Science.gov

Sample records for 2-d shear wave

  1. Comparison with Analytical Solution: Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer resulting in sound radiating away from the shear layer. Solve the linearized Euler equations to predict the sound radiation outside of the jet. The jet static pressure is assumed to be constant. The jet flow is parallel and symmetric about the x-axis. Use a symmetry boundary condition along the x-axis.

  2. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners. PMID:26025508

  3. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  4. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    A thin free shear layer containing an inflection point in the mean velocity profile is inherently unstable. Disturbances in the flow field can excite the unstable behavior of a shear layer, if the appropriate combination of frequencies and shear layer thicknesses exists, causing instability waves to grow. For other combinations of frequencies and thicknesses, these instability waves remain neutral in amplitude or decay in the downstream direction. A growing instability wave radiates noise when its phase velocity becomes supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This occurs primarily when the mean jet flow velocity is supersonic. Thus, the small disturbances in the flow, which themselves may generate noise, have generated an additional noise source. It is the purpose of this problem to test the ability of CAA to compute this additional source of noise. The problem is idealized such that the exciting disturbance is a fixed known acoustic source pulsating at a single frequency. The source is placed inside of a 2D jet with parallel flow; hence, the shear layer thickness is constant. With the source amplitude small enough, the problem is governed by the following set of linear equations given in dimensional form.

  5. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer using the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Wang, Xiao Y.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work, the generation and radiation of acoustic waves from a 2-D shear layer problem is considered. An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer, resulting in sound Mach radiation. The numerical solution is obtained by solving the Euler equations using the space time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Linearization is achieved through choosing a small acoustic source amplitude. The Euler equations are nondimensionalized as instructed in the problem statement. All other conditions are the same except that the Crocco's relation has a slightly different form. In the following, after a brief sketch of the CE/SE method, the numerical results for this problem are presented.

  6. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  7. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Morris, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    A parallel numerical simulation of the radiation of sound from an acoustic source inside a 2-D jet is presented in this paper. This basic benchmark problem is used as a test case for scattering problems that are presently being solved by using the Impedance Mismatch Method (IMM). In this technique, a solid body in the domain is represented by setting the acoustic impedance of each medium, encountered by a wave, to a different value. This impedance discrepancy results in reflected and scattered waves with appropriate amplitudes. The great advantage of the use of this method is that no modifications to a simple Cartesian grid need to be made for complicated geometry bodies. Thus, high order finite difference schemes may be applied simply to all parts of the domain. In the IMM, the total perturbation field is split into incident and scattered fields. The incident pressure is assumed to be known and the equivalent sources for the scattered field are associated with the presence of the scattering body (through the impedance mismatch) and the propagation of the incident field through a non-uniform flow. An earlier version of the technique could only handle uniform flow in the vicinity of the source and at the outflow boundary. Scattering problems in non-uniform mean flow are of great practical importance (for example, scattering from a high lift device in a non-uniform mean flow or the effects of a fuselage boundary layer). The solution to this benchmark problem, which has an acoustic wave propagating through a non-uniform mean flow, serves as a test case for the extensions of the IMM technique.

  8. Influence of Food Intake on 2-D Shear Wave Elastography Assessment of Liver Stiffness in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Lenghel, Lavinia M; Vasilescu, Dan; Botar-Jid, Carolina; Dudea, Sorin M

    2016-06-01

    Transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging are useful non-invasive methods for liver stiffness estimation, although both are influenced by food intake. The aim of the work described here was to identify liver stiffness variation after a standardized meal using 2-D shear wave elastography. Liver stiffness was estimated in 31 apparently healthy subjects, under fasting conditions and after a standardized meal (20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min after food intake). In most of the cases, liver stiffness values increased between 20 and 40 min after the meal (p < 0.05) and then significantly decreased between 60 and 80 min (p < 0.05). At 120 min after food intake, liver stiffness values were significantly lower compared with liver stiffness values under fasting conditions (p < 0.05). Gender, but not body mass index, had an important role in liver stiffness variation after food intake (p < 0.01). In conclusion, to avoid the influence of food intake on liver stiffness estimation, 2-D shear wave elastography should be performed only under fasting conditions. PMID:26947447

  9. An Experimental Study of the Potential Biological Effects Associated with 2-D Shear Wave Elastography on the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Cao, Xiaolin; Song, Danfei

    2016-07-01

    2-D Shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging is widely used in clinical practice, and some researchers have applied this technique in the evaluation of neonatal brains. However, the immediate and long-term impacts of dynamic radiation force exposure on the neonatal central nervous system remain unknown. In this study, we exposed neonatal mice to 2-D SWE scanning for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min under diagnostic mode (mechanical index [MI]: 1.3; thermal index [TI]: 0.5), respectively. For the control group, the neonatal mice were sham irradiated for 30 min with the machine powered off. Their brains were collected and analyzed using histologic staining and western blot analysis at 24 h and 3 mo after the 2-D SWE scanning. The Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory function of the mice at 3 mo of age. The results indicated that using 2-D SWE in evaluating brains of neonatal mice does not cause detectable histologic changes, nor does it have long-term effects on their learning and memory abilities. However, the PI3 K/AKT/mTOR pathway was disturbed when the 2-D SWE scanning lasted for more than 30 min, and the expression of p-PKCa was suppressed by 10 min or more in 2-D SWE scanning. Although these injuries may be self-repaired as the mice grow, more attention should be paid to the scanning duration when applying 2-D-SWE elastography in the assessment of neonatal brains. PMID:27112914

  10. Maximum Value Measured by 2-D Shear Wave Elastography Helps in Differentiating Malignancy from Benign Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen-Shuo; Lin, Man-Xia; Zhou, Lu-Yao; Pan, Fu-Shun; Huang, Guang-Liang; Wang, Wei; Lu, Ming-De; Xie, Xiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the work described here was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of 2-D shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) in differentiating malignancy from benign focal liver lesions (FLLs). The maxima, minima, means and the standard deviations of 2-D SWE measurements, expressed in kilopascals (Emax, Emin, Emean, ESD), were obtained for 221 patients with 229 FLLs. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 2-D SWE. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to assess inter-group differences. Emax, Emin, Emean and ESD were significantly higher in the 164 malignant lesions than in the 65 benign lesions (p < 0.001). For identification of malignant FLLs, the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves for Emax, Emin, Emean and ESD were 0.920, 0.710, 0.879 and 0.915, respectively. Emax was 96.21 ± 35.40 for 19 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 90.32 ± 54.71 for 35 liver metastatic lesions, which were significantly higher than 61.83 ± 28.87 for 103 hepatocellular carcinomas (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0237). Emax was 38.72 ± 18.65 for 15 focal nodular hyperplasias, which was significantly higher than 20.56 ± 10.74 for 37 hemangiomas (p = 0.0009). The Emax values for adjacent liver parenchyma of hepatocellular carcinomas and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas were significantly higher than those for the other three lesion types (p < 0.005). In conclusion, Emax values of FLLs and adjacent liver parenchyma could help in differentiating malignant from benign FLLs. PMID:27283039

  11. Global approach for transient shear wave inversion based on the adjoint method: a comprehensive 2D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Arnal, B; Pinton, G; Garapon, P; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2013-10-01

    Shear wave imaging (SWI) maps soft tissue elasticity by measuring shear wave propagation with ultrafast ultrasound acquisitions (10 000 frames s(-1)). This spatiotemporal data can be used as an input for an inverse problem that determines a shear modulus map. Common inversion methods are local: the shear modulus at each point is calculated based on the values of its neighbour (e.g. time-of-flight, wave equation inversion). However, these approaches are sensitive to the information loss such as noise or the lack of the backscattered signal. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits of a global approach for elasticity inversion using a least-squares formulation, which is derived from full waveform inversion in geophysics known as the adjoint method. We simulate an acoustic waveform in a medium with a soft and a hard lesion. For this initial application, full elastic propagation and viscosity are ignored. We demonstrate that the reconstruction of the shear modulus map is robust with a non-uniform background or in the presence of noise with regularization. Compared to regular local inversions, the global approach leads to an increase of contrast (∼+3 dB) and a decrease of the quantification error (∼+2%). We demonstrate that the inversion is reliable in the case when there is no signal measured within the inclusions like hypoechoic lesions which could have an impact on medical diagnosis. PMID:24018867

  12. Imaging Transverse Isotropic Properties of Muscle by Monitoring Acoustic Radiation Force Induced Shear Waves using a 2D Matrix Ultrasound Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A 2D matrix ultrasound array is used to monitor acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced shear wave propagation in 3D in excised canine muscle. From a single acquisition, both the shear wave phase and group velocity can be calculated to estimate the shear wave speed (SWS) along and across the fibers, as well as the fiber orientation in 3D. The true fiber orientation found using the 3D Radon Transform on B-mode volumes of the muscle was used to verify the fiber direction estimated from shear wave data. For the simplified imaging case when the ARFI push can be oriented perpendicular to the fibers, the error in estimating the fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 3.5 ±2.6° and 3.4 ±1.4° (mean ± standard deviation), respectively, over six acquisitions in different muscle samples. For the more general case when the push is oblique to the fibers, the angle between the push and the fibers is found using the dominant orientation of the shear wave displacement magnitude. In 30 acquisitions on six different muscle samples with oblique push angles up to 40°, the error in the estimated fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 5.4±2.9° and 5.3±3.2°, respectively, after estimating and accounting for the additional unknown push angle. Either the phase or group velocity measurements can be used to estimate fiber orientation and SWS along and across the fibers. Although it is possible to perform these measurements when the push is not perpendicular to the fibers, highly oblique push angles induce lower shear wave amplitudes which can cause inaccurate SWS measurements. PMID:23686942

  13. 2D and 3D Shear-Wave Velocity Structure to >1 Km Depth from Ambient and Active Surface Waves: Three "Deep Remi" Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Refraction microtermor routinely assesses 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiles to shallow depths of approximately 100 m primarily for engineering applications. Estimation of both shallow and deep (>100 m) shear-velocity structure are key elements in the assessment of urban areas for potential earthquake ground shaking, damage, and the calibration of recorded ground motions. Three independent studies investigated the ability of the refraction microtremor technology to image deep velocity structure, to depths exceeding 1 km (Deep ReMi). In the first study, we were able to delineate basin thicknesses of up to 900 m and the deep-basin velocity structure beneath the Reno-area basin. Constraints on lateral velocity changes in 3D as well as on velocity profiles extended down to 1500 m, and show a possible fault offset. This deployment used 30 stand-alone wireless instruments mated to 4.5 Hz geophones, along each of five arrays 2.9 to 5.8 km long. Rayleigh-wave dispersion was clear at frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz using 120 sec ambient urban noise records. The results allowed construction of a 3D velocity model, vetted by agreement with gravity studies. In a second test, a 5.8 km array delimited the southern edge of the Tahoe Basin, with constraints from gravity. There, bedrock depth increased by 250 m in thickness over a distance of 1600 m, with definition of the velocity of the deeper basin sediments. The third study delineated the collapse region of an underground nuclear explosion within a thick sequence of volcanic extrusives, using a shear-wave minivibe in a radial direction, and horizontal geophones. Analysis showed the cavity extends to 620 m depth, with a width of 180 m and a height of 220 m. Our results demonstrate that deep velocity structure can be recovered using ambient noise. This technique offers the ability to define 2D and 3D structural representations essential for seismic hazard evaluation.

  14. Performance of 2-D ultrasound shear wave elastography in liver fibrosis detection using magnetic resonance elastography as the reference standard: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Mellema, Daniel C.; Sheedy, Shannon P.; Meixner, Duane D.; Karshen, Ryan M.; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Sanchez, William; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between 2-D ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in liver stiffness measurement and the diagnostic performance of 2-D SWE for liver fibrosis when imaging from different intercostal spaces and using MRE as the reference standard. Methods 2-D SWE was performed on 47 patients (22 females and 25 males, age 19–77) using the GE LOGIQ E9 scanner. Each of the 47 patients had same day MRE obtained for clinical purposes. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from each subject. 2-D SWE measurements were acquired from the 9th, 8th, and 7th intercostal spaces. Correlation with MRE was calculated at each intercostal space and multiple intercostal spaces combined. The performance of 2-D SWE in diagnosing liver fibrosis was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using MRE as the standard. Results The highest correlation between 2-D SWE and MRE was from the 8th and 7th intercostal spaces (r = 0.68 – 0.76). The range of the areas under the ROC curve for separating normal or inflamed livers from fibrotic livers using MRE as the clinical reference were 0.84 – 0.92 when using 8th and 7th intercostal spaces individually, and 0.89 –0.9 when combined. Conclusion The results suggest that 2-D SWE and MRE are well correlated when SWE is performed at the 8th and 7th intercostal spaces. The 9th intercostal space is less reliable for diagnosing fibrosis using 2-D SWE. Combining measurements from multiple intercostal spaces does not significantly improve 2-D SWE performance for the detection of fibrosis. PMID:26782164

  15. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  16. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Severity: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tian’an; Tian, Guo; Zhao, Qiyu; Kong, Dexing; Cheng, Chao; Zhong, Liyun; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the quantitative diagnosis of liver fibrosis severity. Methods The published literatures were systematically retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Web of science and Scopus up to May 13th, 2016. Included studies reported the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, as well as the diagnostic odds ratio of SWE in populations with liver fibrosis. A bivariate mixed-effects regression model was used, which was estimated by the I2 statistics. The quality of articles was evaluated by quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Results Thirteen articles including 2303 patients were qualified for the study. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis are as follows: ≥F1 0.76 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.71–0.81, I2 = 75.33%), 0.92 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.80–0.97, I2 = 79.36%); ≥F2 0.84 (p = 0.35, 95% CI, 0.81–0.86, I2 = 9.55%), 0.83 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.77–0.88, I2 = 86.56%); ≥F3 0.89 (p = 0.56, 95% CI, 0.86–0.92, I2 = 0%), 0.86 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.82–0.90, I2 = 75.73%); F4 0.89 (p = 0.24, 95% CI, 0.84–0.92, I2 = 20.56%), 0.88 (p<0.001, 95% CI, 0.84–0.92, I2 = 82.75%), respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed no significant changes if any one of the studies was excluded. Publication bias was not detected in this meta-analysis. Conclusions Our study suggests that SWE is a helpful method to appraise liver fibrosis severity. Future studies that validate these findings would be appropriate. PMID:27300569

  18. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26116161

  19. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  20. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  1. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  2. A new method for shear wave speed estimation in shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of mechanical properties of tissue can aid in noninvasive pathology diagnosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) measures the elastic properties of soft tissues by estimation of local shear wave propagation speed. In this paper, a new robust method for estimation of shear wave speed is introduced which has the potential for simplifying continuous filtering and real-time elasticity processing. Shear waves were generated by external mechanical excitation and imaged at a high frame rate. Three homogeneous phantoms of varying elastic moduli and one inclusion phantom were imaged. Waves propagating in separate directions were filtered and shear wave speed was estimated by inversion of the 1-D first-order wave equation. Final 2-D shear wave speed maps were constructed by weighted averaging of estimates from opposite traveling directions. Shear wave speed results for phantoms with gelatin concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 9% were 1.52 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.86 ± 0.10 m/s, and 2.37 ± 0.15 m/s, respectively, which were consistent with estimates computed from three other conventional methods, as well as compression tests done with a commercial texture analyzer. The method was shown to be able to reconstruct a 2-D speed map of an inclusion phantom with good image quality and variance comparable to conventional methods. Suggestions for further work are given. PMID:26670851

  3. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  4. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  5. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2Din-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  6. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  7. Shear wave logging using guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winbow, G.A.; Chen, S.T.; Rice, J.A.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a method for acoustically logging an earth formation surrounding a borehole which contains a liquid where the approximate shear wave velocity v of the formation is known. The method consists of: vibrating a dipole source in the liquid to generate in the liquid a guided wave the frequencies of which include a critical frequency f given by zeta = ..nu..12a where a is the borehole radius, so that the fastest component of the guided wave has velocity substantially equal to ..nu..; and detecting the arrival of the fastest component of the guided wave at least one location in the liquid spaced longitudinally along the borehole from the dipole source.

  8. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  9. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2012-02-01

    solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k3=0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ>1+|K2/k1|, where τ=St is a dimensionless time and K2 is the radial component of the wave vector at τ=0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k3=0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K2/k1≫1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like Kh/kh where kh(τ)=[k12+(K2-k1τ)2]1/2 and Kh=kh(0). After the leading phase (τ>K2/k1≫1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k1=0 and k3=0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k1=0. The limit at k1=0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement.

  10. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    stability of the solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k(3) = 0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ > 1+|K(2)/k(1)|, where τ = St is a dimensionless time and K(2) is the radial component of the wave vector at τ = 0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k(3) = 0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K(2)/k(1)>1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like K(h)/k(h) where k(h)(τ)=[k(1)(2) + (K(2) - k(1)τ)(2)](1/2) and K(h) =k(h)(0). After the leading phase (τ > K(2)/k(1)>1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k(1) = 0 and k(3) = 0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k(1) = 0. The limit at k(1) = 0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement. PMID:22463311

  11. Explosion Shear Wave Generation and Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, G. E.; Stevens, J. L.; Xu, H.

