressure conditions at the base of the wedge and across the basal plate interface décollement where possible, using established velocity-porosity transforms. Interpretation in this way incorporates both accurate structural relationships and robust porosity models to document wedge development and present-day stress state, in particular regions of potential overpressure. Results shed light on the origin and evolution of the mid-slope terrace and the low taper angle for the forearc wedge. This work may shed light ultimately on the position of the potential updip limit of the seismogenic zone beneath the wedge.

  4. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  5. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  6. Analysis of membrane-protein complexes of the marine sulfate reducer Desulfobacula toluolica Tol2 by 1D blue native-PAGE complexome profiling and 2D blue native-/SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Ruppersberg, Hanna S; Feenders, Christoph; Blasius, Bernd; Braun, Hans-Peter; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) obtain energy from cytoplasmic reduction of sulfate to sulfide involving APS-reductase (AprAB) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). These enzymes are predicted to obtain electrons from membrane redox complexes, i.e. the quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase (QmoABC) and DsrMKJOP complexes. In addition to these conserved complexes, the genomes of SRB encode a large number of other (predicted) membrane redox complexes, the function and actual formation of which is unknown. This study reports the establishment of 1D Blue Native-PAGE complexome profiling and 2D BN-/SDS-PAGE for analysis of the membrane protein complexome of the marine sulfate reducer Desulfobacula toluolica Tol2. Analysis of normalized score profiles of >800 proteins in combination with hierarchical clustering and identification of 2D BN-/SDS-PAGE separated spots demonstrated separation of membrane complexes in their native form, e.g. ATP synthase. In addition to the QmoABC and DsrMKJOP complexes, other complexes were detected that constitute the basic membrane complexome of D. toluolica Tol2, e.g. transport proteins (e.g. sodium/sulfate symporters) or redox complexes involved in Na(+) -based bioenergetics (RnfABCDEG). Notably, size estimation indicates dimer and quadruple formation of the DsrMKJOP complex in vivo. Furthermore, cluster analysis suggests interaction of this complex with a rhodanese-like protein (Tol2_C05230) possibly representing a periplasmic electron transfer partner for DsrMKJOP. PMID:26792001

  7. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  8. Seismic full waveform inversion from compressive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional methods in seismic acquisition require sources and geophones that are uniformly located along a spatial line, using the Nyquist sampling rate. Depending on the area to be explored, it can be necessary to use seismic surveys with large offsets, or decrease the separation between adjacent geophones to improve the resolution, which generates very high volumes of data. It makes the exploration process more difficult and particularly expensive. This work presents the reconstruction of a compressive set of seismic traces acquired using the compressive sensing paradigm where the pair of sources and geophones are randomly located along the spatial line. The recovery of the wavefield from compressive measurements is feasible due to the capabilities of Curvelets on representing wave propagators with only a small set of coefficients. The method first uses the compressive samples to find a sparse vector representation of each pixel in a 2-D Curvelet dictionary. The sparse vector representation is estimated by solving a sparsity constrained optimization problem using the Gradient Projection for Sparse Reconstruction (GPSR) method. The estimated vector is then used to compute the seismic velocity profiles via acoustic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI). Simulations of the reconstructed image gathers and the resulting seismic velocity profiles illustrate the performance of the method. An improvement in the resulting images is obtained in comparison with traditional F-K filtering used in seismic data processing when traces are missing.

  9. Cenozoic magmatism in the northern continental margin of the South China Sea: evidence from seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Shiguo; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-06-01

    Igneous rocks in the northern margin of the South China Sea (SCS) have been identified via high resolution multi-channel seismic data in addition to other geophysical and drilling well data. This study identified intrusive and extrusive structures including seamounts and buried volcanoes, and their seismic characteristics. Intrusive features consist of piercement and implicit-piercement type structures, indicating different energy input associated with diapir formation. Extrusive structures are divided into flat-topped and conical-topped seamounts. Three main criteria (the overlying strata, the contact relationship and sills) were used to distinguish between intrusive rocks and buried volcanos. Three criteria are also used to estimate the timing of igneous rock formation: the contact relationship, the overlying sedimentary thickness and seismic reflection characteristics. These criteria are applied to recognize and distinguish between three periods of Cenozoic magmatism in the northern margin of the SCS: before seafloor spreading (Paleocene and Eocene), during seafloor spreading (Early Oligocene-Mid Miocene) and after cessation of seafloor spreading (Mid Miocene-Recent). Among them, greater attention is given to the extensive magmatism since 5.5 Ma, which is present throughout nearly all of the study area, making it a significant event in the SCS. Almost all of the Cenozoic igneous rocks were located below the 1500 m bathymetric contour. In contrast with the wide distribution of igneous rocks in the volcanic rifted margin, igneous rocks in the syn-rift stage of the northern margin of the SCS are extremely sporadic, and they could only be found in the southern Pearl River Mouth basin and NW sub-sea basin. The ocean-continent transition of the northern SCS exhibits high-angle listric faults, concentrated on the seaward side of the magmatic zone, and a sharply decreased crust, with little influence from a mantle plume. These observations provide further evidence to

  10. Cenozoic magmatism in the northern continental margin of the South China Sea: evidence from seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Shiguo; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-03-01

    Igneous rocks in the northern margin of the South China Sea (SCS) have been identified via high resolution multi-channel seismic data in addition to other geophysical and drilling well data. This study identified intrusive and extrusive structures including seamounts and buried volcanoes, and their seismic characteristics. Intrusive features consist of piercement and implicit-piercement type structures, indicating different energy input associated with diapir formation. Extrusive structures are divided into flat-topped and conical-topped seamounts. Three main criteria (the overlying strata, the contact relationship and sills) were used to distinguish between intrusive rocks and buried volcanos. Three criteria are also used to estimate the timing of igneous rock formation: the contact relationship, the overlying sedimentary thickness and seismic reflection characteristics. These criteria are applied to recognize and distinguish between three periods of Cenozoic magmatism in the northern margin of the SCS: before seafloor spreading (Paleocene and Eocene), during seafloor spreading (Early Oligocene-Mid Miocene) and after cessation of seafloor spreading (Mid Miocene-Recent). Among them, greater attention is given to the extensive magmatism since 5.5 Ma, which is present throughout nearly all of the study area, making it a significant event in the SCS. Almost all of the Cenozoic igneous rocks were located below the 1500 m bathymetric contour. In contrast with the wide distribution of igneous rocks in the volcanic rifted margin, igneous rocks in the syn-rift stage of the northern margin of the SCS are extremely sporadic, and they could only be found in the southern Pearl River Mouth basin and NW sub-sea basin. The ocean-continent transition of the northern SCS exhibits high-angle listric faults, concentrated on the seaward side of the magmatic zone, and a sharply decreased crust, with little influence from a mantle plume. These observations provide further evidence to

  11. SinoProbe-02: Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling of the Bangong Suture and Qiangtang terrane in central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Chen, C.; Gao, R.; Brown, L.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.; Deng, G.

    2010-12-01

    The Bangong Suture represents the tectonic junction between the two primary terranes of the Tibetan Plateau- the Lhasa block and the Qiangtang terrane.This suture was originally formed during a Jurassic collision of these two terranes,but has retained considerably significance as the suspect surface position of the buried mantle suture between Indian and Asian lithosphere that formed during Himalayan collision.As a corollary,these terranes have been associated with very different styles of mantle tectonics,perhaps as a result of mantle delamination beneath the Qiangtang.There have been a number of attempts to probe the deep structure of both the suture and its flanking terranes with refraction and teleseismic methods.Here we report the results of the first multichannel seismic reflection profile across this critical region.Deep seismic reflection method is internationally recognized as a pioneering technology for imaging crustal details,and it has been successfully applied in Southern Tibetan plateau in early 1990s.From October 2009 to May 2010,SinoProbe collected 310 km of a deep seismic reflection profile crossing BNS,successfully revealing structural details down to the Moho and possible deeper.The profile starts west of Silin Co in the northern Lhasa block,crosses the Bangong-Nujiang suture west of Lunpola,skirts the eastern extension of the central Qiantang anticline and ends at Dogai Coring just of south of Jinsha suture.The survey used explosive sources with variable shot size to insure adequate imaging of both the upper and lower crust.In the southern part of the profile,small shots of 50kg explosive were placed at 30m depth at 250m spacing,augmented by larger shots of 200kg t 50m depth spaced every 1km.In addition,large shots of 1000kg were placed every 50km.In the middle and north part,only 200 kg shots at 500m spacing along with the big shots.A linear array of receivers was used with a group interval of 50 m.The data was acquired by Sercel 408 XL using

  12. Integration of seismic data, iodine geochemistry yields Lodgepole exploration model

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A.; Andrew, J.A.

    1995-09-18

    The recent discovery of prolific Mississippian Lodgepole mounds near Dickinson, N.D., has resulted in one of the most exciting US exploration plays in several decades. the presence of the mounds in the Williston basin around Dickinson in North Dakota; in outcrop in central Montana; and in the subsurface of eastern Montana, northern Alberta, southwestern Manitoba, and southeastern Saskatchewan suggests a potential target that could be found over the entire basin and especially on the eastern margin. However, as prolific as the Lodgepole wells near Dickinson are, they are not easily found by simple subsurface mapping, interpreting existing 2D seismic, or newly acquired 3D seismic data (as proved by dry holes located on 3D seismic data). Presented here are a section and map examples of two different exploration methods used together over two producing areas near Dickinson, N.D. When the two methods are used together, in synergistic fashion, they provide a higher degree of success than when used apart. this approach can be used as a model for future exploration. The empirical signature of a Lodgepole mound on conventionally acquired and processed, high-resolution 2D and swath 2D seismic data is clearly expressed in the nature and character of the seismic event representing the contrast between the lodgepole and underlying rocks. Furthermore, and more importantly, there is direct correlation between the occurrence of surface iodine geochemical anomalies and the location of Lodgepole mounds on map and profile views of the seismic data.

  13. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  14. Lithospheric structure beneath trans-Carpathian transect from Precambrian platform to Pannonian basin: CELEBRATION 2000 seismic profile CEL05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Guterch, Aleksander; Keller, G. Randy; Janik, Tomasz; Hegedűs, Endre; Vozár, Jozef; Ślączka, Andrzej; Tiira, Timo; Yliniemi, Jukka

    2006-03-01

    In 2000, a consortium of European and North American institutions completed a huge active source seismic experiment focused on central Europe, the Central European Lithospheric Experiment Based on Refraction or CELEBRATION 2000. This experiment primarily consisted of a network of seismic refraction profiles that extended from the East European craton, along and across the Trans-European suture zone region in Poland to the Bohemian massif, and through the Carpathians and eastern Alps to the Pannonian basin. The longest profile CEL05 (1420 km) is the focus of this paper. The resulting two-dimensional tomographic and ray-tracing models show strong variations in crustal and lower lithospheric structure. Clear crustal thickening from the Pannonian basin (24-25 km thick) to the Trans-European suture zone region (˜50 km), together with the configuration of the lower lithospheric reflectors, suggests northward subduction of mantle underlying Carpathian-Pannonian plate under the European plate. This, however, conflicts with strong geological evidence for southward subduction, and we present three tectonic models that are to not totally mutually exclusive, to explain the lithospheric structure of the area: (1) northward "old" subduction of the Pannonian lithosphere under the East European craton in the Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous, (2) a collisional zone containing a "crocodile" structure where Carpatho-Pannonian upper crust is obducting over the crystalline crust of the East European craton and the Carpathian-Pannonian mantle lithosphere is underthrusting cratonic lower crust, and (3) lithosphere thinning due to the effects of Neogene extension and heating with the slab associated with "young" subduction southward in the Miocene having been either detached and/or rolled back to the east. In the last case, the northwestward dipping in the lithosphere can be interpreted as being due to isotherms that could represent the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary in the Pannonian region.

  15. VSP [Vertical Seismic Profiling] and cross hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Myer, L.R.; Karasaki, K.; Daley, T.M.; Long, J.C.S.

    1989-09-01

    For the past several years LBL has been carrying out experiments at various fractured rock sites to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media. These experiments have been utilizing high frequency (1000 to 10000 Hz.) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Three component sources and receivers are used to map fracture density, and orientation. The goal of the experiments has been to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters, if possible, in order to provide a more accurate description of a starting model for hydrological characterization. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of the Yucca Mountain site for the storage of nuclear waste. In addition to these controlled experiments multicomponent VSP work has been carried out at several sites to determine fracture characteristics. The results to date indicate that both P-wave and S-wave can be used to map the location of fractures. In addition, fractures that are open and conductive are much more visible to seismic waves that non-conductive fractures. The results of these tests indicate direct use in an unsaturated environment. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Using a fibre-optic cable as Distributed Acoustic Sensor for Vertical Seismic Profiling - Overview of various field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Julia; Lüth, Stefan; Henninges, Jan; Reinsch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fibre-optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) or Distributed Vibration Sensing (DVS) is a technology, where an optical fibre cable is used as a sensor for acoustic signals. An ambient seismic wavefield, which is coupled by friction or pressure to the optical fibre, induces dynamic strain changes along the cable. The DAS/DVS technology offers the possibility to record an optoelectronic signal which is linearly related to the time dependent local strain. The DAS/DVS technology is based on the established technique of phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (phi-OTDR). Coherent laser pulses are launched into the fibre to monitor changes in the resulting elastic Rayleigh backscatter with time. Dynamic strain changes lead to small displacements of the scattering elements (non-uniformities within the glass structure of the optical fibre), and therefore to variations of the relative phases of the backscattered photons. The fibre behaves as a series of interferometers whose output is sensitive to small changes of the strain at any point along its length. To record the ground motion not only in space but also in time, snapshots of the wavefield are created by repeatedly firing laser pulses into the fibre at sampling frequencies much higher than seismic frequencies. DAS/DVS is used e.g. for continuous monitoring of pipelines, roads or borders and for production monitoring from within the wellbore. Within the last years, the DAS/DVS technology was further developed to record seismic data. We focus on the recording of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data with DAS/DVS and present an overview of various field tests published between 2011 and 2014. Here, especially CO2 storage pilot sites provided the opportunity to test this new technology for geophysical reservoir monitoring. DAS/DVS-VSP time-lapse measurements have been published for the Quest CO2 storage site in Canada. The DAS/DVS technology was also tested at the CO2 storage sites in Rousse (France), Citronelle

  17. Reconstructing conjugate margins of the Canada-Amerasian basin: New tectonic constraints from deep seismic data and gravity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helwig, J.; Ady, B.; Kumar, N.; Granath, J. W.; Dinkelman, M. G.; Bird, D. E.; Emmet, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, decreasing sea ice and increasing scientific and economic interest in the Arctic have prompted new geological and geophysical studies that advance knowledge of the northern continental margins of North America. We report here on ArcticSPAN™ 40-km deep, PSDM (Pre-Stack Depth Migrated) marine seismic reflection profiles and gravity data from the Beaufort Sea of Canada and the US Chukchi Sea that constrain the position of the continent-ocean boundary and the relict spreading center of the Canada Basin, displaying significant variations in the orientation, geometry and deep crustal structure of the passive margin facing the Arctic Ocean. In the Canadian Beaufort Sea three distinct segments of the margin correspond to contrasts of pre-rift foundations: 1. the rifted, rotated Arctic Alaska Terrane west of the Mackenzie Delta (Beaufort segment); 2. the transform-faulted Laurentian crust of the Tuktoyaktuk margin (Tuk segment); and, 3. the rifted Laurentian crust of the Banks Island segment. The thick late Mesozoic-Cenozoic clastic prism of the continental margin was centered in the Mackenzie delta area by Mesozoic rifting of the Canada Basin. The northerly Paleocene-Miocene sweep of Cordilleran deformation modified the passive margin, overprinting the offshore Mackenzie Delta. The interpreted tectonic architecture of the three segments of the Beaufort passive margin demonstrates their distinct roles in opening of the Canada Basin. Two conjugate rifted margin segments (Beaufort and Banks Island) and a linking transform fault margin (Tuk) formed during the separation of the Arctic Alaska Terrane from northwestern Laurentia, in accord with a Jurassic-Aptian rotational model of Canada Basin opening. But the orientation of the Tuk transform segment indicates that a single pole of rotation cannot describe the opening of the basin. Additional seismic profiles from investigations of the Chukchi Sea margin display passive margin structures and rift to pre

  18. Mesozoic(?) lithosphere-scale buckling of the East European Craton in southern Ukraine: DOBRE-4 deep seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, Vitaly; Janik, Tomasz; Lysynchuk, Dmytro; Środa, Piotr; Czuba, Wojciech; Kolomiyets, Katherina; Aleksandrowski, Paweł; Gintov, Oleg; Omelchenko, Victor; Komminaho, Kari; Guterch, Aleksander; Tiira, Timo; Gryn, Dmytro; Legostaeva, Olga; Thybo, Hans; Tolkunov, Anatoliy

    2013-04-01

    In order to study the lithospheric structure in southern Ukraine, a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction project DOBRE-4 was conducted. The 500 km-long profile starts in the SW from the Alpine/Variscan North Dobrudja fold-thrust belt, being part of the Trans-European Suture Zone. It runs to the NE, mostly along the NW Black Sea coastal plain, towards the center of the Precambrian Ukrainian Shield. The field acquisition in October 2009 included 13 chemical shot points with charge sizes 600-1000 kg every 35-50 km and 230 recording stations, every ~2.5 km. The high data quality allows modelling of the P- and S-wave velocity structure along the profile. Two methods were used for the modelling of the seismic data. At first, ray-tracing trial-and-error modelling was developed using arrivals of major refracted and reflected P- and S-wave phases. Next, the amplitudes of the recorded phases were analysed using finite-difference full waveform method. The resulting velocity model shows fairly homogeneous structure of the middle to lower crust both vertically and laterally. The situation is different in the upper crust, with Vp velocities decreasing upwards from c. 6.35 at 15-20 km to 5.9-5.8 km/s at the top of the crystalline basement and to c. 5.15 to 3.80 km/s in Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic and to 2.70 to 2.30 km/s in Mesozoic strata. Below the upper crust the Vp smoothly increases downward, from c. 6.5 to 6.7-6.8 km/s near the crustal base, making it difficult to differentiate between the middle and lower crust. No Vp velocities exceeding 6.80 km/s have been recorded even in the lowermost part of the crust, unlike in similar profiles on the East European Craton. There is no clear change in the velocity field when moving laterally from the Precambrian platform into the younger tectonic units to the SW. Therefore, on purely seismic grounds it is not possible to distinguish major tectonic units known from the surface. The Moho is, however, clearly delineated by a

  19. Mesozoic(?) lithosphere-scale buckling of the East European Craton in southern Ukraine: DOBRE-4 deep seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Lysynchuk, D.; Środa, P.; Czuba, W.; Kolomiyets, K.; Aleksandrowski, P.; Gintov, O.; Omelchenko, V.; Komminaho, K.; Guterch, A.; Tiira, T.; Gryn, D.; Legostaeva, O.; Thybo, H.; Tolkunov, A.

