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Sample records for 2-d seismic velocity

  1. Predicting abnormal pressure from 2-D seismic velocity modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grauls, D.; Dunand, J.P.; Beaufort, D.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic velocities are the only data available, before drilling, on which to base a quantitative, present-day estimate of abnormal pressure. Recent advances in seismic velocity processing have enabled them to obtain, using an in-house approach, an optimized 2-D interval velocity field and consequently to better define the lateral extension of pressure regimes. The methodology, interpretation and quantification of overpressure-related anomalies are supported by case studies, selected in sand-shale dominated Tertiary basins, offshore West Africa. Another advantage of this approach is that it can also account for the presence of reservoir-potential intervals at great depth and thus provide significant insight, from a prospective standpoint, into very poorly explored areas. Although at the outset the 2-D seismic tool legitimately merits being favored, optimization of the final predictive pressure model, prior to drilling, will depend upon the success of its combined use with other concepts and approaches, pertaining to structural geology, sedimentology, rock mechanics and fluid dynamics.

  2. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  3. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  4. The seismic analyzer: interpreting and illustrating 2D seismic data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Daniel; Giertsen, Christopher; Thurmond, John; Gjelberg, John; Gröller, M Eduard

    2008-01-01

    We present a toolbox for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil and gas involves creating a structural overview of seismic reflection data to identify hydrocarbon reservoirs. We improve the search of seismic structures by precalculating the horizon structures of the seismic data prior to interpretation. We improve the annotation of seismic structures by applying novel illustrative rendering algorithms tailored to seismic data, such as deformed texturing and line and texture transfer functions. The illustrative rendering results in multi-attribute and scale invariant visualizations where features are represented clearly in both highly zoomed in and zoomed out views. Thumbnail views in combination with interactive appearance control allows for a quick overview of the data before detailed interpretation takes place. These techniques help reduce the work of seismic illustrators and interpreters.

  5. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  6. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A velocity field, even one that represents a steady state flow, implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives. These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunctions with several examples.

  7. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex

    2000-01-01

    A velocity field. even one that represents a steady state flow implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives, These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunction with several examples.

  8. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  9. Estimating 2-D vector velocities using multidimensional spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-08-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wideband estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity. Later, it was shown that this approach could also be used for finding the lateral velocity component by also including a lateral sampling. A single velocity component would then be concentrated along a plane in the 3-D Fourier space, tilted according to the 2 velocity components. This paper presents 2 new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3- D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. Several phantom measurements, for flow-to-depth angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed. Multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously, and 2 different receive apodization schemes were tried. The 2 estimators were then applied to the data. The axial velocity component was estimated with an average standard deviation below 2.8% of the peak velocity, while the average standard deviation of the lateral velocity estimates was between 2.0% and 16.4%. The 2 estimators were also tested on in vivo data from a transverse scan of the common carotid artery, showing the potential of the vector velocity estimation method under in vivo conditions. PMID:18986918

  10. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  11. Velocity distributions for 2D inelastic granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, Dylan J.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Moon, Sung Joon; Rericha, Erin; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2002-11-01

    A previous study of a vertically vibrated 2D granular gas found a time-averaged horizontal velocity distribution function of the form P(v) exp(-C|v|^3/2) for the entire velocity range(F. Rouyer and N. Menon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 3676 (2000).. We examine the dependence of the velocity distribution function on phase in the cycle, height above the plate and air pressure in the container. We use 1.6 mm stainless steel balls confined to a vertical plane by a container 32σ tall, 48σ wide, and 1.15σ thick, where σ is the particle diameter. The container oscillates with peak acceleration 20g and frequency 50 Hz. We observe that a shock forms at collision of the plate with the layer and propagates through the layer, heating the grains. The shock rapidly decays over a distance of approximately 8σ above the plate; above this height the granular temperature and density are essentially independent of phase in the cycle. In this steady-state region, we compare the observed functional form of the velocity distribution to molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  13. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, M. K.; Fomel, S. B.; Sethian, J. A.

    2007-08-01

    We address the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the Earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. The main goals are to develop algorithms to convert time-migration velocities to true seismic velocities, and to convert time-migrated images to depth images in regular Cartesian coordinates. Our main results are three-fold. First, we establish a theoretical relation between the true seismic velocities and the 'time-migration velocities' using the paraxial ray tracing. Second, we formulate an appropriate inverse problem describing the relation between time-migration velocities and depth velocities, and show that this problem is mathematically ill posed, i.e., unstable to small perturbations. Third, we develop numerical algorithms to solve regularized versions of these equations which can be used to recover smoothed velocity variations. Our algorithms consist of efficient time-to-depth conversion algorithms, based on Dijkstra-like fast marching methods, as well as level set and ray tracing algorithms for transforming Dix velocities into seismic velocities. Our algorithms are applied to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems, and we test them on a collection of both synthetic examples and field data.

  14. Factors Affecting Seismic Velocity in Alluvium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Prothro, L.

    2015-12-01

    Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site has been selected as the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Dry Alluvium Geology Phase II site. The alluvium in this part of Yucca Flat is typical of desert basin fill, with discontinuous beds that are highly variable in clast size and provenance. Detailed understanding of the subsurface geology will be needed for interpretation of the SPE seismic data. A 3D seismic velocity model, created for Yucca Flat using interval seismic velocity data, shows variations in velocity within alluvium near the SPE Phase II site beyond the usual gradual increase of density with depth due to compaction. In this study we examined borehole lithologic logs, geophysical logs, downhole videos, and laboratory analyses of sidewall core samples to understand which characteristics of the alluvium are related to these variations in seismic velocity. Seismic velocity of alluvium is generally related to its density, which can be affected by sediment provenance, clast size, gravel percentage, and matrix properties, in addition to compaction. This study presents a preliminary subdivision of the alluvial strata in the SPE Phase II area into mappable units expected to be significant to seismic modeling. Further refinements of the alluvial units may be possible when seismic data are obtained from SPE Phase II tests. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  16. Seismic velocity structure of the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The recently completed set of seismic arrival times from the Apollo lunar seismic network are inverted to estimate the average seismic velocities in three sections of the lunar mantle: two for the upper mantle and one for the middle mantle. The method used is a variation of the linearized least squares inversion where the inversion is accomplished in steps. The estimated average velocities in the upper mantle decrease from Vp = 7.74 km/sec and Vs = 4.49 km/sec in the section above 270-km depth to Vp = 7.46 km/sec and Vs = 4.25 km/sec in the section between 270- and 500-km depth, confirming the earlier finding of negative gradients based on seismic amplitude variations. The average velocities in the middle mantle between the depths of 500 km and 1000 km of Vp = 8.26 km/sec and Vs = 4.65 km/sec are significantly higher than those in the upper mantle, contradicting earlier estimates based on more limited data. The higher velocities may suggest initial melting of the moon down to at least 1000-km depth.

  17. Detecting low Velocity Anomalies Combining Seismic Reflection With First Arrival Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flecha, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.

    2002-12-01

    In the present study seismic reflection techniques and high resolution seismic tomography are combined to determine location and geometry of shallow low velocity anomalies. Underground cavities (mines), water flows (formation with loose sand), etc. are geologic features characterized by slow seismic velocities and are targets of considerable social interest. Theoretical considerations (Snell's law) suggest that low velocity anomalies are undersampled and therefore badly resolved by ray tracing methods. A series of synthetics simulations have been carried out to asses the resolving power of the different methodologies. A 400mx50m two dimensional velocity model consisting of a background velocity gradient in depth from 3000 to 4000 m/s which included a rectangular low velocity anomaly (300 m/s). This anomaly was placed between 10m and 30m in depth and between 180m and 220m in length. The synthetic data calculation and the tomographic inversion have been done with absolutely independent programs. The data has been created using a 2D finite differences wave propagation acoustic algorithm. The tomographic inversion has been performed using two different software packages. The first one uses a combination of ray tracing a finite differences schemes to estimate the forward problem and an iterative conjugate gradient matrix solver to calculate the inverse. The second software package uses a modified Vidale scheme (Eikonal equation) to solve the forward problem and a LSQR to solve the inverse problem. The synthetic data were used for the inversions and for the generation of a conventional stacked section simulating a high resolution seismic reflection transect along the velocity model. The conventional stack images the diffractions caused by the velocity anomaly, which provided the location and extent of the low velocity anomaly. The inversions schemes provided estimates of the velocities, however, the tomograms and the ray tracing diagrams indicated a low resolution for

  18. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    earth becomes horizontally nonconstant. Even mild lateral velocity variations can significantly distort subsurface structures on the time migrated images. Conversely, depth migration provides the potential for more accurate reconstructions, since it can handle significant lateral variations. However, this approach requires good input data, known as a "velocity model". We address the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth, i.e., the problem of constructing a velocity model, which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. The main goals are to develop algorithms to convert time-migration velocities to true seismic velocities, and to convert time-migrated images to depth images in regular Cartesian coordinates. Our main results are three-fold. First, we establish a theoretical relation between the true seismic velocities and the "time migration velocities" using the paraxial ray tracing. Second, we formulate an appropriate inverse problem describing the relation between time migration velocities and depth velocities, and show that this problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., unstable to small perturbations. Third, we develop numerical algorithms to solve regularized versions of these equations which can be used to recover smoothed velocity variations. Our algorithms consist of efficient time-to-depth conversion algorithms, based on Dijkstra-like Fast Marching Methods, as well as level set and ray tracing algorithms for transforming Dix velocities into seismic velocities. Our algorithms are applied to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems, and we test them on a collection of both synthetic examples and field data.

  19. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    earth becomes horizontally nonconstant. Even mild lateral velocity variations can significantly distort subsurface structures on the time migrated images. Conversely, depth migration provides the potential for more accurate reconstructions, since it can handle significant lateral variations. However, this approach requires good input data, known as a 'velocity model'. We address the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth, i.e., the problem of constructing a velocity model, which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. The main goals are to develop algorithms to convert time-migration velocities to true seismic velocities, and to convert time-migrated images to depth images in regular Cartesian coordinates. Our main results are three-fold. First, we establish a theoretical relation between the true seismic velocities and the 'time migration velocities' using the paraxial ray tracing. Second, we formulate an appropriate inverse problem describing the relation between time migration velocities and depth velocities, and show that this problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., unstable to small perturbations. Third, we develop numerical algorithms to solve regularized versions of these equations which can be used to recover smoothed velocity variations. Our algorithms consist of efficient time-to-depth conversion algorithms, based on Dijkstra-like Fast Marching Methods, as well as level set and ray tracing algorithms for transforming Dix velocities into seismic velocities. Our algorithms are applied to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems, and we test them on a collection of both synthetic examples and field data.

  20. 2-D Gaussian beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    An approach for true-amplitude seismic beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in 2-D anisotropic elastic media is presented and discussed. Here, the recovered true-amplitude function is a scattering potential. This approach is a migration procedure based on the weighted summation of pre-stack data. The true-amplitude weights are computed by applying Gaussian beams (GBs). We shoot a pair of properly chosen GBs with a fixed dip and opening angles from the current imaging point towards an acquisition system. This pair of beams is used to compute a true-amplitude selective image of a rapid velocity variation. The total true-amplitude image is constructed by superimposing selective images computed for a range of available dip angles. The global regularity of the GBs allows one to disregard whether a ray field is regular or irregular. P- and S-wave GBs can be used to handle raw multicomponent data without separating the waves. The use of anisotropic GBs allows one to take into account the anisotropy of the background model.

  1. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  2. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and

  3. 2D seismic residual statics derived from refraction interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Refraction traveltimes have long been applied for deriving long-wavelength statics solutions. These traveltimes are also applied for the derivation of residual statics, but they must be sufficiently accurate at short wavelengths. In this study, we present a seismic residual statics method that applies interferometric theory to produce four stacked virtual refraction gathers with a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. These gathers are composed of forward and backward virtual refraction gathers for receivers and shots. By picking the first arrivals on these four gathers followed by the application of a set of refraction equations, reliable residual statics solutions can be derived. This approach can help deal with noisy data and also avoid using traveltime picks from shot gathers. We demonstrate the approach by applying it to synthetic data as well as real data.

  4. Lateral variations in lower mantle seismic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Thomas S.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a theoretical model which provides a rationale for the observed high values of velocity variations, the effect of a 0.1 to 0.2 percent partially molten volatile-rich material in various geometries which are heterogeneously dispersed in the lower mantle is examined. Data obtained indicate that, depending on aspect ratio and geometry, 0.1-0.2 percent partial melting in conjunction with about 100 K thermal anomalies can explain the seismic variations provided the compressibility of the melt differs by less than about 20 percent from the surrounding solid.

  5. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  6. Explore Seismic Velocity Change Associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung Earthquake by Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Chin-Shang; Wu, Yih-Min; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Huang, Win-Gee; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A ML 6.4 earthquake occurred on 4 March 2010 in Kaohsiung, the southern part of Taiwan, this shallow earthquake is the largest one of that area in the past few years. Some damages occurred on buildings and bridges after the earthquake, obvious surface deformation up to few cm was observed and the transportation including road and train traffic was also affected near the source area. Some studies about monitoring the velocity change induced by the big earthquake were carried out recently, most of studies used cross-correlation of the ambient noise-based method and indicated velocity drop was observed immediately after the big earthquake. However, this method is not able to constrain the depth of velocity change, and need to assume a homogeneous seismic velocity change during the earthquake. In this study, we selected 25 broadband seismic stations in the southern Taiwan and time period is from 2009/03 to 2011/03. Then we explored the velocity change associated with the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake by applying ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. ANT is a way of using interferometry to image subsurface seismic velocity variations by using surface wave dispersions extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation of seismic station-pairs, then the 2-D group velocity map with different periods could be extracted. Compare to ambient noise-based cross-correlation analysis, we estimated sensitivity kernel of dispersion curves and converted 2-D group velocity map from "with the period" to "with the depth" to have more constraints on the depth of velocity change. By subtracting shear velocity between "before" and "after" the earthquake, we could explore velocity change associated with the earthquake. Our result shows velocity reduction about 5-10% around the focal depth after the 2010 Kaohsiung earthquake and the post-seismic velocity recovery was observed with time period increasing, which may suggest a healing process of damaged rocks.

  7. Using overlapping sonobuoy data from the Ross Sea to construct a 2D deep crustal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Stock, J. M.; Granot, R.

    2012-03-01

    Sonobuoys provide an alternative to using long streamers while conducting multi-channel seismic (MCS) studies, in order to provide deeper velocity control. We present analysis and modeling techniques for interpreting the sonobuoy data and illustrate the method with ten overlapping sonobuoys collected in the Ross Sea, offshore from Antarctica. We demonstrate the importance of using the MCS data to correct for ocean currents and changes in ship navigation, which is required before using standard methods for obtaining a 1D velocity profile from each sonobuoy. We verify our 1D velocity models using acoustic finite-difference (FD) modeling and by performing depth migration on the data, and demonstrate the usefulness of FD modeling for tying interval velocities to the shallow crust imaged using MCS data. Finally, we show how overlapping sonobuoys along an MCS line can be used to construct a 2D velocity model of the crust. The velocity model reveals a thin crust (5.5 ± 0.4 km) at the boundary between the Adare and Northern Basins, and implies that the crustal structure of the Northern Basin may be more similar to that of the oceanic crust in the Adare Basin than to the stretched continental crust further south in the Ross Sea.

  8. Structure, Density and Velocity Fluctuations in Quasi-2D non-Brownian Suspensions of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Lhuillier, Daniel; Martin, Jérôme; Salin, Dominique

    1999-11-01

    Non-brownian sedimenting suspensions exhibit density and velocity fluctuations. We have performed experiments on a quasi-2D counter-flow stabilized suspension of 2000 spherical particles, namely a liquid-solid fluidized bed in a Hele-Shaw cell. This 2D suspension displays a uniform concentration but the particle radial distribution function and the fluctuations of the particle number in a sub-volume of the suspension suggest that the micostructure is homogeneous but not random. We have also measured the velocity fluctuations of a test-particle and the fluctuation of the mean particle velocity in a sub-volume. It happens that the relation between velocity and concentration fluctuation in a sub-volume can be deduced from a balance between buoyancy and parietal friction forces.

  9. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  10. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  11. High Resolution 2D Seismic Exploration of Poly-Metallic Massive Sulfide deposits at Garpenberg, Central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, O.; Juhlin, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Garpenberg mine is a VMS stratabound deposit in central Sweden which is located in the main mineralized part of a palaeoprotrozoic felsic magmatic province in the Baltic Shield. It has been mined for centuries and continues to date, therefore shallow deposits will soon be mined out. The seismic reflection method has been used recently in mineral exploration for imaging the subsurface by many researchers around the world. Therefore, to explore and evaluate the deeper potential, a 2D seismic profile was acquired over parts of the mining area. Due to the complexity in the structural geology of the area, a high resolution was desired along the profile and 5 meters spacing for shots and receivers was used. Underground activity and traffic on the surface generated significant noise, so that it was not possible to observe reflections on shot gathers easily. To attenuate coherent noise on shot gathers, an F-K filter was applied followed by deconvolution and a spectral weighting filter to improve the data quality. Most of the reflections on stacked section emanate from out of the plane and require a cross-dip correction to be imaged optimally. Velocity analysis, DMO and migration further improved the images. This study has shown that the reflection seismic method has potential in imaging complex structures in this challenging environment. The cross-dip correction is an important tool to enhance dipping and sub-horizontal seismic reflections and diffractions. Interpretation of the reflections shows that there is good correlation between the migrated seismic stacked section and some geological features.

  12. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    /arrival directions together with divergence/rotation decomposition will be useful for pursuing constituents of observed wavefield in inhomogeneous medium. In contrast, short-period waves are quite incoherent at stations mostly due to wave significant wave scattering. However, their envelope shapes resemble at neighbor stations. Therefore, we may be able to extract seismic wave energy propagation by seismogram envelope analysis. Based on this idea, we applied the same method to the time-integration of seismogram envelope to estimate its spatial derivatives. Together with seismogram envelope, we succeeded in reconstructing 2D envelope field and in estimating its arrival direction as well as long-period waveforms, without using phase information of seismic waves. Our results show that the seismic gradiometry suits the Hi-net to extract wave propagation characteristics both at long and short periods. This method is appealing that it can estimate waves at homogeneous grid to monitor seismic wave as a wavefield. It is promising to obtain phase velocity variation from direct waves, and to understand scattering and/or attenuation from coda envelopes, by applying the seismic gradiometry to Hi-net.

  13. Estimation of pseudo-2D shear-velocity section by inversion of high frequency surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A scheme to generate pseudo-2D shear-velocity sections with high horizontal resolution and low field cost by inversion of high frequency surface waves is presented. It contains six steps. The key step is the joint method of crossed correlation and phase shift scanning. This joint method chooses only two traces to generate image of dispersion curve. For Rayleigh-wave dispersion is most important for estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity, it can effectively obtain reliable images of dispersion curves with a couple of traces. The result of a synthetic example shows the feasibility of this scheme. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. A seismic survey in Antarctica, parallel schemes for seismic migration and target oriented velocity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Vikramaditya

    analysis that is customized for imaging tabular salt structures. An inverse problem is formulated where a multidimensional model space is iteratively searched using a modified simulated annealing scheme to determine the background velocities and salt structure. At each iteration, common image gathers are constructed by migrating common offset gathers with the current velocity model and an error measure is computed on the basis of the residual moveout in the common image gathers. A 2D parallel implementation, based on the algorithm discussed in the second part of this dissertation, was executed on an 8-node, 8 Gbytes SGI Origin 2000 and used to illustrate the feasibility of the method for a test case. Keeping the basic approach unchanged, the method can be easily extended to the 3D case.

  15. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  16. Catalog of velocity distributions around a reconnection site in 2D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Lukas; Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Nakamura, Rumi; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The velocity distribution of electrons and ions are known to be a marker for regions where magnetic reconnection develops. Past theoretical and computational works demonstrated that non-gyrotropic and anisotropic distributions depending on particle meandering motions and accelerations are seen around the reconnection point. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is expected to resolve such kinetic scale reconnection regions. We present a catalog of velocity distribution functions that can give hints on the location within the current sheet relative to the reconnection point, which is sometimes unclear from pure spacecraft observations. We use 2D PIC simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection to obtain velocity distributions at different locations, like in the center of the reconnection site, the ion and electron diffusion regions, or the reconnection inflow and outflow regions. With sufficiently large number of particles we resolve the distribution functions also in rather small regions. Such catalog may be compared with future MMS observations of the Earth's magnetotail.

  17. Measuring curvature and velocity vector fields for waves of cardiac excitation in 2-D media.

    PubMed

    Kay, Matthew W; Gray, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Excitable media theory predicts the effect of electrical wavefront morphology on the dynamics of propagation in cardiac tissue. It specifies that a convex wavefront propagates slower and a concave wavefront propagates faster than a planar wavefront. Because of this, wavefront curvature is thought to be an important functional mechanism of cardiac arrhythmias. However, the curvature of wavefronts during an arrhythmia are generally unknown. We introduce a robust, automated method to measure the curvature vector field of discretely characterized, arbitrarily shaped, two-dimensional (2-D) wavefronts. The method relies on generating a smooth, continuous parameterization of the shape of a wave using cubic smoothing splines fitted to an isopotential at a specified level, which we choose to be -30 mV. Twice differentiating the parametric form provides local curvature vectors along the wavefront and waveback. Local conduction velocities are computed as the wave speed along lines normal to the parametric form. In this way, the curvature and velocity vector field for wavefronts and wavebacks can be measured. We applied the method to data sampled from a 2-D numerical model and several examples are provided to illustrate its usefulness for studying the dynamics of cardiac propagation in 2-D media.

  18. Joint analysis of the seismic data and velocity gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, A. S.; Lavrov, V. S.; Muchamedov, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We performed joint analysis of the seismic noises recorded at the Japanese Ogasawara station located on Titijima Island in the Philippine Sea using the STS-2 seismograph at the OSW station in the winter period of January 1-15, 2015, over the background of a velocity gravity model. The graphs prove the existence of a cause-and-effect relation between the seismic noise and gravity and allow us to consider it as a desired signal.

  19. Robust seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalakis, E.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Garnier, J.; Melis, N. S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Tsogka, C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings. Motivated by Zhan et al., we study how the velocity change estimation is affected by seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. More precisely, we consider a numerical model and introduce spatio-temporal seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. We show that indeed, as pointed out by Zhan et al., the stretching method is affected by these fluctuations and produces misleading apparent velocity variations which reduce dramatically the signal to noise ratio of the method. We also show that these apparent velocity variations can be eliminated by an adequate normalization of the cross-correlation functions. Theoretically we expect our approach to work as long as the seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources are uniform, an assumption which holds for closely located seismic stations. We illustrate with numerical simulations in homogeneous and scattering media that the proposed normalization significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity change estimation. Similar behaviour is also observed with real data recorded in the Aegean volcanic arc. We study in particular the volcano of Santorini during the seismic unrest of 2011-2012 and observe a decrease in the velocity of seismic waves which is correlated with GPS measured elevation.

  20. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  1. Geomorphological relationships through the use of 2-D seismic reflection data, Lidar, and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesce, Meghan Elizabeth

    Barrier Islands are crucial in protecting coastal environments. This study focuses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, located within the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Barrier Island complex. It is one of many islands serving as natural protection for NGOM ecosystems and coastal cities. The NGOM barrier islands formed at 4 kya in response to a decrease in rate of sea level rise. The morphology of these islands changes with hurricanes, anthropogenic activity, and tidal and wave action. This study focuses on ancient incised valleys and and the impact on island morphology on hurricane breaches. Using high frequency 2-D seismic reflection data four horizons, including the present seafloor, were interpreted. Subaerial portions of Dauphin Island were imaged using Lidar data and aerial imagery over a ten-year time span, as well as historical maps. Historical shorelines of Dauphin Island were extracted from aerial imagery and historical maps, and were compared to the location of incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection data. Erosion and deposition volumes of Dauphin Island from 1998 to 2010 (the time span covering hurricanes Ivan and Katrina) in the vicinity of Katrina Cut and Pelican Island were quantified using Lidar data. For the time period prior to Hurricane Ivan an erosional volume of 46,382,552 m3 and depositional volume of 16,113.6 m3 were quantified from Lidar data. The effects of Hurricane Ivan produced a total erosion volume of 4,076,041.5 m3. The erosional and depositional volumes of Katrina Cut being were 7,562,068.5 m3 and 510,936.7 m3, respectively. More volume change was found within Pelican Pass. For the period between hurricanes Ivan and Katrina the erosion volume was 595,713.8 m3. This was mostly located within Katrina Cut. Total deposition for the same period, including in Pelican Pass, was 15,353,961 m3. Hurricane breaches were compared to ancient incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection results. Breaches from hurricanes from 1849

  2. Seismic waves velocity dispersion: An indicator of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, M.B.; Ryjkov, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    VSP data recorded in eleven wells located in different geological conditions were analyzed for studying the phase velocity dispersion of seismic waves. Strong positive dispersion (velocity increases with rising frequency) with the intensity of between 1.7 and 5.0% was obtained in all productive wells in depths of oil and gas pools. The close correlation between local increasing of velocity dispersion and absorption occurred in most cases. Background level of velocity dispersion with both signs (less then {+-}1.0%) which the authors consider as a level of mistakes was observed outside productive intervals and in ``dry`` wells. Modeling has shown that pseudodispersion caused by layered media may attain {+-}0.5% and, besides, curves of pseudodispersion and pseudoabsorption exhibit no correlation. Analysis of seismic waves dispersion together with the absorption may provide with reliable indicators of hydrocarbon pools.

  3. Monitoring seismic wave velocities in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEvilly, T.V.; Clymer, R.

    1979-01-01

    Beginning in the early 1960's, reports from the Soviet Union described travel-time anomalies of 5 to 20 percent preceding large earthquakes. In the early 970's, similar observations began to be reported outside the U.S.S.R. The most convincing were anomalously low values of the velocity ration, Vp/Vs, before four earthquakes of magnitudes 2.5 to 3.3 at Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y.; the anomalies were based on large amounts of high-quality data. In Japan, significant decreases were observed in the travel-time ratio, ts/tp, before two thrust-type earthquakes of magnitudes 6. and 5.3. Finally, there is the much discussed report of an anomaly before the magnitude 6.4 San Fernando, Calif., earthquake of 1971 and the implication that the change was caused principally by a decrease in the velocity of the primary (P) wave.

  4. Comparative 2D BRT and seismic modeling of CO2 plumes in deep saline reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrey, Said Attia Al; Strahser, Matthias; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The multi-disciplinary research project 'CO2 MoPa' (modeling and parameterization of CO2 storage in deep saline formations for dimensions and risk analysis) deals, among others, with the parameterization of virtual subsurface storage sites to characterize rock properties with modeling of processes related to CCS in deep saline reservoirs. The geophysical task is to estimate the sensitivity and the resolution of reflection seismic and geoelectrical time-lapses in order to determine the propagation of CO2 within the sediments and the development of the CO2 reservoir. Compared with seismic, borehole electric resistivity tomography (BRT) has lower resolution, but its permanent installation and continuous monitoring can make it an economical alternative or complement. Seismic and geoelectric applications to quantify changes of intrinsic aquifer properties with time are justified by the lower density and velocity and the higher electric resistivity of CO2 in comparison to pore brine. We present here modeling results on scenarios with realistic parameters of deep saline formations of the German Basin (candidate for CCS). The study focuses on effects of parameters related to depth (temperature, pressure), petrophysics (salinity, porosity), plume dimensions/saturations and data acquisition, processing and inversions. Both methods show stronger effects with increasing brine salinity, CO2 reservoir thickness, porosity and CO2 saturation in the pores. Both methods have a pronounced depth dependence due to the pressure and temperature dependence of the velocities, densities and resistivities of the host rock, brine and CO2. Increasing depth means also decreasing frequencies of the seismic signal and hence weaker resolution. Because of the expected limited thickness of the CO2 reservoir, the reflections from its top and bottom will most likely interfere with each other, making it difficult to determine the exact dimensions of the reservoir. In BRT, the resulting resistivity

  5. A crustal seismic velocity model for the UK, Ireland and surrounding seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, A.; England, R.W.; Maguire, Peter K.H.

    2007-01-01

    A regional model of the 3-D variation in seismic P-wave velocity structure in the crust of NW Europe has been compiled from wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles. Along each 2-D profile a velocity-depth function has been digitised at 5 km intervals. These 1-D velocity functions were mapped into three dimensions using ordinary kriging with weights determined to minimise the difference between digitised and interpolated values. An analysis of variograms of the digitised data suggested a radial isotropic weighting scheme was most appropriate. Horizontal dimensions of the model cells are optimised at 40 ?? 40 km and the vertical dimension at 1 km. The resulting model provides a higher resolution image of the 3-D variation in seismic velocity structure of the UK, Ireland and surrounding areas than existing models. The construction of the model through kriging allows the uncertainty in the velocity structure to be assessed. This uncertainty indicates the high density of data required to confidently interpolate the crustal velocity structure, and shows that for this region the velocity is poorly constrained for large areas away from the input data. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  6. Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J.J. ); Evans, J.R. )

    1989-06-01

    We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

  7. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  8. Carbonate platform-margins and reefs distribution using 2-D seismic analysis, Central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzali, Makrem; Troudi, Habib; Ben Boubaker, Kamel; Ouali, Jamel

    2014-12-01

    The seismic characterization of sedimentary facies in a carbonate platform, comprising different types of reefs constructions, is based using two-dimensional (2-D) seismic and borehole data. Reefs of the Aptian Serdj carbonates are shown as mounds of strong chaotic amplitudes that have a high-amplitude continuous reflection at the top. They are sealed by Albian marl and claystone deposits characterized by mid- to low-amplitude, parallel and discontinuous to weak reflections. These buildups were restricted to the outer platform margin of Central Tunisia. Sea level oscillations associated with master fault rejuvenation governed the growth, the distribution and development of these reefs. Their distribution is largely controlled by deep-seated fault-related folds and the topography of underlying structures, representing local domal uplifts. Falls of sea level led to subaerial exposure and the development of a karstified denudation of the carbonate platform. Subsequently, reefs were partially or totally destroyed and then overlain, during the Albian, by marls and claystones of the Fahdene Formation. Their study indicates that reef buildups have important oil and gas exploration potential, not only onshore, but also in offshore, Central Tunisia.

  9. Sleipner CCS site: velocity and attenuation model from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Chadwick, R. A.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The results of the travel-time and frequency shift tomographic inversion of the seismic data from one of the high-resolution lines acquired in 2006 on the Sleipner CO2 geological storage site are here presented. The work has been performed within the European project CO2ReMoVe, to produce an accurate model in-depth, of both seismic velocities and attenuation, to constrain better the quantification studies of the project's partners. Tomographic techniques have the advantage of not assuming horizontal layering or uniform lateral velocities, and of enabling an easy comparison of models, even if resulting from seismic data acquired with different geometries, unavoidable in a time-lapse data set. Through an iterative process, the differences in travel-times between observed direct, reflected or refracted arrivals and the same, calculated on a discrete model, with a ray-tracing based on the Fermat's principle, are minimized. Other minimization procedures provide the reflector/refractor geometries in -depth. Analogously, in attenuation tomography, the minimization process takes into account the observed and calculated spectral-centroid frequency-shift, due to the loss of the highest frequency of the seismic wave, while crossing an attenuating medium. The result is a seismic quality factor (Q) model in-depth, and hence of the attenuation that is known to be more sensitive to subtle changes in physical properties than seismic velocity. The model is across the center of the CO2 plume, on the in-line 1838, and is constituted by nine layers, four resulting by a preliminary analysis of the pre-injection 1994 data set, i.e. seabed, a strong reflection in the overburden and the top and bottom of the Utsira Sand, plus additional five horizons, four of which within Utsira Sands, and one just above the top of it. The layers within the reservoir are very close to each other and in some cases they merge together laterally. The accumulation of CO2 in the uppermost layer of the

  10. 2D He+ pickup ion velocity distribution functions: STEREO PLASTIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Taut, A.; Peleikis, T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Context. He+ pickup ions are either born from the ionization of interstellar neutral helium inside our heliosphere, the so-called interstellar pickup ions, or through the interaction of solar wind ions with small dust particles, the so-called inner source of pickup ions. Until now, most observations of pickup ions were limited to reduced 1D velocity spectra, which are insufficient to study certain characteristics of the He+ velocity distribution function (VDF). Aims: It is generally assumed that rapid pitch-angle scattering of freshly created pickup ions quickly leads to a fully isotropic He+ VDF. In light of recent observations, this assumption has found to be oversimplified and needs to be reinvestigated. Methods: Using He+ pickup ion data from the PLASTIC instrument on board the STEREO A spacecraft, we reconstruct a reduced form of the He+ VDF in two dimensions. This allows us to study relative changes of the 2D He+ VDF as a function of the configuration of the heliospheric magnetic field. Results: Our observations show that the He+ VDF is highly anisotropic and even indicates that, at least for certain configurations of B, it is not fully gyrotropic. Our results further suggest, that the observed velocity and pitch angle of He+ depends strongly on the local solar magnetic field vector, B, the ecliptic longitude, λ, the solar wind speed, vsw, and the global distribution of B. Conclusions: We found two distinct signatures that systematically change as a function of the alignment of B: (1) a ring beam distribution that is most pronounced at wsw> 0.5 and likely attributed to interstellar He+; (2) a beam signature aligned parallel to B that is most pronounced at wsw < 0.5 and attributed to inner-source He+. The strong anisotropy and the aforementioned dependencies of the He+ VDF also imply that observations of 1D velocity spectra of He+ pickup ions are potentially deceiving.

  11. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity anisotropy of salt diapirs: Implications for wellbore stability and seismic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Meleza, Liliana; Healy, David

    2013-04-01

    A set of ten evaporite samples collected from outcrops in a single diapiric province in Cape Breton Island (Canada) have been tested for seismic velocity anisotropy using three methods: 1) conventional ultrasonic pulse transmission method, where velocities are found from the travel times and the known dimensions of the samples. In order to obtain the entire suite of elastic constants, both P- and S-wave velocity measurements were taken in three different directions of cuboid rock samples. Velocities have been measured under dry, ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in halite-, gypsum- and anhydrite-dominated samples; 2) optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on thin sections to define the spatial distribution of minerals, their crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO); and 3) a numerical 'rock-recipe' approach based on Tatham et al. (2008) to calculate seismic velocity anisotropy using arbitrary composites of evaporite minerals and different CPOs. These three methods are then compared to understand the controlling factors of the anisotropic elastic properties. The elasticity data are used to guide geomechanical modeling for wellbore stability and to provide insights for the seismic data processing and seismic imaging of salt diapirs. Reference Tatham, D.J., Lloyd, G.E., Butler, R.W.H. and Casey, M, 2008, Amphibole and lower crustal seismic properties: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 267, 118-128.

  12. Local variations of seismic velocity in the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.D.; Lee, W.B.

    1981-12-01

    The authors inverted local earthquake arrival times to estimate spatial variations of seismic velocity. Their model consisted of near-surface station corrections and local perturbations to a standard crustal velocity model. The authors found a zone of relatively high-velocity trending southeast from the Salton Sea. This zone corresponds to the region of thickest sediments. The authors compared results with those of teleseismic studies by Savino et al (1977). The agreement was excellent, suggesting that the teleseismic delays are caused primarily by crustal velocity variations. Residual delays between the teleseismic observations and predicted crustal delays imply crustal thinning of 3 or 4 km along the axis of the valley. Known geothermal resource areas at Salton Sea (or Obsidian Buttes), Brawley, and East Mesa, lie on the axis of a zone of thin crust, and they may be intimately related to the Brawley fault. Neither local earthquake nor teleseismic arrival times can discriminate between these hypotheses, but the issue might be resolved by combining both types of data. Known geothermal resource areas at Heber, Dunes, and Glamis, lie away from the projected trace of the Brawley fault. These areas are nearly aseismic, and overlie crust with apparent seismic velocities only mildly higher than the regional average. These apparent velocity anomalies could be related to crustal thinning, but because of the very mild Bouguer gravity anomalies in these areas, it seems more likely that the velocity anomalies occur entirely within the crust. 7 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  13. MSNoise: a Python Package for Monitoring Seismic Velocity Changes using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin; Brenguier, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We present MSNoise, a complete software suite to compute relative seismic velocity changes under a seismic network, using ambient seismic noise. The whole is written in Python, from the monitoring of data archives, to the production of high quality figures. All steps have been optimized to only compute the necessary steps and to use 'job'-based processing. All steps can be changed by matching the in/outs. MSNoise exposes an API for communication with the data archive and the database. We present a validation of the software on a dataset acquired during the UnderVolc project on the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island, France, for which precursory relative changes of seismic velocity are visible for three eruptions betwee 2009 and 2011. MSNoise is available on http://www.msnoise.org

  14. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  15. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  16. Seismic velocity structure variation along northern Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Kamiya, S.; Kodaira, S.; Suetsugu, D.; Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin Island arc is an intra-oceanic island arc, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Recent active seismic surveys in the Izu-Bonin arc show significant variations in thickness of the middle crust along the volcanic front [Kodaira et al, 2007]. To understand the crustal evolution in the oceanic island arc, we have to clarify structures in the mantle wedge along the arc in addition to the oceanic island arc crust. We conducted seismicity observations to investigate structure variations in northern Izu-Bonin arc using natural earthquakes. A temporal ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) network consists of 40 pop-up type OBSs was deployed in April 2006 between Tori-shima and Hachijo-jima islands. These OBSs were retrieved in July after about 80-day observations. We used continuous seismic data at 36 OBSs and three F-net and Hi-net seismic stations on Hachijo-jima and Aoga-shima islands operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. During the OBS observations, more than 4000 earthquakes were observed by the OBSs. First, we modeled 1-D velocity structure using the VELEST [Kissling et al., 1995]. We used 325 earthquakes of which both P- and S-wave arrivals observed at 10 or more stations and occurred within the OBS network. The number of arrival data is 5382 and 5764 for P- and S-wave arrival, respectively. Then, we estimated 3-D velocity structure using the method by Kamiya and Kobayashi [2007]. The result of the 1-D velocity modeling was used for the initial model in the 3-D velocity tomography. We used about 2000 earthquakes for the 3-D tomography. The number of P- and S-wave arrivals are about 23000 and 26000, respectively. The 3-D velocity model indicates heterogeneous structures in the mantle along the arc. Low velocity anomalies down to the subducting slab beneath the volcanic front correspond to thicker parts of the arc crust around Hachijo-jima and Sumisu-jima islands. The low velocity

  17. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  18. Stress-Release Seismic Source for Seismic Velocity Measurement in Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, P. L.; Clark, C.; Richardson, J.; Martin, L.; Zahl, E.; Etter, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate seismic event locations are needed to delineate roles of mine geometry, stress and geologic structures in developing rockburst conditions. Accurate absolute locations are challenging in mine environments with rapid changes in seismic velocity due to sharp contrasts between individual layers and large time-dependent velocity gradients attending excavations. Periodic use of controlled seismic sources can help constrain the velocity in this continually evolving propagation medium comprising the miners' workplace. With a view to constructing realistic velocity models in environments in which use of explosives is problematic, a seismic source was developed subject to the following design constraints: (i) suitable for use in highly disturbed zones surrounding mine openings, (ii) able to produce usable signals over km-scale distances in the frequency range of typical coal mine seismic events (~10-100 Hz), (iii) repeatable, (iv) portable, (v) non-disruptive to mining operations, and (vi) safe for use in potentially explosive gaseous environments. Designs of the compressed load column seismic source (CLCSS), which generates a stress, or load, drop normal to the surface of mine openings, and the fiber-optic based source-initiation timer are presented. Tests were conducted in a coal mine at a depth of 500 m (1700 ft) and signals were recorded on the surface with a 72-ch (14 Hz) exploration seismograph for load drops of 150-470 kN (16-48 tons). Signal-to-noise ratios of unfiltered signals ranged from ~200 immediately above the source (500 m (1700 ft)) to ~8 at the farthest extent of the array (slant distance of ~800 m (2600 ft)), suggesting the potential for use over longer range. Results are compared with signals produced by weight drop and sledge hammer sources, indicating the superior waveform quality for first-arrival measurements with the CLCSS seismic source.

  19. A nearly analytic symplectically partitioned Runge-Kutta method for 2-D seismic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao; Yang, Dinghui; Liu, Faqi

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a new nearly analytic symplectically partitioned Runge-Kutta (NSPRK) method for numerically solving elastic wave equations. In this method, we first transform the elastic wave equations into a Hamiltonian system, and use the nearly analytic discrete operator to approximate the high-order spatial differential operators, and then we employ the partitioned second-order symplectic Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the resulted semi-discrete Hamiltonian ordinary differential equations (ODEs). We investigate in great detail on the properties of the NSPRK method that includes the stability condition for the P-SV wave in a 2-D homogeneous isotropic medium, the computational efficiency, and the numerical dispersion relation for the 2-D acoustic case. Meanwhile, we apply the NSPRK to simulate the elastic wave propagating in several multilayer models with both strong velocity contrasts and fluctuating interfaces. Both theoretical analysis and numerical results show that the NSPRK can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion resulted from the discretization of the wave equations, and more importantly, it preserves the symplecticity structure for long-time computation. In addition, numerical experiments demonstrate that the NSPRK is effective to combine the split perfectly matched layer boundary conditions to take care of the reflections from the artificial boundaries.

  20. Coda wave interferometry for estimating nonlinear behavior in seismic velocity.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel; Grêt, Alexandre; Douma, Huub; Scales, John

    2002-03-22

    In coda wave interferometry, one records multiply scattered waves at a limited number of receivers to infer changes in the medium over time. With this technique, we have determined the nonlinear dependence of the seismic velocity in granite on temperature and the associated acoustic emissions. This technique can be used in warning mode, to detect the presence of temporal changes in the medium, or in diagnostic mode, where the temporal change in the medium is quantified.

  1. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug

    2012-05-24

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  2. Monitoring of injected CO2 using the seismic full waveform inversion for 2-D elastic VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Shin, Y.; Moon, S.

    2014-12-01

    To monitor the injected CO2 in the subsurface, seismic monitoring techniques are extensively applied because of its high resolution. Among the seismic monitoring techniques, seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) has high applicability because it can delineate parameter changes by injected CO2. When seismic FWIs are applied, subsurface media can be generally assumed to be isotropic. However, most subsurface media are not isotropic, and shale is a representative anisotropic medium, particularly vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) medium, which is often encountered as a barrier to injected CO2. Thus, anisotropic properties of subsurface media are important for monitoring of injected CO2. For these issues, we need to consider anisotropy of subsurface media when seismic FWIs are applied as a monitoring tool for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed seismic FWI for 2-D elastic VTI media to investigate the effects of anisotropic properties in CO2 monitoring. For this numerical test, we assumed a geological model, which copies after one of CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We also applied seismic FWI algorithm for 2-D elastic isotropic media for comparison. From this comparison, we noticed that we can obtain more reliable results when we apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm. Numerical examples indicate that we should apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm rather than the isotropic FWI algorithm when we interpret seismic monitoring data acquired in anisotropic media to increase the success of monitoring for injected CO2. Our numerical results can also be used as references for real seismic monitoring of the Korea CO2 sequestration projects in the near future. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine

  3. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the

  4. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  5. Seismic Velocity Anomalies in the Outer Core: The Final Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Variation in density along outer core geoid surfaces must be very small (of order one part in a billion) since the resulting fluid motions and buoyancy fluxes would otherwise be prohibitively large for any reasonable choice of outer core viscosity. In any situation where seismic velocity variations are proportional to density variations (a generalized Birch's "law") this means that the resulting seismic travel time variations in the outer core would be unobservable. The largest lateral variations in the outer core are thus likely to arise from the distortion of geoid surfaces caused by density anomalies in the mantle or inner core. However, these do not change on decadal timescales and would be very difficult to separate from the inner core or mantle variations that cause them. Nonetheless, a recent study (Dai and Song, GRL, vol. 35, L16311, doi:10.1029/2008GL034895) provides evidence for time-variable outer core seismic velocity at the level of ten parts per million. Assuming this is real, I argue that the best candidate explanation is that all or part of the outer core is a two-phase medium consisting of a small mass fraction of small (ten or 100 micron-sized) particles of exsolving silicate material suspended in the convecting liquid. The seismic velocity of this two phase medium can vary at the desired level should the size distribution of particles vary from place to place (and with time) as one would expect in a convecting system, even though the mean density of the medium is invariant at the level of a part per billion, as required by dynamical considerations (thus invalidating Birch's "law"). The seismic velocity variation depends on the ratio of diffusion times to seismic periods, where the diffusion times are thermal or compositional for the particles or the particle spacing. This idea is not new (cf. Stevenson, JGR, 1983) but gains increased impetus from recent work on the nature of core formation and the desirability of an additional energy source for

  6. San Francisco Bay Area Velocity Structure From Controlled-Source Seismic Refraction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. R.; Catchings, R. D.; Steedman, C. E.; Gandhok, G.; Boatwright, J.; Rymer, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    To better understand the velocities and structures of the crust and upper mantle in the San Francisco Bay area, we developed 2-D tomographic velocity models along four seismic refraction profiles acquired along and across the bay area in the early 1990's. The four profiles extended from (1) Hollister to Inverness along the San Francisco and Marin Peninsulas (~200 km long), (2) Hollister to Santa Rosa along the East Bay (~220 km long), (3) the Pacific Ocean to Livermore crossing the bay (~100 km long), and (4) the Pacific Ocean to the western Santa Clara Valley (~25 km long), centered on the epicenter of the1989 M. 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake. Velocity models were not previously developed for three of the seismic profiles, and the previously developed model for the fourth profile (Catchings and Kohler, 1996) did not include some of the currently available seismic data. The profiles along the bay image structures from the near surface to about 25 km depth, and they show velocity anomalies associated with the major faults (San Andreas, Hayward, Rodgers Creek, Calaveras) and basins along the profile. Velocities range from about 2 km/s in the basins to about 7 km/s at the Moho, which dips southward along both sides of the bay. The cross bay profile shows velocity anomalies associated with six fault zones between the Pacific Ocean and the Livermore Valley and higher upper-crustal velocities (~6.2 km/s) between the San Andreas and Hayward faults than to the southwest (~5 km/s) or northeast (~4 km/s) of those faults. The Loma Prieta profile shows velocities ranging from 2 km/s to 6 km/s in the upper 5 km, with the highest velocities in the epicentral region of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. A pronounced, northeast-dipping, low-velocity zone is located beneath the surface expression of the San Andreas fault zone, but other fault zones along the profile show high-velocity anomalies beneath their surface expressions. Collectively, the velocity images show the complexity of

  7. Seismic Velocity Anomalies beneath Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-yu; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Chang, Li-Chin

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruption has been a natural disaster for human society. Taiwan is located in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Although there is no obvious phenomenon of volcanic activity in Taiwan, some volcanoes need to be monitored, especially the Tatun Volcano Group (TVG), which exhibits very active hydrothermal activity, is located on the tip of southwestern Ryukyu arc. TVG is about 15 km north to Taipei, capital of Taiwan, and is nearby two nuclear power plants along the northern coast of Taiwan. If TVG erupts, there must be a serious impact and damage to Taiwan. Since TVG is located within the Yangmingshan National Park, any artificial seismic source is not allowed to estimate possible eruption site and the degree of volcanic disaster. Instead, we use natural seismic waves generated by earthquakes to image the possible velocity anomaly of magma chamber and/or hydrothermal system beneath TVG. We systematically compare the differences of arrival times generated by some local earthquakes and recorded at 42 seismic stations in 2014 for finding any low-velocity zone within the crust. The results show that the arrival times always appeared significant delay at some particular seismic stations, such as Chi-Hsin-Shan (CHS), Siao-You-Keng (SYK) and some other stations at TVG, no matter where the earthquakes occurred. It implies that possible low-velocity zones, which could be the location of magma chamber and/or active hydrothermal system, exist beneath the CHS and SYK areas. This feature is generally consistent with the clustered micro-earthquakes in the shallow crust beneath the CHS area in the last decade.

  8. Seismicity and average velocities beneath the Argentine Puna Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Asch, G.; Rietbrock, A.; Kind, R.; Pardo, M.; Heit, B.; Monfret, T.

    A network of 60 seismographs was deployed across the Andes at ∼23.5°S. The array was centered in the backarc, atop the Puna high plateau in NW Argentina. P and S arrival times of 426 intermediate depth earthquakes were inverted for 1-D velocity structure and hypocentral coordinates. Average velocities and υp/υs in the crust are low. Average mantle velocities are high but difficult to interpret because of the presence of a fast velocity slab at depth. Although the hypocenters sharply define a 35° dipping Benioff zone, seismicity in the slab is not continuous. The spatial clustering of earthquakes is thought to reflect inherited heterogeneties of the subducted oceanic lithosphere. Additionally, 57 crustal earthquakes were located. Seismicity concentrates in the fold and thrust belt of the foreland and Eastern Cordillera, and along and south of the El Toro-Olacapato-Calama Lineament (TOCL). Focal mechanisms of two earthquakes at this structure exhibit left lateral strike-slip mechanisms similar to the suggested kinematics of the TOCL. We believe that the Puna north of the TOCL behaves like a rigid block with little internal deformation, whereas the area south of the TOCL is weaker and currently deforming.

  9. Seismic Anisotropy and Velocity-Porosity Relationships in the Seafloor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.

    In this dissertation, I investigate the structure and composition of marine sediments and the upper oceanic crust using seismic data and rock physics theories. Common marine sediments such as silty clays exhibit anisotropy because they are made up of thin sub-parallel lamellae of contrasting mineralogical composition and differing elastic properties. In 1986, Rondout Associates, Inc. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution recorded direct shear waves in shallow marine sediments in 21-m-deep water by using a newly developed ocean-bottom shear source and a multicomponent on-bottom receiver. A nearby drill hole showed that the sediments are interbedded silty clays, clays, and sands. I used an anisotropic reflectivity program written by Geo-Pacific Corporation to produce synthetic seismograms to estimate the five independent elastic stiffnesses necessary for describing transverse isotropy, the form of anisotropy found in these sediments. The synthetics fit the vertical and two horizontal components for two intersecting profiles, 150 and 200 m long. The data require low shear velocities (<400 m/s) and high attenuation (Q_{S} < 100) in about the top 30 m of the sediments. In the top 10 m, silty clay exhibits 12-15% anisotropy for shear waves. In this dissertation, I also consider the applicability of various rock physics theories to modeling the oceanic crust. Seismic velocities are controlled by the porosity, typically 20-30% for the top of layer 2. Most rock physics theories that relate seismic velocities to porosities are invalid for such high porosities. I combined elements of the self-consistent and noninteraction approaches to extend some rock physics theories for porosities up to at least 30-35%. Since the oceanic crust contains pores and cracks of many shapes, an appropriate theory must model round pores as well as flat cracks. I present examples of how layer 2A of the oceanic crust might be represented using an extended version of the Kuster-Toksoz theory

  10. Upper Mississippi embayment shallow seismic velocities measured in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Huaibao P.; Hu, Y.; Dorman, J.; Chang, T.-S.; Chiu, J.-M.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical seismic compressional- and shear-wave (P- and S-wave) profiles were collected from three shallow boreholes in sediment of the upper Mississippi embayment. The site of the 60-m hole at Shelby Forest, Tennessee, is on bluffs forming the eastern edge of the Mississippi alluvial plain. The bluffs are composed of Pleistocene loess, Pliocene-Pleistocene alluvial clay and sand deposits, and Tertiary deltaic-marine sediment. The 36-m hole at Marked Tree, Arkansas, and the 27-m hole at Risco, Missouri, are in Holocene Mississippi river floodplain sand, silt, and gravel deposits. At each site, impulsive P- and S-waves were generated by man-made sources at the surface while a three-component geophone was locked downhole at 0.91-m intervals. Consistent with their very similar geology, the two floodplain locations have nearly identical S-wave velocity (VS) profiles. The lowest VS values are about 130 m s-1, and the highest values are about 300 m s-1 at these sites. The shear-wave velocity profile at Shelby Forest is very similar within the Pleistocene loess (12m thick); in deeper, older material, VS exceeds 400 m s-1. At Marked Tree, and at Risco, the compressional-wave velocity (VP) values above the water table are as low as about 230 m s-1, and rise to about 1.9 km s-1 below the water table. At Shelby Forest, VP values in the unsaturated loess are as low as 302 m s-1. VP values below the water table are about 1.8 km s-1. For the two floodplain sites, the VP/VS ratio increases rapidly across the water table depth. For the Shelby Forest site, the largest increase in the VP/VS ratio occurs at ???20-m depth, the boundary between the Pliocene-Pleistocene clay and sand deposits and the Eocene shallow-marine clay and silt deposits. Until recently, seismic velocity data for the embayment basin came from earthquake studies, crustal-scale seismic refraction and reflection profiles, sonic logs, and from analysis of dispersed earthquake surface waves. Since 1991, seismic data

  11. Effect of Velocity of Detonation of Explosives on Seismic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Leidig, M.; Bonner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We studied seismic body wave generation from four fully contained explosions of approximately the same yields (68 kg of TNT equivalent) conducted in anisotropic granite in Barre, VT. The explosions were detonated using three types of explosives with different velocities of detonation (VOD): Black Powder (BP), Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil/Emulsion (ANFO), and Composition B (COMP B). The main objective of the experiment was to study differences in seismic wave generation among different types of explosives, and to determine the mechanism responsible for these differences. The explosives with slow burn rate (BP) produced lower P-wave amplitude and lower corner frequency, which resulted in lower seismic efficiency (0.35%) in comparison with high burn rate explosives (2.2% for ANFO and 3% for COMP B). The seismic efficiency estimates for ANFO and COMP B agree with previous studies for nuclear explosions in granite. The body wave radiation pattern is consistent with an isotropic explosion with an added azimuthal component caused by vertical tensile fractures oriented along pre-existing micro-fracturing in the granite, although the complexities in the P- and S-wave radiation patterns suggest that more than one fracture orientation could be responsible for their generation. High S/P amplitude ratios and low P-wave amplitudes suggest that a significant fraction of the BP source mechanism can be explained by opening of the tensile fractures as a result of the slow energy release.