    2004-12-01

    We use observations of explosion-generated Lg together with three separate types of numerical models to determine how underground nuclear explosions generate shear wave phases. This question is fundamental to how Lg phases are interpreted for use in explosion yield estimation and earthquake/explosion discrimination. A simple point explosion in a uniform medium generates no shear waves, so the Lg phase is generated entirely by non-spherical components of the source and conversions through reflections and scattering. Our results indicate that the most important sources of high frequency explosion shear waves are P to S conversions at the free surface and S waves generated directly by a realistic distributed explosion source including nonlinear effects due to the free surface and gravity. In addition, Rg scattering may contribute to lower frequency Lg. Near source S is observed on both radial and tangential component records from a diverse set of explosion data. The data sets include 1) Degelen Mountain explosions recorded at distances less than 100 km and corresponding recordings at Borovoye (BOR) at 650 km; 2) recordings from Russian deep seismic sounding experiments; 3) Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosion sources including the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) and nuclear tests covering a range of source depths and media properties. We model the overburied NPE, and underburied and overburied Degelen explosions, using point sources and two-dimensional nonlinear finite difference calculations to quantify the source effects. We use energy conservation to determine an upper bound on Rg to Lg scattering. Results indicate that Rg to Lg scattering may be important at frequencies less than 1 Hz, and in Lg coda, but is less than Lg generated directly by the explosion at higher frequencies. We use 2D and 3D finite difference calculations, using the known topography and velocity structure at Degelen Mt. and lateral heterogeneities within the crust, to estimate the effect of

  12. Maximum likelihood estimation of shear wave speed in transient elastography.

    PubMed

    Audière, Stéphane; Angelini, Elsa D; Sandrin, Laurent; Charbit, Maurice

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic transient elastography (TE), enables to assess, under active mechanical constraints, the elasticity of the liver, which correlates with hepatic fibrosis stages. This technique is routinely used in clinical practice to assess noninvasively liver stiffness. The Fibroscan system used in this work generates a shear wave via an impulse stress applied on the surface of the skin and records a temporal series of radio-frequency (RF) lines using a single-element ultrasound probe. A shear wave propagation map (SWPM) is generated as a 2-D map of the displacements along depth and time, derived from the correlations of the sequential 1-D RF lines, assuming that the direction of propagation (DOP) of the shear wave coincides with the ultrasound beam axis (UBA). Under the assumption of pure elastic tissue, elasticity is proportional to the shear wave speed. This paper introduces a novel approach to the processing of the SWPM, deriving the maximum likelihood estimate of the shear wave speed when comparing the observed displacements and the estimates provided by the Green's functions. A simple parametric model is used to interface Green's theoretical values of noisy measures provided by the SWPM, taking into account depth-varying attenuation and time-delay. The proposed method was evaluated on numerical simulations using a finite element method simulator and on physical phantoms. Evaluation on this test database reported very high agreements of shear wave speed measures when DOP and UBA coincide. PMID:24835213

  13. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  14. Stress dynamics of a 2D dense granular system near shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2013-03-01

    We study the dynamics of pressure and shear stress in a frictional 2D dense granular system using a novel apparatus that can provide fixed-volume shear without generating inhomogeneities. Under increasing shear strain, the system's pressure shows a strong increase with strain, characterized by a ``Reynolds coefficient,'' R =d2 P / dγ2 . R depends only on packing fraction ϕ, and shows a strong increase as ϕ approaches ϕJ from below. In the meantime, the system's shear stress shows a non-monotonic behavior with increasing strain. It first increases with strain as the system is in ``fragile'' states and builds up long force chains along the compression direction. After a certain amount of strain, force chains along the dilation direction starts to build up, and the system transfers into a ``shear-jammed'' state and the shear stress starts to decrease with strain. Under oscillatory shear, both pressure and shear stress show limit-cycle behavior and reach steady states after many cycles. However, the limit cycles of pressure and shear stress are very different: the pressure exhibits a hysteresis-free parabolic curve, while the shear stress exhibits a strongly hysteretic loop. This work is funded by NSF grants: DMR0906908, DMS0835571, NASA grant NNX10AU01G and ARO grant W911NF-11-1-0110.

  15. A new shear wave imaging system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound elastography is able to provide a non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) technique is a quantitative method for tissue stiffness assessment. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire 2D quantitative images of tissue elasticity distribution. In this study, a new shear wave imaging system is proposed and evaluated. Detailed delineation of hardware and image processing algorithms are presented. Programmable devices are selected to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. Analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transform based shear wave speed determination method are proposed with parallel computation ability. Tissue mimicking phantom imaging, and in vitro imaging measurements are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The system has the ability to provide a new choice for quantitative mapping of the tissue elasticity, and has good potential to be implemented into commercial ultrasound scanner. PMID:26737133

  16. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  17. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  18. Multiscale simulation of 2D elastic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zheng, Hui

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop the multiscale method for simulation of elastic wave propagation. Based on the first-order velocity-stress hyperbolic form of 2D elastic wave equation, the particle velocities are solved first ona coarse grid by the finite volume method. Then the stress tensor is solved by using the multiscale basis functions which can represent the fine-scale variation of the wavefield on the coarse grid. The basis functions are computed by solving a local problem with the finite element method. The theoretical formulae and description of the multiscale method for elastic wave equation are given in more detail. The numerical computations for an inhomogeneous model with random scatter are completed. The results show the effectiveness of the multiscale method.

  19. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners with time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE).

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Macdonald, Michael; Behler, Russell; Lanning, Justin; Wang, Michael; Urban, Matthew; Manduca, Armando; Zhao, Heng; Callstrom, Matthew; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James; Chen, Shigao

    2015-02-01

    Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography presents 2-D quantitative shear elasticity maps of tissue, which are clinically useful for both focal lesion detection and diffuse disease diagnosis. Realization of 2-D shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners, however, is challenging because of the low tracking pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) of these systems. Although some clinical and research platforms support software beamforming and plane-wave imaging with high PRF, the majority of current clinical ultrasound systems do not have the software beamforming capability, which presents a critical challenge for translating the 2-D shear-wave elastography technique from laboratory to clinical scanners. To address this challenge, this paper presents a time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) method for shear-wave tracking on conventional ultrasound scanners. TAST takes advantage of the parallel beamforming capability of conventional systems and realizes high-PRF shear-wave tracking by sequentially firing tracking vectors and aligning shear wave data in the temporal direction. The comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) technique was used to simultaneously produce multiple shear wave sources within the field-of-view (FOV) to enhance shear wave SNR and facilitate robust reconstructions of 2-D elasticity maps. TAST and CUSE were realized on a conventional ultrasound scanner. A phantom study showed that the shear-wave speed measurements from the conventional ultrasound scanner were in good agreement with the values measured from other 2-D shear wave imaging technologies. An inclusion phantom study showed that the conventional ultrasound scanner had comparable performance to a state-of-the-art shear-wave imaging system in terms of bias and precision in measuring different sized inclusions. Finally, in vivo case analysis of a breast with a malignant mass, and a liver from a healthy subject demonstrated the feasibility of using the conventional ultrasound

  20. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  1. Error propagation for velocity and shear stress prediction using 2D models for environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gregory B.; Gilbert, Andrew T.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Buckland, Evan M.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryResource managers, scientists, government regulators, and stakeholders are considering sophisticated numerical models for managing complex environmental problems. In this study, observations from a river-rehabilitation experiment involving gravel augmentation and spawning habitat enhancement were used to assess sources and magnitudes of error in depth, velocity, and shear velocity predictions made at the 1-m scale with a commercial two-dimensional (depth-averaged) model. Error in 2D model depth prediction averaged 21%. This error was attributable to topographic survey resolution, which at 1 pt per 1.14 m 2, was inadequate to resolve small humps and depressions influencing point measurements. Error in 2D model velocity prediction averaged 29%. More than half of this error was attributable to depth prediction error. Despite depth and velocity error, 56% of tested 2D model predictions of shear velocity were within the 95% confidence limit of the best field-based estimation method. Ninety percent of the error in shear velocity prediction was explained by velocity prediction error. Multiple field-based estimates of shear velocity differed by up to 160%, so the lower error for the 2D model's predictions suggests such models are at least as accurate as field measurement. 2D models enable detailed, spatially distributed estimates compared to the small number measurable in a field campaign of comparable cost. They also can be used for design evaluation. Although such numerical models are limited to channel types adhering to model assumptions and yield predictions only accurate to ˜20-30%, they can provide a useful tool for river-rehabilitation design and assessment, including spatially diverse habitat heterogeneity as well as for pre- and post-project appraisal.

  2. Breakdown of wave diffusion in 2D due to loops.

    PubMed

    Haney, Matthew; Snieder, Roel

    2003-08-29

    The validity of the diffusion approximation for the intensity of multiply scattered waves is tested with numerical simulations in a strongly scattering 2D medium of finite extent. We show that the diffusion equation underestimates the intensity and attribute this to both the neglect of recurrent scattering paths and interference within diffusion theory. We present a theory to quantify this discrepancy based on counting all possible scattering paths between point scatterers. Interference phenomena, due to loop paths, are incorporated in a way similar to coherent backscattering. PMID:14525183

  3. Coded Excitation Plane Wave Imaging for Shear Wave Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) compared to conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2-4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (Body Mass Index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue. PMID:26168181

  4. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity. PMID:21342824

  5. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  6. Shear wave mapping of skeletal muscle using shear wave wavefront reconstruction based on ultrasound color flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Iijima, Tomohiro; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed a quantitative shear wave imaging technique for continuous shear wave excitation. Shear wave wavefront is observed directly by color flow imaging using a general-purpose ultrasonic imaging system. In this study, the proposed method is applied to experiments in vivo, and shear wave maps, namely, the shear wave phase map, which shows the shear wave propagation inside the medium, and the shear wave velocity map, are observed for the skeletal muscle in the shoulder. To excite the shear wave inside the skeletal muscle of the shoulder, a hybrid ultrasonic wave transducer, which combines a small vibrator with an ultrasonic wave probe, is adopted. The shear wave velocity of supraspinatus muscle, which is measured by the proposed method, is 4.11 ± 0.06 m/s (N = 4). This value is consistent with those obtained by the acoustic radiation force impulse method.

  7. Estimation of seabed shear-wave velocity profiles using shear-wave source data.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hefeng; Nguyen, Thanh-Duong; Duffaut, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates seabed shear-wave velocity profiles and their uncertainties using interface-wave dispersion curves extracted from data generated by a shear-wave source. The shear-wave source generated a seismic signature over a frequency range between 2 and 60 Hz and was polarized in both in-line and cross-line orientations. Low-frequency Scholte- and Love-waves were recorded. Dispersion curves of the Scholte- and Love-waves for the fundamental mode and higher-order modes are extracted by three time-frequency analysis methods. Both the vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles in the sediment are estimated by the Scholte- and Love-wave dispersion curves, respectively. A Bayesian approach is utilized for the inversion. Differential evolution, a global search algorithm is applied to estimate the most-probable shear-velocity models. Marginal posterior probability profiles are computed by Metropolis-Hastings sampling. The estimated vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles fit well with the core and in situ measurements. PMID:23862796

  8. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  9. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    PubMed

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented. PMID:24658144

  10. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  11. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  12. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity within San Francisco Bay Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment properties are spatially variable at all scales, and this variability at smaller scales influences high frequency ground motions. We show that surface shear-wave velocity is highly correlated within San Francisco Bay Area sediments using shear-wave velocity measurements from 210 seismic cone penetration tests. We use this correlation to estimate the surface sediment velocity structure using geostatistics. We find that the variance of the estimated shear-wave velocity is reduced using ordinary kriging, and that including this velocity structure in 2D ground motion simulations of a moderate sized earthquake improves the accuracy of the synthetics. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  13. Shear wave velocities in the earth's mantle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Direct measurement of the travel time gradient for S waves together with travel time data are used to derive a shear velocity model for the earth's mantle. In order to satisfy the data it is necessary to discard the usual assumption of lateral homogeneity below shallow depths. A shear velocity differential is proposed for a region between western North America and areas of the Pacific Ocean. Distinctive features of the velocity model for the upper mantle beneath western North America are a low-velocity zone centered at 100 km depth and zones of high velocity gradient beginning at 400, 650, and 900 km.

  14. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  15. ML shear wave velocity tomography for the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri-Peyrov, Mehdi; Ghods, Abdolreza; Abbasi, Madjid; Bergman, Eric; Sobouti, Farhad

    2016-04-01

    Iranian Plateau reflects several different tectonic styles of collision, and large-scale strike-slip faults. We calculate a high-resolution 2-D ML shear velocity map for the Iranian Plateau to detect lateral crustal thickness changes associated with different tectonic boundaries. The ML velocity is very sensitive to strong lateral variations of crustal thickness and varies between the velocity of Lg and Sn phases. Our data set consists of 65 795 ML amplitude velocity measurements from 2531 precisely relocated events recorded by Iranian networks in the period 1996-2014. Using a constrained least-squares inversion scheme, we inverted the ML velocities for a 2-D shear velocity map of Iran. Our results show that the Zagros and South Caspian Basin (SCB) have shear wave velocities close to the Sn phase, and are thus Lg-blocking regions. High velocities in the High Zagros and the Simply Folded Belt imply significant crustal undulations within these zones. We note that in the central and south Zagros, the velocity border between the Zagros and central Iran is not coincident with the Zagros suture line that marks underthrusting of the Arabian plate beneath central Iran. The low plains of Gilan and Gorgan to the south of the Caspian Sea show high shear velocities similar to the SCB, implying that they are either underlain by an oceanic type crust or a transitional crust with a strong lateral crustal thickness gradient. The Lut block is an Lg-passing block implying that it is not surrounded by any sudden crustal thickness changes along its borders with central Iran. In the Alborz, NW Iran, Kopeh-Dagh, Binalud and most of the central Iran, low shear velocity near the Lg velocity is attributed to smooth or minor Moho undulations within these regions.

  16. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  17. The stability of Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Benkui

    1990-11-01

    An investigation is undertaken of the stability of linear Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid by means of a qualitative theory employing ordinary differential equations. It is noted that, while the basic current has no detectable shear, the Rossby waves are always stable. If the basic current possesses only horizontal shear, the unstable criterion for waves takes one form, but it takes entirely another in the case where the basic current possesses only vertical shear.

  18. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  19. Cascade properties of shear Alfven wave turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear three-wave interactions of linear normal modes are investigated for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics and the weakly three-dimensional Strauss equations in the case where a strong uniform background field B0 is present. In both systems the only resonant interaction affecting Alfven waves is caused by the shear of the background field plus the zero frequency components of the perturbation. It is shown that the Alfven waves are cascaded in wavenumber space by a mechanism equivalent to the resonant absorption at the Alfven resonance. For large wavenumbers perpendicular to B0, the cascade is described by Hamilton's ray equations, dk/dt = -(first-order) partial derivative of omega with respect to vector r, where omega includes the effects of the zero frequency perturbations.

  20. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  1. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  2. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  4. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  5. 2-D traveling-wave patterns in binary fluid convection

    SciTech Connect

    Surko, C.M.; Porta, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    An overview is presented of recent experiments designed to study two-dimensional traveling-wave convection in binary fluid convection in a large aspect ratio container. Disordered patterns are observed when convection is initiated. As time proceeds, they evolve to more ordered patterns, consisting of several domains of traveling-waves separated by well-defined domain boundaries. The detailed character of the patterns depends sensitively on the Rayleigh number. Numerical techniques are described which were developed to provide a quantitative characterization of the traveling-wave patterns. Applications of complex demodulation techniques are also described, which make a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the domain boundaries possible.

  6. Wave-forced reconfiguration of a 2D artificial canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsu, Sylvie; Doppler, Delphine; Rivière, Nicolas; Lance, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Blades inside aquatic vegetation canopies show collective motion when submitted to a water flow. Coherent deformation waves might be observed under given flow conditions, which might enhance mass and sediment transfers between the canopy and surrounding flow, thus impacting the plants development. However, most studies have been focused on the flow velocity while the cover motion has been far less studied. Here we present experimental results about the dynamic reconfiguration of a single array of PVC blades in a wave flume. The oscillations of the blades are imaged while the water level is separately measured using resistive probes. A delayed coherent wave motion is observed within the canopy, as a response to the oscillatory flow. The associated transfer function (amplitude, phase, wave speed) is built by correlating blade displacements and water local velocity time series. The canopy-flow interaction is then modelled by a simple linear damped oscillator chain whose parameters are deduced from experiments.

  7. Standing shear waves in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krit, T.; Golubkova, I.; Andreev, V.

    2015-10-01

    We studied standing shear waves in anisotropic resonator represented by a rectangular parallelepiped (layer) fixed without slipping between two wooden plates of finite mass. The viscoelastic layer with edges of 70 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm was made of a rubber-like polymer plastisol with rubber bands inside. The bands were placed vertical between the top and the bottom plate. Mechanical properties of the plastisol itself were carefully measured previously. It was found that plastisol shows a cubic nonlinear behavior, i.e. the stress-strain curve could be represented as: σ = μɛ + βμɛ3, where ɛ stands for shear strain and σ is an applied shear stress. The value of shear modulus μ depends on frequency and was found to be several kilopascals which is common for such soft solids. Nonlinear parameter β is frequency dependent too and varies in range from tenths to unity at 1-100 Hz frequency range, decreasing with frequency growth. Stretching the rubber bands inside the layer leads to change of elastic properties in resonator. Such effect could be noticed due to frequency response of the resonator. The numerical model of the resonator was based on finite elements method (FEM) and performed in MatLab. The resonator was cut in hundreds of right triangular prisms. Each prism was provided with viscoelastic properties of the layer except for the top prisms provided with the wooden plate properties and the prisms at the site of the rubber bands provided with the rubber properties. The boundary conditions on each prism satisfied the requirements that resonator is inseparable and all its boundaries but bottom are free. The bottom boundary was set to move horizontally with constant acceleration amplitude. It was shown numerically that the resonator shows anisotropic behavior expressed in different frequency response to oscillations applied to a bottom boundary in different directions.

  8. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the Galapagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Burkett, P. G.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Silver, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We report measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting in the Galápagos Archipelago. The inferred lateral variations in azimuthal anisotropy allow us to examine the dynamics of an evolving hotspot-ridge system. The data are from SKS and SKKS phases, as well as S waves from deep sources, recorded by a relatively dense network of 10 portable broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA (Imaging Galápagos Upwelling and Neotectonics of the Archipelago) experiment and from the GSN broadband station in Santa Cruz (PAYG). We find a delay time between fast and slow shear waves of 0.4 to 0.9 s and fast polarization directions of N85-90° E beneath five stations at the leading and southern edge of the archipelago. Despite clear seismic signals, we did not find any anisotropy at the six stations located in the interior of the archipelago. For those stations that show shear wave splitting, there is an increase in the delay time toward the expected location of the Galápagos hotspot at the western edge of the archipelago. With the exception of Española, fast polarization directions (N85-90° E) are close to the current direction of absolute plate motion of the overlying Nazca plate (N91° E). The lack of azimuthal anisotropy in the interior of the archipelago is interpreted as an absence of strongly oriented mantle fabric beneath these stations. The apparent isotropy in this dynamic region, where we expect considerable mantle strain, is surprising. It is not likely that the olivine a-axis is oriented vertically beneath the interior of the archipelago as the Galápagos plume is thought to lie at the western edge. It is also unlikely that there are two layers of perpendicularly-oriented anisotropy which are solely confined to the center of the archipelago. However, there appears to be some correlation between the region of apparent isotropy and a zone of anomalously low upper mantle velocities imaged beneath Santiago and Marchena from surface waves by

  9. Origin of crustal anisotropy: Shear wave splitting studies in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshima, Satoshi )

    1990-07-10

    Shear wave splitting manifested as leading shear wave polarization, that is, parallel alignment of leading shear wave particle motions from a variety of sources, has been observed at a number of seismograph stations in Japan. Detected on shear wave seismograms from crustal earthquakes over a wide range of source zones and source-receiver azimuths, the shear wave splitting can be attributed to crustal anisotropy. This paper discusses the relation between leading shear wave polarization directions and tectonic features of Japan. To explain the observed shear wave splitting, the author proposes that at least three phenomena should be taken into account: stress-induced microcracks primarily aligned in vertical or subvertical planes; cracks or fractures in the vicinity of active faults having their orientation parallel to the fault planes; and intrinsic rock anisotropy resulting from preferred orientation of minerals. Travel time differences between leading and slower split shear waves from crustal and upper mantle earthquakes analyzed for about one third of the stations suggest that the crustal anisotropy which causes the observed shear wave splitting may be limited to the upper 15-25 km. This implies that the density of nonhorizontally aligned cracks or fractures below 15-25 km and into the upper mantle is much smaller than that in the crust above 15-25 km.