    2013-11-01

    In order to study the lithospheric structure in southern Ukraine, a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction project DOBRE-4 was conducted. The 500-km-long profile starts in the SW from the Alpine/Variscan North Dobrudja Fold-Thrust Belt, being part of the Trans-European Suture Zone. It runs to the NE, mostly along the NW Black Sea coastal plain, towards the centre of the Precambrian Ukrainian Shield. The field acquisition in October 2009 included 13 chemical shot points with charge sizes 600-1000 kg every 35-50 km and 230 recording stations, every ˜2.5 km. The high data quality allows modelling of the P- and S-wave velocity structure along the profile. Two methods were used for the modelling of the seismic data. At first, ray tracing trial-and-error modelling was developed using arrivals of major refracted and reflected P- and S-wave phases. Next, the amplitudes of the recorded phases were analysed using finite-difference full waveform method. The resulting velocity model shows fairly homogeneous structure of the middle to lower crust both vertically and laterally. The situation is different in the upper crust, with Vp velocities decreasing upwards from ca. 6.35 at 15-20 km to 5.9-5.8 km s-1 at the top of the crystalline basement and to ca. 5.15-3.80 km s-1 in Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic and to 2.70-2.30 km s-1 in Mesozoic strata. Below the upper crust the Vp smoothly increases downward, from ca. 6.50 to 6.7-6.8 km s-1 near the crustal base, making it difficult to differentiate between the middle and lower crust. No Vp velocities exceeding 6.80 km s-1 have been recorded even in the lowermost part of the crust, unlike in similar profiles on the East European Craton. There is no clear change in the velocity field when moving laterally from the Precambrian platform into the younger tectonic units to the SW. Therefore, on purely seismic grounds it is not possible to distinguish major tectonic units known from the surface. The Moho is, however, clearly delineated by

  20. Crustal structure and evolution of the Trans-Hudson orogen: Results from seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, D. J.; Nelson, K. D.; Knapp, J. H.; Walters, J. J.; Brown, L. D.

    1996-04-01

    A 400-km-long deep seismic reflection transect across northeastern Montana and northern North Dakota reveals the crustal-scale structural fabric of the Early Proterozoic Trans-Hudson orogen beneath the Williston basin. Comparison with deep seismic reflection data across the Canadian portion of the same orogen ˜700 km to the north reveals first-order similarities in crustal architecture but documents significant along-strike variation in orogenic evolution. Both transects display a broad crustal-scale antiform axial to the orogen. In the north, geologic data suggest that this antiform is cored by an Archean microcontinent. In the south, west dipping reflections on the western flank of the antiform extend from the upper crust to the uppermost mantle and truncate prominent subhorizontal lower crustal reflections of the Archean Wyoming craton. Within the Wyoming craton, the eastern limit of east dipping midcrustal reflections coincides with the subsurface age boundary between the craton and the Early Proterozoic Trans-Hudson orogen as interpreted from potential field and drill core data. On the basis of subsurface geochronologic data from the crystalline basement and by analogy with the Glennie domain within the exposed Trans-Hudson orogen in Canada, we suggest that the southern antiform is cored by an Archean crustal fragment that was caught up in the terminal collision of the Wyoming and Superior cratons during Hudsonian orogeny. The eastern side of the Trans-Hudson orogen is characterized on both seismic transects by predominantly east dipping crustal penetrating reflections. We interpret the easterly dip of these reflections as evidence that the Superior province was thrust westward over the interludes of the orogen during terminal collision. Although juvenile Early Proterozoic terranes characterize the exposed segment of the Trans-Hudson orogen in Canada, limited drill core information within the Dakota segment of the orogen shows a predominance of granulitic

  1. Age of the bay of biscay: evidence from seismic profiles and bottom samples.

    PubMed

    Jones, E J; Ewing, J I

    1969-10-01

    Paleomagnetic data and marine magnetic surveys suggest that the Bay of Biscay was created by rifting due to an anticlockwise rotation of the Iberian peninsula. The period during which movement occurred is not known precisely, but a rotation, amounting to 22 degrees, appears to have taken place in post-Eocene time. To provide independent evidence on the age of the rift, bottom samples from the Biscay abyssal plain have been related to the distribution of seismic reflectors within the sediments. The investigation shows that a large part of the Bay of Biscay was in existence in late Cretaceous times and that the data can be interpreted in terms of some early Tertiary rotation. However, the amount of possible Tertiary opening is appreciably less than the paleomagnetic results suggest. In view of the fact that reflectors of Middle-Upper Miocene age can be traced as undisturbed horizons across the bay, all tectonic movements must have ceased by the early Miocene. PMID:17769757

  2. Possible modes of coral-reef development at Molokai, Hawaii, inferred from seismic-reflection profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Grossman, E.E.; Hart, P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution, seismic-reflection data elucidate the late Quaternary development of the largest coral-reef complex in the main Hawaiian Islands. Six acoustic facies were identified from reflection characteristics and lithosome geometry. An extensive, buried platform with uniformly low relief was traced beneath fore-reef and marginal shelf environments. This highly reflective surface dips gently seaward to ???130 m depth and locally crops out on the seafloor. It probably represents a wave-cut platform or ancient reef flat. We propose alternative evolutionary models, in which sea-level changes have modulated the development of reef systems, to explain the observed stratigraphic relationships. The primary difference between the models is the origin of the underlying antecedent surface, which arguably could have formed during either regression/lowstand or subsequent transgression. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  3. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  4. Shallow subsurface structure of the Wasatch fault, Provo segment, Utah, from integrated compressional and shear-wave seismic reflection profiles with implications for fault structure and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.; South, J.V.; Brinkerhoff, A.R.; Keach, R.W.; Okojie-Ayoro, A. O.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vibroseis compressional and experimental hammer-source, shear-wave, seismic reflection profiles across the Provo segment of the Wasatch fault zone in Utah reveal near-surface and shallow bedrock structures caused by geologically recent deformation. Combining information from the seismic surveys, geologic mapping, terrain analysis, and previous seismic first-arrival modeling provides a well-constrained cross section of the upper ~500 m of the subsurface. Faults are mapped from the surface, through shallow, poorly consolidated deltaic sediments, and cutting through a rigid bedrock surface. The new seismic data are used to test hypotheses on changing fault orientation with depth, the number of subsidiary faults within the fault zone and the width of the fault zone, and the utility of integrating separate elastic methods to provide information on a complex structural zone. Although previous surface mapping has indicated only a few faults, the seismic section shows a wider and more complex deformation zone with both synthetic and antithetic normal faults. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of a combined shallow and deeper penetrating geophysical survey, integrated with detailed geologic mapping to constrain subsurface fault structure. Due to the complexity of the fault zone, accurate seismic velocity information is essential and was obtained from a first-break tomography model. The new constraints on fault geometry can be used to refine estimates of vertical versus lateral tectonic movements and to improve seismic hazard assessment along the Wasatch fault through an urban area. We suggest that earthquake-hazard assessments made without seismic reflection imaging may be biased by the previous mapping of too few faults. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  5. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  6. Crustal Structure of the Puget Lowland, Washington State From the Dry SHIPS '99 Seismic Refraction/Wide-Angle Reflection Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Miller, K. C.; Brocher, T. M.; Li, Q.; Pratt, T. L.; Wilcock, W. S.; Crosson, R. S.; Trehu, A. M.; Weaver, C. S.

    2001-12-01

    The SHIPS (Seismic Hazards Investigations of Puget Sound) experiments are part of a continuing effort to define basin and fault geometry beneath the populated Puget Lowland. In September 1999, the USGS and a number of university collaborators collected the "Dry SHIPS" seismic profile across the Seattle basin of western Washington State. In March 2000, this group collected additional seismic data in the city of Seattle using the implosion of the Kingdome sports arena as a seismic source. The objectives of the Dry SHIPS study were to define the geometry of the Seattle basin in an E-W direction and to determine the structure of the eastern and western boundaries of the basin. In addition, we were testing the hypothesis that N-S trending faults lie beneath Puget Sound or the adjacent Lowland: one of these faults may form the eastern boundary of the Siletz terrane. The main objective of Kingdome SHIPS was to look at the Seattle fault and shallow strata beneath Seattle to estimate site response in Seattle. The Dry SHIPS data are characterized by travel time advances associated with the Siletz terrane to the west and the Cascades to the east and by delays of as much as 2 s caused by the Seattle basin. P-wave 3-D tomographic results show that the basin is about 70 km wide and contains sedimentary strata with velocities increasing gradually from 1.8 - 4.5 km/s. The contact with underlying basement rocks is characterized by a rapid increase in velocity from 4.5 to 5.0 km/s. At its center the basin is 6 - 7 km deep along this profile. This result is consistent with results from a N-S trending reflection line collected in 1998 during the Wet SHIPS phase of the project that is tied to well control. The symmetry of the Seattle basin is consistent with thrust loading as the major contributor to the formation of the basin. The lower velocities within the upper part of the basement found east of the Puget Sound may be indicative of pre-Tertiary basement rocks of the Cascades. This

  7. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  8. Shallow 3-D vertical seismic profiling around a contaminant withdrawal well on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.; Bainer, R.; Milligan, P.; Tong, C.

    1997-01-30

    One of the major problems associated with ground water contaminant remediation is well placement. Optimal-placement of wells requires an accurate knowledge of geologic structure and stratigraphy in the near surface sediments and rock (0 to 100 m). Without the development of remote imaging provided by geophysical techniques, the required spacing between treatment wells may be less than 2 m in order to be confident that all contaminant reservoirs had been remediated. One method for characterizing geologic structure and stratigraphy in the near surface is vertical seismic profiling (VSP), a technique often used on deep exploration wells to calibrate surface seismic reflection data. For near-surface applications, VSP data can be acquired efficiently using an array of hydrophones lowered into a fluid-filled borehole (Milligan et al, 1997). In this paper we discuss the acquisition and processing of a 3-D VSP collected at a shallow remediation site located on the grounds of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) near Livermore, California. The site was used by the United States Navy as an air training base. At this time, initial releases of hazardous materials to the environment occurred in the form of solvents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs)] that were used for the cleaning of airplanes and their parts. Gasoline, diesel and other petroleum-based compounds are also known to have leaked into the ground. California Research and Development Company, a subsidy of Standard Oil, occupied the southeastern portion of the site from 1950 to 1954. The first releases of radioactive materials to the environment occurred at this time, with the beginning of testing of radioactive materials at the site. In 1952, LLNL acquired the site. Additional releases of VOCS, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, radionuclides (primarily tritium), gasoline and pesticides have occurred since. These releases were due to localized spills, landfills, surface impoundments, disposal pits

  9. Method and system for vertical seismic profiling by measuring drilling vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, F.W.; DiSiena, J.P.; Bseisu, A.A.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes a method for obtaining seismic data pertaining to an earth formation while forming a wellbore in the formation with a drillstring having a drillbit or the like disposed at the lower distal end thereof. It comprises: providing vibration sensing means connected to an upper region of the drillstring. The vibration sensing means being adapted to produce electrical signals related to vibrations of the drillstring; providing an array of seismometers disposed generally on the earth's surface in the vicinity of the wellbore; measuring first signals generated by the vibration sensing means resulting from vibrations of the drillstring; measuring second signals generated by the array of seismometers resulting from vibrations transmitted through the formation; and comparing the first signals and the second signals to determine selected characteristics of the formation including the step of calculating the location of origin of the first signal based on the difference in time of arrival at the vibration sensing means of a torsional vibration signal and an axial vibration signal transmitted through the drillstring and at least one of the torsional wave speed and the axial wave speed in the drillstring to determine the origin in time of the first signal.

  10. Quaternary extensional growth folding beneath Reno, Nevada, imaged by urban seismic profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frary, Roxy N.; Louie, John; Odum, Jackson K.

    2013-01-01

    We characterize shallow subsurface faulting and basin structure along a transect through heavily urbanized Reno, Nevada, with high‐resolution seismic reflection imaging. The 6.8 km of P‐wave data image the subsurface to approximately 800 m depth and delineate two subbasins and basin uplift that are consistent with structure previously inferred from gravity modeling in this region of the northern Walker Lane. We interpret two primary faults that bound the uplift and deform Quaternary deposits. The dip of Quaternary and Tertiary strata in the western subbasin increases with greater depth to the east, suggesting recurrent fault motion across the westernmost of these faults. Deformation in the Quaternary section of the western subbasin is likely evidence of extensional growth folding at the edge of the Truckee River through Reno. This deformation is north of, and on trend with, previously mapped Quaternary fault strands of the Mt. Rose fault zone. In addition to corroborating the existence of previously inferred intrabasin structure, these data provide evidence for an active extensional Quaternary fault at a previously unknown location within the Truckee Meadows basin that furthers our understanding of both the seismotectonic framework and earthquake hazards in this urbanized region.

  11. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  12. Structure of the ophiolite-hosted Outokumpu Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide ore district revealed by combined 3D modelling and 2D high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, Kerstin; Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    The Outokumpu district within the North Karelia Schist Belt in eastern Finland hosts Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide deposits which are associated with Palaeoproterozoic ophiolitic metaperidotites that were tectonically interleaved with allochthonous metaturbidites. Extensive metasomatism of the peridotites produced a rim of quartz-carbonate-calc-silicate rocks, grouped as the Outokumpu assemblage (OKA). A tectonic history comprising various phases of folding and shearing followed by several faulting events dismembered the metaperidotites so that ore bodies cannot be easily followed along strike. Future exploration has to expand the search into deeper areas and consequently requires better knowledge of the subsurface geology. In order to unravel the complex structure 3D geologic models of different scales have been built using a variety of information: geological maps, aeromagnetic and gravity maps, digital terrain models, mine cross sections, drill core logs combined with observations from underground mine galleries, structural measurements, and data from seismic survey lines. The latter have been used to detect upper crustal-scale structures and have been reprocessed for our purpose. The models reveal that the ore body has formed during remobilisation of a proto-ore and is closely related to thrust zones that truncate the OKA. Later faults dismembered the ore explaining the variable depth of the different ore bodies along the Outokumpu ore zone. On a larger scale, at least four km-scale thrust sheets separated by major listric shear zones (curved dislocations in the seismic lines) can be recognized, each internally further imbricated by subordinate shear zones containing a number of lens-shape bodies of probably OKA rocks. Thrust stacking was followed by at least 3 stages of faulting that divided the ore belt into fault-bounded blocks with heterogeneous displacements: (i) NW-dipping faults with unresolved kinematics, (ii) reverse faulting along c.50°-60° SE

  13. Transcurrent nature of the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone in Central Europe: results of the POLCRUST-01 deep reflection seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkiewicz, M.; Maksym, A.; Malinowski, M.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Petecki, Z.; Probulski, J.; Janik, T.; Majdański, M.; Środa, P.; Czuba, W.; Gaczyński, E.; Jankowski, L.

    2015-04-01

    Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) corresponds to a crustal boundary between the Precambrian East European Platform (EEP) and the Palaeozoic West European Platform. Although the zone has been controlling Phanerozoic evolution of large parts of Central Europe, its course, geometry and origin are still poorly constrained. Deep reflection seismic profile POLCRUST-01, recently acquired in SE Poland, for the first time allowed a precise comparison of the Ediacaran and later tectonic patterns to the deep crustal features of the TTZ and adjacent areas. The TTZ corresponds to the subvertical Tomaszów Fault separating the Radom-Kraśnik Elevation, composed of the typical EEP crust, from the Biłgoraj-Narol Block (BNB) in the SW, with a thinned crystalline basement showing affinities to the EEP crust. The BNB is a part of the larger Caledonian Łysogóry Terrane as evidenced by its Lower Palaeozoic stratigraphy and gravity data. Thus, for the first time, the proximal Baltican affinity of this unit has been documented unambiguously. The Łysogóry Terrane is delimited from the SW by the subvertical Cieszanów Fault Zone, corresponding to the Holy Cross Suture. The adjacent Małopolska Terrane is characterized by a distinct Early Palaeozoic stratigraphy, and lower-middle crust exhibiting SW-dipping reflective packages interpreted as NE-verging thrust and shear zones of a Neoproterozoic orogen. The observations from the POLCRUST-01 profile and regional comparisons indicate that the TTZ is a major Caledonian transcurrent zone between Poland and East Romania. In central Poland, the TTZ likely forms a narrow subvertical contact between the EEP and a proximal Kuiavia Terrane, as constrained by the deep refraction seismic data. To the NW, the zone extends towards the Pomeranian part of the Caledonide fold-and-thrust belt related to the Avalonia-Baltica collision zone (Thor Suture). South-east of Poland the TTZ corresponds to the Rava Ruska Fault Zone established as a Caledonian suture

  14. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling of the Santa Monica Fault Zone, West Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, J.F.; Pratt, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection data obtained across the Santa Monica fault in west Los Angeles reveal the near-surface geometry of this active, oblique-reverse-left-lateral fault. Although near-surface fault dips as great as 55?? cannot be ruled out, we interpret the fault to dip northward at 30?? to 35?? in the upper few hundred meters, steepening to ???65?? at 1 to 2 km depth. A total of ???180 m of near-field thrust separation (fault slip plus drag folding) has occurred on the fault since the development of a prominent erosional surface atop ???1.2 Ma strata. In the upper 20 to 40 m strain is partitioned between the north-dipping main thrust strand and several closely spaced, near-vertical strike-slip faults observed in paleoseismologic trenches. The main thrust strand can be traced to within 20 m of the ground surface, suggesting that it breaks through to the surface in large earthquakes. Uplift of a ???50,000-year-old alluvial fan surface indicates a short-term, dip-slip rate of ???0.5 mm/yr, similar to the ???0.6 mm/yr dip-slip rate derived from vertical separation of the oxygen isotope stage 5e marine terrace 3 km west of the study site. If the 0.6 mm/yr minimum, dip-slip-only rate characterizes the entire history of the fault, then the currently active strand of the Santa Monica fault probably began moving within the past ???300,000 years. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  16. Imaging of urban sinkhole structures - combination of P-wave and shear-wave reflection seismic profiling in the metropolitan region of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Polom, U.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    The investigated roof region of a salt diapir in Hamburg, northern Germany, suffers sinkhole activity that was accompanied lately by microseismic events in the Gross Flottbek quarter. Thus, a high geohazard potential is present which can only be evaluated if highly resolved structural data are available. In addition to a shear-wave reflection seismic survey we performed with our shear-wave seismic system (ELVIS microvibrator, 120 m land streamer with 1 m SH-geophone distance), we also measured two P-wave reflection seismic profiles with the aim of imaging the top of the salt diapir. The LIAG- minivibrator and planted geophones of 5 m distance were used. The main profile runs along the major shear-wave line, the other crosses perpendicularly, so that a good areal coverage is given. Top salt is suggested at ca. 180 m depth, which is slightly deeper than previously thought from gravimetric measurements and larger-scale modelling. However, the general dip of the salt flank is further corroborated by additional gravimetric measurements. The surface of the salt dome undulates in the 10 m-range. Variable continuity of reflective elements and amplitude further characterize the top salt surface, which will be discussed in the context of fault and subrosion structures revealed from the shear-wave seismic experiment.

  17. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  18. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  19. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  20. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  1. 1978 Yellowstone-eastern Snake River Plain seismic profiling experiment: Data and upper crustal structure of the Yellowstone region

    SciTech Connect

    Schilly, M.M.; Smith, R.B.; Braile, L.W.; Ansorge, J.

    1982-04-10

    Eleven in-line refraction profiles, recorded to distances of 300 km, and one azimuthal fan plot were constructed from data recorded with a 150-station array in the Yellowstone National Park area during the 1978 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic experiment. Interpretations of the data suggest that the crustal P wave velocity model for the Yellowstone region is characterized by (1) an averaged 10-km-thick upper crustal layer, V/sub p/ = 6.0 km/s, (2) an average crustal velocity of 6.3 km/s, and (3) a total crustal thickness of 44 km. Velocity models are presented for profiles that emphasize the upper crust and show (1) a decrease in the depth to the top of the upper crustal crystalline basement from 5 km in southwestern Yellowstone near Island Park to 1 km at the northeast side of the Yellowstone Plateau that is interpreted as a progressive thinning of the silicic surface volcanic layer to the northeast and (2) evidence for a large lateral inhomogeneity interpreted to be a low-velocity body, with a decrease of at least 10% in P wave velocity, located beneath the northeast corner of the Yellowstone Plateau. The low-velocity zone coincides with a local -30-mgal residual gravity anomaly and is located beneath part of the Sour Creek resurgent dome and part of the Hot Springs Basin, the largest hydrothermal system in Yellowstone. The low-velocity body has a maximum depth to the top of 3 km and a minimum depth to the bottom of 9 km and may represent a zone of partial melt. In comparison to the thermally undisturbed upper crust of the surrounding Rocky Mountains the upper crust of the northeastern Yellowstone plateau appears laterally inhomogeneous in velocity and layer thickness, suggesting effects of thermal and magma intrusion, whereas the lower crust appears relatively homogeneous.