  12. Seismic Q and velocity at depth. [of lunar outgassed rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Nadler, H.; Clark, V.; Coombe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the p-wave and s-wave internal friction quality factors (Q) and velocities of samples of a moderately outgassed terrestrial analog of lunar basalt exposed simultaneously to temperatures and hydrostatic confining pressures in accordance with the best available estimates of the lunar selenotherm are presented. Q values and velocities are found to increase with simulated depth, and an extrapolation of the Q value to a thoroughly outgassed states provides a Q value in reasonable agreement with those derived from lunar seismic data, suggesting a very dry lunar crust. Results also imply that similar seismic determinations for Mars would be able to distinguish between a dry crust and a crust containing water trapped beneath a layer of ice. Results of thermal cracking tests which demonstrate that high degrees of cracking associated with thermal cycling, as during the lunar day, are not inconsistent with high Q in a dry environment are presented, and it is shown that volatiles with diple moments comparable to H2O can greatly affect Q. Possible attenuation mechanisms are then considered, and velocity measurements on a synthetic anorthosite are presented.

  13. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  14. Wave-equation migration velocity inversion using passive seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2 sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits the fact that the P- and S-wave arrivals originate at the same time and location in the subsurface. We generate image volumes by back-propagating P- and S-wave data through initial Earth models and then applying a correlation-based extended-imaging condition. Energy focusing away from zero lag in the extended image volume is used as a (penalized) residual in an adjoint-state tomography scheme to update the P- and S-wave velocity models. We use an acousto-elastic approximation to greatly reduce the computational cost. Because the method requires neither an initial source location or origin time estimate nor picking of arrivals, it is suitable for low signal-to-noise datasets, such as microseismic data. Synthetic results show that with a realistic distribution of microseismic sources, P- and S-velocity perturbations can be recovered. Although demonstrated at an oil and gas reservoir scale, the technique can be applied to problems of all scales from geologic core samples to global seismology.

  15. Absolute plate velocities from seismic anisotropy: Importance of correlated errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard G.; Kreemer, Corné

    2014-09-01

    The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25 ± 0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ = 21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (σ = 14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS = 4 mm a-1, σ = 29°) and Eurasia (vRMS = 3 mm a-1, σ = 33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ≈ 5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. The tendency of observed azimuths on the Arabia plate to be counterclockwise of plate motion may provide information about the direction and amplitude of superposed asthenospheric flow or about anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle.

  16. Extracting physical parameters from marine seismic data: New methods in seismic oceanography and velocity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Will F. J.

    The utility and meaning of a geophysical dataset is dependent on good interpretation informed by high-quality data, processing, and attribute examination via technical methodologies. Active source marine seismic reflection data contains a great deal of information in the location, phase, and amplitude of both pre- and post-stack seismic reflections. Using pre- and post-stack data, this work has extracted useful information from marine reflection seismic data in novel ways in both the oceanic water column and the sub-seafloor geology. In chapter 1 we develop a new method for estimating oceanic turbulence from a seismic image. This method is tested on synthetic seismic data to show the method's ability to accurately recover both distribution and levels of turbulent diffusivity. Then we apply the method to real data offshore Costa Rica where we observe lee waves. Our results find elevated diffusivities near the seafloor as well as above the lee waves five times greater than surrounding waters and 50 times greater than open ocean diffusivities. Chapter 2 investigates subsurface geology in the Cascadia Subduction Zone and outlines a workflow for using pre-stack waveform inversion to produce highly detailed velocity models and seismic images. Using a newly developed inversion code, we achieve better imaging results as compared to the product of a standard, user-intensive method for building a velocity model. Our results image the subduction interface ~30 km farther landward than previous work and better images faults and sedimentary structures above the oceanic plate as well as in the accretionary prism. The resultant velocity model is highly detailed, inverted every 6.25 m with ~20 m vertical resolution, and will be used to examine the role of fluids in the subduction system. These results help us to better understand the natural hazards risks associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Chapter 3 returns to seismic oceanography and examines the dynamics of nonlinear

  17. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy: Importance of Correlated Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.; Kreemer, C.

    2014-12-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath the interiors of plates may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the deeper mantle. Here we analyze a global set of shear-wave splitting data to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11º Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1ºS, 68.6ºE. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (σ=14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS=4 mm a-1, σ=29°) and Eurasia (vRMS=3 mm a-1, σ=33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ≈5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion.

  18. Earthquake locations and seismic velocity models for Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    Earthquake locations are fundamental to studies of earthquake physics, fault orientations and Earth's deformation. Improving earthquake location accuracy has been an important goal branch in seismology for the past few decades. In this dissertation, I consider several methods to improve both relative and absolute earthquake locations. Chapter 2 is devoted to the comparison of different relative earthquake location techniques based on synthetic data, including the double-difference and source-specific station term (SSST) method. The shrinking box SSST algorithm not only provides similar improvements in relative earthquake locations compared to other techniques, but also improves absolute location accuracy compared to the simple SSST method. Chapter 4 describes and documents the COMPLOC software package for implementing the shrinking box SSST algorithm. Chapter 3 shows how absolute locations for quarry seismicity can be obtained by using remote sensing data, which is useful in providing absolute reference locations for three-dimensional velocity inversions and to constrain the shallow crustal structure in simultaneous earthquake location and velocity inversions. Chapter 5 presents and tests a method to estimate local Vp/Vs ratios for compact similar earthquake clusters using the precise P- and S-differential times obtained using waveform cross-correlation. Chapter 6 describes a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model for southern California obtained using the "composite event method" applied to the SIMULPS tomographic inversion algorithm. Based on this velocity model and waveform cross-correlation, Chapter 7 describes how a new earthquake location catalog is obtained for about 450,000 southern California earthquakes between 1981 and 2005.

  19. Shallow velocity structure and seismic site effects at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Mauricio M.; Lesage, Philippe; Valette, Bernard; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Leandro, Carlos; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe; Dorel, Jacques

    2006-04-01

    We use the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method with improved inversion algorithms to estimate the Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves at two sites at the West and Northeast flanks of Arenal volcano, Costa Rica. At the West flank site, the Rayleigh waves phase velocities vary from 765 m s - 1 at 1 Hz to 300 m s - 1 at 12 Hz and those of Love waves between 780 and 295 m s - 1 in the same frequency band. At the Northeast flank site, the Rayleigh wave velocities range from 1386 to 300 m s - 1 and those of Love from 1983 to 315 m s - 1 . From dispersion curves we derive shallow (< 400 m) P and S waves velocity models. 2D velocity models down to a depth of 150 m are also obtained by seismic refraction surveys along two radial profiles on the tephra apron at West and East flanks. They present strong vertical and lateral variations in the velocity and thickness of the layers. Strong variations in amplitude of the spectral peaks are observed for the seismic events along two radial arrays. These site effects are analysed using the H/V spectral ratio method and S-wave theoretical transfer functions. Results show that the wave amplifications are related to resonance effects of shallow structure (< 150 m) and occur only where impedance contrast with the deeper layers is strong enough. In contrast, almost no site effect are detected at the Masaya shield volcano, Nicaragua, where the structure is more homogeneous and mainly composed of lava flows. When a resonance of the shallow layers occurs, the correlation coefficients between close stations increase at the corresponding frequency. The site effects may thus produce spurious results with the SPAC method. The H/V spectral ratio, used in complement of the SPAC method, can help detecting the site effects and testing the plane layer hypothesis. Furthermore, the theoretical transfer functions calculated for the estimated velocity models is also useful to validate the models.

  20. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  1. Seismic velocities and Poisson's ratio of shallow unconsolidated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    The authors determined P- and S-wave velocity depth profiles in shallow, unconsolidated beach sand by analyzing three-component surface seismic data. P- and S-wave velocity profiles were calculated from travel time measurements of vertical and tangential component seismograms, respectively. The results reveal two discrepancies between theory and data. Whereas both velocities were found to be proportional to the pressure raised to the power of 1/6, as predicted by the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory, the actual values of the velocities are less than half of those calculated from this theory. The authors attribute this discrepancy to the angularity of the sand grains. Assuming that the average radii of curvature at the grain contacts are smaller than the average radii of the grains, they modify the Hertz-Hindlin theory accordingly. They found that the ratio of the contact radius to the grain radius is about 0.086. The second disparity is between the observed Poisson's ratio of 0.15 and the theoretical value (0.008 for random pack of quartz spheres). This discrepancy can be reconciled by assuming slip at the grain contacts. Because slip decreases the shearing between grains, Poisson's ratio increases.

  2. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  3. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  4. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  5. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  6. Seasonal variations of seismic velocities in the San Jacinto fault area observed with ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Campillo, M.; Zigone, D.

    2015-08-01

    We observe seasonal seismic wave speed changes (dv/v) in the San Jacinto fault area and investigate several likely source mechanisms. Velocity variations are obtained from analysis of 6 yr data of vertical component seismic noise recorded by 10 surface and six borehole stations. We study the interrelation between dv/v records, frequency-dependent seismic noise properties, and nearby environmental data of wind speed, rain, ground water level, barometric pressure and atmospheric temperature. The results indicate peak-to-peak seasonal velocity variations of ˜0.2 per cent in the 0.5-2 Hz frequency range, likely associated with genuine changes of rock properties rather than changes in the noise field. Phase measurements between dv/v and the various environmental data imply that the dominant source mechanism in the arid study area is thermoelastic strain induced by atmospheric temperature variations. The other considered environmental effects produce secondary variations that are superimposed on the thermal-based changes. More detailed work with longer data on the response of rocks to various known external loadings can help tracking the evolving stress and effective rheology at depth.

  7. Mineralization, crystallography, and longitudinal seismic wave velocity of speleothems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.; Grant, S.K. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Haas, C.J. . Dept. of Mining Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Speleothems, or cave deposits, of Fisher Cave in Sullivan, Missouri, display unique arrangements of overlapping and interwoven crystals that provide the foundation for intricate shapes and patterns. Research has found that the deposition of such forms are affected by many variables associated with carbonate petrology. An active cave system having a consistent yearly rate of water flow will deposit trace, non-carbonate mineralization at locations of initial contact with the cave environment. Deposit specimens were tested using X-ray diffraction methods resulting in the identification of a manganese oxide coating of a psilomelane. Speleothems, considered a natural resource, are protected along with the cave from industrial advancements outside the cave environment. When the detonation of explosives during the construction of a highway near Crystal Cave in Springfield, Missouri threatened the speleothegenic decoration, a study of the damaging resonant frequency of the speleothems was instigated. To calculate this frequency, the longitudinal and transverse seismic wave velocity was measured by geophysical techniques.

  8. Seismic velocities, anisotropy and elastic properties of crystalline rocks and implications for interpretation of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shengsi

    The knowledge of seismic and elastic properties of polyphase crystalline rocks under high pressure and temperature conditions is fundamental in interpreting in-situ seismic data (e.g., reflections, refractions, received functions, and tomography). These data may be understood in terms of lithology, mineralogy, and physical state and as such they allow establishing lithospheric structure and composition models of continents. The present study aims to better understand how the seismic and elastic properties [e.g., compressional- and shear-wave velocities (Vp and Vs), anisotropy, and elastic parameters] under confining pressure are affected by modal and chemical compositions, microstructures, lattice preferred orientations (LPO) of rocks and by the geometry and state of microcracks. This thesis consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 addresses the framework of rock seismic property studies, focusing on the concepts of elasticity and mixture rules, and providing an overview on results of statistical analysis on previous laboratory-measured seismic data of different lithologies and rock-forming minerals, and on the seismic anisotropy of the continental crust and upper mantle. Chapter 2 deals with seismic and elastic properties measured at hydrostatic pressures up to 800 MPa for 12 representative samples from the Longmen Shan complex in which the great 2008 Wenchuan earthquake took place. These allowed understanding how coseismic ruptures nucleated and propagated. This study also offers necessary information for broadband simulations of strong ground motions in the assessment and forecast of earthquake hazards in the region. Furthermore, the study, which yields a moment magnitude of 7.9-8.0 given the variation in the dip of the coseismic ruptures and the uncertainty in the depth to which the coseismic rupture may propagate downwards below the depth of the mainshock hypocenter, presents the first accurate quantification of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake’s size. Chapter 3 is

  9. Velocity Structure Determination Through Seismic Waveform Modeling and Time Deviations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Zhu, L.; Tan, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    Through the use of seismic waveforms recorded by TriNet, a dataset of earthquake focal mechanisms and deviations (time shifts) relative to a standard model facilitates the investigation of the crust and uppermost mantle of southern California. The CAP method of focal mechanism determination, in use by TriNet on a routine basis, provides time shifts for surface waves and Pnl arrivals independently relative to the reference model. These shifts serve as initial data for calibration of local and regional seismic paths. Time shifts from the CAP method are derived by splitting the Pnl section of the waveform, the first arriving Pn to just before the arrival of the S wave, from the much slower surface waves then cross-correlating the data with synthetic waveforms computed from a standard model. Surface waves interact with the entire crust, but the upper crust causes the greatest effect. Whereas, Pnl arrivals sample the deeper crust, upper mantle, and source region. This natural division separates the upper from lower crust for regional calibration and structural modeling and allows 3-D velocity maps to be created using the resulting time shifts. Further examination of Pnl and other arrivals which interact with the Moho illuminate the complex nature of this boundary. Initial attempts at using the first 10 seconds of the Pnl section to determine upper most mantle structure have proven insightful. Two large earthquakes north of southern California in Nevada and Mammoth Lakes, CA allow the creation of record sections from 200 to 600 km. As the paths swing from east to west across southern California, simple 1-D models turn into complex structure, dramatically changing the waveform character. Using finite difference models to explain the structure, we determine that a low velocity zone is present at the base of the crust and extends to 100 km in depth. Velocity variations of 5 percent of the mantle in combination with steeply sloping edges produces complex waveform variations

  10. Velocity models and Hypocenter Relocations for the Charlevoix Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present 3-D P- and S-wave velocity (Vp and Vs) models and new hypocenter locations for the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) based upon local travel time tomography. Prominent velocity anomalies and the distribution of earthquakes are discussed in relation to known structural features produced by Iapetan rifting and a large Devonian meteor impact. The CSZ is located along the St. Lawrence River about 100 km downstream from Quebec City, Canada. A 7 station permanent network, augmented by temporary stations, records more than 200 earthquakes annually. The inversion dataset consists of 1,329 earthquakes providing 8,540 P-wave and 8,304 S-wave arrival times. Velocity model resolution is adequate to a depth of at least16 km as indicated by recovery of synthetic checkerboard models. Low Vp and Vs are associated with the impact structure to a depth of 12 km. A prominent high Vp feature is present north of the impact structure and high Vp and Vs extend below the impact at depths exceeding 12 km. Following inversion, hypocenter location errors are less than 0.2 km horizontally and 0.4 km vertically. Hypocenters form a semicircle delineating the eastern margin of the impact structure. Northeast of the impact, hypocenters cluster into planes in several locations, suggesting the presence of distinct, seismogenic faults. The planes trend NE, in the same direction as the Iapitan rift faults, and dip to the SE. One steeply dipping plane is located below the north shore of the St. Lawrence River and extends to a depth of at least 30 km. Two other planes with shallower dips are located below the river and extend to depths of 12 and 15 km. All three planes are disrupted when they encounter the impact but the north shore plane appears to continue through and below the impact zone. The presence of through-going Iapetan faults within the impact structure is an important constraint for 3-D stress models developed to explain the spatial distribution of seismicity in the CSZ. We identify

  11. Generalized 2D Euler-Boussinesq equations with a singular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Durga; Regmi, Dipendra; Tao, Lizheng; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-07-01

    This paper studies the global (in time) regularity problem concerning a system of equations generalizing the two-dimensional incompressible Boussinesq equations. The velocity here is determined by the vorticity through a more singular relation than the standard Biot-Savart law and involves a Fourier multiplier operator. The temperature equation has a dissipative term given by the fractional Laplacian operator √{-Δ}. We establish the global existence and uniqueness of solutions to the initial-value problem of this generalized Boussinesq equations when the velocity is “double logarithmically” more singular than the one given by the Biot-Savart law. This global regularity result goes beyond the critical case. In addition, we recover a result of Chae, Constantin and Wu [8] when the initial temperature is set to zero.

  12. Analysis of Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using 2D seismic data and well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Ferhi, Issam; Bédir, Mourad; Youssef, Mohamed Ben; Gasmi, Mohamed; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a structural and depositional model of lower Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using detailed facies relations in outcrops, seismic reflection data, and wells. The study interval (called the "Aptian supersequence") is subdivided into four seismic sequences containing third-order sequences. Sequence architecture was strongly affected by syndepositional tectonic movements, which controlled sequence position and distribution. Specifically, the seismic sections show irregular distribution of different zones of subsidence and uplift. The observed structures identified through the detailed mapping suggest that lower Cretaceous rifting created depressions and grabens that filled with strata characterized by divergent reflectors striking against dipping growth faults. The Aptian-Albian unconformity ("crisis") marked a change of the extensional stress field from NNW-SSE to NE-SW induced rotation of blocks and an evolution of sedimentary basin filling related to the regional tectonic deformation. Local salt tectonic movement accentuated the formation of asymmetric depocenters. The salt ascended at the junction of master faults, resulting in cross-cutting of the strata and local reworking of Triassic evaporites in Aptian strata. Basinward to landward variations of the thickness and facies associated with strata pinch-outs and unconformities are related to the main synsedimentary tectonic events that were synchronous with salt tectonic movements. Triassic salt domes and salt intrusions along faults accentuated the border elevations between basin depocenters and uplifts. These sedimentary phenomena in central Tunisia are interpreted as causally related aspects of a local and global tectonic event during the Aptian.

  13. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  14. Three Dimensional velocity Structure in the New Madrid and Other SCR Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recent tomographic inversions of travel time data accumulated for active SCR seismic zones have revealed strong velocity contrasts that appear to control the distribution of seismicity. Velocity images have been obtained for the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ), and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ). We have also obtained a preliminary velocity model for the aftershock region associated with the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake. Both P and S waves were inverted for velocity structure in the NMSZ. High velocity bodies were imaged and are interpreted to be intrusions associated with the axis and edge of the Reelfoot graben. Low velocities were imaged near the intersection of the long NE arm of seismicity and the NW trending arm; the low velocities are attributed to highly fractured, fluid saturated crust and are associated with shallow earthquake swarms. In general, earthquakes tend to avoid regions with higher than average velocities and concentrate in areas of low velocity or along the edges of high velocity zones. Similar results were obtained for both the ETSZ and the CSZ. A prominent low-velocity zone was detected in the ETSZ; most earthquakes occur in rocks that surround the lowest-velocity regions. An elongated, high velocity region is present at mid-crustal depths in the CSZ; earthquakes avoid the high velocity body and separate into two bands, one on either side of the feature. Larger earthquakes (exceeding magnitude 4) have occurred along the northern edge of the high velocity region. Our results suggest that earthquakes in SCR seismic zones tend to occur in rocks where strain energy is concentrating. This observation is consistent with results from high resolution tomographic images of fault zones in California.

  15. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  16. Effective filtering and interpolation of 2D discrete velocity fields with Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumier, Louis-Philippe; Khouider, Boualem; Agueh, Martial

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new variational technique to interpolate and filter a two-dimensional velocity vector field which is discretely sampled in a region of {{{R}}}2 and sampled only once at a time, on a small time-interval [0,{{Δ }}t]. The main idea is to find a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations that is closest to a prescribed field in the sense that it minimizes the l 2 norm of the difference between this solution and the target field. The minimization is performed on the initial vorticity by expanding it into radial basis functions of Gaussian type, with a fixed size expressed by a parameter ɛ. In addition, a penalty term with parameter k e is added to the minimizing functional in order to select a solution with a small kinetic energy. This additional term makes the minimizing functional strongly convex, and therefore ensures that the minimization problem is well-posed. The interplay between the parameters k e and ɛ effectively contributes to smoothing the discrete velocity field, as demonstrated by the numerical experiments on synthetic and real data.

  17. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia; Saad, Rosli

    2010-12-23

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  18. Seismic response of a deep continental basin including velocity inversion: the Sulmona intramontane basin (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giulio, Giuseppe; de Nardis, Rita; Boncio, Paolo; Milana, Giuliano; Rosatelli, Gianluigi; Stoppa, Francesco; Lavecchia, Giusy

    2016-01-01

    The Sulmona plain (central Italy) is an intramontane basin of the Abruzzi Apennines that is known in the literature for its high seismic hazard. We use extensive measurements of ambient noise to map the fundamental frequency and to detect the presence of geological heterogeneities in the basin. We perform noise measurements along two basin-scale orthogonal transects, in conjunction with 2-D array experiments in specific key areas. The key areas are located in different positions with respect to the basin margins: one at the eastern boundary (fault-controlled basin margin) and one in the deepest part of the basin. We also collect independent data by using active seismic experiments (MASW), down-hole and geological surveys to characterize the near-surface geology of the investigated sites. In detail, the H/V noise spectral ratios and 2-D array techniques indicate a fundamental resonance (f0) in the low-frequency range (0.35-0.4 Hz) in the Sulmona Basin. Additionally, our results highlight the important role that is played by the alluvial fans near the edge-sectors of the basin, which are responsible for a velocity inversion in the uppermost layering of the soil profile. The H/V ratios and the dispersion curves of adjacent measurements strongly vary over a few dozens of meters in the alluvial fan area. Furthermore, we perform 1-D numerical simulations that are based on a linear-equivalent approach to estimate the site response in the key areas, using realistic seismic inputs. Finally, we perform a 2-D simulation that is based on the spectral element method to propagate surface waves in a simple model with an uppermost stiff layer, which is responsible for the velocity inversion. The results from the 2-D modelling agree with the experimental curves, showing deamplified H/V curves and typical shapes of dispersion curves of a not normally dispersive site.

  19. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-01

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems. PMID:24994652

  20. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-01

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems.

  1. Improved seismic velocity structure in southwestern Japan using pronounced sP phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, T.; Tajima, F. C.; Mori, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    In southwestern Japan the Philippine Sea plate (PHSP) subducts along the Nankai trough and this subduction causes the megathrust earthquakes in the Nankai seismic zone as well as large intraslab and inland earthquakes in the vicinity. The dip angle of the PHSP varies significantly along strike. In this region the sP phase is widely observed and its amplitude sometimes becomes larger than that of the direct S wave. This suggests that the phase could control the peak ground velocities and be a significant factor in evaluating regional seismic hazards. We previously showed that the arrivals of this strong phase are explained by incorporating the structure with shallow bedrock depths in the velocity model, and presented consistent 2D seismic velocity models. The 2D models derived for profiles between earthquake hypocenters and observation stations represent the configuration of the subducting PHSP and the depth variation of the Conrad and Moho discontinuities (Hayashida et al., 2010). Here, we present a 3D seismic velocity model that accounts for observed waveforms at a number of local stations where the pronounced sP phase was recorded. We present the results of finite difference modeling of the observed seismograms for an intraslab earthquake (2001/3/26 Mw5.1, h = 46 km) using the e3d code (e3d; Larsen and Schultz, 1995). First we calculated synthetics using a simple layered structure (Asano et al., 1986) to fit the arrival times and amplitudes of sP phases, and then matched the P- and S-wave arrivals by tuning the slab configurations and the Conrad and Moho depths. At an early stage of the 3D modeling we referred to the travel time tomography model (Nakajima and Hasegawa, 2007) and receiver function images (e.g. Shiomi et al., 2006; Ueno et al., 2008). The results show that the dip angle of the PHSP beneath the region varies significantly along the trench strike, and the agreement between data and synthetics varies among the models. At stations located to the north

  2. Detailed temporally resolved 2-D Velocity Measurements in a Novel Heat Exchanger Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guezennec, Yann G.; Ko, Jang-Hyok; Choi, Woong-Chul

    1998-11-01

    Using flow visualization as a primary tool, a novel, high-performance heat transfer surface for compact heat exchangers was designed, specifically for low Reynolds number applications. This geometry was specifically created to enhance or generate strong three-dimensional transport even at low Reynolds number. It consists of a staggered array of "pin" mounted normal to the fins. A 15:1 model of this heat exchanger surface core was built out of Plexiglas to provide optical access and this model was placed in a 1'x1' water channel. The flow speed was adjusted to match the Reynolds based on the hydraulic diameter based on the fin pitch. The flow was seeded with small polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser sheet from an Argon Ion laser. The fluid motion was recorded using a CCD camera and an S-VHS video recorder. In post-processing, the video records were automatically digitized and processed using a cinematographic PIV technique. The temporal evolution of the 2-D flow field (side view) clearly shows the presence of unsteady, shed vortical regions behind the pins, modulated by the spatially-periodic acceleration/deceleration and meandering of the mean flow between the periodic array of staggered pins. In the perpendicular view (top view), the results show the presence of two strong cross-stream transport mechanisms, mainly the horse-shoe vortex near the pin-fin junctions and the very strong spanwise transport in the separated wake region of the pins. This transport is most likely associated with the strong interaction of the longitudinal vortices (emanating form the horseshoe) and the spanwise vortices from the pin wake. This vortex interaction sets up a strong spanwise pressure gradient inducing large cross-stream transport from the fin to the core flow. Animation of the results illustrating these effects will be presented.

  3. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  4. Tectonics Of Eastern Offshore Trinidad Based On Integration Of BOLIVAR 2D Seismic Lines With Industry 3D Seismic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M. D.; Mann, P.; Wood, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    New MCS lines in the eastern offshore area of Trinidad augmented by existing 3D seismic surveys by industry provide new insights into complex, strain partitioning produced along this segment of the South America-Caribbean plate boundary. Two major tectonosequences are imaged separated by a Middle Miocene angular unconformity known from wells and mapping in Trinidad. A thick section of deep-marine carbonate and clastic rocks are cleanly truncated by the Middle Miocene unconformity and are chaotically deformed along vertical to northwest-dipping thrust faults. This shortening event reflects a major pulse of pre-Middle Miocene southeastward overthrusting of the Caribbean arc over the passive margin of South America. An upper 2-7-km-thick tectonosequence consisting of late Miocene-Quaternary shelf-related sandstone and shale was deposited by the nearby Orinoco delta. This section is folded to lesser degree and deformed by the sub-vertical, right-lateral Central Range fault zone (CRFZ), known from GPS studies to accommodate 12 mm/yr, of the total 20 mm/yr of interplate motion. Deep, continuous reflec-tors are observed at a depth of 12-17 km beneath eastern Trinidad are correlated with authochthonous, late Cretaceous-early Tertiary carbonate and clastic rocks of the South American passive margin. The Darien fault southeast of the CRFZ accommodates active shortening, elevates passive margin rocks to the surface in Trinidad, and forms the northeastern limit of a large, 12-km-thick foreland basin (Columbus basin) that extends onshore.

  5. Seismic velocities to characterize the soil-aquifer continuum on the Orgeval experimental basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, S.; Ludovic, B.; Dhemaied, A.; Flipo, N.; Guérin, R.; Mouhri, A.; Faycal, R.; Vitale, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Among geophysical methods applied to hydrogeology, seismic prospecting is frequently confined to the characterization of aquifers geometry. The combined study of pressure- (P) and shear- (SH) wave velocities (respectively Vp and Vs) can however provide information about the aquifer parameters, as it is commonly done for most fluids in hydrocarbon exploration. This approach has recently been proposed in sandy aquifers with the estimation of Vp/Vs ratio. In order to address such issues in more complex aquifer systems (e.g. unconsolidated, heterogeneous or low-permeability media) we carried out P- and SH-wave seismic surveys on the Orgeval experimental basin (70 km east from Paris, France). This basin drains a multi-layer aquifer system monitored by a network of piezometers. The upper part of the aquifer system is characterized by tabular layers well delineated all over the basin thanks to Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Time Domain ElectroMagnetic (TDEM) soundings and wells. But the lateral variability of the intrinsic properties in each layer raises questions regarding the hydrodynamics of the upper aquifer and the validity of interpolations between piezometers. A simple interpretation of P- and SH-wave first arrivals for tabular models provides 1D velocity structures in very good agreement with the stratification anticipated from ERT and nearby geological logs. Vp/Vs ratios show a strong contrast at a depth consistent with the observed water table level, reinforcing the assumption of a free upper aquifer in the area. Similar experiments have to be conducted under different hydrological conditions to validate these observations. Anticipating the need to propose lateral applications of the method, we additionally performed tomographic inversions of the recorded data to retrieve 2D Vp and Vs models. If interpreted independently, both models fail to depict the stratification of the medium and the water table level cannot be straightforwardly identified

  6. Source rock potential analysis using rock physics approach and 2D seismic data inversion: case study of Great Australian Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulakova, V.

    2015-12-01

    The quantity of total organic carbon (TOC) and its type determine the ability of source rocks to generate hydrocarbons. Thus, the quantification of TOC content is an essential part of any reservoir characterisation project. Traditionally TOC is estimated from geochemical analysis of core samples. In this case the results are limited spatially by a well location as well as vertically by a number of tested samples. At the same time TOC vertical variability might be very high, changing every 1-3 m. The several methods have been deployed to estimate TOC from well-log data which provides continuous vertical profile estimations. The basin wide information might be provided by the utilization of seismic surveys. The methodology of mapping source rocks based on seismic data has been lately reported to be successful for the thick source rocks (>20 m) with relatively high TOC values up to 3-4% (Løseth et al., 2011). We employ the described approach and demonstrate our findings for a case study from Ceduna Basin (Great Australian Bight, Australia). The reported TOC values estimated from the cores go up to only 1.3%. The organic matter is contained in thin layers of claystones interlayered with sandstones. The workflow included TOC estimation from the well-log data and then seismic data inversion performed in JasonTM software. The inverted acoustic impedance decreases nonlinearly with increasing TOC content. The obtained results comprises 2D section of TOC distribution. The calculated TOC values are in a good agreement with the results of laboratory measurements. The results of this study show that TOC can be successfully estimated from seismic data inversion even in the case of low organic matter values. Further work has to be done to understand whether this approach works for different types of organic matter and stages of its maturation. Løseth H., Wensaas L., Gading M., Duffaut K., Springer M. 2001. Can hydrocarbon source rocks be identified on seismic data? Geology 39/12.

  7. Volcano growth mechanisms and the role of sub-volcanic intrusions: Insights from 2D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Hunt-Stewart, Esther; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2013-07-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in volcano morphology and internal architecture can determine eruption style and location. However, the relationship between the external and internal characteristics of volcanoes and sub-volcanic intrusions is often difficult to observe at outcrop or interpret uniquely from geophysical and geodetic data. We use high-quality 2D seismic reflection data from the Ceduna Sub-basin, offshore southern Australia, to quantitatively analyse 56, pristinely-preserved, Eocene-age volcanogenic mounds, and a genetically-related network of sub-volcanic sills and laccoliths. Detailed seismic mapping has allowed the 3D geometry of each mound to be reconstructed and distinct seismic facies within them to be recognised. Forty-six continental, basaltic shield volcanoes have been identified that have average flank dips of <12°, basal diameters of 1.94-18.89 km, central summits that are 0.02-1 km high and volumes that range from 0.06 to 57.21 km3. Parallel seismic reflections within the shield volcanoes are interpreted to represent interbedded volcanic and clastic material, suggesting that a series of temporally separate eruptions emanated from a central vent. The shield volcanoes typically overlie the lateral tips of sills and we suggest that the intermittent eruption phases correspond to the incremental emplacement of discrete magma pulses within the laterally extensive sill-complex. Eight volcanogenic hydrothermal vents, which are also associated with the lateral tips of sills, were also recognised, and these appear to have formed from the seepage of intrusion-related hydrothermal fluids onto the seafloor via emplacement-induced fractures. This work highlights that deformation patterns preceding volcanic eruptions may (i) be offset from the eruption site; (ii) attributed to intrusions with complex morphologies; and/or (iii) reflect magma movement along pre-existing fracture systems. These complexities should therefore be considered in eruption

  8. AMTCLAB: A MATLAB ®-based program for traveltime analysis and velocity tuning in 2D elliptical anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Pedruelo González, L. M.; García Gonzalo, E.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the program AMTCLAB, a MATLAB ®-based computer code that analyzes the traveltime distribution and performs quality analysis at the pre-inversion stage for elliptically anisotropic media explored via 2D transmission experiments. This software generalizes the program MTCLAB presented in the past for the case of layered isotropic media, and makes use of traditional and robust traveltime distribution descriptors (mean, standard deviation, median, lower and upper quartiles, inter-quartile range and minimum absolute deviation), which are valid for all kinds of recording geometries. A guided user interface leads the modeller through the algorithm steps using the same data MTCLAB-structures. This methodology offers better understanding of the data variability prior to inversion, and provides the geophysicist with a macroscopic elliptical anisotropic velocity model, which is valid at the experiment scale, and matches the experimental mean traveltime distribution. To solve the inverse problems involved, program AMTCLAB uses the particle swarm optimisation algorithm, which allows the use of different norms and sampling the region of equivalent anisotropic velocity models in order to perform posterior sample statistics in each individual model parameter. The approximated velocity model issued from this analysis can serve in the traveltime inverse problem as an initial guess, or as a reference model in the subsequent inversion.

  9. Ultrasonic laboratory measurements of the seismic velocity changes due to CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. G.; Choi, H.; Park, Y. C.; Hwang, S.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the behavior and movement of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface is a quite important in sequestration of CO2 in geological formation because such information provides a basis for demonstrating the safety of CO2 sequestration. Recent several applications in many commercial and pilot scale projects and researches show that 4D surface or borehole seismic methods are among the most promising techniques for this purpose. However, such information interpreted from the seismic velocity changes can be quite subjective and qualitative without petrophysical characterization for the effect of CO2 saturation on the seismic changes since seismic wave velocity depends on various factors and parameters like mineralogical composition, hydrogeological factors, in-situ conditions. In this respect, we have developed an ultrasonic laboratory measurement system and have carried out measurements for a porous sandstone sample to characterize the effects of CO2 injection to seismic velocity and amplitude. Measurements are done by ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer mounted on both ends of cylindrical core sample under various pressure, temperature, and saturation conditions. According to our fundamental experiments, injected CO2 introduces the decrease of seismic velocity and amplitude. We identified that the velocity decreases about 6% or more until fully saturated by CO2, but the attenuation of seismic amplitude is more drastically than the velocity decrease. We also identified that Vs/Vp or elastic modulus is more sensitive to CO2 saturation. We note that this means seismic amplitude and elastic modulus change can be an alternative target anomaly of seismic techniques in CO2 sequestration monitoring. Thus, we expect that we can estimate more quantitative petrophysical relationships between the changes of seismic attributes and CO2 concentration, which can provide basic relation for the quantitative assessment of CO2 sequestration by further researches.

  10. Using micro-seismicity and seismic velocities to map subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure within the Coso geothermal field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaven, Joern Ole; Hickman, Stephen H.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs derive their capacity for fluid and heat transport in large part from faults and fractures. Micro-seismicity generated on such faults and fractures can be used to map larger fault structures as well as secondary fractures that add access to hot rock, fluid storage and recharge capacity necessary to have a sustainable geothermal resource. Additionally, inversion of seismic velocities from micro-seismicity permits imaging of regions subject to the combined effects of fracture density, fluid pressure and steam content, among other factors. We relocate 14 years of seismicity (1996-2009) in the Coso geothermal field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform cross-correlation to augment to expansive catalog of P- and S-wave differential travel times recorded at Coso. We further carry out rigorous uncertainty estimation and find that our results are precise to within 10s of meters of relative location error. We find that relocated micro-seismicity outlines prominent, through-going faults in the reservoir in some cases. We also find that a significant portion of seismicity remains diffuse and does not cluster into more sharply defined major structures. The seismic velocity structure reveals heterogeneous distributions of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speed, with Vp generally lower in the main field when compared to the east flank and Vs varying more significantly in the shallow portions of the reservoir. The Vp/Vs ratio appears to outline the two main compartments of the reservoir at depths of -0.5 to 1.5 km (relative to sea-level), with a ridge of relatively high Vp/Vs separating the main field from the east flank. In the deeper portion of the reservoir this ridge is less prominent. Our results indicate that high-precision relocations of micro-seismicity can provide

  11. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region...part II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.

    1976-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for determining the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. Currently a program is in progress to measure seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region at an estimated 150 sites. At each site seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill hole cuttings, undisturbed samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the site. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. The broad data base available in the San Francisco Bay region suggests using the area as a pilot area for the development of general techniques applicable to other areas.

  12. Monitoring seismic velocity changes caused by the 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake using continuous ambient noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, Christos; Daskalakis, Emmanouil; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-04-01

    The 24 May 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake (6.9 Mw), an event on the Northern Aegean Trough (NAT), ruptured on two different fault segments with a total ruptured length of ~100 km. For the second delayed segment, rupture propagated eastward from the hypocenter for ˜65 km with a supershear velocity (5.5 km/s). Low-aftershock seismicity on the supershear segment implies a simple and linear fault geometry there. An effort to monitor temporal seismic velocity changes across the ruptured area of the Northern Aegean earthquake is underway. In recent years, neighboring seismic broadband stations near active faults have been successfully used to detect such changes. The crosscorrelation functions (CCF) of ambient noise records between stations yields the corresponding traveltimes for those inter-station paths. Moreover, the auto-correlation functions (ACF) at each station produce the seismic responce for a coincident source and receiver position. Possible temporal changes of the measured traveltimes from CCFs and ACFs correspond to seismic velocity changes. Initially, we investigate the characteristics and sources of the ambient seismic noise as recorded at permanent seismic stations installed around NAT at the surrounding islands and in mainland Greece and Turkey. The microseismic noise levels show a clear seasonal variation at all stations. The noise levels across the double frequency band (DF; period range 4-8 s) reflect the local sea-weather conditions within a range of a few hundred kilometers. Three years of continuous seismic records framing the main shock have been analysed from ~15 stations within a radius of 100 km from the epicentre. We observe a clear decrease of seismic velocities most likely corresponding to the co-seismic shaking. The spatial variation of this velocity drop is imaged from all inter-station paths that correspond to CCF measurements and for station sites that correspond to ACF measurements. Thus, we explore a possible correlation between co-seismic

  13. Seismic velocity change and slip rate during the 2006 Guerrero (Mexico) slow slip event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; Radiguet, Mathilde; Campillo, Michel; Cotton, Fabrice; Shapiro, Nikolai; Krishna Singh, Shri; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    We measure temporal change of the seismic velocity in the crust below the Guerrero region during the 2006 slow sleep event (SSE). We use repeated cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at 26 broad-band stations of the MesoAmerica Seismic Experiment (MASE). The cross-correlations are computed over 90 days with a moving window of 10 days from January 2005 to July 2007. To insure measurements independent of noise source variations, we only take into account the travel time change within the coda. For period of 8 to 20s, we observe a decrease in velocity starting in April 2006 with a maximum change of -0.3% of the initial velocity in June 2006. At these periods, the Rayleigh waves are sensitive to velocity changes down to the lower crust. In the other hand, we compute the deformation rate below the MASE array from a slip propagation model of the SSE observed by means of the displacement time-series of 15 continuous GPS stations. Slip initiates in the western part of the Guerrero Gap and propagates southeastward. The propagation velocity is of the order of 1 km/day. We then compare the seismic velocity change measured from continuous seismological data with the deformation rate inferred from geodetic measurements below the MASE array. We obtain a good agreement between the time of maximal seismic velocity change (July 2006) and the time of maximum deformation associated with the SSE (July to August 2006). This result shows that the long-term velocity change associated with the SSE can be detected using continuous seismic recordings. Since the SSE does not emit seismic waves, which interact with the superficial layers, the result indicates that the velocity change is due to deformation at depth.

  14. Using stochastic borehole seismic velocity tomography and Bayesian simulation to estimate Ni, Cu and Co grades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, Lorenzo; Gloaguen, Erwan; Rondenay, Stephane; Leite, André; McDowell, Glenn; Wheeler, Robert

    2010-05-01

    In the mining industry, classic methods to build a grade model for ore deposits are based on kriging or cokriging of grades for targeted minerals measured in drill core in fertile geological units. As the complexity of the geological geometry increases, so does the complexity of grade estimations. For example, in layered mafic or ultramafic intrusions, it is necessary to know the layering geometry in order to perform kriging of grades in the most fertile zones. Without additional information on geological framwork, the definition of fertile zones is a low-precision exercise that requires extensive experience and good ability from the geologist. Recently, thanks to computer and geophysical tool improvements, seismic tomography became very attractive for many application fields. Indeed, this non-intrusive technique allows inferring the mechanical properties of the ground using travel times and amplitude analysis of the transmitted wavelet between two boreholes, hence provide additional information on the nature of the deposit. Commonly used crosshole seismic velocity tomography algorithms estimate 2D slowness models (inverse of velocity) in the plane between the boreholes using the measured direct wave travel times from the transmitter (located in one of the hole) to the receivers (located in the other hole). Furthermore, geophysical borehole logging can be used to constrain seismic tomography between drill holes. Finally, this project aims to estimate grade of economically worth mineral by integrating seismic tomography data with respectively drill core measured grades acquired by Vale Inco for one of their mine sites in operation. In this study, a new type algorithm that combines geostatistical simulation and tomography in the same process (namely stochastic tomography) has been used. The principle of the stochastic tomography is based on the straight ray approximation and use the linear relationship between travel time and slowness to estimate the slowness

  15. Comparison of 4D flow and 2D velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI sequences for the evaluation of aortic hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bollache, Emilie; van Ooij, Pim; Powell, Alex; Carr, James; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic flow and velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI and 2D CINE phase-contrast (PC)-MRI with either one-directional (2D-1dir) or three-directional (2D-3dir) velocity encoding. 15 healthy volunteers (51 ± 19 years) underwent MRI including (1) breath-holding 2D-1dir and (2) free breathing 2D-3dir PC-MRI in planes orthogonal to the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta, as well as (3) free breathing 4D flow MRI with full thoracic aorta coverage. Flow quantification included the co-registration of the 2D PC acquisition planes with 4D flow MRI data, AA and DA segmentation, and calculation of AA and DA peak systolic velocity, peak flow and net flow volume for all sequences. Additionally, the 2D-3dir velocity taking into account the through-plane component only was used to obtain results analogous to a free breathing 2D-1dir acquisition. Good agreement was found between 4D flow and 2D-3dir peak velocity (differences = -3 to 6 %), peak flow (-7 %) and net volume (-14 to -9 %). In contrast, breath-holding 2D-1dir measurements exhibited indices significantly lower than free breathing 2D-3dir and 2D-1dir (differences = -35 to -7 %, p < 0.05). Finally, high correlations (r ≥ 0.97) were obtained for indices estimated with or without eddy current correction, with the lowest correlation observed for net volume. 4D flow and 2D-3dir aortic hemodynamic indices were in concordance. However, differences between respiration state and 2D-1dir and 2D-3dir measurements indicate that reference values should be established according to the PC-MRI sequence, especially for the widely used net flow (e.g. stroke volume in the AA). PMID:27435230

  16. Comparison of 4D flow and 2D velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI sequences for the evaluation of aortic hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bollache, Emilie; van Ooij, Pim; Powell, Alex; Carr, James; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic flow and velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI and 2D CINE phase-contrast (PC)-MRI with either one-directional (2D-1dir) or three-directional (2D-3dir) velocity encoding. 15 healthy volunteers (51 ± 19 years) underwent MRI including (1) breath-holding 2D-1dir and (2) free breathing 2D-3dir PC-MRI in planes orthogonal to the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta, as well as (3) free breathing 4D flow MRI with full thoracic aorta coverage. Flow quantification included the co-registration of the 2D PC acquisition planes with 4D flow MRI data, AA and DA segmentation, and calculation of AA and DA peak systolic velocity, peak flow and net flow volume for all sequences. Additionally, the 2D-3dir velocity taking into account the through-plane component only was used to obtain results analogous to a free breathing 2D-1dir acquisition. Good agreement was found between 4D flow and 2D-3dir peak velocity (differences = -3 to 6 %), peak flow (-7 %) and net volume (-14 to -9 %). In contrast, breath-holding 2D-1dir measurements exhibited indices significantly lower than free breathing 2D-3dir and 2D-1dir (differences = -35 to -7 %, p < 0.05). Finally, high correlations (r ≥ 0.97) were obtained for indices estimated with or without eddy current correction, with the lowest correlation observed for net volume. 4D flow and 2D-3dir aortic hemodynamic indices were in concordance. However, differences between respiration state and 2D-1dir and 2D-3dir measurements indicate that reference values should be established according to the PC-MRI sequence, especially for the widely used net flow (e.g. stroke volume in the AA).

  17. Shear Velocity Structure of the Crust and Uppermost Mantle across the Mariana Trench from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Wiens, D. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the shear wave structure of the crust and uppermost mantle across the Northern and Central Mariana trench using ambient seismic noise recorded by land and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). The main goal of this study is to constrain velocity variations resulting from possible serpentinization of the incoming plate or the forearc mantle. Vertical component waveforms from 20 OBSs and 7 island stations deployed in 2012-2013 are correlated to reveal the empirical green functions. Due to the distinct structure difference across the trench, we adopt two different lithosphere models when calculating the phase velocity predictions. For each station pair, water depth estimated by averaging values along the great circle path connecting two stations is also introduced to predict the phase velocity. For each frequency, only high quality station pairs (SNR > 5) with distance larger than twice the wavelength are included. The dispersion curves are then interpolated to obtain the 2-D phase velocity map for period from 8 s to 32 s. Phase velocity maps from short periods (< 15 s) are strongly affected by the water depth. For periods between 15 s - 18 s, extremely low phase velocities near the trench result from water depth up to 9 km. Longer period results show fast phase velocity anomalies in the incoming plate and slow anomalies beneath the forearc, consistent with faster mantle velocities expected for the incoming plate. We will also show the results of inverting this phase velocity dataset for 3-D shear velocity structure. We are also investigating the use of higher mode Rayleigh waves, because in deep water regions the fundamental mode results fail to constrain the velocity structure of the shallowest part of the mantle.

  18. Monitoring Velocity Changes Caused By Underground Coal Mining Using Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarny, Rafał; Marcak, Henryk; Nakata, Nori; Pilecki, Zenon; Isakow, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    We use passive seismic interferometry to monitor temporal variations of seismic wave velocities at the area of underground coal mining named Jas- Mos in Poland. Ambient noise data were recorded continuously for 42 days by two three-component broadband seismometers deployed at the ground surface. The sensors are about 2.8 km apart, and we measure the temporal velocity changes between them using cross-correlation techniques. Using causal and acausal parts of nine-component cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with a stretching technique, we obtain seismic velocity changes in the frequency band between 0.6 and 1.2 Hz. The nine-component CCFs are useful to stabilize estimation of velocity changes. We discover correlation between average velocity changes and seismic events induced by mining. Especially after an event occurred between the stations, the velocity decreased about 0.4 %. Based on this study, we conclude that we can monitor the changes of seismic velocities, which are related to stiffness, effective stress, and other mechanical properties at subsurface, caused by mining activities even with a few stations.

  19. Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of the Plate Boundary, Cascadia Subduction Zone, from Prestack Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, W.; Holbrook, W.; Tobin, H. J.; Keranen, K. M.; Everson, E.; Mallick, S.; Padhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the geologic makeup of the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) has great importance for understanding seismic hazards in the coastal margin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia margin is a potential earthquake and tsunami threat to the many millions who live in the area, yet details of its structure and mechanics remain poorly understood. In particular, the character of the subduction interface is elusive due to the CSZ's relatively aseismic behavior and low seismic reflectivity, making imaging difficult for passive and active source methods, respectively. In July 2012 seismic data were acquired as a part of the COAST project, spanning the important transition from the Cascadia basin, across the deformation front, and into the accretionary wedge. This modern data, coupled with sophisticated pre-stack full waveform seismic inversion methods, allows us to create highly detailed velocity models. While still computationally expensive, current computing clusters can perform these inversions with enough lateral density to yield highly detailed velocity information in both the vertical and horizontal. Here we present pre-stack full waveform inversions of a seismic line from the center of the COAST survey offshore Washington state as a cross section of the velocity structure of the CSZ. This detailed velocity model is a necessary initial step toward a detailed porosity cross section to be used to determine the role of fluids in the CSZ. Using these new data we investigate the lateral variability in reflectivity of the subducting plate boundary reflection in terms of its seismic velocity.

  20. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  1. Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate tectonics in the High Arctic: new 2D seismic data and geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishin, Anatoly; Kazmin, Yuriy; Glumov, Ivan; Petrov, Eugene; Poselov, Viktor; Burov, Evgueni; Gaina, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Our paper is mainly based on the interpretation of 2D seismic lines, obtained from Arctic-2001 and Arctic-2012 projects. We also analyzed all available open-source data concerning Arctic geology. Three domains are distinguished in the abyssal part of Arctic Ocean: (1) Canada Basin, (2) Lomonosov-Podvodnikov-Alpha-Mendeleev-Nautilus-Chukchi Plateau (LPAMNCP) area, (3) Eurasia Basin. Canada Basin has oceanic and transitional crust of different structure. The formation time of this oceanic basin is probably 134-117 Ma. New seismic data for LPAMNCP area shows numerous rift structures parallel to the Lomonosov Ridge and Mendeleev Ridge. These rift structures are also nearly orthogonal to the Canada Basin spreading axis, and this may indicate either a different mechanism for the formation of the LPAMNCP region and Canada Basin, or a very complicated basin architecture formed by processes we do not yet understand. We also observe at the base of the LPAMNCP area sedimentary cover packages of bright reflectors, they were interpreted as basalt flows probably related to the Cretaceous plume volcanism. Approximate time of the volcanism is about 125 Ma. After this event, the area experienced stretching and transtension as documented by large scale rifting structures. The younger Eurasian Basin has oceanic crust of Eocene to Recent age, and our new seismic data confirms that Gakkel Ridge has typical ultraslow-spreading zone topography. Perhaps, Eurasia Basin crust was partly formed by exhumed and serpentinized mantle. Lomonosov and Alpha-Mendeleev Ridges has typical present-day basin and range topography with Oligocene to Recent faults. It means, that all LPAMNCP area was subjected to regional intra-plate stretching during Neogene to Recent time. We assume, that this intra-plate stretching was related to the Gakkel Ridge extension. We suppose, that the deep-water part of Arctic Ocean was formed during three main stages: (1) Valanginian - Early Aptian: formation of Canada Basin

  2. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  3. Seismic velocity changes associated with aseismic deformations of a fault stimulated by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; De Barros, Louis; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric; Castilla, Raymi; Henry, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Fluid pressure plays an important role in the stability of tectonic faults. However, the in situ mechanical response of faults to fluid pressure variations is still poorly known. To address this question, we performed a fluid injection experiment in a fault zone in shales while monitoring fault movements at the injection source and seismic velocity variations from a near-distance (<10 m) monitoring network. We measured and located the P and S wave velocity perturbations in and around the fault using repetitive active sources. We observed that seismic velocity perturbations dramatically increase above 1.5 MPa of injection pressure. This is consistent with an increase of fluid flow associated with an aseismic dilatant shearing of the fault as shown by numerical modeling. We find that seismic velocity changes are sensitive to both fault opening by fluid invasion and effective stress variations and can be an efficient measurement for monitoring fluid-driven aseismic deformations of faults.