  10. A proposed experimental test to distinguish waves from 2-D turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewan, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A theory of buoyancy range turbulence that leads to a unique scale, K sub B, that allows one to differentiate between waves and turbulence for the special case of theta = 0 (i.e., horizontally propagating waves) is discussed. The theory does not seem to lead to a practical empirical distinction for the general situation. This is due to the fact that, as theta is increased, one has the ever-increasing presence of BRT for longer wavelengths. The fact that the numerical values of epsilon prime are not yet available compounds the difficulty. In addition, it does not appear possible to encompass true 2-D turbulence in the theory. We are thus driven to a test which circumvents all these difficulties. A proposed test is based on the idea that waves are coherent and propagate, while in turbulence we have the opposite situation. In particular, the test is suggested by the following quotation from MULLER (1984), on the nature of such turbulence: The turbulence in each horizontal plane is independent from the turbulence in the other planes. If this statement were to be taken literally, it would imply that the temporal coherence between horizontal speeds, separated only in altitude, would be zero. Any vertical separation would be forced to take into account the effects of viscosity: that is to say, a specific finite vertical separation would be needed to destroy coherence. In order to estimate this distance, L, one can use L = C(v/S) (1/2) were v is the kinematic viscosity, S is the shear scale, and C is a constant of order unity.

  11. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  12. 2D wave-front shaping in optical superlattices using nonlinear volume holography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Hong, Xu-Hao; Lu, Rong-Er; Yue, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear volume holography is employed to realize arbitrary wave-front shaping during nonlinear processes with properly designed 2D optical superlattices. The concept of a nonlinear polarization wave in nonlinear volume holography is investigated. The holographic imaging of irregular patterns was performed using 2D LiTaO3 crystals with fundamental wave propagating along the spontaneous polarization direction, and the results agree well with the theoretical predictions. This Letter not only extends the application area of optical superlattices, but also offers an efficient method for wave-front shaping technology. PMID:27367067

  13. Application of a laser/EMAT system for using shear and LS mode converted waves.

    PubMed

    Murray, P R; Dewhurst, R J

    2002-05-01

    Quantitative time-of-flight analysis of laser-generated shear waves and longitudinal-shear mode-converted waves has demonstrated an effective method for non-contact monitoring of the thickness of metal plates. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses with energies of approximately 18 mJ, delivered to the material surface via an optical fibre and focused to a line source by a cylindrical lens, excited surface waves, longitudinal and shear waves. Bulk waves propagated through the plate to be reflected from the far surface. Returning waves were detected using an electro-magnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) sensitive to in-plane motion. The compilation of B-scans generated as the sensor head was moved along the material's surface to produce a 2-D intensity profile made any changes in the plate thickness easy to visualise. The longitudinal-shear (L-S) and shear-longitudinal (S-L) mode-converted waves provided a method of simultaneously monitoring two different points on the far surface enabling any changes in the material thickness to be clearly identified. This method was used to determine the thickness of aluminium samples ranging in from 5 to 70 mm. PMID:12160043

  14. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.S.; Lakin, K.M.; Landin, A.R.

    1985-05-20

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppM//sup 0/C.

  15. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jin S.; Lakin, Kenneth M.; Landin, Allen R.

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppm/.degree.C.

  16. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.S.; Lakin, K.M.; Landin, A.R.

    1983-10-25

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppM//sup 0/C.

  17. Method of making a piezoelectric shear wave resonator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jin S.; Lakin, Kenneth M.; Landin, Allen R.

    1987-02-03

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppm/.degree.C.

  18. An analytic, Fourier domain description of shear wave propagation in a viscoelastic medium using asymmetric Gaussian sources

    PubMed Central

    Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent measurements of shear wave propagation in viscoelastic materials have been analyzed by constructing the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) of the spatial-temporal shear wave signal and using an analysis procedure derived under the assumption the wave is described as a plane wave, or as the asymptotic form of a wave expanding radially from a cylindrically symmetric source. This study presents an exact, analytic expression for the 2D-FT description of shear wave propagation in viscoelastic materials following asymmetric Gaussian excitations and uses this expression to evaluate the bias in 2D-FT measurements obtained using the plane or cylindrical wave assumptions. A wide range of biases are observed depending on specific values of frequency, aspect ratio R of the source asymmetry, and material properties. These biases can be reduced significantly by weighting the shear wave signal in the spatial domain to correct for the geometric spreading of the shear wavefront using a factor of xp. The optimal weighting power p is found to be near the theoretical value of 0.5 for the case of a cylindrical source with R = 1, and decreases for asymmetric sources with R > 1. PMID:26328717

  19. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics at a 2D magnetic null point: ponderomotive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In the linear, β = 0 MHD regime, the transient properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the vicinity of 2D null points are well known. The waves are decoupled and accumulate at predictable parts of the magnetic topology: fast waves accumulate at the null point; whereas Alfvén waves cannot cross the separatricies. However, in nonlinear MHD mode conversion can occur at regions of inhomogeneous Alfvén speed, suggesting that the decoupled nature of waves may not extend to the nonlinear regime. Aims: We investigate the behaviour of low-amplitude Alfvén waves about a 2D magnetic null point in nonlinear, β = 0 MHD. Methods: We numerically simulate the introduction of low-amplitude Alfvén waves into the vicinity of a magnetic null point using the nonlinear LARE2D code. Results: Unlike in the linear regime, we find that the Alfvén wave sustains cospatial daughter disturbances, manifest in the transverse and longitudinal fluid velocity, owing to the action of nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients (viz. the ponderomotive force). These disturbances are dependent on the Alfvén wave and do not interact with the medium to excite magnetoacoustic waves, although the transverse daughter becomes focused at the null point. Additionally, an independently propagating fast magnetoacoustic wave is generated during the early stages, which transports some of the initial Alfvén wave energy towards the null point. Subsequently, despite undergoing dispersion and phase-mixing due to gradients in the Alfvén-speed profile (∇cA ≠ 0) there is no further nonlinear generation of fast waves. Conclusions: We find that Alfvén waves at 2D cold null points behave largely as in the linear regime, however they sustain transverse and longitudinal disturbances - effects absent in the linear regime - due to nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients.

  20. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  1. Large amplitude compression and shear wave propagation in an elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Murri, W. J.; Henley, D.

    1982-04-01

    Experimental techniques have been developed to measure the high strain-rate compression and shear response of Solithane 113. Compression and shear wave profiles have been measured in specimens compressed to 20% (compressive stresses ˜1.2 GPa). The compressive profiles are nearly steady and the compressive stress-strain response is typical of a compliant material. The shear wave profiles are dispersive and show attenuation with propagation. Analyses of these wave profiles will be presented. Shear moduli vary from 0.35 GPa to 0.8 GPa for the compression range examined to date. These values are within a factor of two of the static shear moduli in the glassy state. The data described here have been used to calculate the high strain rate compressive and shear stress-strain curves for Solithane 113.

  2. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  3. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  4. Excitation of fundamental shear horizontal wave by using face-shear (d36) piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Dong, Shuxiang; Li, Faxin

    2016-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is extremely useful for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) as it is non-dispersive. However, currently, the SH0 wave is usually excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) whose energy conversion efficiency is fairly low. The face-shear ( d 36 ) mode piezoelectrics is more promising for SH0 wave excitation, but this mode cannot appear in conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Recently, by modifying the symmetry of poled PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering, we realized the face-shear d 36 mode in both soft and hard PZT ceramics. In this work, we further improved the face-shear properties of PZT-4 and PZT-5H ceramics via lateral compression under elevated temperature. It was found that when bonded on a 1 mm-thick aluminum plate, the d 36 type PZT-4 exhibited better face-shear performance than PZT-5H. We then successfully excite SH0 wave in the aluminum plate using a face-shear PZT-4 square patch and receive the wave using a face-shear 0.72[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-0.28[PbTiO3] (PMN-PT) patch. The frequency response and directionality of the excited SH0 wave were also investigated. The SH0 wave can be dominated over the Lamb waves (S0 and A0 waves) from 160 kHz to 280 kHz. The wave amplitude reaches its maxima along the two main directions (0° and 90°). The amplitude can keep over 80% of the maxima when the deviate angle is less than 30°, while it vanishes quickly at the 45° direction. The excited SH0 wave using piezoelectric ceramics could be very promising in the fields of NDT and SHM.

  5. Shear viscosity of quasi-2D dipolar Bose-Fermi mixtures with long-range 1/r interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsheshdar, E.; Yavari, H.; Moniri, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Low-temperature shear viscosity of a spin polarized two-component quasi-2D dipolar Fermi gas with long-range 1/ r interaction in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) limit, where the system can be considered as dimers and the unpaired fermions, is calculated by means of the Kubo formalism. By taking into account the dimer-atom, dimer-dimer, and atom-atom interactions in the self-energies the viscous relaxation time (τ_{η}= (τ_{DA}^{-1}+τ_{DD}^{-1}+ τ_{AA}^{-1})^{-1}) is determined. Since the relaxation rates due to these interactions τ_{DA}^{-1} , τ_{DD}^{ -1} and τ_{AA}^{-1} varies, respectively, as T , T2 , and T in the low-temperature limit T→0 , the dimer-atom and atom-atom interactions play the dominant role to the shear viscosity and the shear viscosity varies as T^{-1} . For small polarization the effect of dimer-dimer interaction is important (τ_{DA},τ_{AA}≫τ_{DD}) , and the shear viscosity changes as the standard T^{-2} behviour. In this case, the temperature behavior of the dimer relaxation rate unaffected by 1/ r interaction and the contact, dipole-dipole, and 1/ r interactions play the same role in the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity. Our results have important consequences for developing experiments and theoretical researches on the transport properties of ultracold gases with repulsive or attractive long range 1/ r interaction.

  6. Flipping and scooping of curved 2D rigid fibers in simple shear: The Jeffery equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical system governing the motion of a curved rigid two-dimensional circular-arc fiber in simple shear is derived in analytical form. This is achieved by finding the solution for the associated low-Reynolds-number flow around such a fiber using the methods of complex analysis. Solutions of the dynamical system display the "flipping" and "scooping" recently observed in computational studies of three-dimensional fibers using linked rigid rod and bead-shell models [J. Wang et al., "Flipping, scooping, and spinning: Drift of rigid curved nonchiral fibers in simple shear flows," Phys. Fluids 24, 123304 (2012)]. To complete the Jeffery-type equations for a curved fiber in a linear flow field we also derive its evolution equations in an extensional flow. It is expected that the equations derived here also govern the motion of slender, curved, three-dimensional rigid fibers when they evolve purely in the plane of shear or strain.

  7. Application of an elastic 2D tube-waveform tomography to estimate the shear modulus in the vicinity of the FINO3 offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; Wilken, D.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The FINO3 project is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform in the north-sea, hosting research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. As part of FINO3 our sub-project deals with the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. We are focussed on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of the platform. Possible changes of the shear modulus of the sediments in the vicinity of the FINO3 monopile due to mechanic loads on the platform are estimated by a tube-waveform tomography. The tube-waves are excited by a hammer blow at the internal wall of the FINO3 monopile above the water line. The tube-waves are propagating through the water column and the sediments and are measured in situ by hydrophones at the external wall of the monopile. Homogenous long wavelength starting models for the waveform tomography are estimated using simple 2D finite difference models. Possible shear-wave velocity starting models range from 150-300 m/s. The resolution of the tube-waveform tomography is estimated by simple chequerboard and random media models. Additionally first results of the data application in the vicinity of the monopile are presented.

  8. Effect of shear on failure waves in soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, R. J.; Mello, M.; Brar, N. S.

    1998-07-10

    By means of in-material stress gauges, failure waves in shock-compressed soda lime glass have been shown to be distinguished by a marked reduction in shear stress. To explore further the relation between failure waves and shearing resistance, a series of pressure-shear impact experiments have been performed involving the impact of a glass plate by a steel flyer plate and vice versa. The latter configuration is designed to allow direct measurements of the shearing resistance of the failed material. In both configurations, the normal and transverse motion of the free surface of the target is monitored using laser interferometry. The transverse velocity-time profiles show a pronounced loss in shearing resistance of the glass at impact velocities above the threshold for failure waves to occur.

  9. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  10. Shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The reported compressional wave speed dispersion and attenuation could be explained by a modified gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model). In contrast, shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation have not been investigated in detail. No measurements of shear wave speed dispersion have been reported, and only Brunson's data provide the frequency characteristics of shear wave attenuation. In this study, Brunson's attenuation measurements are compared to predictions using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the BIMGS model accurately predicts the frequency dependence of shear wave attenuation. Then, the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand are measured in the frequency range of 4-20 kHz. The vertical stress applied to the sample is 17.6 kPa. The temperature of the sample is set to be 5 °C, 20 °C, and 35 °C in order to change the relaxation frequency in the BIMGS model. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation are predicted accurately by using the BIMGS model. PMID:23862793

  11. Convertion Shear Wave Velocity to Standard Penetration Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madun, A.; Tajuddin, S. A. A.; Abdullah, M. E.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Sani, S.; Siang, A. J. L. M.; Yusof, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Multichannel Analysis Surface Wave (MASW) measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine the soil profile based on shear wave velocity. Meanwhile, borehole intrusive technique identifies the changes of soil layer based on soil penetration resistance, i.e. standard penetration test-number of blows (SPT-N). Researchers across the world introduced many empirical conversions of standard penetration test blow number of borehole data to shear wave velocity or vice versa. This is because geophysics test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment, and thus should be promoted to compliment the site investigation work. These empirical conversions of shear wave velocity to SPT-N blow can be utilised, and thus suitable geotechnical parameters for design purposes can be achieved. This study has demonstrated the conversion between MASW and SPT-N value. The study was conducted at the university campus and Sejagung Sri Medan. The MASW seismic profiles at the University campus test site and Sejagung were at a depth of 21 m and 13 m, respectively. The shear wave velocities were also calculated empirically using SPT-N value, and thus both calculated and measured shear wave velocities were compared. It is essential to note that the MASW test and empirical conversion always underestimate the actual shear wave velocity of hard layer or rock due to the effect of soil properties on the upper layer.

  12. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  13. Shear Wave Propagation Across Filled Joints with the Effect of Interfacial Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Liu, T. T.; Li, H. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liu, B.; Xia, X.

    2015-07-01

    The thin-layer interface model for filled joints is extended to analyze shear wave propagation across filled rock joints when the interfacial shear strength between the filling material and the rocks is taken into account. During the wave propagation process, the two sides of the filled joint are welded with the adjacent rocks first and slide on each other when the shear stress on the joint is greater than the interfacial shear strength. By back analysis, the relation between the shear stress and the relative tangential deformation of the filled joints is obtained from the present approach, which is shown as a cycle parallelogram. Comparison between the present approach and the existing method based on the zero-thickness interface model indicates that the present approach is efficient to analyze shear wave propagation across rock joints with slippery behavior. The calculation results show that the slippery behavior of joints is related to the interfacial failure. In addition, the interaction between the shear stress wave and the two sides of the filling joint influences not only the wave propagation process but also the dynamic response of the filled joint.

  14. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials - A general bond polarizability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Ying Quek, Su

    2015-10-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials.

  15. Three Dimensional Shear Wave Elastographic Reconstruction of Ablations*

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Atul; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of tumor ablations using ultrasound electrode vibration elastography. Shear wave velocity, which is used as a surrogate for tissue stiffness, is estimated by perturbing the ablation needle and tracking frame-to-frame displacements using radiofrequency ultrasound echo data. This process is repeated over many imaging planes that share a common axis of intersection collinear with needle. A 3D volume is reconstructed by solving an optimization problem which smoothly approximates shear wave velocities on a stack of transverse planes. The mean shear wave velocity estimates obtained in the phantom experiments are within 20% of those measured using a commercial shear wave imaging system. PMID:25570587

  16. A comparative study of shear wave speed estimation techniques in optical coherence elastography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvietcovich, Fernando; Yao, Jianing; Chu, Ying-Ju; Meemon, Panomsak; Rolland, Jannick P.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a widely investigated noninvasive technique for estimating the mechanical properties of tissue. In particular, vibrational OCE methods aim to estimate the shear wave velocity generated by an external stimulus in order to calculate the elastic modulus of tissue. In this study, we compare the performance of five acquisition and processing techniques for estimating the shear wave speed in simulations and experiments using tissue-mimicking phantoms. Accuracy, contrast-to-noise ratio, and resolution are measured for all cases. The first two techniques make the use of one piezoelectric actuator for generating a continuous shear wave propagation (SWP) and a tone-burst propagation (TBP) of 400 Hz over the gelatin phantom. The other techniques make use of one additional actuator located on the opposite side of the region of interest in order to create an interference pattern. When both actuators have the same frequency, a standing wave (SW) pattern is generated. Otherwise, when there is a frequency difference df between both actuators, a crawling wave (CrW) pattern is generated and propagates with less speed than a shear wave, which makes it suitable for being detected by the 2D cross-sectional OCE imaging. If df is not small compared to the operational frequency, the CrW travels faster and a sampled version of it (SCrW) is acquired by the system. Preliminary results suggest that TBP (error < 4.1%) and SWP (error < 6%) techniques are more accurate when compared to mechanical measurement test results.

  17. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziman, M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Haimi, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data.

  18. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  19. A pitfall in shallow shear-wave refraction surveying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Wightman, E.; Nigbor, R.

    2002-01-01

    The shallow shear-wave refraction method works successfully in an area with a series of horizontal layers. However, complex near-surface geology may not fit into the assumption of a series of horizontal layers. That a plane SH-wave undergoes wave-type conversion along an interface in an area of nonhorizontal layers is theoretically inevitable. One real example shows that the shallow shear-wave refraction method provides velocities of a converted wave rather than an SH- wave. Moreover, it is impossible to identify the converted wave by refraction data itself. As most geophysical engineering firms have limited resources, an additional P-wave refraction survey is necessary to verify if velocities calculated from a shear-wave refraction survey are velocities of converted waves. The alternative at this time may be the surface wave method, which can provide reliable S-wave velocities, even in an area of velocity inversion (a higher velocity layer underlain by a lower velocity layer). ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Galerkin Spectral Method for the 2D Solitary Waves of Boussinesq Paradigm Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Christou, M. A.; Christov, C. I.