  2. Frozen subduction in the Yangtze block: insights from the deep seismic profiling and gravity anomaly in east Sichuan fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaosong; Gao, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jisheng; Guo, Lianghui

    2016-04-01

    The Sichuan basin is the main part of the middle-upper Yangtze block, which has been experienced a long-term tectonic evolution since Archean. The Yangtze block was regarded as a stable block until the collision with the Cathaysia block in late Neoproterozoic. A new deep seismic reflection profile conducted in the eastern Sichuan fold belt (ESFB) discovered a serials of south-dipping reflectors shown from lower crust to the mantle imply a frozen subduction zone within the Yangtze block. In order to prove the speculation, we also obtain the middle-lower crustal gravity anomalies by removing the gravity anomalies induced by the sedimentary rocks and the mantle beneath the Moho, which shows the mid-lower crustal structure of the Sichuan basin can be divided into eastern and western parts. Combined with the geochronology and Aeromagnetic anomalies, we speculated the Yangtze block was amalgamated by the West Sichuan and East Sichuan blocks separated by the Huayin-Chongqing line. The frozen subduction zone subsequently shifted to a shear zone accommodated the lower crustal shortening when the decollement at the base of the Nanhua system functioned in the upper plate.

  3. Results of vertical seismic profiling at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Feighner, M.A.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

    1998-02-25

    A Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was recorded in Rye Patch by LBNL between December 11 and December 13, 1997. Figure 1 shows the location of the Rye Patch Geothermal Field with Well 46-28 located within the marked Rye Patch Anomaly. The VSP in Well 46-28 used a vibroseis source and a single-level, high temperature, hydraulic wall-locking, 3-component seismometer. The vibroseis source was a Mertz P-wave vibrator. The source sweep was 10 Hz to 80 Hz, 10 seconds long, with a 0.2 s cosine taper. The borehole geophone was an SSC model LVHK 6001 using 14 Hz geophones. The recording system was a Geometrics Strataview. Six data channels were recorded: the three geophones, the source pilot, the vibrator reference and the vibrator baseplate accelerometer. The record length was 12,288 samples at a 1 ms sample rate, giving a 2.3 s correlated record length. A 10 Hz low cut filter was used and no high cut filter was used except the anti-alias filter. Results are described.

  4. Anatomy of a metamorphic core complex: seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling in southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.; Larkin, S.P.; Fuis, G.S.; Simpson, R.W.; Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The metamorphic core complex belt in southeastern California and western Arizona is a NW-SE trending zone of unusually large Tertiary extension and uplift. Midcrustal rocks exposed in this belt raise questions about the crustal thickness, crustal structure, and the tectonic evolution of the region. Three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles were collected to address these issues. The results presented here, which focus on the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains, yield a consistent three-dimensiional image of this part of the metamorphic core complex belt. The final model consists of a thin veneer (<2 km) of upper plate and fractured lower plate rocks (1.5-5.5 km s-1) overlying a fairly homogeneous basement (~6.0 km s-1) and a localized high-velocity (6.4 km s -1) body situated beneath the western Whipple Mountains. A prominent midcrustal reflection is identified beneath the Whipple and Buckskin Rawhide mountains between 10 and 20km depth. -from Authors

  5. Proterozoic basin in the southern Midcontinent of the United States revealed by COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, J. A.; Brown, L. D.; Steiner, D.; Oliver, J. E.; Kaufman, S.; Denison, R. E.

    1981-12-01

    COCORP deep crustal seismic profiles in southwestern Oklahoma show strong, persistent, continuous, and undeformed layering in the basement over an area probably very much greater than 2,500 km2. Such layering is very unusual, judging by COCORP experience with basement rocks elsewhere in the United States. The data can be interpreted as representing a Proterozoic basin filled with clastic sedimentary and felsic volcanic rocks 7 to 10 km thick, whose base lies 10 to 13 km deep. These rocks are believed, on the basis of sparse evidence from regional geology, to have been deposited or extruded about 1,200 to 1,400 m.y. ago, and some of them may now be metamorphosed. This basin lies on the south side of the Wichita Mountains, under the Paleozoic Hardeman Basin, and is similar in depth to the Paleozoic Anadarko Basin north of the mountains. The deep basement layering is truncated on the south side of the Wichita Mountains, probably by Precambrian faults in conjunction with granitic intrusions. Pennsylvanian compression probably reactivated these Precambrian trends. Extensive Precambrian basin deposits in this area were unexpected, on the basis of evidence from sparse well control, and reports of other layered basement reflections elsewhere in the southern Midcontinent suggest that Precambrian basins may be an important feature of this region. Simple models for the evolution of southwestern Oklahoma as an aulacogen must be reformulated in the light of these new data.

  6. The effects of recent uplift and volcanism on deposition in Mono Lake, California, from seismic-reflection (CHIRP) profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, S. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Stine, S.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.

    2014-05-01

    About 150 km of high-resolution, seismic reflection (Compressed High-Intensity Radar Pulse) profiles (approximately 20 m penetration) were collected in Mono Lake in order to define the uppermost sedimentary architecture of the basin, which has been heavily impacted by recent volcanic, tectonic, and climatic processes. The study also provides an important background for ongoing efforts to obtain paleoenvironmental records from sediment cores in the lake. The history of four seismic-stratigraphic units in the upper 20 m of section are inferred from the data, and the interpretations are generally consistent with previous interpretations of lake history for the past 2000 years, including a major lowstand at 1941 m. No shorelines below the previously documented major lowstand at 1941 m were found. A relatively steep slope segment, whose toe is at about 1918 m, and which occurs on the southern and western margins of the deep basin of the lake, is interpreted as the relict foreset slope of deposition from prograding western tributaries. This topography is unconformably overlain by a unit of interbedded tephra and lake sediments of variable lithology, which contains tephra of the North Mono (600-625 cal yr BP) eruption in its upper part. The tephra-rich unit is overlain by a mostly massive mudflow deposit that is locally more than 18 m thick and that is distributed in a radial pattern around Paoha Island. The evidence suggests that within the past few hundred years, rapid uplift of Paoha Island through thick, preexisting lake deposits led to widespread slope failures, which created a terrain of disrupted, intact blocks near the island, and a thick, fluid mudflow beyond. As is common in mudflows, the mudflow moved up the depositional slope of the lake floor, terminating against the preexisting slopes, likely in multiple surges. Since about 1700 Common Era, fine-grained, well-laminated sediments have accumulated in the deep parts of the lake at anomalously rapid rates

  7. Dissolution of bedded rock salt: A seismic profile across the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member, central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, N.L.; Hopkins, J.; Martinez, A.; Knapp, R.W.; Macfarlane, P.A.; Watney, W.L.; Black, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since late Tertiary, bedded rock salt of the Permian Hutchinson Salt Member has been dissolved more-or-less continuously along its active eastern margin in central Kansas as a result of sustained contact with unconfined, undersaturated groundwater. The associated westward migration of the eastern margin has resulted in surface subsidence and the contemporaneous sedimentation of predominantly valley-filling Quarternary alluvium. In places, these alluvium deposits extend more than 25 km to the east of the present-day edge of the main body of contiguous rock salt. The margin could have receded this distance during the past several million years. From an environmental perspective, the continued leaching of the Hutchinson Salt is a major concern. This predominantly natural dissolution occurs in a broad zone across the central part of the State and adversely affects groundwater and surface-water quality as nonpoint source pollution. Significant surface subsidence occurs as well. Most of these subsidence features have formed gradually; others developed in a more catastrophic manner. The latter in particular pose real threats to roadways, railways, and buried oil and gas pipelines. In an effort to further clarify the process of natural salt dissolution in central Kansas and with the long-term goal of mitigating the adverse environmental affects of such leaching, the Kansas Geological Survey acquired a 4-km seismic profile across the eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt in the Punkin Center area of central Kansas. The interpretation of these seismic data (and supporting surficial and borehole geologic control) is consistent with several hypotheses regarding the process and mechanisms of dissolution. More specifically these data support the theses that: 1. (1) Dissolution along the active eastern margin of the Hutchinson Salt Member was initiated during late Tertiary. Leaching has resulted in the steady westward migration of the eastern margin, surface subsidence, and the

  8. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  9. Quaternary deformation along the Meeman-Shelby Fault near Memphis, Tennessee, imaged by high-resolution marine and land seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanjun; Magnani, Maria Beatrice; McIntosh, Kirk; Waldron, Brian; Guo, Lei

    2013-06-01

    series of high-resolution seismic reflection surveys was carried out in 2008, 2010, and 2011, providing a total of five new seismic profiles constraining the location and character of the Meeman-Shelby Fault (MSF), about 9 km west of Memphis, Tennessee, in the Central U.S. The MSF is the best documented fault closest to Memphis yet discovered and shows a recurrent fault history. The fault, as imaged by the reflection profiles, is ~45 km long, strikes N25°E, and dips west-northwest ~83°, exhibiting an up-to-the-west sense of motion with a possible right-lateral strike-slip component. The data show that on average, the MSF offsets the Paleozoic unit ~77 m and folds the top of the Cretaceous unit and the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group ~44 and ~25 m, respectively. One seismic profile acquired along the Mississippi River images the bottom of the Quaternary alluvium warped up ~28 m, indicating recent activity of the MSF. Calculated vertical slip rates of the MSF during the deposition of the Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene, and Quaternary sediments are 0.0022, 0.0010, 0.0004, and 0.2154 mm/yr, respectively, suggesting an increase in fault activity during the Quaternary. Consistent with the present stress field and the deformation of the New Madrid seismic zone fault system, we interpret the MSF as a P shear fault in the context of a left-stepping, right-lateral constraining strike-slip fault system under a nearly east-west oriented compressional stress field. Source scaling estimates indicate that the MSF is capable of generating a M6.9 earthquake if rupturing in one event.

  10. Deep structure and historical earthquakes in the Calabrian subduction zone (Southern Italy): preliminary results from multi-channel seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, F.; Gutscher, M.; Torelli, L.; Polonia, A.; Riminucci, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Calabrian subduction zone is located in the complex Central Mediterranean area. This subduction is characterized by the presence of deep earthquakes under the Tyrrhenian Sea down to 500 km depth. The Tethyan remnant Ionian slab descends towards the NW at a dip of about 70° and is associated with an active volcanic arc (the Aeolian Islands). Recently reported GPS and seismicity studies suggest that the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere beneath the Calabrian Arc may be locally still active, though at very slow rates (<5 mm/yr). Moreover the offshore Calabrian accretionary wedge is known to include compressional anticlines and ongoing hydrological activity (mud volcanoes), evidence of an active deformation in the wedge. In the Calabria - Eastern Sicily area, significant historical seismicity is documented, with the strongest event occurring in 1693. The 1693 earthquake (MCS intensities = XI) destroyed the coast of Eastern Sicily (60000 people killed) and generated a 5-10 m high tsunami. Because of the tsunami generated and because the isoseismals are open to the sea, the source region appears to be offshore. The subduction fault plane would then be a good candidate for the 1693 event. Historical reports indicates that the 1169 earthquake had similar intensities and a comparable isoseismal pattern, suggesting the events may have the same source. However, a lack of instrumentally recorded thrust earthquakes, characteristic of active subduction zone, suggests that if subduction is active, the fault plane may be locked since the instrumental period. To seek evidence of continuous tectonic activity of the Calabrian system, we present preliminary results from reprocessed 96-channels seismic reflection profiles (French Archimede cruise, 1997) offshore Sicily. This analysis permits to recognize a well-defined stratigraphy in the Ionian Abyssal Plain, this stratigraphy becomes difficult to follow under the deformed Calabrian Prism. But the joint interpretation with the

  11. Initiation and evolution of the Oligo-Miocene rift basins of southwestern Europe: Contribution of deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bois, C.

    1993-11-01

    Southwestern European Oligo-Miocene rift basins have recently been investigated by deep seismic reflection profiling. The study of these data, together with other geophysical and geological data, shows that the rifts, which run from the Rhinegraben to the western Mediterranean, do not form a single clearcut system. The N-trending rifts (Rhinegraben, Bresse and Limagne) were developed on a cold and rigid lithosphere affected by the Alpine collision. The NE-trending rifts (southeastern France, Gulf of Lions and Valencia Trough) were formed slightly later in a backarc basin associated with an active segment of the European-Iberian plate that was heated, affected by widespread calcalkaline volcanism and probably weakened. All the southwestern European rifts and basins together may, however, be related to a common heritage represented by the boundary between the European-Iberian and African-Apulian plates that was created in the Jurassic with the initiation of the Tethys Ocean. The present features of the southwestern European Oligo-Miocène rift basins may be explained by a combination of three geodynamic mechanisms: mechanical stretching of the lithosphere, active mantle uplifting, and subordinate lithospheric flexuring. All the rifts were probably initiated by passive stretching. A systematic discrepancy between stretching derived from fault analysis and attenuation of the crust has been observed in all the rifts. This suggests that these rifts were subsequently reworked by one or several active mantle upwelling events associated with late shoulder uplift, asthenosphere upwelling and anomalous P-wave velocities in the lowermost crust and the uppermost mantle. Crustal attenuation may have been achieved by mantle intrusion, metamorphism of the deep crust and/or its delamination. Some of the rifts were affected by lithospheric flexuring. Combinations, in various proportions, of a small number of geodynamic mechanisms probably controlled many basins in the world. This

  12. Continuous resistivity profiling and seismic-reflection data collected in April 2010 from Indian River Bay, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Michael, H.A.; Kroeger, K.D.; Green, Adrian; Bergeron, Emile M.

    2014-01-01

    A geophysical survey to delineate the fresh-saline groundwater interface and associated sub-bottom sedimentary structures beneath Indian River Bay, Delaware, was carried out in April 2010. This included surveying at higher spatial resolution in the vicinity of a study site at Holts Landing, where intensive onshore and offshore studies were subsequently completed. The total length of continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) survey lines was 145 kilometers (km), with 36 km of chirp seismic lines surveyed around the perimeter of the bay. Medium-resolution CRP surveying was performed using a 50-meter streamer in a baywide grid. Results of the surveying and data inversion showed the presence of many buried paleochannels beneath Indian River Bay that generally extended perpendicular from the shoreline in areas of modern tributaries, tidal creeks, and marshes. An especially wide and deep paleochannel system was imaged in the southeastern part of the bay near White Creek. Many paleochannels also had high-resistivity anomalies corresponding to low-salinity groundwater plumes associated with them, likely due to the presence of fine-grained estuarine mud and peats in the channel fills that act as submarine confining units. Where present, these units allow plumes of low-salinity groundwater that was recharged onshore to move beyond the shoreline, creating a complex fresh-saline groundwater interface in the subsurface. The properties of this interface are important considerations in construction of accurate coastal groundwater flow models. These models are required to help predict how nutrient-rich groundwater, recharged in agricultural watersheds such as this one, makes its way into coastal bays and impacts surface-water quality and estuarine ecosystems.

  13. Integration of P- and SH-wave high-resolution seismic reflection and micro-gravity techniques to improve interpretation of shallow subsurface structure: New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Ravat, D.; Biswas, S.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Fillerup, M.A.; Tingey, B.E.; Wald, L.; Northcott, M.L.; South, J.V.; Okure, M.S.; Chandler, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    Shallow high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have traditionally been restricted to either compressional (P) or horizontally polarized shear (SH) waves in order to produce 2-D images of subsurface structure. The northernmost Mississippi embayment and coincident New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) provide an ideal laboratory to study the experimental use of integrating P- and SH-wave seismic profiles, integrated, where practicable, with micro-gravity data. In this area, the relation between "deeper" deformation of Paleozoic bedrock associated with the formation of the Reelfoot rift and NMSZ seismicity and "shallower" deformation of overlying sediments has remained elusive, but could be revealed using integrated P- and SH-wave reflection. Surface expressions of deformation are almost non-existent in this region, which makes seismic reflection surveying the only means of detecting structures that are possibly pertinent to seismic hazard assessment. Since P- and SH-waves respond differently to the rock and fluid properties and travel at dissimilar speeds, the resulting seismic profiles provide complementary views of the subsurface based on different levels of resolution and imaging capability. P-wave profiles acquired in southwestern Illinois and western Kentucky (USA) detect faulting of deep, Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous reflectors while coincident SH-wave surveys show that this deformation propagates higher into overlying Tertiary and Quaternary strata. Forward modeling of micro-gravity data acquired along one of the seismic profiles further supports an interpretation of faulting of bedrock and Cretaceous strata. The integration of the two seismic and the micro-gravity methods therefore increases the scope for investigating the relation between the older and younger deformation in an area of critical seismic hazard. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  15. Structure of thinned continental crust across the Orphan Basin from a dense wide-angle seismic profile and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. W. Helen; Watremez, Louise; Louden, Keith E.; Nedimovíć, Mladen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a 500-km long, 2-D P-wave velocity model across the Orphan Basin, offshore NE Newfoundland, Canada, from Flemish Cap to the Bonavista Platform, formed using refraction and wide-angle reflection data from 89 ocean-bottom seismometers. This layered model builds on a recent traveltime tomography result using additional constraints from coincident multichannel seismic reflection and gravity data plus borehole logs from three wells. The model shows (i) post-rift Tertiary (velocities ˜1.7-3.5 km s-1) and (ii) both post-rift and syn-rift, Cretaceous and Jurassic sediments (˜4-5 km s-1), deposited within an eastern and a western sub-basin that are separated by a major basement block. The existence of Jurassic sediments indicates a pre-Cretaceous rifting phase in the eastern sub-basin, and possibly in the western sub-basin. However, there is no evidence that Triassic sediments are widespread across the Orphan Basin. Two upper crustal sublayers and one lower crustal layer are defined by differences in velocities (5.4-6.1, 6.1-6.5 and 6.3-7.1 km s-1, respectively) and vertical velocity gradients (mean = 0.14, 0.10 and 0.05 s-1, respectively). Crustal thinning is asymmetric across the Orphan Basin. Within the eastern sub-basin, continental crust beneath Flemish Cap (˜32 km thick; β ˜ 1.1) thins westward into a 35-km-wide zone of hyperextended crust (<10 km thick; β > 3.4) beneath an 11-km-deep sedimentary basin. Within the western sub-basin, the Bonavista Platform crust (˜32 km thick) thins eastward into a 116-km-wide zone of hyperextended crust. Two zones of thicker crust (β = 2-3.5) exist within the central section, with muted topography within the eastern part and large basement highs in the western part, separated by the eastward dipping White Sail Fault (WSF). The zone to the east of the WSF displays higher velocities in the lower crust than to the west. This can only be explained by a lateral ductile flow across the zone boundary. By combining the two

  16. Seismic data interpretation using the Hough transform and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco-del-Castillo, M. G.; Ortiz-Alemán, C.; Martin, R.; Ávila-Carrera, R.; Rodríguez-Castellanos, A.