  4. Modelling of a coal seam of the deposit Đurđevik (BiH) by means of 2D reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenović, Siniša; Urošević, Milovan; Sretenović, Branislav; Cvetkov, Vesna; Životić, Dragana

    2016-06-01

    A low cost 2D reflection seismic survey was used to map the continuity of the main seams as well as the numerous faults at the Đurđevik sub-bituminous coal deposit (BiH). A 24-channel seismic data acquisition system was available for this survey. The natural high reflectivity of the coal seams and a favourable geometry of seismic profiles enabled the identification and correlation of major faults across the area. Rugged terrain presented challenges to both data acquisition and processing. Stacks of acceptable quality were obtained only after the application of surface consistent statics and careful application of multi-channel filtering. A set of recorded 2D lines was interpreted in a 3D environment. Inferred structural elements disrupting the seam continuity were identified and were in agreement with available drilling results and mine workings. The result of this work was used to reduce mining hazards and also to help optimise mine planning.

  5. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2004-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial

  6. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial

  7. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay Region; part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.; Roth, Edward F.

    1977-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for estimating the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. In the current program seismic velocities have been measured at 59 locations 1n the San Francisco Bay Region. This report is the third in a series of Open-File Reports and describes the in-situ velocity measurements at locations 35-59. At each location seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill cuttings, undisturbed (cored) samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the sites. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. There is a variety of geologic and seismic data available in the San Francisco Bay Region for use 1n developing the general zoning techniques which can then be applied to other areas. Shear wave velocities 1n near-surface geologic materials are of especial interest for engineering seismology and seismic zonation studies, yet in general, they are difficult to measure because of contamination by compressional waves. A comparison of various in-situ techniques by Warrick (1974) establishes the reliability of the method utilizing a "horizontal traction" source for sites underlain by bay mud and alluvium. Gibbs, and others (1975a) present data from 12 holes and establishes the reliability of the method for sites underlain by a variety of different rock units and suggest extending the measurements to

  8. Are seismic wave velocities and anisotropies reliable proxies for partial melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amicia; Torvela, Taija; Lloyd, Geoffrey; Walker, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Partial melts and their segregation weaken mineral crystallographic alignment, resulting in a decrease in seismic anisotropy (AV). Furthermore, introduction of melt induces a drop in seismic wave velocities, especially for shear (Vs) but also compressional (Vp) waves, although some solid-state processes can also lead to velocity drops. Thus, decreases in AV and/or V are often used to infer the presence and even the amount of melt in both the crust and mantle, for example via the Vp/Vs ratio. However, evidence is accumulating that the relationship between melt fraction and seismic properties is not straight-forward. We consider how varying melt fraction (f) might affect crustal seismic properties. Our modelling approach is based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) patterns from granulite facies sheared migmatites. The CPO data are used to model the seismic properties of rocks with different solid/melt proportions. Subsequently, melt was simulated via an isotropic elastic stiffness matrix and combined mathematically with the CPO-derived seismic properties, and seismic properties then recalculated to take into account the presence of melt. These melt models, therefore, predict changes in seismic properties at different f. The models show that low (c. f < 0.15) and high (0.7 < f < 1) values affect seismic properties much more than the 'crystal mush' part (0.1 < f < 0.7): velocities (V) and anisotropies (AV) for both low and high f drop rapidly but 'plateau' at intermediate f. Our results imply that V and, especially, AV may not be reliable proxies for the amount of crustal melt present. Seismic wave behaviour in crystal-supported (0.1 < f < 0.7) material may be controlled by the solid rather than the melt phase.

  9. Multiple plates subducting beneath Colombia, as illuminated by seismicity and velocity from the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    DOE PAGES

    Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Prieto, German A.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ammon, Charles J.

    2016-04-12

    Subduction beneath the northernmost Andes in Colombia is complex. Based on seismicity distributions, multiple segments of slab appear to be subducting, and arc volcanism ceases north of 5° N. Here, we illuminate the subduction system through hypocentral relocations and Vp and Vs models resulting from the joint inversion of local body wave arrivals, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data. The simultaneous use of multiple data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in velocity models that have improved resolution at both shallower and deeper depths than would result from traditional travel time tomography alone.more » The relocated earthquake dataset and velocity model clearly indicate a tear in the Nazca slab at 5° N, corresponding to a 250-km shift in slab seismicity and the termination of arc volcanism. North of this tear, the slab is flat, and it comprises slabs of two sources: the Nazca and Caribbean plates. The Bucaramanga nest, a small region of among the most intense intermediate-depth seismicity globally, is associated with the boundary between these two plates and possibly with a zone of melting or elevated water content, based on reduced Vp and increased Vp/Vs. As a result, we also use relocated seismicity to identify two new faults in the South American plate, one related to plate convergence and one highlighted by induced seismicity.« less

  10. Multiple plates subducting beneath Colombia, as illuminated by seismicity and velocity from the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Prieto, Germán A.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ammon, Charles J.

    2016-06-01

    Subduction beneath the northernmost Andes in Colombia is complex. Based on seismicity distributions, multiple segments of slab appear to be subducting, and arc volcanism ceases north of 5° N. Here, we illuminate the subduction system through hypocentral relocations and Vp and Vs models resulting from the joint inversion of local body wave arrivals, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data. The simultaneous use of multiple data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in velocity models that have improved resolution at both shallower and deeper depths than would result from traditional travel time tomography alone. The relocated earthquake dataset and velocity model clearly indicate a tear in the Nazca slab at 5° N, corresponding to a 250-km shift in slab seismicity and the termination of arc volcanism. North of this tear, the slab is flat, and it comprises slabs of two sources: the Nazca and Caribbean plates. The Bucaramanga nest, a small region of among the most intense intermediate-depth seismicity globally, is associated with the boundary between these two plates and possibly with a zone of melting or elevated water content, based on reduced Vp and increased Vp/Vs. We also use relocated seismicity to identify two new faults in the South American plate, one related to plate convergence and one highlighted by induced seismicity.

  11. Experimental validation of a 2D overland flow model using high resolution water depth and velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, L.; Legout, C.; Darboux, F.; Esteves, M.; Nord, G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a validation of a two-dimensional overland flow model using empirical laboratory data. Unlike previous publications in which model performance is evaluated as the ability to predict an outlet hydrograph, we use high resolution 2D water depth and velocity data to analyze to what degree the model is able to reproduce the spatial distribution of these variables. Several overland flow conditions over two impervious surfaces of the order of one square meter with different micro and macro-roughness characteristics are studied. The first surface is a simplified representation of a sinusoidal terrain with three crests and furrows, while the second one is a mould of a real agricultural seedbed terrain. We analyze four different bed friction parameterizations and we show that the performance of formulations which consider the transition between laminar, smooth turbulent and rough turbulent flow do not improve the results obtained with Manning or Keulegan formulas for rough turbulent flow. The simulations performed show that using Keulegan formula with a physically-based definition of the bed roughness coefficient, a two-dimensional shallow water model is able to reproduce satisfactorily the flow hydrodynamics. It is shown that, even if the resolution of the topography data and numerical mesh are high enough to include all the small scale features of the bed surface, the roughness coefficient must account for the macro-roughness characteristics of the terrain in order to correctly reproduce the flow hydrodynamics.

  12. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  13. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  14. The distribution of seismic velocities and attenuation in the earth. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the radial distribution of seismic velocities and density and of seismic attenuation within the earth are obtained through inversion of body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data. The effect of attenuation related dispersion on gross earth structure, and on the reliability of eigenperiod identifications is discussed. The travel time baseline discrepancies between body waves and free oscillation models are examined and largely resolved.

  15. Hemispherical variations in seismic velocity at the top of the Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Niu, F; Wen, L

    2001-04-26

    Knowledge of the seismic velocity structure at the top of the Earth's inner core is important for deciphering the physical processes responsible for inner-core growth. Previous global seismic studies have focused on structures found 100 km or deeper within the inner core, with results for the uppermost 100 km available for only isolated regions. Here we present constraints on seismic velocity variations just beneath the inner-core boundary, determined from the difference in travel time between waves reflected at the inner-core boundary and those transmitted through the inner core. We found that these travel-time residuals-observed on both global seismograph stations and several regional seismic networks-are systematically larger, by about 0.8 s, for waves that sample the 'eastern hemisphere' of the inner core (40 degrees E to 180 degrees E) compared to those that sample the 'western hemisphere' (180 degrees W to 40 degrees E). These residuals show no correlation with the angle at which the waves traverse the inner core; this indicates that seismic anisotropy is not strong in this region and that the isotropic seismic velocity of the eastern hemisphere is about 0.8% higher than that of the western hemisphere.

  16. Near-surface velocity structure from borehole and refraction seismic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.; Lawton, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic refraction and borehole reflection data have been used in conjunction with other geophysical tools to characterize the near-surface geology in the vicinity of a shallow well near Calgary, Alberta. The investigated section is comprised primarily of glacial tills and gravels. Seismic waves generated in the lower gravel units travel as compressional waves up to the till/gravel interface, where they are converted to shear waves upon transmission. Velocity structure from a reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) survey agrees closely with that from refraction surveying.

  17. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Seismic velocity structure of the Brawley Seismic Zone, Salton Buttes and Geothermal Field, Salton Trough, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.; Rymer, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough is an active rift in southern California in a step-over between the plate-bounding Imperial and San Andreas Faults. In March 2011, the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) investigated the rift's crustal structure by acquiring several seismic refraction and reflection lines. One of the densely sampled refraction lines crosses the northern-most Imperial Valley, perpendicular to the strike-slip faults and parallel to a line of small Quaternary rhyolitic volcanoes. The line crosses the obliquely extensional Brawley Seismic Zone and goes through one of the most geothermally productive areas in the United States. Well logs indicate the valley is filled by several kilometers of late Pliocene-recent lacustrine, fluvial, and shallow marine sediment. The 42-km long seismic line was comprised of eleven 110-460 kg explosive shots and receivers at a 100 m spacing. First arrival travel times were used to build a tomographic seismic velocity image of the upper crust. Velocity in the valley increases smoothly from <2 km/s to >5 km/s, indicating diagenesis and gradational metamorphism of rift sediments at very shallow depth due to an elevated geotherm. The velocity gradient is much smaller in the relatively low velocity (<6 km/s) crystalline basement comprised of recently metamorphosed sediment reaching greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. The depth of this basement is about 4-km below the aseismic region of the valley west of the Brawley Seismic Zone, but rises sharply to ~2 km depth beneath the seismically, geothermally, and volcanically active area of the Brawley Seismic Zone. The basement deepens to the northeast of the active tectonic zone and then is abruptly offset to shallower depth on the northeast side of the valley. This offset may be the subsurficial expression of a paleofault, most likely an extension of the Sand Hills Fault, which bounds the basin to the east. Basement velocity east of the fault is ~5.7 km/s, consistent with the granitic rocks

  18. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  19. New Observations of Seismic Group Velocities in the Western Solomon Islands from Cross-Correlation of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, C. S.; You, S. H.; Kuo, Y. T.; Huang, B. S.; Wu, Y. M.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    A MW 8.1 earthquake occurred on 1 April 2007 in the western Solomon Islands. Following this event, a damaging tsunami was induced and hit the Island Gizo where the capital city of Western Province of Solomon Islands located. Several buildings of this city were destroyed and several peoples lost their lives during this earthquake. However, during this earthquake, no near source seismic instrument has been installed in this region. The seismic evaluations for the aftershock sequence, the possible earthquake early warning and tsunami warning were unavailable. For the purpose of knowing more detailed information about seismic activity in this region, we have installed 9 seismic stations (with Trillium 120PA broadband seismometer and Q330S 24bit digitizer) around the rupture zone of the 2007 earthquake since September of 2009. Within a decade, it has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the Green's function or impulse response between two seismic stations can be retrieved from the cross-correlation of ambient noise. In this study, 6 stations' observations which are more complete during 2011/10 ~ 2012/12 period, were selected for the purpose of the cross-correlation analysis of ambient seismic noise. The group velocities at period 2-20 seconds of 15 station-pairs were extracted by using multiple filter technique (MFT) method. The analyzed results of this study presented significant results of group velocities with higher frequency contents than other studies (20-60 seconds in usually cases) and opened new opportunities to study the shallow crustal structure of the western Solomon Islands.

  20. Studying temporal velocity changes with ambient seismic noise at Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, S.; Wolfe, C. J.; Okubo, P. G.; Haney, M. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-04-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of volcanoes and to assess the associated hazards, the analysis of ambient seismic noise - a continuous passive source - has been used for both imaging and monitoring temporal changes in seismic velocity. Between pairs of seismic stations, surface wave Green's functions can be retrieved from the background ocean-generated noise being sensitive to the shallow subsurface. Such Green's functions allow the measurement of very small temporal perturbations in seismic velocity with a variety of applications. In particular, velocity decreases prior to some volcanic eruptions have been documented and motivate our present study. Here we perform ambient seismic noise interferometry to study temporal changes in seismic velocities within the shallow (<5km) subsurface of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Our study is the first to assess the potential for using ambient noise analyses as a tool for Hawaiian volcano monitoring. Five volcanoes comprise the island of Hawaii, of which two are active: Mauna Loa volcano, which last erupted in 1984, and Kilauea volcano, where the Pu'u'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption along the east rift zone has been ongoing since 1983. For our analysis, we use data from the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismic network from 05/2007 to 12/2009. Our study period includes the Father's Day dike intrusion into Kilauea's east rift zone in mid-June 2007 as well as increased summit activity commencing in late 2007 and leading to several minor explosions in early 2008. These volcanic events are of interest for the study of potential associated seismic velocity changes. However, we find that volcanic tremor complicates the measurement of velocity changes. Volcanic tremor is continuously present during most of our study period, and contaminates the recovered Green's functions for station pairs across the entire island. Initial results suggest that a careful quality assessment (i.e. visually inspecting the Green's functions and filtering

  1. Automated Interval velocity picking for Atlantic Multi-Channel Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwajit

    2016-04-01

    This paper described the challenge in developing and testing a fully automated routine for measuring interval velocities from multi-channel seismic data. Various approaches are employed for generating an interactive algorithm picking interval velocity for continuous 1000-5000 normal moveout (NMO) corrected gather and replacing the interpreter's effort for manual picking the coherent reflections. The detailed steps and pitfalls for picking the interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements are describe in these approaches. Key ingredients these approaches utilized for velocity analysis stage are semblance grid and starting model of interval velocity. Basin-Hopping optimization is employed for convergence of the misfit function toward local minima. SLiding-Overlapping Window (SLOW) algorithm are designed to mitigate the non-linearity and ill- possessedness of root-mean-square velocity. Synthetic data case studies addresses the performance of the velocity picker generating models perfectly fitting the semblance peaks. A similar linear relationship between average depth and reflection time for synthetic model and estimated models proposed picked interval velocities as the starting model for the full waveform inversion to project more accurate velocity structure of the subsurface. The challenges can be categorized as (1) building accurate starting model for projecting more accurate velocity structure of the subsurface, (2) improving the computational cost of algorithm by pre-calculating semblance grid to make auto picking more feasible.

  2. Key elements of regional seismic velocity models for long period ground motion simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    Regional 3-D seismic velocity models used for broadband strong motion simulations must include compressional-wave velocity (Vp), shear-wave velocity (Vs), intrinsic attenuation (Qp, Qs), and density. Vs and Qs are the most important of these parameters because the strongest ground motions are generated chiefly by shear- and surface-wave arrivals. Because Vp data are more common than Vs data, many researchers first develop a Vp model and convert it to a Vs model. I describe recent empirical relations between Vs, Vp, Qs, Qp, and density that allow velocity models to be rapidly and accurately calculated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  3. Variations and healing of the seismic velocity (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snieder, Roel

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of waves leads to a complexity of waveforms that is often seen by seismologists as a nuisance. And indeed, the complicated wave paths of multiple scattered waves makes it difficult to use these waves for imaging. Yet, the long wave paths of multiple scattered waves makes these waves an ideal tool for measuring minute velocity changes. This has led to the development of coda wave interferometry as a tool for measuring small velocity changes in the laboratory and with field data. Combined with the use of noise cross correlations - seismic interferometry - this method is even more useful because it follows for a quasi-continuous measurement of velocity changes. I will show examples of detecting velocity changes in the laboratory, the earth's near surface, and in engineered structures. Perhaps surprisingly, the seismic velocity is not constant at all, and varies with the seasons, temperature, precipitation, as the weather does. In addition, the seismic velocity usually drops as a result of deformation. Most of these changes likely occur in the near surface or the region of deformation, and a drawback of using strongly scattered waves is that it is difficult to localize the spatial area of the velocity change. I will present laboratory measurements that show that a certain spatial localization of the velocity change can be achieved. One of the intriguing observations is that after deformation the seismic velocity recovers logarithmically with time. The reason for this particular time-dependence is the presence of healing mechanisms that operate at different time scales. Since this is feature of many physical systems, the logarithmic healing is a widespread behavior and is akin in its generality to the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  4. Applicability of artificial neural networks for obtaining velocity models from synthetic seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronian, C.; Riahi, M. A.; Lucas, C.

    2009-07-01

    Seismic velocity analysis is a crucial part of seismic data processing and interpretation which has been practiced using different methods. In contrast to time consuming and complicated numerical methods, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are found to be of potential applicability. ANN ability to establish a relationship between an input and output space is considered to be appropriate for mapping seismic velocity corresponding to travel times picked from seismograms. Accordingly a preliminary attempt is made to evaluate the applicability of ANNs to determine velocity and dips of dipping layered earth models corresponding to travel time data. The study is based on synthetic data generated using inverse modeling approach for three earth models. The models include a three-layer structure with same dips and same directions, a three-layer model with different dips and same directions, as well as a two-layer model with different dips and directions. An ANN structure is designed in three layers, namely, input, output, and hidden ones. The training and testing process of the ANN is successfully accomplished using the synthetic data. The evaluation of the applicability of the trained ANN to unknown data sets indicates that the ANN can satisfactorily compute velocity and dips corresponding to travel times. The error intervals between the desired and calculated velocity and dips are shown to be acceptably small in all cases. The applicability of the trained ANN in extrapolating is also evaluated using a number of data outside of the range already known to ANN. The results indicate that the trained ANN acceptably approximates the velocity and dips. Furthermore, the trained ANN is also evaluated in terms of capability of handling deficiency in input data where acceptable results were also achieved in velocity and dip calculations. Generally, this study shows that velocity analysis using ANNs can promisingly tackle the challenge of retrieving an initial velocity model from the

  5. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Haney, Matthew; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford H.; Freymueller, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok's caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. The magnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/or magmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation source may be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  6. Evidence for a high-velocity slab associated with the Hindu Kush seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, R. J.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Al-Shukri, H. J.; Lukk, A. A.

    1995-03-01

    We used teleseismic travel time residuals to determine lateral velocity variations of the crust and upper mantle in the Pamir-Hindu Kush region in Tadjikistan and Afghanistan. Data from 29 analog seismic stations in Tadjikistan and northern Afghanistan were used to determine travel time residuals for 210 teleseismic events ranging in distance from 28 deg to 87 deg and covering a broad range of azimuths. We inverted for velocity perturbations over a rectangular grid with a block size of 99 x 99 km. The model extended to a depth of 350 km with a 50-km-thick first layer and two 150-km-thick deeper layers. The results show a strong and well-resolved zone of high velocities in the upper mantle at depths greater than 200 km, coincident with the location of the Hindu Kush seismic zone. No clear velocity perturbations are associated with the Pamir seismic zone. Above 200 km little correlation is observed with the seismic zone, but indications of thicker crust under the Pamir and thinner crust under the Tadjik Depression are seen. The high velocities are most likely caused by the presence of oceanic lithosphere at depth.

  7. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennington, Ninfa; Haney, Matt; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford; Freymueller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok’s caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. Themagnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/ormagmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation sourcemay be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  8. A bayesian approach for determining velocity and uncertainty estimates from seismic cone penetrometer testing or vertical seismic profiling data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pidlisecky, A.; Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional processing methods for seismic cone penetrometer data present several shortcomings, most notably the absence of a robust velocity model uncertainty estimate. We propose a new seismic cone penetrometer testing (SCPT) data-processing approach that employs Bayesian methods to map measured data errors into quantitative estimates of model uncertainty. We first calculate travel-time differences for all permutations of seismic trace pairs. That is, we cross-correlate each trace at each measurement location with every trace at every other measurement location to determine travel-time differences that are not biased by the choice of any particular reference trace and to thoroughly characterize data error. We calculate a forward operator that accounts for the different ray paths for each measurement location, including refraction at layer boundaries. We then use a Bayesian inversion scheme to obtain the most likely slowness (the reciprocal of velocity) and a distribution of probable slowness values for each model layer. The result is a velocity model that is based on correct ray paths, with uncertainty bounds that are based on the data error. ?? NRC Research Press 2011.

  9. Seismic velocity variation along the Izu-Bonin arc estaimated from traveltime tomography using OBS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Tamura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc is an intra-oceanic island arc along the convergent plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding Philippine Sea plates. Recent active seismic studies in the Izu-Bonin arc reveal significant along-arc variations in crustal structure [Kodaira et al., 2007]. The thickness of the arc crust shows a remarkable change between thicker Izu (~30 km) and thinner Bonin (~10 km) arcs. In addition to this, several geological and geophysical contrasts, such as seafloor topography and chemical composition of volcanic rocks, between Izu and Bonin arc have been reported [e.g., Yuasa 1992]. We have conducted earthquake observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to reveal seismic velocity structure of the crust and mantle wedge in the Izu-Bonin arc and to investigate origin of the along-arc structure variations. We deployed 40 short-period OBSs in Izu and Bonin area in 2006 and 2009, respectively. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at routine seismic stations on Hachijo-jima, Aoga-shima, and Chichi-jima operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). More than 5000 earthquakes were observed during about three-months observation period in each experiment. We conducted three-dimensional seismic tomography using manually picked P- and S-wave arrival time data. The obtained image shows a different seismic velocity structures in the mantle beneath the volcanic front between Izu and Bonin arcs. Low P-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the volcanic front in the Izu arc are limited at depths deeper than those in the Bonin arc. On the other hand, P-wave velocity in the low velocity anomalies beneath volcanic front in the Bonin arc is slower than that in the Izu arc. These large-scale along-arc structure variations in the mantle could relate to the geological and geophysical contrasts between Izu and Bonin arcs.

  10. Potential Misidentification of Love-Wave Phase Velocity Based on Three-Component Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zongbo; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    People have calculated Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from vertical component of ambient seismic noise for several years. Recently, researchers started to extract Love waves from transverse component recordings of ambient noise, where "transverse" is defined as the direction perpendicular to a great-circle path or a line in small scale through observation sensors. Most researches assumed Rayleigh waves could be negligible, but Rayleigh waves can exist in the transverse component when Rayleigh waves propagate in other directions besides radial direction. In study of data acquired in western Junggar Basin near Karamay city, China, after processing the transverse component recordings of ambient noise, we obtain two energy trends, which are distinguished with Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities, in the frequency-velocity domain using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Rayleigh waves could be also extracted from the transverse component data. Because Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities are close in high frequencies (>0.1 Hz), two kinds of surface waves might be merged in the frequency-velocity domain. Rayleigh-wave phase velocities may be misidentified as Love-wave phase velocities. To get accurate surface-wave phase velocities from the transverse component data using seismic interferometry in investigating the shallow geology, our results suggest using MASW to calculate real Love-wave phase velocities.

  11. Debunking Urban Legends about Seismic Velocities in Urban Basins Using Oil Industry Sonic and Density Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    I use compressional-wave (sonic) and density logs from 130 oil industry boreholes to debunk several simplistic myths about velocity-depth functions commonly used in site response estimates and computer modeling of seismic waves in basins. The logs are being used to help construct a new 3-D velocity model for the greater San Francisco Bay Area, and to test tomography and gravity models of the region. The logs sample strata to an average depth of 2 km, some as deep as 5.6 km, in several urban sedimentary basins, mainly in northern California. The logs sample primarily Pliocene to Upper Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks including shales, sandstones, and conglomerates: higher-velocity chemical precipitates such as carbonates, dolomites, anhydrites, and halites are notably missing. Myth #1: Velocity increases monotonically with depth. Many logs show abrupt, pronounced, and thick low velocity zones often associated with an abrupt downward reduction of the grain size of the sedimentary strata. These low velocity zones often record regional uplift in which coarse grained and higher velocity strata are deposited above finer grained strata. These regional low velocity zones, with thicknesses of several hundred m, may represent an efficient wave guide for seismic wave propagation. Myth #2: There are only small regional variations in the seismic velocities of the basin strata. In the San Francisco Bay Area, logs from wells extending from the Great Valley to offshore basins show a pronounced westward increase in sonic velocity associated with relatively high velocity Miocene strata. Myth #3: The impedance contrast at the bottom of basins is depth independent. Most wells penetrating basement at depths less than 1.5 km around basin edges exhibit a large (30%) impedance contrast. In the Bay Area, wells penetrating basement at depths greater than 3 km in the middle of basins show only a modest impedance contrast. Thus, the logs predict pronounced basin edge effects and more

  12. Seismic velocity models for the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Ratchkovski, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crustal-scale seismic-velocity models across the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway show a 50-km-thick crust, a near vertical fault trace, and a 5-km-wide damage zone associated with the fault near Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station 10, which provided the closest strong ground motion recordings of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake. We compare models, derived from seismic reflection and refraction surveys acquired in 1986 and 1987, to laboratory measurements of seismic velocities for typical metamorphic rocks exposed along the profiles. Our model for the 1986 seismic reflection profile indicates a 5-km-wide low-velocity zone in the upper 1 km of the Denali fault zone, which we interpret as fault gouge. Deeper refractions from our 1987 line image a 40-km wide, 5-km-deep low-velocity zone along the Denali fault and nearby associated fault strands, which we attribute to a composite damage zone along several strands of the Denali fault zone and to the obliquity of the seismic line to the fault zone. Our velocity model and other geophysical data indicate a nearly vertical Denali fault zone to a depth of 30 km. After-shocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake and our velocity model provide evidence for a flower structure along the fault zone consisting of faults dipping toward and truncated by the Denali fault. Wide-angle reflections indicate that the crustal thickness beneath the Denali fault is transitional between the 60-km-thick crust beneath the Alaska Range to the south, and the extended, 30-km-thick crust of the Yukon-Tanana terrane to the north.

  13. Low seismic velocities below mid-ocean ridges: Attenuation versus melt retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Saskia; Armitage, John; Harmon, Nick; Smith, Hannah; Huismans, Ritske

    2012-12-01

    The first comprehensive seismic experiment sampling subridge mantle revealed a pronounced low-velocity zone between 40 and 100 km depth below the East Pacific Rise (EPR) that has been attributed to substantial retained melt fractions of 0.3-2%. Such high melt fractions are at odds with low melt productivity and high melt mobility inferred from petrology and geochemistry. Here, we evaluate whether seismic attenuation can reconcile subridge seismic structure with low melt fractions. We start from a dynamic spreading model which includes melt generation and migration and is converted into seismic structure, accounting for temperature-, pressure-, composition-, phase-, and melt-dependent anharmonicity, and temperature-, pressure-, frequency- and hydration-dependent anelasticity. Our models predict a double low-velocity zone: a shallow—approximately triangular—region due to dry melting, and a low-velocity channel between 60 and 150 km depth dominantly controlled by solid state high-temperature seismic attenuation in a damp mantle, with only a minor contribution of (<0.1%) melt. We test how tomographic inversion influences the imaging of our modeled shear velocity features. The EPR experiment revealed a double low-velocity zone, but most tomographic studies would only resolve the deeper velocity minimum. Experimentally constrained anelasticity formulations produce VSas low as observed and can explain lateral variations in near-ridge asthenospheric VS with ±100 K temperature variations and/or zero to high water content. Furthermore, such QS formulations also reproduce low asthenospheric VS below older oceans and continents from basic lithospheric cooling models. Although these structures are compatible with global QS images, they are more attenuating than permitted by EPR data.

  14. Depth-dependence of time-lapse seismic velocity change detected by a joint interferometric analysis of vertical array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawazaki, K.; Saito, T.; Ueno, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, utilizing depth-sensitivity of interferometric waveforms recorded by co-located Hi-net and KiK-net sensors, we separate the responsible depth of seismic velocity change associated with the M6.3 earthquake occurred on November 22, 2014, in central Japan. The Hi-net station N.MKGH is located about 20 km northeast from the epicenter, where the seismometer is installed at the 150 m depth. At the same site, the KiK-net has two strong motion seismometers installed at the depths of 0 and 150 m. To estimate average velocity change around the N.MKGH station, we apply the stretching technique to auto-correlation function (ACF) of ambient noise recorded by the Hi-net sensor. To evaluate sensitivity of the Hi-net ACF to velocity change above and below the 150 m depth, we perform a numerical wave propagation simulation using 2-D FDM. To obtain velocity change above the 150 m depth, we measure response waveform from the depths of 150 m to 0 m by computing deconvolution function (DCF) of earthquake records obtained by the two KiK-net vertical array sensors. The background annual velocity variation is subtracted from the detected velocity change. From the KiK-net DCF records, the velocity reduction ratio above the 150 m depth is estimated to be 4.2 % and 3.1 % in the periods of 1-7 days and 7 days - 4 months after the mainshock, respectively. From the Hi-net ACF records, the velocity reduction ratio is estimated to be 2.2 % and 1.8 % in the same time periods, respectively. This difference in the estimated velocity reduction ratio is attributed to depth-dependence of the velocity change. By using the depth sensitivity obtained from the numerical simulation, we estimate the velocity reduction ratio below the 150 m depth to be lower than 1.0 % for both time periods. Thus the significant velocity reduction and recovery are observed above the 150 m depth only, which may be caused by strong ground motion of the mainshock and following healing in the shallow ground.

  15. 2D Seismic interpretation of strike-slip faulting, salt tectonics, and Cretaceous unconformities, Atlas Mountains, central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Bédir, Mourad; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2005-11-01

    The Cretaceous deposits in central Tunisia blocks were studied by sequence stratigraphy, 2D seismic interpretation calibrated to the well and associated outcrop data. The constructing and comparing histories of the northern and southern blocks of the Gafsa master fault was the establishment of platform to basin stratigraphic configuration based on the major unconformity surfaces. Three important basin zones mark subsurface structures: Gafsa to the south, Souinia-Majoura to the northeast and Sidi Aïch-Mèjel Bel Abbès to the northwest. Basin depocenters and upthrown blocks are bounded by the N120° Gafsa and Majoura and N180° Sidi Ali Ben Aoun wrench fault salt-intruded tectonic corridors and subdivided by the associated N60° and N90° trending second-order fault corridors. The Mèjel Bel Abbès block is characterized by brittle structures associated with a deep asymmetric geometry that is organized into depressions and uplifts. Halokinesis of Triassic salt began in the Jurassic and continued during the Cretaceous periods. During extensional deformations, salt movement controlled sedimentation distribution and location of pre-compressional structures. During compressional deformations, salt remobilization accentuated the folded uplifts. The Triassic salt facies constitutes a level of decollement at the base of the Mesozoic deposits during the later displacements. The coeval dextral strike-slip motion along the three northwest-southeast bounding master faults (Gafsa, Sehib-Alima and Majoura-Mech) suggests a pull-apart opening of the Gafsa basin. Synchronous movements of the Gafsa first-order dextral strike-slip fault with the Sidi Ali Ben Aoun sinistral wrench fault caused formation of tectonic obstacles that are shown first by the sealed structures, then by development of the local compressive stress that caused formation of the south overturned folds and the syncline depressions. The transcurrent fault systems caused formation of Turonian and Senonian

  16. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  17. Relationships among seismic velocity, metamorphism, and seismic and aseismic fault slip in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Lohman, Rowena B.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.

    2015-04-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is one of the most geothermally and seismically active areas in California and presents an opportunity to study the effect of high-temperature metamorphism on the properties of seismogenic faults. The area includes numerous active tectonic faults that have recently been imaged with active source seismic reflection and refraction. We utilize the active source surveys, along with the abundant microseismicity data from a dense borehole seismic network, to image the 3-D variations in seismic velocity in the upper 5 km of the crust. There are strong velocity variations, up to ~30%, that correlate spatially with the distribution of shallow heat flow patterns. The combination of hydrothermal circulation and high-temperature contact metamorphism has significantly altered the shallow sandstone sedimentary layers within the geothermal field to denser, more feldspathic, rock with higher P wave velocity, as is seen in the numerous exploration wells within the field. This alteration appears to have a first-order effect on the frictional stability of shallow faults. In 2005, a large earthquake swarm and deformation event occurred. Analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar data and earthquake relocations indicates that the shallow aseismic fault creep that occurred in 2005 was localized on the Kalin fault system that lies just outside the region of high-temperature metamorphism. In contrast, the earthquake swarm, which includes all of the M > 4 earthquakes to have occurred within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in the last 15 years, ruptured the Main Central Fault (MCF) system that is localized in the heart of the geothermal anomaly. The background microseismicity induced by the geothermal operations is also concentrated in the high-temperature regions in the vicinity of operational wells. However, while this microseismicity occurs over a few kilometer scale region, much of it is clustered in earthquake swarms that last from hours to a

  18. Imaging 3D seismic velocity along the seismogenic zone of Algarve region (southern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João.; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Caldeira, Bento; Dias, Nuno; Borges, José; Matias, Luís.; Dorbath, Catherine; Carrilho, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    The present seismic tomographic study is focused around Algarve region, in South of Portugal. To locate the seismic events and find the local velocity structure of epicentral area, the P and S arrival times at 38 stations are used. The data used in this study were obtained during the Algarve campaign which worked from January/2006 to July/2007. The preliminary estimate of origin times and hypocentral coordinates are determined by the Hypoinverse program. Linearized inversion procedure was applied to comprise the following two steps: 1) finding the minimum 1D velocity model using Velest and 2) simultaneous relocation of hypocenters and determination of local velocity structure. The velocity model we have reached is a 10 layer model which gave the lowest RMS, after several runnings of eight different velocity models that we used "a priori". The model parameterization assumes a continuous velocity field between 4.5 km/s and 7.0 km/s until 30 km depth. The earth structure is represented in 3D by velocity at discrete points, and velocity at any intervening point is determined by linear interpolation among the surrounding eight grid points. A preliminary analysis of the resolution capabilities of the dataset, based on the Derivative Weight Sum (DWS) distribution, shows that the velocity structure is better resolved in the West part of the region between the surface to15 km. The resulting tomographic image has a prominent low-velocity anomaly that shows a maximum decrease in P-wave velocity in the first 12 kms in the studied region. We also identified the occurrence of local seismic events of reduced magnitude not catalogued, in the neighbourhood of Almodôvar (low Alentejo). The spatial distribution of epicentres defines a NE-SW direction that coincides with the strike of the mapped geological faults of the region and issued from photo-interpretation. Is still expectable to refine the seismicity of the region of Almodôvar and establish more rigorously its role in the

  19. Meteorite Impact at the Bedout High, NW Australian Margin, and Seismic Velocities: is There a Connection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A.; Kennard, J.; Becker, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Bedout High in the Roebuck Basin at the NW Australian Margin (NWAM) appears to be a good candidate for a massive impact structure associated with the global Permian/Triassic extinction event. On a regional and crustal scale, the NWAM is one of the best studied offshore areas of Australia: ocean-bottom seismograph (OBS) survey supplemented by deep reflection seismic studies in the region has enabled co-interpretation of conventional deep seismic reflection data and accurate seismic velocity models on several transects, including one across the Bedout High. The purpose of this research is to investigate if there is any manifestation of the meteorite impact on a crustal scale, and also on a finer scale of seismic velocity variation in the basement. The impact of the suggested magnitude may have significantly modified the crustal structure in the region. Depth conversion of reflection seismic data indicates that depth to basement at the top of the Bedout High is approximately 3.9 km, and that the High stands more than 4 km above the surrounding sedimentary basins. The basement and crust in the Roebuck Basin have a number of features that distinguish it from other basins at the NWAM. Rapid crustal thinning outboard of the Bedout High and the presence of a thick layer of magmatic underplating in the lower crust are among these features. The meteorite impact may have been one of the possible causes to have triggered upper mantle melting and generation of a voluminous layer of underplated material. On a finer scale, OBS-derived seismic velocity variation along the basement is speculatively interpreted to be consistent with impact-related effects. However, existing seismic and potential field data do not allow accurate estimates of the extent of the crust affected by the meteorite impact, and effects that it may have had on the subsequent rifting, thermal, sedimentation and hydrocarbon maturation regimes in the area. Further multidisciplinary research is necessary to

  20. A three-dimensional P wave velocity model for the Charlevoix seismic zone, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovic, Gordana; Powell, Christine; Lamontagne, Maurice

    2003-09-01

    A three-dimensional P wave velocity model has been developed for the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ). The CSZ is located along the St. Lawrence River ˜100 km northeast of Quebec City, Canada, and is one of the most active seismic zones in eastern North America. Five earthquakes with magnitudes equal to or exceeding 6.0 have occurred in the CSZ in historic time, and around 200 earthquakes occur annually. Hypocenters are located in Precambrian basement rocks. Basement rocks have been affected by numerous tectonic events including Grenvillian collision, Iapetan rifting, and meteor impact. We performed a sequential, tomographic inversion for P wave velocity structure based upon 3093 P wave arrivals from 489 earthquakes recorded by 12 stations. High velocity is associated with the center of the impact crater. The region of high velocity is surrounded by low velocities interpreted to be highly disrupted rocks. An elongated, high-velocity region is present at midcrustal depths that trends parallel to the St. Lawrence River. Earthquakes avoid the high-velocity body and separate into two bands, one on either side of the feature. Larger earthquakes (magnitude ≥ 4) have occurred along the northern edges of the high-velocity region.

  1. Using seismically constrained magnetotelluric inversion to recover velocity structure in the shallow lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorkamp, M.; Fishwick, S.; Jones, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Typical surface wave tomography can recover well the velocity structure of the upper mantle in the depth range between 70-200km. For a successful inversion, we have to constrain the crustal structure and assess the impact on the resulting models. In addition,we often observe potentially interesting features in the uppermost lithosphere which are poorly resolved and thus their interpretationhas to be approached with great care.We are currently developing a seismically constrained magnetotelluric (MT) inversion approach with the aim of better recovering the lithospheric properties (and thus seismic velocities) in these problematic areas. We perform a 3D MT inversion constrained by a fixed seismic velocity model from surface wave tomography. In order to avoid strong bias, we only utilize information on structural boundaries to combine these two methods. Within the region that is well resolved by both methods, we can then extract a velocity-conductivity relationship. By translating the conductivitiesretrieved from MT into velocities in areas where the velocity model is poorly resolved, we can generate an updated velocity model and test what impactthe updated velocities have on the predicted data.We test this new approach using a MT dataset acquired in central Botswana over the Okwa terrane and the adjacent Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons togetherwith a tomographic models for the region. Here, both datasets have previously been used to constrain lithospheric structure and show some similarities.We carefully asses the validity of our results by comparing with observations and petrophysical predictions for the conductivity-velocity relationship.

  2. InSight detection of a Lithospheric Low Seismic Velocity Zone in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Nimmo, F.; Lay, T.

    2014-12-01

    Most seismological models for the interior of Mars lack an upper mantle low velocity zone. However, there is expected to be a large thermal gradient across the stagnant conductive lid (lithosphere) of Mars. This gradient should tend to decrease elastic wave velocities with increasing depth, with this effect dominating the opposing tendency caused by increasing pressure with depth because Mars has low gravity. An upper mantle lithosphere with a low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath a thin high velocity "seismic lid" is thus predicted. The upcoming NASA InSight mission includes a three-component seismometer, which should provide the first opportunity to directly detect any lithospheric LVZ in Mars. Seismic wavefields expected for Mars mantle velocity structures with or without a strong LVZ are very distinct and may be distinguished by observing a modest number of seismic sources at different epicentral ranges. The LVZ models predict shadow zones for high-frequency seismic body wave phases such as P, S, PP and SS, etc. The most diagnostic waves that can be used to evaluate presence of a lithospheric LVZ given a single seismometer are intermediate period surface waves, which travel along the great circle from a seismic source to the seismometer along both minor- and (if the source is large enough) major-arc directions. An LVZ produces distinctive dispersion, with a Rayleigh wave Airy phase around 100 s period and very different surface wave seismograms compared to a model with no LVZ. Even a single observation of long-period surface waves from a known range can be diagnostic of the lithospheric structure. Establishing the existence of an LVZ has major implications for thermal evolution, volatile content and internal dynamics of the planet.

  3. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  4. Effects of fluid pressures to the seismic velocity of crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Katayama, I.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction Water of the earth interior is mainly supplied at the subduction zone and has important role on seismic activity and volcanism in island arc. It is suggested that slow slip events and tremors occurring at this region are related to water (e.g., Obara, 2000). Based on the seismic tomography beneath Kanto district, high Poisson's ratio area (~0.337) was observed and suggested weak seismic coupling at plate interface (Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2000). Similar high Poisson's ratio is detected beneath Tonankai and Shikoku district, exceeding 0.3. Those regions correspond to the plate boundary generating slow slip events or tremors (Kodaira et al., 2004 ; Shelly et al., 2006). Because relatively young oceanic plates are subducting in districts from Kanto to Sikoku, antigorite which Poisson's ratio is ~0.29 may exist stably in those areas. In this case, the observed high Poisson's ratio requires excess pore fluids in addition to the serpentinized mantle. In order to clarify geometry and the abundance of water, we investigate seismic velocity of crustal rocks under high confining pressure and pore fluid pressure. Experimental methods For the measurement of seismic velocity, we used the hydraulic pressure vessel in Hiroshima University, in which seismic velocity was calculated by using pulse echo method. We used the Aji granite as a test sample, which was prepared into a cylindrical shape with 20 mm diameter and 5-10 mm length. The top and bottom of sample were polished mirror surfaces within 0.001 mm difference. We measured seismic velocity under dry and wet conditions. In the later case, distilled water is supplied into the sample with pore pressure up to 100 MPa, and we also measured permeable time of water at Pc = 20 MPa, Pp = 0 MPa and Pc =40 MPa, Pp =20 MPa. Results and discussion Under dry experiments, seismic velocities of granite were measured up to confining pressure as high as 200 MPa. Calculated velocities were Vp = 5.900 km/s, Vs = 3.478 km/s at

  5. Xenolith constraints on seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D. E.; Boyd, F. R.; Schutt, D.; Bell, D. R.; Carlson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    We impose geologic constraints on seismic three-dimensional (3-D) images of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa by calculating seismic velocities and rock densities from approximately 120 geothermobarometrically calibrated mantle xenoliths from the Archean Kaapvaal craton and adjacent Proterozoic mobile belts. Velocity and density estimates are based on the elastic and thermal moduli of constituent minerals under equilibrium P-T conditions at the mantle source. The largest sources of error in the velocity estimates derive from inaccurate thermo-barometry and, to a lesser extent, from uncertainties in the elastic constants of the constituent minerals. Results are consistent with tomographic evidence that cratonic mantle is higher in velocity by 0.5-1.5% and lower in density by about 1% relative to off-craton Proterozoic samples at comparable depths. Seismic velocity variations between cratonic and noncratonic xenoliths are controlled dominantly by differences in calculated temperatures, with compositional effects secondary. Different temperature profiles between cratonic and noncratonic regions have a relatively minor influence on density, where composition remains the dominant control. Low-T cratonic xenoliths exhibit a positive velocity-depth curve, rising from about 8.13 km/s at uppermost mantle depths to about 8.25 km/s at 180-km depth. S velocities decrease slightly over the same depth interval, from about 4.7 km/s in the uppermost mantle to 4.65 km/s at 180-km depth. P and S velocities for high-T lherzolites are highly scattered, ranging from highs close to those of the low-T xenoliths to lows of 8.05 km/s and 4.5 km/s at depths in excess of 200 km. These low velocities, while not asthenospheric, are inconsistent with seismic tomographic images that indicate high velocity root material extending to depths of at least 250 km. One plausible explanation is that high temperatures determined for the high-T xenoliths are a nonequilibrium consequence of

  6. Velocity logging and seismic velocity of rocks in the Rainier Mesa area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.D.; Magner, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Velocity data obtained in 38 vertical drill holes in the Rainier and Aqueduct Mesa area were evaluated. Twenty-three geophone surveys and 20 acoustic logs were used to define the in-situ velocity of rocks in the region. The vertical velocity profile can be subdivided into the caprock; the unsaturated zone, the base of which is approximately defined by the top of pervasive zeolitization; the saturated zone of zeolitized rocks; and the pre-Tertiary clastic and carbonate rocks. Comparisons of geophone and acoustic log surveys indicate considerable positive drift (higher acoustic log velocity) in several holes, and none of the postulated causes (dispersion, geologic structure, data error, invasion) can be isolated.

  7. Multicomponent, 3-D, and High-Resolution 2-D Seismic Characterization of Gas Hydrate Study Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W.; Lee, M. W.; Miller, J.

    2012-12-01

    High saturations of gas hydrates have been identified within coarse-grained sediments in the Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 lease blocks of the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. The thickness, lateral extent, and hydrate saturations in these deposits are constrained by geological and geophysical data and state-of-the-art logging-while-drilling information obtained in multiple boreholes at each site during a 2009 expedition. Presently lacking are multicomponent seismic data that can provide a thorough understanding of the in-situ compressional and shear seismic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediments. Such data may represent an important tool for future characterization of gas hydrate resources. To address this data gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will collaborate on a 20-day research expedition to acquire wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer and high-resolution vertical incidence 2-D seismic data at the study sites. In preparation for this mid-2013 expedition, we have analyzed existing industry 3-D seismic data, along with numerically modeled multicomponent data. The 3-D seismic data allow us to identify and rank specific survey targets and can be combined with the numerical modeling results to determine optimal survey line orientation and acquisition parameters. Together, these data also provide a more thorough understanding of the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  8. Smooth 2-D ocean sound speed from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion of seismic oceanography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, Tanya M.; Jun, Hyunggu; Rosado, Hayley; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    In seismic oceanography, processed images highlight small temperature changes, but inversion is needed to obtain absolute temperatures. Local search-based full waveform inversion has a lower computational cost than global search but requires accurate starting models. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data have little associated hydrographic data and the band-limited nature of seismic data makes extracting the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data inherently challenging. Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (LDI) can use rudimentary starting models without prior information about the medium. Data are transformed to the Laplace domain, and a smooth sound speed model is extracted by examining the zero and low frequency components of the damped wavefield. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of LDI for creating starting models suitable for more detailed inversions.

  9. Precursory changes in seismic velocity for the spectrum of earthquake failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, M. M.; Marone, C.; Tinti, E.; di Stefano, G.; Collettini, C.

    2016-09-01

    Temporal changes in seismic velocity during the earthquake cycle have the potential to illuminate physical processes associated with fault weakening and connections between the range of fault slip behaviours including slow earthquakes, tremor and low-frequency earthquakes. Laboratory and theoretical studies predict changes in seismic velocity before earthquake failure; however, tectonic faults fail in a spectrum of modes and little is known about precursors for those modes. Here we show that precursory changes of wave speed occur in laboratory faults for the complete spectrum of failure modes observed for tectonic faults. We systematically altered the stiffness of the loading system to reproduce the transition from slow to fast stick-slip and monitored ultrasonic wave speed during frictional sliding. We find systematic variations of elastic properties during the seismic cycle for both slow and fast earthquakes indicating similar physical mechanisms during rupture nucleation. Our data show that accelerated fault creep causes reduction of seismic velocity and elastic moduli during the preparatory phase preceding failure, which suggests that real-time monitoring of active faults may be a means to detect earthquake precursors.

  10. Density and seismic velocity of hydrous melts under crustal and upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Kenta; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    We present a new model for calculating the density of hydrous silicate melts as a function of P, T, H2O concentration, and melt composition. We optimize VPr,Tr, ∂V/∂T, ∂V/∂P, ∂V2/∂T∂P, and K' of H2O end-member components in hydrous silicate melts, as well as K' of anhydrous silicate melts, using previously reported experimental results. The parameter set for H2O end-member component in silicate melt optimized in this study is internally consistent with the parameter values for the properties of anhydrous silicate melt reported by Lange and Carmichael (1987, 1990). The model calculation developed in this study reproduces the experimentally determined densities of various hydrous melts, and can be used to calculate the relationships between pressures, temperatures, and H2O concentrations of various hydrous melts from ultramafic to felsic compositions at pressures of 0-4.29 GPa. Using the new parameter set, we investigate the effects of H2O content on the seismic velocity of hydrous melts, as well as seismic velocities in partially molten regions of subduction zones. The results show that water content in silicate melt plays a key role in determining seismic velocity structure, and therefore must be taken into account when interpreting seismic tomography.

  11. Three-dimensional shear velocity anisotropic model of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2015-01-01

    We cross correlate 4 years of seismic noise from the seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) to measure the group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We average measurements from vertical and radial components to obtain 577 Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The transverse components provided 395 Love wave dispersion curves. We regionalize the group velocities measurements into 2-D velocity maps between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we locally inverted these maps for a pseudo 3-D anisotropic shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level using a Neighborhood Algorithm. The 3-D isotropic shear-wave model shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The anomaly located below the present "Plaine des Sables" could be related to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body located below the summit of the volcano likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the dismantled "Les Alizés" Volcano. Radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: positive anisotropy above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of horizontal lava flows and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy corresponding to the ancient edifice of Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  12. Joint Travel-time Inversion of Streamer and OBS Seismic Data for Improved Velocity Models and Interplate Boundary Geometry in Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begovic, S.; Ranero, C. R.; Sallares, V.; Melendez, A.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2015-12-01

    We combine wide-angle (WAS) seismic and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data acquired in the northern Chile subduction zone during the CINCA'95 survey into a common inversion scheme to obtain high-resolution image of upper plate and inter-plate boundary, and to characterize seismic velocity (Vp) as well as tectonic structure across ~300 km long, E-W profile, 21.30°S. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results using two different travel-time inversion strategies: First, we have produced seismic velocity and inter-plate boundary geometry using the WAS data, recorded on 19 OBH (Ocean Bottom Hydrophones) and 6 land stations following a typical joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography strategy. In particular, the WAS model is obtained using tomo2d tomographic inversion code (Korenaga et al, 2000) and applying layer-stripping method. Second, to compare structure, physical properties and rupture characteristics we jointly invert two types of seismic data sets, integrating multichannel seismic (MCS) data collected with a 3 km long streamer with the OBS wide-angle seismic (WAS) data described above into a common inversion scheme. To do so, we have adapted tomo2d to deal with streamer data. The scheme results in a joint travel time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel time information from refracted and reflected from WAS data and reflected phases from the top of the basement and the inter-plate boundaries identified in the MCS shot gathers. Our first results of the joint inversion indicate a 5 - 10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model around the interplate boundary, compared to models obtained inverting with just wide-angle seismic data. Interpretation of the joint WAS-MCS velocity model, and MCS images provide improved models of physical properties of the upper plate and around inter-plate boundary. In turn this will help to better understand

  13. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  14. Contrasting behavior between dispersive seismic velocity and attenuation: advantages in subsoil characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Ghose, Ranajit

    2012-02-01

    A careful look into the pertinent models of poroelasticity reveals that in water-saturated sediments or soils, the seismic (P and S wave) velocity dispersion and attenuation in the low field-seismic frequency band (20-200 Hz) have a contrasting behavior in the porosity-permeability domain. Taking advantage of this nearly orthogonal behavior, a new approach has been proposed, which leads to unique estimates of both porosity and permeability simultaneously. Through realistic numerical tests, the effect of maximum frequency content in data and the integration of P and S waves on the accuracy and robustness of the estimates are demonstrated. PMID:22352618

  15. Contrasting behavior between dispersive seismic velocity and attenuation: advantages in subsoil characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Ghose, Ranajit

    2012-02-01

    A careful look into the pertinent models of poroelasticity reveals that in water-saturated sediments or soils, the seismic (P and S wave) velocity dispersion and attenuation in the low field-seismic frequency band (20-200 Hz) have a contrasting behavior in the porosity-permeability domain. Taking advantage of this nearly orthogonal behavior, a new approach has been proposed, which leads to unique estimates of both porosity and permeability simultaneously. Through realistic numerical tests, the effect of maximum frequency content in data and the integration of P and S waves on the accuracy and robustness of the estimates are demonstrated.