    2009-10-29

    We consider the 2D stationary propagating solitary waves of the so-called Boussinesq Paradigm equation. The fourth- order elliptic boundary value problem on infinite interval is solved by a Galerkin spectral method. An iterative procedure based on artificial time ('false transients') and operator splitting is used. Results are obtained for the shapes of the solitary waves for different values of the dispersion parameters for both subcritical and supercritical phase speeds.

  1. On System-Dependent Sources of Uncertainty and Bias in Ultrasonic Quantitative Shear-Wave Imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yufeng; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic quantitative shear-wave imaging methods have been developed over the last decade to estimate tissue elasticity by measuring the speed of propagating shear waves following acoustic radiation force excitation. This work discusses eight sources of uncertainty and bias arising from ultrasound system-dependent parameters in ultrasound shear-wave speed (SWS) measurements. Each of the eight sources of error is discussed in the context of a linear, isotropic, elastic, homogeneous medium, combining previously reported analyses with Field II simulations, full-wave 2-D acoustic propagation simulations, and experimental studies. Errors arising from both spatial and temporal sources lead to errors in SWS measurements. Arrival time estimation noise, speckle bias, hardware fluctuations, and phase aberration cause uncertainties (variance) in SWS measurements, while pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and beamforming errors, as well as coupling medium sound speed mismatch, cause biases in SWS measurements (accuracy errors). Calibration of the sources of bias is an important step in the development of shear-wave imaging systems. In a well-calibrated system, where the sources of bias are minimized, and averaging over a region of interest (ROI) is employed to reduce the sources of uncertainty, an SWS error can be expected. PMID:26886980

  2. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  3. Regional and teleseismic shear-wave radiation feature of underground nuclear explosions and its implications for shear-wave excitation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.-K.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the shear-wave excitation mechanism is a key issue for effective seismic monitoring of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs). We often observe strong shear waves from UNEs, which causes difficulty in prompt discrimination of nuclear explosions from natural earthquakes. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the shear-wave excitation from the UNEs. Consensus on dominant mechanism of shear-wave excitation has not been made. To constrain the shear-wave excitation mechanism, we examine the consistency in shear-wave radiation pattern using a source-array slowness-wavenumber (F-K) analysis, which allows us to check the time-invariant feature in the shear waves. We examine regional and teleseismic waveforms for the UNEs of the Balapan test site and Nevada test site along with the Indian and North Korean UNEs. We observe consistent radiation pattern in both regional and teleseismic shear waves. The observed radiation pattern suggests that the shear waves were not excited azimuthally-isotropic. Shear waves observed in teleseismic distances are far weak compared to those in regional distances, which implies that shear waves are excited stronger at high takeoff angles. Also, spectra of shear waves display significantly low overshoot feature that is different from those of P phases. The time-invariant anisotropic radiation pattern, strong excitation in high takeoff angle and low overshoot feature allow us to constrain the shear-wave excitation mechanism.

  4. WAVE ACTION AND BOTTOM SHEAR STRESSES IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Lake Erie, the amplitudes and periods of wind-driven, surface gravity waves were calculated by means of the SMB hindcasting method. Bottom orbital velocities and bottom shear stresses were then calculated using linear wave theory and Kajiura's (1968) turbulent oscillating bou...

  5. Measurement of Oblique Impact-generated Shear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, J. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental strain measurements reveal that oblique impacts can generate shear waves with displacements as large as those in the P-wave. Large oblique impacts may thus be more efficient sources of surface disruption than vertical impacts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  7. Analytical solution of boundary integral equations for 2-D steady linear wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    Based on the Fourier transform, the analytical solution of boundary integral equations formulated for the complex velocity of a 2-D steady linear surface flow is derived. It has been found that before the radiation condition is imposed, free waves appear both far upstream and downstream. In order to cancel the free waves in far upstream regions, the eigensolution of a specific eigenvalue, which satisfies the homogeneous boundary integral equation, is found and superposed to the analytical solution. An example, a submerged vortex, is used to demonstrate the derived analytical solution. Furthermore, an analytical approach to imposing the radiation condition in the numerical solution of boundary integral equations for 2-D steady linear wave problems is proposed.

  8. Well-posedness and generalized plane waves simulations of a 2D mode conversion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert-Gérard, Lise-Marie

    2015-12-01

    Certain types of electro-magnetic waves propagating in a plasma can undergo a mode conversion process. In magnetic confinement fusion, this phenomenon is very useful to heat the plasma, since it permits to transfer the heat at or near the plasma center. This work focuses on a mathematical model of wave propagation around the mode conversion region, from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It aims at developing, for a well-posed equation, specific basis functions to study a wave mode conversion process. These basis functions, called generalized plane waves, are intrinsically based on variable coefficients. As such, they are particularly adapted to the mode conversion problem. The design of generalized plane waves for the proposed model is described in detail. Their implementation within a discontinuous Galerkin method then provides numerical simulations of the process. These first 2D simulations for this model agree with qualitative aspects studied in previous works.

  9. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle. PMID:21859579

  10. Numerical modeling of electromagnetic waves scattering from 2D coastal breaking sea waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairi, Refzul; Coatanhay, Arnaud; Khenchaf, Ali; Scolan, Yves Marie

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work is to model the interaction of L-band electromagnetic waves with coastal breaking sea waves. The breaking sea waves' profiles are generated using the desingularized technique and the electromagnetic waves scattering is computed using the high-order method of moments (HO-MoM) combined with non uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) geometry. Our study mainly focuses upon the electromagnetic waves behavior in the crest and the cavity of breaking sea waves. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Numelec 2012", Edited by Adel Razek.

  11. Gravitational Wave Signals from 2D and 3D Core Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Bruenn, Stephen; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John

    2016-03-01

    We study two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) using our first-principles CCSN simulations performed with the neutrino hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. The following physics is included: Newtonian hydrodynamics with a nuclear equation of state capable of describing matter in both NSE and non-NSE, MGFLD neutrino transport with realistic neutrino interactions, an effective GR gravitational potential, and a nuclear reaction network. Both our 2D and 3D models achieve explosion, which in turn enables us to determine their complete gravitational wave signals. In this talk, we present them, and we analyze the similarities and differences between the 2D and 3D signals.

  12. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  13. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  14. Terrane-controlled crustal shear wave splitting in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, David; Christensen, Nikolas I.; Ross, Zachary E.; Wu, Francis T.

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan is the result of arc-continent collision associated with the convergence of the Philippine Sea plate with the eastern Eurasian plate continental margin. The locus of deformation is found in eastern Taiwan in the form of mountain building (Central Range) with underlying thickened lithosphere. Rapid tectonic exhumation in the Central Range has uncovered low-to-high-grade metamorphic rocks marked by steep cleavage. We carried out a crustal seismic anisotropy study across Taiwan, producing a database of over 27,000 local earthquake shear wave splitting measurements. Additionally, we carried out rock physics measurements of metamorphic outcrop samples to quantify shear wave rock anisotropy. We produced a map of station-averaged splitting measurements across Taiwan. Patterns of fast shear wave directions correlate with tectonic terranes produced by plate convergence. Deformation-related mineral-preferred orientation in the metamorphic rocks produces a significant amount of the crustal anisotropy in the Taiwan collision zone.

  15. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior. PMID:25701527

  16. Wave Transformation and Breaking on a Sheared Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zippel, S.; Thomson, J. M.; Rusch, C.

    2014-12-01

    Waves shoaling against tidal currents at river inlets have long been a hazard to navigation. We present measurements of waves, currents, and turbulence from SWIFT drifters at the Columbia River Mouth to diagnose wave transformation, breaking, and the resulting turbulence. In particular, down-looking velocity profiles, measured onboard the drifters, allow for evaluation of wave transformation on a vertically sheared current, for which theory exists but few in situ measurements are available. One consequence of wave transformation is steepening and breaking, which is identified using visual images, increased near surface turbulence, and gradients in wave energy flux. Vertical turbulent dissipation profiles measured during breaking are compared to existing scalings developed for deep and shallow water and expanded to the intermediate depth conditions common at the Columbia River Mouth. The analysis is intended to improve hydrodynamic models, especially two-way coupled wave-current models, and to aid navigation by better predicting dangerous wave conditions.

  17. Crustal Shear Wave Anisotropy in the Taiwan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, R.; Yang, C.

    2002-12-01

    Crustal shear wave anisotropy is analyzed in seismograms from local earthquakes (1.5 < M < 4.5) recorded at 75 permanent network stations in Taiwan during the period between 1991 and 2000. We investigate the origin of Taiwan crustal anisotropy by analyzing splitting in recorded shear waves, which can be characterized by a fast polarization direction and a time delay between fast and slow shear waves. Particle motion analysis and cross-correlation method are applied to estimate the splitting parameters of local shear waves. Clear evidence of shear wave splitting with split times of 0.02 to 0.2 s is found in about 75% of the stations studied. Stations in Coastal Plain, the foreland basin, show consistent alignment of the fast polarization directions that are parallel to the directions of local maximum horizontal compressive stress. Around the Chukou fault in the foothills region, fast shear-wave polarization directions of over 20 earthquakes recorded at station TWL are normal to the direction of local maximum horizontal compressive stress and parallel to the NE-SW trend of this east-dipping thrust fault. Except TWL, all the stations in foothills show large scatter in measured shear-wave polarizations. In the southern Central Range, two stations with a stable polarization direction of NNE-SSW, which is consistent with the local preferential mineral orientation, are found near the ChaoChou fault system. Two persistent polarization directions of fast shear wave are observed in a station (STY) near the boundary between the foothills and the southern Central Range: NW-SE direction for earthquakes located beneath the foothills and NE-SW direction for earthquakes coming under the Central Range. Our study indicates that the crustal anisotropy beneath the Taiwan orogen cannot be simply explained by the hypothesis of extensive dilatancy anisotropy (EDA), where parallel alignment of fluid-filled fractures produces the anisotropy. Other factors, such as intrinsic rock anisotropy

  18. 2D Traveling Wave Array Employing a Trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranada, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation addresses the progress made so far in the development of an antenna array with reconfigurable transmission line feeds connecting each element in series. In particular, 2D traveling wave array employing trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering will be discussed. The presentation includes current status of the effort and suggested future work. The work is being done as part of the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  19. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Salimullah, M.

    2010-07-15

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  20. A nearly analytic exponential time difference method for solving 2D seismic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Dinghui; Song, Guojie

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a nearly analytic exponential time difference (NETD) method for solving the 2D acoustic and elastic wave equations. In this method, we use the nearly analytic discrete operator to approximate the high-order spatial differential operators and transform the seismic wave equations into semi-discrete ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Then, the converted ODE system is solved by the exponential time difference (ETD) method. We investigate the properties of NETD in detail, including the stability condition for 1-D and 2-D cases, the theoretical and relative errors, the numerical dispersion relation for the 2-D acoustic case, and the computational efficiency. In order to further validate the method, we apply it to simulating acoustic/elastic wave propagation in multilayer models which have strong contrasts and complex heterogeneous media, e.g., the SEG model and the Marmousi model. From our theoretical analyses and numerical results, the NETD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively by using the displacement and gradient to approximate the high-order spatial derivatives. In addition, because NETD is based on the structure of the Lie group method which preserves the quantitative properties of differential equations, it can achieve more accurate results than the classical methods.

  1. Observations of wave shear stress on a steep beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. W.; Hay, A. E.; Bowen, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Observations are presented of the wave shear stress on a steeply sloping beach. Above the wave boundary layer (WBL), positive values of were observed and are attributed to a combination of both wave shoaling due to the large-scale bed slope, and dissipation due to wave breaking, in agreement with the wave theory of Zou et al. (2003). Within the WBL, observed vertical profiles of were also in good agreement with theory, in cases where the wave height was small. As wave heights increased, however, the WBL profile of generally did not agree with theory. Near-simultaneous rotary sonar observations of the bed suggest the disagreement with theory was due to the presence of orbital-scale ripples, which the present theory does not accommodate.

  2. Wave Propagation in 2-D Granular Matrix and Dust Mitigation of Fabrics for Space Exploration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thanh, Phi Hung X.

    2004-01-01

    Wave Propagation study is essential to exploring the soil on Mars or Moon and Dust Mitigation is a necessity in terms of crew's health in exploration missions. The study of Dust Mitigation has a significant impact on the crew s health when astronauts track dust back into their living space after exploration trips. We are trying to use piezoelectric fiber to create waves and vibrations at certain critical frequencies and amplitudes so that we can shake the particles off from the astronaut s fabrics. By shaking off the dust and removing it, the astronauts no longer have to worry about breathing in small and possibly hazardous materials, when they are back in their living quarters. The Wave Propagation in 2-D Granular Matrix studies how the individual particles interact with each other when a pressure wave travels through the matrix. This experiment allows us to understand how wave propagates through soils and other materials. By knowing the details about the interactions of particles when they act as a medium for waves, we can better understand how wave propagates through soils and other materials. With this experiment, we can study how less gravity effects the wave propagation and hence device a way to study soils in space and on Moon or Mars. Some scientists treat the medium that waves travel through as a "black box", they did not pay much attention to how individual particles act as wave travels through them. With this data, I believe that we can use it to model ways to measure the properties of different materials such as density and composition. In order to study how the particles interact with each other, I have continued Juan Agui's experiment of the effects of impacts on a 2-D matrix. By controlling the inputs and measuring the outputs of the system, I will be able to study now the particles in that system interact with each other. I will also try to model this with the software called PFC2D in order to obtain theoretical data to compare with the experiment

  3. Instability of plasma waves during relaxation of 2D turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Drsicoll, C. F.

    2015-11-01

    We observe strong excitation of novel low-frequency z-dependent plasma waves (mθ = 0 ,kz = 1) , occurring during the nominally 2D relaxation of turbulent initial conditions (10 -100 interacting vortices) in strongly magnetized electron columns. This initial relaxation often results in ``2D vortex crystal'' states. Here we describe experiments showing the concomitant growth of ill-understood low-frequency plasma waves, probably due to ``leakage'' of 2D turbulent potential energy into z-dependent fluctuations. With plasma injection, the lowest regular Trivelpiece- Gould mode (mθ = 0 ,kz = 1) is observed at fTG (t) ~ 2 . 8 MHz and exponential decay time τTG ~ 1 msec. Also, we observe rapid exponential growth of a novel low-frequency mode with fLF (t) ~ 0 . 3 MHz, nominally also with mθ = 0 ,kz = 1 . In a few milliseconds (several tens of rotation times at B = 10kG), the LF-mode becomes highly nonlinear, developing up to a dozen temporal harmonics. When a LF-harmonic resonates with the decaying TG-mode, LF-mode energy is transferred into the TG-mode, and both modes remain at moderate amplitudes until the 2D turbulent relaxation abates (hundreds of rotation times). The ill-understood fLF is independent of B, even though the growth and duration times follow scale as B1 from the 2D flows. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0008693.

  4. Shear wave elastography using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high spatial resolution and sensitivity that are ideal for imaging the cornea and lens. Quantifying the biomechanical properties of these tissues could add clinically valuable information. Thus, we propose a dynamic elastography method combining OCT detection and a mechanical actuator to map the shear modulus of soft tissues. We used a piezoelectric actuator driven in the kHz range and we used phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) to track the resulting shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We mapped the shear wave speed of anesthetized mice cornea using monochromatic excitations. We found a significant difference between a group of knock-out (3.92 +/- 0.35 m/s, N=4) and wild-type mice (5.04 +/- 0.51 m/s, N=3). These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using PhS-OCT to perform in vivo shear wave elastography of the cornea. We then implemented a shear pulse compression approach on ex vivo human cornea. For that purpose, frequency- modulated excitations were used and the resulting displacement field was digitally compressed in a short broadband pulse with a 7 dB gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  5. A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

  6. Scattering of elastic waves by a 2-D crack using the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Vai, Rossana; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.

    2005-09-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by cracks is an old problem and various ways to solve it have been proposed in the last decades. One approach is using dual integral equations, another useful and common formulation is the Boundary Element Method (BEM). With the last one, the boundary conditions of the crack lead to hyper-singularities and particular care should be taken to regularize and solve the resulting integral equations. In this work, instead, the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) is applied to study problems of zero-thickness 2-D cracks. The IBEM yields the Crack Opening Displacement (COD) which is used to evaluate the solution away from the crack. We use a multiregional approach which consists of splitting a boundary S into two identical boundaries S+ and S- chosen such that the cracks lie in the interface. The resulting integral equations are not hyper-singular and wave propagation within media that contain zero-thickness cracks can be rigorously solved. In order to validate the method, we deal with the scalar case, namely the scattering of antiplane SH waves by a 2-D crack. We compare results against a recently published analytic solution, obtaining an excellent agreement. This comparison gives us confidence to study cases where no analytic solutions exist. Some examples of incidence of P- or SV waves are depicted and the salient aspects of the method are also discussed.

  7. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  8. Density gradient effects on transverse shear driven lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Ami M.; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William E.; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2014-06-15

    Shear driven instabilities are commonly observed in the near-Earth space, particularly in boundary layer plasmas. When the shear scale length (L{sub E}) is much less than the ion gyro-radius (ρ{sub i}) but greater than the electron gyro-radius (ρ{sub e}), the electrons are magnetized in the shear layer, but the ions are effectively un-magnetized. The resulting shear driven instability, the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, is investigated in a new interpenetrating plasma configuration in the Auburn Linear EXperiment for Instability Studies. In order to understand the dynamics of magnetospheric boundary layers, the EIH instability is studied in the presence of a density gradient located at the boundary layer between two plasmas. This paper reports on a recent experiment in which electrostatic lower hybrid waves are identified as the EIH instability, and the effect of a density gradient on the instability properties are investigated.

  9. Shear Wave Elastography and Cervical Lymph Nodes: Predicting Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Ghobad; Keller, James M; Mayo, Michelle L; Piper, Kelé; Puett, David; Earp, Karly M; Malchoff, Carl D

    2016-06-01

    This prospective study evaluates the accuracy of virtual touch imaging quantification (VTIQ), a non-invasive shear wave elastography method for measuring cervical lymph nodes (LN) stiffness in differentiating benign from malignant LN. The study evaluated 270 LN in 236 patients with both conventional B-mode ultrasound and VTIQ shear wave elastography before fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). LN stiffness was measured as shear wave velocity (SWV) in m/s. Surgical resection was advised for FNAB results that were not clearly benign. Surgical pathology confirmed 54 malignant LN. The receiver operating curve (ROC) identified a single cut-off value of 2.93 m/s as the maximum SWV for predicting a malignant cervical LN. The sensitivity and specificity were 92.59% and 75.46%, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) was 48.54% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 97.60%. LN stiffness measured by VTIQ-generated shear wave elastography is an independent predictor of malignancy. PMID:26976785

  10. Fast Acceleration of 2D Wave Propagation Simulations Using Modern Computational Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Lifan; Cavazos, John; Huang, Howie H.; Kay, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least faster than the sequential implementation and faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other computational models of wave propagation in

  11. Cosmic shear from scalar-induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Baumann, Daniel

    2008-05-15

    Weak gravitational lensing by foreground density perturbations generates a gradient mode in the shear of background images. In contrast, cosmological tensor perturbations induce a nonzero curl mode associated with image rotations. In this note, we study the lensing signatures of both primordial gravitational waves from inflation and second-order gravitational waves generated from the observed spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. We derive the curl mode for galaxy lensing surveys at redshifts of 1-3 and for lensing of the cosmic microwave background at a redshift of 1100. We find that the curl mode angular power spectrum associated with secondary tensor modes for galaxy lensing surveys dominates over the corresponding signal generated by primary gravitational waves from inflation. However, both tensor contributions to the shear curl mode spectrum are below the projected noise levels of upcoming galaxy and cosmic microwave background lensing surveys and therefore are unlikely to be detectable.