    2011-03-01

    In this work two novel image processing techniques are applied to detect and delineate complex salt bodies from seismic exploration profiles: Hough transform and principal component analysis (PCA). It is well recognized by the geophysical community that the lack of resolution and poor structural identification in seismic data recorded at sub-salt plays represent severe technical and economical problems. Under such circumstances, seismic interpretation based only on the human-eye is inaccurate. Additionally, petroleum field development decisions and production planning depend on good-quality seismic images that generally are not feasible in salt tectonics areas. In spite of this, morphological erosion, region growing and, especially, a generalization of the Hough transform (closely related to the Radon transform) are applied to build parabolic shapes that are useful in the idealization and recognition of salt domes from 2D seismic profiles. In a similar way, PCA is also used to identify shapes associated with complex salt bodies in seismic profiles extracted from 3D seismic data. To show the validity of the new set of seismic results, comparisons between both image processing techniques are exhibited. It is remarkable that the main contribution of this work is oriented in providing the seismic interpreters with new semi-automatic computational tools. The novel image processing approaches presented here may be helpful in the identification of diapirs and other complex geological features from seismic images. Conceivably, in the near future, a new branch of seismic attributes could be recognized by geoscientists and engineers based on the encouraging results reported here.

  17. Deep geometry and evolution of the northern part of Itoigwa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system, Central Japan, revealed by Seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Matsuta, N.; Takeda, T.; Kawasaki, S.; Kozawa, T.; Elouai, D.; Hirata, N.; Kawanaka, T.

    2003-12-01

    The northern Fossa Magna (NFM) is a Miocene rift system produced in the final stages of the opening of the Sea of Japan. It divides the major structure of Japan into SW and NE portions. The Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) bounds the western part of the northern Fossa Magna and forms an active fault system showing the one of the largest slip rates in the Japanese islands. Based on the paleo-seismological data, the ISTL active fault system was evaluated to have the highest seismic risk among active faults within inland Japan. A quantitative understanding of active tectonic processes, including crustal deformation and related destructive earthquakes, is important in reducing seismic hazards through precise estimation of strong ground motions. The structure of the crust, especially the deep geometry of active fault systems, is the most important piece information required to construct such a dynamic model. In this context, the seismic reflection profiling was performed across the northern part of the ISTL active fault system by three seismic lines. Obtained seismic sections are interpreted based on the pattern of reflectors, surface geology and velocity model by refraction analysis, using the balanced cross section technique. The 68-km-long Itoshizu 2002 seismic section across the northern middle part of the ISTL active fault system suggest that the Miocene NFM basin was formed by an east dipping normal fault with shallow flat (6 km), deeper ramp (6 15 km) and deeper flat at 15 km in depth. This unique geometry is interpreted that this low-angle normal fault was produced by Miocene high thermal regime, estimated from the thick volcanic rocks at the base of the basin fill. Namely, the normal fault reflects the brittle-ductile boundary in Miocene. Consequently, since the Pliocene, the basin fill was strongly folded by the reverse faulting along the pre-existing normal faults in the Pre-Neogene rocks. The reverse faults in the basin fill produced fault

  18. From subduction to collision: Results from seismic profiling, gravity modeling, and earthquake finite fault inversions in Taiwan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Wu-Cheng

    This study used (1) 132-channel reflection profiles, forward gravity modeling, and (2) finite source inversions of earthquakes to analyze crustal evolution from Subduction to collision in the region of Taiwan. Reflection and gravity data in the offshore region shows that the accretionary prism in the Subduction zone is mainly sedimentary; however, due to tectonic wedging in the initial collision zone, high-density basement materials are incorporated into the rear of the accretionary prism and may extend northward to compose a portion of high-density rocks that underly southeastern Taiwan. Further to the north in the mature collision zone was the site of the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. For this earthquake and its large aftershocks, we inverted strong motion data for finite source processes to study the deep fault structures. The mainshock ruptured on a shallow eastward-dipping fault possibly rooted in the proposed decollement of thin-skin deformation model. Several aftershocks either nucleated in or ruptured the basement indicating active deformation below the decollement, suggesting basement-involved deformation. Interpreting finite-source results requires a thorough understanding of the uncertainty in the parameters. Further more, near-realtime applications of finite-source inversions for estimation of near-fault strong ground motion requires well constrained fault orientation and hypocentral parameters. With this in mind, we tested a wide range of hypocenters and focal mechanisms, and the corresponding fits of the synthetics to the observed waveforms when studying the aftershock source parameters. As a result, we obtained optimal waveform fits and determined how the errors reported in hypocenters and focal mechanisms affected the inverted waveforms and the sensitivity of the waveform fits. For example, if the hypocenter was within 5 km of the optimal hypocenter and the focal mechanism was within 20 degrees of optimal strike, dip, and rake, the waveform fits

  19. Multichannel seismic profiles crossing source regions of megathrust earthquakes and slow slip events off-Boso, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; No, T.; Kodaira, S.; Nozaki, K.; Kobayashi, R.

    2009-12-01

    Off-Boso is a southeastern coastal region of Boso peninsula neighboring Tokyo metropolitan, locating central Japan. This region is one of the most complex plate configuration regions on the earth because the Pacific Plate (PAP) and the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) are subducting beneath off-Boso reigon, which is a part of North American Plate (NAP) (or Okhotsk Plate). Associated with the subduction, magnitude eight-class large earthquakes have occurred historically (e.g. 1703 Genroku and 1923 Taisho earthquakes) bringing serious damages to Tokyo metropolitan. Moreover, slow-slip events have been observed with 5-7 year interval off Boso region. To reveal the structural characteristics associated with the various seismogenesis off-Boso region, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has conducted multichannel seismic (MCS) surveys. The MCS data is important information for the drilling of Kanto Asperity Project (KAP), which is one of IODP proposal. A 7800 cu. in. (140 liter) tuned airgun array was shot with 50-m interval, detected by a 444-ch hydrophone streamer with 12.5 m group interval. In 2008, three NE-SW lines were conducted for revealing the subduction images of the PSP crossing the regions of stable sliding, slow-slip and slip deficit. In 2009, a NW-SE long line and a NE-SW short line were carried out to obtain the structural images of PSP and PAP perpendicular to trench axis and the 1703 Genroku asperity in the vicinity of Boso peninsula, respectively. From NE-SW lines of 2008, the morphology of the top of PSP is not smooth but rugged below the NAP. The northeastern end of PSP is confirmed by the MCS data combined with previous MCS profiles. Moreover, deep events interpreted as the top of PAP are recognized below the reflections of the PSP. The shallow part above the top of PSP can be divided into four blocks based on the MCS images and bathymetries: 1) trough deposits block, 2) thrust block, 3) thick sediments covered block, and 4) thin

  20. Comment on ' Thin-skinned tectonics in the crystalline southern Appalachians: COCORP seismic- reflection profiling of the Blue Ridge and Piedmont'.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Argues that in the report of Cook et al (Geology, 7, 563-567), there is no conclusive evidence, on the basis of seismic- reflection profiling of the crystalline southern Appalachians, that subhorizontal features revealed at depths of several kms. actually represent flat-lying sedimentary rocks. Offers an alternntive interpretation, suggesting that the features shown by the southeastern Blue Ridge - Piedmont COCORP line represent a flat-lying complex of thin but extensive granitic sheets and associated high rank schist and gneiss. -after Author

  1. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  2. Modelling of the Seismic Ground Motion in Barquisimeto and Cabudare cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, L.; Alvarez, L.; Rocabado, V.; Schmitz, M.; Granado, C.; Rendon, H.

    2007-05-01

    A 2D modeling of the seismic response is obtained using modeling techniques that allow the computation of synthetic seismograms, corresponding to two different seismic source models. The application of the modal summation technique, extended to laterally heterogeneous structural models, to the area of Barquisimeto and Cabudare allows us to create synthetic seismograms that can be used for the study of the local response along of four profiles The calculation has been made by a hybrid method: Modal summation in the regional anelastic mode (1D) where the source is located, and the finite difference in the local sedimentary structure (2D). The realistic modeling of ground motion is a very important base of knowledge for the preparation of ground shaking scenarios, as well as for the assessment of ground motion parameters for seismic microzonation.

  3. Revealing the deeper structure of the end-glacial Pärvie fault system in northern Sweden by seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, O.; Juhlin, C.; Ask, M.; Lund, B.

    2015-06-01

    A new seismic reflection survey for imaging deeper levels of the end-glacial Pärvie fault system in northern Sweden was acquired in June 2014. The Pärvie fault system hosts the largest fault scarp so far documented in northern Scandinavia, both in terms of its length and calculated magnitude of the earthquake that generated it. Present-day microearthquakes occur along the length of the fault scarp on the eastern side of the scarp, in general agreement with an east-dipping main fault. In the central section of the fault system, where there is a number of subsidiary faults east of the main Pärvie scarp, it has been unclear how the earthquakes relate to the structures mapped at the surface. A seismic profile across the Pärvie fault system acquired in 2007, with a mechanical hammer as a source, showed a good correlation between the surface mapped faults and moderate to steeply dipping reflections. The most pronounced reflectors could be mapped to about 3 km depth. In the new seismic survey, for deeper penetration an explosive source with a maximum charge size of 8.34 kg in 20 m deep shot holes was used. Reflectors can now be traced to deeper levels with the main 65° east-dipping fault interpreted as a weakly reflective structure. As in the previous profile, there is a strongly reflective 60° west-dipping structure present to the east of the main fault that can now be mapped to about 8 km depth. Extrapolations of the main and subsidiary faults converge at a depth of about 11.5 km, where current earthquake activity is concentrated, suggesting their intersection has created favorable conditions for seismic stress release. Based on the present and previous seismic reflection data, we propose potential locations for future boreholes for scientific drilling into the fault system. These boreholes will provide a better understanding of the reflective nature of the fault structures and stress fields along the faults at depth.

  4. The Vallo di Diano Range-Bounding Fault System (Southern Italy): New Evidence of Recent Activity From High-Resolution Seismic Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiello, A.; Villani, F.; Bruno, P.; Improta, L.; De Rosa, D.; di Fiore, V.; Punzo, M.; Varriale, F.; Montone, P.; Pierdominici, S.; Rapolla, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Vallo di Diano is the largest intermountain basin in the Southern Apennines (Italy). The basin evolution was controlled by the Quaternary activity of a range-bounding, SW-dipping normal fault system located to the east (Vallo di Diano Fault System, VDFS). Geological and oil industry data define the sin-sedimentary activity of the VDFS up to the Middle Pleistocene. However, commercial profiles do not resolve the shallower, eastern portion of the basin, due to strong lateral heterogeneities and unfavourable surface conditions. Therefore, Late Pleistocene-Holocene activity of the VDFS and its seismogenic potential are still uncertain. To better constrain the shallow structure of the basin, we performed four high-resolution seismic surveys, along its eastern side, where slope breccias and fans cover the Mesozoic carbonate bedrock and bury the VDFS. We also investigated some NW-trending flexures affecting Late Pleistocene fans, that we had previously detected and dubitatively ascribed to recent faulting. Seismic data were acquired with a dense wide-aperture geometry. Two high-resolution (HR) NE-trending profiles, about 1.5 km long, were collected using respectively 5 m and 10 m spaced receivers and sources. Two very high-resolution (VHR) NE-trending profiles, 400 and 350 m long, with densely spaced sources (4 m) and receivers (2 m) were also collected. HR profiling was aimed at imaging alluvial fan thickness and morphology of the underlying carbonate bedrock. VHR surveys targeted the flexures and their possible origin. All lines were acquired with a HR vibroseis source, except for the shortest profile, where we used a buffalo-gun, better suited for very near-surface imaging (z < 50 m depth). Seismic imaging consists of reflectivity images obtained by CDP-processing of reflection data complemented by Vp images obtained by multi-scale seismic tomography. The stack sections illuminated the basin down to 0.4-0.5 s TWT and reveal an array of high-angle, generally SW

  5. The RAMESSES experiment-II. Evidence for accumulated melt beneath a slow spreading ridge from wide-angle refraction and multichannel reflection seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, D. A.; Peirce, C.; Sinha, M. C.

    1998-12-01

    The RAMESSES study (Reykjanes Axial Melt Experiment: Structural Synthesis from Electromagnetics and Seismics) targeted an apparently magmatically active axial volcanic ridge (AVR), centred on 57°45'N at the Reykjanes Ridge, with the aim of investigating the processes of crustal accretion at a slow spreading mid-ocean ridge. As part of this multicomponent experiment, airgun and explosive wide-angle seismic data were recorded by 10 digital ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) along profiles oriented both across- and along-axis. Coincident normal-incidence seismic, bathymetry and underway gravity and magnetic data were also collected. Forward modelling of the seismic and gravity data has revealed layer thicknesses, velocities and densities similar to those observed elsewhere within the oceanic crust near mid-ocean ridges. At 57°45'N, the Reykjanes Ridge has a crustal thickness of approximately 7.5 km on-axis. However, the crust is modelled to decrease in thickness slightly off-axis (i.e. with age), which implies that full crustal thickness is achieved on-axis and that it is subsequently thinned, most likely, by off-axis extension. Modelling also indicates that the AVR is underlain by a thin (~100 m), narrow (~4 km) melt lens some 2.5 km beneath the seafloor, which overlies a broader zone of partial melt approximately 8 km in width. Thus the results of this study provide the first clear evidence for a crustal magma chamber beneath any slow spreading ridge. The size and depth of this magma chamber (the melt lens and underlying zone of partial melt) are similar to those observed beneath fast and intermediate spreading ridges, which implies that the processes of crustal accretion are similar at all spreading rates. Hence the lack of previous observations of magma chambers beneath slow spreading ridges is probably temporally related to the periods of magmatic activity being considerably shorter and more widely spaced in time than at fast and intermediate spreading ridges.

  6. Comparison of Vibroseis and explosive source methods for deep crustal seismic reflection profiling in the Basin and Range province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    Direct comparison of low-fold, high-energy explosive and high-fold, lower-energy Vibroseis methods for acquiring deep crustal seismic reflection data in the Basin and Range Province suggests that the high-fold common midpoint (CMP) method there does not provide the best possible image of lower crustal structure. -from Authors

  7. High-resolution crustal structure of the Yinchuan basin revealed by deep seismic reflection profiling: implications for deep processes of basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingfu; Feng, Shaoying; Gao, Rui; Li, Wenhui

    2016-04-01

    The Yinchuan basin, located on the western margin of the Ordos block, has the characteristics of an active continental rift. A NW-striking deep seismic reflection profile across the center of Yinchuan basin precisely revealed the fine structure of the crust. The images showed that the crust in the Yinchuan basin was characterized by vertical stratifications along a detachment located at a two-way travel time (TWT) of 8.0 s. The most outstanding feature of this seismic profile was the almost flat Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) and a high-reflection zone in the lower crust. This sub-horizontal Moho conflicts with the general assumption of an uplifted Moho under sedimentary basins and continental rifts, and may indicate the action of different processes at depth during the evolution of sedimentary basins or rifts. We present a possible interpretation of these deep processes and the sub-horizontal Moho. The high-reflection zone, which consists of sheets of high-density, mantle-derived materials, may have compensated for crustal thinning in the Yinchuan basin, leading to the formation of a sub-horizontal Moho. These high-density materials may have been emplaced by underplating with mantle-sourced magma.

  8. SinoProbe-02:Deep Seismic Reflection Profile (480km) experiment in North China:Acquisition and the Preliminary Processing result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H.; Gao, R.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Kuang, Z.; Liu, J.; Zhang, J.; Guan, Y.; Keller, G.; Liu, M.; Cox, C. M.; Holloway, S.; Chang, J. C.; Kaip, G. M.; Zhang, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active-source deep seismic reflection experiment was recorded across the Central Asian and Trans-North China orogens (see Figure) last winter as part of the SinoProbe-02 program. This profile extended southeastward from Erenhot and ended in the Huailai basin near Beijing. The shot depth was 25m; the shot size was 30-50kg; and the nominal shot interval was 250 km. Additional 200-kg charges were set off every 1 km and 1 ton shots were placed at intervals of 50 km. A Sercel 408 XL recording system and 2000 strings of SM-24 geophones were deployed at a spacing of 50m. Recording was at a 2ms sample interval for a total of 30s.The typical processing stream included crooked-line binning, refraction statics, true amplitude recovery, deconvolution, detailed velocity analyses, residual statics corrections and NMO stack (see Table). To the south, a transparent granite body is indicated in the middle crust with a series of north dipping reflections structures in the lower crust. The complex structures near Sonid Youqi suggest a transparent crust due to the Solonker suture zone. Map showing deep seismic reflection profile (solid black line) across North China. Processing Parameters

  9. Differential CYP 2D6 Metabolism Alters Primaquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Brittney M. J.; Xie, Lisa H.; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T.; Bandara Herath, H. M. T.; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N. P.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity. PMID:25645856

  10. Cenozoic tectonic evolution leading to the Choco-South America collision (Panama-Colombia), from seismic profiles interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barat, F.; Maurin, T.; Auxietre, J.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Salmon, P.; Sosson, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Choco Block is located in eastern Panama and western Colombia, at the western boundary of the Caribbean Plate (CP), and is mainly characterized by a Late Cretaceous-Paleogene volcanic arc overlying the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). This block was accreted to South American plate (SAP) during Middle to Late Miocene. Geological, chronological and structural data are scarce in the Choco Block. Our study aims at reconstructing the evolution at a local scale, to provide new constraints to the regional scale tectonic processes that have occurred since the Paleogene. In that perspective, we have interpreted offshore seismic reflection profiles. This interpretation was supported by biostratigraphic data from two wells. We focused our studies in the Uraba Gulf area, a triple junction between the Choco Block, the SAP and the Caribbean oceanic plateau. This poorly understood zone offers rare observation of two accretionary wedges, the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB), and the Sinu Belt, located at the margins of the Choco Block and the SAP, respectively. They are the results of two opposite convergent zones, and collide along the active Uramita strike-slip Fault Zone (UFZ), a suture zone between the Choco Block and the SAP. This area may provide information on the ages of both accretionary wedges, on the tectonic processes responsible for the disappearance of the CP, and on the late formation of the Choco Block. Our results evidence a northward propagating deformation along the Choco Block, miocene or older in the South of the Uraba Gulf, pliocene in the North of the Uraba Gulf, and active along the northern margin of Panama. This deformation is the result of the progressive accretion of Choco Block along the SAP. At the Uraba triple junction, a thick sedimentary sequence was deposited since late Miocene. North verging progradations suggest that sediments came from the drainage of the western cordillera of Colombia by a Paleo-Sinu river and actual Atrato river

  11. Structure of basement and its N-S direction transformation in Qiangtang basin:discovered by a long seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Gao, R.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.; Deng, G.