  16. Seismic wave velocity of rocks in the Oman ophiolite: constraints for petrological structure of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Shibata, S.; Akizuki, R.; Arima, M.; Tatsumi, Y.; Arai, S.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of rock velocities and comparison with velocity profiles defined by seismic refraction experiments are a crucial approach for understanding the petrological structure of the crust. In this study, we calculated the seismic wave velocities of various types of rocks from the Oman ophiolite in order to constrain a petrological structure of the oceanic crust. Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) have reported experimental elastic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite under oceanic crust-mantle conditions (6-430 MPa). However, in their relatively low-pressure experiments, internal pore-spaces might affect the velocity and resulted in lower values than the intrinsic velocity of sample. In this study we calculated the velocities of samples based on their modal proportions and chemical compositions of mineral constituents. Our calculated velocities represent the ‘pore-space-free’ intrinsic velocities of the sample. We calculated seismic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite including pillow lavas, dolerites, plagiogranites, gabbros and peridotites at high-pressure-temperature conditions with an Excel macro (Hacker & Avers 2004, G-cubed). The minerals used for calculations for pillow lavas, dolerites and plagiogranites were Qtz, Pl, Prh, Pmp, Chl, Ep, Act, Hbl, Cpx and Mag. Pl, Hbl, Cpx, Opx and Ol were used for the calculations for gabbros and peridotites. Assuming thermal gradient of 20° C/km and pressure gradient of 25 MPa/km, the velocities were calculated in the ranges from the atmospheric pressure (0° C) to 200 MPa (160° C). The calculation yielded P-wave velocities (Vp) of 6.5-6.7 km/s for the pillow lavas, 6.6-6.8 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6.9-7.5 km/s for the gabbros and 8.1-8.2 km/s for the peridotites. On the other hand, experimental results reported by Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) were 4.5-5.9 km/s for the pillow lavas, 5.5-6.3 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6

  17. 2D multi-parameter elastic seismic imaging by frequency-domain L1-norm full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is becoming a powerful and efficient tool to derive high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface. In the frequency-domain, computationally efficient FWI algorithms can be designed for wide-aperture acquisition geometries by limiting inversion to few discrete frequencies. However, FWI remains an ill-posed and highly non-linear data-fitting procedure that is sensitive to noise, inaccuracies of the starting model and definition of multiparameter classes. The footprint of the noise in seismic imaging is conventionally mitigated by stacking highly redundant multifold data. However, when the data redundancy is decimated in the framework of efficient frequency-domain FWI, it is essential to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to noise. The impact of the noise in FWI, when applied to decimated data sets, has been marginally illustrated in the past and least-squares minimisation has remained the most popular approach. We investigate in this study the sensitivity of frequency-domain elastic FWI to noise for realistic onshore and offshore synthetic data sets contaminated by ambient random white noise. Four minimisation functionals are assessed in the framework of frequency domain FWI of decimated data: the classical least-square norm (L2), the least-absolute-values norm (L1), and some combinations of both (the Huber and the so-called Hybrid criteria). These functionals are implemented in a massively-parallel, 2D elastic frequency-domain FWI algorithm. A two-level hierarchical algorithm is implemented to mitigate the non-linearity of the inversion in complex environments. The first outer level consists of successive inversions of frequency groups of increasing high-frequency content. This level defines a multi-scale approach while preserving some data redundancy by means of simultaneous inversion of multiple frequencies. The second inner level used complex-valued frequencies for data preconditioning. This preconditioning controls the

  18. Modeling continuous seismic velocity changes due to ground shaking in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, Martina; Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Korn, Michael; Tilmann, Frederik

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate temporal seismic velocity changes due to earthquake related processes and environmental forcing, we analyze 8 years of ambient seismic noise recorded by the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) network in northern Chile between 18° and 25° S. The Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake in 2007 and the Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake in 2014 as well as numerous smaller events occurred in this area. By autocorrelation of the ambient seismic noise field, approximations of the Green's functions are retrieved. The recovered function represents backscattered or multiply scattered energy from the immediate neighborhood of the station. To detect relative changes of the seismic velocities we apply the stretching method, which compares individual autocorrelation functions to stretched or compressed versions of a long term averaged reference autocorrelation function. We use time windows in the coda of the autocorrelations, that contain scattered waves which are highly sensitive to minute changes in the velocity. At station PATCX we observe seasonal changes in seismic velocity as well as temporary velocity reductions in the frequency range of 4-6 Hz. The seasonal changes can be attributed to thermal stress changes in the subsurface related to variations of the atmospheric temperature. This effect can be modeled well by a sine curve and is subtracted for further analysis of short term variations. Temporary velocity reductions occur at the time of ground shaking usually caused by earthquakes and are followed by a recovery. We present an empirical model that describes the seismic velocity variations based on continuous observations of the local ground acceleration. Our hypothesis is that not only the shaking of earthquakes provokes velocity drops, but any small vibrations continuously induce minor velocity variations that are immediately compensated by healing in the steady state. We show that the shaking effect is accumulated over time and best described by

  19. Stochastic characterization of mesoscale seismic velocity heterogeneity in Long Beach, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Nori; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's seismic velocity structure is heterogeneous at all scales, and mapping that heterogeneity provides insight into the processes that create it. At large scale lengths, seismic tomography is used to map Earth structure deterministically. At small scale lengths, structure can be imaged deterministically, but because it is impractical to image short-wavelength heterogeneity everywhere, we often resort to statistical methods to depict its variability. In this study, we develop random-field model representations of a 3-D P-wave velocity model at Long Beach, California, estimated from dense-array recordings of the ambient seismic wavefield. We focus on heterogeneity at the mesoscale, which is smaller than 10+ km scale of regional tomography but larger than the micro scale of borehole measurements. We explore four ellipsoidally anisotropic heterogeneity models, including von Kármán, Gaussian, self-affine and Kummer models, based on their autocorrelation functions. We find that the von Kármán model fits the imaged velocity model best among these options with a correlation length in the horizontal direction about five times greater than in the vertical direction, and with strong small-scale length variations. We validate our results by showing that our model accurately predicts the observed decay of scattered waves in the coda of a nearby earthquake, suggesting that quantitative measures of velocity variability will be useful for predicting high-frequency ground motion in earthquakes.

  20. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  1. Seismological implications of a lithospheric low seismic velocity zone in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yingcai; Nimmo, Francis; Lay, Thorne

    2015-03-01

    Most seismological models for the interior of Mars lack an upper mantle low velocity zone. However, there is expected to be a large thermal gradient across the stagnant conductive lid (lithosphere) of Mars. This gradient should tend to decrease elastic wave velocities with increasing depth, with this effect dominating the opposing tendency caused by increasing pressure with depth because Mars has low gravity. An upper mantle lithosphere with a low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath a thin high velocity "seismic lid" is thus predicted. The upcoming NASA InSight mission includes a three-component seismometer, which should provide the first opportunity to directly detect any lithospheric LVZ in Mars. Seismic wavefields expected for Mars mantle velocity structures with or without a strong LVZ are very distinct. The LVZ models predict shadow zones for high-frequency seismic body wave phases such as P, S, PP and SS, etc. The most diagnostic waves that can be used to evaluate presence of a lithospheric LVZ given a single seismometer are intermediate-period global surface waves, which travel along the great circle from a seismic source to the seismometer. An LVZ produces distinctive dispersion, with a Rayleigh wave Airy phase around 100 s period and very different surface wave seismograms compared to a model with no LVZ. Even a single observation of long-period surface waves from a known range can be diagnostic of the lithospheric structure. Establishing the existence of an LVZ has major implications for thermal evolution, volatile content and internal dynamics of the planet.

  2. Aspect Controls on Bedrock Fracturing and Seismic Velocity within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, A.; Magill, C.; Hendricks, S.; Singha, K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the controls of slope aspect on groundwater flow and geomorphic weathering within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory by studying the orientation and density of bedrock fracturing. Based on a series of seismic refraction surveys, we compare the seismic velocities and anisotropy of the subsurface soil and regolith with the distribution of fractures observed in 7 geophysical borehole logs. Conflicting hypotheses exist as to whether bedrock fracturing, and thus hydraulic conductivity, is controlled more by the regional tectonic stress field or by slope aspect. We examine bedrock fracturing on north- and south-facing slopes via the relationship between fracture orientation and seismic velocity, and find that our south-facing slope demonstrates pronounced seismic anisotropy, with velocities of up to 2,000 m/s in the E-W direction, and approximately 1,000 m/s in the N-S direction. By contrast, the north-facing aspect demonstrates no significant anisotropy, with velocities ranging from approximately 800-1,500 m/s. Similarly, borehole logs show conjugate sets of fractures on south-facing slopes striking in a general E-W direction, while north-facing borehole data reveal a high density of fracturing with less pronounced directional dependence. Based on current models of hillslope weathering, we interpret the slower and more isotropic velocities of the north-facing slope to be a more random orientation of fractures, caused primarily by more intense weathering processes. On the south-facing slope, we interpret the conjugate fracture sets and pronounced anisotropy to be fracturing resulting from tectonic stress. Assuming that both slopes experience similar tectonic stress, results suggest that slope aspect controls weathering and groundwater flow, and north-facing slopes demonstrate a more advanced state of weathering.

  3. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Brocher, T.M.; Klemperer, S.L.; Parsons, T.; Benz, H.M.; Furlong, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Seismic travel times from the northern California earthquake catalogue and from the 1991 Bay Area Seismic Imaging Experiment (BASIX) refraction survey were used to obtain a three-dimensional model of the seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay area. Nonlinear tomography was used to simultaneously invert for both velocity and hypocenters. The new hypocenter inversion algorithm uses finite difference travel times and is an extension of an existing velocity tomography algorithm. Numerous inversions were performed with different parameters to test the reliability of the resulting velocity model. Most hypocenters were relocated 12 km under the Sacramento River Delta, 6 km beneath Livermore Valley, 5 km beneath the Santa Clara Valley, and 4 km beneath eastern San Pablo Bay. The Great Valley Sequence east of San Francisco Bay is 4-6 km thick. A relatively high velocity body exists in the upper 10 km beneath the Sonoma volcanic field, but no evidence for a large intrusion or magma chamber exists in the crust under The Geysers or the Clear Lake volcanic center. Lateral velocity contrasts indicate that the major strike-slip faults extend subvertically beneath their surface locations through most of the crust. Strong lateral velocity contrasts of 0.3-0.6 km/s are observed across the San Andreas Fault in the middle crust and across the Hayward, Rogers Creek, Calaveras, and Greenville Faults at shallow depth. Weaker velocity contrasts (0.1-0.3 km/s) exist across the San Andreas, Hayward, and Rogers Creek Faults at all other depths. Low spatial resolution evidence in the lower crust suggests that the top of high-velocity mafic rocks gets deeper from west to east and may be offset under the major faults. The data suggest that the major strike-slip faults extend subvertically through the middle and perhaps the lower crust and juxtapose differing lithology due to accumulated strike-slip motion. The extent and physical properties of the major geologic units as

  4. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  5. Relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise at Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Haney, M. M.; De Angelis, S.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Okmok and Redoubt are two of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. Leading up to its most recent eruption, Okmok, a shield volcano on Umnak Island, showed precursors to volcanic activity only five hours before it erupted explosively in July 2008. Redoubt, a stratovolcano located along the Cook Inlet, displayed several months of precursory activity leading up to its March 2009 eruption. Frequent activity at both volcanoes poses a major hazard due to heavy traffic along the North Pacific air routes. Additionally, Okmok is adjacent to several of the world's most productive fisheries and Redoubt is located only 110 miles SW of Anchorage, the major population center of Alaska. For these reasons, it is imperative that we improve our ability to detect early signs of unrest, which could potentially lead to eruptive activity at these volcanoes. We take advantage of continuous waveforms recorded on seismic networks at Redoubt and Okmok in an attempt to identify seismic precursors to the recent eruptions at both volcanoes. We perform seismic interferometry using ambient noise, following Brenguier et al. (2008), in order to probe the subsurface and determine temporal changes in relative seismic velocity from pre- through post-eruption, for the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions. In a preliminary investigation, we analyzed 6 months of noise cross-correlation functions averaged over 10-day intervals leading up to the 2009 eruption at Redoubt. During February 2009, station pairs RSO-DFR and RDN-RSO showed a decrease in seismic velocity of ~0.02%. By the beginning of March, the relative velocity changes returned to background levels. Stations RSO and RDN are located within the summit breach, and station DFR is to the north. Although these results are preliminary, it is interesting to note that the decrease in seismic velocity at both station pairs overlaps with the time period when Grapenthin et al. (2012) hypothesize magma in the mid-to-deep crustal reservoir was

  6. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1

  7. Relationship between the upper mantle high velocity seismic lid and the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Keith; Tilmann, Frederik

    2009-04-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary corresponds to the base of the "rigid" plates - the depth at which heat transport changes from advection in the convecting deeper upper mantle to conduction in the shallow upper mantle. Although this boundary is a fundamental feature of the Earth, mapping it has been difficult because it does not correspond to a sharp change in temperature or composition. Various definitions of the lithosphere and asthenosphere are based on the analysis of different types of geophysical and geological observations. The depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary determined from these different observations often shows little agreement when they are applied to the same region because the geophysical and geological observations (i.e., seismic velocity, strain rate, electrical resistivity, chemical depletion, etc.) are proxies for the change in rheological properties rather than a direct measure of the rheological properties. In this paper, we focus on the seismic mapping of the upper mantle high velocity lid and low velocity zone and its relationship to the lithosphere and asthenosphere. We have two goals: (a) to examine the differences in how teleseismic body-wave travel-time tomography and surface-wave tomography image upper mantle seismic structure; and (b) to summarise how upper mantle seismic velocity structure can be related to the structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. Surface-wave tomography provides reasonably good depth resolution, especially when higher modes are included in the analysis, but lateral resolution is limited by the horizontal wavelength of the long-period surface waves used to constrain upper mantle velocity structure. Teleseismic body-wave tomography has poor depth resolution in the upper mantle, particularly when no strong lateral contrasts are present. If station terms are used, features with large lateral extent and gradual boundaries are attenuated in the tomographic image. Body-wave models are not

  8. Velocity changes at Volcán de Colima: Seismic and Experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; Lavallée, Yan; De Angelis, Silvio; Varley, Nick; Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel; Arámbula-Mendoza, Raúl; Hornby, Adrian; Wall, Richard; Kendrick, Jackie

    2016-04-01

    Immediately prior to dome-building eruptions, volcano-seismic swarms are a direct consequence of strain localisation in the ascending magma. A deformation mechanism map of magma subjected to strain localisation will help develop accurate numerical models, which, coupled to an understanding of the mechanics driving monitored geophysical signals prior to lava eruption, will enhance forecasts. Here we present how seismic data from Volcán de Colima, Mexico, is combined with experimental work to give insights into fracturing in and around magma. Volcán de Colima is a dome-forming volcano that has been almost-continuously erupting since November 1998. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify small changes in seismic velocity structure between pairs of similar earthquakes, employing waveforms from clusters of repeating earthquakes. The changes in all pairs of events were then used together to create a continuous function of velocity change at all stations within 7 km of the volcano from October to December 1998. We complement our seismic data with acoustic emission data from tensional experiments using samples collected at Volcán de Colima. Decreases in velocity and frequency reflect changes in the sample properties prior to failure. By comparing experimental and seismic observations, we may place constraints on the conditions of the natural seismogenic processes. Using a combination of field and experimental data promises a greater understanding of the processes affecting the rise of magma during an eruption. This will help with the challenge of forecasting and hazard mitigation during dome-forming eruptions worldwide.

  9. Validating 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Allen, R. M.; Obrebski, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    As seismic instrumentation, data storage and dissemination and computational power improve, seismic velocity models attempt to resolve smaller structures and cover larger areas. However, it is unclear how accurate these velocity models are and, while the best models available are used for event determination, it is difficult to put uncertainties on seismic event parameters. Model validation is typically done using resolution tests that assume the imaging theory used is accurate and thus only considers the impact of the data coverage on resolution. We present the results of a more rigorous approach to model validation via full three-dimensional waveform propagation using Spectral Element Methods (SEM). This approach makes no assumptions about the theory used to generate the models but require substantial computational resources. We first validate 3D tomographic models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency methods. The Dynamic North America (DNA) Models of P- and S- velocity structure (DNA09-P and DNA09-S) use teleseismic body-wave traveltime residuals recorded at over 800 seismic stations provided by the Earthscope USArray and regional seismic networks. We performed systematic computations of synthetics for the dataset used to generate the DNA models. Direct comparison of these synthetic seismograms to the actual observations allows us to accurately assess and validate the models. Implementation of the method for a densely instrumented region such as that covered by the DNA model provides a useful testbed for the validation methods that we will subsequently apply to other, more challenging study areas.

  10. Using glacier seismicity for phase velocity measurements and Green's function retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; Roux, Philippe; Roeoesli, Claudia; Lecointre, Albanne; Kilb, Debi; Roux, Pierre-François

    2015-06-01

    High-melt areas of glaciers and ice sheets foster a rich spectrum of ambient seismicity. These signals not only shed light on source mechanisms (e.g. englacial fracturing, water flow, iceberg detachment, basal motion) but also carry information about seismic wave propagation within glacier ice. Here, we present two approaches to measure and potentially monitor phase velocities of high-frequency seismic waves (≥1 Hz) using naturally occurring glacier seismicity. These two approaches were developed for data recorded by on-ice seasonal seismic networks on the Greenland Ice Sheet and a Swiss Alpine glacier. The Greenland data set consists of continuous seismograms, dominated by long-term tremor-like signals of englacial water flow, whereas the Alpine data were collected in triggered mode producing 1-2 s long records that include fracture events within the ice (`icequakes'). We use a matched-field processing technique to retrieve frequency-dependent phase velocity measurements for the Greenland data. In principle, this phase dispersion relationship can be inverted for ice sheet thickness and bed properties. For these Greenland data, inversion of the dispersion curve yields a bedrock depth of 541 m, which may be too small by as much as 35 per cent. We suggest that the discrepancy is due to lateral changes in ice sheet depth and bed properties beneath the network, which may cause unaccounted mixing of surface wave modes in the dispersion curve. The Swiss Alpine icequake records, on the other hand, allow for reconstruction of the impulse response between two seismometers. The direct and scattered wave fields from the vast numbers of icequake records (tens of thousands per month) can be used to measure small changes in englacial velocities and thus monitor structural changes within the ice.

  11. 2D and 3D seismic measurements to evaluate the collapse risk of an important prehistoric cave in soft carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara

    2015-02-01

    The southern part of the Apulia region (the Salento peninsula) has been the site of at least fifteen collapse events due to sinkholes in the last twenty years. The majority of these occurred in "soft" carbonate rocks (calcarenites). Man-made and/or natural cavities are sometimes assets of historical and archaeological significance. This paper provides a methodology for the evaluation of sinkhole hazard in "soft" carbonate rocks, combining seismic and mine engineering methods.Acase study of a natural cavity which is called Grotta delle Veneri is illustrated. For this example the approach was: i) 2D and 3D seismic methods to study the physical-mechanical characteristics of the rock mass that constitutes the roof of the cave; and ii) scaled span empirical analysis in order to evaluate the instability of the crown pillar's caves.

  12. Italy - Adriatic Sea - Barbara - A giant gas field marked by seismic velocity anomaly - A subtle trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ianniello, A.; Bolelli, W.; Di Scala, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Barbara gas field, discovered in 1971, is located in the northern sector of the Adriatic offshore. The field is a gentle anticline involving Quaternary clastic sediments and shaped by carbonate Mesozoic morphology. The presence of shallow gas pockets at the crest of the structure distort the seismic signal to such an extent that structural reconstruction using seismic data is not possible. Moreover, time delays and ray-path anomalies do not allow the use of staking velocities for the depth conversion. Seismic attribute analysis, instead of velocities, and time delays on the isochrone maps are providing a key to the understanding of seismic anomalies and are an indirect tool for reconstructing the real structural configuration of the field. The appraisal story of the field illustrates how the previously mentioned complications influenced its delineation and how an understanding of these complications helped in upgrading the reserves from an initial value of 10 billion ECM of gas to 40 billion ECM. Additional data acquired with the development wells tend to increase the estimate. Therefore, Barbara field is the most important Italian gas field of the decade. The producing formation is composed of very thin-bedded sandstone and shale intercalations, representing the peculiarity of this reservoir. Development of the field is being achieved with six production platforms and 72 wells.

  13. Methods to improve computer-assisted seismic interpretation using seismic attributes: Multiattribute display, spectral data reduction, and attributes to quantify structural deformation and velocity anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao

    Computer-assisted seismic interpretation gained widespread acceptance in the mid 1980s that no 3D survey and few 2D surveys are interpreted without the aid of an interpretation workstation. Geoscientists routinely quantify features of geologic interest and enhance their interpretation through the use of seismic attributes. Typically these attributes are examined sequentially, or within different interpretation windows. In this dissertation, I present two novel means of presenting the information content of multiple attributes by a single image. In the first approach, I show how two, three, or four attributes can be displayed by an appropriate use of color. I use a colorstack model of Red, Green, and Blue (RGB) to map attributes of similar type such as volumes of near-, mid-, and far-angle amplitude or low-, moderate-, high-frequency spectral components. I use an HLS model to display a theme attribute modulated by another secondary attribute, such as dip magnitude modulating dip azimuth, or amplitude of the peak spectral frequency modulating the phase measured at the peak frequency. Transparency/opacity provides a 4th color dimension and provides additional attribute modulation capabilities. In the second approach I use principal component analysis to reduce the multiplicity of redundant data into a smaller, more manageable number of components. The importance of each principal component is proportional to its corresponding eigenvalue. By mapping the three largest principal components against red, green, and blue, we can represent more than 80% of the original information with a single colored image. I then use these tools to help quantify and correlate structural deformation with velocity anisotropy. I develop an innovative algorithm that automatically counts the azimuth distribution of the fast P-wave velocity (or alternatively, the strike of the structural lineaments) weighted by the amount of anisotropy (or the intensity of the lineaments) at any point in the

  14. Seismic velocity structure of the subducting Pacific plate in the Izu-Bonin region

    SciTech Connect

    Iidaka, Takashi; Mizoue, Megumi; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi )

    1992-10-01

    Observed travel time residual data from a spatially dense seismic network above deep earthquakes in the Izu-Bonin region are compared with 3D ray tracing calculations. The data are inconsistent with a homogeneous slab model and consistent with a heterogenous slab model with regional velocity variations. The residual data can be explained by a model that has a velocity gradient within the slab. In the subducting Pacific plate, the velocity near the center of the slab is faster than that near the upper boundary, and gradually decreases toward the bottom of the plate. A model with a velocity decrease of 3 percent, as predicted by a thermal profile, explains the observed data. 52 refs.

  15. Low-velocity zone atop the 410-km seismic discontinuity in the northwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Helmberger, Don V; Grand, Stephen P

    2004-02-01

    The seismic discontinuity at 410 km depth in the Earth's mantle is generally attributed to the phase transition of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 (refs 1, 2) from the olivine to wadsleyite structure. Variation in the depth of this discontinuity is often taken as a proxy for mantle temperature owing to its response to thermal perturbations. For example, a cold anomaly would elevate the 410-km discontinuity, because of its positive Clapeyron slope, whereas a warm anomaly would depress the discontinuity. But trade-offs between seismic wave-speed heterogeneity and discontinuity topography often inhibit detailed analysis of these discontinuities, and structure often appears very complicated. Here we simultaneously model seismic refracted waves and scattered waves from the 410-km discontinuity in the western United States to constrain structure in the region. We find a low-velocity zone, with a shear-wave velocity drop of 5%, on top of the 410-km discontinuity beneath the northwestern United States, extending from southwestern Oregon to the northern Basin and Range province. This low-velocity zone has a thickness that varies from 20 to 90 km with rapid lateral variations. Its spatial extent coincides with both an anomalous composition of overlying volcanism and seismic 'receiver-function' observations observed above the region. We interpret the low-velocity zone as a compositional anomaly, possibly due to a dense partial-melt layer, which may be linked to prior subduction of the Farallon plate and back-arc extension. The existence of such a layer could be indicative of high water content in the Earth's transition zone.

  16. Apparent changes in seismic wave velocity related to microseism noise source variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friderike Volk, Meike; Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; Craig, David

    2014-05-01

    Currently there is a strong interest of using cross correlation of ambient noise for imaging of the subsurface or monitoring of various geological settings where we expect rapid changes (e.g. reservoirs or volcanoes). Through cross correlation retrieved Green's function is usually used to calculate seismic velocities of the subsurface. The assumption of this method is that the wavefields which are correlated must be diffuse. That means that the ambient noise sources are uniformly distributed around the receivers or the scattering in the medium is high enough to mitigate any source directivity. The location of the sources is usually unknown and it can change in time. These temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources may lead to changes in the retrieved Green's functions. The changed Green's functions will then cause apparent changes in the calculated seismic velocity. We track the spatial and temporal distribution of the noise sources using seismic arrays, located in Ireland. It is a good location in which to study these effects, as it is tectonically very quiet and is relatively close to large microseism noise sources in the North Atlantic, allowing a quantification of noise source heterogeneity. Temporal variations in seismic wave velocity are calculated using data recorded in Ireland. The results are compared to the variations in microseism source locations. We also explore the minimum noise trace length required in Ireland for the Green's functions to converge. We quantify the degree to which apparent velocity variations using direct arrivals are caused by changes in the sources and assess if and at what frequencies the scattering of the medium in Ireland is high enough to homogenise the coda wavefield.

  17. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  19. Crustal and uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath northwestern China from seismic ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyi; Li, S.; Song, X. D.; Gong, M.; Li, X.; Jia, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct ambient noise seismic tomography of northwestern China and adjacent regions. The data include 9 months (2009 January to 2009 September) three-component continuous data recorded at 146 seismic stations of newly upgraded China Provincial Digital Seismic Networks and regional Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan networks. Empirical Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions are obtained from interstation cross-correlations. Group velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves between 7 and 50 s periods were measured for each interstation path by applying the multiple-filter analysis method with phase-matched processing. The group velocity maps show clear lateral variations which correlate well with major geological structures and tectonic units in the study region. Shear wave velocity structures are inverted from Rayleigh wave and love wave dispersion maps. The results show that the Tibetan Plateau has a very thick crust with a low-velocity zone in its mid-lower crust. Along the northern margin of the plateau where a steep topographic gradient is present, the low-velocity zone does not extend to the Tarim basin which may indicate that crustal materials beneath the Tarim basin are colder and stronger than beneath the plateau, therefore inhibit the extension of mid-lower crustal flow and deformation of the Tibetan Plateau, resulting in very sharp topography contrasts. In the northeastern margin with a gentle topographic gradient toward the Ordos platform, the low-velocity zone diminishes around the eastern KunLun fault. Meanwhile, our results reveal obvious lateral velocity changes in the crust beneath the Tarim basin. In the upper crust, the Manjaer depression in the eastern Tarim basin is featured with very low velocities and the Bachu uplift in the western Tarim basin with high velocities; in the mid-lower crust, the northern Tarim basin in general displays lower velocities than the southern part along latitude ˜40° N with an east

  20. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  1. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  2. Seismic images of the upper mantle velocities and structure of European mantle lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomerova, Jaroslava; Munzarova, Helena; Vecsey, Ludek; Babuska, Vladislav

    2014-05-01

    Tomography images of seismic velocities in the Earth mantle represent significant tool for recovering first order structural features. Regional studies, based on dense networks of temporary stations allow us to focus on structure of the continental upper mantle and to study variations of body-wave velocities in greater detail. However, the standard tomography exhibits only isotropic view of the Earth, whose structure is anisotropic in general, as shown by results of various studies exploiting a broad range of methods, types of waves and scales. We present results of our studies of seismic anisotropy in tectonically different provinces that clearly demonstrate the continental mantle lithosphere consists of domains with different fossil fabrics. We detect anisotropic signal both in teleseismic P-wave travel-time deviations and shear-wave splitting and show changes of the anisotropic parameters across seismic arrays, in which stations with similar characteristics form groups. The geographical variations of seismic-wave anisotropy delimit individual, often sharply bounded domains of the mantle lithosphere, each of them having a consistent fabric. The domains can be modelled in 3D by peridotite aggregates with dipping lineation a or foliation (a,c). These findings allow us to interpret the domains as micro-plate fragments retaining fossil fabrics in the mantle lithosphere, reflecting thus an olivine LPO created before the micro-plates assembled. Modelling anisotropic structure of individual domains of the continental mantle lithosphere helps to decipher boundaries of individual blocks building the continental lithosphere and hypothesize on processes of its formation (Plomerova and Babuska, Lithos 2010). Exploiting the long memory of the deep continental lithosphere fabric, we present the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as a transition between a fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and an underlying seismic anisotropy related to the present-day flow in

  3. Seismic Velocity structures in Northern Izu-Bonin arc derived from passive OBS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Kamiya, S.; Kodaira, S.; Suetsugu, D.; Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2007-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin Island arc is an oceanic island arc, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Recent active seismic surveys in the Izu-Bonin arc show significant variations in thickness of the middle crust along the volcanic front [Kodaira et al, 2007]. To understand the crustal evolution in the oceanic island arc, we have to clarify structures in the mantle wedge along the arc in addition to the oceanic island arc crust. We conducted seismicity observations to investigate structure variations in northern Izu-Bonin arc using natural earthquakes. A temporal ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) network consists of 40 pop-up type OBSs was deployed in April 2006 between Tori-shima and Hachijo-jima islands. These OBSs were retrieved in July after about 80-day observations. We used continuous seismic data at 36 OBSs and three F-net and Hi-net seismic stations on Hachijo-jima and Aoga-shima islands operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. During the OBS observations, about 1600 earthquakes were located. These earthquakes clearly show double seismic zone along the subducting Pacific plate. We estimated 1D and 3D P- and S-wave seismic velocity structure using arrival time data of these earthquakes. The 1D velocity model shows that a layer with low Poisson's ratio of 0.24 and high Poisson's ratio of 0.28 corresponds to middle and lower crust, respectively. The low Poisson's ratio layer suggests the granitic middle crust with Vp of ~6km/s. The high Poisson's ratio layer agrees with the gabbroic lower crust as suggested by Kodaira et al. [2007]. Three-dimensional Vp and Vs structures were estimated by 3D tomographic inversion method by Kamiyra and Kobayashi [2000] using the 1D model as an initial model. The estimated 3D model shows structure variations along the volcanic front. We will discuss relationships between the seismic velocity variations and the island arc crust structures in northern Izu- Bonin arc.

  4. Correlation between the neighborhood and the velocity of a bead in a 2D non-brownian suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Martin, Jerome; Salin, Dominique

    2000-03-01

    We quantitatively analyze the correlation between the dynamic of one sphere and its neighborhood in a 2D fluidized suspension of macroscopic spheres. It appears that both the radial and the orientational distribution of spheres around a referenced one clearly depend on wether this particle flows upwards or downwards. We then look at the dynamics of groups of spheres, in order to adress the question: can we analyze this dynamics of our monodisperse suspension as resulting from its local polydispersivity due to these groups?

  5. Accurate Measurement of Velocity and Acceleration of Seismic Vibrations near Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Syed Javed; Imdadullah; Asghar, Mohammad Syed Jamil

    In spite of all prerequisite geological study based precautions, the sites of nuclear power plants are also susceptible to seismic vibrations and their consequent effects. The effect of the ongoing nuclear tragedy in Japan caused by an earthquake and its consequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 is currently beyond contemplations. It has led to a rethinking on nuclear power stations by various governments around the world. Therefore, the prediction of location and time of large earthquakes has regained a great importance. The earth crust is made up of several wide, thin and rigid plates like blocks which are in constant motion with respect to each other. A series of vibrations on the earth surface are produced by the generation of elastic seismic waves due to sudden rupture within the plates during the release of accumulated strain energy. The range of frequency of seismic vibrations is from 0 to 10 Hz. However, there appears a large variation in magnitude, velocity and acceleration of these vibrations. The response of existing or conventional methods of measurement of seismic vibrations is very slow, which is of the order of tens of seconds. A systematic and high resolution measurement of velocity and acceleration of these vibrations are useful to interpret the pattern of waves and their anomalies more accurately, which are useful for the prediction of an earthquake. In the proposed work, a fast rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to measure the velocity and acceleration of seismic vibrations in the millisecond range. The broad spectrum of pulses within one second range, measured by proposed method, gives all possible values of instantaneous velocity and instantaneous acceleration of the seismic vibrations. The spectrum of pulses in millisecond range becomes available which is useful to measure the pattern of fore shocks to predict the time and location of large earthquakes more accurately. Moreover, instead of average, the peak values of these quantities are helpful

  6. New insights from velocity field measurements in multiphase flow of water and liquid CO2 in 2D porous micromodels for

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Kyritsis, D. C.; Christensen, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    We study the multiphase flow of water and liquid/supercritical CO2 in 2D porous micromodels, with the goal of developing a more complete understanding of pore-scale flow dynamics for the scenario of geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. Fluorescent microscopy and the microscopic particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique are employed to simultaneously visualize both phases and obtain the velocity field in the aqueous phase. This technique provides a powerful tool for studying such flow systems and the results give valuable insight into flow processes at the pore scale. The fluid-fluid interface curvature from the images can be used to estimate the local capillary pressure. The velocity measurements illustrate active and passive flow pathways and circulation regions near the fluid-fluid interfaces induced by shear. Thin water films observed on the solid surfaces confirm the hydrophilic nature of the micromodels. The velocity of the said films is measured by particle tracking.

  7. Seismic Noise Analysis to Constrain Shallow Velocity Structure in the southern San Andreas Fault Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Stephanie D.

    The seismic velocity structure in the southern San Andreas Fault region is characterized by a known, distinct seismic velocity contrast on opposite sides of the fault, with a thick sedimentary region on the west side (Salton Sea area). Reverberations would affect the duration of shaking for El Centro, Mexicali, and other communities in the Coachella Valley and Imperial Valley. Furthermore, there are other areas where deep basins are bounded by faults that could have similar effects. Therefore, being able to determine the 3D structure is a critical facet of assessing the overall seismic hazard for structures on such basins. By utilizing the particle motion of surface waves, we are able extract useful information about the S-wave velocity structure. To accomplish this, we measured Rayleigh-wave ellipticity of continuous broadband data from 2010 to 2014 for 67 stations within the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). Measurements of Rayleigh-wave ellipticity were computed as the ratio between the vertical and horizontal amplitudes. Regional variations in the Rayleigh-wave ellipticity measurements at frequencies of 0.10 Hz up to and including 0.30 Hz illuminate small ellipticity values (i.e. horizontal elongation in Rayleigh-wave particle motion) across the entire frequency band in the regions specific to the thick sedimentary region. In this region, minimum ellipticity values (<0.20) observed at 0.10 Hz, 0.15 Hz, and at 0.20 Hz show a gradual increase up to 0.60 between 0.25 Hz to 0.40 Hz. In most areas exterior to the thick sedimentary region, ellipticity values are generally constant across the frequency band and are significantly higher (>0.90). The observed, small ellipticity values, which are characteristic of a slow velocity layer at shallow depths (upper 5-10 km), could have significant implications on the S-wave velocity structure. As the ZH-Ratio method is highly sensitive to the near-surface structure, combination of the ellipticity data with phase

  8. Seismic velocity structure in the western part of Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Nakanishi, A.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough, three major seismogenic zones of megathrust earthquake exist (Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquake regions). The Hyuga-nada region was distinguished from these seismogenic zones because of the lack of megathrust earthquake. However, recent studies show the possibility of simultaneous rupture of the Nankai and Hyuga-nada segments was also pointed out [e.g., Furumura et al, 2010 JGR]. Because seismic velocity structure is one of the useful and basic information for understanding the possibility of seismic linkage of Nankai and Hyuga-nada segments, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology has been carried out a series of wide-angle active source surveys and local seismic observations among the three major seismogenic zones and Hyuga-nada segment from 2008, as a part of "Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes' funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan". We are performing two set of three-dimensional seismic velocity tomographic inversions, one is in the Hyuga-nada region and the other is western part of the coseismic rupture area of 1946 Nankai earthquake, to discuss the relationship between the structural heterogeneities and the location of segment boundary between Hyuga-nada and Nankai segment. For the analysis of Hyuga-nada segment, we used both active and passive source data. The obtained velocity model clearly showed the subducted Kyushu-Palau ridge as thick low velocity Philippine Sea slab in the southwestern part. Our velocity image also indicates that "the thin oceanic crust zone" located between Nankai segment and Kyushu-Palau Ridge segment, founded by Nakanishi et al [2010, AGU] by analyzing of the active source survey, continuously exists from trough axis to near the coastline of Kyushu Island. The overriding plate just above the coseismic slip area of 1968 Hyuga-nada earthquake shows relatively high velocity. Although the tomographic study in

  9. Variations of seismic velocities in the Kachchh rift zone, Gujarat, India, during 2001-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2016-03-01

    We herein study variations of seismic velocities in the main rupture zone (MRZ) of the Mw 7.7 2001 Bhuj earthquake for the time periods [2001-05, 2006-08, 2009-10 and 2011-13], by constructing dVp(%), dVs(%) and d(Vp/Vs)(%) tomograms using high-quality arrival times of 28,902 P- and 28,696 S-waves from 4644 precise JHD (joint hypocentral determination) relocations of local events. Differential tomograms for 2001-05 reveal a marked decrease in seismic velocities (low dVp, low dVs and high d(Vp/Vs)) in the MRZ (at 5-35 km depths) during 2001-10, which is attributed to an increase in crack/fracture density (higher pore fluid pressure) resulted from the intense fracturing that occurred during the mainshock and post-seismic periods. While we observe a slight recovery or increase in seismic velocities 2011-13, this could be related to the healing process (lower pore fluid pressure due to sealing of cracks) of the causative fault zone of the 2001 Bhuj mainshock. The temporal reduction in seismic velocities is observed to be higher at deeper levels (more fluid enrichment under near-lithostatic pressure) than that at shallower levels. Fluid source for low velocity zone (LVZ) at 0-10 km depths (with high d(Vp/Vs)) could be attributed to the presence of meteoric water or soft alluvium sediments with higher water content, while fluid source for LVZ at 10-35 km depths could be due to the presence of brine fluids (released from the metamorphic dewatering) and volatile CO2 (emanating from the crystallization of carbonatite melts in the asthenosphere), in fractures and pores. We also imaged two prominent LVZs associated with the Katrol Hill fault zone and Island Belt fault zone, extending from shallow upper-crust to sub-crustal depth, which might be facilitating the deeper circulation of metamorphic fluids/volatile CO2, thereby, the generation of lower crustal earthquakes occurring in the Kachchh rift zone.

  10. Seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocation for the magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2015-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) seismic velocity model and high-precision location catalog for earthquakes between 1984 and 2014 are presented for Long Valley Caldera and its adjacent fault zones in eastern California. The simul2000 tomography algorithm is applied to derive the 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs models using first-arrivals of 1004 composite earthquakes obtained from the original seismic data at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting Vp model reflects geological structures and agrees with previous local tomographic studies. The simultaneously resolved Vp/Vs model is a major contribution of this study providing an important complement to the Vp model for the interpretation of structural heterogeneities and physical properties in the study area. The caldera is dominated by low Vp anomalies at shallow depths due to postcaldera fill. High Vp and low Vp/Vs values are resolved from the surface to ~ 3.4 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, corresponding to the structural uplift of the Resurgent Dome. An aseismic body with low Vp and high Vp/Vs anomalies at 4.2-6.2 km depth below the surface is consistent with the location of partial melt suggested by previous studies based on Vp models only and the inflation source locations based on geodetic modeling. The Sierran crystalline rocks outside the caldera are generally characterized with high Vp and low Vp/Vs values. The newly resolved velocity model improves absolute location accuracy for the seismicity in the study area and ultimately provides the basis for a high-precision earthquake catalog based on similar-event cluster analysis and waveform cross-correlation data. The fine-scale velocity structure and precise earthquake relocations are useful for investigating magma sources, seismicity and stress interaction and other seismological studies in Long Valley.

  11. Seismic Velocities Contain Information About Depth, Lithology, Fluid Content, and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P

    2002-01-03

    Recent advances in field and laboratory methods for measuring elastic wave velocities provide incentive and opportunity for improving interpretation of geophysical data for engineering and environmental applications. Advancing the state-of-the-art of seismic imaging requires developing petrophysical relationships between measured velocities and the hydrogeology parameters and lithology. Our approach uses laboratory data and rock physics methods. Compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, Vp/Vs ratios, and relative wave amplitudes show systematic changes related to composition, saturation, applied stress (analogous to depth), and distribution of clay for laboratory ultrasonic measurements on soils. The artificial soils were mixtures of Ottawa sand and a second phase, either Wyoming bentonite or peat moss used to represent clay or organic components found in natural soils. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured for dry, saturated, and partially-saturated conditions, for applied stresses between about 7 and 100 kPa, representing approximately the top 5 m of the subsurface. Analysis of the results using rock physics methods shows the link between microstructure and wave propagation, and implications for future advances in seismic data interpretation. For example, we found that Vp in dry sand-clay mixtures initially increases as clay cements the sand grains and fills porosity, but then Vp decreases when the clay content is high enough that the clay matrix controls the elastic response of the material. Vs decreases monotonically with increasing clay content. This provides a method for using Vp/Vs ratios to estimate clay content in a dry soil.

  12. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  13. S-wave velocity measurements applied to the seismic microzonation of Basel, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fäh, Donat; Polom, Ulrich; Roullé, Agathe

    2007-07-01

    An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better constrain the seismic amplification potential of the surface layers. The survey included single station (H/V spectral ratios) and ambient vibration array measurements carried out by the Swiss team, as well as active S-wave velocity measurements performed by the German and French partners. This paper is focused on the application of the array technique, which consists in recording ambient vibrations with a number of seismological stations. Several practical aspects related to the field measurements are outlined. The signal processing aims to determine the dispersion curves of surface waves contained in the ambient vibrations. The inversion of the dispersion curve provides a 1-D S-wave velocity model for the investigated site down to a depth related to the size of the array. Since the size of arrays is theoretically not limited, arrays are known to be well adapted for investigations in deep sediment basins, such as the Upper Rhine Graben including the area of the city of Basel. In this region, 27 array measurements with varying station configurations have been carried out to determine the S-wave velocity properties of the geological layers down to a depth of 100-250 m. For eight sites, the outputs of the array measurements have been compared with the results of the other investigations using active sources, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) and S-wave reflection seismics. Borehole information available for a few sites could be used to calibrate the geophysical measurements. By this comparison, the advantages and disadvantages of the array method and the other techniques are outlined with regard to the effectiveness of the methods and the required investigation depth. The dispersion curves measured with the arrays and the SASW technique were also combined

  14. Formation of damage zone and seismic velocity variations during hydraulic stimulation: numerical modelling and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Calò, Marco; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    During hydraulic stimulations, a complex interaction is observed between the injected flux and pressure, number and magnitude of induced seismic events, and changes in seismic velocities. In this paper, we model formation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns induced by wellbore fluid injection. The model includes the coupling of poroelastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters of crystalline rocks. Results show that three subsequent interactions occur during stimulation. (1) Injected flux-pressure interaction: typically, after a flux increase, the wellbore pressure also rises to satisfy the flux conditions. Thereafter, the elevated pore pressure triggers damage accumulation and seismic activity, that is, accompanied by permeability increase. As a result, wellbore pressure decreases retaining the target injected flux. (2) Wellbore pressure-seismicity interaction: damage processes create an elongated damage zone in the direction close to the main principal stress. The rocks within the damage zone go through partial healing and remain in a medium damage state. Damage that originates around the injection well propagates within the damage zone away from the well, raising the damage state of the already damaged rocks, and is followed by compaction and fast partial healing back to a medium damage state. This `damage wave' behaviour is associated with the injected flux changes only in early stages while fracture's height (h) is larger than its length (l). The ratio h/l controls the deformation process that is responsible for several key features of the damage zone. (3) Stress- and damage-induced variations of the seismic P-wave velocities (Vp). Vp gradually decreases as damage is accumulated and increases after rock failure as the shear stress is released and healing and compaction are dominant. Typically, Vp decreases within the damage zone and increases in

  15. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  16. Characterising volcanic activity of Piton de la Fournaise volcano by the spatial distribution of seismic velocity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schoenfelder, C.; Pomponi, E.

    2013-12-01

    We apply Passive Image Interferometry to investigate the seismic noise recorded from October 2009 until December 2011 by 21 stations of the IPGP/OVPF seismic network installed on Piton de la Fournaise volcano within the UnderVolc project. The analyzed period contains three eruptions in 2009 and January 2010, two eruptions plus one dyke intrusion in late 2010, and a seismic crises in 2011. Seismic noise of vertical and horizontal components is cross-correlated to measure velocity changes as apparent stretching of the coda. For some station pairs the apparent velocity changes exceed 1% and a decorrelation of waveforms is observed at the time of volcanic activity. This distorts monitoring results if changes are measured with respect to a global reference. To overcome this we present a method to estimate changes using multiple references that stabilizes the quality of estimated velocity changes. We observe abrupt changes that occur coincident with volcanic events as well as long term transient signals. Using a simple assumption about the spatial sensitivity of our measurements we can map the spatial distribution of velocity changes for selected periods. Comparing these signals with volcanic activity and GPS derived surface deformation we can identify patterns of the velocity changes that appear characteristic for the type of volcanic activity. We can differentiate intrusive processes associated with inflation and increased seismic activity, periods of relaxation without seismicity and eruptions solely based on the velocity signal. This information can help to assess the processes acting in the volcano.

  17. Transformation of seismic velocity data to extract porosity and saturation values for rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.; Berge, Patricia A.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2000-06-01

    For wave propagation at low frequencies in a porous medium, the Gassmann-Domenico relations are well-established for homogeneous partial saturation by a liquid. They provide the correct relations for seismic velocities in terms of constituent bulk and shear moduli, solid and fluid densities, porosity and saturation. It has not been possible, however, to invert these relations easily to determine porosity and saturation when the seismic velocities are known. Also, the state (or distribution) of saturation, i.e., whether or not liquid and gas are homogeneously mixed in the pore space, is another important variable for reservoir evaluation. A reliable ability to determine the state of saturation from velocity data continues to be problematic. It is shown how transforming compressional and shear wave velocity data to the ({rho}/{lambda},{mu}/{lambda})-plane (where {lambda} and {mu} are the Lame parameters and {rho} is the total density) results in a set of quasi-orthogonal coordinates for porosity and liquid saturation that greatly aids in the interpretation of seismic data for the physical parameters of most interest. A second transformation of the same data then permits isolation of the liquid saturation value, and also provides some direct information about the state of saturation. By thus replotting the data in the ({lambda}/{mu}, {rho}/{mu})-plane, inferences can be made concerning the degree of patchy (inhomogeneous) versus homogeneous saturation that is present in the region of the medium sampled by the data. Our examples include igneous and sedimentary rocks, as well as man-made porous materials. These results have potential applications in various areas of interest, including petroleum exploration and reservoir characterization, geothermal resource evaluation, environmental restoration monitoring, and geotechnical site characterization. (c) 2000 Acoustical Society of America.

  18. Transformation of seismic velocity data to extract porosity and saturation values for rocks

    PubMed

    Berryman; Berge; Bonner

    2000-06-01

    For wave propagation at low frequencies in a porous medium, the Gassmann-Domenico relations are well-established for homogeneous partial saturation by a liquid. They provide the correct relations for seismic velocities in terms of constituent bulk and shear moduli, solid and fluid densities, porosity and saturation. It has not been possible, however, to invert these relations easily to determine porosity and saturation when the seismic velocities are known. Also, the state (or distribution) of saturation, i.e., whether or not liquid and gas are homogeneously mixed in the pore space, is another important variable for reservoir evaluation. A reliable ability to determine the state of saturation from velocity data continues to be problematic. It is shown how transforming compressional and shear wave velocity data to the (rho/lambda, mu/lambda)-plane (where lambda and mu are the Lame parameters and rho is the total density) results in a set of quasi-orthogonal coordinates for porosity and liquid saturation that greatly aids in the interpretation of seismic data for the physical parameters of most interest. A second transformation of the same data then permits isolation of the liquid saturation value, and also provides some direct information about the state of saturation. By thus replotting the data in the (lambda/mu, rho/mu)-plane, inferences can be made concerning the degree of patchy (inhomogeneous) versus homogeneous saturation that is present in the region of the medium sampled by the data. Our examples include igneous and sedimentary rocks, as well as man-made porous materials. These results have potential applications in various areas of interest, including petroleum exploration and reservoir characterization, geothermal resource evaluation, environmental restoration monitoring, and geotechnical site characterization.

  19. Regional velocity structure in northern California from inversion of scattered seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.

    1999-07-01

    Seismic surface waves recorded by the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network have been analyzed in order to constrain three-dimensional lateral heterogeneity of the upper mantle under northern California. A total of 2164 seismograms from 173 teleseismic events were windowed for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave, followed by estimation of complex amplitude spectra over the period range 16 to 100 s using a multiple-taper method. Since Rayleigh waves at shorter periods, particularly below 35 s, suffer from serious multipathing or "non-plane" wave arrivals, these amplitude spectra have been interpreted as the product of wavefront distortion along the teleseismic propagation path and seismic structure beneath the network. The amplitude spectra are first modeled in terms of non-plane incoming wavefields and structural phase velocity perturbations period by period. After corrections for Moho and surface topography, the phase velocity maps are inverted for three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations δνs down to a depth of 200 km. The δνs maps are in good agreement with the results of body studies over a broad spatial scale. The dominant signals are associated with the thermal effects of the active Gorda and fossil Farallon subducted slab stretching from Mount Shasta through the western Sierran foothills to the southern Great Valley and asthenospheric upwelling beneath the northern Coast Ranges. The southern Sierra Nevada Range is characterized by fast δνs down to ˜50 km and slow velocities between ˜60 and 120 km depth, in agreement with independent inferences of a cold crust and warm upper mantle, which may provide the buoyancy forces necessary to support the elevation of the range.

  20. Seismic velocity variations under island arcs: Examples from the Philippines and Montserrat (Lesser antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Winchelle Ian

    Island arcs are geologically active and important structures. From a short-term perspective, they are a major source of seismic and volcanic hazards. From a longer-term perspective, arc processes are most likely a key component in the production of continental lithosphere. They are also the focus of numerous Geoscience investigations. In this thesis I investigate the seismic structure of island arcs at a regional (hundreds of kilometer) and a local (10's of km) scale. My goal in this work is to contribute to our efforts to understand the origin and evolution of these geologically important structures. I focus seismic imaging methods on two regions, the Philippine Island region and the northern Lesser Antilles island of Montserrat. The Philippine Island Arc (PIA) is commonly regarded as a complex structure in which subduction zones border its sides and the intra-arc, sinistral Philippine Fault System transects throughout its length. The arc is seismically active and volcanic activity spans almost the entire arc. While several studies provide a wealth of information on the tectonic and the geodynamic settings of PIA, few have looked carefully into the subsurface because they were limited by the availability of digital seismic data. For this reason, important data gaps exist, in particular the details of the subsurface seismic velocity structure. The recent deployments of relatively dense digital seismic stations offer an opportunity to conduct a detailed study on the arc's velocity structure. Data from this new seismic network are used to determine the three-dimensional (3--D) velocity structure of the PIA by applying the P--wave travel time tomography. A broad distribution of source depths and the arc-wide distribution of seismic stations allow tomographic imaging of structures down to 450 km depth with spatial resolution of about ˜50 km resolution. The prominent features of the tomographic images include the low velocity zones correlating with the overlying

  1. Shear-wave velocity-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.; Moss, R.E.S.; Thompson, E.M.; Seed, R.B.; Cetin, K.O.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) offers a means to determine the seismic resistance of soil to liquefaction by a fundamental soil property. This paper presents the results of an 11-year international project to gather new Vs site data and develop probabilistic correlations for seismic soil liquefaction occurrence. Toward that objective, shear-wave velocity test sites were identified, and measurements made for 301 new liquefaction field case histories in China, Japan, Taiwan, Greece, and the United States over a decade. The majority of these new case histories reoccupy those previously investigated by penetration testing. These new data are combined with previously published case histories to build a global catalog of 422 case histories of Vs liquefaction performance. Bayesian regression and structural reliability methods facilitate a probabilistic treatment of the Vs catalog for performance-based engineering applications. Where possible, uncertainties of the variables comprising both the seismic demand and the soil capacity were estimated and included in the analysis, resulting in greatly reduced overall model uncertainty relative to previous studies. The presented data set and probabilistic analysis also help resolve the ancillary issues of adjustment for soil fines content and magnitude scaling factors.