  12. A nonlocal finite difference scheme for simulation of wave propagation in 2D models with reduced numerical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martowicz, A.; Ruzzene, M.; Staszewski, W. J.; Rimoli, J. J.; Uhl, T.

    2014-03-01

    The work deals with the reduction of numerical dispersion in simulations of wave propagation in solids. The phenomenon of numerical dispersion naturally results from time and spatial discretization present in a numerical model of mechanical continuum. Although discretization itself makes possible to model wave propagation in structures with complicated geometries and made of different materials, it inevitably causes simulation errors when improper time and length scales are chosen for the simulations domains. Therefore, by definition, any characteristic parameter for spatial and time resolution must create limitations on maximal wavenumber and frequency for a numerical model. It should be however noted that expected increase of the model quality and its functionality in terms of affordable wavenumbers, frequencies and speeds should not be achieved merely by denser mesh and reduced time integration step. The computational cost would be simply unacceptable. The authors present a nonlocal finite difference scheme with the coefficients calculated applying a Fourier series, which allows for considerable reduction of numerical dispersion. There are presented the results of analyses for 2D models, with isotropic and anisotropic materials, fulfilling the planar stress state. Reduced numerical dispersion is shown in the dispersion surfaces for longitudinal and shear waves propagating for different directions with respect to the mesh orientation and without dramatic increase of required number of nonlocal interactions. A case with the propagation of longitudinal wave in composite material is studied with given referential solution of the initial value problem for verification of the time-domain outcomes. The work gives a perspective of modeling of any type of real material dispersion according to measurements and with assumed accuracy.

  13. On the use of the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute's prototype seabed-coupled shear wave vibrator for shallow soil characterization - I. Acquisition and processing of multimodal surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Maarten; Madshus, Christian; Socco, Valentina L.; Maraschini, Margherita; Sparrevik, Per M.; Westerdahl, Harald; Duffaut, Kenneth; Skomedal, Eiliv; Bjørnarâ, Tore I.

    2011-04-01

    Pure shear wave data are only very rarely acquired for offshore site investigations and exploration. Here, we present details of a novel, seabed-coupled, shear wave vibrator and field data recorded by a densely populated, multicomponent ocean-bottom cable, to improve shallow soil characterization. The prototype shear wave vibrator uses vibroseis technology adopted for marine environments through its instalment on top of a suction anchor, assuring seabed coupling in combination with self-weight penetration. The prototype is depth rated to 1500 m water depth, and can be rotated while installed in the seabed. The philosophy is to acquire fully complementary seismic data to conventional P- and P-to-S-converted waves, in particular for 2-D profiling, VSP (vertical seismic profiling) or monitoring purposes, thereby exploiting advantages of shear waves over compressional waves for determining, for example, anisotropy, small-strain shear modulus and excess pore pressures/effective stress. The source was primarily designed for reservoir depths. However, significant energy is emitted as surface waves, which provide detailed geotechnical information through mapping of shear wave velocities in potentially high resolution of the upper soil units. To fully utilize pure shear wave content, a proper analysis of surface waves is paramount, due to the proximity of surface wave propagation speed with shear wave velocities. The experiment was carried out in the northern North Sea in 364 m water depth. Cable dragging was necessary to obtain close receiver spacing (2.5 m effective spacing), with total line length of 600 m. Frequency-waveform transforms reveal both Scholte and Love waves. Up to six surface wave modes are identified, that is, fundamental mode and several higher surface wave modes. The occurrence of these two different dispersive surface wave types with well-resolved higher modes allows for a unique analysis and inversion scheme for high-resolution mapping of physical

  14. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  15. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays' elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  16. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroziński, Łukasz Stepinski, Tadeusz Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-31

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array’s aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays’ elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  17. Amplitude-modulated ultrasound radiation force combined with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Tissue stiffness can be measured from the propagation speed of shear waves. Acoustic radiation force (ARF) can generate shear waves by focusing ultrasound in tissue for ~100 μs. Safety considerations and electronics abilities limit ultrasound pressures. We previously presented shear wave elastography combining ARF and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) [1]. Here, we use amplitude-modulated ARF to enhance shear wave signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at low pressures. Experiments were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms. ARF was applied using a single-element transducer, driven by a 7.5 MHz, 3-ms, sine wave modulated in amplitude by a linear-swept frequency (1 to 7 kHz). Pressures between 1 to 3 MPa were tested. Displacements were tracked using PhS-OCT and numerically compressed using pulse compression methods detailed in previous work [2]. SNR was compared to that of 200-μs bursts. Stiffness maps were reconstructed using time-of-flight computations. 200-μs bursts give barely detectable displacements at 1 MPa (3.7 dB SNR). Pulse compression gives 36.2 dB at 1.5 MPa. In all cases with detectable displacements, shear wave speeds were determined in 5%-gelatin and 10%-gelatin phantoms and compared to literature values. Applicability to ocular tissues (cornea, intraocular lens) is under investigation.

  18. Ship waves on uniform shear current at finite depth: wave resistance and critical velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive theory for linear gravity-driven ship waves in the presence of a shear current with uniform vorticity, including the effects of finite water depth. The wave resistance in the presence of shear current is calculated for the first time, containing in general a non-zero lateral component. While formally apparently a straightforward extension of existing deep water theory, the introduction of finite water depth is physically non-trivial, since the surface waves are now affected by a subtle interplay of the effects of the current and the sea bed. This becomes particularly pronounced when considering the phenomenon of critical velocity, the velocity at which transversely propagating waves become unable to keep up with the moving source. The phenomenon is well known for shallow water, and was recently shown to exist also in deep water in the presence of a shear current [Ellingsen, J.~Fluid Mech.\\ {\\bf 742} R2 (2014)]. We derive the exact criterion for criticality as a function of an intrinsic shear Froude number $S\\sqrt{b/g}$ ($S$ is uniform vorticity, $b$ size of source), the water depth, and the angle between the shear current and the ship's motion. Formulae for both the normal and lateral wave resistance force are derived, and we analyse its dependence on the source velocity (or Froude number $Fr$) for different amounts of shear and different directions of motion. The effect of the shear current is to increase wave resistance for upstream ship motion and decrease it for downstream motion. Also the value of $Fr$ at which $R$ is maximal is lowered for upstream and increased for downstream directions of ship motion. For oblique angles between ship motion and current there is a lateral wave resistance component which can amount to $10$-$20\\%$ of the normal wave resistance for side-on shear and $S\\sqrt{b/g}$ of order unity. (Continues...)

  19. Parametric analysis of 2D guided-wave photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, C.; Peluso, F.; Armenise, M. N.

    2005-11-01

    The parametric analysis of the electromagnetic properties of 2D guided wave photonic band gap structures is reported with the aim of providing a valid tool for the optimal design. The modelling approach is based on the Bloch-Floquet method. Different lattice configurations and geometrical parameters are considered. An optimum value for the ratio between the hole (or rod) radius and the lattice constant does exist and the calculation demonstrated that it is almost independent from the etching depth, only depending on the lattice type. The results are suitable for the design optimisation of photonic crystal reflectors to be used in integrated optical devices.

  20. Parametric analysis of 2D guided-wave photonic band gap structures.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, C; Peluso, F; Armenise, M

    2005-11-28

    The parametric analysis of the electromagnetic properties of 2D guided wave photonic band gap structures is reported with the aim of providing a valid tool for the optimal design. The modelling approach is based on the Bloch-Floquet method. Different lattice configurations and geometrical parameters are considered. An optimum value for the ratio between the hole (or rod) radius and the lattice constant does exist and the calculation demonstrated that it is almost independent from the etching depth, only depending on the lattice type. The results are suitable for the design optimisation of photonic crystal reflectors to be used in integrated optical devices. PMID:19503180

  1. Multipacting Simulation Study for 56 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator using 2D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Naik,D.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-02

    A beam excited 56 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Niobium Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) has been proposed to enhance RHIC beam luminosity and bunching. Being a RF cavity, multipacting is expected; therefore an extensive study was carried out with the Multipac 2.1 2D simulation code. The study revealed that multipacting occurs in various bands up to peak surface electric field 50 kV/m and is concentrated mostly above the beam gap and on the outer conductor. To suppress multipacting, a ripple structure was introduced to the outer conductor and the phenomenon was successfully eliminated from the cavity.

  2. Hα Moreton waves observed on December 06, 2006. A 2D case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, C.; Costa, A.; Luoni, M. L.; Elaskar, S.

    2013-04-01

    Context. We present high temporal resolution observations of a Moreton wave event detected with the Hα Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in the Hα line 656.3 nm, on December 6, 2006. Aims: The aim is to contribute to the discussion about the nature and triggering mechanisms of Moreton wave events. Methods: We describe the HASTA telescope capabilities and the observational techniques. We carried out a detailed analysis to determine the flare onset, the radiant point location, the kinematics of the disturbance and the activation time of two distant filaments. We used a 2D reconstruction of the HASTA and corresponding TRACE observations, together with conventional techniques, to analyze the probable origin of the phenomenon. Results: The kinematic parameters and the probable onset time of the Moreton wave event are determined. A small-scale ejectum and the winking of two remote filaments are analyzed to discuss their relation with the Moreton disturbance. Conclusions: The analysis of the Moreton wave event favors the hypothesis that the phenomenon can be described as the chromospheric imprint of a single fast coronal shock triggered from a single source in association with a coronal mass ejection. Its onset time is concurrent with a Lorentz force peak measured in the photosphere, as stated by other authors. However, the existence of multiple shock waves that were generated almost simultaneously cannot be discarded.

  3. Bottom shear stress and pressure perturbations under an internal solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Use of a postprocessing projection onto a modified set of divergence-free basis functions enables investigation of wave-based Reynolds numbers within the range [105 ,106 ] . At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is the focus of this presentation. Implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models. Support from the Cornell Sloan Diversity Fellowship program is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  5. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  6. Shear Wave Structure in the Crust and Upper Mantle Beneath the Wyoming Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, R.; Li, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Wyoming craton was pervasively deformed during the Laramide and has been encroached by the Yellowstone hotspot. It is therefore an ideal place to study the survival and evolution of cratonic lithosphere. We have analyzed Rayleigh wave data recorded by the USArray and applied the two-plane-wave tomography method to determine average and 2-D phase velocities in the Wyoming craton area. These phase velocities were inverted to construct 3-D shear wave structure of the crust and upper mantle. Vertical component seismograms from 82 events at 103 stations were filtered at 18 center frequencies with a narrow bandwidth of 10 mHz. The average phase velocity varies from 3.48 km/s at 20 s to 4.36 km/s at 166 s. Compared to the average global phase velocities, these values are lower at longer periods, indicating a generally slower upper mantle. 2-D variation of phase velocity shows significantly low velocities at the hotspot and relatively high velocities in the north of the stable craton. The same pattern of velocity variation is also imaged in the 3-D shear wave model. The lowest velocity tilted to north and east to the current hotspot location with depth, reflecting shearing of the hotspot material due to the relative motion of the North American plate. In addition, a low velocity anomaly is imaged at central-eastern portion of the craton at depths greater than 150 km, correlated with a thin crust. Relative high velocity anomaly is found in between this slow anomaly and the hotspot. This slow-fast-slow velocity variation in the upper mantle could be associated with small-scale mantle convection of upwelling-downwelling-upwelling trigged by the hotspot, which could thermally erode the cratonic lithosphere.

  7. Linear coupling of planetary scale waves in ionospheric zonal shear winds: Generation of fast magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, R.; Chagelishvili, G.; Uchava, E.; Kharshiladze, O.

    2016-04-01

    Our goal is to gain new insight into the physics of wave dynamics in ionospheric zonal shear flows. We study the shear flow non-normality induced linear coupling of planetary scale (slow) modified Rossby waves and westward propagating fast magnetized (Khantadze) waves using an approach different from the existing one to the linear wave dynamics. The performed analysis allows us to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay, and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the linear coupling of the slow and fast waves in an ionospheric zonal flow with linear shear of mean velocity, U0=(S y ,0 ) . It should be noted from the beginning that we consider incompressible flow and the classified "slow" and "fast" waves are not connected with the similarly labeled magnetosonic waves in compressible heliosphere. We show that: the modified Rossby waves generate fast magnetized waves due to the coupling for a quite wide range of ionospheric and shear flow parameters; the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wavenumber plane; the generation of the magnetized waves/oscillations is most efficient/optimal for S ≃0.1 (S is the shear rate normalized to the combination of the angular velocity and latitude, Ω0 cos θ0 ); the streamwise wave number of the optimally generated magnetized wave harmonics decreases (the length scale increases) with increasing the Hall parameter, α. At the end, we discuss nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics—they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes (in wavenumber plane). In turn, an interplay of the analyzed quite strong transient growth of the fast magnetic waves with anisotropic nonlinear processes should ensure self-sustenance of (stochastic or regular) magnetic perturbations.

  8. The Hartle-Hawking wave function in 2D causal set quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Lisa; Surya, Sumati

    2016-03-01

    We define the Hartle-Hawking no-boundary wave function for causal set theory (CST) over the discrete analogs of spacelike hypersurfaces. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo and numerical integration methods we analyze the wave function in non-perturbative 2D CST. We find that in the low-temperature regime it is dominated by causal sets which have no continuum counterparts but possess physically interesting geometric properties. Not only do they exhibit a rapid spatial expansion with respect to the discrete proper time, but a high degree of spatial homogeneity. The latter is due to the extensive overlap of the causal pasts of the elements in the final discrete hypersurface and corresponds to high graph connectivity. Our results thus suggest new possibilities for the role of quantum gravity in the observable Universe.

  9. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Nasraoui, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N3. For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004), 10.1086/420972]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δm=(3√3 /16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N3/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  10. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes. PMID:24483566

  11. 2D aperture synthesis for Lamb wave imaging using co-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2014-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays in Lamb wave based SHM systems can operate in the phased array (PA) or synthetic focusing (SF) mode. In the real-time PA approach, multiple electronically delayed signals excite transmitting elements to form the desired wave-front, whereas receiving elements are used to sense scattered waves. Due to that, the PA mode requires multi channeled hardware and multiple excitations at numerous azimuths to scan the inspected region of interest. To the contrary, the SF mode, assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing of the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the SF technique, a single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Performance of a 2D imaging array depends on many parameters, such as, its topology, number of its transducers and their spacing in terms of wavelength as well as the type of weighting function (apodization). Moreover, it is possible to use sparse arrays, which means that not all array elements are used for transmitting and/ or receiving. In this paper the co-array concept is applied to facilitate the synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum co-array is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual elements' locations in the sub-arrays used for imaging. The coarray framework will be presented here using two different array topologies, aID uniform linear array and a cross-shaped array that will result in a square coarray. The approach will be discussed in terms of array patterns and beam patterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both, theoretical and experimental results will be given.

  12. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  13. Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves.

    PubMed

    Khidas, Y; Jia, X

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the mechanical responses of dense granular materials, using a direct shear box combined with simultaneous acoustic measurements. Measured shear wave speeds evidence the structural change of the material under shear, from the jammed state to the flowing state. There is a clear acoustic signature when the shear band is formed. Subjected to cyclic shear, both shear stress and wave speed show the strong hysteretic dependence on the shear strain, likely associated with the geometry change in the packing structure. Moreover, the correlation function of configuration-specific multiply scattered waves reveals an intermittent behavior before the failure of material. PMID:23004745

  14. Prediction of the Shear Wave Velocity from Compressional Wave Velocity for Gachsaran Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvizi, Saeed; Kharrat, Riyaz; Asef, Mohammad R.; Jahangiry, Bijan; Hashemi, Abdolnabi

    2015-10-01

    Shear and compressional wave velocities, coupled with other petrophysical data, are very important for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. In situ shear wave velocity (Vs) is measured by some sonic logging tools. Shear velocity coupled with compressional velocity is vitally important in determining geomechanical parameters, identifying the lithology, mud weight design, hydraulic fracturing, geophysical studies such as VSP, etc. In this paper, a correlation between compressional and shear wave velocity is obtained for Gachsaran formation in Maroon oil field. Real data were used to examine the accuracy of the prediction equation. Moreover, the genetic algorithm was used to obtain the optimal value for constants of the suggested equation. Furthermore, artificial neural network was used to inspect the reliability of this method. These investigations verify the notion that the suggested equation could be considered as an efficient, fast, and cost-effective method for predicting Vs from Vp.

  15. Shear waves in an inhomogeneous strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Janaki, M. S.; Banerjee, D.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2011-09-15

    The properties of electrostatic transverse shear waves propagating in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with an equilibrium density gradient are examined using the generalized hydrodynamic (GH) equation. In the usual kinetic limit, the resulting equation has similarity to zero energy Schrodinger's equation. This has helped in obtaining some exact eigenmode solutions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometries for certain nontrivial density profiles. The corresponding velocity profiles and the discrete eigenfrequencies are obtained for several interesting situations and their physics discussed.