    2011-12-01

    Qiangtang basin is located between the Bangong suture and the Jinsha suture. It is very hard to do geophysical work because of most difficult condition. There have been a number of attempts to probe the deep structure of both the suture and its flanking terranes with refraction and teleseismic (e.g. receiver function) methods. Here we report the upper crustal results of the first multichannel seismic reflection profile across this critical region acquired by SinoProbe-02 from October 2009 to May 2010. The SINOPROBE 310 km profile starts west of Silin Co in the northern Lhasa block, crosses the Bangong-Nujiang suture west of Lunpola, skirts the eastern extension of the central Qiantang anticline and ends at Dogai Coring just of south of Jinsha suture. In the southern part of the profile, small shots of 50kg explosive placed at 30m depth were placed at 250m spacing, augmented by larger shots of 200kg t 50m depth spaced every 1km. In addition, large shots of 1000kg were placed every 50km. In the middle and north part, only 200 kg shots at 500m spacing along with the big shots. A linear array of receivers was used with a group interval of 50 m. The data was acquired by Sercel 408 XL using 720 channels. For discovering clear upper crustal structure, we use Sinoprobe data and Oil company data together in data process. The oil company data were acquired with small shots of 8kg t 12m depth spaced every 80m and recorded in 6s TWT in 1990s. We build new geometry to joint profiles, Tomo statics, multi-zone denoising , predictive deconvolution, velolcity analysis and NMO, prestack time migration in data process. By collecting and reprocessing current reflection seismic profiles, we get a long profile across the Qiangtang basin at S-N direction. Profile shows: there are probably precambrian crystal basement in Qiangtang basin. The depth of the basement is changeable, it is deeper in South Qiangtang basin and shallower in North Qiangtang basin. Shallow crustal deformations

  12. Seismic 3D modelling of VHMS deposits: case studies from Pyhäsalmi and Vihanti, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Suvi; Heikkinen, Pekka; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Snyder, David

    2013-04-01

    In the HIRE (HIgh-REsolution reflection seismics for ore exploration 2008-2010, Geological Survey of Finland), 2D seismic reflection profiles were acquired at 15 mining camps in Finland including the Pyhäsalmi, and Vihanti districts. Both Pyhäsalmi and Vihanti are volcanic hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) deposits located in a Proterozoic volcanic belt in central Finland. In Pyhäsalmi, six seismic profiles were acquired with 45 total line kilometres. In Vihanti the total length of 12 profiles exceeds 120 km. Both Vibroseis and explosive sources were used in the surveys. In these study sites, the network of seismic profiles enables modelling of the subsurface structures well beyond the mined depths. In the study areas, seismic velocities and densities derived from drill hole logging provide crucial information about physical rock properties forming basis for seismic interpretation. Besides the acoustic impedance, also the scale and orientation of the geological structures influence reflectivity. In Pyhäsalmi, it was shown that subvertical structures are not imaged directly with seismic reflection data and only the subhorizontal fold hinges are visible in seismic section while steep flanks need to be interpreted indirectly with the help of drill hole data and by recognizing change in reflectivity characteristics. Deformation in the Vihanti area has not been as intensive as in Pyhäsalmi, and the ore hosting volcanic sequence forms gentle folds. Reflection seismic profiles in Vihanti and Pyhäsalmi show the continuation of the volcanic lithologies underneath intrusive granites, thus expanding the area of interest for exploration. Seismic data support the interpretation that thrust faulting that occurred in a compressional tectonic setting has played a main role in deformation of these VHMS areas. Physical properties of massive sulphides predict the ore to be strong reflector in geological settings like Vihanti and Pyhäsalmi, but no clear seismic signal was observed

  13. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  14. An Updated Eurasian Crustal Model Using Multiple Seismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, S.; Mooney, W. D.; McDonald, S.

    2006-12-01

    An updated 2 by 2 degree crustal model for greater Eurasia is being completed from (1) synthesizing existing models, such as WENA 1.0, the new Barents Sea model, and WINPAK; (2) Pn/Sn tomography data; (3) our ongoing compilation of published seismic models for the crust, based on active- and passive-source seismology; and (4) observed and calculated seismic surface wave group and phase velocity maps. In particular, three controlled source studies from China and India completed by the U.S. Geological Survey and colleagues in the past year are contributing to this updated Eurasian crustal model. These include: (1) three short (20-35 km) seismic reflection profiles from the immediate region of the 2001 Mw 7.7 Bhuj (western India) earthquake that yielded a crustal thickening from 35 to 45 km over a distance of about 50 km from the northern margin of the Gulf of Kutch to the epicentral zone of the earthquake; (2) a compilation of over 90 seismic refraction/wide angle reflection profiles, with a cumulative length of more than sixty thousand kilometers, across mainland China that have shown a mid-crustal low velocity layer in unstable regions; and (3) a 1000- km-long geophysical profile from Darlag-Lanzhou-Jingbian extending from the Songpan-Ganzi terrane to the Ordos basin in the NE margin of the Tibetan plateau that yielded a 2-D seismic velocity profile from which crustal composition and continental dynamics of the Tibetan plateau are inferred. New crustal depth and velocity maps for greater Eurasia have been compiled, which incorporate the results from the above three studies and other relevant controlled source experiments. This updated compilation of Eurasian Pn and Sn data in CRUST 2.2 will yield more detailed models of the Earth's structure and subsequently more accurate seismic monitoring. Well-resolved crustal models are critical for determining event locations and size estimations.

  15. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  16. Structural architecture of the central Apennines: Interpretation of the CROP 11 seismic profile from the Adriatic coast to the orographic divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacca, Etta; Scandone, Paolo; di Luzio, Emiliano; Cavinato, Gian Paolo; Parotto, Maurizio

    2008-06-01

    We present an interpretation of the eastern half portion of the CROP 11 line, a deep reflection seismic profile 265 km long that cuts across the central Apennines from the Tyrrhenian coast to the Adriatic coast. In the study area the line cuts across a pile of thrust sheets that underwent tectonic transport between the Messinian and the Pleistocene. In its easternmost part, the line runs through the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Adriatic foredeep. In the foreland region the CROP 11 line integrates previous information on the crustal structure derived from petroleum exploration and from deep seismic sounding refraction experiments. In particular, the CROP 11 line confirms the existence of a very thick sedimentary sequence underlying the Mesozoic-Tertiary carbonates of the Apulia Platform interpreted as the Paleozoic-Triassic sedimentary cover of a pre-Cambrian crystalline basement. In the mountain chain, where the base thrust of the orogenic wedge reaches a depth of about 25 km, this sedimentary sequence appears to be the deepest geological unit incorporated in the thrust system. This interpretation of the CROP 11 profile suggests an unusual thin-skin tectonic style implying the detachment from the original basement and the incorporation in the post-Tortonian tectonic wedge of a very thick Paleozoic-Triassic sedimentary sequence possibly affected by low-grade metamorphism in the lower part. Other new suggestions from the CROP 11 seismic data concern the origin of the Fucino basin, one of the most remarkable Plio-Pleistocene intramontane basins. The normal faults bordering this structural depression, as other important normal faults present in the central Apennines (e.g., the Caramanico fault system in the Majella region), seem to have been controlled by gravitational-collapse processes driven by uplift during crustal shortening rather than by a generalized extension subsequent to the Apennine compression, as usually reported in the geological literature. If this

  17. Crustal structure and geodynamic of the Middle and Lower reaches of Yangtze metallogenic belt and neighboring areas: insights from deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q.; Shi, D.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2014-12-01

    A 300 km deep seismic reflection profile across the middle and lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt (YRMB) and its adjacent areas established the architecture and geodynamic framework of the region. Results based on the interpretation of the deep seismic data include the deep complicated geometry of the Tan-Lu fault and Zhangbaling uplift, appears as a subvertical thrust fault with its deep portion dip toward the southeast, and along which the Zhangbaling uplift is squeezed out; complex upper crust deformation structure beneath Chuquan depression, within which there are both kink bands, thrusts, imbrication and fold structures reflecting contraction deformation, and detachment fault and normal-fault structures reflecting extensional deformation; the "crocodile" reflection structure emerging beneath the Tan-Lu fault and Ningwu-Lishui volcanic basin, i.e., the upper crust reflection thrust upward, and the lower crust reflection thrust downward and offsetting the Moho discontinuity, which reflects the decoupled deformation process of the upper and lower crust, and is interpreted as an intracontinental subduction. Further to the southeast, the upper crust deformation shows a large-scale "wave-form" pattern, making crustal scale syncline and anticline. The entire section of the reflection Moho is clearly discernible at depth of 30.0-34.5 km, and the Moho beneath the YRMB is shallowest, while the Moho beneath the North China block is deeper than that beneath the Yangtze block. Moho offsets could be seen beneath the Ningwu volcanic basin. Overall, the seismic data show evidence for an intracontinental orogeny and imposes constraints on the deep geodynamic model applied to study region. Our interpretation of seismic profile supports the view that the Yanshanian orogeny, due to the northwest subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate during the Middle-Late Jurassic, is the major event that shaped the tectonic framework of the region. A geodynamic model is proposed for the

  18. Joint pre-stack depth migration and travel-time tomography applied to a deep seismic profile across the northern Barents Sea igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Faleide, Jan Inge; Sakulina, Tamara; Krupnova, Natalia; Dergunov, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    The mainly Permo-Triassic North Barents Sea Basin is considered as a superdeep intracratonic basin containing over 20 km of sedimentary material. This basin was strongly affected by magmatism attributed to the formation of the Early Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province. Dolerite dikes, sills, and lava flows are observed in the northern Barents Sea and on the islands of Svalbard and Franz Josef Land. Some dike swarms can be traced over hundreds of kilometers using high-resolution airborne magnetic data. In the North Barents Sea Basin, the dikes fed giant sill complex emplaced into organic-rich Triassic siliciclastic rocks. The sill complex creates a major challenge for seismic imaging masking the underlying strata. In this contribution, we first perform refraction and reflection travel-time tomography using wide-angle ocean-bottom seismometer data (with receivers deployed every 10 km) along the 4-AR profile (Sakulina et al. 2007, Ivanova et al. 2011). The resulting tomographic model is then used to construct a background velocity model for the pre-stack depth migration. We show that the use of a combined velocity model for the time and depth imaging based on travel-time tomography and RMS velocities constitutes a substantial improvement with respect to a standard processing workflow providing a more coherent seismic structure of this volcanic province. The interpretation of multichannel seismic and high-resolution magnetic data together with P-wave velocity and density anomalies allow to create a model for the system of magmatic feeders in the crystalline basement of the northern Barents Sea region. Sakulina, T.S., Verba, M.L., Ivanova, N.M., Krupnova, N.A., Belyaev I.V., 2007. Deep structure of the north Barents-Kara Region along 4AR transect (Taimyr Peninsula - Franz Joseph Land). In: Models of the Earth's crust and upper mantle after deep seismic profiling. Proceedings of the international scientific-practical seminar. Rosnedra, VSEGEI. St

  19. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  20. Long-lived deformation in the southern Mississippi Embayment revealed by high-resolution seismic reflection and sub-bottom profiler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanjun; McIntosh, Kirk; Magnani, Maria Beatrice

    2015-03-01

    Three high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and two sub-bottom profiler sections acquired along the Mississippi River in southern-Central U.S. image deformation in post-Paleozoic sediments. The northernmost profile images two faults offsetting Cretaceous through at least Eocene Cane River reflectors, interpreted to strike northwest and to be part of the Arkansas River fault zone. The central profile shows a down-to-the-north fault, displacing Cretaceous and Paleocene Midway Group reflectors by ~210 m and ~160 m, respectively. The fault is interpreted as the northern edge fault of the Monroe Uplift, a Late Cretaceous uplift associated with igneous intrusions. The southernmost profile displays a down-to-the-south fault, offsetting Cretaceous and Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group reflectors by ~125 m and ~32 m, respectively. Tilted reflectors in the first 80 m indicate Eocene-Oligocene activity of the fault, although Quaternary activity cannot be ruled out. Quaternary tectonic activity is proposed for a series of faults that offset shallow (<40 m depth) Eocene sequences and the base of the Quaternary alluvium as imaged on two sub-bottom profiler sections. These shallow faults are imaged in the vicinity of Holocene earthquake-induced liquefaction fields, corroborating the evidence for recent tectonic activity in the area. The spatial coincidence of the imaged faults with the inferred location of the Alabama-Oklahoma transform strongly argues toward a long-lived influence of this Precambrian continental margin in focusing tectonic activity in the southern U.S. by controlling the reactivation of Triassic-Jurassic syn-rift basement structures and guiding the emplacement of Late Cretaceous igneous intrusions and the location of Cenozoic deformation.

  1. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: I. Spectral data-activity relationship and structure-activity relationship models for inhibitors and non-inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Brooks; Tie, Yunfeng; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Valerio, Luis G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fowler, Bruce A; Demchuk, Eugene; Beger, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    An interagency collaboration was established to model chemical interactions that may cause adverse health effects when an exposure to a mixture of chemicals occurs. Many of these chemicals--drugs, pesticides, and environmental pollutants--interact at the level of metabolic biotransformations mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In the present work, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches were used to develop machine-learning classifiers of inhibitors and non-inhibitors of the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes. The models were built upon 602 reference pharmaceutical compounds whose interactions have been deduced from clinical data, and 100 additional chemicals that were used to evaluate model performance in an external validation (EV) test. SDAR is an innovative modeling approach that relies on discriminant analysis applied to binned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral descriptors. In the present work, both 1D ¹³C and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectra were used together in a novel implementation of the SDAR technique. It was found that increasing the binning size of 1D ¹³C-NMR and ¹⁵N-NMR spectra caused an increase in the tenfold cross-validation (CV) performance in terms of both the rate of correct classification and sensitivity. The results of SDAR modeling were verified using SAR. For SAR modeling, a decision forest approach involving from 6 to 17 Mold2 descriptors in a tree was used. Average rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in a hundred CV tests were 60% and 61% for CYP3A4, and 62% and 70% for CYP2D6, respectively. The rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in the EV test were 73% and 86% for CYP3A4, and 76% and 90% for CYP2D6, respectively. Thus, both SDAR and SAR methods demonstrated a comparable performance in modeling a large set of structurally diverse data. Based on unique NMR structural descriptors, the new SDAR modeling method complements the existing SAR

  2. Crustal structure and geodynamics of the Middle and Lower reaches of Yangtze metallogenic belt and neighboring areas: Insights from deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qingtian; Shi, Danian; Liu, Zhendong; Zhang, Yongqian; Dong, Shuwen; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    A 300 km long seismic reflection profile was acquired across the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River (MLY) metallogenic belt and its adjacent areas. The objective of the survey was to establish the deep architecture and geodynamic framework of the region. Results based on the interpretation of the deep seismic data include (1) Tan-Lu fault appears as a subvertical thrust fault or transpression fault with its deep portion dipping toward the southeast; (2) the Zhangbaling uplift is squeezed out along this fault; (3) complex upper crustal deformation structures beneath the Chuquan depression include both kink bands, thrusts, imbrication and fold structures reflecting contraction deformation, and detachment fault and normal-fault structures reflecting extensional deformation; (4) the "crocodile" reflection structure emerging beneath the Tan-Lu fault and Ningwu-Lishui volcanic basin, which represents the decoupled deformation process of the upper and lower crust associated with intra-continental subduction; (5) further to the southeast, the upper crust deformation shows a large-scale "wave-form" pattern, making crustal scale syncline and anticline; (6) the entire section of the reflection Moho is clearly discernible at depth of 30.0-34.5 km, and the Moho beneath the Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River metallogenic belt is shallowest, while the Moho beneath the North China block is deeper than that beneath the Yangtze block. The Moho offsets could be seen beneath the Ningwu volcanic basin. The seismic reflection data suggest that lithosphere delamination and asthenosphere upwelling that may result from the Mesozoic intra-continental orogenesis is responsible for the formation of large scale magmatism and mineralization in the MLY metallogenic belt.

  3. Brasiliano crustal structure and the tectonic setting of the Parnaíba basin of NE Brazil: Results of a deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Michael C.; Andrade, Vander; Barousse, Chuck A.; Costa, Rafaela; McDowell, Kenneth; Piggott, Neil; Poole, Alan J.

    2014-11-01

    A 1430 km, deep crustal, seismic reflection profile of the Parnaíba basin shows an asymmetric, structured western margin and a gently dipping eastern margin. The ~3 km thick, Phanerozoic sedimentary section overlies a pronounced, planar, regional unconformity that crosses three Precambrian blocks with differing seismic facies: the Amazonian/Araguaia block, the Parnaíba block, and the Borborema block. The blocks are separated by steep crustal-scale boundaries across which seismic facies change abruptly. In the west, the ophiolitic metasedimentary rocks of the Araguaia Group overlie the Amazonian craton. Both craton and metasediments terminate eastward against a steep, east dipping fault zone defining the Amazonian/Araguaia block and Parnaíba block boundary. Reactivation of this Neoproterozoic margin in the Late Triassic and Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous, folded and elevated basement and basin over 2 km. A second crustal boundary defines the eastern margin of the Parnaíba block with the Neoproterozoic Borborema block. This boundary is interpreted as the extension of the Transbrasiliano shear zone. These data demonstrate that the basement of the Parnaíba basin was formed during Brasiliano orogenesis by west directed collision-related thrusting, succeeded by lateral accretion along steep, crustal-scale boundaries. After formation of a post-Brasiliano peneplain, the Parnaíba basin developed seamlessly across three very different crustal blocks and appears to have been significantly larger than its present outline. No extensive underlying rift system is evident suggesting that basement structure had little to do with basin formation, but that episodic reactivation of the boundary zones and basement fabric has controlled the structuring and preservation of the basin.

  4. High-resolution boomer seismic-reflection profiles of the shelf off southern California from cruise A-1-00-SC: Santa Monica Bay to San Diego

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutmacher, Christina E.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Sliter, Ray W.; Normark, William R.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution boomer data were collected in the California Continental Borderland as part of the southern California Earthquake Hazards Task of the Southern California Coastal and Marine Geology Regional Investigations Project. During the period from 1997 to 2002, five data-acquisition cruises collected seismic-reflection data using several different systems from offshore Santa Barbara, California, south to the Exclusive Economic Zone boundary with Mexico. A key mission of this project was to map late Quaternary deformation in addition to improving our understanding of which offshore fault zones might have potential to damage highly populated areas of southern California. State regulations concerning the use of seismic-reflection equipment within three miles of the coastline precluded the routine gathering of high-resolution multichannel data in that swath adjacent to the coast. Boomer seismic-reflection data, however, can be obtained within the state 3-mile limit provided the operation receives authorization from the California State Lands Commission. The Geopulse boomer data accessible through this report were collected on the cruise A-1-00-SC, which was the only survey where we requested permission to work inside the 3-mile limit of the State of California. These data are critical to discovering connections between onshore and offshore faults, the overall lengths of which are related to the potential size of an earthquake that might be generated along them. The 2000 survey was designed to fill the gap between onshore data and reflection data obtained in deeper water on previous cruises as well as data anticipated from future surveys. This report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  5. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  6. Using reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP) to characterise the subsurface fracture system of the Seokmo Island geothermal field, Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bona; Byun, Joongmoo; Seol, Soon Jee; Park, Kwon Gyu; Lee, Tae Jong

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a case study of fracture-system interpretation using reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP) with seismic reflection, refraction, and borehole televiewer data on Seokmo Island, South Korea. We first extracted fracture locations from a pre-existing image obtained by prestack phase-screen migration of RVSP data, and the strike and dip of each fracture from the borehole televiewer data. We established an initial velocity model using this fracture information and then generated synthetic common-receiver gather data through forward simulation. However, the synthetic data could not sufficiently reflect the characteristics of the field data. To resolve this problem, we added an upper alluvial layer, observed in the surface reflection and refraction data, to the velocity model. To improve the quality of the migrated image of the RVSP field data and the velocity model, we not only reprocessed the RVSP data, but also applied prestack generalized-screen migration, which is more accurate than phase-screen migration in computing steep fractures. The new synthetic data generated from the improved velocity model agreed well with the RVSP field data. As a result, we could describe a markedly improved subsurface structure including fracture locations. The workflow suggested in this study will be helpful for imaging fracture systems in oil and gas reservoirs as well as in geothermal reservoirs.