  2. High resolution applications of seismic tomography: low velocity anomalies and static corrections using wave-equation datuming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flecha, I.; Marti, D.; Escuder, J.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2003-04-01

    A detailed characterization of the internal structure and physical properties of shallow surface can be obtained using high-resolution seismic tomography. Two applications of high resolution seismic tomography are presented in this study. Several synthetics simulations have been carried out to asses the resolving power of this methodology in different cases. The first studied case is the detection of low velocity anomalies in the shallow subsoil. Underground cavities (mines), water flows (formation wich loose sand), etc., are geological features present in the shallow subsurface characterized by low seismic velocities, and are targets of considerable social interest. We have considered a 400m×50m two dimensional velocity model consisting of a background velocity gradient in depth from 3 to 4 Km/s which included a rectangular low velocity anomaly (300 m/s). This anomaly was placed between 10m and 30m in depth and between 180m and 220m in length. The inversions schemes provided estimates of the velocity, however the tomograms and the ray tracing diagrams indicated a low resolution for the anomaly. In the second case we have applied wave-equation datuming to pre-stack layer replacement. The standard seismic data processing applies a vertical time shift to the data traces. However, it is not a good option when we are dealing with rugged topography or bathymetry, and when the media presents a high heterogeneity. Wave-equation datuming extrapolates seismic time data to some level datum keeping consistency between raypaths and wavefield propagation. It improves considerably seismic reflectors imaging. In order to implement this technique a velocity model is required, and usually a constant velocity is used to propagate the wavefield; instead of it we have used seismic tomography to provide an accurate velocity model.

  3. Temporal Variability in Seismic Velocity at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Nayak, A.; Brenguier, F.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the temporal variability of ambient noise wavefield and search for velocity changes associated with activities of the geothermal energy development at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The noise cross-correlations (NCFs) are computed for ~6 years of continuous three-component seismic data (December 2007 through January 2014) collected at 8 sites from the CalEnergy Subnetwork (EN network) with MSNoise software (Lecocq et al., 2014, SRL). All seismic data are downloaded from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. Velocity changes (dv/v) are obtained by measuring time delay between 5-day stacks of NCFs and the reference NCF (average over the entire 6 year period). The time history of dv/v is determined by averaging dv/v measurements over all station/channel pairs (252 combinations). Our preliminary dv/v measurement suggests a gradual increase in dv/v over the 6-year period in a frequency range of 0.5-8.0 Hz. The resultant increase rate of velocity is about 0.01%/year. We also explore the frequency-dependent velocity change at the 5 different frequency bands (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.75-3.0 Hz, 1.0-4.0 Hz, 1.5-6.0 Hz, and 2.0-8.0 Hz) and find that the level of this long-term dv/v variability is increased with increase of frequency (i.e., the highest increase rate of ~0.15%/year at the 0.5-2.0 Hz band). This result suggests that the velocity changes were mostly occurred in a depth of ~500 m assuming that the coda parts of NCFs (~10-40 s depending on station distances) are predominantly composed of scattered surface waves, with the SoCal velocity model (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993, JGR). No clear seasonal variation of dv/v is observed in the frequency band of 0.5-8.0 Hz.

  4. Well log and 2D seismic data character of the Wilcox Group in south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilcox Group is productive in updip areas of Texas and Louisiana from fluvial, deltaic, and near-shore marine shelf sandstones. The reported presence of porous sandstones at 29,000 feet within the Wilcox Group containing about 200 feet of gas in the Davy Jones 1 discovery well in the offshore Louisiana South Marsh Island area illustrates a sand-rich system developed during the Paleocene and early Eocene. This study describes some of the well log and reflection seismic data characteristics of the slope and basin-floor reservoirs with gas-discovery potential that may be in the area between the producing trend onshore Louisiana and the offshore discovery.

  5. Lunar Seismic Velocity and Crustal Thickness Inversions Using Constraints from Apollo and GRAIL Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette-Guertin, J. F.; Drilleau, M.; Kawamura, T.; Lognonne, P. H.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from new Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversions of (i) 1-D lunar crustal and upper mantle velocity models and (ii) 3-D lateral crustal thickness models anchored by crustal thicknesses under the Apollo stations and the artificial and natural impact sites. These new generation models are constrained by both the Apollo impact event seismic data arrival times and by the more recent GRAIL gravimetric data. In all models, 1-D seismic velocities are parameterized using C1 Bézier polynomials, using two independent sets to represent the crust and the underlying mantle. Other parameters of the inversions include the depth and velocity amplitude of the Bézier control points, the depth of the crust-mantle discontinuity, the thickness of the crust under each Apollo station and impact epicenter, the vp/vs ratio, as well as location-specific time delays. Inverting for station-specific crustal thicknesses and velocity delays highlights geology-related differences between stations (e.g. contrasts in megaregolith thickness, in shallow subsurface composition and structure). These differences have already been observed by other analytical methods in the past, as detailed in the literature. We also test the possibility of having a dual-layered crust. However, some of the finer structural elements might be difficult to observe with the available data and might fall within the inherent uncertainty of the dataset. We use the more precise LROC-located epicentral locations for the lunar modules and Saturn-IV booster artificial impacts, reducing that way some of the uncertainty observed in past models. Natural impact epicentral locations are relocated during the inversions. Constraints from deep and shallow moonquakes will be included in future inversions to potentially refine the velocity and crustal models. This work falls within the NASA InSight mission to Mars seismic investigation (SEIS). Accordingly, the method and analytical software developed for this study will be

  6. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  7. Field observations of seismic velocity changes caused by shaking-induced damage and healing due to mesoscopic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, M.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Eulenfeld, T.; Bartsch, M.; Victor, P.; Tilmann, F.; Korn, M.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate temporal seismic velocity changes due to earthquake related processes and environmental forcing in Northern Chile, we analyse 8 yr of ambient seismic noise recorded by the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC). By autocorrelating the ambient seismic noise field measured on the vertical components, approximations of the Green's functions are retrieved and velocity changes are measured with Coda Wave Interferometry. At station PATCX, we observe seasonal changes in seismic velocity caused by thermal stress as well as transient velocity reductions in the frequency range of 4-6 Hz. Sudden velocity drops occur at the time of mostly earthquake-induced ground shaking and recover over a variable period of time. We present an empirical model that describes the seismic velocity variations based on continuous observations of the local ground acceleration. The model assumes that not only the shaking of large earthquakes causes velocity drops, but any small vibrations continuously induce minor velocity variations that are immediately compensated by healing in the steady state. We show that the shaking effect is accumulated over time and best described by the integrated envelope of the ground acceleration over the discretization interval of the velocity measurements, which is one day. In our model, the amplitude of the velocity reduction as well as the recovery time are proportional to the size of the excitation. This model with two free scaling parameters fits the data of the shaking induced velocity variation in remarkable detail. Additionally, a linear trend is observed that might be related to a recovery process from one or more earthquakes before our measurement period. A clear relationship between ground shaking and induced velocity reductions is not visible at other stations. We attribute the outstanding sensitivity of PATCX to ground shaking and thermal stress to the special geological setting of the station, where the subsurface material

  8. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocations at Katmai, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Rachel; Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie; Bennington, Ninfa

    2014-04-01

    We invert arrival time data from local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and May 2009 to determine the three-dimensional (3D) upper crustal seismic structure in the Katmai volcanic region. Waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory's permanent network of 20 seismic stations in the area (predominantly single-component, short period instruments) plus a densely spaced temporary array of 11 broadband, 3-component stations. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for 3D P- and S-wave velocity models for an area encompassing the main volcanic centers. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident-Novarupta, and Mount Katmai. The seismic activity extends from about sea level to 2 km depth (all depths referenced to mean sea level) beneath Martin, is concentrated near 2 km depth beneath Mageik, and lies mainly between 2 and 4 km depth below Katmai and Trident-Novarupta. Many new features are apparent within these earthquake clusters. In particular, linear features are visible within all clusters, some associated with swarm activity, including an observation of earthquake migration near Trident in 2008. The final velocity model reveals a possible zone of magma storage beneath Mageik, but there is no clear evidence for magma beneath the Katmai-Novarupta area where the 1912 eruptive activity occurred, suggesting that the storage zone for that eruption may have largely been evacuated, or remnant magma has solidified.

  9. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocations at Katmai, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Rachel; Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Bennington, Ninfa

    2014-01-01

    We invert arrival time data from local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and May 2009 to determine the three-dimensional (3D) upper crustal seismic structure in the Katmai volcanic region. Waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory's permanent network of 20 seismic stations in the area (predominantly single-component, short period instruments) plus a densely spaced temporary array of 11 broadband, 3-component stations. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for 3D P- and S-wave velocity models for an area encompassing the main volcanic centers. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident-Novarupta, and Mount Katmai. The seismic activity extends from about sea level to 2 km depth (all depths referenced to mean sea level) beneath Martin, is concentrated near 2 km depth beneath Mageik, and lies mainly between 2 and 4 km depth below Katmai and Trident-Novarupta. Many new features are apparent within these earthquake clusters. In particular, linear features are visible within all clusters, some associated with swarm activity, including an observation of earthquake migration near Trident in 2008. The final velocity model reveals a possible zone of magma storage beneath Mageik, but there is no clear evidence for magma beneath the Katmai-Novarupta area where the 1912 eruptive activity occurred, suggesting that the storage zone for that eruption may have largely been evacuated, or remnant magma has solidified.

  10. Complete regional waveform modeling to estimate seismic velocity structure and source parameters for CTBT monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bredbeck, T; Rodgers, A; Walter, W

    1999-07-23

    The velocity structures and source parameters estimated by waveform modeling provide valuable information for CTBT monitoring. The inferred crustal and uppermost mantle structures advance understanding of tectonics and guides regionalization for event location and identification efforts. Estimation of source parameters such as seismic moment, depth and mechanism (whether earthquake, explosion or collapse) is crucial to event identification. In this paper we briefly outline some of the waveform modeling research for CTBT monitoring performed in the last year. In the future we will estimate structure for new regions by modeling waveforms of large well-observed events along additional paths. Of particular interest will be the estimation of velocity structure in aseismic regions such as most of Africa and the Former Soviet Union. Our previous work on aseismic regions in the Middle East, north Africa and south Asia give us confidence to proceed with our current methods. Using the inferred velocity models we plan to estimate source parameters for smaller events. It is especially important to obtain seismic moments of earthquakes for use in applying the Magnitude-Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC; Taylor et al., 1999) to regional body-wave amplitudes for discrimination and calibrating the coda-based magnitude scales.

  11. Three dimensional crust and upper mantle velocity structure of Antarctica from seismic noise correlation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Chaput, J. A.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    The successful deployment and year-around operation of the AGAP/GAMSEIS and POLENET/ANET arrays in Antarctica, which include more than 50 broadband seismic stations, provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the detailed structure beneath the continent. Using about four years of continuous data from these arrays (from late 2007 through end of 2011), together with data from the previous TAMSEIS array and permanent stations around Antarctica, we acquire empirical Green's functions between all possible pairs of seismographs by cross-correlating seismic ambient noise. We then extract Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities from 8 to 60 s, and velocity maps for each period are determined by tomographic inversion. Finally, shear velocities in the crust and upper mantle, together with Moho depths are determined from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves at each location. Our results show the crust and upper mantle structure with higher resolution than obtained in previous studies. The general features are: 1) At shallow depths (several to tens of km), fast velocities are seen beneath the Gamburtsev Mountains (GSM), Transantarctic Mountains (TAM), Marie Byrd Land and Ellsworth Mountains, while slow velocities are seen underneath the West Antarctic rift system (WARS) and Ross Embayment. We interpret this result as indicating thick sedimentary deposits in the WARS and Ross Sea. 2) We also find slow velocities in East Antarctica and fast velocities in West Antarctica at about 20-40 km, which is consistent with the thick/thin crust thickness in these two regions. The transition between the fast and slow velocity is along the Transantarctic Mountains front. 3) Beneath the Gamburtsev Mountains in East Antarctica, low crustal velocities extend to about 55 km, suggesting the mountains are supported by thickened crust. 4) There are pronounced slow upper mantle anomalies within the WARS, indicating a mantle thermal anomaly resulting from Cenozoic extension. 5) Clear fast

  12. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  13. Grain size evolution in the mantle and its effect on geodynamics, seismic velocities and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Eilon, Zach; Gassmoeller, Rene; Moulik, Pritwiraj; Myhill, Robert; Faul, Ulrich; Asimow, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic models of Earth's convecting mantle usually implement flow laws with constant grain size, stress-independent viscosity and a limited treatment of variations associated with changes in mineral assemblage. These simplifications greatly reduce computational requirements but preclude effects such as shear localisation and transient changes in rheology associated with phase transitions, which have the potential to fundamentally change flow patterns in the mantle. Here we use the finite-element code ASPECT (Bangerth et al., 2013) to model grain size evolution and the interplay between grain size, stress and strain rate in the convecting mantle. We include the simultaneous and competing effects of dynamic recrystallisation resulting from work done by dislocation creep, grain growth in multiphase assemblages and recrystallisation at phase transitions. Grain size variations also affect seismic properties of mantle materials. We use several published formulations to relate intrinsic variables (P, T, and grain size) from our numerical models to seismic velocity (Vs) and attenuation (Q). Our calculations use thermodynamically self-consistent anharmonic elastic moduli determined for the mineral assemblages in the mantle using HeFESTo (Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2013). We investigate the effect of realistically heterogeneous grain sizes by computing body wave travel times, ray paths, and attenuation (t*) at different frequencies. We highlight the frequency-dependent sensitivity of seismic waves to grain size, which is important when interpreting Vs and Q observations in terms of mineral assemblage and temperature. Our models show that rapid metamorphic reactions in mantle upwellings and downwellings lead to high lateral viscosity contrasts, as a result of gradual grain size evolution. Positive feedback between grain size reduction and viscosity reduction results in shear localisation. As a result, the edges of thermal plumes have smaller grain sizes and lower

  14. Uppermost Mantle Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy in Southwestern Europe and North Africa by Using PN Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Diaz, J.; Gallart, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present here new images of the seismic velocity and anisotropy variations in the uppermost mantle beneath Southwestern Europe and North Africa, compiled from inversion of Pn phases. The method of Hearn (1996) has been applied to Pn lectures from the catalogs of the International Seismological Center and the Spanish Instituto Geografico Nacional, for the time period 1990-2009. A total of 338,691 Pn arrivals coming from 13,027 earthquakes recorded at 802 stations, with epicentral distances between 220 km and 1400 km have been retained after applying quality criteria (maximum depth, minimum number of recordings, maximum residual values...). Our results, grossly consistent with available 3D tomography images, show significant features well correlated with surface geology: (a) The Pn velocities are higher (>8.2 km/s) beneath major sedimentary basins (western edge of the Alboran Sea, Valencia Through, Guadalquivir, Duero, Aquitaine and Po basins), and lower (<7.8 km/s) in orogenic areas (Betics, Pyrenees, Alps, Apennines chains and Calabrian Arc), confirming the existence of marked variations in crustal thicknesses already documented by active seismic experiments. The lowest velocity values are found under the Betics (<7.5 km/s), while a less pronounced low velocity (7.85 km/s) is observed beneath the Iberian Range, an area where the existence of crustal root is still poorly constrained. (b) Pn anisotropy shows consistent orientations sub-parallel to major orogenic structures, such as Betics, Apennines, Calabrian Arc and Alps. (c) The station delays beneath Betic and Rif ranges are strongly negative, suggesting the presence of crustal thickening all along the Gibraltar Arc System. However, only the Betics have a very strong low-velocity anomaly and a pronounced anisotropy pattern, suggesting that high temperature material may be present there at subcrustal levels.

  15. Development of a State-Wide 3-D Seismic Tomography Velocity Model for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, C. H.; Lin, G.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.; Waldhauser, F.; Hardebeck, J.; Brocher, T.

    2007-12-01

    We report on progress towards the development of a state-wide tomographic model of the P-wave velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle of California. The dataset combines first arrival times from earthquakes and quarry blasts recorded on regional network stations and travel times of first arrivals from explosions and airguns recorded on profile receivers and network stations. The principal active-source datasets are Geysers-San Pablo Bay, Imperial Valley, Livermore, W. Mojave, Gilroy-Coyote Lake, Shasta region, Great Valley, Morro Bay, Mono Craters-Long Valley, PACE, S. Sierras, LARSE 1 and 2, Loma Prieta, BASIX, San Francisco Peninsula and Parkfield. Our beta-version model is coarse (uniform 30 km horizontal and variable vertical gridding) but is able to image the principal features in previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, such as the high-velocity subducting Gorda Plate, upper to middle crustal velocity highs beneath the Sierra Nevada and much of the Coast Ranges, the deep low-velocity basins of the Great Valley, Ventura, and Los Angeles, and a high- velocity body in the lower crust underlying the Great Valley. The new state-wide model has improved areal coverage compared to the previous models, and extends to greater depth due to the data at large epicentral distances. We plan a series of steps to improve the model. We are enlarging and calibrating the active-source dataset as we obtain additional picks from investigators and perform quality control analyses on the existing and new picks. We will also be adding data from more quarry blasts, mainly in northern California, following an identification and calibration procedure similar to Lin et al. (2006). Composite event construction (Lin et al., in press) will be carried out for northern California for use in conventional tomography. A major contribution of the state-wide model is the identification of earthquakes yielding arrival times at both the Northern California Seismic

  16. Evidence of depth dependence of the seismic velocity temporal change associated with the Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, M.; Chen, J.; Froment, B.; Liu, Q.

    2009-12-01

    We used the vertical motions recorded during two years by a 159 broad band sensor network run by the Institute of Geology of the China Earthquake Administration to monitor the velocity changes associated with the M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. We measured the velocity changes from ambient noise in different period bands. We cross-correlate 30-day moving windows of noise records for all the possible stations pairs and compare the correlations function using the doublet method. The relative velocity variation is deduced from the accurately measured delays for the different station pairs. We found a clear co-seismic change when considering the 1-3s and 3-8 sec. The spatial distribution of velocity change is discussed in a companion paper (Chen et al.). The amplitude of the relative change of velocity measured for a group of 22 stations in a range of 100 km around the fault is of the order of 6 10-4 for both period bands. Within the temporal resolution of our measurements, the change appears to coincide with the earthquake. If we assume that the wavefield consists mostly of Rayleigh waves, we expect our measurements to be characteristic of changes occurring in the upper crust. To investigate deeper process, we filtered the original data in the band 2-40s and increased the length of the moving window to 100 days. We found that the apparent velocity variation is of the same order as for the short period cases. The main difference with the short period result is that the peak of velocity decrease is not coincident with the earthquake but actually reaches its maximum about 100 days after the earthquake. We also filtered the original data in the band 8-30s and found that the apparent velocity variation is of the same order as for the short period cases but begins to be measurable only 100 days after the earthquake. This observation suggests a very different behavior for the ‘elastic’ upper crust and a lower crust subject to a more complex rheology as it was suggested from

  17. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  18. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  19. Seismic velocities in unconsolidated sands: Measurements of pressure, sorting, and compaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Michael Andrew

    . A compilation of this data with velocity data from dry and water-saturated rocks from a number of published sources demonstrates that the sensitivity of the seismic velocities to pressure ( ∂V/∂P) is a continuous function of pressure for a wide variety of rocks over a pressure range from below 100 kPa to above 600 MPa.

  20. Seismic velocity variations along the rupture zone of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    We revisit the rupture zone of the 1989 Mw6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake, central California, by developing high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D)Vp and Vp/Vs models. We apply the simul2000 inversion method and algorithm to a set of "composite" events, which have greater number of picks per event and reduced random picking errors compared with traditional master events. Our final P-wave velocity model generally agrees with previous studies, showing a high velocity body of above 6.7 km/s in the southeast rupture zone of the main shock. The 3-DVp/Vs model, however, has different features, with low Vp/Vs in the upper crust and high Vp/Vs anomalies in deeper layers of the rupture zone. We interpret the low Vp/Vs at shallow depths to be granitic rocks, whereas at greater depths the areas of higher Vp/Vs(around 1.725-1.75) presumably are mafic rocks. The resulting 3-D velocity model was used to improve absolute locations for all local events between 1984 and 2010 in our study area. We then applied a similar event cluster analysis, waveform cross-correlation, and differential time relocation methods to improve relative event location accuracy. Over 88% of the seismicity falls into similar event clusters. A dramatic sharpening of seismicity patterns is obtained after using these methods. The medians of the relative location uncertainties calculated by using the bootstrap approach are 5 m for horizontal and 8 m for vertical. Differential times from cross-correlation are used to estimatein situnear-sourceVp/Vsratio within each event cluster. The high-resolutionVp/Vs method confirms the trend of the velocity variations from the tomographic results, although absolute values are slightly different.

  1. Seismic velocity structure and seismotectonics of the eastern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Hayward Fault System is considered the most likely fault system in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to produce a major earthquake in the next 30 years. To better understand this fault system, we use microseismicity to study its structure and kinematics. We present a new 3D seismic-velocity model for the eastern San Francisco Bay region, using microseismicity and controlled sources, which reveals a ???10% velocity contrast across the Hayward fault in the upper 10 km, with higher velocity in the Franciscan Complex to the west relative to the Great Valley Sequence to the east. This contrast is imaged more sharply in our localized model than in previous regional-scale models. Thick Cenozoic sedimentary basins, such as the Livermore basin, which may experience particularly strong shaking during an earthquake, are imaged in the model. The accurate earthquake locations and focal mechanisms obtained by using the 3D model allow us to study fault complexity and its implications for seismic hazard. The relocated hypocenters along the Hayward Fault in general are consistent with a near-vertical or steeply east-dipping fault zone. The southern Hayward fault merges smoothly with the Calaveras fault at depth, suggesting that large earthquakes may rupture across both faults. The use of the 3D velocity model reveals that most earthquakes along the Hayward fault have near-vertical strike-slip focal mechanisms, consistent with the large-scale orientation and sense of slip of the fault, with no evidence for zones of complex fracturing acting as barriers to earthquake rupture.

  2. A California statewide three-dimensional seismic velocity model from both absolute and differential times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, G.; Thurber, C.H.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.M.; Waldhauser, F.; Brocher, T.M.; Hardebeck, J.

    2010-01-01

    We obtain a seismic velocity model of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin by using absolute arrival-time picks to solve for a coarse three-dimensional (3D) P velocity (VP) model with a uniform 30 km horizontal node spacing, which we then use as the starting model for a finer-scale inversion using double-difference tomography applied to absolute and differential pick times. For computational reasons, we split the state into 5 subregions with a grid spacing of 10 to 20 km and assemble our final statewide VP model by stitching together these local models. We also solve for a statewide S-wave model using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model based on the VP results and a VP=VS ratio of 1.732. Our new model has improved areal coverage compared with previous models, extending 570 km in the SW-NE directionand 1320 km in the NW-SE direction. It also extends to greater depth due to the inclusion of substantial data at large epicentral distances. Our VP model generally agrees with previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, but we also observe some new features, such as high-velocity anomalies at shallow depths in the Klamath Mountains and Mount Shasta area, somewhat slow velocities in the northern Coast Ranges, and slow anomalies beneath the Sierra Nevada at midcrustal and greater depths. This model can be applied to a variety of regional-scale studies in California, such as developing a unified statewide earthquake location catalog and performing regional waveform modeling.

  3. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  4. DIRDOP: a directivity approach to determining the seismic rupture velocity vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Borges, José F.

    2010-07-01

    Directivity effects are a characteristic of seismic source finiteness and are a consequence of the rupture spread in preferential directions. These effects are manifested through seismic spectral deviations as a function of the observation location. The directivity by Doppler effect method permits estimation of the directions and rupture velocities, beginning from the duration of common pulses, which are identified in waveforms or relative source time functions. The general model of directivity that supports the method presented here is a Doppler analysis based on a kinematic source model of rupture (Haskell, Bull Seismol Soc Am 54:1811-1841, 1964) and a structural medium with spherical symmetry. To evaluate its performance, we subjected the method to a series of tests with synthetic data obtained from ten typical seismic ruptures. The experimental conditions studied correspond with scenarios of simple and complex, unilaterally and bilaterally extended ruptures with different mechanisms and datasets with different levels of azimuthal coverage. The obtained results generally agree with the expected values. We also present four real case studies, applying the method to the following earthquakes: Arequipa, Peru ( M w = 8.4, June 23, 2001); Denali, AK, USA ( M w = 7.8; November 3, 2002); Zemmouri-Boumerdes, Algeria ( M w = 6.8, May 21, 2003); and Sumatra, Indonesia ( M w = 9.3, December 26, 2004). The results obtained from the dataset of the four earthquakes agreed, in general, with the values presented by other authors using different methods and data.

  5. 2-D High Resolution Seismic Imaging and Potential-Field Modeling of Small-Scale Intrabasin Faulting in Surprise Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athens, N.; Fontiveros, V. C.; Klemperer, S. L.; Egger, A. E.; Glen, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Surprise Valley, located in the northeast corner of California, constitutes the westernmost basin of the Basin and Range Province (BRP) and acts as a transition zone between the unextended Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Modoc Plateau to the west and the extended BRP to the east. Previous seismic experiments undertaken in Surprise Valley to examine the structural setting of a developing extensional basin imaged the Surprise Valley Fault (SVF), the large-scale structure that controls the basin formation. In this study, we image small-scale structures associated with a prominent N-S-trending magnetic anomaly in the basin; these small-scale structures have no surface expression, yet they presumably play a role in the active geothermal system in the valley and may lend insight into the development of the basin. We recorded a total of 198 shots fired between geophones on a fixed linear array spanning ~ 1 km using a Betsy Seisgun source. The source yielded excellent penetration depths of up to 400 m, presumably due to the ideal conditions of fine-grained lake deposits saturated almost immediately below the surface. We used a standard seismic processing sequence to create an unmigrated time section, but lack of velocity control at depth led to the creation of a suite of different migrated images to explore the effects of strong lateral velocity variations in the subsurface. . Images obtained by applying Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration to the seismic data reveal what we interpret to be an east-dipping (~56°) normal fault offsetting tilted strata of probable Oligocene age with ~250 meters of vertical throw. In addition to the 1 km seismic line, detailed gravity and magnetic surveys were undertaken to fully image the structure(s) north and south of the seismic line. The magnetic survey was performed with a cesium vapor total-field magnetometer installed on our newly developed all-terrain vehicle (ATV) magnetometer system, which was designed for efficient surveying in

  6. Crustal seismic velocity structure from Eratosthenes Seamount to Hecataeus Rise across the Cyprus Arc, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welford, J. Kim; Hall, Jeremy; Hübscher, Christian; Reiche, Sönke; Louden, Keith

    2015-02-01

    Wide-angle reflection/refraction seismic profiles were recorded across the Cyprus Arc, the plate boundary between the African Plate and the Aegean-Anatolian microplate, from the Eratosthenes Seamount to the Hecataeus Rise immediately south of Cyprus. The resultant models were able to resolve detail of significant lateral velocity variations, though the deepest crust and Moho are not well resolved from the seismic data alone. Conclusions from the modelling suggest that (i) Eratosthenes Seamount consists of continental crust but exhibits a laterally variable velocity structure with a thicker middle crust and thinner lower crust to the northeast; (ii) the Hecataeus Rise has a thick sedimentary rock cover on an indeterminate crust (likely continental) and the crust is significantly thinner than Eratosthenes Seamount based on gravity modelling; (iii) high velocity basement blocks, coincident with highs in the magnetic field, occur in the deep water between Eratosthenes and Hecataeus, and are separated and bounded by deep low-velocity troughs and (iv) one of the high velocity blocks runs parallel to the Cyprus Arc, while the other two appear linked based on the magnetic data and run NW-SE, parallel to the margin of the Hecataeus Rise. The high velocity block beneath the edge of Eratosthenes Seamount is interpreted as an older magmatic intrusion while the linked high velocity blocks along Hecataeus Rise are interpreted as deformed remnant Tethyan oceanic crust or mafic intrusives from the NNW-SSE oriented transform margin marking the northern boundary of Eratosthenes Seamount. Eratosthenes Seamount, the northwestern limit of rifted continental crust from the Levant Margin, is part of a jagged rifted margin transected by transform faults on the northern edge of the lower African Plate that is being obliquely subducted under the Aegean-Anatolian upper plate. The thicker crust of Eratosthenes Seamount may be acting as an asperity on the subducting slab, locally locking up

  7. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Sandvol, E

    2007-07-10

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Crustal and upper mantle velocities show great heterogeneity in this region and regional phases display variations in both amplitudes and travel time. Furthermore, due to a lack of quality data, the region has largely been unexplored in terms of the detailed lithospheric seismic structure. A unified high-resolution 3D velocity and attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle will be developed and calibrated. This model will use new data from 23 new broadband stations in the region analyzed with a comprehensive set of techniques. Velocity models of the crust and upper mantle will be developed using a joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. The surface wave modeling will use both event-based methods and ambient noise tomography. Regional phase (Pg, Pn, Sn, and Lg) Q model(s) will be constructed using the new data in combination with existing data sets. The results of the analysis (both attenuation and velocity modeling) will be validated using modeling of regional phases, calibration with selected events, and comparison with previous work. Preliminary analyses of receiver functions show considerable variability across the region. All results will be integrated into the KnowledgeBase.

  9. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  10. Isotropic Crustal Velocity beneath Central Idaho/ Eastern Oregon using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M.; Hongsresawat, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new, high resolution isotropic crustal velocity model beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity model from vertical component Rayleigh wave group velocity measurements on data from the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 85 3-component broadband seismic stations, using ambient noise tomography and the method of Gallego et. al (2010). We calculated inter-station group velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the stacked cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/ West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath the batholith. We cross-correlated seismograms for each IDOR Passive station pair in 24 hr segments, and then band-passed, removed mean and trend, whitened, and progressively stacked these cross-correlated seismograms for the number of days of available data for each station pair. We made travel-time measurements in relative width, narrow frequency bands by picking the peak of the envelope of the stacked seismograms. To overcome the loss of temporal resolution in the narrow bands, we measured 1-sided cross-correlated seismograms made by adding the negative side to the positive side of the stacked seismograms, and multiplying by a step function. We derived Rayleigh wave group velocity models for each frequency band using the least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005). We determined depth sensitivity of the various frequency bands from group velocity dispersion curves. Similarly

  11. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-15

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge–Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid–solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  12. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; García-Muñoz, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f(v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion.

  13. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    computed in the internal loop, each parameter being rescaled by its corresponding Hessian. The velocities and the source attributes are then updated in the external loop where the line search is performed. As the TCN method uses an iterative algorithm to compute Δm, it also needs a stopping criteria to avoid time-consuming large number of iterations and return the truncated solution of the normal equation. The strategy proposed by Eisenstat and Walker (1994) and used by Métivier et al. (2012) for FWI ensures superlinear convergence far from the solution and quadratic convergence in its attraction basin. In order to obtain better convergence of the resolution of the Newton system, it is also possible to use specific preconditioners for each inverted parameter. In particular, the exact Hessian for source parameters can be directly used as a preconditioner for the inversion. As it allows to consider the full Hessian operator, the TCN method mitigates scaling and trade-offs between seismic velocities and source parameters. We compare in this study the performances of various optimization algorithms (steepest descent, conjugate gradient, LBFGS and TCN) used with and without preconditioning, for this multi-parameter inversion problem. Tests are performed here on 2D models, but extensions to 3D is affordable.

  14. Crosswell seismic studies in gas hydrate-bearing sediments: P wave velocity and attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Haberland, Ch.; Pratt, R. G.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M. H.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present crosswell seismic data from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. The crosswell seismic measurements were carried out by making use of two 1160 m deep observation wells (Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38) both 45 m from and co-planar with the 1188 m deep production research well (5L-38). A high power piezo-ceramic source was used to generate sweeped signals with frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz recorded with arrays of 8 hydrophones per depth level. A depth range between 800 and 1150 m was covered, with shot and receiver spacings of 0.75 m. High quality data could be collected during the survey which allow for application of a wide range of crosswell seismic methods. The initial data analysis included suppression of tube wave energy and picking of first arrivals. A damped least-squares algorithm was used to derive P-wave velocities from the travel time data. Next, t* values were derived from the decay of the amplitude spectra, which served as input parameters for a damped least-squares attenuation tomography. The initial results of the P-wave velocity and attenuation tomography reveal significant features reflecting the stratigraphic environment and allow for detection and eventually quantification of gas hydrate bearing sediments. A prominent correlation between P velocity and attenuation was found for the gas hydrate layers. This contradicts to the apparently more meaningful inverse correlation as it was determined for the gas hydrates at the Blake Ridge but supports the results from

  15. Microseismic monitoring of soft-rock landslide: contribution of a 3D velocity model for the location of seismic sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriane, Provost; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Cécile, Doubre; Julien, Gance; Alessia, Maggi; Agnès, Helmstetter

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing the micro-seismic activity of landslides is an important parameter for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling landslide behaviour. However, the location of the seismic sources on landslides is a challenging task mostly because of (a) the recording system geometry, (b) the lack of clear P-wave arrivals and clear wave differentiation, (c) the heterogeneous velocities of the ground. The objective of this work is therefore to test whether the integration of a 3D velocity model in probabilistic seismic source location codes improves the quality of the determination especially in depth. We studied the clay-rich landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps). Most of the seismic events (rockfalls, slidequakes, tremors...) are generated in the upper part of the landslide near the main scarp. The seismic recording system is composed of two antennas with four vertical seismometers each located on the east and west sides of the seismically active part of the landslide. A refraction seismic campaign was conducted in August 2014 and a 3D P-wave model has been estimated using the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm. The shots of the seismic campaign are used as calibration shots to test the performance of the different location methods and to further update the 3D velocity model. Natural seismic events are detected with a semi-automatic technique using a frequency threshold. The first arrivals are picked using a kurtosis-based method and compared to the manual picking. Several location methods were finally tested. We compared a non-linear probabilistic method coupled with the 3D P-wave model and a beam-forming method inverted for an apparent velocity. We found that the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm provides results coherent with the original underlaying topography. The velocity ranges from 500 m.s-1 at the surface to 3000 m.s-1 in the bedrock. For the majority of the calibration shots, the use of a 3D velocity model

  16. Estimating time-lapse velocity changes in the earth by full waveform inversion of repeating seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, R.; Lumley, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Passive seismic monitoring of natural or induced seismicity can provide important information about time-variant subsurface phenomena, especially concerning fluid flow and stress-strain conditions. Traditional monitoring focuses on locating seismic events, and interpreting the results in terms of changes to subsurface properties. Instead, we directly estimate the subsurface velocity changes, which can be more quantitatively related to changes in fluid and stress states via rock physics and geomechanical relationships. The expected velocity changes are often so small that conventional traveltime tomography has difficulty in providing reliable detailed estimates. Our method is based on full waveform inversion (FWI) of the seismic data. FWI estimates a high-resolution subsurface model by fitting waveforms in the data domain based on a numerical solution to the wave equation. We evaluate the performance of our FWI by using a synthetic set of a limited number (up to three) repeating events recorded at a surface array of sensors. We use a realistic complex velocity model which includes fine-scale heterogeneity, and consider the case where fluid pore pressure has changed the stress state leading to a small velocity increase in two distinct thin layers. We assume that we have reasonable estimates of the event locations and the background velocity model before starting the inversion. We compare parallel, double-difference and bootstrapping techniques, and analyse effects of accuracy in the background velocity model to the inversion. FWI retrieves the correct velocity change with excellent accuracy at a high spatial resolution less than one wavelength. This is due to the ability of FWI to invert the full waveform data, rather than traveltime arrivals only. We analyse the inversion sensitivity kernels and show that the spatial resolution improves, and the required density of the sensor array reduces, for velocity changes nearer to the seismic source location.

  17. The relationship between seismic velocity structure and the seismic coupling in the Hyuga-nada region, southwest Japan, deduced from onshore and offshore seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehira, K.; Yakiwara, H.; Yamada, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Nakao, S.; Kobayashi, R.; Goto, K.; Miyamachi, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Shinohara, M.; Kanazawa, T.; Hino, R.; Goda, M.; Shimizu, H.

    2011-12-01

    In Hyuga-nada region, the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian (EU) plate (the southwest Japan arc) along the Nankai trough at a rate of about 5 cm per year. Big earthquakes (M7 class) have occurred in the north region from latitude 31.6 degrees north, but it has not occurred in the south region from latitude 31.6 degrees north. The largest earthquake ever recorded in Hyuga-nada region is the 1968 Hyuga-nada earthquake (Mw 7.5). And microseismicity varies spatially. There are non-seismic slip events in Hyuga-nada region. For example, the after-slips associated with events for 19 October 1996 and 3 December 1996 were observed (Yagi et al., 2001), and in the same region, the slow-slip events were also observed by GPS measurements (GSI, 2011). We performed extraordinary seismic observations for 75 days from April to July 2006, for 73 days from April to July 2008, and for 77 days from April to July 2009. About 25 pop-up type ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed above hypocentral region in Hyuga-nada using Nagasaki-maru. And three data loggers were deployed on land in order to compensate a regular seismic network. We used these data and permanent stations for this analysis. In order to obtain precise hypocenter distribution, focal mechanisms, and a 3D seismic velocity structure around the Hyuga-nada region, we used Double-Difference (DD) Tomography method developed by Zhang and Thurber (2003). In northern part of Hyuga-nada, Vp/Vs ratio is high along the upper part of PHS slab, and this layer is interpreted as the subducting oceanic crust. On the other hand, Vp/Vs ratio is about 1.73 in southern part of Hyuga-nada, and this is interpreted as the subducted Kyushu-Palau Ridge, old island arc, which is made by granitic rock. More over, there is a difference of Poisson's ratio at mantle wedge. This value is high (> 0.3) in northern part of Hyuga-nada. The high Poisson's mantle wedge is suggesting that the zone probably corresponds to a

  18. The density, compressibility and seismic velocity of hydrous melts at crustal and upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, K.; Iwamori, H.

    2015-12-01

    Various processes of subduction zone magmatism, such as upward migration of partial melts and fractional crystallization depend on the density of the hydrous silicate melt. The density and the compressibility of the hydrous melt are key factors for the thermodynamic calculation of phase relation of the hydrous melt, and the geophysical inversion to predict physicochemical conditions of the melting region based on the seismic velocity. This study presents a new model for the calculations of the density of the hydrous silicate melts as a function of T, P, H2O content and melt composition. The Birch-Murnaghan equation is used for the equation of state. We compile the experimentally determined densities of various hydrous melts, and optimize the partial molar volume, compressibility, thermal expansibility and its pressure derivative, and K' of the H2O component in the silicate melt. P-T ranges of the calibration database are 0.48-4.29 GPa and 1033-2073 K. As such, this model covers the P-T ranges of the entire melting region of the subduction zone. Parameter set provided by Lange and Carmichael [1990] is used for the partial molar volume and KT value of the anhydrous silicate melt. K' of anhydrous melt is newly parameterized as a function of SiO2 content. The new model accurately reproduces the experimentally determined density variations of various hydrous melts from basalt to rhyolite. Our result shows that the hydrous melt is more compressive and less dense than the anhydrous melt; with the 5 wt% of H2O in melt, density and KT decrease by ~10% and ~30% from those of the anhydrous melt, respectively. For the application of the model, we calculated the P-wave velocity of the hydrous melt. With the 5 wt% of H2O, P-wave velocity of the silicate melt decreases by >10%. Based on the melt P-wave velocity, we demonstrate the effect of the melt H2O content on the seismic velocity of the partially molten zone of the subduction zone.

  19. High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

    1988-09-10

    Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

  20. Very long-period GPS waveforms. What can GPS bring to Earth seismic velocity models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelevitz, K.; Houlie, N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.; Giardini, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2014-12-01

    It is now admitted that high rate GPS observations can provide reliable surface displacement waveforms. For long-period (T > 5s) transients, it was shown that GPS and seismometer (STS-1) displacements are in agreement at least for vertical component [Houlié et al., 2011]. We propose here to supplement existing long-period seismic networks with high rate (>= 1Hz) GPS data in order to improve the resolution of global seismic velocity models. We aim at extending the use of GPS measurements beyond the range of STS-1 in the low frequency end (T>1000s). We present the results of the processing of 1Hz GPS records of the Hokkaido, Sumatra and Tohoku earthquakes (25th of September, 2003, Mw = 8.3; 26th of December, 2004, Mw = 8.9; 11th of March, 2011, Mw = 9.1, respectively). 3D waveforms phase time-series have been used to recover the ground motion histories at the GPS sites. Through the better resolution of inversion of the GPS phase observations, we determine displacement waveforms of periods ranging from 30 seconds to 1300 seconds for a selection of sites. We compare inverted GPS waveforms with STS-1 waveforms, superconducting gravity waveforms and synthetic waveforms computed using 3D global wave propagation with SPECFEM. We find that the GPS waveforms are in agreement with the SPECFEM synthetic data and are able to fill the period-gap between the broadband seismometer STS-1 data and the normal mode period range detected by the superconducting gravimeters. References: Houlié, N., G. Occhipinti, T. Blanchard, N. Shapiro, P. Lognonne, and M. Murakami (2011), New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series, Scientific reports, 1, 44.

  1. FWT2D: A massively parallel program for frequency-domain full-waveform tomography of wide-aperture seismic data—Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbier, Florent; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean; Amestoy, Patrick; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series that describes a massively parallel code that performs 2D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-aperture seismic data for imaging complex structures. Full-waveform inversion methods, namely quantitative seismic imaging methods based on the resolution of the full wave equation, are computationally expensive. Therefore, designing efficient algorithms which take advantage of parallel computing facilities is critical for the appraisal of these approaches when applied to representative case studies and for further improvements. Full-waveform modelling requires the resolution of a large sparse system of linear equations which is performed with the massively parallel direct solver MUMPS for efficient multiple-shot simulations. Efficiency of the multiple-shot solution phase (forward/backward substitutions) is improved by using the BLAS3 library. The inverse problem relies on a classic local optimization approach implemented with a gradient method. The direct solver returns the multiple-shot wavefield solutions distributed over the processors according to a domain decomposition driven by the distribution of the LU factors. The domain decomposition of the wavefield solutions is used to compute in parallel the gradient of the objective function and the diagonal Hessian, this latter providing a suitable scaling of the gradient. The algorithm allows one to test different strategies for multiscale frequency inversion ranging from successive mono-frequency inversion to simultaneous multifrequency inversion. These different inversion strategies will be illustrated in the following companion paper. The parallel efficiency and the scalability of the code will also be quantified.

  2. Can we go From Tomographically Determined Seismic Velocities to Composition? Amplitude Resolution Issues in Local Earthquake Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L.

    2007-12-01

    There have been a number of recent papers (i.e. Lee (2003), James et al. (2004), Hacker and Abers (2004), Schutt and Lesher (2006)) which calculate predicted velocities for xenolith compositions at mantle pressures and temperatures. It is tempting, therefore, to attempt to go the other way ... to use tomographically determined absolute velocities to constrain mantle composition. However, in order to do this, it is vital that one is able to accurately constrain not only the polarity of the determined velocity deviations (i.e. fast vs slow) but also how much faster, how much slower relative to the starting model, if absolute velocities are to be so closely analyzed. While much attention has been given to issues concerning spatial resolution in seismic tomography (i.e. what areas are fast, what areas are slow), little attention has been directed at the issue of amplitude resolution (how fast, how slow). Velocity deviation amplitudes in seismic tomography are heavily influenced by the amount of regularization used and the number of iterations performed. Determining these two parameters is a difficult and little discussed problem. I explore the effect of these two parameters on the amplitudes obtained from the tomographic inversion of the Chile Argentina Geophysical Experiment (CHARGE) dataset, and attempt to determine a reasonable solution space for the low Vp, high Vs, low Vp/Vs anomaly found above the flat slab in central Chile. I then compare this solution space to the range in experimentally determined velocities for peridotite end-members to evaluate our ability to constrain composition using tomographically determined seismic velocities. I find that in general, it will be difficult to constrain the compositions of normal mantle peridotites using tomographically determined velocities, but that in the unusual case of the anomaly above the flat slab, the observed velocity structure still has an anomalously high S wave velocity and low Vp/Vs ratio that is most

  3. Sound velocity of hcp-Fe at high pressure: experimental constraints, extrapolations and comparison with seismic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Ohtani, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Determining the sound velocity of iron under extreme thermodynamic conditions is essential for a proper interpretation of seismic observations of the Earth's core but is experimentally challenging. Here, we review techniques and methodologies used to measure sound velocities in metals at megabar pressures, with specific focus on the compressional sound velocity of hexagonal close-packed iron. A critical comparison of literature results, coherently analyzed using consistent metrology (pressure scale, equation of state), allows us to propose reference relations for the pressure and density dependence of the compressional velocity of hexagonal close-packed iron at ambient temperature. This provides a key base line upon which to add complexity, including high-temperature effects, pre-melting effects, effects of nickel and/or light element incorporation, necessary for an accurate comparison with seismic models, and ultimately to constrain Earth's inner core composition.

  4. The P wave velocity structure of Deception Island, Antarctica, from two-dimensional seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, T. Z.; Barclay, A. H.; Wilcock, W. S.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Almendros, J.

    2006-12-01

    Deception Island is a small (diameter of ~15km) active volcanic island located at the western end of the Bransfield Strait, a region of back-arc extension associated with the recently extinct South Shetland Island Arc. The island has a horseshoe shape with a flooded caldera (Port Foster) that is open to the sea through a narrow passage. The geometry of the island makes it ideal for seismic imaging. In January, 2005, an international team of scientists deployed seismometers on Deception Island and the seafloor in order to record P wave arrivals from airgun shots both within the caldera and around the island. The experiment geometry was designed for high-resolution three-dimensional tomography of the shallow structure of the volcano but also included two linear profiles that were configured to image structure down to 5-10 km depth; a 90 km long-profile was oriented NNW-SSE and extended over 50 km to the south of the island and a 50 km long profile was oriented ENE-WSW and extended equal distances to either side of the island. We have obtained tomographic inversions for two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along these profiles using shots and stations that lie up 2 km away from the profile. The inversions resolve a pronounced low- velocity anomaly beneath much of the caldera which extends from near the surface to about 3-4 km depth with a maximum anomaly of ~ -1 km/s at 1.5-2km depth. Refracted arrivals for shots within the caldera are consistent with a 1-km-thick layer of sediments infilling the caldera but synthetic inversions suggest that the low velocity anomaly resolved by the inversions is primarily a result of structure at greater depth. The inversion for the NNW-SSE profile resolves a sharp increase in velocities to the northwest of the caldera that coincides with the location of a regional zone of normal faulting that defines the northern boundary of the extension in the Bransfield Strait. The ENE-WSW profile also resolves a high velocity region to the

  5. Shear velocity structure beneath the central United States: implications for the origin of the Illinois Basin and intraplate seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Gilbert, Hersh; Andronicos, Christopher; Hamburger, Michael W.; Larson, Timothy; Marshak, Stephen; Pavlis, Gary L.; Yang, Xiaotao

    2016-03-01

    We present new estimates of lithospheric shear velocities for the intraplate seismic zones and the Illinois Basin in the U.S. midcontinent by analyzing teleseismic Rayleigh waves. We find that relatively high crustal shear velocities (VS) characterize the southern Illinois Basin, while relatively low crustal velocities characterize the middle and lower crust of the central and northern Illinois Basin. The observed high crustal velocities may correspond to high-density mafic intrusions emplaced into the crust during the development of the Reelfoot Rift, which may have contributed to the subsidence of the Illinois Basin. The low crustal VS beneath the central and northern basin follow the La Salle deformation belt. We also observe relatively low velocities in the mantle beneath the New Madrid seismic zone where VS decreases by about 7% compared to those outside of the rift. The low VS in the upper mantle also extends beneath the Wabash Valley and Ste. Genevieve seismic zones. Testing expected VS reductions based on plausible thermal heterogeneities for the midcontinent indicates that the 7% velocity reduction would not result from elevated temperatures alone. Instead this scale of anomaly requires a contribution from some combination of increased iron and water content. Both rifting and interaction with a mantle plume could introduce these compositional heterogeneities. Similar orientations for the NE-SW low-velocity zone and the Reelfoot Rift suggest a rift origin to the reduced velocities. The low VS upper mantle represents a weak region and the intraplate seismic zones would correspond to concentrated crustal deformation above weak mantle.

  6. Upper Crustal Seismic Velocity Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    We report preliminary results from an active-source seismic tomography experiment that was conducted along the intermediate-spreading Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 2009. The overarching objective of the experiment is to test competing hypotheses for what governs the scale and intensity of magmatic and hydrothermal processes at mid-ocean ridges. Previous models of crustal accretion inferred that ridge-basin topography observed at the Endeavour results from alternating periods of enhanced or reduced magma supply from the mantle. Alternatively, a recent seismic reflection study has imaged a crustal magma chamber underlying the central portion of the Endeavour, which may indicate that variations in seafloor topography instead result from dike-induced faulting that occurs within the upper crust, adjacent to the axial magma chamber. The first model predicts a thicker high-porosity eruptive layer and lower velocities beneath topographic highs, while the second model is compatible with a uniform pattern of volcanic accretion. The experiment used 68 four-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites to record 5,567 airgun shots from the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Three nested shooting grids were collected to image the three-dimensional crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the segment at multiple spatial scales. We use first-arriving crustal phases (Pg) recorded by the two grids with the densest shot-receiver spacing, the 24 x 8 km2 vent field grid and the 60 x 20 km2 crustal grid, to image the fine-scale (< 1 km) three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper few kilometers of crust at the segment scale. We employ a non-linear tomographic method that utilizes a shortest-path ray-tracing algorithm with columns of nodes sheared vertically to include effects of seafloor topography. To date, we have manually picked 13,000 Pg phases located within 10 km of 17 OBSs. The full analysis will include ~40,000 Pg travel

  7. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  8. Comprehensive observation and modeling of earthquake and temperature-related seismic velocity changes in northern Chile with passive image interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-06-01

    We report on earthquake and temperature-related velocity changes in high-frequency autocorrelations of ambient noise data from seismic stations of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile project in northern Chile. Daily autocorrelation functions are analyzed over a period of 5 years with passive image interferometry. A short-term velocity drop recovering after several days to weeks is observed for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake at most stations. At the two stations PB05 and PATCX, we observe a long-term velocity decrease recovering over the course of around 2 years. While station PB05 is located in the rupture area of the Tocopilla earthquake, this is not the case for station PATCX. Station PATCX is situated in an area influenced by salt sediment in the vicinity of Salar Grande and presents a superior sensitivity to ground acceleration and periodic surface-induced changes. Due to this high sensitivity, we observe a velocity response of several regional earthquakes at PATCX, and we can show for the first time a linear relationship between the amplitude of velocity drops and peak ground acceleration for data from a single station. This relationship does not hold true when comparing different stations due to the different sensitivity of the station environments. Furthermore, we observe periodic annual velocity changes at PATCX. Analyzing data at a temporal resolution below 1 day, we are able to identify changes with a period of 24 h, too. The characteristics of the seismic velocity with annual and daily periods indicate an atmospheric origin of the velocity changes that we confirm with a model based on thermally induced stress. This comprehensive model explains the lag time dependence of the temperature-related seismic velocity changes involving the distribution of temperature fluctuations, the relationship between temperature, stress and velocity change, plus autocorrelation sensitivity kernels.

  9. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  10. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  11. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  12. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-07-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  13. Coal-seismic, desktop computer programs in BASIC; Part 6, Develop rms velocity functions and apply mute and normal movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasbrouck, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Processing of data taken with the U.S. Geological Survey's coal-seismic system is done with a desktop, stand-alone computer. Programs for this computer are written in the extended BASIC language utilized by the Tektronix 4051 Graphic System. This report presents computer programs used to develop rms velocity functions and apply mute and normal moveout to a 12-trace seismogram.

  14. Velocity Ellipsoids for Crustal Seismic Anisotropy: Pumpkins and Melons Have Dimples and Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D.; Christensen, N.