  16. Monitoring temporal changes with shear wave splitting: testing the methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, E.; Savage, M. K.; Arnold, R.; Brenguier, F.; Rivemale, E.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in stress or fluid content of cracks should cause changes in seismic anisotropy, which can be monitored via shear wave splitting. However, shear wave splitting measurements often yield larger variation between the results than is expected from the formal error bars generated by computer programs. Furthermore, recent measurements on multiplets of nearly identical events have yielded large variations and "jumps" in apparent splitting parameters as a function of time rather than smooth variations as expected for slow changes in path properties. We carry out a systematic analysis of the Silver and Chan method. We recently reported on variations based on synthetic seismograms with various types of noise added. Here we extend the analysis to examine the variations of shear wave splitting on a family of 513 earthquakes that was recorded on station BOR on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano on La Reunion Island. Earthquakes were assigned to families based on cross correlation of the P waveform of higher than 90%. Of these 513 events, only 268 high quality events were used. A fixed 2 pole Butterworth bandpass filter with corner frequencies of 4 and 10Hz was applied. Several clusters of fast directions appeared so we chose to analyse the cluster with the most (146) events, which had fast directions between 0 and 45 degrees. The analysis window was then fixed at 3.88-4.39 seconds for all events. In the process of examination, we discovered that the cause of the jumps is most likely related to cycle skipping. Cycle skipping in shear wave splitting is a phenomenon that is known to lead to delay time shifts that are half integer multiples of the dominant period and can create 90 degree errors in the fast direction. Using plots of particle motion, the polarisation components and delay times against incoming polarisation, our preliminary findings show that 90 degree errors in the incoming polarisation can lead to correctly identifying the fast direction, but produces jumps in

  17. Shear-driven Dynamo Waves in the Fully Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Nigro, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale dynamo action is well understood when the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is small, but becomes problematic in the astrophysically relevant large Rm limit since the fluctuations may control the operation of the dynamo, obscuring the large-scale behavior. Recent works by Tobias & Cattaneo demonstrated numerically the existence of large-scale dynamo action in the form of dynamo waves driven by strongly helical turbulence and shear. Their calculations were carried out in the kinematic regime in which the back-reaction of the Lorentz force on the flow is neglected. Here, we have undertaken a systematic extension of their work to the fully nonlinear regime. Helical turbulence and large-scale shear are produced self-consistently by prescribing body forces that, in the kinematic regime, drive flows that resemble the original velocity used by Tobias & Cattaneo. We have found four different solution types in the nonlinear regime for various ratios of the fluctuating velocity to the shear and Reynolds numbers. Some of the solutions are in the form of propagating waves. Some solutions show large-scale helical magnetic structure. Both waves and structures are permanent only when the kinetic helicity is non-zero on average.

  18. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Helgerud, M.B.; Nur, A.; Pinkston, J.C.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through polycrystalline methane hydrate have been made. Methane hydrate, grown directly in a wave speed measurement chamber, was uniaxially compacted to a final porosity below 2%. At 277 K, the compacted material had a compressional wave speed of 3650 ?? 50 m/s. The shear wave speed, measured simultaneously, was 1890 ?? 30 m/s. From these wave speed measurements, we derive V(p)/V(s), Poisson's ratio, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli.

  19. Shear wave velocity structure in West Java, Indonesia as inferred from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Titi; Syuhada

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the crust and upper mantle of West Java, Indonesia by measuring the group velocity dispersion of surface waves. We analyzed waveform from four teleseismic earthquake recorded at three 3-component broadband seismometers. We analyzed fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves from vertical, radial, and transverse components using multiple filter technique. We inverted the measured group velocity to obtain shear wave velocity profile down to 200 km depth. We observed low shear wave velocity zone at depth of about 20 km. Shear velocity reduction is estimated to be 18% compared to the upper and lower velocity layer. The low velocity zone might be associated with the subducting slab of Indo-Australian Plate as similar characteristics of low velocity zones also observed at other subducting regions.

  20. Experimental Database with Baseline CFD Solutions: 2-D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock-Wave/Turbulent-Boundary-Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.; Brown, James L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A database compilation of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments is provided. The experiments selected for the database are either 2D or axisymmetric, and include both compression corner and impinging type SWTBL interactions. The strength of the interactions range from attached to incipient separation to fully separated flows. The experiments were chosen based on criterion to ensure quality of the datasets, to be relevant to NASA's missions and to be useful for validation and uncertainty assessment of CFD Navier-Stokes predictive methods, both now and in the future. An emphasis on datasets selected was on surface pressures and surface heating throughout the interaction, but include some wall shear stress distributions and flowfield profiles. Included, for selected cases, are example CFD grids and setup information, along with surface pressure and wall heating results from simulations using current NASA real-gas Navier-Stokes codes by which future CFD investigators can compare and evaluate physics modeling improvements and validation and uncertainty assessments of future CFD code developments. The experimental database is presented tabulated in the Appendices describing each experiment. The database is also provided in computer-readable ASCII files located on a companion DVD.

  1. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  2. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  3. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  4. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  5. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  6. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-differences to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P, slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High order explicit finite-differences (FD) can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  7. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  8. Validation of Shear Wave Elastography in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; Greenleaf, James F.; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a very dynamic tissue, thus accurate quantification of skeletal muscle stiffness throughout its functional range is crucial to improve the physical functioning and independence following pathology. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound-based technique that characterizes tissue mechanical properties based on the propagation of remotely induced shear waves. The objective of this study is to validate SWE throughout the functional range of motion of skeletal muscle for three ultrasound transducer orientations. We hypothesized that combining traditional materials testing (MTS) techniques with SWE measurements will show increased stiffness measures with increasing tensile load, and will correlate well with each other for trials in which the transducer is parallel to underlying muscle fibers. To evaluate this hypothesis, we monitored the deformation throughout tensile loading of four porcine brachialis whole-muscle tissue specimens, while simultaneously making SWE measurements of the same specimen. We used regression to examine the correlation between Young's modulus from MTS and shear modulus from SWE for each of the transducer orientations. We applied a generalized linear model to account for repeated testing. Model parameters were estimated via generalized estimating equations. The regression coefficient was 0.1944, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.1463 – 0.2425) for parallel transducer trials. Shear waves did not propagate well for both the 45° and perpendicular transducer orientations. Both parallel SWE and MTS showed increased stiffness with increasing tensile load. This study provides the necessary first step for additional studies that can evaluate the distribution of stiffness throughout muscle. PMID:23953670

  9. Shape waves in 2D Josephson junctions: exact solutions and time dilation.

    PubMed

    Gulevich, D R; Kusmartsev, F V; Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, V A; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-19

    We predict a new class of excitations propagating along a Josephson vortex in two-dimensional Josephson junctions. These excitations are associated with the distortion of a Josephson vortex line and have an analogy with shear waves in solid mechanics. Their shapes can have an arbitrary profile, which is retained when propagating. We derive a universal analytical expression for the energy of arbitrary shape excitations, investigate their influence on the dynamics of a vortex line, and discuss conditions where such excitations can be created. Finally, we show that such excitations play the role of a clock for a relativistically moving Josephson vortex and suggest an experiment to measure a time dilation effect analogous to that in special relativity. PMID:18851404

  10. Shape Waves in 2D Josephson Junctions: Exact Solutions and Time Dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulevich, D. R.; Savel'ev, Sergey; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Yampol'skii, V. A.; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-19

    We predict a new class of excitations propagating along a Josephson vortex in two-dimensional Josephson junctions. These excitations are associated with the distortion of a Josephson vortex line and have an analogy with shear waves in solid mechanics. Their shapes can have an arbitrary profile, which is retained when propagating. We derive a universal analytical expression for the energy of arbitrary shape excitations, investigate their influence on the dynamics of a vortex line, and discuss conditions where such excitations can be created. Finally, we show that such excitations play the role of a clock for a relativistically moving Josephson vortex and suggest an experiment to measure a time dilation effect analogous to that in special relativity.

  11. Unbounded wall flow with free surface waves and horizontal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    2015-11-01

    Free surface waves in the presence of a non-uniform shear flow are treated. The shear flow of interest varies with both the transverse and vertical coordinates, U (y , z) . Initial results treat a mean flow varying only with the transverse, U (y) . The domain is bounded on one side by a flat rigid vertical wall and is unbounded on the other side. The mean flows considered here are nonzero near the vertical wall and approach zero far from the wall, e.g. U =e-γy . The flowfield is treated as inviscid but rotational. Linear solutions are obtained using a nonuniform coordinate transformation that converts the free surface boundary condition into a modified Bessel equation. Velocity components are expanded in modified Bessel functions of the first kind of purely imaginary order. The dispersion relation for steady waves are found with wavespeeds outside the range of U, matching previous results for a flow bounded on both sides. Corresponding eigenvectors show a sequence of wave profiles of increasing complexity near the wall. The wave amplitude approaches zero far from the wall.

  12. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  13. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  14. Assessment of local pulse wave velocity in arteries using 2D distension waveforms.

    PubMed

    Meinders, J M; Kornet, L; Brands, P J; Hoeks, A P

    2001-10-01

    The reciprocal of the arterial pulse wave velocity contains crucial information about the mechanical characteristics of the arterial wall but is difficult to assess noninvasively in vivo. In this paper, a new method to assess local pulse wave velocity (PWV) is presented. To this end, multiple adjacent distension waveforms are determined simultaneously along a short arterial segment, using a single 2D-vessel wall tracking system with a high frame rate (651 Hz). Each B-mode image consists of 16 echo lines spanning a total width of 15.86 mm. Dedicated software has been developed to extract the end-diastolic diameter from the B-mode image and the distension waveforms from the underlying radiofrequency (rf) information for each echo-line. The PWV is obtained by determining the ratio of the temporal and spatial gradient of adjacent distension velocity waveforms. The proposed method is verified in a phantom and in the common carotid artery (CCA) of humans. Phantom experiments show a high concordance between the PWV obtained from 2D distension velocity waveforms (4.21 +/- 0.02 m/s) and the PWV determined using two pressure catheters (4.26 +/- 0.02 m/s). Assuming linear spatial gradients, the PWV can also be obtained in vivo for CCA and averages to 5.5 +/- 1.5 m/s (intersubject variation, n = 23), which compares well to values found in literature. Furthermore, intrasubject PWV compares well with those calculated using the Bramwell-Hill equation. It can be concluded that the PWV can be obtained from the spatial and temporal gradient if the spatial gradient is linear over the observed length of the artery, i.e. the artery should be homogenous in diameter and distension and the influence of reflections must be small. PMID:12051275

  15. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein-Didier, C; Andrade, R J; Brum, J; Hug, F; Tanter, M; Nordez, A; Gennisson, J-L

    2016-03-21

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear. PMID:26948399

  16. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  17. The Role of Shear and Interface Waves in the Excitation of T-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, R. I.

    2007-12-01

    T-waves are late arriving phases on a seismogram which travel a significant portion of their journey from the source to the receiver along a slow oceanic path. Park, Soukup and Odom [2001] proposed a modal scattering mechanism which permits energy from steeply arriving rays impinging on the ocean bottom to be converted to shallow grazing angle rays corresponding to low order modes known to comprise the T-wave signal. The Scholte interface waves are crucial to this energy transfer as they have anti-nodes nearly coincident with the ocean bottom. Any seafloor roughness acts as a secondary source located right on the Scholte wave anti-node. This allows energy to be efficiently transferred from high energy modes to lower energy, and slower, T-wave modes. In fact the presence of the Scholte waves is crucial to the existence of T-waves. Some finite shear strength in the bottom sediments and/or upper ocean crust is essential for the existence of the Scholte waves. Elastic interface waves do not exist the boundary between two fluids. The effect of the the shear modulus of the ocean bottom sediment and ocean crust on the excitation of the interface waves and T-waves is discussed.

  18. Shear Wave Splitting Inversion in a Complex Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Shear wave splitting (SWS) inversion presents a method whereby the upper crust can be interrogated for fracture density. It is caused when a shear wave traverses an area of anisotropy, splits in two, with each wave experiencing a different velocity resulting in an observable separation in arrival times. A SWS observation consists of the first arrival polarization direction and the time delay. Given the large amount of data common in SWS studies, manual inspection for polarization and time delay is considered prohibitively time intensive. All automated techniques used can produce high amounts of observations falsely interpreted as SWS. Thus introducing error into the interpretation. The technique often used for removing these false observations is to manually inspect all SWS observations defined as high quality by the automated routine, and remove false identifications. We investigate the nature of events falsely identified compared to those correctly identified. Once this identification is complete we conduct a inversion for crack density from SWS time delay. The current body of work on linear SWS inversion utilizes an equation that defines the time delay between arriving shear waves with respect to fracture density. This equation makes the assumption that no fluid flow occurs as a result of the passing shear wave, a situation called squirt flow. We show that the assumption is not applicable in all geological situations. When it is not true, its use in an inversion produces a result which is negatively affected by the assumptions. This is shown to be the case at the test case of 6894 SWS observations gathered in a small area at Puna geothermal field, Hawaii. To rectify this situation, a series of new time delay formulae, applicable to linear inversion, are derived from velocity equations presented in literature. The new formula use a 'fluid influence parameter' which indicates the degree to which squirt flow is influencing the SWS. It is found that accounting for

  19. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  20. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  1. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  2. Simulations of SH wave scattering due to cracks by the 2-D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kawahara, J.; Okamoto, T.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-05-01

    We simulate SH wave scattering by 2-D parallel cracks using the finite difference method (FDM), instead of the popularly used boundary integral equation method (BIEM). Here special emphasis is put on simplicity; we apply a standard FDM (fourth-order velocity-stress scheme with a staggered grid) to media in cluding traction-freecracks, which are expressed by arrays of grid points with zero traction. Two types of accuracy tests based oncomparison with a reliable BIEM, suggest that the present method gives practically sufficient accuracy, except for the wavefields in the vicinity of cracks, which can be well handled if the second-order FDM is used instead. As an application of this method, we also simulate wave propagation in media with randomly distributed cracks of the same length. We experimentally determine the attenuation and velocity dispersion induced by scattering from the synthetic seismograms, using a waveform averaging technique. It is shown that the results are well explained by a theory based on the Foldy approximation for crack densities of up to about 01. The presence of a free surface does not affect the validity of the theory. A preliminary experiment also suggests that the validity will not change even for multi-scale cracks.

  3. Electrostatic drift waves in a 2D magnetic current sheet - a new kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Tur, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons has been proposed for several years. Fruit et al. 2013 already used it to investigate the possibilities for electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations.It turns out that some corrections should be added to the electrostatic version of Fruit et al. 2013. We propose to revist the theory in this present paper.Starting with a modified 2D Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electrostatic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electrostatic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition.The new feature of the present model is the inclusion of diamagnetic drift effects due to the density gradient in the tail. It is well known in MHD theory that drift waves are driven unstable through collisions or other dissipative effects. Here electrostatic drift waves are revisited in this more complete kinetic model including bouncing electrons and finite Larmor radius effects. A new mode has been found with original propagation proprieties. It is moreover mildly unstable due to electron or ion damping (dissipative instability).

  4. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  5. Error in Estimates of Tissue Material Properties from Shear Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (μ1) and viscosity (μ2) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of μ1 and μ2. A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (Δr), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, Δr, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained for Δr = 3-6 mm

  6. Evolution of crustal stress, pressure and temperature around shear zones during orogenic wedge formation: a 2D thermo-mechanical numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Schmalholz, Stefan; Jaquet, Yoann

    2016-04-01

    We study the formation of an orogenic wedge during lithospheric shortening with 2D numerical simulations. We consider a viscoelastoplastic rheology, thermo-mechanical coupling by shear heating and temperature-dependent viscosities, gravity and erosion. In the initial model configuration there is either a lateral temperature variation at the model base or a lateral variation in crustal thickness to generate slight stress variations during lithospheric shortening. These stress variations can trigger the formation of shear zones which are caused by thermal softening associated with shear heating. We do not apply any kind of strain softening, such as reduction of friction angle with progressive plastic strain. The first major shear zone that appears during shortening crosscuts the entire crust and initiates the asymmetric subduction/underthrusting of mainly the mechanically strong lower crust. After some deformation, the first shear zone in the upper crust is abandoned, the deformation propagates towards the foreland and a new shear zone forms only in the upper crust. The shear zone propagation occurs several times where new shear zones form in the upper crust and the mechanically strong top of the lower crust acts as detachment horizon. We calculate the magnitudes of the maximal and minimal principal stresses and of the mean stress (or dynamic pressure), and we record also the temperature for several marker points in the upper and lower crust. We analyse the evolution of stresses and temperature with burial depth and time. Deviatoric stresses (half the differential stress) in the upper crust are up to 200 MPa and associated shear heating in shear zones ranges between 40 - 80 °C. Lower crustal rocks remain either at the base of the orogenic wedge at depths of around 50 km or are subducted to depths of up to 120 km, depending on their position when the first shear zone formed. Largest deviatotric stresses in the strong part of the lower crust are about 1000 MPa and

  7. Long-wave shear instability of fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniavski, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The earlier oceanographic works largely focused on the case of very large density differences between the two fluids sepa¬rated by an interface. The aim of this investigation is to extend the shear-flow analysis to more wide range of density ratios for the log profile of the "wind". Long wave asymptotic leads to the analytic determination of the stability characteristics of the flow. The present work is originally motivated by a laboratory experiment and can be useful for an astrophysical problem.

  8. Explicit wave action conservation for water waves on vertically sheared flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Brenda; Toledo, Yaron; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Water waves almost always propagate on currents with a vertical structure such as currents directed towards the beach accompanied by an under-current directed back toward the deep sea or wind-induced currents which change magnitude with depth due to viscosity effects. On larger scales they also change their direction due to the Coriolis force as described by the Ekman spiral. This implies that the existing wave models, which assume vertically-averaged currents, is an approximation which is far from realistic. In recent years, ocean circulation models have significantly improved with the capability to model vertically-sheared current profiles in contrast with the earlier vertically-averaged current profiles. Further advancements have coupled wave action models to circulation models to relate the mutual effects between the two types of motion. Restricting wave models to vertically-averaged non-turbulent current profiles is obviously problematic in these cases and the primary goal of this work is to derive and examine a general wave action equation which accounts for these shortcoming. The formulation of the wave action conservation equation is made explicit by following the work of Voronovich (1976) and using known asymptotic solutions of the boundary value problem which exploit the smallness of the current magnitude compared to the wave phase velocity and/or its vertical shear and curvature. The adopted approximations are shown to be sufficient for most of the conceivable applications. This provides correction terms to the group velocity and wave action definition accounting for the shear effects, which are fitting for application to operational wave models. In the limit of vanishing current shear, the new formulation reduces to the commonly used Bretherton & Garrett (1968) no-shear wave action equation where the invariant is calculated with the current magnitude taken at the free surface. It is shown that in realistic oceanic conditions, the neglect of the vertical

  9. Seismic Waves in Finely Layered VTI Media: Poroelasticity, Thomsen Parameters, and Fluid Effects on Shear Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-02-24

    Layered earth models are well justified by experience, and provide a simple means of studying fairly general behavior of the elastic and poroelastic characteristics of seismic waves in the earth. Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for weak elastic and poroelastic anisotropy are now commonly used in exploration, and can be conveniently expressed in terms of the layer averages of Backus. Since our main interest is usually in the fluids underground, it would be helpful to have a set of general equations relating the Thomsen parameters as directly as possible to the fluid properties. This end can be achieved in a rather straightforward fashion for these layered earth models, and the present paper develops and then discusses these relations. Furthermore, it is found that, although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves in VTI media. The effects of the pore fluids on this effective shear modulus can be substantial - an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable -when the medium behaves in an undrained fashion, and the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy). These effects are expected to be seen at higher frequencies such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments, or at seismic wave frequencies for low permeability regions of reservoirs, prior to hydrofracing. Results presented are strictly for velocity analysis.