  7. Misinterpretation of lateral acoustic variations on high-resolution seismic reflection profiles as fault offsets of Holocene bay mud beneath the southern part of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marlow, M. S.; Hart, P.E.; Carlson, P.R.; Childs, J. R.; Mann, D. M.; Anima, R.J.; Kayen, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We collected high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in the southern part of San Francisco Bay in 1992 and 1993 to investigate possible Holocene faulting along postulated transbay bedrock fault zones. The initial analog records show apparent offsets of reflection packages along sharp vertical boundaries. These records were originally interpreted as showing a complex series of faults along closely spaced, sharp vertical boundaries in the upper 10 m (0.013 s two-way travel time) of Holocene bay mud. A subsequent survey in 1994 was run with a different seismic reflection system, which utilized a higher power source. This second system generated records with deeper penetration (max. 20 m, 0.026 s two-way travel time) and demonstrated that the reflections originally interpreted as fault offsets by faulting were actually laterally continuous reflection horizons. The pitfall in the original interpretations was caused by lateral variations in the amplitude brightness of reflection events, coupled with a long (greater than 15 ms) source signature of the low-power system. These effects combined to show apparent offsets of reflection packages along sharp vertical boundaries. These boundaries, as shown by the second system, in fact occur where the reflection amplitude diminishes abruptly on laterally continuous reflection events. This striking lateral variation in reflection amplitude is attributable to the localized presence of biogenic(?) gas.

  8. Calculation of zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1990-01-01

    Impulse responses including near-field terms have been obtained in closed form for the zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The method is based on the correspondence principle. Through transformation of variables, the Fourier transform of the elastic impulse response is put in a form such that the Fourier transform of the corresponding anelastic impulse response can be expressed as elementary functions and their definite integrals involving distance angular frequency, phase velocities, and attenuation factors. These results are used for accurate calculation of shear-wave arrival rise times of synthetic seismograms needed for data interpretation of anelastic-attenuation measurements in near-surface sediment. -Author

  9. Regional seismic reflection profile from Railroad Valley to Lake Valley, east-central Nevada, reveals a variety of structural styles beneath Neogene basins

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Grow, J.A.; Lund, K.; Perry, W.J. Jr.; Miller, J.J.; Lee, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Two seismic reflection lines that compose a 90-km east-west profile at approximately 38{degree}25{prime}N latitude, east-central Nevada, help define the structure beneath Railroad Valley, White River Valley, the southern Egan Range, Cave Valley, Muleshoe Valley, the southern Schell Creek Range, and Lake Valley, Preliminary seismic interpretations are being integrated with ongoing geologic mapping, gravity, and magnetic studies and with drill-hole data along this transect. In the Grant Canyon oil field of Railroad Valley, a gently west-dipping normal fault appears to have controlled the development of the Neogene basin. The fault is clearly defined by fault-plane reflections and by terminations of east-dipping reflections from Tertiary and Paleozoic strata that have rotated toward the fault; the fault projects to nearby outcrops of a major low-angle extensional fault mapped in the Grant Range to the east. White River Valley at this latitude consists of three east-dipping half-grabens and two intervening basement highs. Two half-grabens in the western part of the valley are bounded by west-dipping faults with intermediate to steep dips. East-dipping reflections in the southern Egan Range correspond to a homoclinal Paleozoic panel overlain by a veneer of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks. The north end of Muleshoe Valley yields a narrow sag basin pattern between the southern Schell Creek Range and Dutch John Mountain, with no well-defined bounding faults. Lake Valley, on the east end of the profile, is a broad, complex basin containing normal faults with opposing dips. The progressive steepening of westerly dips in basin-fill beneath the west side of the basin suggests the presence of a major east-dipping listric fault.

  10. Geophysical constraints on the crustal structure of the East European Platform margin and its foreland based on the POLCRUST-01 deep reflection seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, M.; Guterch, A.; Narkiewicz, M.; Petecki, Z.; Janik, T.; Środa, P.; Maksym, A.; Probulski, J.; Grad, M.; Czuba, W.; Gaczyński, E.; Majdański, M.; Jankowski, L.

    2015-06-01

    A new 240-km long, deep seismic reflection profile (POLCRUST-01) was recently acquired in SE Poland crossing the East European Platform (EEP) margin south-east of the North-German-Polish Caledonides (NGPC). Here we document geophysical field work and subsequent data processing and modeling. Results obtained from reflection seismic data are augmented by results of the first-arrival tomography applied to co-located extended-offset refraction data, as well as potential field modeling and comparison with the available wide-angle reflection/refraction data. Our preferred model of the crustal structure, derived by integrating seismic, potential field and geological data, is composed of crustal blocks (terranes) separated by nearly-vertical faults. These are: (I) intact part of the EEP; (II) Łysogóry Terrane; (III) Małopolska Terrane; and (IV) Carpathian Mts. with their basement. Reflective lower crust of the EEP can be an inherited feature of crustal extension (rifting) or compressional tectonics acting at the cratonic margin. The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is depicted as a Caledonian transcurrent accretion zone corresponding with the near-vertical Tomaszów Fault, bounding the Łysogóry Terrane to the east. The crust of the Łysogóry Terrane suggests EEP affinity, although its middle/lower crust thickness is highly reduced. The Małopolska Terrane seems to be internally subdivided into blocks of different magnetic properties of the lower crust. The Carpathian frontal thrust is associated with a change in the rock properties in the deep basement (an unknown crustal block?) which is not visible in seismic data alone. The interpreted structure of the Caledonian terranes and their tectonic boundaries favors a transcurrent style of a crustal accretion along the central and SE Polish segments of the TTZ, implying a very complex nature of the Caledonian accretionary belt of Central Europe: from an array of terranes displaced along the TTZ to an accretionary wedge of

  11. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: Results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lovalvo, D.A.; Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Pierce, K.L.; Harlan, S.S.; Finn, C.A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Duhn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-01-01

    Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (???1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.; Lovalvo, D. A.; Johnson, S. Y.; Stephenson, W. J.; Pierce, K. L.; Harlan, S. S.; Finn, C. A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Dühn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-04-01

    'No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (˜1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem.

  13. A new passive seismic method based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Xia, Jianghai; Xu, Yixian; Xu, Zongbo; Pan, Yudi

    2015-06-01

    We proposed a new passive seismic method (PSM) based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) to meet the demand for increasing investigation depth by acquiring surface-wave data at a low-frequency range (1 Hz ≤ f ≤ 10 Hz). We utilize seismic interferometry to sort common virtual source gathers (CVSGs) from ambient noise and analyze obtained CVSGs to construct 2D shear-wave velocity (Vs) map using the MASW. Standard ambient noise processing procedures were applied to the computation of cross-correlations. To enhance signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the empirical Green's functions, a new weighted stacking method was implemented. In addition, we proposed a bidirectional shot mode based on the virtual source method to sort CVSGs repeatedly. The PSM was applied to two field data examples. For the test along Han River levee, the results of PSM were compared with the improved roadside passive MASW and spatial autocorrelation method (SPAC). For test in the Western Junggar Basin, PSM was applied to a 70 km long linear survey array with a prominent directional urban noise source and a 60 km-long Vs profile with 1.5 km in depth was mapped. Further, a comparison about the dispersion measurements was made between PSM and frequency-time analysis (FTAN) technique to assess the accuracy of PSM. These examples and comparisons demonstrated that this new method is efficient, flexible, and capable to study near-surface velocity structures based on seismic ambient noise.

  14. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  15. Geology of the offshore Southeast Georgia Embayment, U.S. Atlantic continental margin, based on multichannel seismic reflection profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buffler, Richard T.; Watkins, Joel S.; Dillon, William P.

    1979-01-01

    The sedimentary section is divided into three major seismic intervals. The intervals are separated by unconformities and can be mapped regionally. The oldest interval ranges in age from Early Cretaceous through middle Late Cretaceous, although it may contain Jurassic rocks where it thickens beneath the Blake Plateau. It probably consists of continental to nearshore clastic rocks where it onlaps basement and grades seaward to a restricted carbonate platform facies (dolomite-evaporite). The middle interval (Upper Cretaceous) is characterized by prograding clinoforms interpreted as open marine slope deposits. This interval represents a Late Cretaceous shift of the carbonate shelf margin from the Blake Escarpment shoreward to about its present location, probably due to a combination of co tinued subsidence, an overall Late Cretaceous rise in sea level, and strong currents across the Blake Plateau. The youngest (Cenozoic) interval represents a continued seaward progradation of the continental shelf and slope. Cenozoic sedimentation on the Blake Plateau was much abbreviated owing mainly to strong currents.

  16. Imaging in 2D media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    Stacking by CDP technique is inapplicable for processing of data from bottom seismic stations or acoustic sonobuoys. In addition, big amount of unknown velocity and structural parameters of the real layered medium do not allow these parameters to be defined by standard processing methods. Local sloped stacking is proposed for simultaneous obtaining the stacked tracks, travel time curve of a chosen wave, and the first derivative of this travel time curve. The additionally defined parameters are second derivative of this travel time curve and integrated average of squared travel time curve. These data are sufficient to reduce the amount of unknown parameters (down to one-two for each boundary) when layer-by-layer top-to-bottom processing. As a result, the stable estimates of velocity parameters of the layered (isotropic or anisotropic) medium can be obtained and stacked tracks obtained by local sloped staking can be transformed into boundaries in the time and depth sections.

  17. Seismic Images of the Gulf Stream Front off the Coast of North Carolina from the 2014 ENAM Community Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern North America Margin (ENAM) Community Seismic Experiment (CSE) is scheduled to collect on- and offshore active source seismic data including more than 2500 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles in the fall of 2014. The project was designed to address a wide array of questions related to the evolution and modification of the eastern North American rifted margin in conjunction with the arrival of the Earthscope transportable array on the US East Coast. The planned rifting-parallel profiles north and south of Cape Hatteras are expected to cross the front between the warm water of the Gulf Stream western boundary current and colder North Atlantic water providing the opportunity to image mesoscale features related to the front and their associated fine structure. Standard MCS data has been shown to be well-tuned to image ocean fine structure resulting from abrupt vertical changes in temperature and salinity in the ocean. Thus, the same seismic data that is collected to investigate the sub-seafloor geology can also be processed to image reflections in the water that reveal ocean processes with a horizontal resolution of ~10 m and vertical resolution of ~4 m. As an add-on to the ENAM CSE, 30 additional expendable bathythermographs and 3 conductivity temperature depth probes belonging to the University of Wyoming are planned for deployment during the collection of the MCS profiles resulting in an average hydrographic profile spacing of ~33 km. We present a first look at this new seismic oceanography data set providing 2-D images of ocean acoustic reflectivity correlated with closely spaced hydrographic measurements across the Gulf Stream front.

  18. Variation in crustal structure along the Kyushu-Palau Ridge at 15-21°N on the Philippine Sea plate based on seismic refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, A.; Kaneda, K.; Katagiri, Y.; Kasahara, J.

    2007-06-01

    We acquired coincident wide-angle and multi-channel seismic reflection data along four profiles perpendicular to the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) between 15°N and 20°N on the Philippine Sea plate. The crustal thickness beneath the KPR, which is a remnant arc created in the Late Eocene, varies along the strike from 8 to approximately 20 km and is always thicker than the adjacent oceanic crust of the West Philippine Basin to the west and the Parece Vela Basin to the east. The thickest crust among the four profiles, which is primarily due to a thickening of the lower crust, is found where the KPR adjoins Oki-no-Tori-Shima Island. There is no clear evidence of the thick (>5 km) middle crustal layer with a P-wave velocity of 6.0-6.5 km/s that has been inferred beneath the conjugate rifted counterpart of the Izu-Ogasawara(Bonin)-Mariana Island-arc. Our results suggest that the crust of the KPR at 15-21°N represents a less mature island arc crust relative to that further north along the ridge where a mid-crustal layer of 6 km/s has been reported.

  19. TranSCorBe Project: A high-resolution seismic-passive profile to study the variation of the crustal and upper mantle structures under the Betic mountain ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, José; Martín, Rosa; Stich, Daniel; Heit, Benjamín; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mancilla, Flor; Benito, José; Carrion, Francisco; Serrano, Inmaculada; López-Comino, Jose Angel; Abreu, Rafael; Alguacil, Gerardo; Almendros, Javier; Carmona, Enrique; Ontiveros, Alfonso; García-Quiroga, Daniel; García-Jerez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this project is to study the crustal and upper mantle structures under the Betic mountain ranges and their variations between the different geological domains. We deployed 50 broadband and short period seismic stations during 18 months following two profiles. We collect teleseismic events to perform a high-resolution P-to-S and S-to-P receiver function analysis. The main profile (TranSCorBe), of 160 km length, starts near the coast in Mazarrón (Murcia) and follows a NW-SE direction, crossing the Cazorla mountain range. It probes, from south to north, the Alboran domain (metamorphic rocks), the External zones (sedimentary rocks) and the Variscan terrains of the Iberian Massif. The spacing between stations is around 3-4 km. This inter-station distance allows us mapping with high accuracy the variations of the crust and upper mantle discontinuities in the Betic Range and their transition to the Iberian Massif. A second profile (HiRe II) with a larger spacing between seismic stations, is a continuation of a previously installed HiRe I profile, a NS profile starting near the Mediterranean coast in Adra (Almería) through Sierra Nevada Mountains. HiRe II profile prolongs HiRe I profile until the Variscan intersecting with TranSCorBe profile near Cazorla.

  20. Full waveform forward seismic modeling of geologically complex environment: Comparison of simulated and field seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, S.; Heinonen, M.; Koivisto, E.

    2012-04-01

    Reflection seismic data acquired in hard-rock terrains are often difficult to interpret due to complex geological architecture of the target areas. Even fairly simple geological structures, such as folds, can be difficult to identify from the seismic profiles because the reflection method is only able to image the sub-horizontal fold hinges, and no reflections arise from the steep fold limbs. Furthermore, typically acquisition lines in the hard-rock areas are crooked, and the data can rarely be acquired perpendicular to the strikes of the structures, if the strikes are even known. These further complicate the interpretation, because conventional processing techniques fail to compensate for the associated distortions in the ray paths. Full waveform seismic forward modeling can be used to facilitate the interpretations, to help to find optimal processing algorithms for specific structures, and also to guide the planning of a seismic survey. Recent increases in computational power and development of softwares make full wavefield forward modeling possible also for more complex, realistic geological models. In this study, we use Sofi3D-software for seismic forward modeling of 2D reflection seismic data acquired along a crooked acquisition line over a 3D fold structure. The model presents the structures previously interpreted in the Pyhäsalmi VHMS deposit, central Finland. Density, P and S-wave velocities required for the modeling are derived from in-situ drill hole logging data from the Pyhäsalmi mining camp, and Paradigm GoCad is used to build the geological 3D models. Meaningful modeling results require a sufficiently dense modeling grid, however, increasing the grid density comes at the cost of increased running time of the Sofi3D. Thus, careful parameter selection needs to be done before running the forward modeling. The results of the forward modeling aim to facilitate the interpretation of the 2D reflection seismic data available from Pyhäsalmi mining camp. The

  1. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  2. Deep geometry structure feature of Haiyuan Fault on the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau revealed by deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gao, R.; Yin, A.; Kuang, Z.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.

    2012-12-01

    Because of incessant uplifting and pushing role of the active Qinghai-Tibet Plateau uplift and pushed role, Cenozoic tectonic deformation and seismic activity is intense, several large deep fault zones distribute in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan area. The Haiyuan fault is a left strike-slip fault zone with the strongest activities and the largest scale among the arc and active fault zones of the northeastern margin of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, which is an important tectonic zone boundary faults and also an active faults controling earthquake activity. The CAGS carried out the research of the deep seismic reflection profiling with 300 km long across the northern margin of the West Qinling orogen,Linxia basin,the north Qilian and the southern margin of the Alxa block in 2009, supported by Crust Probe Project of China(Sinoprobe-02) and the Natural Science Foundation of China(No.40830316). The migration section were obtained. According to the section showing the different reflection characteristics, the deep geometry of the Haiyuan fault zone and the fine structure of the crust and upper mantle on both sides of fault. The results discolsed that the Haiyuan fault is not a simple steep or moderate, but its geometric shape changes with depth. The continuous reflection characteristics of the Moho under the Haiyuan fault show that Haiyuan fault is not an ultra-crust fault broke up the Moho directly. The research results provide seismological basis for studying the lithosphere deformation mechanism of the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  3. shallow seismic profiling of onland Leogane fan-delta, Haiti, for imaging fan stratigraphy and buried faults associated with the January 12, 2010, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowla, N.; Stewart, R.; Mann, W. P.; Chang, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Léogane fan of southern Haiti is the largest subaerial fan-delta in the Caribbean with an exposed land area of 109 km2. The southern Léogane fan-delta is located adjacent to the epicenter and main aftershocks of the M 7.0 January 12, 2010, Haiti earthquake. This catastrophic event was produced by movement along a buried thrust fault beneath the fan that is associated with the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden (EPGFZ) left-lateral strike-slip fault zone. Coseismic uplift of the western fan edge at the coast reached up to 62 cm and aftershocks of the buried thrust reached to within about 1 km of the top fan surface. Extreme ground shaking of the Léogane fan directly above these buried faults produced some of the greatest loss of life and destruction of buildings during the 2010 earthquake: between 20,000 and 30,000 estimated lives were lost, almost every concrete building was leveled in the city of Léogane and surrounding agricultural areas, and liquefaction of road beds and beach areas was commonplace. A large 1770 earthquake also believed to be nucleated on the EPGFZ shook the fan area in 1770, destroyed the French colonial town of Léogane and produced widespread liquefaction effects. In January, 2011, we collected gravity and shallow seismic measurements. Our goal was to begin to understand the stratigraphy of the Leogane fan and to image buried thrust faults responsible for shaking and coseismic, coastal uplift in 2010 and likely in future events. Three-component seismic data were acquired along a 402-m-long, north-south profile located 3 km north of the EPGFZ in the area of maximum coseismic, coastal uplift to investigate the thickness and geotechnical properties of the Leogane fan. Using sledge hammers on a metal plate as a source, penetration was excellent down to a depth of 400 m. We identified discontinuous layering interpreted as 50-60-m thick channel bodies deposited on previous fan surfaces. Discontinuities indicate shallow faulting in the depth range

  4. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the southern Sierra Nevada from seismic fan profiles and gravity modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fliedner, M.M.; Ruppert, S.; Park, S.K.; and others.

    1996-04-01

    Traveltime data from the 1993 Southern Sierra Nevada Continental Dynamics seismic refraction experiment reveal low velocities in the southern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range province of California (6.0 to 6.6 km/s), as well as low upper mantle velocities (7.6 to 7.8 km/s). The crust thickens from southeast to northwest along the axis of the Sierra Nevada from 27 km in the Mojave Desert to 43 km near Fresno, California. A crustal welt is present beneath the Sierra Nevada, but the deepest Moho is found under the western slopes, not beneath the highest topography. A density model directly derived from the crustal velocity model but with constant mantle density satisfies the pronounced negative Bouguer anomaly associated with the Sierra Nevada, but shows large discrepancies of >50 mgal in the Great Valley and in the Basin and Range province. Matching the observed gravity with anomalies in the crust alone is not possible with geologically reasonable densities; we require a contribution from the upper mantle, either by lateral density variations or by a thinning of the lithosphere under the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province. Such a model is consistent with the interpretation that the uplift of the present Sierra Nevada is caused and dynamically supported by asthenospheric upwelling or lithospheric thinning under the Basin and Range province and eastern Sierra Nevada. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Seismic stratigraphy and sediment thickness of the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, Øyvind; Gjengedal, Jakob Andreas; Faleide, Jan Inge; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Eldholm, Olav

    2009-03-01

    A Norwegian expedition to the western Nansen Basin, Yermak Plateau and the Hinlopen margin in 2001 acquired about 1100 km of 2-D multichannel seismic profiles and 50 wide-angle sonobuoy record sections. Analysis of these data establishes a regional seismic stratigraphic framework for the western Nansen Basin integrating previously published stratigraphic schemes. P-wave velocities and sediment thickness were derived within 7-8 per cent uncertainty from 2-D seismic ray tracing models of each sonobuoy section. Sediment thickness reaches 2 km in the studied area and increases towards the depocentre of the giant Franz-Victoria fan on the Barents-Kara continental margin. High-relief oceanic crystalline crust with 3.7 km s-1 average near-top velocity is infilled by four seismic sediment units with typical velocities 2.4, 2.2, 2.0 and 1.8 km s-1. A prominent regional seismic horizon between units 2 and 3 is tentatively correlated by basement onlap and sedimentation rates to a Miocene (~10 Ma) palaeoceanographic event, possibly the opening of the Fram Strait. The youngest unit is correlated to prograding sequences on the margin and to the onset of major slope failure caused by intensified glacio-fluvial drainage and ice sheet erosion during Northern Hemisphere glaciations (2.6-0.01 Ma).