    2003-12-01

    Geological causes of crustal anisotropy include regional fractures and cracks, isotropic heterogeneity or layering, and material composition and textural properties. In addition, shear or metamorphic foliations in fault zones or structural terranes serve as proxies for intracrustal deformation in a manner analogous to lattice preferred orientation of olivine produced by mantle shear. The primary factor in the production of crustal seismic anisotropy is the relative angle between a seismic wave and the (dipping) symmetry axes representing the crustal material even as either change along the propagation raypath. As a result, in order to analyze observations of crustal anisotropy we must understand the behavior of compressional and shear wave velocities in all propagation directions parallel to and in-between the principal symmetry axes which represent the crustal materials. In this poster we use Christoffel equations and physical properties obtained from petrophysical lab measurements in order to examine anisotropic velocities and travel-time effects for bulk rocks representative of different crustal levels. Ellipses and ellipsoids are commonly used to represent the P- and S-wave velocity directional behavior for materials described using hexagonal and orthorhombic symmetries, respectively. While olivine and pyroxene-based mantle rocks are characteristically fast symmetry axes (the "melons" of Levin and Park, 1997), crustal rocks are typically slow symmetry axes ("pumpkins") due to the predominance of fractures or textural foliations. Careful application of Christoffel solutions indicate that for most crustal (and mantle) rocks the surfaces of their pumpkins or melons are not exact analytical ellipsoids. Rather, the surfaces in the non-axial directions have second-order deflections (bulges or dimples) which potentially may produce observable azimuthal travel-time or shear splitting effects. In the case when the P-wave surface on average is slow (dimpled), due to SV

  15. A Seismic Velocity-Pressure Model for Sedimentary Rocks Consistent with Critical Porosity and Compaction Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, M.; Lumley, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the pressure dependence of seismic rock properties is useful for analysis of sedimentary basins, prediction of pore pressure and geomechanical effects, and time-lapse monitoring of groundwater, petroleum, geothermal and CO2 sequestration reservoirs. We are especially interested in changes in seismic rock properties due to changes in pore pressure caused by injection or withdrawal of fluids from the sedimentary rock. A long standing problem has been that physical model-based derivations of velocity-pressure relationships (e.g., Hertz-Mindlin) do not fit lab measurements well, and alternatively, empirical regressions that are fit to specific data points do not extrapolate well to other conditions because they have little or no physical basis. A key problem is the accurate determination of the dry rock frame properties at low effective pressure (i.e., high pore pressure), particularly when ultrasonic lab measurements at or near zero effective pressure are not available. We propose a double exponential model to describe the pressure sensitivity of the bulk modulus (K) and shear modulus (G) for unconsolidated sands. The physical basis for this model incorporates compaction porosity-depth trends for unconsolidated sands, and the concept of critical porosity when a sediment-fluid mixture is at the critical point of a suspension. Grain size distribution and sorting information is used to estimate the critical porosity of a rock when it was first deposited as sediment, and this value is used to constrain the compacted rock velocity at zero effective pressure. A porosity-pressure relationship is included in the model to account for porosity loss with increases in effective pressure, and this leads to a relationship to predict density changes with effective pressure. Our new model is tested on laboratory measurements of unsaturated sand samples and fits well over a wide range of pressure conditions, grain size distributions and compositions. This new velocity

  16. Evaluation of the southern California seismic velocity models through simulation of recorded events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-06-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite-element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m s-1. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyse the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  17. Full Waveform Inversion for Seismic Velocity And Anelastic Losses in Heterogeneous Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Askan, A.; Akcelik, V.; Bielak, J.; Ghattas, O.; /Texas U.

    2009-04-30

    We present a least-squares optimization method for solving the nonlinear full waveform inverse problem of determining the crustal velocity and intrinsic attenuation properties of sedimentary valleys in earthquake-prone regions. Given a known earthquake source and a set of seismograms generated by the source, the inverse problem is to reconstruct the anelastic properties of a heterogeneous medium with possibly discontinuous wave velocities. The inverse problem is formulated as a constrained optimization problem, where the constraints are the partial and ordinary differential equations governing the anelastic wave propagation from the source to the receivers in the time domain. This leads to a variational formulation in terms of the material model plus the state variables and their adjoints. We employ a wave propagation model in which the intrinsic energy-dissipating nature of the soil medium is modeled by a set of standard linear solids. The least-squares optimization approach to inverse wave propagation presents the well-known difficulties of ill posedness and multiple minima. To overcome ill posedness, we include a total variation regularization functional in the objective function, which annihilates highly oscillatory material property components while preserving discontinuities in the medium. To treat multiple minima, we use a multilevel algorithm that solves a sequence of subproblems on increasingly finer grids with increasingly higher frequency source components to remain within the basin of attraction of the global minimum. We illustrate the methodology with high-resolution inversions for two-dimensional sedimentary models of the San Fernando Valley, under SH-wave excitation. We perform inversions for both the seismic velocity and the intrinsic attenuation using synthetic waveforms at the observer locations as pseudoobserved data.

  18. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  19. The preliminary results: Internal seismic velocity structure imaging beneath Mount Lokon

    SciTech Connect

    Firmansyah, Rizky; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kristianto

    2015-04-24

    Historical records that before the 17{sup th} century, Mount Lokon had been dormant for approximately 400 years. In the years between 1350 and 1400, eruption ever recorded in Empung, came from Mount Lokon’s central crater. Subsequently, in 1750 to 1800, Mount Lokon continued to erupt again and caused soil damage and fall victim. After 1949, Mount Lokon dramatically increased in its frequency: the eruption interval varies between 1 – 5 years, with an average interval of 3 years and a rest interval ranged from 8 – 64 years. Then, on June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation. Peak activity happened on July 4{sup th}, 2011 that Mount Lokon erupted continuously until August 28{sup th}, 2011. In this study, we carefully analyzed micro-earthquakes waveform and determined hypocenter location of those events. We then conducted travel time seismic tomographic inversion using SIMULPS12 method to detemine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structures beneath Lokon volcano in order to enhance our subsurface geological structure. During the tomographic inversion, we started from 1-D seismic velocities model obtained from VELEST33 method. Our preliminary results show low Vp, low Vs, and high Vp/Vs are observed beneath Mount Lokon-Empung which are may be associated with weak zone or hot material zones. However, in this study we used few station for recording of micro-earthquake events. So, we suggest in the future tomography study, the adding of some seismometers in order to improve ray coverage in the region is profoundly justified.

  20. The preliminary results: Internal seismic velocity structure imaging beneath Mount Lokon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah, Rizky; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kristianto

    2015-04-01

    Historical records that before the 17th century, Mount Lokon had been dormant for approximately 400 years. In the years between 1350 and 1400, eruption ever recorded in Empung, came from Mount Lokon's central crater. Subsequently, in 1750 to 1800, Mount Lokon continued to erupt again and caused soil damage and fall victim. After 1949, Mount Lokon dramatically increased in its frequency: the eruption interval varies between 1 - 5 years, with an average interval of 3 years and a rest interval ranged from 8 - 64 years. Then, on June 26th, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation. Peak activity happened on July 4th, 2011 that Mount Lokon erupted continuously until August 28th, 2011. In this study, we carefully analyzed micro-earthquakes waveform and determined hypocenter location of those events. We then conducted travel time seismic tomographic inversion using SIMULPS12 method to detemine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structures beneath Lokon volcano in order to enhance our subsurface geological structure. During the tomographic inversion, we started from 1-D seismic velocities model obtained from VELEST33 method. Our preliminary results show low Vp, low Vs, and high Vp/Vs are observed beneath Mount Lokon-Empung which are may be associated with weak zone or hot material zones. However, in this study we used few station for recording of micro-earthquake events. So, we suggest in the future tomography study, the adding of some seismometers in order to improve ray coverage in the region is profoundly justified.

  1. Bounding Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. King; K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2004-07-13

    Earthquake ground motions have been assessed using a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the proposed repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. To meet the applicable regulations, consideration must be given to ground motions that have probabilities of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}/yr. In the PSHA, aleatory variability in ground motion attenuation relations is characterized by unbounded lognormal distributions. At extremely low annual probability levels, the tails of these distributions, along with large assessed epistemic uncertainties in ground motions from large, close earthquakes, result in upper-percentile and mean ground motions that are extremely high and probably unphysical. To address this issue, we evaluated site-specific geologic evidence with respect to an upper bound on peak ground velocity (PGV), the ground motion measure that is correlated with damage to underground repository systems. Ground-motion amplitudes are limited by the strength of the materials through which they propagate. At high enough levels of seismic shaking, the rocks at the waste-emplacement level, particularly the lithophysal tuffs, will fracture and fail. A key finding of geologic relations from underground explorations and rock-mechanics modeling is the absence of mechanical damage of the type expected from seismic shaking in the 12.8 my old volcanic rocks at the waste-emplacement level (Buesch and Damjanac, this session). Rock mechanics tests and computer modeling provide estimates of the shear strains required to fail the lithophysal rock. In turn, a site-response model is used to calculate PGVs that would cause these shear strains at repository depths. The threshold shear strains required to cause significant damage are estimated to range from 0.09 to 0.35%. This translates to site-specific average PGV values ranging from about 153 to 451 cm/sec. Considering that ground motions of this amplitude are not

  2. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  4. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  5. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  6. The effect of the velocity model, stations geometry, seismic phases and environmental noise level on earthquake location quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The precision and accuracy in the estimation of focal parameters mainly depend by the seismic network features and by the velocity model used in the localization process. The number and geometry of the stations that detect a seismic event heavily affect the quality of the localization. To well constrain a hypocenter it is essential that a sufficient number of stations, near and around the epicenter, recording with good signal to noise ratio the event. Large azimuthal gap or the lack of stations near the epicenter can lead to a mistaken location. Low signal to noise ratio due to high-level environmental noise, can lead to large errors in the seismic phases picking thus compromising the precision of the hypocentral location. A not optimized velocity model may lead to strongly biased location affected by important systematic errors. In this work, by means of numerical simulation, will be investigated the effects of these parameters on the quality of the hypocenter estimation. With this goal were simulated different stations geometries, characterized also by different levels of environmental noise, and earthquakes location was carry out by introducing random and systematic errors in both velocity model and seismic phases arrival times. The results of simulations were summarized in focal parameters errors maps.

  7. Frictional behavior of talc at seismic slip rates: preliminary results from high-velocity experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutareaud, S.; Hirose, T.; Doan, M. L.; Andréani, M.; Calugaru, D. G.

    2009-04-01

    Talc is one of the few minerals not following the Byerlee law, its static friction velocity is 0.2-0.25. Talc has been identified in the San Andreas Fault, and is expected to occur within subduction zone. Talc can then affect their seismic behavior. Yet, the details of its frictional properties are poorly known, especially at seismic velocities. Our study aims at understanding its behavior at these velocities. The properties of the talc were studied during high-velocity rotary-shear experiments carried out at from 0.01 m/s to 1.31 m/s, at normal stresses of 0.6 to 1.4 MPa, using the frictional testing apparatus of the JAMSTEC. The experimental gouge is a pure natural talc schist powder (99.9% wt). The samples were test used in dry (i.e. at room moisture conditions) or wet conditions. During experiments, we were able to measure simulated fault thickness evolution, moisture release and to calculate friction coefficient. Even though it is from the start a weak material, talc schist follows a slip weakening law, which appears to depend strongly on the saturation of the sample. Dry samples sliding at speed of 1.31m/s an exponential decrease of friction coefficient from a peak value of 0.98-0.71 to a steady state value between 0.18 and 0.59. This weakening is strongly dependent on normal stress. Dry sample also experienced large gouge dilation. Results from experiments on wet samples are different. The friction peak values of 0.52-0.36 drop to a steady state value between 0.1 and 0.18. Moreover the steady state friction seems to be independent on the applied normal stress. Finally, the wet samples do not experience dilation, but a large release of water steam. This preliminary work suggests two different weakening processes for dry and wet conditions, respectively. To understand the talc friction behavior, we performed studies on talc schist decomposition, in case flash heating would locally alter the talc structure. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined to

  8. Fine-scale thermohaline ocean structure retrieved with 2-D prestack full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data: Application to the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Biescas, B.; Ranero, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of 2-D time-domain, adjoint-state acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to retrieve high-resolution models of ocean physical parameters such as sound speed, temperature and salinity. The proposed method is first described and then applied to prestack multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia) in 2007 in the framework of the Geophysical Oceanography project. The inversion strategy flow includes specifically designed data preconditioning for acoustic noise reduction, followed by the inversion of sound speed in the shotgather domain. We show that the final sound speed model has a horizontal resolution of ˜ 70 m, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the initial model constructed with coincident eXpendable Bathy Thermograph (XBT) data, and close to the theoretical resolution of O(λ). Temperature (T) and salinity (S) are retrieved with the same lateral resolution as sound speed by combining the inverted sound speed model with the thermodynamic equation of seawater and a local, depth-dependent T-S relation derived from regional conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) database. The comparison of the inverted T and S models with XBT and CTD casts deployed simultaneously to the MCS acquisition shows that the thermohaline contrasts are resolved with an accuracy of 0.18oC for temperature and 0.08 PSU for salinity. The combination of oceanographic and MCS data into a common, pseudo-automatic inversion scheme allows to quantitatively resolve submeso-scale features that ought to be incorporated into larger-scale ocean models of oceans structure and circulation.

  9. Towards Simulating a Realistic Planetary Seismic Wavefield: The Contribution of the Megaregolith and Low-Velocity Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Weber, Renee C.; Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Thorne, Michael Scott; Garnero, Ed J.

    2011-01-01

    Lunar seismograms are distinctly different from their terrestrial counterparts. The Apollo lunar seismometers recorded moonquakes without distinct P- or S-wave arrivals; instead waves arrive as a diffuse coda that decays over several hours making the identification of body waves difficult. The unusual character of the lunar seismic wavefield is generally tied to properties of the megaregolith: it consists of highly fractured and broken crustal rock, the result of extensive bombardment of the Moon. The megaregolith extends several kilometers into the lunar crust, possibly into the mantle in some regions, and is covered by a thin coating of fine-scale dust. These materials possess very low seismic velocities that strongly scatter the seismic wavefield at high frequencies. Directly modeling the effects of the megaregolith to simulate an accurate lunar seismic wavefield is a challenging computational problem, owing to the inherent 3-D nature of the problem and the high frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) required. Here we focus on modeling the long duration code, studying the effects of the low velocities found in the megaregolith. We produce synthetic seismograms using 1-D slowness integration methodologies, GEMINI and reflectivity, and a 3-D Cartesian finite difference code, Wave Propagation Program, to study the effect of thin layers of low velocity on the surface of a planet. These codes allow us generate seismograms with dominant frequencies of approximately 1 Hz. For background lunar seismic structure we explore several models, including the recent model of Weber et al., Science, 2011. We also investigate variations in megaregolithic thickness, velocity, attenuation, and seismogram frequency content. Our results are compared to the Apollo seismic dataset, using both a cross correlation technique and integrated envelope approach to investigate coda decay. We find our new high frequency results strongly support the hypothesis that the long duration of the lunar seismic

  10. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  11. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  12. Carbonate reservoir characterization using seismic velocity and amplitude variation with offset analysis: Hardeman basin, Texas, test case

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Shrestha, R.K. ); Warwick, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Mississippian bioherms in the Hardeman basin, Texas, produce from dolomitized mud cores with porosities that can vary from 10 to 40%. These carbonate buildups, though often similar in seismic reflector boundary configuration, can vary remarkably in reservoir quality (e.g., porosity) owing to diagenesis. However, imaging these lateral variations of porosity and determining the reservoir pressure is possible with detailed seismic velocity control and amplitude variation with offset (AVO) analysis. The investigated 24-fold seismic profile was acquired by four Vibroseis trucks in the Hardeman basin across two bioherms, one oil-productive and other tight and water-filled. Detailed stacking velocity analyses on the relative amplitude processed line directly delineate areas of increasing and decreasing gross porosity and dramatically differentiate the two mounds. Moreover, the detailed velocity analyses help provide a more accurate stacked section with resultant better definition of the external mound configuration. Analysis of available laboratory compressional and shear wave velocity data for carbonate rocks reveal that Young's modulus in carbonates is a function of porosity and differential pressure. Comparison of the derived Young's modulus from an inversion of the AVO data for the unstacked line with the experimental laboratory data yield porosity and differential pressure estimates over the productive bioherm which are within 18% and 15%, respectively, of those observed in the borehole.

  13. Periods of the Earth's seismicity activation and their relationship to variations in the Earth's rotation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris

    2015-04-01

    It is known that Earth's seismic activity (SA) demonstrates distinct roughness (nonuniformity) in time. Periods of intensification of the SA followed by periods of its decaying. For strong earthquakes these periods are continued several decades. It was also noted that there is a pronounced periodic amplification and attenuation of the SA with a period of about 30 years, which is manifested mainly in two latitudinal belts 50°N-30°N and 0°-30°S [Levin, Sasorova, 2014, 2015]. This work deals with the hypothesis that it is the properties of rotating non-uniform rate of the planet may be the cause of the periodicity of manifestations SA. The objective of this work is the searching of the spatial-temporal interconnection between the Earth rotation irregularity and the observed cyclic increasing and decreasing of the Earth's SA. This requires preparation a long series of observations of seismic events with representative data sets (EQ selected from 1895 up to date with a magnitude M> = 7.5, based on the catalog NEIC). Two sources of data on the angular velocity of the Earth's rotation of (length of day, LOD) were adapted: the world-known database IERS (Annual Report, International Earth Rotation Service) and the data, which were presented in the work (McCarthy, D.D., and Babcock A.K., 1986). The first one contains daily observations from 1962 to 2013, the second one was identified semi-annual observations from 1720 to 1984. It was prepared concatenated data set (CLOD) for the period from 1720 to 2013. Characteristic periods in the time series CLOD: 62, 32, and 23 years have been isolated by the use of spectral analysis. Next, it were used a band-pass filters for the four frequency bands from 124 to 45 years, from 37 do 25 years, from 25 to 19 years, and in the range of less than 19 years. In the frequency bands 37-25 years and 25-19 years marked clear periodic oscillations close to a sine wave. The amplitude of the oscillations with the 1720 to 1790 gradually

  14. Lithospheric velocity model across the Southern Central Iberian Zone (Variscan Iberian Massif): The ALCUDIA wide-angle seismic reflection transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Martí, David; Martínez Poyatos, David; Simancas, José Fernando; Azor, Antonio; Ayala, Concepción; Torné, Montserrat; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés.

    2015-03-01

    A P wave seismic velocity model has been obtained for the Central Iberian Zone, the largest continental fragment of the Iberian Variscan Belt. The spatially dense, high-resolution, wide-angle seismic reflection experiment, ALCUDIA-WA, was acquired in 2012 across central Iberia, aiming to constrain the lithospheric structure and resolve the physical properties of the crust and upper mantle. The seismic transect, ~310 km long, crossed the Central Iberian Zone from its suture with the Ossa-Morena Zone to the southern limit of the Central System mountain range. The energy generated by five shots was recorded by ~900 seismic stations. High-amplitude phases were identified in every shot gather for the upper crust (Pg and PiP) and Moho (PmP and Pn). In the upper crust, the P wave velocities increase beneath the Cenozoic Tajo Basin. The base of the upper crust varies from ~13 km to ~20 km between the southernmost Central Iberian Zone and the Tajo Basin. Lower crustal velocities are more homogeneous. From SW-NE, the traveltime of PmP arrivals varies from ~10.5 s to ~11.8 s, indicating lateral variations in the P wave velocity and the crustal thickness, reflecting an increase toward the north related with alpine tectonics and the isostatic response of the crust to the orogenic load. The results suggest that the high velocities of the upper crust near the Central System might correspond to igneous rocks and/or high-grade metamorphic rocks. The contrasting lithologies and the increase in the Moho depth to the north evidence differences in the Variscan evolution.

  15. Near-surface S-wave velocity measured with six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor Rotaphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Jiri; Brokesova, Johana

    2015-04-01

    An essential parameter in seismic engineering is the near-surface S-wave velocity. Rotaphone, a six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor can be used with advantage to retrieve it from collocated rotational and translational measurements. Rotaphone consists of highly sensitive geophones connected to a conjoint datalogger. The geophones are mounted in parallel pairs to a rigid (metal) ground-based frame. The instrument is designed to measure short-period translational ground motion (velocity) and, in addition, differential motion between the paired geophones. The records of those differential motions are used to obtain rotational components. In-situ calibration of individual geophones is performed simultaneously with each measurement, which enables to reach high sensitivity and accuracy of rotational measurements. In our method we utilize seismic waves produced by anthropogenic source - a generator of S waves and rotational ground motions. The generator contains a fixed part (anchored to the ground), a revolving part and a braking mechanism for immediate braking of the rotational part, in which rotational seismic motions are generated by immediately stopping the revolving part, whereby energy is transmitted into the rock massive. The generator produces repeatedly identical source pulses. Due to identity of the source pulses, we can suppress noise by means of stacking data from many generator actions and thus increase the depth range and resolution. The phase velocity retrieval is based on matching relevant acceleration and rotation rate components. Thanks to a near-source distance and high-frequency content of the source pulses, well-known equations for plane-wave approximation must be replaced by more adequate equations relating the individual rotation rate components to the translational ones. These equations are derived under an assumption of spherical wave. The resulting S-wave phase velocity is compared to the value obtained by standard profile measurements. The

  16. Crustal seismicity and the earthquake catalog maximum moment magnitudes (Mcmax) in stable continental regions (SCRs): correlation with the seismic velocity of the lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Ritsema, Jeroen; Hwang, Yong Keun

    2012-01-01

    A joint analysis of global seismicity and seismic tomography indicates that the seismic potential of continental intraplate regions is correlated with the seismic properties of the lithosphere. Archean and Early Proterozoic cratons with cold, stable continental lithospheric roots have fewer crustal earthquakes and a lower maximum earthquake catalog moment magnitude (Mcmax). The geographic distribution of thick lithospheric roots is inferred from the global seismic model S40RTS that displays shear-velocity perturbations (δVS) relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). We compare δVS at a depth of 175 km with the locations and moment magnitudes (Mw) of intraplate earthquakes in the crust (Schulte and Mooney, 2005). Many intraplate earthquakes concentrate around the pronounced lateral gradients in lithospheric thickness that surround the cratons and few earthquakes occur within cratonic interiors. Globally, 27% of stable continental lithosphere is underlain by δVS≥3.0%, yet only 6.5% of crustal earthquakes with Mw>4.5 occur above these regions with thick lithosphere. No earthquakes in our catalog with Mw>6 have occurred above mantle lithosphere with δVS>3.5%, although such lithosphere comprises 19% of stable continental regions. Thus, for cratonic interiors with seismically determined thick lithosphere (1) there is a significant decrease in the number of crustal earthquakes, and (2) the maximum moment magnitude found in the earthquake catalog is Mcmax=6.0. We attribute these observations to higher lithospheric strength beneath cratonic interiors due to lower temperatures and dehydration in both the lower crust and the highly depleted lithospheric root.

  17. Velocity Field in the NW Himalayan Syntaxis: Implications for Future Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, R. G.; Szeliga, W.; Bali, B. S.; Khan, A.; Wahab, A.; Khan, F.; Qazi, S.

    2011-12-01

    For the past eight years we have monitored crustal deformation in Ladakh, the Karakoram, Kohistan, Zanskar, Salt Range and Pir Pinjal, using a combination of fixed and campaign GPS measurements, to provide quantitative constraints on the rates of convergence in the NW syntaxis of the Himalaya. We find a 13-17 mm convergence rate with maximum SSW velocity gradients NE of the Kashmir Valley beneath the Zanskar range, and maximum SSE directed gradients NW of the Peshawar basin beneath the Kohistan range. The inferred locking line appear to follow the 3.5 km contour as it does elsewhere in the Himalaya, however, this results in a 200 km wide décollement, twice the width of the central Himalaya. The SSE velocity of the Potwar Plateau is 3 mm/yr, significantly slower than the 6-12 mm/yr inferred from geological offsets along the Kalabagh fault in the past 10 My, and hence an inferred slip deficit exists between the Kohistan Range and the Salt Range. No great earthquakes are known in this area, and it is unclear whether the deficit is annulled by accelerated salt-decollement creep or by seismic rupture. A brief period of accelerated creep followed the 2005 Kashmir earthquake. Velocities across the Kashmir Valley and Pir Pinjal are suggestive of a locked décollement (no creep) implying possible SE translation of the entire Kashmir Valley in great earthquakes. Were the segment of the Himalaya between the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake, and the Mw7.8 Kangra earthquake to slip 20 m in a single earthquake, it could do so in a Mw=9. No earthquake of this severity is known, although the historical record includes several earthquakes that may account for partial slip of the decollement. Slip on the Reasi fault north of the frontal Pir Pinjal range front can account for less than half the observed convergence at this longitude, and although no surface slip has been detected in the ranges fronting the Punjab plains, we deduce that the frontal folds, and associated blind thrusts, may

  18. Benchmarking passive seismic methods of estimating the depth of velocity interfaces down to ~300 m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnota, Karol; Gorbatov, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    In shallow passive seismology it is generally accepted that the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method is more robust than the horizontal-over-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method at resolving the depth to surface-wave velocity (Vs) interfaces. Here we present results of a field test of these two methods over ten drill sites in western Victoria, Australia. The target interface is the base of Cenozoic unconsolidated to semi-consolidated clastic and/or carbonate sediments of the Murray Basin, which overlie Paleozoic crystalline rocks. Depths of this interface intersected in drill holes are between ~27 m and ~300 m. Seismometers were deployed in a three-arm spiral array, with a radius of 250 m, consisting of 13 Trillium Compact 120 s broadband instruments. Data were acquired at each site for 7-21 hours. The Vs architecture beneath each site was determined through nonlinear inversion of HVSR and SPAC data using the neighbourhood algorithm, implemented in the geopsy modelling package (Wathelet, 2005, GRL v35). The HVSR technique yielded depth estimates of the target interface (Vs > 1000 m/s) generally within ±20% error. Successful estimates were even obtained at a site with an inverted velocity profile, where Quaternary basalts overlie Neogene sediments which in turn overlie the target basement. Half of the SPAC estimates showed significantly higher errors than were obtained using HVSR. Joint inversion provided the most reliable estimates but was unstable at three sites. We attribute the surprising success of HVSR over SPAC to a low content of transient signals within the seismic record caused by low levels of anthropogenic noise at the benchmark sites. At a few sites SPAC waveform curves showed clear overtones suggesting that more reliable SPAC estimates may be obtained utilizing a multi-modal inversion. Nevertheless, our study indicates that reliable basin thickness estimates in the Australian conditions tested can be obtained utilizing HVSR data from a single

  19. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  20. Current Absolute Plate Velocities Inferred from Hotspot Tracks, Comparison with Absolute Velocities Inferred from Seismic Anisotropy, and Bounds on Rates of Motion Between Groups of Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hotspot tracks have been widely used to estimate the velocities of the plate relative to the lower mantle. Here we analyze the hotspot azimuth data set of Morgan and Phipps Morgan [2007] and show that the errors in plate velocity azimuths inferred from hotspot tracks in any one plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths in the same plate. We use a two-tier analysis to account for this correlated error. First, we determine an individual best-fitting pole for each plate. Second, we determine the absolute plate velocity by minimizing the misfit while constrained by the MORVEL relative plate velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Our preferred model, HS4-MORVEL, uses azimuths from 9 major plates, which are weighted equally. We find that the Pacific plate rotates 0.860.016°Ma-1 right handed about 63.3°S, 96.1°E. Angular velocities of four plates (Amur, Eurasia, Yangtze and Antarctic) differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.24°±0.014° Ma-1 right handed about 52.3S, 56.9E. The angular velocities differ insignificantly from the absolute angular velocities inferred from the orientation of seismic anisotropy [Zheng et al. 2014]. The within-plate dispersion of hotspot track azimuths is 14°, which is comparable to the within-plate dispersion found from orientations of seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion is 6.9±2.4° (95% confidence limits), which is smaller than that found from seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion of 4.5° to 9.3° can be used to place bounds on how fast hotspots under one plate move relative to hotspots under another plate. For an average plate absolute speed of ≈50 mm/yr, the between-plate dispersion indicates a rate of motion of 4 mm/yr to 8 mm/yr for the component of hotspot motion perpendicular to plate motion. This upper bound is consistent with prior work that indicated upper bounds on motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past 48 Ma of 8-13 mm

  1. Formation time and mean movement velocities of the 7 August Zhouqu debris flows extracted from broadband seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, X.; Xu, Q.; Fan, J.; Yu, D.; Hao, Z.; Qiao, X.

    2015-01-01

    The catastrophic Zhouqu debris flows, which were induced by heavy rainfall, occurred at approximately midnight of 7 August 2010 (Beijing time, UTC + 8) and claimed 1765 lives. Broadband seismic signals recorded by the Zhouqu seismic station nearby are acquired and analyzed in this paper. The seismic signals are divided into two separate parts for the first time using the crucial time of 23:33:10 (Bejing time, UTC +8), with distinctly different frequency characteristics on time-by-time normalized spectrograms and amplitude increasing patterns on smoothed envelopes. They are considered to be generated by the development stage and the maturity stage of the Sanyanyu debris flow respectively. Seismic signals corresponding to the development stage have a broader main frequency band of approximately 0-15 Hz than that of the maturity stage, which is around 1-10 Hz. The N-S component can detect the development stage of the debris flow about 3 min earlier than other components due to its southward flow direction. Two sub-stages within the maturity stage are recognized from best-fitted amplitude increasing velocities and the satellite image of the Sanyanyu flow path and the mean movement velocities of the Sanyanyu debris flow during these two sub-stages are estimated to be 9.2 and 9.7 m s-1 respectively.

  2. 3D seismic velocity structure in the rupture area of the 2014 M8.2 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, Jack; Fuenzallida, Amaya; Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ruiz, Sergio; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-04-01

    Seismic velocity tomography is one of the key tools in Earth sciences to image the physical properties of the subsurface. In recent years significant advances have been made to image the Chilean subductions zone, especially in the area of the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake (e.g. Hicks et al., 2014), providing much needed physical constraints for earthquakes source inversions and rupture models. In 2014 the M8.2 Iquique earthquake struck the northern part of the Chilean subduction zone in close proximity to the Peruvian boarder. The pre- and aftershock sequence of this major earthquake was recorded by a densified seismological network in Northern Chile and Southern Peru, which provides an excellent data set to study in depth the 3D velocity structure along the subduction megathrust. Based on an automatic event catalogue of nearly 10,000 events spanning the time period March to May 2014 we selected approximately 450 events for a staggered 3D inversion approach. Events are selected to guarantee an even ray coverage through the inversion volume. We only select events with a minimum GAP of 200 to improve depth estimates and therefore increase resolution in the marine forearc. Additionally, we investigate secondary arrivals between the P- and S-wave arrival to improve depth location. Up to now we have processed about 450 events, from which about 150 with at least 30 P- and S-wave observations have been selected for the subsequent 3D tomography. Overall the data quality is very high, which allows arrival time estimates better than 0.05s on average. We will show results from the 1D, 2D, and preliminary 3D inversions and discuss the results together with the obtained seismicity distribution.

  3. Seismic Study of the Velocity Structure and Earthquake FocalMechanisms beneath the Krafla Central Volcano, NE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, H. R.; Schuler, J.; Greenfield, T. S.; White, R. S.; Roecker, S. W.; Brandsdottir, B.; Stock, J. M.; Tarasewicz, J.; Pugh, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the seismic velocity structure of the Krafla central volcano, NE Iceland, and its shallow geothermal fields. In our 3D tomographic inversions, we used passive seismic data recorded between 2009-2012 from a temporary local network as well as active seismic legacy data to constrain the velocity models. We find high P-wave velocities (Vp) underneath regions of elevated topographic relief as well as two low-Vp anomalies that coincide spatially with two attenuating bodies outlined from S-wave shadows during the Krafla rifting episode of 1974-1985. Within the Krafla geothermal reservoir, which is developed for energy production, we imaged a shallow low-Vp/Vs zone overlying a deeper high-Vp/Vs zone and interpreted them as steam- and brine-bearing formations, respectively. Previously undertaken borehole measurements support our findings. A prominent low-Vp/Vs anomaly underlies these zones at rock depths greater than 1.5 km, where a super-heated zone within felsic overlies rhyolitic within the geothermal melt. Calculations systems show that of the most earthquake focal events are mechanisms consistent double-couple source models with only a few clear non-shear source models.

  4. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  5. Laboratory Permeability and Seismic velocity anisotropy measurements across the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D.; Allen, M. J.; Tatham, D.; Mariani, E.; Boulton, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Alpine Fault, a transpressional plate boundary between the Australia-Pacific plates, is known to rupture periodically (200-400yr) with large magnitude earthquakes (Mw~8) and is currently nearing the end of its latest interseismic period. The hydraulic and elastic properties of fault zones influence the nature and style of earthquake rupture and associated processes; investigating these properties in Alpine Fault rocks yields insights into conditions late in the seismic cycle. We present a suite of laboratory permeability and P (Vp) and S (Vs) wave velocity measurements preformed on diverse fault rock lithologies recovered during the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1). DFDP-1 drilled two boreholes reaching depths of 100.6m and 151.4m and retrieved fault rocks from both the hanging wall and footwall, including ultramylonites, ultracomminuted gouges and variably foliated and unfoliated cataclasites. Drilling revealed a typical shallow fault structure: localised principal slip zones (PSZ) of gouge nested within a damage zone overprinted by a zone of alteration, a record of enhanced fluid-rock interaction. Core material was tested in three orthogonal directions, orientated relative to the down core axis and, when present, foliation. Measurements were conducted with pore pressure held at 5MPa over an effective pressure (Peff) range of 5-105MPa, equivalent to pressure conditions down to ~7km depth. Using the Pulse Transient technique permeabilities at Peff=5MPa range from 10-17 to 10-20m2, decreasing to 10-18 to 10-21m2 at Peff=105MPa. Vp and Vs decrease with increased proximity to the PSZ with Vp in the hanging wall spanning 4500-5900m/s, dropping to 3900-4200m/s at the PSZ and then increasing to 4400-5600m/s in the foot wall. Wave velocities and permeability are enhanced parallel to tectonic fabrics e.g. foliation defined by aligned phyllosillicates and quartz- feldspar clasts. These measurements constrain interseismic conditions within the

  6. Uppermost mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in the Euro-Mediterranean region from Pn and Sn tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J.; Gil, A.; Gallart, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 10-15 years, the number of high quality seismic stations monitoring the Euro-Mediterranean region has increased significantly, allowing a corresponding improvement in structural constraints. We present here new images of the seismic velocity and anisotropy variations in the uppermost mantle beneath this complex area, compiled from inversion of Pn and Sn phases sampling the whole region. The method of Hearn has been applied to the traveltime arrivals of the International Seismological Center catalogue for the time period 1990-2010. A total of 579 753 Pn arrivals coming from 12 377 events recorded at 1 408 stations with epicentral distances between 220 km and 1 400 km have been retained after applying standard quality criteria (maximum depth, minimum number of recordings, maximum residual values …). Our results show significant features well correlated with surface geology and evidence the heterogeneous character of the Euro-Mediterranean lithosphere. The station terms reflect the existence of marked variations in crustal thickness, consistent with available Moho depths inferred from active seismic experiments. The highest Pn velocities are observed along a continuous band from the Po Basin to the northern Ionian Sea. Other high velocity zones include the Ligurian Basin, the Valencia Trough, the southern Alboran Sea and central part of the Algerian margin. Most significant low-velocity values are associated to orogenic belts (Betics, Pyrenees, Alps, Apennines and Calabrian Arc, Dinarides-Hellenides), and low-velocity zones are also identified beneath Sardinia and the Balearic Islands. The introduction of an anisotropic term enhances significantly the lateral continuity of the anomalies, in particular in the most active tectonic areas. Pn anisotropy shows consistent orientations subparallel to major orogenic structures, such as Betics, Apennines, Calabrian Arc and Alps. The Sn tomographic image has lower resolution but confirms independently most of the

  7. Nature and origin of upper crustal seismic velocity fluctuations and associated scaling properties: Combined stochastic analyses of KTB velocity and lithology logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.A.; Holliger, K.

    1999-01-01

    The main borehole of the German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) extends over 9000 m into a crystalline upper crust consisting primarily of interlayered gneiss and metabasite. We present a joint analysis of the velocity and lithology logs in an effort to extract the lithology component of the velocity log. Covariance analysis of lithology log, approximated as a binary series, indicates that it may originate from the superposition of two Brownian stochastic processes (fractal dimension 1.5) with characteristic scales of ???2800 m and ???150 m, respectively. Covariance analysis of the velocity fluctuations provides evidence for the superposition of four stochastic process with distinct characteristic scales. The largest two scales are identical to those derived from the lithology, confirming that these scales of velocity heterogeneity are caused by lithology variations. The third characteristic scale, ???20 m, also a Brownian process, is probably related to fracturing based on correlation with the resistivity log. The superposition of these three Brownian processes closely mimics the commonly observed 1/k decay (fractal dimension 2.0) of the velocity power spectrum. The smallest scale process (characteristic scale ???1.7 m) requires a low fractal dimension, ???1.0, and accounts for ???60% of the total rms velocity variation. A comparison of successive logs from 6900-7140 m depth indicates that such variations are not repeatable and thus probably do not represent true velocity variations in the crust. The results of this study resolve disparity between the differing published estimates of seismic heterogeneity based on the KTB sonic logs, and bridge the gap between estimates of crustal heterogeneity from geologic maps and borehole logs. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  9. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  10. S-waves velocity model for the SW-Iberia derived from the IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.; Ayarza, P.; Simancas, F.; Martinez-Poyatos, D.; Azor, A.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2009-04-01

    The IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects acquired in 2003 in SW-Iberia Peninsula provided constraints on the P-wave seismic velocity structure across the three tectonic provinces in the area: the South Portuguesse Zone (SPZ), the Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ) and the Central Iberia Zone (CIZ). These data were acquired by 650 vertical component seismographs (TEXAN seismic recorders) from the IRIS-PASSCAL Instrument center, using explosive sources with charge sizes ranging from 500 to 1000 kg. Both transects A and B are, approximately, 300 km long with a station spacing of 400 m and of 150 m respectively. The relatively small station spacing favored the lateral correlation of the seismic events and provided enough resolution for the identification of shear-wave arrivals. The most prominent S-wave phase recorded by the vertical component sensors corresponds to the SmS which is nearly horizontal for a velocity reduction of 4600 m/s. This phase can even be followed up to near vertical incidence at 18 s(twtt). A few S-wave crustal arrivals can be also identified, although at small offsets they interfere with the previous P-wave arrivals. The Sn phase can be observed at very far offsets providing additional constraints on the nature of the shallow subcrustal mantle. Furthermore, slant stacks of the shot gathers (tau-p sections) reveal the existing of PS energy. PS phases are more difficult to identify in the shot gathers. Finally, a preliminary S-wave velocity model has been derived by iterative forward modeling to provide additional constraints on the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle beneath the Variscan of SW-Iberia.

  11. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A.; DeAngelo, Michael V.; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A.; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  12. Active faulting and deformation of the Coalinga anticline as interpreted from three-dimensional velocity structure and seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberhart-Phillips, D.

    1989-01-01

    This work gives a clear picture of the geometry of aftershock seismicity in a large thrust earthquake. Interpretation of hypocenters and fault plane solutions, from the 1983 Coalinga, Coast Range California, earthquake sequence, in combination with the three-dimensional velocity structure shows that the active faulting beneath the fold primarily consists of a set of southwest dipping thrusts uplifting blocks of higher-velocity material. With the three-dimensional velocity model each individual hypocenter moved slightly (0-2km) in accord with the details of the surrounding velocity structure, so that secondary features in the seismicity pattern are more detailed than with a local one-dimensional model and station corrections. The overall character of the fault plane solutions was not altered by the three-dimensional model, but the more accurate ray paths did result in distinct changes. In particular, the mainshock has a fault plane dipping 30?? southwest instead of the 23?? obtained with the one-dimensional model. -from Author

  13. Crustal velocity structure across the Main Ethiopian Rift: results from two-dimensional wide-angle seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, G. D.; Thybo, H.; Maguire, P. K. H.

    2005-09-01

    We present the results of velocity modelling of a recently acquired wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile across the Main Ethiopian Rift. The models show a continental type of crust with significant asymmetry between the two sides of the rift. A 2- to 5-km-thick layer of sedimentary and volcanic sequences is modelled across the entire region. This is underlain by a 40- to 45-km-thick crust with a c. 15-km-thick high-velocity lowest crustal layer beneath the western plateau. This layer is absent from the eastern side, where the crust is 35 km thick beneath the sediments. We interpret this layer as underplated material associated with the Oligocene flood basalts of the region with possible subsequent addition by recent magmatic events. Slight crustal thinning is observed beneath the rift, where Pn velocities indicate the presence of hot mantle rocks containing partial melt. Beneath the rift axis, the velocities of the upper crustal layers are 5-10 per cent higher than outside the rift, which we interpret as resulting from mafic intrusions that can be associated with magmatic centres observed in the rift valley. Variations in seismic reflectivity suggest the presence of layering in the lower crust beneath the rift, possibly indicating the presence of sills, as well as some layering in the proposed underplated body.

  14. Calibration formulae and values for velocity seismometers used in the 1998 Santa Clara Valley, California seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindh, Allan G.; Eaton, Jerry P.; O'Neill Allen, Mary; Healy, John H.; Stewart, Samuel W.; Damerell, Lu

    1999-01-01

    Eaton (1975), Bakun and Dratler (1976), Eaton (1977), Healy and O’Neil (1977), Asten (1977), Stewart and O'Neill (1980), Liu and Peselnick (1986), Eaton (1991), Rodgers et al. (1995), and many others (see Asten (1977) for a list of earlier references) have presented formulae for calculating the damped generator constant (or motor constant), and the damping constant (or fractional damping ratio) for magnetically damped velocity seismometers. Unfortunately the notation varies between authors, and not all the formulae allow for some of the significant variables -- differences in input impedance of the recording system in particular. This has become particularly relevant because the USGS seismic networks in California have traditionally set up their velocity sensors for the 10K Ohm impedance of the standard USGS analog telemetry systems (Eaton, 1977), but modern digital recording systems are usually set up with high input impedances, often of a megaohm or greater. Thus the nominal calibration values valid for USGS velocity sensors in their “normal” configuration are incorrect when they are recorded on other systems. In this short note we have collected the relevant formulae needed, and computed the seismometer responses for the various velocity sensors used in the recent Santa Clara Valley Seismic Experiment (SCVSE, see Lindh et al., 1999).

  15. Towards Simulating a Realistic Planetary Seismic Wavefield: The Contribution of the Megaregolith and Low-Velocity Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerr, N. C.; Weber, R. C.; Lin, P. P.; Thorne, M. S.; Garnero, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lunar seismograms are distinctly different from their terrestrial counterparts. The Apollo lunar seismometers recorded moonquakes without distinct P- or S-wave arrivals; instead waves arrive as a diffuse coda that decays over several hours making the identification of body waves difficult. The unusual character of the lunar seismic wavefield is generally tied to properties of the megaregolith: it consists of highly fractured and broken crustal rock, the result of extensive bombardment of the Moon. The megaregolith extends several kilometers into the lunar crust, possibly into the mantle in some regions, and is covered by a thin coating of fine-scale dust. These materials possess very low seismic velocities that strongly scatter the seismic wavefield at high frequencies. Directly modeling the effects of the megaregolith to simulate an accurate lunar seismic wavefield is a challenging computational problem, owing to the inherent 3-D nature of the problem and the high frequencies (>1 Hz) required. Here we focus on modeling the long duration coda, studying the effects of the low velocities found in the megaregolith. We produce synthetic seismograms using 1-D slowness integration methodologies, GEMINI and reflectivity, and a 3-D Cartesian finite difference code, Wave Propagation Program, to study the effect of thin layers of low velocity on the surface of a planet. These codes allow us generate seismograms with dominant frequencies of ~1 Hz. For background lunar seismic structure we explore several models, including the recent model of Weber et al., Science, 2011. We also investigate variations in megaregolithic thickness, velocity, attenuation, and seismogram frequency content. Our results are compared to the Apollo seismic dataset, using both a cross correlation technique and integrated envelope approach to investigate coda decay. We find our new high frequency results strongly support the hypothesis that the long duration of the lunar seismic codas is generated by

  16. Transition from elastic to inelastic deformation identified by a change in trend of seismic attenuation, not seismic velocity - A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Verheij, Jeroen; Frehner, Marcel; Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The transition from elastic to inelastic deformation occurs at the yield point in a stress-strain diagram. This yield point expresses the moment when a material undergoes permanent deformation and is marked by the onset of fracturing in the brittle field at relatively low pressures and temperatures or the onset of dislocation and/or diffusional creep processes in the ductile field at higher temperatures and pressures. Detection of this transition in materials under stress using an indirect measurement technique is crucial to predict imminent failure, loss of material integrity, or of approaching release of energy by seismic rupture. Here we use a pulse transmission method at ultrasonic frequencies to record the change in acoustic wave form across the transition from elastic to inelastic deformation in a rock-fracturing experiment. In particular, we measure both the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation with increasing strain from the elastic regime all the way to macroscopic failure. Our results show that the transition from elastic to inelastic deformation coincides with a minimum in attenuation. Below this minimum, pre-existing microfractures close, leading to a reduction of attenuation. Above this minimum, formation of new microfractures occurs and attenuation increases until peak stress conditions, at which larger fractures are formed and the rock starts to lose its strength and integrity. At the same time, the acoustic wave velocity continues to increase across the transition from elastic to inelastic deformation; hence the acoustic velocity is not a valid indicator for this elastic to inelastic transition. We propose that analysis of attenuation, not velocity, of acoustic waves through stressed materials may thus be used, for example, to detect imminent failure in materials, onset of crack formation in pipes or the cement casing in boreholes, or onset of fracturing in the near wellbore area. On a larger scale, attenuation monitoring may help predict the

  17. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  18. The seismic velocity structure of a foreshock zone on an oceanic transform fault: Imaging a rupture barrier to the 2008 Mw 6.0 earthquake on the Gofar fault, EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Collins, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    from ~100 km refraction profiles crossing the two faults, each using 8 short period ocean bottom seismometers from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth. These data are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals. We resolve a significant low velocity zone associated with the faults, which likely indicates rocks that have undergone intensive brittle deformation. Low velocities may also signify the presence of metamorphic alteration and/or elevated fluid pressures, both of which could have a significant affect on the friction laws that govern fault slip in these regions. A broad low velocity zone is apparent in the shallow crust (< 3km) at both faults, with velocities that are reduced by more than 1 km/s relative to the surrounding oceanic crust. A narrower zone of reduced seismic velocity appears to extend to mantle depths, and particularly on the Gofar fault, this corresponds with the seismogenic zone inferred from located foreshock seismicity, spanning depths of 3-9 km beneath the seafloor.

  19. Microplasticity effect in low-velocity zone induced by seismic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    Microplasticity effects in loam caused by seismic wave of frequency about 1000 Hz are detected in the borehole-to-borehole measurements. Microplasticity manifestations on seismic record are presented as the ladder-like stepwise changes in amplitude course. The step (plateau) on seismic trace is time delay, its duration depends on the strain-amplitude value. Time delay changes the frequency characteristic of stress pulse, nonlinearly transforms wave front, and shifts the amplitude maximum along time axis. The microplastic process occurs owing to the anomalous realignment of the internal stresses on the microstructural defects in the area of small deformations. This is the useful contribution to wave propagation physics. The received results can also be used in solving the applied problems in material science, seismic prospecting, diagnostics, etc.

  20. Three-dimensional velocity structure, seismicity, and fault structure in the Parkfield region, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberhart-Phillips, D.; Michael, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the three-dimensional velocity structure in a 60- by 80-km region containing the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault. The San Andreas fault (SAF), characterized by a sharp across-fault velocity gradient, is the primary feature in the velocity solution. The model also shows significant variations in the velocity and in the complexity of the velocity patterns along the SAF. There may be a general relation between increasing velocity and increasing ability of the rocks to store strain energy and release it as brittle failure. -from Authors

  1. Numerical Models of Subduction Beneath Non-Uniform Overriding Plates. Implications for Subduction Velocity and Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, J.; Billen, M. I.; Negredo, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones show significant along-strike variations of different subduction features. In particular there is a good correlation between variations of overriding plate thickness and variations of slab dip, seismic anisotropy and subduction velocity. Previous numerical models have shown that overriding plate thermal state influences the slab dip and variations in slab dip can cause trench-parallel flow above the slab. This suggests a causal link between overriding plate structure, slab geometry and mantle flow in subduction zones. Models also show that interplate coupling is stronger for colder overriding plates, which might lead to lower subduction velocities. We implement generic numerical models to study the effect of the overriding plate structure on the evolution of slab geometry, induced mantle flow and subduction velocity. We solve the 3D, time dependent thermo-mechanical equations with a non-linear rheology to simulate buoyancy driven subduction processes. We find that along-strike variations in thermal thickness of the overriding plate cause increased hydrodynamic suction and shallower slab dip beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate; the variation in slab geometry drives strong trench-parallel flow beneath the slab and a complex flow pattern above the slab. Induced mantle flow varies significantly with time, suggesting that the global variability in seismic anisotropy observations in subduction zones is in part due to the non-steady-state behavior of these systems. This new mechanism for driving trench-parallel flow provides a good explanation for seismic anisotropy observations from the Middle and South America subduction zones. Our results also show that increased interplate coupling beneath a colder portion of the overriding plate leads to a reduction of the subduction velocity in the region, leading to along-strike variations subduction velocity. These results provide a good explanation of the observed present-day variations in

  2. Correlations between seismic wave velocities and physical properties of near-surface geologic materials in the southern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.

    1978-01-01

    To identify geologic units with distinctly different seismic responses for the purposes of seismic zonation, compressional and shear wave velocities have been measured in boreholes at 59 sites in the San Francisco Bay region in a wide range of near-surface (0-30m) geologic materials. Several physical parameters, which can be readily determined in the field, were found to correlate with the shear wave velocities and were used to define seismically distinct groups. For the unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sediments, texture, standard penetration resistance and depth were used to define eight seismically distinct groups. For the bedrock materials, fracture spacing and hardness were used to differentiate ten distinct categories. The correlation obtained between shear wave velocity and the physical parameters were used to regroup the map units defined for the San Francisco Bay region into seismically distinct units. The map units for the younger unconsolidated sediments can be really differentiated seismically. In contrast, the older semiconsolidated sedimentary deposits and bedrock units, which have experienced significant variations in post-depositial changes, show wider and overlapping velocity ranges. The map units for the sedimentary deposits have been regrouped into eight seismically distinct geotechnical units. The bedrock map units have been broadly regrouped into five distinct categories. Compressional wave velocities were not found to be well correlated with the physical parameters dependent on the soil or rock structure. For materials above the water table, the wide velocity variations found for each geotechnical group can be attributed to differences in degree of saturation. The strong correlations observed between shear wave velocity and other readily determine physical properties suggest that geologic maps which incorporate these parameters are most useful for seismic zonation.

  3. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  4. Estimation of seismic velocity in the subducting crust of the Pacific slab beneath Hokkaido, northern Japan by using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, T.; Nakajima, J.; Toyokuni, G.; Kita, S.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    A subducting crust contains a large amount of water as a form of hydrous minerals (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003), and the crust plays important roles for water transportation and seismogenesis in subduction zones at intermediate depths (e.g., Kirby et al., 1996; Iwamori, 2007). Therefore, the investigation of seismic structure in the crust is important to understand ongoing physical processes with subduction of oceanic lithosphere. A guided wave which propagates in the subducting crust is recorded in seismograms at Hokkaido, northern Japan (Shiina et al., 2014). Here, we estimated P- and S-wave velocity in the crust with guided waves, and obtained P-wave velocity of 6.6-7.3 km/s and S-wave velocity of 3.6-4.2 km/s at depths of 50-90 km. Moreover, Vp/Vs ratio in the crust is calculated to be 1.80-1.85 in that depth range. The obtained P-wave velocity about 6.6km/s at depths of 50-70 km is consistent with those estimated in Tohoku, northeast Japan (Shiina et al., 2013), and this the P-wave velocity is lower than those expected from models of subducting crustal compositions, such as metamorphosed MORB model (Hacker et al., 2003). In contrast, at greater depths (>80 km), the P-wave velocity marks higher velocity than the case of NE Japan and the velocity is roughly comparable to those of the MORB model. The obtained S-wave velocity distribution also shows characteristics similar to P waves. This regional variation may be caused by a small variation in thermal regime of the Pacific slab beneath the two regions as a result of the normal subduction in Tohoku and oblique subduction in Hokkaido. In addition, the effect of seismic anisotropy in the subducting crust would not be ruled out because rays used in the analysis in Hokkaido propagate mostly in the trench-parallel direction, while those in Tohoku are sufficiently criss-crossed.