  10. The Gaussian Shear Wave in a Dispersive Medium

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kevin J.; Baddour, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Within the field of “imaging the biomechanical properties of tissues,” a number of approaches analyze shear wave propagation initiated by a short radiation force push. Unfortunately, it is experimentally observed that the displacement vs. time curves in lossy tissues are rapidly damped and distorted in ways that confound any simple tracking approach. This paper addresses the propagation, decay, and distortion of pulses in lossy and dispersive media, in order to derive closed form analytic expressions for the propagating pulses. The theory identifies key terms that drive the distortion and broadening of the pulse. Furthermore, the approach taken is not dependent on any particular viscoelastic model of tissue, but instead takes a general first order approach to dispersion. Examples with a Gaussian beam pattern and realistic dispersion parameters are given along with general guidelines for identifying the features of the distorting wave that are the most compact. PMID:24412170

  11. Monitoring the lesion formation during histotripsy treatment using shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Lee, Wei-Ning; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring the lesion formation induced by histotripsy has mainly relied on the quantitative change in backscatter intensity using ultrasound B-mode imaging. However, how the mechanical properties of the histotripsy-treated tissue region alter during the procedure is yet to be fully investigated. We thus proposed here to monitor such a therapeutic process based on shear modulus estimated by shear wave imaging (SWI). In the therapeutic procedure, a single-element piezo-composite focused transducer (Imasonic, Besançon, France) with a center frequency of 660 kHz, a focal length of 45 mm, and an fnumber of 1 was driven by a function generator (AFG 3101, Tektronix, Beaverton, OR) and a gated RF power amplifier (GA-2500A, RITEC Inc., USA) to generate ultrasound histotripsy pulses. Histotripsy pulses were delivered for 20 seconds and then followed by a 30-second pause and a rapid monitoring step. Such a treatment and monitoring scheme was repeated for 10 mins. Both the reference measurement and monitoring were realized by SWI, where plane shear waves were generated by an 8 MHz linear array probe connected to a prototype ultrasound scanner, and acquired at a frame rate of 10000 Hz. Shear modulus was estimated and mapped in 2D through a time-of-flight algorithm. Gelatin (8%)-agar (2%) phantoms and ex-vivo porcine liver samples were tested. Regions of interests (ROI's) of 2 mm-by-2 mm in both untreated and treated regions were selected to compute the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In all three scenarios where different PD's and PRF's were implemented, during the first 100 seconds of the treatment, 50% decrease in the shear modulus within the histotripsy-targeted zone was already observed, and the CNR of the shear modulus increased by 18 dB. In contrast, the backscatter intensity began to reduce and the corresponding CNR was found to increase by 6 dB only after 120 seconds of treatment. The results demonstrated that SWI can map quantitatively the change of mechanical

  12. Solitary waves of permanent form in a deep fluid with weak shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzho, Oleg G.; Velarde, Manuel G.

    1995-06-01

    The Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono equation is generalized to account for finite, large amplitude solitary waves in a sheared deep fluid. It is shown how fine structure of stratification and weak noncritical shear in such geophysical flows do affect length (shape), wave (phase) velocity, and even stability of finite amplitude solitary waves.

  13. Shear Wave Splitting Observations Beneath Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, N. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Moore-Driskell, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy in the upper mantle is often associated with mantle flow direction through the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic minerals such as olivine in the upper mantle material. The flow of the mantle around subduction zones can be particularly complex, and thus difficult to explain. Because of its relationship to anisotropy, analysis of shear wave splitting measurements can help to answer questions regarding the upper mantle flow that surrounds subducting slabs. Here we present SK(K)S shear wave splitting measurements from a temporary broadband network (PLUTONS) of 33 stations deployed from April 2009 to October 2012 on the Altiplano plateau around Uturuncu volcano in Bolivia. The stations are spaced 10-20 km apart, providing a high spatial resolution of the region of the mantle directly below Uturuncu volcano. Despite the lack of numerous splitting results to analyze, preliminary measurements indicate a relatively consistent pattern of fast-polarization directions in a NW-SE orientation of about N80ºW. We think that it is likely that these observations come from anisotropy in the mantle wedge above the subducting Nazca plate indicating a direction of flow in the mantle wedge that is sub-parallel to the subduction direction of the Nazca plate. Although W-E flow beneath the subducting Nazca plate cannot be completely ruled out, these results appear to be consistent with the simple model of two-dimensional corner flow in the mantle wedge and slab-entrained mantle flow beneath the slab.

  14. Predicting prognostic factors of breast cancer using shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Jung; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Hyunji; Chae, Eun Young; Hong, Min Ji

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to investigate the correlation between histologic factors, including immunohistochemical factors, related to the prognosis of breast cancer and shear wave elastography (SWE) measurements. One hundred twenty-two breast cancers from 116 women were subjected to sonoelastography. Of the SWE features, mean and maximum elasticity and SWE ratio were extracted. The SWE ratio was calculated as the ratio of the stiffness of a portion of the lesion to that of a similar region of interest in fatty tissue. High ratios indicate stiffer lesions. The Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used for statistical analysis. Estrogen receptor negativity, progesterone receptor negativity, p53 positivity, Ki-67 positivity, high nuclear grade, high histologic grade and large tumor (invasive) size were associated with a significantly high SWE ratio (p < 0.05). ROC curve analysis yielded SWE ratio cutoff values of 2.74-3.69 for significant immunohistochemical factors and 4.21 for the basal-like subtype by maximizing specificity while ensuring more than 80% sensitivity. Breast cancers with aggressive histologic features had high SWE ratios. Shear wave elastography may provide useful information for determining prognosis. PMID:24268451

  15. 2-D modeling of laterally acoustically coupled thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator filters.

    PubMed

    Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Ylilammi, Markku

    2010-11-01

    A 2-D model is developed for calculating lateral acoustical coupling between adjacent thin film BAW resonators forming an electrical N-port. The model is based on solution and superposition of lateral eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a structure consisting of adjacent regions with known plate wave dispersion properties. Mechanical and electrical response of the device are calculated as a superposition of eigenmodes according to voltage drive at one electrical port at a time while extracting current induced in the other ports, leading to a full Y-parameter description of the device. Exemplary cases are simulated to show the usefulness of the model in the study of the basic design rules of laterally coupled thin film BAW resonator filters. Model predictions are compared to an experimental 1.9-GHz band-pass filter based on aluminum nitride thin film technology and lateral acoustical coupling. Good agreement is obtained in prediction of passband behavior. The eigenmode-based model forms a useful tool for fast simulation of laterally coupled acoustic devices. It allows one to gain insight into basic device physics in a very intuitive fashion compared with more detailed but heavier finite element method. Shortcomings of this model and possible improvements are discussed. PMID:21041141

  16. GPU computing with OpenCL to model 2D elastic wave propagation: exploring memory usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Molero-Armenta, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become increasingly powerful in recent years. Programs exploring the advantages of this architecture could achieve large performance gains and this is the aim of new initiatives in high performance computing. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient tool to model 2D elastic wave propagation on parallel computing devices. To this end, we implement the elastodynamic finite integration technique, using the industry open standard open computing language (OpenCL) for cross-platform, parallel programming of modern processors, and an open-source toolkit called [Py]OpenCL. The code written with [Py]OpenCL can run on a wide variety of platforms; it can be used on AMD or NVIDIA GPUs as well as classical multicore CPUs, adapting to the underlying architecture. Our main contribution is its implementation with local and global memory and the performance analysis using five different computing devices (including Kepler, one of the fastest and most efficient high performance computing technologies) with various operating systems.

  17. Measurements of Wall Shear Stress and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Swine with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Wentland, Andrew L.; Wieben, Oliver; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Krueger, Christian G.; Meudt, Jennifer J.; Consigny, Daniel; Rivera, Leonardo; McBride, Patrick E.; Reed, Jess D.; Grist, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wall shear stress (WSS) in a swine model of atherosclerosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Nine familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine with angioplasty balloon catheter-induced atherosclerotic lesions to the abdominal aorta (injured group) and ten uninjured FH swine were evaluated with a 4D phase contrast (PC) MRI acquisition, as well as with radial and Cartesian 2D PC acquisitions, on a 3T MR scanner. PWV values were computed from the 2D and 4D PC techniques, compared between the injured and uninjured swine, and were validated against reference standard pressure probe-based PWV measurements. WSS values were also computed from the 4D PC MRI technique and compared between injured and uninjured groups. RESULTS PWV values were significantly greater in the injured than in the uninjured groups with the 4D PC MRI technique (p=0.03) and pressure probes (p=0.02). No significant differences were found in PWV between groups using the 2D PC techniques (p=0.75–0.83). No significant differences were found for WSS values between the injured and uninjured groups. CONCLUSION The 4D PC MRI technique provides a promising means of evaluating PWV and WSS in a swine model of atherosclerosis, providing a potential platform for developing the technique for the early detection of atherosclerosis. PMID:24964097

  18. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Steht, M.; Jaskolla, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp) structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55 65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s) in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45 0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  19. Wave blocking phenomenon of surface waves on a shear flow with a constant vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maïssa, Philippe; Rousseaux, Germain; Stepanyants, Yury

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of gravity-capillary surface waves on a background shear flow with a constant vorticity is studied and compared with the case when the background flow is uniform in depth. Under the assumption that the background flow gradually varies in the horizontal direction, the primary attention is paid to the wave blocking phenomenon; the effect of vorticity on this phenomenon is studied in detail. The conditions for wave blocking are obtained and categorized for different values of the governing dimensionless parameters: Froude number, dimensionless vorticity, and surface tension.

  20. Generation of remote adaptive torsional shear waves with an octagonal phased array to enhance displacements and reduce variability of shear wave speeds: comparison with quasi-plane shear wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-10-21

    A method based on adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSW) is proposed to overcome the strong attenuation of shear waves generated by a radiation force in dynamic elastography. During the inward propagation of ATSW, the magnitude of displacements is enhanced due to the convergence of shear waves and constructive interferences. The proposed method consists in generating ATSW fields from the combination of quasi-plane shear wavefronts by considering a linear superposition of displacement maps. Adaptive torsional shear waves were experimentally generated in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms, and compared to quasi-plane shear wave propagations. Results demonstrated that displacement magnitudes by ATSW could be up to 3 times higher than those obtained with quasi-plane shear waves, that the variability of shear wave speeds was reduced, and that the signal-to-noise ratio of displacements was improved. It was also observed that ATSW could cause mechanical inclusions to resonate in heterogeneous phantoms, which further increased the displacement contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium. This method opens a way for the development of new noninvasive tissue characterization strategies based on ATSW in the framework of our previously reported shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) method proposed for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:26439616

  1. New Measurements of Shear-wave Splitting in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Mooney, W. D.; Suzuki, J.; Zahran, H. M.; El-Hadidy, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) operates a nationwide digital seismic network with more than 160 broadband seismometers that transmit to a central location at the SGS. These seismic data have been used to measure shear-wave splitting in infer anisotropy within and beneath the Arabian plate. We selected for analysis more than 300 teleseismic recordings between January, 2008 and February, 2015. Individual seismometers located on the crystalline rock of the Arabian shield provide 20 to 30 shear-wave splitting results, whereas seismometers located on volcanic rocks provide 2 to 14 reliable measurements. Here we summarize results obtained from the Tertiary volcanic fields ("harrats") of western Saudi Arabia, in particular Harrat Lunayyir and Harrat Rahat. Both of these volcanic fields have been active in historic times. Eighteen seismic stations with an average inter-station spacing of 10 km are located within Harrat Lunayyir. Seismic stations there have consistent shear-wave splitting directions ranging from N2°E to N20°W and delay times from 0.7 s to 1.6 s. This volcanic field is of particular interest because in 2009 it experienced abundant seismic activity and measureable crustal deformation that was associated with a dike intrusion into the upper crust (Pallister et al., 2010, Nature Geoscience). However, our analysis does not reveal any anomalous splitting results beneath this harrat. Fifteen seismic stations with an average inter-station spacing of 30 km are located in or adjacent to Harrat Rahat. These show very similar splitting directions to Harrat Lunayyir, ranging from N1°W to N16°W, with delay times of 1.0 s to 1.4 s. Following previous studies, we assume that these delay times are dominantly due to mantle anisotropy, with crustal anisotropy being secondary. Our results indicate a highly uniform fast-direction of anisotropy oriented approximately N10°W beneath these two volcanic fields. The measured orientation is inconsistent with the N40

  2. Teleseismic shear wave tomography of the Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asamori, Koichi; Zhao, Dapeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution shear wave tomography of the Japan subduction zone down to a depth of 700 km, which is determined by inverting a large number of high-quality S-wave arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events. The subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs are revealed clearly as high-velocity (high-V) zones, whereas low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are revealed in the mantle wedge above the two slabs. The PHS slab has subducted aseismically down to a depth of 480 km under the Japan Sea and to a depth of 540 km under the Tsushima Strait. A window is revealed within the aseismic PHS slab, being consistent with P-wave tomography. Prominent low-V and high-Poisson's ratio (σ) anomalies exist below the PHS slab and above the Pacific slab, which reflect hot and wet mantle upwelling caused by the joint effect of deep dehydration of the Pacific slab and convective circulation process in the mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. The hot and wet mantle upwelling has caused the complex geometry and structure of the PHS slab in SW Japan, and contributed to the Quaternary volcanism along the Japan Sea coast. In eastern Japan, low-V zones are revealed at depths of 200-700 km below the Pacific slab, which may reflect hot upwelling from the lower mantle or even the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  4. Transition from 1D to 2D Laser-Induced Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in an Extended Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloš, Jernej; Požar, Tomaž; Možina, Janez

    2016-05-01

    Optodynamic interaction between a laser pulse and the surface of an opaque, solid elastic object produces transient waves that propagate and reverberate within the object. They can be, in general, categorized into three distinctive types which are all formed through different mechanisms: ablation-induced waves, light-pressure-induced waves, and thermoelastic waves. In this paper, out-of-plane displacements of such waves are simulated at the epicentral position on the opposite side of an extended plane-parallel elastic plate. Wave propagation is mathematically described by Green's transfer functions convolved with suitable time profiles of the incoming laser pulses. The simulated size of the circularly symmetric laser-illuminated area on the plate surface is varied to show the limit-to-limit transition of the displacement waveforms: from a 2D point source to an infinite 1D source.

  5. Shear Wave Splitting Analysis of Aftershocks of the 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2013-12-01

    Shear wave splits into faster and slower shear waves that are nearly perpendicular when it travels through an anisotropic medium. There are two important parameters of shear wave splitting, one is the fast polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the other one is the time delay of the slow shear wave. The mechanisms for anisotropy in the upper crust can be divided into two categories. The first category is stress-induced anisotropy related to alignment of cracks in response to the in situ stress field. The second category is structural anisotropy associated with aligned planar features such as fault zone fabrics, sedimentary bedding planes and aligned minerals. We can characterize anisotropy around fault zone by shear wave splitting analysis. We used cross-correlation method for the shear wave splitting analysis. Since the faster shear wave and the slower shear wave are from the same source, they will correlate well after the time delay correction. We rotated two horizontal seismograms at a 10 increment of azimuth α from 00 to 1800. For each α, the cross-correlation coefficients between the two orthogonal seismograms are calculated for a range of time delays τ. When the absolute value of cross-correlation coefficient reaches a maximum, the corresponding values of α and τ are chosen as the fast polarization direction of the faster shear wave and the time delay of the slower shear wave, respectively. We chose 200 aftershocks observed at a temporary array consisting of 29 stations in the Lushan region. Shear wave arrivals were first picked for setting up the time window for the shear wave splitting analysis using the cross-correlation method. Because these 200 events are shallower than 20km, we can infer that the shear wave splitting is caused by crustal anisotropy. The rose diagram of the fast polarization directions of the fast shear waves showed two major directions. One is nearly parallel to the south-north trending fault system in this region, and

  6. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  7. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  8. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  9. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  10. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials – A general bond polarizability model

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Ying Quek, Su

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  11. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials--A general bond polarizability model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical z(xx)z configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  12. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  13. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Eren; Özdaǧ, Özkan Cevdet; Akgün, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  14. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    SciTech Connect

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  15. Passive elastography: shear-wave tomography from physiological-noise correlation in soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Gallot, Thomas; Catheline, Stefan; Roux, Philippe; Brum, Javier; Benech, Nicolas; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Inspired by seismic-noise correlation and time reversal, a shear-wave tomography of soft tissues using an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner is presented here. Free from the need for controlled shear-wave sources, this passive elastography is based on Green's function retrieval and takes advantage of the permanent physiological noise of the human body. PMID:21693392

  16. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field's II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green's formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii. PMID:25880794

  17. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field’s II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green’s formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii.

  18. A new method for estimating shear-wave velocity in marine sediments from radiation impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masao

    2005-11-01

    Shear-wave velocity is one of the important parameters that characterize the physical properties of marine sediments. In this study, a new method is proposed for measuring shear-wave velocity in marine sediments by using radiation impedance. Shear-wave velocities for three kinds of urethane rubber with different Japanese Industrial Standards hardness values were obtained by radiation impedance and time-of-flight measurement techniques. It was shown that the values of the shear-wave velocity measured by the radiation impedance method were consistent with those of time-of-flight measurements. It was then shown that the shear-wave velocities for air- and water-saturated beach sands are different. It was also found that the indicated shear-wave velocity is dependent on the vibrating plate radius because the instrument measures an average shear-wave velocity within a depth window beneath the plate; the larger the plate radius, the deeper the averaging window. Finally, measurements were made on two-layered media in which air-saturated beach sand or urethane rubber was covered with air-saturated clay, and the relationship between the thickness of the clay layer and the indicated shear-wave velocity was investigated.

  19. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  20. Finite-difference modelling to evaluate seismic P-wave and shear-wave field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, T.; Beilecke, T.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear-wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P-wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P-wave and a SH-wave seismic reflection profile measured at the same location on the island of Föhr, Germany and applied seismic reflection processing to the field data as well as finite-difference modelling of the seismic wave field. The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance (1 m for SH wave) and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P-wave and 800 m long SH-wave profiles. A Ricker wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first-order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth were taken from borehole data, VSP (vertical seismic profile) measurements and cross-plot relations. The simulation of the P-wave wave-field was based on interpretation of the P-wave depth section that included a priori information from boreholes and airborne electromagnetics. Velocities for 14 layers in the model were derived from the analysis of five nearby VSPs (vP =1600-2300 m s-1). Synthetic shot data were compared with the field data and seismic sections were created. Major features like direct wave and reflections are imaged. We reproduce the mayor reflectors in the depth section of the field data, e.g. a prominent till layer and several deep reflectors. The SH-wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near-surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of

  1. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  2. Shear Wave Splitting Analysis to Estimate Fracture Orientation and Frequency Dependent Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Moradzadeh, Ali; Rasouli, Vamegh; Hanachi, Javid

    2016-02-01

    Shear wave splitting is a well-known method for indication of orientation, radius, and length of fractures in subsurface layers. In this paper, a three component near offset VSP data acquired from a fractured sandstone reservoir in southern part of Iran was used to analyse shear wave splitting and frequency-dependent anisotropy assessment. Polarization angle obtained by performing rotation on radial and transverse components of VSP data was used to determine the direction of polarization of fast shear wave which corresponds to direction of fractures. It was shown that correct implementation of shear wave splitting analysis can be used for determination of fracture direction. During frequency-dependent anisotropy analysis, it was found that the time delays in shear-waves decrease as the frequency increases. It was clearly demonstrated throughout this study that anisotropy may have an inverse relationship with frequency. The analysis presented in this paper complements the studied conducted by other researchers in this field of research.