  6. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  7. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  8. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  9. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  10. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  11. Seismic model of the crust and upper mantle in the Scythian Platform: the DOBRE-5 profile across the north western Black Sea and the Crimean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Yegorova, T.; Farfuliak, L.; Czuba, W.; Środa, P.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I.; Sosson, M.; Volfman, Y.; Kolomiyets, K.; Lysynchuk, D.; Omelchenko, V.; Gryn, D.; Guterch, A.; Komminaho, K.; Legostaeva, O.; Tiira, T.; Tolkunov, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Scythian Platform (ScP) with a heterogeneous basement of Baikalian-Variscan-Cimmerian age is located between the East European Craton (EEC) on the north and the Crimean-Caucasus orogenic belt and the Black Sea (BS) Basin on the south. In order to get new constrains on the basin architecture and crustal structure of the ScP and a better understanding of the tectonic processes and evolution of the southern margin of the EEC during Mesozoic and Cenozoic time, a 630-km-long seismic wide-angle refraction and reflection (WARR) profile DOBRE-5 was acquired in 2011 October. It crosses in a W-E direction the Fore-Dobrudja Trough, the Odessa Shelf of the BS and the Crimean Plain. The field acquisition included eight chemical shot points located every 50 km and recorded by 215 stations placed every ˜2.0 km on the land. In addition, the offshore data from existing profile 26, placed in the Odessa Shelf, were used. The obtained seismic model shows clear lateral segmentation of the crust within the study region on four domains: the Fore-Dobrudja Domain (km 20-160), an offshore domain of the Karkinit Trough at the Odessa Shelf of the BS (km 160-360), an onshore domain of the Central Crimean Uplift (Crimean Plain, km 360-520) and the Indolo-Kuban Trough at the Kerch Peninsula (km 520-620) that is the easternmost part of the Crimea. Two contrasting domains of the ScP within the central part of the DOBRE-5 profile, the Karkinit Trough and the Central Crimean Uplift, may represent different stages of the ScP formation. A deep Karkinit Trough with an underlying high-velocity (>7.16 km s-1) lower crust body suggests its rifting-related origin during Early Cretaceous time. The Central Crimean Uplift represents a thick (up to 47 km) crustal domain consisting of three layers with velocities 5.8-6.4, 6.5-6.6 and 6.7-7.0 km s-1, which could be evidence of this part of the ScP originating on the crust of Precambrian craton (EEC). The thick heterogeneous basement of the Central Crimean

  12. Seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle along profile PANCAKE across the Carpathians between the Pannonian Basin and the East European Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Kolomiyets, K.; Czuba, W.; Środa, P.; Grad, M.; Kovács, I.; Stephenson, R.; Lysynchuk, D.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Omelchenko, V.; Gintov, O.; Kutas, R.; Gryn, D.; Guterch, A.; Hegedűs, E.; Komminaho, K.; Legostaeva, O.; Tiira, T.; Tolkunov, A.

    2013-11-01

    Results are presented of a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along a profile between the Pannonian Basin (PB) and the East European Craton (EEC) called PANCAKE. The P- and S-wave velocity model derived can be divided into three sectors: the PB; the Carpathians, including the Transcarpathian Depression and the Carpathian Foredeep; and the south-western part of the EEC, including the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ). Seismic data support a robust model of the Vp velocity structure of the crust. In the PB, the 22-23 km thick crust consists of a 2-5 km thick sedimentary layer (Vp = 2.4-3.7 km/s), 17-20 km thick upper crystalline crust (5.9-6.3 km/s) and an up to 3 km thick lower crustal layer (Vp = 6.4 km/s). In the central part of the Carpathians, a 10-24 km thick uppermost part of the crust with Vp ≤ 6.0 km/s may correspond to sedimentary rocks of different ages; several high velocity bodies (Vp = 5.35, 5.95 and 6.05 km/s) within the sedimentary flysch sequences may represent volcanic sequences. The Moho depth changes from 25 km to 45 km over ca. 100 km distance beneath the Carpathians, west of TESZ. The cratonic crust has a typical three layer structure with a pronounced thickening of the lower crust towards the Ukrainian Shield, where a high velocity lower crust (Vp > 7.2 km/s) is observed. Two low-velocity lenses in the upper crust of the EEC are interpreted beneath major sedimentary troughs (Lviv and Volyn-Podolsk). Mantle reflectors are observed at depths of ~ 45 km and ~ 75 km below the PB and 10-20 km below the Moho in the EEC. Sub-Moho (Pn) velocities increase from 8.0 km/s beneath the PB to 8.1 km/s beneath the Carpathians and to ~ 8.3 km/s beneath the EEC. S-waves of acceptable quality are recorded in the EEC; their signal-to-noise ratios increase towards the Ukrainian Shield.

  13. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  14. Calibration of R/V Marcus G. Langseth Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, J.; Tolstoy, M.; Webb, S.; Doermann, L.; Bohenstihl, D.; Nooner, S.; Crone, T.; Holmes, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    NSF-owned Research Vessel Marcus G. Langseth is operated by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, providing the tools for full-scale marine seismic surveys to the academic community. Since inauguration of science operations, Langseth has successfully supported 2D and 3D seismic operations, including offshore- onshore and OBS refraction profiling A significant component of Langseths equipage is the seismic source, comprising four identical linear subarrays which can be combined in a number of configurations according to the needs of each scientific mission. To ensure a full understanding of the acoustic levels of these sources and in order to mitigate their possible impact upon marine life through accurate determination of safety radii, an extensive program of acoustic calibration was carried out in 2007 and 2008, during Langseths shakedown exercises. A total of 14000+ airgun array discharges were recorded in three separate locations with water depths varying from 1750 to 45 meters and at source-receiver offsets between near-zero and 17 km. The quantity of data recorded allows significant quantitative analysis of the sound levels produced by the Langseth seismic sources. A variety of acoustic metrics will be presented and compared, including peak levels and energy-based measures such as RMS, Energy Flux Density and its equivalent, Sound Exposure Level. It is clearly seen that water depth exerts a fundamental control on received sound levels, but also that these effects can be predicted with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Improved Subsurface Imaging of Deep Seismic Data in Areas with Rugged Topography and Crooked-line Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Ito, T.; Brown, L. D.; Ikawa, T.

    2001-12-01

    Deep seismic reflection surveying in mountainous areas imposes serious restrictions and compromises on both data processing and acquisition. In addition to complex subsurface structure, rugged acquisition topography, crookedness of seismic lines and irregular distribution of shots often result in poor data quality. High-velocity rocks at the surface can cause shot and receiver coupling problems, and produce misalignments of seismic traces due to improperly-determined statics. Furthermore back-scattered energy from off-line surfaces can get trapped in weathered layers and generate unwanted coherent noise. We have investigated the applicability and limitations of conventional processing to deal with the problems related to acquisition geometries. We evaluated and modified the following options in data processing to improve the deep seismic image: (1) Simultaneous application of Kirchhoff trace mapping and local-datum corrections (wave-equation datuming or static time shift); (2) Kirchhoff imaging to account for the crookedness of shot and receiver lines; (3) Simultaneous application of 3D DMO trace mapping and cross-dip corrections; (4) Accurate estimation of refraction/reflection statics by turning-ray tomography and global-optimization method. The seismic datasets used for this case study are a 2D seismic profile acquired in Hidaka mountains on Hokkaido, northeast Japan, and a 2D seismic profile from the INDEPTH Project in the Himalayas. The result of imaging crustal structure of the Hidaka collision zone has revealed that the Kuril arc lithosphere is delaminated at about 23km deep in the lower crust. Also, we find that the above processing strategy significantly improved imaging of structure in the upper plate of the Himalayan megathrust.

  16. First Arrival Seismic Tomography (FAST) vs. PStomo_eq applied to crooked line seismic data from the Siljan ring area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tablante, Johiris I.; Juhlin, Christopher; Bergman, Björn

    2006-05-01

    When seismic profiles deviate significantly from straight lines, the results from 2D traveltime inversion programs will be in error due to the inherent 3D component present in the data. Thus, it is necessary to use a program that can handle the 3D aspects of the acquisition geometry. This study compares the performance and results from two computer programs for 3D seismic tomography. These algorithms are the package for First Arrival Seismic Tomography (FAST) and a Local Earthquake tomography program, PStomo_eq. Although both codes invert for the velocity field using the conjugate gradient solver LSQR, the common smoothness constraint is handled differently. In addition, the programs do not incorporate the same options for user-specified constraints. These differences in implementation are clearly observed in the inverted velocity fields obtained in this study. Both FAST and PStomo_eq are applied to synthetic and real data sets with crooked line geometry. First arrival traveltimes from seismic data acquired in the Siljan ring impact area are used for the real data set test. The results show that FAST gives smoother models than PStomo_eq. On the real data set PStomo_eq showed a better correlation to the information at hand. Different criteria exist for what is desirable in a model; thus, the choice of which program to use will mostly depend on the particular goals of the study.

  17. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  18. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  19. Interlocked optimization and fast gradient algorithm for a seismic inverse problem

    SciTech Connect

    Metivier, Ludovic

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} A 2D extension of the 1D nonlinear inversion of well-seismic data is given. {yields} Appropriate regularization yields a well-determined large scale inverse problem. {yields} An interlocked optimization loop acts as an efficient preconditioner. {yields} The adjoint state method is used to compute the misfit function gradient. {yields} Domain decomposition method yields an efficient parallel implementation. - Abstract: We give a nonlinear inverse method for seismic data recorded in a well from sources at several offsets from the borehole in a 2D acoustic framework. Given the velocity field, approximate values of the impedance are recovered. This is a 2D extension of the 1D inversion of vertical seismic profiles . The inverse problem generates a large scale undetermined ill-conditioned problem. Appropriate regularization terms render the problem well-determined. An interlocked optimization algorithm yields an efficient preconditioning. A gradient algorithm based on the adjoint state method and domain decomposition gives a fast parallel numerical method. For a realistic test case, convergence is attained in an acceptable time with 128 processors.

  20. Structural characteristics of the Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, from high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and multibeam echosounder data: geologic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukur, Deniz; Krastel, Sebastian; Tomonaga, Yama; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari; Meydan, Ayşegül Feray; Çağatay, M. Namık; Toker, Mustafa; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kong, Gee-Soo; Horozal, Senay

    2016-03-01

    The structural evolution of Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, was reconstructed based on seismic reflection profiles through the sedimentary fill as well as from newly acquired multibeam echosounder data. The major sub-basins (Tatvan Basin and Northern Basin) of Lake Van, bound by NE-trending faults with normal components, formed during the past ~600 ka probably due to extensional tectonics resulting from lithospheric thinning and mantle upwelling related to the westward escape of Anatolia. Rapid extension and subsidence during early lake formation led to the opening of the two sub-basins. Two major, still active volcanoes (Nemrut and Süphan) grew close to the lake basins approximately synchronously, their explosive deposits making up >20 % of the drilled upper 220 m of the ca. 550-m-thick sedimentary fill. During basin development, extension and subsidence alternated with compressional periods, particularly between ~340 and 290 ka and sometime before ~14 ka, when normal fault movements reversed and gentle anticlines formed as a result of inversion. The ~14 ka event was accompanied by widespread uplift and erosion along the northeastern margin of the lake, and substantial erosion took place on the crests of the folds. A series of closely spaced eruptions of Süphan volcano occurred synchronously suggesting a causal relationship. Compression is still prevalent inside and around Lake Van as evidenced by recent faults offsetting the lake floor and by recent devastating earthquakes along their onshore continuations. New, high-resolution bathymetry data from Lake Van reveal the morphology of the Northern Ridge and provide strong evidence for ongoing transpression on a dextral strike-slip fault as documented by the occurrence of several pop-up structures along the ridge.

  1. Crustal structure and Moho geometry of the northeastern Tibetan plateau as revealed by SinoProbe-02 deep seismic-reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Gao, Rui; Zeng, Lingsen; Kuang, Zhaoyang; Xue, Aimin; Li, Wenhui; Xiong, Xiaosong; Huang, Weiyi

    2014-12-01

    Underthrusting of India below Eurasia has resulted in the formation of the Himalayan and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Distributed deformation coupled with block translation and rotation has generated the Qilian Shan thrust belt and a series of east- and northwest-striking strike-slip faults across northeastern Tibet. Because these structures lie in a transition zone between the high plateau region to the south and the lowlands of the North China craton in the north, determining their deep-crustal and upper-mantle structures has important implications for unraveling the mechanism of Tibetan plateau formation. In this paper, we present new results from the SinoProbe-02 deep seismic reflection project across the eastern part of the Qilian Shan and the southern margin of the Alxa block. Interpretation of the reflection profile obtained from this study is based on constraints from surface geology and detailed geometric analysis of structural relationships among key reflectors in the crust and the upper mantle. Our results indicate that the upper crust of the eastern Qilian Shan is characterized by fault-bend folds and duplex systems involving Phanerozoic strata that may have resulted from early Paleozoic collisional tectonics and Cenozoic intra-continental deformation. Locally, half-graben structures hosting Cretaceous strata are also present. The active structures in the region are dominated by left-slip Haiyuan and Tianjian fault systems marking the northern margin of the Tibetan plateau. The strike-slip structures have variable dips and dip directions and sole into a common décollement with a depth of 40-45 km. Because the two faults do not cut and offset the Moho below, the active crustal and mantle deformation in the northeastern Tibet must be decoupled.

  2. Morphology, structure, and tectonic evolution of the Mona canyon (northern Mona passage) from multibeam bathymetry, side-scan sonar, and seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondziel, Steven; Grindlay, Nancy; Mann, Paul; Escalona, Alejandro; Abrams, Lewis

    2010-04-01

    The submarine Mona Canyon is a rift between Puerto Rico and Hispaniola of the Greater Antilles. An integrated marine geophysical data set, including multibeam bathymetry, side-scan sonar imagery, single channel and multichannel seismic reflection profiles is used to evaluate the morphology, structure, and tectonic evolution of the Mona Canyon. A structural restoration of the central Mona canyon indicates that extension in the rift initiated in the Middle Oligocene, approximately 30 Ma. A minimum total extension of 6.1 km and a minimum longitudinal strain of 11.4% across the central Mona canyon are calculated. The overall extension is proposed to have occurred over two phases. Phase I occurred from the Middle Oligocene to Late Miocene, and was a slow (0.09 mm/yr) stage of at least 1.7 km of opening. Phase II was most likely controlled by the impact of the subducted southeast portion of the Bahamas platform beneath the northeastern Caribbean plate margin. Phase II was a more rapid (0.4 mm/yr) stage of extension of at least 4.4 km that occurred from the Late Pliocene to the Recent as the SE Bahamas collision warped the middle and upper slope of the northern Puerto Rico margin along its advancing path and slowed the eastward movement of Hispaniola relative to Puerto Rico. The upper reaches of the Mona canyon form the trailing edge of the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands block as it pulls away from a pinned Hispaniola. The Mona reentrant marks the trailing edge of a northern Hispaniola forearc sliver that forms due to increased coupling between the subducting North America plate and the overriding plate.

  3. A transect across Australia's southern margin in the Otway Basin region: crustal architecture and the nature of rifting from wide-angle seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, D. M.; Collins, C. D. N.; Lukaszyk, I.; Chudyk, E. C.

    1998-03-01

    The Otway Basin in southeastern Australia formed on a triangular-shaped area of extended continental lithosphere during two extensional episodes in Cretaceous-to-Miocene times which ultimately led to the separation of Australia and Antarctica. The velocity structure and crustal architecture of the Otway continental margin has been interpreted from offshore-onshore wide-angle seismic profiling data along a transect extending from near the northern Otway Basin margin with Palaeozoic outcrop to the deep ocean basin under the Southern Ocean. Along this transect, the Otway Continental Margin (OCM) Transect, the onshore half-graben geometry of Early Cretaceous deposition gives way to a 5-km-thick basin sequence (P-wave velocity 2.2-4.6 km/s) extending down the continental slope offshore to at least 60 km from the shoreline. At 120 km from the nearest shore, sonobuoy data indicate a 4-5 km sedimentary sequence overlying 7 km of crustal basement rocks above the Moho at 15 km depth (water depth 4220 m). Conspicuous strong Moho reflections are evident under the continental slope at about 10.2 s TWT. Basement is interpreted to be attenuated/faulted Palaeozoic rocks of the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens (intruded with Jurassic volcanics) that thin from 16 km onshore to about 3.5 km at 120 km from the nearest shore. These rocks comprise a 3 km section that has a velocity of 5.5-5.7 km/s overlying deeper basement with a velocity of 6.15-6.35 km/s. Over the same distance the Moho shallows from a depth of 30 km onshore to 15 km depth at 120 km from the nearest shore, and then to about 12 km in the deep ocean at the limits of the profile (water depth 5200 m). The continent-ocean boundary (COB) is interpreted to be at a prominent topographic inflection point at the bottom of the continental slope in 4800 m of water. P-wave velocities in the lower crust are 6.4-6.8 km/s above a transition to the Moho, with an upper mantle velocity of 8.05 km/s. There is no evidence of massive high

  4. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  5. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  6. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  7. An active seismic experiment proposal onboard the NASA 2009 MSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonné, P.; Experiment Team

    NASA will launch in 2009 a 900 kg class rover to Mars. This rover will land with a new descent system, called the ``sky-crane''. After releasing the rover on the ground, the sky-crane will have a final flight until a hard landing about 2 km away from the rover. The science objectives of the 2009 MSL mission, among others, are to characterize the geology of the landing region at all appropriate spatial scales, to interpret the processes that have formed and modified rocks and regolith and to determine present state, distribution, and cycling of water. We propose to perform with the sky-crane an active seismic experiment for subsurface characterization. This experiment will be conducted after the rover deployment. The proposed idea is to deploy a seismic receiver line by ejecting about 10 seismic nodes from the sky-crane and then to record then the reflected signals from the impact of the sky-crane. Preliminary modeling and tests indicate that a penetration depth of several hundred meters will be reached. The experiment will be used to determine a 2D geological profile of the landing site subsurface, to determine the depth and shape of the dry regolith/icy regolith discontinuity and to identify possible layering structures in the subsurface. In addition, information on the structure of the regolith (mean size of building blocs) and on the presence of liquid water will be obtained by an analysis of the seismic coda and attenuation. The seismic high frequency noise will also be monitored, especially during windy periods, and will be used to get additional information on the subsurface. The proposed experiment is based on a consortium between academics laboratories and seismic industry and will be a first example of a resource oriented experiment on another planet than Earth. The complete mass of the experiment will be 2.5 kg. Seismic nodes will have their own acquisition/power and telemetry system and will be based on high sensitive geophones developed for seismic

  8. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  9. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  10. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  11. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  12. Seismic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  13. Directional seismic reflectivity of deep crust: Examples from southeastern US and central Anatolia

    SciTech Connect

    Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    Apparent reflectivity of seismic reflection sections is used to elaborate on rheology of deep crustal reflectors. Because of physical anisotropy and other conditions that affect the amplitudes of seismic reflections, the apparent seismic reflectivity can vary considerably depending on the direction of the seismic profile. Crustal seismic refection data from the southeastern US, Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia, and from central Anatolia are presented to demonstrate the variation in the apparent seismic reflectivity of the crust in seismic sections.