  5. A 3D Seismic Velocity Model Offshore Southern California from Ambient Noise Tomography of the ALBACORE OBS Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, M. D.; Bowden, D. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary in Southern California extends far west of the coastline, and a 12-month ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array spanned the western side of the plate boundary to image lithospheric seismic velocities. Velocities are modeled through stacked cross correlations of ambient noise data. Twelve months of continuous data were used from 22 OBS stations and ~30 coastal and island Southern California Seismic Network stations. Particular attention has been paid to improving signal-to-noise ratios in the noise correlations with OBS stations by removing the effects of instrument tilt and infragravity waves. Different applications of preprocessing techniques allow us to distinguish the fundamental and first higher order Rayleigh modes, especially in deep water OBS pairs where the water layer dominates crustal sensitivity of the fundamental mode. Standard time domain and frequency domain methods are used to examine surface wave dispersion curves for group and phase velocities between 5 and 50 second periods, and these are inverted for 3D velocity structure. The results define the transition in three dimensions from continental lithospheric structure in the near-shore region to oceanic structure west of the continental borderland. While the most prominent features of the model relate to thinning of the crust west of the Patton Escarpment, other notable anomalies are present north-to-south throughout the continental borderland and along the coast from the Los Angeles Basin to the Peninsular Ranges. The velocity model will help describe the region's tectonic history, as well as provide new constraints for determination of earthquake relocations and rupture styles.

  6. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  7. Estimating the effects of sill intrusion on sediments in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California based on seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. S.; Lizarralde, D.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the change in sedimentary seismic velocity due to intrusion of magmatic sills into the sediments of Guaymas Basin, a young, sedimented spreading center in the Gulf of California. In Guaymas Basin, igneous sills, on average 1 km in width, intrude sediments at depths of hundreds of meters below the seafloor. Sediments at these depths are young and, where they are not close to a recently intruded sill, have experienced little diagentic changes. However, multichannel seismic (MCS) images show that these shallow sediments are structurally disrupted immediately above intruded sills. This disruption probably indicates some degree of thermogenic alteration due to the intruded sills, because Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 64 cores recovered from the axial trough of Guaymas Basin show that sediments above intruded sills are typically highly altered, with alteration including substantial porosity reduction and carbon loss. Shallow sill emplacement appears to be widespread throughout Guaymas Basin, and because the sediments are rich in organic carbon, it is possible that carbon released from the sediments into the ocean via this mechanism is an important component of the carbon budget of this basin. If widespread shallow sill intrusion is common to other young rifts and backarc spreading centers, then this mechanism may result in a globally important flux of carbon into the ocean. In addition, it has been suggested that carbon release due to sill intrusion associated with large magmatic events, such as the formation of the Siberian traps and the North Atlantic Tertiary igneous province, has led to global warming events. The degree of alteration and carbon release resulting from widespread heating of organic-rich sediments is poorly known, however. Our results attempt to remotely quantify the degree of sediment alteration due to sill intrusion based on changes in sediment seismic velocity. The MCS images from Guaymas Basin enable us to identify

  8. Crustal velocity structure associated with the eastern Tennessee seismic zone: Vp and Vs images based upon local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Christine A.; Withers, Mitchell M.; Cox, Randel Tom; Vlahovic, Gordana; Arroucau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present three-dimensional P and S wave velocity models for the active eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) using arrival time data from more than 1000 local earthquakes. A nonlinear tomography method is used that involves sequential inversion for model and hypocenter parameters. We image several velocity anomalies that persist through most of the inversion volume. Some anomalies support the presence of known features such as an ancient rift zone in northern Tennessee. Other anomalies reveal the presence of basement features that can be correlated with regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. We image a narrow, NE-SW trending, steeply dipping zone of low velocities that extends to a depth of at least 24 km and is associated with the vertical projection of the prominent New York-Alabama magnetic lineament. The low-velocity zone may have an apparent dip to the SE at depths exceeding 15 km. The low-velocity zone is interpreted as a major basement fault juxtaposing Granite-Rhyolite basement to the NW from Grenville southern Appalachian basement to the SE. Relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments suggesting reactivation of a distributed zone of deformation associated with a major strike-slip fault. We suggest that the ETSZ represents reactivation of an ancient shear zone established during formation of the super continent Rodinia.

  9. Changes in seismic velocity during the first 14 months of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotovec-Ellis, A.J.; Vidale, J.E.; Gomberg, Joan S.; Thelen, Weston A.; Moran, Seth C.

    2015-01-01

    Mount St. Helens began erupting in late 2004 following an 18 year quiescence. Swarms of repeating earthquakes accompanied the extrusion of a mostly solid dacite dome over the next 4 years. In some cases the waveforms from these earthquakes evolved slowly, likely reflecting changes in the properties of the volcano that affect seismic wave propagation. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify small changes in seismic velocity structure (usually <1%) between two similar earthquakes and employed waveforms from several hundred families of repeating earthquakes together to create a continuous function of velocity change observed at permanent stations operated within 20 km of the volcano. The high rate of earthquakes allowed tracking of velocity changes on an hourly time scale. Changes in velocity were largest near the newly extruding dome and likely related to shallow deformation as magma first worked its way to the surface. We found strong correlation between velocity changes and the inverse of real-time seismic amplitude measurements during the first 3 weeks of activity, suggesting that fluctuations of pressure in the shallow subsurface may have driven both seismicity and velocity changes. Velocity changes during the remainder of the eruption likely result from a complex interplay of multiple effects and are not well explained by any single factor alone, highlighting the need for complementary geophysical data when interpreting velocity changes.

  10. 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Central Idaho/ Eastern Oregon from Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities Derived from Ambient Seismic Noise: Newest Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the latest 3-D isotropic crustal velocity model beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity model from vertical component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on data from the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the stacked cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith. We derived Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. 3-D checkerboard resolution tests indicate lateral resolution of better than 40 km. Preliminary results show higher S wave velocities in the western study area, and lower velocities in the lower crust on the east side of the network, consistent with Basin-and-Range style extension there. A tabular velocity anomaly juxtaposing higher above lower seismic velocities dips shallow west in the midcrust on the west side of the network.

  11. Towards a Comprehensive Seismic Velocity Model for the Broader Africa-Eurasia Collision Region, to Improve Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    der Lee, S v; Flanagan, M P; Rodgers, A J; Pasyanos, M E; Marone, F; Romanowicz, B

    2005-07-13

    We report on progress towards a new, comprehensive three-dimensional model of seismic velocity in a broad region encompassing the Middle East, northern Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, the Turkish-Iranian Plateau, Indus Valley, and the Hindu Kush. Our model will be based on regional waveform fits, surface wave group velocity measurements, teleseismic arrival times of S and P waves, receiver functions, and published results from active source experiments. We are in the process of assembling each of these data sets and testing the joint inversion for subsets of the data. Seismograms come from a variety of permanent and temporary seismic stations in the region. Some of the data is easily accessible through, for example, IRIS, while collection of other data is more involved. This work builds on ongoing work by Schmid et al. (GJI, 2004, and manuscript in preparation). In these proceedings we highlight our data sets and their inferences, demonstrate the proposed new data-inversion modeling methodology, discuss results from preliminary inversions of subsets of the data, and demonstrate the prediction of arrival times with three-dimensional velocity models. We compare our preliminary inversion results to the results of Schmid et al., and the predicted arrival times to ground-truth data from the NNSA Knowledge Base. Our data sets are simultaneously redundant and highly complementary. The combined data coverage will ensure that our three-dimensional model comprises the crust, the upper mantle, including the transition zone, and the top of the lower mantle, with spatially varying, but useful resolution. The region of interest is one of the most structurally heterogeneous in the world. Continental collision, rifting and sea-floor spreading, back-arc spreading, oceanic subduction, rotating micro plates, continental shelf, and stable platforms, are just some of the region's characteristics. Seismicity and the distribution of seismic stations are

  12. Contribution of seismic velocity studies to structural and lithostratigraphic reconstructions: Salt-intruded corridor ceiling and Lower Turonian Beida anhydrite deposits' outline in the central southern Atlas of Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi; Bédir, Mourad

    2007-01-01

    The Triassic salt dome/ripple ceiling and the Lower Turonian anhydrite Beida distribution are the main geological research objectives in central Tunisia. 2D seismic interpretation and outcrop studies show the thickness and the facies variations of the Turonian deposits identified along the structures recognised in the Gafsa area. Sedimentary distribution in the sub-basin and on the platform zones of the Gafsa plain is controlled by the WNW-ESE salt-intruded Gafsa corridor, the north-south Sidi Ali Ben Aoun and NE-SW Sidi Aïch master strike-slip faults. The conventional seismic velocity enables the extraction of an iso-velocity section that allows us to follow the Sehib-Berda salt-intruded ceiling identified in the Turonian deposits. The interval velocity map was helpful to predict the facies nature and, therefore, to delineate the Lower Turonian anhydrite Beida Formation that filled a local part of the northern Gafsa plain and does not exceed the Sidi Aïch fault to the north and the Sidi Ali Ben Aoun fault to the southeast. The palaeogeographic distribution is the result of a broadly NE-SW extensional tectonic event. The Early Turonian distension is followed by the Middle and Upper Turonian sinistral transtension, causing an inversion of the structuring and a new distribution of the deposits.

  13. 3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle in the northeastern Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Horiuchi, Shigeki; Hasegawa, Akira

    1990-09-01

    3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the northeastern Japan Arc is investigated by using arrival time data from local earthquakes. We use a velocity model composed of three layers corresponding to the upper crust, the lower crust and the uppermost mantle, respectively. Taking into account the observed regional variation of P n-velocity, the uppermost mantle is further divided into three parts by two P n-velocity boundaries near the coasts of the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean. The velocities within the upper crust, the lower crust and the three parts of the uppermost mantle are assumed to be constant. Locations of two P n-velocity boundaries and depth distributions of the Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are expressed by continuous functions of unknown parameters. Station corrections and hypocenters are also introduced to be unknowns. These unknown parameters are determined by inverting arrival time data of P- and S-wave first arrivals and clear later arrivals of P g- and P ∗-waves. The P n-velocity boundary between the land and the Pacific Ocean is located approximately along the Pacific coastline and that between the land and the Japan Sea is nearly along the Japan Sea coastline. The Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are at depths ranging from 14 to 20 km and from 27 to 36 km, respectively. The Conrad and the Moho depths have similar spatial distributions. They are deep beneath the land and become shallower toward the western and the eastern coastlines. Beneath the land, they are shallow in the central part of the Tohoku District and become deeper toward both the north and the south directions. In the north, they become shallow again.

  14. Characteristics of Offshore Hawai';i Island Seismicity and Velocity Structure, including Lo';ihi Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, D. K.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Island of Hawai';i is home to the most active volcanoes in the Hawaiian Islands. The island's isolated nature, combined with the lack of permanent offshore seismometers, creates difficulties in recording small magnitude earthquakes with accuracy. This background offshore seismicity is crucial in understanding the structure of the lithosphere around the island chain, the stresses on the lithosphere generated by the weight of the islands, and how the volcanoes interact with each other offshore. This study uses the data collected from a 9-month deployment of a temporary ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) network fully surrounding Lo';ihi volcano. This allowed us to widen the aperture of earthquake detection around the Big Island, lower the magnitude detection threshold, and better constrain the hypocentral depths of offshore seismicity that occurs between the OBS network and the Hawaii Volcano Observatory's land based network. Although this study occurred during a time of volcanic quiescence for Lo';ihi, it establishes a basis for background seismicity of the volcano. More than 480 earthquakes were located using the OBS network, incorporating data from the HVO network where possible. Here we present relocated hypocenters using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), as well as tomographic images for a 30 km square area around the summit of Lo';ihi. Illuminated by using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), offshore seismicity during this study is punctuated by events locating in the mantle fault zone 30-50km deep. These events reflect rupture on preexisting faults in the lower lithosphere caused by stresses induced by volcano loading and flexure of the Pacific Plate (Wolfe et al., 2004; Pritchard et al., 2007). Tomography was performed using the double-difference seismic tomography method TomoDD (Zhang & Thurber, 2003) and showed overall velocities to be slower than

  15. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and wave propagation at the San Jose, California, dense seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.; Harmsen, S.; Zerva, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion records from a 52-element dense seismic array near San Jose, California, are analyzed to obtain site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and plane-wave propagation characteristics. The array, located on the eastern side of the Santa Clara Valley south of the San Francisco Bay, is sited over the Evergreen basin, a 7-km-deep depression with Miocene and younger deposits. Site response values below 4 Hz are up to a factor of 2 greater when larger, regional records are included in the analysis, due to strong surface-wave development within the Santa Clara Valley. The pattern of site amplification is the same, however, with local or regional events. Site amplification increases away from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley, reaching a maximum over the western edge of the Evergreen basin, where the pre-Cenozoic basement shallows rapidly. Amplification then decreases further to the west. This pattern may be caused by lower shallow shear-wave velocities and thicker Quaternary deposits further from the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and generation/trapping of surface waves above the shallowing basement of the western Evergreen basin. Shear-wave velocities from the inversion of site response spectra based on smaller, local earthquakes compare well with those obtained independently from our seismic reflection/refraction measurements. Velocities from the inversion of site spectra that include larger, regional records do not compare well with these measurements. A mix of local and regional events, however, is appropriate for determination of site response to be used in seismic hazard evaluation, since large damaging events would excite both body and surface waves with a wide range in ray parameters. Frequency-wavenumber, plane-wave analysis is used to determine the backazimuth and apparent velocity of coherent phases at the array. Conventional, high-resolution, and multiple signal characterization f-k power spectra and stacked slowness power spectra are

  16. Inversion of ambient seismic noise HVSR to evaluate velocity and structural models of the Lower Tagus Basin, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, J. F.; Silva, H. G.; Torres, R. J. G.; Caldeira, B.; Bezzeghoud, M.; Furtado, J. A.; Carvalho, J.

    2016-07-01

    During its history, several significant earthquakes have shaken the Lower Tagus Valley (Portugal). These earthquakes were destructive; some strong earthquakes were produced by large ruptures in offshore structures located southwest of the Portuguese coastline, and other moderate earthquakes were produced by local faults. In recent years, several studies have successfully obtained strong-ground motion syntheses for the Lower Tagus Valley using the finite difference method. To confirm the velocity model of this sedimentary basin obtained from geophysical and geological data, we analysed the ambient seismic noise measurements by applying the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. This study reveals the dependence of the frequency and amplitude of the low-frequency (HVSR) peaks (0.2-2 Hz) on the sediment thickness. We have obtained the depth of the Cenozoic basement along a profile transversal to the basin by the inversion of these ratios, imposing constraints from seismic reflection, boreholes, seismic sounding and gravimetric and magnetic potentials. This technique enables us to improve the existing three-dimensional model of the Lower Tagus Valley structure. The improved model will be decisive for the improvement of strong motion predictions in the earthquake hazard analysis of this highly populated basin. The methodology discussed can be applied to any other sedimentary basin.

  17. Laboratory Velocity Measurements Used for Recovering Soil Distributions from Field Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Bertete-Aguirre, H

    1999-10-20

    Recent advances in field methods make it possible to obtain high quality compressional (P) and shear (S) velocity data for the shallow subsurface. Environmental and engineering problems require new methods for interpreting the velocity data in terms of sub-surface soil distribution. Recent advances in laboratory measurement techniques have provided high quality velocity data for soils at low pressures that can be used to improve interpretation of field data. We show how laboratory data can be used to infer lithology from field data. We use laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements from artificial soils made by combining various amounts of sand and peat moss.

  18. Velocity structure and the role of fluids in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Calò, M.; Bouchaala, F.; Vavryčuk, V.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we apply the double-difference tomography to investigate the detailed 3-D structure within and around the Nový Kostel Seismic Zone, an area in the Czech Republic known for frequent occurrences of earthquake swarms. We use data from the 2008 swarm since it has already been analysed in terms of earthquake focal mechanisms, principal faults, tectonic stress and foci migration. We selected about 500 microearthquakes recorded at 22 local seismic stations of the West Bohemia seismic monitoring network (WEBNET). Applying double-difference tomography, combined with weighted average model (WAM) post-processing to correct for parameter dependence effects, we produce and interpret 3-D models of the Vp-to-Vs ratio (Vp/Vs) in and around the focal zone. The modelled Vp/Vs ratio shows several distinct structures, namely an area of high Vp/Vs ratio correlating with the foci of the microearthquakes, and a layer of low values directly above it. These structures may reflect changes in lithology and/or fluid concentration. The overlaying low Vp/Vs ratio layer coincides with the base of the Fichtelgebirge (Smrčiny) granitic intrusion. It is possible that the base of the layer acts as a fluid trap and an upper limit to the seismicity, resulting in observed periodic swarms.

  19. Insights into induced earthquakes and aftershock activity with in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations in an active underground mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Olivier, G.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.; Lynch, R.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of the crust shortly after large earthquakes has been the subject of numerous studies, but many co- and post-seismic processes remain poorly understood. Damage and healing of the bulk rock mass, post-seismic deformation and the mechanisms of earthquake triggering are still not well understood. These processes are important to properly model and understand the behaviour of faults and earthquake cycles.In this presentation, we will show how in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations have given new insights into these co- and post-seismic processes. An experiment was performed where a blast was detonated in a tunnel in an underground mine, while seismic velocity variations were accurately (0.005 %) measured with ambient seismic noise correlations. Additionally, aftershock activity was examined and the influence of the removal of a piece of solid rock was estimated with elastic static stress modelling. The majority of the aftershocks were delayed with respect to the passing of the dynamic waves from the blast, while the locations of the aftershocks appeared clustered and not homogeneously spread around the blast location. A significant velocity drop is visible during the time of the blast, which is interpreted as co-seismic damage and plastic deformation. These non-elastic effects are healed by the confining stresses over a period of 5 days until the seismic velocity converges to a new baseline level. The instantaneous weakening and gradual healing observed from the velocity variations are qualitatively similar to results reported in laboratory studies. The change in the baseline level of the seismic velocity before and after the blast indicate a change in the static stress that is comparable to the results of elastic static stress modelling. The differences between the elastic model predictions and the seismic velocity variations could be due to zones of fractured rock, indicated by the spatial clustering of the aftershocks, that are not

  20. The effect of fault-bend folding on seismic velocity in the marginal ridge of accretionary prisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Y.; Wang, Chun-Yong; Hwang, W.-t.; Cochrane, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid venting in accretionary prisms, which feeds chemosynthetic biological communities, occurs mostly on the marginal thrust ridge. New seismic data for the marginal ridge of the Cascadia prism show significantly lower velocity than that in the adjacent oceanic basin and place important constraints on the interpretations of why fluid venting occurs mostly on the marginal ridge. We employed a finite-element method to analyze a typical fault-bend folding model to explain the phenomenon. The fault in the model is simulated by contact elements. The elements are characterized not only by finite sliding along a slide line, but also by elastoplastic deformation. We present the results of a stress analysis which show that the marginal ridge is under subhorizontal extension and the frontal thrust is under compression. This state of stress favors the growth of tensile cracks in the marginal ridge, facilitates fluid flow and reduces seismic velocities therein; on the other hand, it may close fluid pathways along the frontal thrust and divert fluid flow to the marginal ridge. ?? 1995 Birkha??user Verlag.

  1. Anisotropic 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Idaho/ Oregon from a Joint Inversion of Group and Phase Velocities of Love and Rayleigh Waves from Ambient Seismic Noise: Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present new 3-D radially anisotropic and isotropic crustal velocity models beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity models from Love and horizontal component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, dataset using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the rotated stacked horizontal component cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. We derived group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith.

  2. Three-dimensional seismic velocity models, high-precision earthquake locations and their implications for seismic, tectonic and magmatic settings in the Coso Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Lin, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Coso Geothermal Field (CGF) lies at the east of Sierra Nevada and is situated in tectonically active area with the presence of hot spring, rhyolite domes at the surface, strike-slip and normal faulting and frequent seismic activity. In this study, we present our comprehensive analysis of three-dimensional velocity structure, high-precision earthquake relocation and in situ Vp/Vs estimates. We select 1,893 master events among 177,000 events between 1981 and 2011 recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network stations. High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) Vp and Vp/Vs models in Coso are inverted from the master events with 52,160 P- and 23,688 S-wave first arrivals by using the SIMUL2000 algorithm. The tomographic model reveals slightly high Vp and Vp/Vs in most regions of Coso near the surface compared to the layers at depth of 6 and 12 km, which is consistent with the fact that the Coso area is filled with diorite and minor basalt. The feature of low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs between 6 and 12 km depths underneath the CGF can be related to the porous, gas-filled rock or volatile-rich magma. The low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs structure from the surface to 3 km depth beneath the Indian Wells Valley is consistent with the existence of the 2 km deep sediment strata revealed by the borehole data. The resulting new 3-D velocity model is used to improve the absolute event location accuracy. We then apply waveform cross-correlation, similar event cluster analysis and differential time relocation methods to improve relative event location accuracy with the horizontal and vertical location uncertainties in tens of meters. The relocated seismicity indicates that the brittle-ductile transition depth is as shallow as 5 km underneath the CGF. We also estimate in situ near-source Vp/Vs ratio within each event cluster using differential times from cross-correlation to complement the Vp/Vs model from tomographic inversions, which will help to estimate the volume fraction of

  3. Oceanic Intraplate Magmatism Off The Vøring Volcanic Passive Margin, Norway - Constraints On Origin From Seismic Velocity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.

    2009-12-01

    Early Eocene continental breakup in the NE Atlantic was associated with voluminous extrusive and intrusive magmatism, and initial seafloor spreading produced anomalously thick oceanic crust. During 2003, a wide-angle seismic data set was collected on the Norwegian Margin under the Euromargins 2003 program. One target was a bathymetric high of unclear nature on oceanic crust off the Vøring Plateau. Velocity modeling of the data shows a 14-15 km thick crust supporting the high, and both velocity structure and dimension are similar to the thick igneous crust created at the Vøring margin during breakup. By analyzing stratigraphic disturbances of sedimentary strata on multichannel seismic reflection data around the high, we argued in a recent G3 paper that the bathymetric relief of this Mid- to Late Eocene oceanic crust was established much later, probably Late Miocene. We estimated that ~57500 cubic-km of igneous material was added to the crust at that time, forcing up the high by dominantly lower-crustal growth. This explanation has, however, not been universally accepted, and it has been argued that the crustal thickness may be primary, tied to the strong magmatism following crustal breakup, and later uplift caused by movement on East Jan Mayen Fracture Zone bordering the high to the Southwest. We have looked closer at the velocity structure of the igneous crust of the high in an attempt to constrain the melting mode of the mantle. In recent years several groups have compared igneous crustal thickness to mean seismic velocity (H-Vp) at the northeast Atlantic margins, and always found a positive correlation. This correlation indicates that the breakup magmatism was caused by elevated mantle temperature, cooling down as seafloor spreading progressed. We obtain the same result for the margin part of our profile, but the H-Vp diagram for the bathymetric high itself shows a low correlation. We conclude that melting was quite uniform and the melting degree moderate here

  4. Evidence of a Volcanic Rifted Margin: A Velocity Model for the Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening Seismic Refraction Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Mark; Van Avendonk, Harm; Christeson, Gail

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening marine seismic refraction project (GUMBO) is a study of the lithological composition and structural evolution of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) that uses Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) data from four transects in the Northern GoM. Our analysis focuses specifically on line 4, the easternmost transect which extends over ~500 km from the continental shelf near Gainesville across the Florida Escarpment to the deep water GoM. Shear-wave first arrivals are picked from eleven out of the 39 OBS shot records in order to perform a tomographic inversion. The resulting shear-wave velocity model is used in conjunction with a previously constructed P-wave model to plot Vs as a function of Vp. We compare the Vp-Vs relationship with empirical velocities from the literature for the purpose of constraining lithological composition along GUMBO Line 4, and we make an interpretation of the structural evolution of the eastern GoM. The crust landward of the Florida Escarpment appears from our comparison with external data to be normal continental crust. Velocities plot within ~100 -200 m/s from compilations of seismic velocities (Vp = 6.2 - 7.0 km/sec; Vs = 3.8 - 4.0 km/sec) of felsic crystalline basement. Seaward of the escarpment, velocities in the oceanic crust are anomalously high (Vp = 6.5 - 7 km/sec; Vs = 4.0 - 4.6 km/sec). A possible explanation for this is that early-Jurassic basaltic sheet flows formed subaerially, reducing the vesicularity found in basalts that have cooled rapidly underwater. An increased magnesium and iron content could also account for these high velocities, and would suggest that the oceanic crust formed at higher mantle potential temperatures than previously thought. Geometrically, the transition from thick to thin crust near the Florida Escarpment on GUMBO line 4 is relatively narrow, which may be explained by rapid continental breakup with little stretching of continental crust. Alternatively, this margin may also have

  5. Continent-sized anomalous zones with low seismic velocity at the base of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; McNamara, Allen K.; Shim, Sang-Heon

    2016-07-01

    Seismic images of Earth's interior reveal two massive anomalous zones at the base of the mantle, above the core, where seismic waves travel slowly. The mantle materials that surround these anomalous regions are thought to be composed of cooler rocks associated with downward advection of former oceanic tectonic plates. However, the origin and composition of the anomalous provinces is uncertain. These zones have long been depicted as warmer-than-average mantle materials related to convective upwelling. Yet, they may also be chemically distinct from the surrounding mantle, and potentially partly composed of subducted or primordial material, and have therefore been termed thermochemical piles. From seismic, geochemical and mineral physics data, the emerging view is that these thermochemical piles appear denser than the surrounding mantle materials, are dynamically stable and long-lived, and are shaped by larger-scale mantle flow. Whether remnants of a primordial layer or later accumulations of more-dense materials, the composition of the piles is modified over time by stirring and by chemical reactions with material from the surrounding mantle, underlying core and potentially from volatile elements transported into the deep Earth by subducted plates. Upwelling mantle plumes may originate from the thermochemical piles, so the unusual chemical composition of the piles could be the source of distinct trace-element signatures observed in hotspot lavas.

  6. Structure and Deformation in the Transpressive Zone of Southern California Inferred from Seismicity, Velocity, and Qp Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.

    2004-12-01

    We synthesize relocated regional seismicity and 3D velocity and Qp models to infer structure and deformation in the transpressive zone of southern California. These models provide a comprehensive synthesis of the tectonic fabric of the upper to middle crust, and the brittle ductile transition zone that in some cases extends into the lower crust. The regional seismicity patterns in southern California are brought into focus when the hypocenters are relocated using the double difference method. In detail, often the spatial correlation between background seismicity and late Quaternary faults is improved as the hypocenters become more clustered, and the spatial patterns are more sharply defined. Along some of the strike-slip faults the seismicity clusters decrease in width and form alignments implying that in many cases the clusters are associated with a single fault. In contrast, the Los Angeles Basin seismicity remains mostly scattered, reflecting a 3D distribution of the tectonic compression. We present the results of relocating 327,000 southern California earthquakes that occurred between 1984 and 2002. In particular, the depth distribution is improved and less affected by layer boundaries in velocity models or other similar artifacts, and thus improves the definition of the brittle ductile transition zone. The 3D VP and VP/VS models confirm existing tectonic interpretations and provide new insights into the configuration of the geological structures in southern California. The models extend from the US-Mexico border in the south to the Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada in the north, and have 15 km horizontal grid spacing and an average vertical grid spacing of 4 km, down to 22 km depth. The heterogeneity of the crustal structure as imaged in both the VP and VP/VS models is larger within the Pacific than the North America plate, reflecting regional asymmetric variations in the crustal composition and past tectonic processes. Similarly, the relocated seismicity is

  7. Seismic velocities and attenuation in an underground granitic waste repository subjected to heating

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.

    1984-03-01

    The behavior of a granitic rock mass subjected to thermal load has been studied by an acoustic cross-hole technique between four boreholes, over a period of some two years. Velocities between boreholes were obtained from the times-of-flight of pulses of acoustic waves between transducers clamped to the borehole wall. The attenuation was obtained by a spectral ratios technique. When the heater was turned on, the velocities increased rapidly to an asymptotic value. When the heater was turned off, the velocities decreased rapidly to their original values or below. Velocities along a particular profile were found to increase linearly with the mean temperature in the profile tested. The attenuation showed little correlation with changes in temperature or the associated thermal stresses, but there was a good correlation of attenuation with water content and the related changes in pore pressure. 18 references, 7 figures.

  8. Slow slip events estimated from ground deformation and seismic wave velocity structure estimated from seismic wave tomography in the Tokai region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, F.; Ohota, Y.; Negishi, H.; Matsubara, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ohota et al. (2004) estimated the fault model of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event based on the re-processing GPS data comparing the ground deformation in 1997-2000. From their discussion, in the period of slow slip event, interplate coupling is tightly remained in the depth of 10-25 km in the plate boundary in the Tokai region. Forward slip consisting of slow slip event is ongoing with a rate of 3 cm/yr at the depth of 25-40 km in the plate boundary. The slow slip event fault locates outside of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake fault model by Tanioka and Satake (2002). It suggests that slow slip event is occurred outside of asperity area of historical large earthquakes along the Nankai Trough. Recently dense seismological network is constructed and seismic wave velocity structure are discussed with detail from the seismic wave tomography method (Matsubara et al.,2004; Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2004). According to their resolution, the low Vp and Vs layer is estimated in the 25-40 km depth of the plate boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate in the Tokai region. Precisely we discus the location of low Vp and Vs layers, it is located upper part pf the plate boundary with width of 10km, which is corresponded to the lower continental crust..It is located just under northern area of Lake Hamana and Mikawa Bay. Kodaira et al.(2004), they conclude that high Vp/Vs ration distributed in subducting upper ocean crust around 30 km depth of the plate boundary is a occurrence mechanism of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event. From our research, the rate of Vp/Vs in upper part of the subducting oceanic crust is changing with the depth of the plate boundary. Until 25 km depth, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are not low, and the rate Vp/Vs is normal. At depth of 25 - 40 km, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are decreasing, and the rate Vp/Vs is increasing. The depth of high rate is correspond the slow slip fault estimated by Ohota et al.(2004) and hypocenters of unvolcanic low

  9. Seismic microzonation and velocity models of El Ejido area (SE Spain) from the diffuse-field H/V method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Seivane, Helena; Navarro, Manuel; Piña-Flores, José; Luzón, Francisco; Vidal, Francisco; Posadas, Antonio M.; Aranda, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    El Ejido town is located in the Campo de Dalías coastal plain (Almería province, SE Spain), emplaced in one of the most seismically active regions of Spain. The municipality has 84000 inhabitants and presented a high growth rate during the last twenty years. The most recent intense seismic activity occurred close to this town was in 1993 and 1994, with events of Mb = 4.9 and Mb = 5.0, respectively. To provide a basis for site-specific hazard analysis, we first carried out a seismic microzonation of this town in terms of predominant periods and geotechnical properties. The predominant periods map was obtained from ambient noise observations on a grid of 250 x 250 m in the main urban area, and sparser measurements on the outskirts. These broad-band records, of about 20 minutes long each, were analyzed by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio technique (H/V). Dispersion curves obtained from two array measurements of ambient noise and borehole data provided additional geophysical information. All the surveyed points in the town were found to have relatively long predominant periods ranging from 0.8 to 2.3 s and growing towards the SE. Secondary high-frequency (> 2Hz) peaks were found at about the 10% of the points only. On the other hand, Vs30 values of 550 - 650 m/s were estimated from the array records, corresponding to cemented sediments and medium-hard rocks. The local S-wave velocity structure has been inverted from the H/V curves for a subset of the measurement sites. We used an innovative full-wavefield method based on the diffuse-wavefield approximation (Sánchez-Sesma et al., 2011) combined with the simulated annealing algorithm. Shallow seismic velocities and deep boreholes data were used as constraints. The results show that the low-frequency resonances are related with the impedance contrast between several hundred meters of medium-hard sedimentary rocks (marls and calcarenites) with the stiffer basement of the basin, which dips to the SE. These

  10. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  11. Seismic Structure beneath the Gulf of California: a Contribution from Group Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luccio, F.; Persaud, P.; Clayton, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion measurements from local and regional earthquakes are used to interpret the lithospheric structure in the Gulf of California region. We compute group velocity maps for Rayleigh waves from 10 to 150 s using earthquakes recorded by broadband stations of the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs in Baja California and Mexico mainland, UNM in Mexico, BOR, DPP and GOR in Southern California and TUC in Arizona. The study area is gridded in 120 longitude cells by 180 latitude cells, with an equal spacing of 10 x 10 km. Assuming that each grid point is laterally homogeneous, for each period the tomographic maps are inverted to produce a 3D lithospheric shear wave velocity model for the region. Near the Gulf of California rift axis, we found three prominent low shear wave velocity regions, which are associated with mantle upwelling near the Cerro Prieto volcanic field, the Ballenas Transform Fault and the East Pacific Rise. Upwelling of the mantle at lithospheric and asthenospheric depths characterizes most of the Gulf. This more detailed finding is new when compared to previous surface wave studies in the region. A low velocity zone in north-central Baja at ~28ºN which extends east-south-eastward is interpreted as an asthenospheric window. In addition, we also identify a well-defined high velocity zone in the upper mantle beneath central-western Baja California, which correlates with the previously interpreted location of the stalled Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. We interpret locations of the fossil slab and slab window in light of the distribution of unique post-subduction volcanic rocks in the Gulf of California and Baja California. We also observe a high velocity anomaly at 50 km depth extending down to ~130 km near the southwestern Baja coastline and beneath Baja, which may represent another remnant of the Farallon slab.

  12. Seismic structure beneath the Gulf of California: a contribution from group velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luccio, F.; Persaud, P.; Clayton, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion measurements from local and regional earthquakes are used to interpret the lithospheric structure in the Gulf of California region. We compute group velocity maps for Rayleigh waves from 10 to 150 s using earthquakes recorded by broad-band stations of the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs in Baja California and Mexico mainland, UNM in Mexico, BOR, DPP and GOR in southern California and TUC in Arizona. The study area is gridded in 120 longitude cells by 180 latitude cells, with an equal spacing of 10 × 10 km. Assuming that each gridpoint is laterally homogeneous, for each period the tomographic maps are inverted to produce a 3-D lithospheric shear wave velocity model for the region. Near the Gulf of California rift axis, we found three prominent low shear wave velocity regions, which are associated with mantle upwelling near the Cerro Prieto volcanic field, the Ballenas Transform Fault and the East Pacific Rise. Upwelling of the mantle at lithospheric and asthenospheric depths characterizes most of the Gulf. This more detailed finding is new when compared to previous surface wave studies in the region. A low-velocity zone in northcentral Baja at ˜28ºN which extends east-south-eastwards is interpreted as an asthenospheric window. In addition, we also identify a well-defined high-velocity zone in the upper mantle beneath central-western Baja California, which correlates with the previously interpreted location of the stalled Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. We interpret locations of the fossil slab and slab window in light of the distribution of unique post-subduction volcanic rocks in the Gulf of California and Baja California. We also observe a high-velocity anomaly at 50-km depth extending down to ˜130 km near the southwestern Baja coastline and beneath Baja, which may represent another remnant of the Farallon slab.

  13. Seismic reflection and tomographic velocity model constraints on the evolution of the Tofino forearc basin, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Nathan; Calvert, Andrew J.

    2007-02-01

    The Tofino Basin is a sedimentary forearc basin that overlies the continental shelf of the Cascadia margin to the southwest of Vancouver Island. The basin, which contains up to ~4 km of marine clastic sedimentary rocks, formed following accretion in the Early Eocene of the Crescent and Pacific Rim Terranes, and subsequent accretionary wedge basement. Subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate has since been the primary tectonic driving force in the development of the basin's structure. Investigations using coincident seismic reflection profiles, tomographic velocity models and recently reassessed biostratigraphic well data show that basement composition has largely controlled deformation of the overlying Tofino Basin sediments. Anticlinal folds overlying the accretionary wedge exhibit low P-wave velocities at the apex of the fold, which may be related to fracturing of older, more lithified sediments accompanied by fluid expulsion from the accretionary wedge. In contrast the velocity variation across folds over the Crescent Terrane mimics the fold geometry, and does not appear anomalous. A sub-basin (containing up to ~3 km of Oligocene to Holocene sediment) has developed in the central part of the Tofino Basin at the boundary between the Crescent and Pacific Rim Terranes. Seismic interpretation suggests that deposition has increased more rapidly in the Late Miocene to Holocene. Subsidence within the sub-basin is likely to have been controlled by sediment loading, flexure and regional tectonic forces, localized by pre-existing zones of weakness such as the Tofino Fault. The development of the sub-basin may also have been influenced by the displacement landward of part of the lower forearc crust during subduction erosion. Diapiric structures along the axis of the sub-basin suggest that fluid expulsion into the Tofino Basin from the deeper accreted terranes is localized by the terrane-bounding fault. Further seaward, fluid expulsion from the accretionary wedge may be more

  14. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  15. The efficiency of using a seismic base isolation system for a 2D concrete frame founded upon improved soft soil with rigid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwad, Talal; Donia, Modar

    2016-03-01

    2D finite element models were developed to analyze the effect of improved soft-soil foundation on the efficiency of a base-isolated concrete frame. Static and dynamic analyses were performed for a frame on raft foundation. Non-improved and improved soft-soil foundation using rigid inclusions were considered, as well as the use of high damping rubber bearing as base isolation. Results show that the use of rigid inclusions increases the efficiency of base isolation; base shear is reduced by 38% and maximum acceleration at the top of the frame by 30%.

  16. Hillslope characterization in terms of geophysical units based on the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feskova, Tatiana; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological conditions in a catchment depend on many factors such as climatic, geological, geomorphological, biological and human, which interact with each other and influence water balance in a catchment. This interaction leads to the subordination in the landscape structure, namely the weak elements subordinate to the powerful elements. Thereby, geological and geomorphological factors play an essential role in catchment development and organization. A hillslope consequently can be allocated to one class of the representative units because the important flow processes run at the hillslope. Moreover, a hillslope can be subdivided into stratigraphic subsurface units and significant hillslope areas based on the lithological change of contrasting interfaces. The knowledge of subsurface structures is necessary to understand and predicate complex hydrological processes in a catchment. Geophysical techniques provide a good opportunity to explore the subsurface. A complete geophysical investigation of subsurface in a catchment with difficult environmental conditions never will be achieved because of large time effort in the field, equipment logistic, and ambiguity in the data interpretation. The case study demonstrates how a catchment can be investigated using geophysical methods in an effective manner in terms of characterization of representative units with respect to a functional role in the catchment. This case study aims to develop combined resistivity and seismic velocity hillslope subsurface models for the distinction of representative functional units. In order to identify the contrasting interfaces of the hillslope, to localize significant hillslope areas, and to address the ambiguity in the geophysical data interpretation, the case study combined resistivity surveys (vertical electrical soundings and electrical resistivity tomography) with refraction seismic method, and conducted these measurements at one single profile along the hillslope transect and

  17. Upper mantle P velocity structure beneath the Baikal Rift from modeling regional seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2003-02-01

    Uppermost mantle P wave velocity structure beneath the Baikal rift and southern margin of the Siberian Platform has been investigated by using a grid search method to model Pnl waveforms from two moderate earthquakes recorded by station TLY at the southwestern end of Lake Baikal. The results yielded a limited number of successful models which indicate the presence of upper mantle P wave velocities beneath the rift axis and the margin of the platform that are 2-5% lower than expected. The magnitude of the velocity anomalies and their location support the presence of a thermal anomaly that extends laterally beyond the rift proper, possibly created by small-scale convection or a plume-like, thermal upwelling.

  18. Seismic velocity structure and microearthquake source properties at The Geysers, California, geothermal area

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.R.

    1986-12-01

    The method of progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion has been extended to incorporate S-wave arrival time data and to estimate S-wave velocities in addition to P-wave velocities. S-wave data to progressive inversion does not completely eliminate hypocenter-velocity tradeoffs, but they are substantially reduced. Results of a P and S-wave progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion at The Geysers show that the top of the steam reservoir is clearly defined by a large decrease of V/sub p//V/sub s/ at the condensation zone-production zone contact. The depth interval of maximum steam production coincides with minimum observed V/sub p//V/sub s/, and V/sub p//V/sub s/ increses below the shallow primary production zone suggesting that reservoir rock becomes more fluid saturated. The moment tensor inversion method was applied to three microearthquakes at The Geysers. Estimated principal stress orientations were comparable to those estimated using P-wave firstmotions as constraints. Well constrained principal stress orientations were obtained for one event for which the 17 P-first motions could not distinguish between normal-slip and strike-slip mechanisms. The moment tensor estimates of principal stress orientations were obtained using far fewer stations than required for first-motion focal mechanism solutions. The three focal mechanisms obtained here support the hypothesis that focal mechanisms are a function of depth at The Geysers. Progressive inversion as developed here and the moment tensor inversion method provide a complete approach for determining earthquake locations, P and S-wave velocity structure, and earthquake source mechanisms.

  19. Seismic velocity change after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake estimated from repeating earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, R.; Uchida, N.; Okada, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed repeating earthquake data to estimate velocity change in the overriding plate in NE Japan associated with the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Because repeating earthquakes occur as the repeating slips on the same patch on the Pacific plate with the same source mechanism at different time, waveform data of repeating earthquake is suitable for detecting temporal change in subsurface structure. We tried to use the direct part of seismograms to estimate location of the velocity change. This is because the time-shift in direct part simply reflects the velocity change only along a direct ray path in contrast to the complex path of coda waves. We analyzed repeating earthquake records from 2003 to December 2011. The travel time shifts before and after the Tohoku-Oki earthquake are measured by the cross-spectral method in the frequency range of 1-10 Hz. One problem for using the direct part is an error of origin time. However, because the errors of origin times are identical at all stations, we can estimate the relative delay in many stations for a pair of repeating earthquakes that can be used for the estimation of the spatial variation of time-shift in direct part. After removing outliers, we subtracted a mean of the time-shifts of direct P wave for all stations from the time-shifts of P and S wave at every station. From the result of many repeating earthquake sequences, we can recognize clear relative time delays of approximately 0.01 sec for S wave in both the fore-arc and back-arc region from Fukushima to Iwate prefecture. The travel-time delays of P wave are approximately 3 times smaller than those of S wave. From a consideration of observed travel time shifts and ray paths, the velocity change seems to distribute in land area. One possible mechanism of the receiver-side velocity reduction is crack opening as a result of the static stress change due to coseismic slip on the plate boundary. The velocity change due to the static stress change can be

  20. Velocity structure and the role of fluids in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Calò, M.; Bouchaala, F.; Vavryčuk, V.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we apply the double-difference tomography method to investigate the detailed 3-D structure within and around the Nový Kostel seismic zone, an area in the Czech Republic known for frequent occurrences of earthquake swarms. We use data from the extensively analyzed 2008 swarm, which has known focal mechanisms, principal faults, tectonic stress, source migration and other basic characteristics. We selected about 500 microearthquakes recorded at 22 local seismic stations of the West Bohemia Network (WEBNET). Applying double-difference tomography, combined with Weighted Average Model post-processing to correct for parameter dependence effects, we produce and interpret 3-D models of the Vp-to-Vs ratio (Vp/Vs) in and around the focal zone. The modeled Vp-to-Vs ratio shows several distinct structures, namely an area of high Vp-to-Vs ratio correlating with the microearthquakes, and a layer of low values directly above it. These structures may reflect changes in lithology and/or fluid concentration. The overlaying low Vp-to-Vs ratio layer coincides with high density metamorphic unit associated with the Fichtelgebirge (Smrčiny) granitic intrusion. It is possible that the base of the layer acts as a fluid trap, resulting in the observed periodic swarms.

  1. Velocity variations associated with the large 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Java, retrieved from seismic multiplets and ambient noise cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi-Santoso, Agus; Lesage, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    We present a study of the seismic velocity variations that occurred in the structure before the large 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano. For the first time to our knowledge, the technique of coda wave interferometry is applied to both families of similar events (multiplets) and to correlation functions of seismic noise. About half of the seismic events recorded at the summit stations belong to one of the ten multiplets identified, including 120 similar events that occurred in the last 20 hr preceding the eruption onset. Daily noise cross-correlation functions (NCF) were calculated for the six pairs of short-period stations available. Using the stretching method, we estimate time-series of apparent velocity variation (AVV) for each multiplet and each pair of stations. No significant velocity change is detected until September 2010. From 10 October to the beginning of the eruption on 26 October, a complex pattern of AVV is observed with amplitude of up to ±1.5 per cent. Velocity decrease is first observed from families of deep events and then from shallow earthquakes. In the same period, AVV with different signs and chronologies are estimated from NCF calculated for various station pairs. The location in the horizontal plane of the velocity perturbations related with the AVV obtained from NCF is estimated by using an approach based on the radiative transfer approximation. Although their spatial resolution is limited, the resulting maps display velocity decrease in the upper part of the edifice in the period 12-25 October. After the eruption onset, the pattern of velocity perturbations is significantly modified with respect to the previous one. We interpret these velocity variations in the framework of a scenario of magmatic intrusion that integrates most observations. The perturbation of the stress field associated with the magma migration can induce both decrease and increase of the seismic velocity of rocks. Thus the detected AVVs can be considered as precursors of

  2. Understanding the Structure of the Subsurface of the El Tatio Geyser field: A Velocity Model of the El Jefe Geyser from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LongJohn, T.; Kelly, C.; Seats, K.; Lawrence, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal system studies are important for geothermal energy exploration and geysers are also believed to be functional analogues of volcanoes. However, the mechanism of eruption and the characteristics of the plumbing system of most geysers are poorly understood given their subsurface location and sparse global distribution. An accurate acoustic velocity model could yield important insight into subsurface density and thermal variations in a geyser system. Passive seismic data was collected at El Jefe geyser in El Tatio Geyser Field, northern Chile during October of 2012. An array of 6 broadband seismometers and 51 high frequency geophones were deployed for ~1 week in a grid array with station spacing of 2-10 meters (geophones) and 3-50 meters (broadbands) centered around El Jefe Geyser. Using ambient seismic noise generated by the geyser system, I constructed a preliminary subsurface velocity model for El Jefe Geyser. As a result of the close station spacing, the seismic signals sampled shallow depths corresponding to high frequency waves. Coherent seismic records from different seismic station pairs were cross correlated to produce noise correlation functions (NCF). Adaptive covariance filtering and stacking techniques were utilized to amplify the signal of the NCFs and one-dimensional velocities between station pairs at varying depths were determined. Next, a tomographic inversion was done to interpolate between the one-dimensional velocities and produce a three-dimensional velocity model for the entire geyser area. From the velocity model, we can identify regions of low and high acoustic velocity that potentially represent water reservoirs and bedrock respectively.

  3. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  4. P-wave velocity structure of the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan: Results from the ACTS wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Berthet, T.; Lallemand, S.; Schnurle, P.; Lee, C.-S.; Liu, C.-S.; McIntosh, K.; Theunissen, T.

    2012-11-01

    An active seismic experiment has been conducted across the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan over the whole trench-arc-backarc system in May 2009. Twenty-four ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed from the Ryukyu trench to the southern Okinawa trough over the Ryukyu arc and forearc. Wide angle seismic data were recorded by the OBS array while coincident reflection seismic data were acquired using a 6 km long streamer and a 6600 cubic inch seismic airgun array. Results from tomographic inversion of 21091 travel time picks along this line allowed us to image crustal structures of the Ryukyu margin down to a depth of 25 km. The transect has been designed to provide a better seismic velocity structure of the subduction zone in a highly deformed area that has produced an M8 earthquake in 1920. The line crosses a seismic cluster of earthquakes which source mechanisms are still poorly understood. The subducting oceanic crust of the Huatung Basin is about 5-6 km thick. The underlying mantle exhibits low seismic velocities around 7.8 km/s suggesting some hydrothermal alterations or alteration of the upper mantle through faults generated by the flexure of the subducting plate as it enters the subduction. Low velocities, up to 4.5 km/s, associated with the accretionary wedge are well imaged from the trench back to the Nanao forearc. A major result concerns the abrupt termination of the buttress at the rear of the accretionary wedge. Despite the low resolution of the tomographic inversion near the subduction interface, several lines of evidence supporting the presence of a low velocity zone beneath the toe of the forearc buttress could be established. The Moho beneath the Ryukyu non-volcanic arc is located at a depth around 25 km depth.

  5. Regional three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle of northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.; Zhang, H.; Brocher, T.; Langenheim, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic model of the P wave velocity (Vp) structure of northern California. We employed a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm that incorporates a finite-difference travel time calculator and spatial smoothing constraints. Arrival times from earthquakes and travel times from controlled-source explosions, recorded at network and/or temporary stations, were inverted for Vp on a 3D grid with horizontal node spacing of 10 to 20 km and vertical node spacing of 3 to 8 km. Our model provides an unprecedented, comprehensive view of the regional-scale structure of northern California, putting many previously identified features into a broader regional context and improving the resolution of a number of them and revealing a number of new features, especially in the middle and lower crust, that have never before been reported. Examples of the former include the complex subducting Gorda slab, a steep, deeply penetrating fault beneath the Sacramento River Delta, crustal low-velocity zones beneath Geysers-Clear Lake and Long Valley, and the high-velocity ophiolite body underlying the Great Valley. Examples of the latter include mid-crustal low-velocity zones beneath Mount Shasta and north of Lake Tahoe. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Regional three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle of northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Clifford; Zhang, Haijiang; Brocher, Thomas; Langenheim, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic model of the P wave velocity (Vp) structure of northern California. We employed a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm that incorporates a finite-difference travel time calculator and spatial smoothing constraints. Arrival times from earthquakes and travel times from controlled-source explosions, recorded at network and/or temporary stations, were inverted for Vp on a 3D grid with horizontal node spacing of 10 to 20 km and vertical node spacing of 3 to 8 km. Our model provides an unprecedented, comprehensive view of the regional-scale structure of northern California, putting many previously identified features into a broader regional context and improving the resolution of a number of them and revealing a number of new features, especially in the middle and lower crust, that have never before been reported. Examples of the former include the complex subducting Gorda slab, a steep, deeply penetrating fault beneath the Sacramento River Delta, crustal low-velocity zones beneath Geysers-Clear Lake and Long Valley, and the high-velocity ophiolite body underlying the Great Valley. Examples of the latter include mid-crustal low-velocity zones beneath Mount Shasta and north of Lake Tahoe.

  7. Stochastic velocity inversion of seismic reflection/refraction traveltime data for rift structure of the southwest Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stephen A.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Hauser, Juerg; Ritzmann, Oliver; Mjelde, Rolf; Ebbing, Jörg; Thybo, Hans; Flüh, Ernst

    2013-05-01

    We present results from an active-source, onshore-offshore seismic reflection/refraction transect acquired as part of the PETROBAR project (Petroleum-related studies of the Barents Sea region). The 700 km-long profile is oriented NW-SE, coincident with previously published multichannel seismic reflection profiles. We utilize layer-based raytracing in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion to determine a probabilistic velocity model constraining the sedimentary rocks, crystalline crust, and uppermost mantle in a complex tectonic regime. The profile images a wide range of crustal types and ages, from Proterozoic craton to Paleozoic to early Cenozoic rift basins; and volcanics related to Eocene continental breakup with Greenland. Our analyses indicate a complex architecture of the crystalline crust along the profile, with crystalline crustal thicknesses ranging from 43 km beneath the Varanger Peninsula to 12 km beneath the Bjørnøya Basin. Assuming an original, post-Caledonide crustal thickness of 35 km in the offshore area, we calculate the cumulative thinning (β) factors along the entire profile. The average β factor along the profile is 1.7 ± 0.1, suggesting 211-243 km of extension, consistent with the amount of overlap derived from published plate reconstructions. Local β factors approach 3, where Bjørnøya Basin reaches a depth of more than 13 km. Volcanics, carbonates, salt, diagenesis and metamorphism make deep sedimentary basin fill difficult to distinguish from original, pre-rift crystalline crust, and thus actual stretching may in places exceed our estimates. Crustal velocity structure reflects multi-stage rifting in the SW Barents Sea. A stochastic inversion is applied to the widely-used RAYINVR raytracing package. β factors peak 200 km landward of the transform margin edge. Maximum β coincides with Caledonian suture. We determine 227 ± 16 km total extension of the Barents Sea rifted margin.