  14. Crustal structure of the Celtic Sea and western approaches from gravity data and deep seismic profiles: Constraints on the formation of continental basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Dyment, Jerome; Bois, Christian; Pinet, Bertrand; Ondreas, Helene

    1990-07-01

    A free-air anomaly map of the Celtic Sea and the Western Approaches is presented including all available marine gravimetric data and Bouguer anomalies on land. N60° features are predominant in the area. They correspond to the N60° so-called Caledonian grain which played a major role in the Variscan orogeny and in the formation of the Permo-Triassic sedimentary basins. The fundamental new point which comes out from this gravimetric map is the existence of a closely spaced pattern of N105° features which we regard as late Carboniferous transpressional structures. In the eastern pan of the Celtic Sea, thrusts are in the same N105° direction. West of 6°W longitude, however, folds and thrusts trend preferentially in a N60° direction, following the older grain. There, the N105° lineaments may be regarded as dextral shear structures with a possible compressive component. The Hercynian shortening of the Celtic Sea domain, located between the Variscan Front and the Lizard suture, resulted from the displacement, along the N160° direction of the two adjacent rigid domains. North of the Variscan Front, the N105° and N135° features were possibly active in more recent times. Then, both the N60° and N105° trends controlled the formation of Permo-Triassic basins, the N105° directions being transfer faults. Two-dimensional gravity modelling of the SWAT profiles in the Celtic Sea shows that the base of the reflective lower crust may be associated with the Moho discontinuity everywhere in the Celtic Sea except below the Saint George's Channel basin. The lower crust does not change significantly in depth and thickness beneath the Permo-Triassic basins. None of the available models simply satisfies such conditions. They all require at least a modification of the geometry of the lower crust after the formation of the Celtic Sea basins. Nevertheless, if the simple shear model can be ruled out mainly from structural arguments, the uniform stretching and to a lesser degree the

  15. Regional Seismic Travel Time Node Get and Set

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. C.

    2012-10-24

    RSTT_NOGS allows users to easily get and set seismic velocity vs. depth profiles at specified model tessellation nodes. RSTT_NOGS uses the Sandia Seismic Location Baseline Model code that was released under BSD license in 2009.

  16. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  17. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  18. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  19. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  20. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  1. 2-D tomography with bolometry in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A.W.; Meyer, W.H.; Geer, B.; Behne, D.M.; Hill, D.N.

    1994-07-01

    We have installed a 48-channel platinum-foil bolometer system on DIII-D achieve better spatial and temporal resolution of the radiated power in diverted discharges. Two 24-channel arrays provide complete plasma coverage with optimized views of the divertor. We have measured the divertor radiation profile for a series of radiative divertor and power balance experiments. We observe a rapid change in the magnitude and distribution of divertor radiation with heavy gas puffing. Unfolding the radiation profile with only two views requires us to treat the core and divertor radiation separately. The core radiation is fitted to a function of magnetic flux and is then subtracted from the divertor viewing chords. The divertor profile is then fit to a 2-D spline as a function of magnetic flux and poloidal angle.

  2. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  3. Seismic Characterization and Continuity Analysis of Gas Hydrate Horizons Near the Mallik Research Wells, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2005-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits in arctic environment generally lack the BSR signature diagnostic of their presence in marine seismic data. The absence of the BSR signature complicates the estimation of the resources within or below the permafrost and the determination of their potential impact on future energy supplies, geohazard and climate change. We present results from a detailed seismic characterization of three gas hydrate horizons (A, B and C) intersected below the permafrost in five wells of the Mallik gas hydrate field located in the Mackenzie delta (Northwest Territories, Canada). The detailed seismic characterization included attribute analyses, synthetic modeling and acoustic impedance inversion and allowed estimation of the lateral continuity of the three horizons in the vicinity of the wells. Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data, 3D and 2D industry seismic data and the 5L/2L-38 geophysical logs (density, P-wave sonic velocity) were used for this study. Synthetic modeling using the sonic and density logs reveals that the base of the lower gas hydrate horizons B and C can be identified on the industry 3D and 2D seismic sections as prominent isolated reflections. The uppermost gas hydrate occurrence (horizon A) and potentially other additional smaller-scale layers are identified only on the higher-resolution VSP data. The 3D industry seismic data set processed to preserve the relative true-amplitudes was used for attribute calculations and acoustic impedance inversion. The attribute maps defined areas of continuous reflectivity for horizons B and C and structural features disrupting them. Results from impedance inversion indicate that such continuous reflectivity around the wells is most likely attributable to gas hydrates. The middle gas hydrate occurrence (horizon B) covers an area of approximately 25 000m2. Horizon C, which marks the base of gas hydrate occurrence zone, extends over a larger area of approximately 120 000m2.

  4. Subsurface structure of the geothermal well site in Ilan, Taiwan by using the seismic exploration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Ting-Ching; Shih, Ruey-Chuyan; Wang, Chien-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Geothermal energy could be a feasible way to reconcile the energy needs of a growing population and economic development. Several studies have shown that the Ilan area is a significantly potential area for developing the geothermal energy in Taiwan. However, since the Ilan Plain is covered by the thick Quaternary sediments, the previous studies of the subsurface structure in this area are mostly at a large-scale. The purpose of this study is to find an appropriate drilling site for the geothermal well in Ilan by using the seismic exploration method. We cooperated with the seismic survey team from National Central University again, used the two vibrators (EnviroVibe) along with a 432-channel seismograph to conduct more seismic surveys in the Ilan area. Since we have collected more 2-D seismic sections in the different directions to sketch the structures underneath, we are now able to describe the geometry of the subsurface structures in three dimensions. The seismic profiles showed that the sediments are thickened to the east, and the bedding planes are dominantly dipping to the northeast and slightly tilted. As we have known the Ilan area is located in a tectonic divergent area, the major fault system passing through this area may result in a derivative structure, and provide the channels for inflow of the hot water to produce geothermal power. Currently, we have construct a 3D model of the subsurface structure, and is waiting for the evidence from core boring to examine the accuracy of the interpretation.

  5. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  6. 3-D Seismic Tomographic Modelling of the North-Western Spitsbergen Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, W.

    2015-12-01

    Deep seismic sounding measurements were performed in the continent-ocean transition zone of the north-western Svalbard continental margin in 1976 - 1999 in an international co-operation. Seismic energy (airgun and TNT shots) was recorded by land (onshore) seismic stations, ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), and ocean bottom hydrophone systems (OBH). Data from archival and modern seismic profiles were altogether used for 3-D tomographic inversion using JIVE3D software. The modelling area was chosen to be a rectangle of 420 x 330 km (Fig.). The results are similar to the earlier 2-D modelling, supplemented by off-line information from the profiles and the SPITS permanent station, giving a 3-D image of the crustal structure and Moho interface shape. The continental crust thins to the west and north. A minimum depth of about 6 km to the Moho discontinuity was found east of the Molloy Deep and in the Knipovich Ridge. The Moho interface deepens to about 30 km beneath the continental crust of Spitsbergen.

  7. MPEG-4-based 2D facial animation for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegel, Thomas B.

    2005-03-01

    The enormous spread of mobile computing devices (e.g. PDA, cellular phone, palmtop, etc.) emphasizes scalable applications, since users like to run their favorite programs on the terminal they operate at that moment. Therefore appliances are of interest, which can be adapted to the hardware realities without loosing a lot of their functionalities. A good example for this is "Facial Animation," which offers an interesting way to achieve such "scalability." By employing MPEG-4, which provides an own profile for facial animation, a solution for low power terminals including mobile phones is demonstrated. From the generic 3D MPEG-4 face a specific 2D head model is derived, which consists primarily of a portrait image superposed by a suited warping mesh and adapted 2D animation rules. Thus the animation process of MPEG-4 need not be changed and standard compliant facial animation parameters can be used to displace the vertices of the mesh and warp the underlying image accordingly.

  8. Graphical representations of DNA as 2-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan

    2004-03-01

    We describe a modification of the compact representation of DNA sequences which transforms the sequence into a 2-D diagram in which the 'spots' have integer coordinates. As a result the accompanying numerical characterization of DNA is quite simple and straightforward. This is an important advantage, particularly when considering DNA sequences having thousands of nucleic bases. The approach starts with the compact representation of DNA based on zigzag spiral template used for placing 'spots' associated with binary codes of the nucleic acids and subsequent suppression of the underlying zigzag curve. As a result, a 2-D map is formed in which all 'spots' have integer coordinates. By using only distances between spots having the same x or the same y coordinate one can construct a 'map profile' using integer arithmetic. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin.

  9. Interpretation of Magnetic Phase Anomalies over 2D Tabular Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, phase angle (inverse tangent of the ratio of the horizontal to vertical gradients of magnetic anomalies) profile over two-dimensional tabular bodies has been subjected to detailed analysis for determining the source parameters. Distances between certain characteristic positions on this phase curve are related to the parameters of two-dimensional tabular magnetic sources. In this paper, I have derived the mathematical expressions for these relations. It has been demonstrated here that for locating the origin of the 2D tabular source, knowledge on the type of the model (contact, sheet, dyke, and fault) is not necessary. A procedure is evolved to determine the location, depth, width and magnetization angle of the 2D sources from the mathematical expressions. The method is tested on real field data. The effect of the overlapping bodies is also discussed with two synthetic examples. The interpretation technique is developed for contact, sheet, dike and inclined fault bodies.

  10. Thermal conductivity measurements in a 2D Yukawa system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.; Goree, J.; Piel, A.

    2007-03-01

    Thermal conductivity was measured for a 2D Yukawa system. First, we formed a monolayer suspension of microspheres in a plasma, i.e., a dusty plasma, which is like a colloidal suspension, but with an extremely low volume fraction and a partially-ionized rarefied gas instead of solvent. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. To melt this lattice and form a liquid, we used a laser-heating method. Two focused laser beams were moved rapidly around in the monolayer. The kinetic temperature of the particles increased with the laser power applied, and above a threshold a melting transition occurred. We used digital video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking. The spatial profiles of the particle kinetic temperature were calculated. Using the heat transport equation with an additional term to account for the energy dissipation due to the gas drag, we analyzed the temperature distribution to derive the thermal conductivity.

  11. Seismic Imaging Processing and Migration

    2000-06-26

    Salvo is a 3D, finite difference, prestack, depth migration code for parallel computers. It is also capable of processing 2D and poststack data. The code requires as input a seismic dataset, a velocity model and a file of parameters that allows the user to select various options. The code uses this information to produce a seismic image. Some of the options available to the user include the application of various filters and imaging conditions. Themore » code also incorporates phase encoding (patent applied for) to process multiple shots simultaneously.« less

  12. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  13. Multichannel analysis of surface-waves and integration of downhole acoustic televiewer imaging, ultrasonic Vs and Vp, and vertical seismic profiling in an NEHRP-standard classification, South of Concordia, Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Gad, Sabreen; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Seismic site characteristics, as pertaining to earthquake hazard reduction, are a function of the subsurface elastic moduli and the geologic structures. This study explores how multiscale (surface, downhole, and laboratory) datasets can be utilized to improve "constrained" average Vs30 (shear-wave velocity to a 30-meter depth). We integrate borehole, surface and laboratory measurements for a seismic site classification based on the standards of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). The seismic shear-wave velocity (Vs30) was derived from a geophysical inversion workflow that utilized multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) and downhole acoustic televiewer imaging (DATI). P-wave and S-wave velocities, based on laboratory measurements of arrival times of ultrasonic-frequency signals, supported the workflow by enabling us to calculate Poisson's ratio, which was incorporated in building an initial model for the geophysical inversion of MASW. Extraction of core samples from two boreholes provided lithology and thickness calibration of the amplitudes of the acoustic televiewer imaging for each layer. The MASW inversion, for calculating Vs sections, was constrained with both ultrasonic laboratory measurements (from first arrivals of Vs and Vp waveforms at simulated in situ overburden stress conditions) and the downhole acoustic televiewer (DATV) amplitude logs. The Vs30 calculations enabled categorizing the studied site as NEHRP-class "C" - very dense soil and soft rock. Unlike shallow fractured carbonates in the studied area, S-wave and P-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequency for the deeper intact shale core-samples from two boreholes were in better agreement with the corresponding velocities from both a zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and inversion of Rayleigh-wave velocity dispersion curves.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of 2-D Elastic Contacts Involving FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, M. N.; Murthy, H.

    2014-05-01

    The response of elastic indenters in contact with Functionally Graded Material (FGM) coated homogeneous elastic half space has been presented in the current paper. Finite element analysis has been used due to its ability to handle complex geometry, material, and boundary conditions. Indenters of different typical surface profiles have been considered and the problem has been idealized as a two-dimensional (2D) plane strain problem considering only normal loads. Initially, indenters were considered to be rigid and the results were validated with the solutions presented in the literature. The analysis has then been extended to the case of elastic indenters on FGM-coated half spaces and the results are discussed.

  15. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  16. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  17. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  18. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  19. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  20. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  1. Seismic volumetric flattening and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomask, Jesse

    Two novel algorithms provide seismic interpretation solutions that use the full dimensionality of the data. The first is volumetric flattening and the second is image segmentation for tracking salt boundaries. Volumetric flattening is an efficient full-volume automatic dense-picking method applied to seismic data. First local dips (step-outs) are calculated over the entire seismic volume. The dips are then resolved into time shifts (or depth shifts) in a least-squares sense. To handle faults (discontinuous reflections), I apply a weighted inversion scheme. Additional information is incorporated in this flattening algorithm as geological constraints. The method is tested successfully on both synthetic and field data sets of varying degrees of complexity including salt piercements, angular unconformities, and laterally limited faults. The second full-volume interpretation method uses normalized cuts image segmentation to track salt interfaces. I apply a modified version of the normalized cuts image segmentation (NCIS) method to partition seismic images along salt interfaces. The method is capable of tracking interfaces that are not continuous, where conventional horizon tracking algorithms may fail. This method partitions the seismic image into two groups. One group is inside the salt body and the other is outside. Where the two groups meet is the salt boundary. By imposing bounds and by distributing the algorithm on a parallel cluster, I significantly increase efficiency and robustness. This method is demonstrated to be effective on both 2D and 3D seismic data sets.

  2. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  3. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  4. Interpretation of seismic multiattributes using a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Michelle Chaves; Vidal, Alexandre Campane; de Carvalho, Ancilla Maria Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Geological bodies in 2D seismic section are characterized by differences from the surrounding response. These differences can be highlighted by attributes that are sensitive to the desired feature. In this paper the attributes were carefully chosen and trained by a neural network. These seismic attributes are transformed into a new attribute that allows a different view of the seismic lines. The database used for this study is a 2D seismic line of the Taubaté Basin, São Paulo State, Brazil. Two seismic sets were analyzed and the results bring out the horizons and the boundary between seismic units, which helps a better understanding of the evolution of the Taubaté sedimentary basin.

  5. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  7. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  8. Interface adhesion between 2D materials and elastomers measured by buckle delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Christopher; Lu, Nanshu

    2015-03-01

    A major application for 2D materials is creating electronic devices, including flexible and wearable devices. These applications require complicated fabrication processes where 2D materials are either mechanically exfoliated or grown via chemical vapor deposition and then transferred to a host substrate. Both processes require intimate knowledge of the interactions between the 2D material and the substrate to allow for a controllable transfer. Although adhesion between 2D materials and stiff substrates such as silicon and copper have been measured by bulge or peeling tests, adhesion between 2D materials and soft polymer substrates are hard to measure by conventional methods. Here we propose a simple way of measuring the adhesion between 2D materials and soft, stretchable elastomers using mature continuum mechanics equations. By creating buckle delamination in 2D atomic layers and measuring the buckle profile using an atomic force microscope, we can readily extract 2D-elastomer adhesion energy. Here we look at the adhesion of MoS2 and graphene to PDMS. The measured adhesion values are found insensitive to the applied strains in the substrate and are one order smaller than 2D-silicon oxide adhesion which is mainly attributed substrate surface roughness differences.

  9. Fluid Substitution Modeling to Determine Sensitivity of 3D Vertical Seismic Profile Data to Injected CO­2­ at an active Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project, Farnsworth field, TX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, K. K.; Balch, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration monitors a CO2 capture, utilization and storage project at Farnsworth field, TX. The reservoir interval is a Morrowan age fluvial sand deposited in an incised valley. The sands are between 10 to 25m thick and located about 2800m below the surface. Primary oil recovery began in 1958 and by the late 1960's secondary recovery through waterflooding was underway. In 2009, Chaparral Energy began tertiary recovery using 100% anthropogenic CO2 sourced from an ethanol and a fertilizer plant. This constitutes carbon sequestration and fulfills the DOE's initiative to determine the best approach to permanent carbon storage. One purpose of the study is to understand CO­2 migration from injection wells. CO2­ plume spatial distribution for this project is analyzed with the use of time-lapse 3D vertical seismic profiles centered on CO2 injection wells. They monitor raypaths traveling in a single direction compared to surface seismic surveys with raypaths traveling in both directions. 3D VSP surveys can image up to 1.5km away from the well of interest, exceeding regulatory requirements for maximum plume extent by a factor of two. To optimize the timing of repeat VSP acquisition, the sensitivity of the 3D VSP surveys to CO2 injection was analyzed to determine at what injection volumes a seismic response to the injected CO­2 will be observable. Static geologic models were generated for pre-CO2 and post-CO2 reservoir states through construction of fine scale seismic based geologic models, which were then history matched via flow simulations. These generated static states of the model, where CO2­ replaces oil and brine in pore spaces, allow for generation of impedance volumes which when convolved with a representative wavelet generate synthetic seismic volumes used in the sensitivity analysis. Funding for the project is provided by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  10. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/ or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  11. Reflective Moho beneath Qiangtang terrane, central Tibet, revealed by large explosive shot gathers along SinoProbe deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Gao, R.; Li, H.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Xiong, X.

    2013-12-01

    It is difficult to acquire deep seismic reflection data in central Tibet using the standard oil-industry acquisition parameters because of severe topography, rapid velocity and thickness variation of near-surface layer and strong seismic attenuation through the thickest crust of the Earth. Large explosive of 1000 kg seismic sources had been tentatively detonated in Qiangtang terrane and good quality data were acquired. The shot gather data showed clear Moho image in Qiangtang terrane. Moho was characterized by a sharp increase band in reflectivity at the base of the crust showed on shot records of the 1000-kg explosive. Moho reflection appeared at ~ 24 s TWT (~ 75.1 km)in the northmost Lhasa terrane and about 21 ~ 20 s TWT(65.7-62.6 km) beneath the Qiangtang terrane. We speculate that Moho get 9.4 km-12.5 km shallower from Lhasa to Qiangtang terrane rather than a 20 km offset. There is not obvious change of Moho depth across the Shung Hu suture.

  12. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  13. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  14. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn; Thibault, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Danian chalk is well exposed in the 14 km long coastal cliff of Stevns Klint (eastern Denmark). The cliff is a world renowned for its spectacular exposure of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Based on regional geological knowledge of the field and cores, the characteristics of the Chalk Group have been well constrained. Distinct sedimentary facies have been encountered; the sedimentology, the biostratigraphy, the diagenesis and the reservoir properties have been thoroughly investigated and reported. Stimulated by the intensive geological research, the field studies have been completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated with the seismic stratigraphy. Several seismic facies are identified in the Chalk Group: the 'transparent' (white chalk), the stratified (marl-chalk alternations), the crudely stratified (flint-rich chalk) and the hummocky (bryozoan mounds). The units not