  8. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data for Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Maceira, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    The crust around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) has been the subject of many geophysical studies aimed at characterizing in detail the fault zone structure and elucidating the lithologies and physical properties of the surrounding rocks. Seismic methods in particular have revealed the complex two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the crustal volume around SAFOD and the strong velocity reduction in the fault damage zone. In this study we conduct a joint inversion using body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data to image the P-and S-wave velocity structure of the upper crust surrounding SAFOD. The two data types have complementary strengths - the body-wave data have good resolution at depth, albeit only where there are crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution and are not dependent on the earthquake source distribution because they are derived from ambient noise. The body-wave data are from local earthquakes and explosions, comprising the dataset analyzed by Zhang et al. (2009). The surface-wave data are for Love waves from ambient noise correlations, and are from Roux et al. (2011). The joint inversion code is based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference (DD) tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion code that is integrated into the joint inversion algorithm is from Maceira and Ammon (2009). The propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) is used for the forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models. We examined how the structural models vary as we vary the relative weighting of the fit to the two data sets and in comparison to the previous separate inversion results. The joint inversion with the 'optimal' weighting shows more clearly the U-shaped local structure from the Buzzard Canyon Fault on the west side of SAF to the Gold Hill Fault on the east side.

  9. Seismic velocities and geologic logs from boreholes at three downhole arrays in San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.; Warrick, Richard E.; Liu, Hsi-Ping; Westerlund, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    The Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989 (1704 PST), has reinforced observations made by Wood and others (1908) after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, that poor ground conditions (soft soil) increase the likelihood of shaking damage to structures. Since 1908 many studies (for example Borcherdt, 1970, Borcherdt and Gibbs, 1976, Borcherdt and Glassmoyer, 1992) have shown that soft soils amplify seismic waves at frequencies that can be damaging to structures. Damage in the City of San Francisco from the Loma Prieta earthquake was concentrated in the Marina District, the Embarcadero, and the China Basin areas. Each of these areas, to some degree, is underlain by soft soil deposits. These concentrations of damage raise important questions regarding the amplification effects of such deposits at damaging levels of motion. Unfortunately, no strong-motion recordings were obtained in these areas during the Loma Prieta earthquake and only a limited number (< 10) have been obtained on other soft soil sites in the United States. Consequently, important questions exist regarding the response of such deposits during damaging earthquakes, especially questions regarding the nonlinear soil response. Towards developing a data set to address these important questions, borehole strong-motion arrays have been installed at three locations. These arrays consist of groups of wide-dynamic-range pore-pressure transducers and three-component accelerometers, the outputs of which are recorded digitally. The arrays are designed to provide an integrated set of data on ground shaking, liquifaction-induced ground failure, and structural response. This report describes the detailed geologic, seismic, and material-property determinations derived at each of these sites.

  10. Velocity and structural model of the Lower Tagus Basin according to the study of environmental seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes Torres, Ricardo Jorge; Furtado, José Augusto; Gonçalves Silva, Hugo; Borges, José Fernando; Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Carvalho, João

    2013-04-01

    Along his history the Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) region was shaken by several earthquakes, some of them produced in large ruptures of offshore structures located southwest of the Portuguese coastline. Among these is the Lisbon earthquake of 1 November 1755 (M~8.5-8.7), and other moderates earthquakes that were produced by local sources such as the 1344 (M6.0), 1531 (M7.1) and 1909 (M6.0) earthquakes. Previous simulations [1] have shown high velocity amplification in the region. The model used in the simulations was updated from low to high resolution using all the new available geophysical and geotechnical data on the area (seismic reflection, aeromagnetic, gravimetric, deep wells and geological outcrops) [2]. To confirm this model in the areas where it was derived by potential field methods we use broadband ambient noise measurements collected in about 200 points along seven profiles on the LTV basin, six perpendicular and one parallel to the basin axis. We applied the horizontal to vertical (H/V) spectral ratio method [3] to the seismic noise profiles in order to estimate the distribution of amplification in the basin. The H/V curves obtained reveals the existence of two low frequency peaks centered on 0.2 and 1 Hz [4]. These peaks are strongly related with the thickness of Cenozoic and alluvial sediments. The velocity model obtained by inversion of the H/V curves is in good agreement with borehole data, and results obtained using seismic reflection and gravimetric methods. However, aeromagnetic data overestimates the depth of the base of Cenozoic in the areas where it overlies directly the paleozoic basement, which we attribute either to the existence of Mesozoic units or higher magnetic susceptibilities than expected for the Paleozoic. References: [1] Bezzeghoud, M., Borges, J.F., M., Caldeira (2011). Ground motion simulations of the SW Iberia margin: rupture directivity and earth structure effects. Natural Hazards, pages 1-17. doi:10.1007/s11069-011-9925-2 [2

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Pasyanos, M; Skobeltsyn, G; Teoman, U; Godoladze, T; Sandvol, E

    2008-07-01

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Using data from 25 broadband stations located in the region, new estimates of crustal and upper mantle thickness, velocity structure, and attenuation are being developed. Receiver functions have been determined for all stations. Depth to Moho is estimated using slant stacking of the receiver functions, forward modeling, and inversion. Moho depths along the Caspian and in the Kura Depression are in general poorly constrained using only receiver functions due to thick sedimentary basin sediments. The best fitting models suggest a low velocity upper crust with Moho depths ranging from 30 to 40 km. Crustal thicknesses increase in the Greater Caucasus with Moho depths of 40 to 50 km. Pronounced variations with azimuth of source are observed indicating 3D structural complexity and upper crustal velocities are higher than in the Kura Depression to the south. In the Lesser Caucasus, south and west of the Kura Depression, the crust is thicker (40 to 50 km) and upper crustal velocities are higher. Work is underway to refine these models with the event based surface wave dispersion and ambient noise correlation measurements from continuous data. Regional phase (Lg and Pg) attenuation models as well as blockage maps for Pn and Sn are being developed. Two methods are used to estimate Q: the two-station method to estimate inter-station Q and the reversed, two-station, two event method. The results are then inverted to create Lg and Pg Q maps. Initial results suggest substantial variations in both Pg and Lg Q in the region. A zone of higher Pg Q extends west from the Caspian between the Lesser and Greater Caucasus and a narrow area of higher Lg Q is observed.

  12. A complex, young subduction zone imaged by three-dimensional seismic velocity, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Reyners, Martin

    2001-09-01

    The Fiordland subduction zone, where subduction developed in the late Miocene, has been imaged with P and S-P arrival-time data from 311 earthquakes in a simultaneous inversion for hypocentres and 3-D VP and VP/VS models. The three-month microearthquake survey, recorded with 24 portable seismographs, provides excellent coverage, and, since earthquakes to depths of 130km are included, parts of the model are well-resolved to depths of 100km. The crustal features are generally consistent with geology. The low velocity in the upper 10km is associated with the Te Anau and Waiau basins. The Western Fiordland Orthogneiss is associated with a prominent feature from near-surface to over 40km depth, which includes the residue from the basaltic source rocks. It is defined by high VP (7.4kms-1 at 15km depth) and slightly low VP/VS, and has distinct boundaries on its southern and eastern margins. Adjacent to the deepest earthquakes, there is high-velocity Pacific mantle below 80km depth, inferred to be the mantle expression of ongoing shortening since the early Miocene. As the subducting slab moves down and northeast, it is hindered by the high-velocity body and bends to near-vertical. Bending is accommodated by distributed fracturing evidenced by high VP/VS and persistent deep earthquake activity. Buckling of the subducted plate pushes up the Western Fiordland Orthogneiss. In the transition to the Alpine fault in northern Fiordland, a prominent low-velocity crustal root is consistent with ductile thickening in combination with downwarp of the subducted plate.

  13. Analytic solutions for seismic travel time and ray path geometry through simple velocity models.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    The geometry of ray paths through realistic Earth models can be extremely complex due to the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of the velocity distribution within the models. Calculation of high fidelity ray paths and travel times through these models generally involves sophisticated algorithms that require significant assumptions and approximations. To test such algorithms it is desirable to have available analytic solutions for the geometry and travel time of rays through simpler velocity distributions against which the more complex algorithms can be compared. Also, in situations where computational performance requirements prohibit implementation of full 3D algorithms, it may be necessary to accept the accuracy limitations of analytic solutions in order to compute solutions that satisfy those requirements. Analytic solutions are described for the geometry and travel time of infinite frequency rays through radially symmetric 1D Earth models characterized by an inner sphere where the velocity distribution is given by the function V (r) = A-Br{sup 2}, optionally surrounded by some number of spherical shells of constant velocity. The mathematical basis of the calculations is described, sample calculations are presented, and results are compared to the Taup Toolkit of Crotwell et al. (1999). These solutions are useful for evaluating the fidelity of sophisticated 3D travel time calculators and in situations where performance requirements preclude the use of more computationally intensive calculators. It should be noted that most of the solutions presented are only quasi-analytic. Exact, closed form equations are derived but computation of solutions to specific problems generally require application of numerical integration or root finding techniques, which, while approximations, can be calculated to very high accuracy. Tolerances are set in the numerical algorithms such that computed travel time accuracies are better than 1 microsecond.

  14. Joint inversion of multichannel seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic data: Improved imaging and refined velocity model of the crustal structure of the north Ecuador-south Colombia convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, W.; Ribodetti, A.; Collot, J.-Y.; Operto, S.

    2009-02-01

    Improving seismic imaging of the crust is essential for understanding the structural factors controlling subduction zones processes. We developed a processing work flow based on the combined analysis of multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) and wide angle (WA) reflection/refraction data to derive both shallow and deep velocities suitable for prestack depth migration and to construct a blocky velocity model integrating all identifiable seismic phases contained in MCS and WA data. We apply this strategy to the study of the north Ecuador-SW Colombia subduction margin to improve the imaging and geostructural interpretation of a splay fault and surrounding outer and inner margin wedges. Results show improvements over tomographic inversion of WA data only, such as (1) sediment velocity variation across the trench and margin slope that correlates with lateral lithologic changes, tectonic compaction and effect of mass wasting processes; (2) a two-layer velocity structure of the inner wedge basement that is consistent with the crust of an oceanic plateau; (3) a complex velocity structure of the outer wedge basement that consists of a deep, high-velocity (5.0-5.5 km s-1) core and a low-velocity zone (3.8-5.0 km s-1) associated with the major splay fault; (4) a ˜1.3-km-thick, low-velocity (3.5-4.0 km s-1) subduction channel that extends beneath the margin outer wedge. Both the splay fault and subduction channel are expected to direct fluid flows; and (5) downdip velocity increase (5-6 km s-1) in the subducting oceanic crust associated with a low (7.8 km s-1) upper mantle velocity, possibly reflecting changes in rock nature or properties.

  15. Anticorrelated seismic velocity anomalies from post-perovskite in the lowermost mantle.

    PubMed

    Hutko, Alexander R; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin; Garnero, Edward J

    2008-05-23

    Earth's lowermost mantle has thermal, chemical, and mineralogical complexities that require precise seismological characterization. Stacking, migration, and modeling of over 10,000 P and S waves that traverse the deep mantle under the Cocos plate resolve structures above the core-mantle boundary. A small -0.07 +/- 0.15% decrease of P wave velocity (Vp) is accompanied by a 1.5 +/- 0.5% increase in S wave velocity (V(s)) near a depth of 2570 km. Bulk-sound velocity [Vb = (Vp2 - 4/3Vs2)1/2] decreases by -1.0 +/- 0.5% at this depth. Transition of the primary lower-mantle mineral, (Mg(1-x-y) Fe(x)Al(y))(Si,Al)O3 perovskite, to denser post-perovskite is expected to have a negligible effect on the bulk modulus while increasing the shear modulus by approximately 6%, resulting in local anticorrelation of Vb and Vs anomalies; this behavior explains the data well.

  16. Anticorrelated seismic velocity anomalies from post-perovskite in the lowermost mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, T.; Revenaugh, Justin; Garnero, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Earth's lowermost mantle has thermal, chemical, and mineralogical complexities that require precise seismological characterization. Stacking, migration, and modeling of over 10,000 P and S waves that traverse the deep mantle under the Cocos plate resolve structures above the core-mantle boundary. A small -0.07 ?? 0.15% decrease of P wave velocity (Vp) is accompanied by a 1.5 ?? 0.5% increase in S wave velocity (Vs) near a depth of 2570 km. Bulk-sound velocity [Vb = (V p2 - 4/3Vs2)1/2] decreases by -1.0 ?? 0.5% at this depth. Transition of the primary lower-mantle mineral, (Mg1-x-y FexAly)(Si,Al) O3 perovskite, to denser post-perovskite is expected to have a negligible effect on the bulk modulus while increasing the shear modulus by ???6%, resulting in local anticorrelation of Vb and Vs anomalies; this behavior explains the data well.

  17. Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugroho, Hendro; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2013-09-09

    Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

  18. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  19. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2016-10-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  20. Seismic detection of fault zone hydrocarbon conduit-seal potential using velocity, frequency, and Q analysis: La Concepcion Field, Lake Maracaibo Venezuela example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahdal, Ahmed Omar

    The 3-D Post-Stack Time Migrated Seismic Data of La Concepcion Field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela cover an existing field with known oil and gas pay zones. The thesis problem is how to use this seismic data in an interpretation of leaky faults that occur in the exploration area of interest. A solution to the problem was obtained using an integrated geophysical approach that included published seismic attribute methods (Variance Cube, Geoframe IESX). Specific developments in this thesis to solve the interpretation problem of leaky faults in the region include (1) an image ray perturbation approach for updating the interval velocity in a faulted domain (2) a peak frequency approach to attenuation estimation within intervals and (3) a scaled interpretation of the velocity measurements at sonic, checkshot and surface seismic reflection data. The first development refines the interval velocities within fracture zones. The second development identifies anomalous attenuation most likely due to the presence of gas. The combined effects of low interval velocity and high attenuation are interpreted to be signs of leaking faults.

  1. Constraints on temporal velocity variations associated with an underground gas storage in the Gulf of Valencia using earthquake and seismic ambient noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugalde, Arantza; Gaite, Beatriz; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    During September 2013, the injection of the base gas in a depleted oil reservoir used as an underground natural gas storage (CASTOR) caused a sudden seismic activity increase in the eastern coast of Spain. As a result, a compact cluster of more than 550 earthquakes with magnitudes mbLg > 0.7 were located in the shallow offshore area of the Gulf of Valencia during two months. The strongest event, having a magnitude of Mw=4.2, was followed by two Mw=4.1 events the day after and took place once the gas injection activities had finished. Using the seismic data recorded by permanent stations at more than 25 km from the injection well, we applied coda wave interferometry to monitor changes in seismic velocity structure between similar earthquakes. Then we solved for a continuous function of velocity changes with time by combining observations from all the closely located earthquake sources. The rate of repeating events allowed measurements of relative velocity variations for about 30 days on a daily scale. To extend the analysis in time, we also processed the continuous data using the autocorrelation of band-pass filtered ambient seismic noise. A 10-day average was required to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the 0.2-0.5 Hz and 0.5-1 Hz frequency bands. We quantified the time lags between two traces in the frequency and time domains by means of the Moving Window Cross Spectral Analysis and a Dynamic Time Warping technique, respectively. Injection of fluids in geologic formations causes variations in seismic velocities associated to changes in fluid saturation, increase in pore pressure or opening or enlargement of cracks due to the injection process. Time delays associated with stress changes caused by moderate to large earthquakes have also been established. In this work, we found no velocity changes during the gas injection period nor on the occasion of the Mw 4.2 earthquake. The sensitivity of the method is dependent on the seismic network geometry and

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  3. Seismic Velocities and Thicknesses of Alluvial Deposits along Baker Creek in the Great Basin National Park, East-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Berger, David L.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how proposed large-scale water withdrawals in Snake Valley may affect the water resources and hydrologic processes in the Great Basin National Park, the National Park Service needs to have a better understanding of the relations between streamflow and groundwater flow through alluvium and karst topography of the Pole Canyon Limestone. Information that is critical to understanding these relations is the thickness of alluvial deposits that overlay the Pole Canyon Limestone. In mid-April 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service used seismic refraction along three profiles adjacent to Baker Creek to further refine understanding of the local geology. Two refractors and three distinct velocity layers were detected along two of the profiles and a single refractor and two distinct velocity layers were detected along a third profile. In the unsaturated alluvium, average velocity was 2,000 feet per second, thickness ranged from about 7 to 20 feet along two profiles downstream of the Narrows, and thickness was at least 100 feet along a single profile upstream of the Narrows. Saturated alluvium was only present downstream of the Narrows - average velocity was 4,400 feet per second, and thickness ranged from about 40 to 110 feet. The third layer probably represented Pole Canyon Limestone or Tertiary granitic rock units with an average velocity of 12,500 feet per second. Along the upstream and middle profiles (profiles 3 and 1, respectively), the depth to top of the third layer ranged from at least 60 to 110 feet below land surface and is most likely the Pole Canyon Limestone. The third layer at the farthest downstream profile (profile 2) may be a Tertiary granitic rock unit. Baker Creek is disconnected from the groundwater system along the upstream profile (profile 3) and streamflow losses infiltrate vertically downward to the Pole Canyon Limestone. Along the downstream and middle profiles (profiles 2 and 1, respectively), the presence of

  4. Constraints from sill intrusions and their deeper source magma chambers (seismic high velocity bodies) on the origins of volcanic rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic rifted margins are characterized by massive igneous activity originating from the rift margin, characterized by seaward dipping reflectors. These consist of basalt flows and associated magmatic products, from deep magma chambers imaged on seismic data as High Velocity Bodies (HVB) with seismic velocities between 7 and 7.5 km/s. The relationship between rifting and decompression melting have been well quantified, using the HVB's as constraints on magmatic production to match extension models. Crucial in this approach are the relationship between extension and mantle plumes, with HVB's generated by mantle plumes often indicative of velocities between 7.5 - 7.8 km/s. Here I address information that can be obtained from sill complexes in sedimentary basins associated with rifting, representing the earliest phase of magmatism. I use a simple crustal scale hydrostatic model for dikes while incorporating the presence of sills by calculating magmatic overpressures from differences in pressure gradients. It transpires that the presence of sills as observed on seismic reflection and outcrop data, can be predicted. Modelling further suggests that the source of these sill complexes are large magma chambers at or near the Moho, and equate to HVB's observed on seismic data. Utilizing simple mass balance calculations, the ratio of cumulate thickness (from HVB thickness) and expelled melt (from accumulated sill thicknesses) can be related to MgO content in expelled liquids, primary magma and cumulates. Higher MgO content translates in higher seismic velocities. Thus, HVB velocity can subsequently be used to discriminate between mantle plume, or shallow rift related melting. The theory is applied to various basins bordering the northern North Atlantic (Vøring Basin, Jameson Land Basin and Rockall Basin) and South Atlantic rifts (Namibia), associated with the Paleocene/Eocene Iceland mantle plume and the Early Cretaceous Tristan da Cunha mantle plume magmatism respectively.

  5. A new method for calculating seismic velocities in rocks containing strongly dimensionally anisotropic mineral grains and its application to antigorite-bearing serpentinite mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tohru; Shirasugi, Yuhto; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Seismic velocity is one of the most important sources of information about the Earth's interior. For its proper interpretation, we must have a thorough understanding of the dependence of seismic velocity on microstructural elements, including the modal composition, the crystal preferred orientation (CPO), the grain shape, the spatial distribution of mineral phases, etc. The conventional Voigt, Reuss and Hill averaging schemes take into account only the modal composition and the CPO. The information about the Earth's interior is thus poorly constrained. For a better interpretation, it is critical to have a calculation method which accounts for the grain shape and the spatial distribution of mineral phases, etc. We propose a calculation method which accounts for the grain shape of strongly dimensionally anisotropic minerals like micas and serpentines. Our method can be applied to a distributed geometrical orientation of mineral grains. Comparison was made between calculated and measured velocities in three antigorite-serpentinite mylonites. Judging from the root mean square relative error, our method provides velocities closer to measured values than the Voigt, Reuss and Hill averaging schemes. The input of the grain shape considerably improves the prediction of seismic properties. However, large discrepancies (>0.1 km/s) between measured and calculated velocities can be seen in some directions. The discrepancies might come from microstructural elements which were not considered in the calculation (layer structures and cracks).

  6. New insights on the subsidence of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta Plain by using 2D multichannel seismic data, gravity and flexural modeling, BanglaPIRE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grall, C.; Pickering, J.; Steckler, M. S.; Spiess, V.; Seeber, L.; Paola, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Palamenghi, L.; Schwenk, T.

    2015-12-01

    Deltas can subside very fast, yet many deltas remain emergent over geologic time. A large sediment input is often enough to compensate for subsidence and rising sea level to keep many deltas at sea level. This implies a balance between subsidence and sedimentation, both of which may, however, be controlled by independent factors such as sediment supply, tectonic loads and sea-level change. We here examine the subsidence of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD). Located in the NE boundary of the Indian-Eurasian collision zone, the GBD is surrounded by active uplifts (Indo-Burma Fold Belt and the Shillong Massif). The pattern of subsidence from these tectonic loads can strongly vary depending on both loads and lithospheric flexural rigidity, both of which can vary in space and time. Sediment cover changes both the lithostatic pressure and the thermal properties and thus the rigidity of the lithosphere. While sediments are deposited cold, they also insulate the lithosphere, acting as a thermal blanket to increase lower crustal temperatures. These effects are a function of sedimentation rates and may be more important where the lithosphere is thin. At the massive GBD the impact of sedimentation should be considered for properly constraining flexural subsidence. The flexural rigidity of the lithosphere is here modeled by using a yield-stress envelope based on a thermomechanic model that includes geothermal changes associated with sedimentation. Models are constrained by using two different data sets, multichannel seismic data correlated to borehole stratigraphy, and gravity data. This approach allows us to determine the Holocene regional distribution of subsidence from the Hinge Zone to the Bengal Fan and the mass-anomalies associated with the flexural loading. Different end-member scenarios are explored for reproducing the observed land tilting and gravity anomalies. For all scenarios considered, data can be reproduced only if we consider an extremely weak lithosphere and

  7. Segmentation of Hypocenters and 3-D Velocity Structure around the Kii Peninsula Revealed by Onshore and Offshore Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Sakai, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Uehira, K.; Shimizu, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate at a rate of ~4 cm/year along the Nankai Trough, southwest of Japan. Around the Kii Peninsula, the rupture boundary of the historical Tonankai and Nankai large earthquakes is located, and previous researches have revealed along-strike segmentation of hypocenters [Mochizuki et al., 2010], P-wave anisotropy [Ishise et al., 2009], low frequency earthquake (LFE) distribution [e.g., Obara, 2010] and subduction depth of the Philippine Sea (PHS) Plate, or there may exist a split in the PHS Plate [Ide et al., 2010]. To investigate such segmentation, in our previous work we determined 3-D velocity structure and hypocenters using P- and S-wave arrival times of earthquakes recorded by both ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed from 2003 to 2007 and on-land stations [Akuhara et al., 2013]. As a result, it was discovered that Vp/Vs ratio is also segmented within the oceanic crust and at the bottom of the overriding plate, which coincides with the LFE distribution: segment A is located along the Kii Channel, segment B around the western Kii Peninsula, and segment C around the eastern Kii Peninsula. In segment B, Vp/Vs ratio is low within the oceanic crust and LFE cluster characterized by an anomalously small amount of cumulative slip, compared to the other LFE clusters around the Kii Peninsula, is located [Obara, 2010]. The difference of Vp/Vs ratio and LFE activity among segments were interpreted as difference of pore fluid pressure. In fact, similar segmentation can be seen in hypocenters: Segment A with concentrated seismicity in the oceanic mantle, segment B with that in the oceanic crust, and segment C with little seismicity. To derive characteristic patterns of the hypocenters, we conducted a cluster analysis of earthquakes based on waveform similarity represented by cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) [e.g., Cattaneo, 1999], in which we took varying structural site effects among the OBS stations

  8. Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Tibetan Lithosphere using Seismic Attributes of P-waves from Regional Earthquakes Recorded by the Hi-CLIMB Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, R. L.; Bakir, A. C.; Griffin, J.; Chen, W.; Tseng, T.

    2010-12-01

    Using data from regional earthquakes recorded by the Hi-CLIMB array in Tibet, we utilize seismic attributes from crustal and Pn arrivals to constrain the velocity and attenuation structure in the crust and the upper mantle in central and western Tibet. The seismic attributes considered include arrival times, Hilbert envelope amplitudes, and instantaneous as well as spectral frequencies. We have constructed more than 30 high-quality regional seismic profiles, and of these, 10 events have been selected with excellent crustal and Pn arrivals for further analysis. Travel-times recorded by the Hi-CLIMB array are used to estimate the large-scale velocity structure in the region, with four near regional events to the array used to constrain the crustal structure. The travel times from the far regional events indicate that the Moho beneath the southern Lhasa terrane is up to 75 km thick, with Pn velocities greater than 8 km/s. In contrast, the data sampling the Qiangtang terrane north of the Bangong-Nujiang (BNS) suture shows thinner crust with Pn velocities less than 8 km/s. Seismic amplitude and frequency attributes have been extracted from the crustal and Pn wave trains, and these data are compared with numerical results for models with upper-mantle velocity gradients and attenuation, which can strongly affect Pn amplitudes and pulse frequencies. The numerical modeling is performed using the complete spectral element method (SEM), where the results from the SEM method are in good agreement with analytical and reflectivity results for different models with upper-mantle velocity gradients. The results for the attenuation modeling in Tibet imply lower upper mantle Q values in the Qiangtang terrane to the north of the BNS compared to the less attenuative upper mantle beneath the Lhasa terrane to the south of the BNS.

  9. A high-resolution 3D seismic velocity model of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone using land & OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Miller, M.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of seismic properties along a subduction megathrust can shed light on the composition and structure of rocks along the fault. By comparing seismic velocity structure with models of interseismic locking, co-seismic slip and afterslip, we can begin to understand how physical properties may affect fault dynamics throughout the subduction seismic cycle. The Maule earthquake, which hit the coast of central Chile in 2010, is the 6th largest earthquake ever recorded, rupturing a 500 x 80 km area of the Chilean megathrust. Published models demonstrate a complex bilateral rupture, with most co-seismic slip occurring to the north of the mainshock epicentre, although significant slip likely stopped short of the trench and the continental Moho. Here, we show a new high-resolution 3D velocity model (vp and vp/vs ratio) of the central Chilean margin Our velocity model is based on manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from 670 aftershocks recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) network. Seismic properties of the marine forearc are poorly understood in subduction zones, but by incorporating picks from two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) networks, we can resolve the velocity structure of the megathrust as far as the trench. In total, the catalogue used for the tomographic inversion yields a total of ~50,000 high quality P- and S-wave picks. We analyse the quality of our model by analysis of the resolution matrix and by testing characteristic models. The 3D velocity model shows the main structures associated within a subduction forearc: the marine forearc basin (vp < 6.0 km/s), continental mantle (vp > 7.5 km/s), and subducting oceanic crust (vp ~ 7.7 km/s). The plate interface is well defined by relocated aftershock seismicity. P-wave velocities along the megathrust range from 6.5 km/s beneath the marine forearc to 7.7 km/s at the intersection of the megathrust with the continental Moho. We infer several high vp anomalies within the South

  10. Coseismic and post-seismic velocity changes detected by Passive Image Interferometry: comparison of one great and five strong earthquakes in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, Manuel; Wegler, Ulrich; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Nakahara, Hisashi

    2016-05-01

    We present a systematic study of seismic velocity changes associated with a megathrust and five strong crustal earthquakes in Japan. We perform both cross-correlation and single-station cross-correlation analysis for station pairs and stations, respectively. The correlation of ambient seismic noise allows us to reconstruct the Green's functions of the wave propagation. By relating the coda parts of the daily Green's functions with the long-term reference Green's functions, shear wave velocity changes are determined. We analyse data from four areas in Japan where large earthquakes occurred: Iwate-Miyagi (2008 MW 6.9 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake), Niigata (2004 MW 6.6 Chūetsu, 2007 MW 6.6 Chūetsu-oki and 2011 MW 6.2 Nagano/Niigata earthquakes), Noto Peninsula (2007 MW 6.7 Noto Hantō earthquake) and Fukuoka (2005 MW 6.6 Fukuoka earthquake). In all areas, we analyse time-series which start before the respective earthquakes and last until after the 2011 MW 9.0 Tōhoku-oki earthquake. The analysis in five different frequency ranges between 0.125 and 4.0 Hz yields time-series of the velocity changes for the different station pairs or stations. At the time of the respective earthquakes, we observe coseismic velocity drops in all areas which are followed by a partial post-seismic recovery process. For the Tōhoku-oki earthquake, coseismic velocity drops can also be observed in all regions. There is a general trend of increasing coseismic velocity drops with frequency in all four areas. The largest coseismic drops are observed close to the fault zones. Over the observed time range, the post-seismic recovery is only partial and around half of the coseismic velocity drops do not recover. The characteristic recovery times for the recovering part are similar in all areas and frequency ranges, with an average value of 0.55 yr. We model the volumetric strain changes for the different earthquakes and find that the observed pattern of the coseismic velocity drops cannot be

  11. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  12. Exact seismic velocities for VTI and HTI media and extendedThomsen Formulas for stronger anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    I explore a different type of approximation to the exactanisotropic wave velocities as a function of incidence angle invertically transversely isotropic (VTI) media. This method extends theThomsen weak anisotropy approach to stronger anisotropy withoutsignificantly affecting the simplicity of the formulas. One importantimprovement is that the peak of the quasi-SV-wave speed vsv(theta) islocated at the correct incidence angle theta= theta max, rather thanalways being at the position theta = 45o, which universally holds forThomsen's approximation although max theta = 45o is actually nevercorrect for any VTI anisotropic medium. The magnitudes of all the wavespeeds are also more closely approximated for all values of the incidenceangle. Furthermore, the value of theta max (which is needed in the newformulas) can be deduced from the same data that are typically used inthe weak anisotropy data analysis. The two examples presented are basedon systems having vertical fractures. The first set of model fractureshas their axes of symmetry randomly oriented in the horizontal plane.Such a system is then isotropic in the horizontal plane and, therefore,exhibits vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) symmetry. The second set offractures also has axes of symmetry in the horizontal plane, but it isassumed these axes are aligned so that the system exhibits horizontaltransverse isotropic (HTI) symmetry. Both types of systems are easilytreated with the new wave speed formulation.

  13. Seismic Imaging Processing and Migration

    2000-06-26

    Salvo is a 3D, finite difference, prestack, depth migration code for parallel computers. It is also capable of processing 2D and poststack data. The code requires as input a seismic dataset, a velocity model and a file of parameters that allows the user to select various options. The code uses this information to produce a seismic image. Some of the options available to the user include the application of various filters and imaging conditions. Themore » code also incorporates phase encoding (patent applied for) to process multiple shots simultaneously.« less

  14. Degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu subduction zone: quantitative evaluations from seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaohong; Sun, Jinlong; Huang, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Serpentinization is an important phenomenon for understanding the water cycle and geodynamics of subduction zones in the upper mantle. In this study, we evaluate quantitatively the degree of serpentinization using the seismic velocity. The results show that serpentinization mainly occurs in the forearc mantle wedge along the subducted oceanic crust, and the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu is strongly heterogeneous and varies from 0 to 12 %, containing about 0-1.8 % water contents. In general, the degree of serpentinization gradually decreases with depth from 40 to 80 km and the largest degree usually occur in about 40-50 km depth. Localized high anomalies of serpentinization are revealed in the northern and southern portions of Kyushu, respectively. We suggest that in the northern portion of the forearc mantle wedge, the water contents are relatively large, which might result from the abundant fractures and cracks with more fluids in the subducting slab because of the subduction of Kyushu-Palau ridge and the sudden change in its subduction angle of Philippine Sea lithosphere. But the high degree of serpentinization in the southern portion is closely associated with the active left-lateral shear zone revealed by global positioning system site velocities and earthquake focal mechanisms. In addition, the present results also display that the low degree of serpentinization in the central domain of the forearc mantle wedge is consistent with the location of anomalous arc volcano. The distribution of water contents is closely associated with the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge.

  15. Depth-dependence of seismic velocity change associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan, revealed from repeating earthquake analysis and finite-difference wave propagation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Kimura, Hisanori; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Uchida, Naoki; Takagi, Ryota; Snieder, Roel

    2015-05-01

    We detect time-lapse changes in seismic velocity associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan (Mw 9.0), by applying the moving time window cross-correlation analysis to repeating earthquake records registered by Hi-net borehole seismograms. The phase delay curve of the repeating earthquake records demonstrates up to 0.2 per cent apparent velocity reduction for S-wave time windows, while the reduction is only 0.1 per cent at the maximum for P-wave time windows. The apparent velocity reductions for S-wave time windows are especially large for offshore region near the large slip area of the Tohoku earthquake. To investigate the sensitivity of the phase delay curve to partial velocity change, we perform a finite difference (FD) wave propagation simulation using short-wavelength random inhomogeneous media. We found that a 1 per cent velocity reduction at the top 150 m depth (shallow zone) is the most possible model to explain the observed phase delay curve. The evaluated velocity reduction at the shallow zone is consistent with previous studies that detected velocity changes due to strong ground motion. Through the FD simulation, we also found that displacement of the source location after the Tohoku earthquake is not likely the primary cause of the observed apparent velocity change. The average velocity reduction at depths from 150 m to 80 km (deep zone) is evaluated to be much smaller than 0.1 per cent. This small velocity reduction at the deep zone can be caused by a static strain change due to the Tohoku earthquake and its post-seismic deformation.

  16. Analysis and algorithms for a regularized Cauchy problem arising from a non-linear elliptic PDE for seismic velocity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, M.K.; Fomel, S.B.; Sethian, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we derive and study a nonlinear elliptic PDE coming from the problem of estimation of sound speed inside the Earth. The physical setting of the PDE allows us to pose only a Cauchy problem, and hence is ill-posed. However we are still able to solve it numerically on a long enough time interval to be of practical use. We used two approaches. The first approach is a finite difference time-marching numerical scheme inspired by the Lax-Friedrichs method. The key features of this scheme is the Lax-Friedrichs averaging and the wide stencil in space. The second approach is a spectral Chebyshev method with truncated series. We show that our schemes work because of (1) the special input corresponding to a positive finite seismic velocity, (2) special initial conditions corresponding to the image rays, (3) the fact that our finite-difference scheme contains small error terms which damp the high harmonics; truncation of the Chebyshev series, and (4) the need to compute the solution only for a short interval of time. We test our numerical scheme on a collection of analytic examples and demonstrate a dramatic improvement in accuracy in the estimation of the sound speed inside the Earth in comparison with the conventional Dix inversion. Our test on the Marmousi example confirms the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. Multi-stage rift evolution of the SW Barents Sea from wide-angle seismic velocity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Faleide, J. I.; Ritzmann, O.; Mjelde, R.

    2009-04-01

    We present results from an active-source, onshore-offshore seismic reflection/refraction transect acquired as part of the PETROBAR project (Petroleum-related studies of the Barents Sea region). The 690 km-long profile is oriented NW-SE, coincident with the deep multichannel seismic reflection profile IKU-B acquired in 1984. The transect comprises 4157 shots from a 78 l. (4800 cu. in.), four-airgun source array. The shots were recorded by 28 GEOMAR ocean-bottom stations (26 four-component OBS and 2 single-component OBH) and 10 land stations deployed by the University of Copenhagen along the northern coast of Norway. Data quality is generally good, with clear signal offsets in excess of 200 km. We utilize first-arrival tomography, layer-based raytracing, and gravity modeling to constrain the velocity and density structure of the sediments, crust, and uppermost mantle in a complex tectonic regime. This is the first wide-angle seismic transect off northern Norway to extend continuously from continental craton, near the Russian border, to oceanic crust, at the interpreted COB. The profile images a wide range of crustal types and ages, including, from SE to NW: Proterozoic cratonic Baltica; Paleozoic orogenic Caledonides; generally westward-younging, Paleozoic to early Cenozoic basins; and transtensional rift structures and volcanics related to the Eocene breakup with Greenland. Our analyses indicate significant heterogeneity of the crystalline crust along the profile, with crystalline crustal thicknesses ranging from 45 km beneath the Varanger Peninsula to <10 km beneath the Bjørnøya Basin. Assuming an original, post-Caledonide crustal thickness of 45 km, the average stretching factor along the entire profile is 1.6, with 260 km of cumulative extension and an original length of 430 km. Associated, fault-bounded basins formed in the grabens and half-grabens of tilted crustal blocks during multiple, distinct rifting episodes. The main rift stages (Carboniferous, Late

  18. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  19. Seismic velocity constraints on the material properties that control earthquake behavior at the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar transform faults, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Emily; Lizarralde, Dan; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Collins, John A.

    2012-11-01

    Mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) vary strongly along strike in their ability to generate large earthquakes. This general observation suggests that local variations in material properties along RTFs exert a primary control on earthquake rupture dynamics. We explore these relationships by examining the seismic structure of two RTFs that have distinctly different seismic coupling. We determine the seismic velocity structure at the Gofar and Quebrada faults on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) using P wave traveltime tomography with data from two active-source wide-angle refraction lines crossing the faults. We image low-velocity zones (LVZs) at both faults, where P wave velocities are reduced by as much as 0.5-1.0 km/s (˜10-20%) within a several kilometer wide region. At the Gofar fault, the LVZ extends through the entire crust, into the seismogenic zone. We rule out widespread serpentinization as an explanation for the low velocities, owing to the lack of a corresponding signal in the locally measured gravity field. The reduced velocities can be explained if the plate boundary region is composed of fault material with enhanced fluid-filled porosity (1.5-8%). Local seismic observations indicate that the high-porosity region lies within a ˜10 km long portion of the fault that fails in large swarms of microearthquakes and acts as a barrier to the propagation of large (M ˜ 6.0) earthquakes. Tomographic images of fault structure combined with observed earthquake behavior suggest that EPR transform segments capable of generating large earthquakes have relatively intact gabbro within the seismogenic zone, whereas segments that slip aseismically or via earthquake swarms are composed of highly fractured, ≥2 km wide damage zones that extend throughout the crust.

  20. Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Images of the Nankai Subduction Zone: New Insight into Megathrust Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Dapeng Zhao, Xin Liu (Tohoku University, Japan) Many large interplate earthquakes (M > 7) occurred on the megathrust fault of the Nankai subduction zone, where the young Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate along the Nankai Trough. The most significant megathrust events in this region are the 1944 Tonankai (Mw 8.1), the 1946 Nankai (Mw 8.3) and the 1968 Hyuganada (Mw 7.5) earthquakes. The landward down-dip limit of the Nankai megathrust seismogenic zone is located at a depth of ~30-40 km, marked by the occurrence of episodic tremors and slips. The seaward up-dip limit is not very distinct, being generally at a depth of ~10 km and correlated with a suite of diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic processes. To clarify the causal mechanism of the megathrust earthquakes, we studied the detailed three-dimensional P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs), attenuation (Qp and Qs), and Poisson's ratio (σ) structures of the SW Japan forearc, using a large number of high-quality arrival time and t* data measured precisely from seismograms of local earthquakes. The suboceanic earthquakes used are relocated precisely using sP depth phase and ocean bottom seismometer data. Our results show the existence of two prominent high-V, high-Q, and low-σ patches separated by low-V, low-Q, and high-σ anomalies in the Nankai megathrust zone. Megathrust earthquakes during 1900 to 2013 nucleated in or around the high-V, high-Q, and low-σ patches, which may represent strongly coupled areas (i.e., asperities) in the megathrust zone. This feature is very similar to that of the NE Japan megathrust zone where the great Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) occurred on 11 March 2011 (e.g., Zhao, 2015). These results indicate that structural heterogeneities in the megathrust zone, such as the subducting seafloor topography and compositional variations, control the nucleation of megathrust earthquakes.

  1. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  2. Crustal shear wave velocity structure of the western United States inferred from ambient seismic noise and earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Lin, F.-C.; Yang, Y.

    2010-10-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient seismic noise and array-based measurements from teleseismic earthquakes observed with the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) are inverted using a Monte Carlo method for a 3-D VS model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the western United States. The combination of data from these methods produces exceptionally broadband dispersion information from 6 to 100 s period, which constrains shear wave velocity structures in the crust and uppermost mantle to a depth of more than 100 km. The high lateral resolution produced by the TA network and the broadbandedness of the dispersion information motivate the question of the appropriate parameterization for a 3-D model, particularly for the crustal part of the model. We show that a relatively simple model in which VS increases monotonically with depth in the crust can fit the data well across more than 90% of the study region, except in eight discrete areas where greater crustal complexity apparently exists. The regions of greater crustal complexity are the Olympic Peninsula, the MendocinoTriple Junction, the Yakima Fold Belt, the southern Cascadia back arc, the Great Central Valley of California, the Salton Trough, the Snake River Plain, and the Wasatch Mountains. We also show that a strong Rayleigh-Love discrepancy exists across much of the western United States, which can be resolved by introducing radial anisotropy in both the mantle and notably the crust. We focus our analysis on demonstrating the existence of crustal radial anisotropy and primarily discuss the crustal part of the isotropic model that results from the radially anisotropic model by Voigt averaging. Model uncertainties from the Monte Carlo inversion are used to identify robust isotropic features in the model. The uppermost mantle beneath the western United States is principally composed of four large-scale shear wave velocity features, but lower crustal velocity structure exhibits far greater

  3. 3D constraints on a possible deep > 2.5 km massive sulphide mineralization from 2D crooked-line seismic reflection data in the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Bongajum, Emmanuel; Bellefleur, Gilles; Juhlin, Christopher; Tryggvason, Ari

    2009-12-01

    2D crooked-line seismic reflection surveys in crystalline environments are often considered challenging in their processing and interpretation. These challenges are more evident when complex diffraction signals that can originate from out-of-the-plane and a variety of geological features are present. A seismic profile in the Kristineberg mining area in northern Sweden shows an impressive diffraction package, covering an area larger than 25 km 2 in the subsurface at depths greater than 2.5 km. We present here a series of scenarios in which each can, to some extent, explain the nature of this extraordinarily large package of diffractions. Cross-dip analysis, diffraction imaging and modeling, as well as 3D processing of the crooked-line data provided constraints on the interpretation of the diffraction package. Overall, the results indicate that the diffraction package can be associated with at least four main short south-dipping diffractors in a depth range of 2.5-4.5 km. Candidate scenarios for the origin of the diffraction package are: (1) a series of massive sulphide deposits, (2) a series of mafic-ultramafic intrusions, (3) a major shear-zone and (4) multiple contact lithologies. We have also investigated the possible contribution of mode-converted scattered energy in the diffraction package using a modified converted-wave 3D prestack depth migration algorithm with the results indicating that a majority of the diffractions are P-wave diffractions. The 3D prestack migration of the data provided improved images of a series of steeply north-dipping mafic-ultramafic sill intrusions to a depth of about 4 km, where the diffractions appear to focus after the migration. The results and associated interpretations presented in this paper have improved our understanding of this conspicuous package of diffractions and may lead to re-evaluation of the 3D geological model of the Kristineberg mining area.

  4. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  5. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  6. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  7. Seismic velocity model of the central United States (Version 1): Description and simulation of the 18 April 2008 Mt. Carmel, Illinois, Earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramírez‐Guzmán, Leonardo; Boyd, Oliver S.; Hartzell, Stephen; Williams, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new three‐dimensional seismic velocity model of the central United States (CUSVM) that includes the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) and covers parts of Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennessee. The model represents a compilation of decades of crustal research consisting of seismic, aeromagnetic, and gravity profiles; geologic mapping; geophysical and geological borehole logs; and inversions of the regional seismic properties. The density, P‐ and S‐wave velocities are synthesized in a stand‐alone spatial database that can be queried to generate the required input for numerical seismic‐wave propagation simulations. We test and calibrate the CUSVM by simulating ground motions of the 18 April 2008 Mw 5.4 Mt. Carmel, Illinois, earthquake and comparing the results with observed records within the model area. The selected stations in the comparisons reflect different geological site conditions and cover distances ranging from 10 to 430 km from the epicenter. The results, based on a qualitative and quantitative goodness‐of‐fit (GOF) characterization, indicate that both within and outside the Mississippi Embayment the CUSVM reasonably reproduces: (1) the body and surface‐wave arrival times and (2) the observed regional variations in ground‐motion amplitude, cumulative energy, duration, and frequency content up to a frequency of 1.0 Hz. In addition, we discuss the probable structural causes for the ground‐motion patterns in the central United States that we observed in the recorded motions of the 18 April Mt. Carmel earthquake.

  8. Seismic velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates revealed by a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    The crust and upper mantle seismic structure, spanning from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda spreading centers to the Cascade back arc, is imaged with full-wave propagation simulation and a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquake recordings. The spreading centers have anomalously low shear wave velocity beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Around the Cobb axial seamount, we observe a low-velocity anomaly underlying a relatively thin oceanic lithosphere, indicating its influence on the Juan de Fuca ridge. The oceanic Moho is clearly defined by a P velocity increase from 6.3 km/s to 7.5 km/s at about 6 km depth beneath the seafloor. The thickness of the oceanic plates is less than 40 km prior to subduction, and the structure of the oceanic lithosphere varies both along strike and along dip. Farther landward, very low velocity anomalies are observed above the plate interface along the Cascade fore arc, indicative of subducted sediments.

  9. New data about seismicity and crustal velocity structure of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara region in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexey N.; Vaganova, Natalya V.; Konechnaya, Yana V.; Asming, Vladimir E.

    2015-01-01

    The recent (2011) installation of seismic station Zemlya Franca-Iocifa (ZFI) on Alexander Island in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago allows new seismic monitoring of the "continent-ocean" transition zone of the Barents-Kara Sea region. The region is seismically active, and we hypothesize that the prevailing geodynamic factor responsible for the occurrence of weak earthquakes is isostatic compensation of avalanche sedimentation in the "continent-ocean" transition zone. The crustal velocity structure beneath ZFI was determined using receiver functions. Crustal thickness is 30 km, based on an observed Moho discontinuity with underlying mantle velocities being Vp = 8.15 km/s and Vs = 4.5 km/s The model indicates a mid-crustal boundary at a depth of about 17 km with a velocity contrast between the upper ( Vp = 6.1 km/s, Vs = 3.6 km/s) and lower ( Vp = 6.8 km/s, Vs = 3.9 km/s) layers. In addition, the upper crustal sedimentary layer is about 4 km thick with Vp = 4.3 km/s and Vs = 2.36 km/s.

  10. Seismic velocity structure and deformation due to the collision of the Louisville Ridge with the Tonga-Kermadec Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, W.; Peirce, C.; Paulatto, M.; Funnell, M.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Bassett, D.

    2015-03-01

    New marine geophysical data recorded across the Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone are used to image deformation and seismic velocity structures of the forearc and Pacific Plate where the Louisville Ridge seamount chain subducts. Due to the obliquity of the Louisville Ridge to the trench and the fast 128 mm yr-1 south-southwest migration of the ridge-trench collision zone, post-, current and pre-seamount subduction deformation can be investigated between 23°S and 28°S. We combine our interpretations from the collision zone with previous results from the post- and pre-collision zones to define the along-arc variation in deformation due to seamount subduction. In the pre-collision zone the lower-trench slope is steep, the mid-trench slope has ˜3-km-thick stratified sediments and gravitational collapse of the trench slope is associated with basal erosion by subducting horst and graben structures on the Pacific Plate. This collapse indicates that tectonic erosion is a normal process affecting this generally sediment starved subduction system. In the collision zone the trench-slope decreases compared to the north and south, and rotation of the forearc is manifest as a steep plate boundary fault and arcward dipping sediment in a 12-km-wide, ˜2-km-deep mid-slope basin. A ˜3 km step increase in depth of the middle and lower crustal isovelocity contours below the basin indicates the extent of crustal deformation on the trench slope. At the leading edge of the overriding plate, upper crustal P-wave velocities are ˜4.0 km s-1 and indicate the trench fill material is of seamount origin. Osbourn Seamount on the outer rise has extensional faulting on its western slope and mass wasting of the seamount provides the low Vp material to the trench. In the post-collision zone to the north, the trench slope is smooth, the trench is deep, and the crystalline crust thins at the leading edge of the overriding plate where Vp is low, ˜5.5 km s-1. These

  11. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting in the Red Sea Rift, Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Almadani, S.; Gao, S. S.; Elsheikh, A. A.; Cherie, S.; Thurmond, A. K.; Liu, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression is currently a unique locale for the investigation of crustal and mantle processes involved in the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. To provide high-quality images of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Red Sea Rift in Central Afar, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Here we report receiver function stacking results to investigate crustal properties of this presumably incipient oceanic rift. Stacking of approximately 2200 radial receiver functions along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22 km, ranging from nearly 18 km within the Red Sea Rift axis to approximately 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift axes. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios systematically decrease toward the northeast, ranging from 2.40 southwest of the Tendaho Graben to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to constrain a highly reduced average crustal P-velocity of 5.0 km/s within the rift axis, which is characterized by a melt percentage of ~11% confined primarily to the lower crust while the overlap zone contains relatively minor quantities of partial melt. An observed asymmetric distribution of high Vp/Vs values within the Tendaho Graben, as well as regionally maximum values on the southwestern rift flank, suggest crustal magmas either delivered from off-axis subcrustal magma chambers or as material present as residuum from the Red Sea Rift axis migration. Comparisons of these crustal properties beneath the Red Sea Rift and those found beneath mature mid-ocean ridges suggest the locus of extensional strain within the Central Afar is currently diffuse and in the process of localizing toward the Tendaho Graben accompanying the northeastward migration of the Afar Triple Junction.

  12. Are seismic velocity time-lapse changes due to fluid substitution or matrix dissolution? A CO2 sequestration study at Pohokura Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, L.; Sim, C. Y.; Macfarlane, J.; van Wijk, K.; Shragge, J. C.; Higgs, K.

    2015-12-01

    Time-lapse seismic signatures can be used to quantify fluid saturation and pressure changes in a reservoir undergoing CO2 sequestration. However, the injection of CO2 acidifies the water, which may dissolve and/or precipitate minerals. Understanding the impact on the rock frame from field seismic time-lapse changes remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we study the effects of carbonate-CO2-water reactions on the physical and elastic properties of rock samples with variable volumes of carbonate cementation. The effects of fluid substitution alone (brine to CO2) and those due to the combination of fluid substitution and mineral dissolution on time-lapse seismic signatures are studied by combining laboratory data, geophysical well-log data and 1-D seismic modeling. Nine rocks from Pohokura Field (New Zealand) are reacted with carbonic acid. The elastic properties are measured using a high-density laser-ultrasonic setup. We observe that P-wave velocity changes up to -19% and correlate with sandstone grain size. Coarse-grained sandstones show greater changes in elastic wave velocities due to dissolution than fine-grained sandstones. To put this in perspective, this velocity change is comparable to the effect of fluid substitution from brine to CO2. This can potentially create an ambiguity in the interpretation of the physical processes responsible for time-lapse signatures in a CO2injection scenario. The laboratory information is applied onto well-log data to model changes in elastic properties of sandstones at the well-log scale. Well-logs and core petrographic analyses are used to find an elastic model that best describes the observed elastic waves velocities in the cemented reservoir sandstones. The Constant-cement rock physics model is found to predict the elastic behaviour of the cemented sandstones. A possible late-time sequestration scenario is that both mineral dissolution and fluid substitution occur in the reservoir. 1-D synthetic seismograms show that

  13. 3D Anisotropic Velocity Structure beneath the Kii Peninsula from P-wave Traveltime Tomography: Diagnostics of Seismic Anisotropy in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishise, M.; Koketsu, K.; Miyake, H.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is one of key elements to understand geodynamics such as mantle convection, plate tectonics, and evolutional process of the crust. Thus, it is crucial to investigate seismic anisotropy in the subduction zone where various phenomena are attributed to dynamic processes caused by interaction among adjacent plates. Actually, recent studies of seismic anisotropy show that the determination of a 3D seismic anisotropy structure can be potential diagnostics of a geological lineament structure inside the crust, and probe earthquake rupture areas and rupture nucleation points. In this study, we have evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) P-wave anisotropic velocity structure in the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan, as well as the isotropic velocity structure by P-wave travel times tomography. The study area lies on the Eurasian (Amulian) plate above the subducting Philippine Sea Plate. This belongs to an accretionary prism, which is being developed at the margin of the Asian Continent, and is characterized by E-W trending metamorphic belts including a segment of the active faults zone called the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Additionally, the Kii Peninsula region is presumed to be source regions of megathrust earthquakes along the Nankai trough. The resultant images of both the isotropic and anisotropic tomography show that the upper crust is characterized by E-W trending structure similar to that of the geological structure over the peninsula region. Because deformation of the crust such as preferred mineral alignment and recrystallization associated with planar structures produces significant seismic anisotropy, the plausible factor of the crustal feature is interpreted as E-W orientation of the regional metamorphic belt. Furthermore, in the resulta