  3. A shear-wave polarization study in the Wellington region New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, K.R. )

    1990-08-01

    A month of digital data from two three component seismograph stations near Wellington, New Zealand, was analyzed as part of a feasibility study for a major project to investigate shear-wave splitting. Although the total number of earthquakes studies was small (14), some suggestive results were obtained. Almost all events recorded within the shear wave window showed a phase reversal of the horizontal components after one or two shear wave cycles, suggesting that there are actually two shear-wave arrivals. The measured polarization of the first shear wave arrivals was N (31 {plus minus} 11) E. This polarization alignment cannot be explained by focal mechanisms, and it is unlikely to be due to topography because of the station-to-station correlation. The present evidence suggests the most likely cause is crustal anistropy due to the geological structure at shallow depth, rather than stress aligned micro-cracks.

  4. Visualization of ultrasonically induced shear wave propagation using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    Shear wave elastography measures the stiffness of soft tissues from the speed of propagating shear waves induced in tissue. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising detection modality given its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, making it suitable for elastic characterization of skin, peripheral vasculature or ocular tissues. For clinical applications, it would be valuable to use a non-contact shear source. Thus, we propose acoustic radiation force as a remote shear source combined with OCT for visualization. A single-element focused transducer (central frequency 7.5 MHz) was used to apply a maximal pressure of ~3 MPa for 100 μs in agar phantoms. It induced shear waves with an amplitude of several hundreds of nanometers and a broadband spectrum in the kilohertz range. Phasesensitive OCT was used to track shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We reconstructed shear modulus maps in a heterogeneous phantom. In addition, we use 3-ms long coded excitation to increase the displacement signal-to-noise ratio. We applied digital pulse compression to the resulting displacement field to obtain a gain of ~15 dB compared to standard pulse excitation while maintaining the US pressure level and the shear wave spatial and temporal resolution. This is a promising result for shear wave generation at low US pressures (~ 1 MPa).

  5. Anisotropy across the Sorgenfrei Tornquist Zone from shear wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylegalla, K.; Bock, G.; Gossler, J.; Hanka, W.; TOR Working Group

    1999-12-01

    During the TOR-1 passive seismic experiment in 1996/97, a maximum of 139 temporary seismograph stations were operating over the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone (STZ) in an area extending from northern Germany through Denmark to central Sweden. One of the objectives was to study horizontal anisotropy directions in the subcrustal lithosphere and asthenosphere across the Trans-European Suture Zone. To achieve this goal, broad-band and intermediate-period (5 s) data of the TOR-1 stations and additional stations of permanent networks (GRSN, GEOFON) were analysed for splitting of SKS and SKKS phases. As a result of the relatively dense station spacing, the method offers good lateral resolution of anisotropy. Preliminary results suggest that the directions of the fast horizontal S wave velocity are affected by the STZ. In central Europe and southern Sweden, far away from the STZ, fast S wave directions are approximately E-W while they turn more northerly closer to the STZ where they are approximately parallel to the trend of the STZ. No significant shear wave splitting was observed north of 57°N and east of 14°E. Small delay times between 0.2 and 0.5 s observed at the northernmost TOR-1 station T40S and T60S may be controlled by anisotropy in a thickened crust. The mantle contribution of horizontal anisotropy within the STZ is probably constrained to an approximately 60-km-thick zone in the depth range between 70 and 300 km. The observations are consistent with a model where azimuthal anisotropy is not governed by present-day mantle flow in the asthenosphere, but rather is frozen into the subcrustal lithosphere during the last episode of tectonic activity.

  6. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  7. Flow shear suppression of turbulence using externally driven ion Bernstein and Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Ono, M. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Diamond, P.H. . Dept. of Physics); Craddock, G.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of externally-launched radio-frequency waves as a means of active confinement control through the generation of sheared poloidal flows is explored. For low-frequency waves, kinetic Alfven waves are proposed, and are shown to drive sheared E {times} B flows as a result of the radial variation in the electromagnetic Reynolds stress. In the high frequency regime, ion Bernstein waves are considered, and shown to generate sheared poloidal rotation through the ponderomotive force. In either case, it is shown that modest amounts of absorbed power ({approximately} few 100 kW) are required to suppress turbulence in a region of several cm radial width. 9 refs.

  8. Estimation of viscoelastic parameters in Prony series from shear wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Wook; Hong, Jung-Wuk; Lee, Hyoung-Ki; Choi, Kiwan

    2016-06-01

    When acquiring accurate ultrasonic images, we must precisely estimate the mechanical properties of the soft tissue. This study investigates and estimates the viscoelastic properties of the tissue by analyzing shear waves generated through an acoustic radiation force. The shear waves are sourced from a localized pushing force acting for a certain duration, and the generated waves travel horizontally. The wave velocities depend on the mechanical properties of the tissue such as the shear modulus and viscoelastic properties; therefore, we can inversely calculate the properties of the tissue through parametric studies.

  9. Fluid Effects on Shear for Seismic Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-07-22

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus of the layered system (namely the uniaxial shear) contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored in this modulus by an amount that ranges from the smallest to the largest effective shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the overall increase in shear energy due to fluids is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of overall shear modulus, being about 20% of the allowed range as liquid is fully substituted for gas. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% decreases the shear wave speed and, thereby, partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. The final result is an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10%. This increase is shown to be possible under most favorable circumstances - i.e. when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy) and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), resulting short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity.

  10. The shear wave velocity underneath Bucharest city, Romania, from the analysis of Love waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sèbe, Olivier; Forbriger, Thomas; Ritter, Joachim R. R.

    2009-03-01

    From the dispersion of Love waves, we infer models of shear wave velocity structure underneath Bucharest (Romania) at depths down to 2km that can contribute to seismic hazard estimation. Waves from eight regional events recorded during 10months with a network of 34 seismic broad-band stations of the URban Seismology (URS) experiment are used. Although these events provide poor azimuthal coverage the data reliably constrain a shear wave velocity model with an interface between the Neogene and the Cretaceous sediments that is dipping northwards towards the Carpathian mountains. Array processing techniques that account for non-uniform wave propagation are used to estimate the dispersion of structural phase velocity. From this, we infer subsurface structure at three different latitudes. The Neogene sediments are represented by a gradient layer with no significant lateral variation. Shear wave velocity increases from approximately 400ms-1 near the surface to 1kms-1 at 1km depth and 5km in the south, and to 1.35kms-1 at 1.5km depth and 5km in the north from the centre of Bucharest, respectively. For the half-space representing the Cretaceous sediments, we obtain shear wave velocities of 2.7-2.9kms-1. The results are consistent with results from boreholes and shallow seismics for the near-surface structure and results from receiver function studies and crustal refraction seismic studies for the deeper structure. The details of the Neogene layer comprising a vertical gradient fill a gap in existing models of the subsurface structure of Bucharest and can contribute to modelling of seismic hazard for the city. Since the signal-to-noise ratio restricted useful data to the frequency range from 90 to 290mHz, the inversion could not constrain the near-surface velocity independently. Due to strong trade-off between near-surface velocity and depth of half-space, the latter had to be introduced as a priori data from previous studies.

  11. Process to generate a synthetic diagnostic for microwave imaging reflectometry with the full-wave code FWR2D.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Domier, C W; Kramer, G; Luhmann, N C; Muscatello, C M; Shi, L; Tobias, B J; Valeo, E

    2014-11-01

    A synthetic microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostic employing the full-wave reflectometer code (FWR2D) has been developed and is currently being used to guide the design of real systems, such as the one recently installed on DIII-D. The FWR2D code utilizes real plasma profiles as input, and it is combined with optical simulation tools for synthetic diagnostic signal generation. A detailed discussion of FWR2D and the process to generate the synthetic signal are presented in this paper. The synthetic signal is also compared to a prescribed density fluctuation spectrum to quantify the imaging quality. An example is presented with H-mode-like plasma profiles derived from a DIII-D discharge, where the MIR focal is located in the pedestal region. It is shown that MIR is suitable for diagnosing fluctuations with poloidal wavenumber up to 2.0 cm(-1) and fluctuation amplitudes less than 5%. PMID:25430276

  12. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  14. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  15. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5 MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  16. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5 MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  17. [Effective control of excitable waves in 2D cardiac excitable media].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Li; Zhang, Guangcai; Wang, Guangrui; Qu, Zhi

    2005-12-01

    We propose a method for effective control of patter on dissipative system by use of little perturbation analysis, and apply this nonuniform feed back method to control the polarization wave of heart represented by FHN equation. In the numerical experiment, we successfully alter the propagating direction of planar waves and drift the spiral waves to boundary without resonant repulsion. The effective control of the excited system will be used to study the mechanism of defibrillation and that is our interesting work. PMID:16422076

  18. Acoustic wave flow sensor using quartz thickness shear mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lifeng; Zeng, Zijing; Cheng, Hongbin; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2009-09-01

    A quartz thickness shear mode (TSM) bulk acoustic wave resonator was used for in situ and real-time detection of liquid flow rate in this study. A special flow chamber made of 2 parallel acrylic plates was designed for flow measurement. The flow chamber has a rectangular flow channel, 2 flow reservoirs for stabilizing the fluid flow, a sensor mounting port for resonator holding, one inlet port, and one outlet port for pipe connection. A 5-MHz TSM quartz resonator was edge-bonded to the sensor mounting port with one side exposed to the flowing liquid and other side exposed to air. The electrical impedance spectra of the quartz resonator at different volumetric flow rate conditions were measured by an impedance analyzer for the extraction of the resonant frequency through a data-fitting method. The fundamental, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th resonant frequency shifts were found to be around 920, 3572, 5947, 8228, and 10,300 Hz for flow rate variation from 0 to 3000 mL/min, which had a corresponding Reynolds number change from 0 to 822. The resonant frequency shifts of different modes are found to be quadratic with flow rate, which is attributed to the nonlinear effect of quartz resonator due to the effective normal pressure imposing on the resonator sensor by the flowing fluid. The results indicate that quartz TSM resonators can be used for flow sensors with characteristics of simplicity, fast response, and good repeatability. PMID:19811997

  19. Mapping an aquitard breach using shear-wave seismic reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, B. A.; Harris, J. B.; Larsen, D.; Pell, A.

    2009-05-01

    In multi-layered hydrostratigraphic systems, aquitard breaches caused by faulting or paleo-erosion can allow substantial quantities of water of differing quality to be exchanged between aquifers. Seismic reflection technology was used to map the extent and orientation of an aquitard breach connecting a shallow alluvial aquifer to the deeper semi-confined Memphis aquifer in southwestern Tennessee, USA. Geophysical well logs indicate the presence of the aquitard at borehole locations that define the beginning and end points on two seismic survey lines, which intersect at a borehole where the aquitard is absent. A SE-NW-oriented paleochannel, 350 m wide and approximately 35-40 m deep, is interpreted from the seismic reflection surveys. The paleochannel cuts through the aquitard and into the upper part of the Memphis aquifer, thus creating a hydraulic connection between the shallow unconfined and deeper, semi-confined aquifers. The results indicate the potential of the shear-wave seismic reflection methods to resolve shallow breaches through fine-grained aquitards given availability of sufficient well control.

  20. Statistical Analysis of Shear Wave Speed in the Uterine Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Lindsey C.; Feltovich, Helen; Palmeri, Mark L.; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Hall, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Although cervical softening is critical in pregnancy, there currently is no objective method for assessing the softness of the cervix. Shear wave speed (SWS) estimation is a noninvasive tool used to measure tissue mechanical properties such as stiffness. The goal of this study was to determine the spatial variability and assess the ability of SWS to classify ripened vs. unripened tissue samples. Ex vivo human hysterectomy samples (n = 22) were collected, a subset (n = 13) were ripened. SWS estimates were made at 4–5 locations along the length of the canal on both anterior and posterior halves. A linear mixed model was used for a robust multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated to describe the utility of SWS to classify ripened vs. unripened tissue samples. Results showed that all variables used in the linear mixed model were significant (p<0.05). Estimates at the mid location for the unripened group were 3.45 ± 0.95 m/s (anterior) and 3.56 ± 0.92 m/s (posterior), and 2.11 ± 0.45 m/s (anterior) and 2.68 ± 0.57 m/s (posterior) for the ripened (p < 0.001). The AUC’s were 0.91 and 0.84 for anterior and posterior respectively suggesting SWS estimates may be useful for quantifying cervical softening. PMID:25392863

  1. Statistical analysis of shear wave speed in the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lindsey C; Feltovich, Helen; Palmeri, Mark L; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Hall, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Although cervical softening is critical in pregnancy, there currently is no objective method for assessing the softness of the cervix. Shear wave speed (SWS) estimation is a noninvasive tool used to measure tissue mechanical properties such as stiffness. The goal of this study was to determine the spatial variability and assess the ability of SWS to classify ripened versus unripened tissue samples. Ex vivo human hysterectomy samples (n = 22) were collected; a subset (n = 13) were ripened. SWS estimates were made at 4 to 5 locations along the length of the canal on both anterior and posterior halves. A linear mixed model was used for a robust multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated to describe the utility of SWS to classify ripened versus unripened tissue samples. Results showed that all variables used in the linear mixed model were significant ( p < 0.05). Estimates at the mid location for the unripened group were 3.45 ± 0.95 m/s (anterior) and 3.56 ± 0.92 m/s (posterior), and 2.11 ± 0.45 m/s (anterior) and 2.68 ± 0.57 m/s (posterior) for the ripened ( p < 0.001). The AUCs were 0.91 and 0.84 for anterior and posterior, respectively, suggesting that SWS estimates may be useful for quantifying cervical softening. PMID:25392863

  2. Shear Wave Splitting Across Eastern, Western and Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, A.; Ramirez, C.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of the AfricaArray network across eastern, western and southern Africa, in conjunction with seismic data from many PASSCAL deployments over the past 20 years, is helping to fill in major gaps in the global coverage of shear wave splitting measurements. New results from stations in Ghana, Nigeria, Mozambique, Botswana, Angola, Namibia and South Africa are presented in this study that when combined with previously published measurements help to map the pattern of seismic anisotropy over much of the African continent. A general pattern of fast polarization directions, characterized by NE orientations, is found, and superimposed on this subcontinental-scale pattern is local and regional variability, most notably around the Archean Tanzania craton in eastern Africa. The subcontinental-scale pattern, as well as local and regional variations in this pattern, are interpreted in terms of large-scale mantle flow from the African Superplume, fossil anisotropy in the lithosphere, and shape anisotropy in magmatic regions of the East African rift system.

  3. Fast voxel-based 2D/3D registration algorithm using a volume rendering method based on the shear-warp factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weese, Juergen; Goecke, Roland; Penney, Graeme P.; Desmedt, Paul; Buzug, Thorsten M.; Schumann, Heidrun

    1999-05-01

    2D/3D registration makes it possible to use pre-operative CT scans for navigation purposes during X-ray fluoroscopy guided interventions. We present a fast voxel-based method for this registration task, which uses a recently introduced similarity measure (pattern intensity). This measure is especially suitable for 2D/3D registration, because it is robust with respect to structures such as a stent visible in the X-ray fluoroscopy image but not in the CT scan. The method uses only a part of the CT scan for the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to accelerate their computation. Nevertheless, computation time is crucial for intra-operative application and a further speed-up is required, because numerous DRRs must be computed. For that reason, the suitability of different volume rendering methods for 2D/3D registration has been investigated. A method based on the shear-warp factorization of the viewing transformation turned out to be especially suitable and builds the basis of the registration algorithm. The algorithm has been applied to images of a spine phantom and to clinical images. For comparison, registration results have been calculated using ray-casting. The shear-warp factorization based rendering method accelerates registration by a factor of up to seven compared to ray-casting without degrading registration accuracy. Using a vertebra as feature for registration, computation time is in the range of 3-4s (Sun UltraSparc, 300 MHz) which is acceptable for intra-operative application.

  4. In Vivo Cardiac, Acoustic-Radiation-Force-Driven, Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) -induced shear waves in the mid-myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of a beating canine heart. Shear waves were generated and tracked with a linear ultrasound transducer that was placed directly on the exposed epicardium. Acquinsition was ECG-gated arid coincided with the mid-diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle. Axial displacement profiles consistent with shear wave propagation were clearly evident in all SWEI acquisitions (i.e., those including an ARFI excitation); displacement data from control cases (i.e., sequences lacking an ARFI excitation) offered no evidence of shear wave propagation and yielded a peak absolute mean displacement below 0.31 μm after motion filtering. Shear wave velocity estimates ranged from 0.82 to 2.65 m/s and were stable across multiple heartbeats for the same interrogation region, with coefficients of variation less than 19% for all matched acquisitions. Variations in velocity estimates suggest a spatial dependence of shear wave velocity through the mid-myocardium of the LVFW, with velocity estimates changing, in limited cases, through depth and lateral position. PMID:19771962

  5. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Shear wave reflectivity and physical properties of the southern Appalachian Thorn Hill Paleozoic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.E.; Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties of a sequence of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks have been examined in detail, with an emphasis on laboratory measurements of density, shear wave velocity, shear wave splitting, and Vp/Vs ratios. Seismic properties of 147 cores from 49 rock samples collected from the thorn hill sedimentary sequence of eastern Tennessee are examined in terms of implications for future seismic studies in the southern Appalachians. The shear wave velocities of these rocks are strongly influenced by the relatively high shear wave velocity of quartz. Shear wave velocity anisotropy is present in most of the lithologic groups: it is highest in the shales while being almost insignificant in the dolostones. The related phenomenon of shear wave splitting occurs to some degree in all of the lithologies studied and at high pressures originates from mineral orientation. Compressional to shear velocity (Vp/Vs) ratios of approximately 1.82 (dolostones) and 1.95 (limestones) effectively characterize the carbonates while other lithologies display wider ranges of Vp/Vs, primarily due to the influence of accessory minerals such as quartz. Densities of the sample suite range from 2.34 g/cm[sup 3] (shale) to 2.86 g/cm[sup 3] (dolostone). Normal incidence shear and compressional wave synthetic seismograms of the entire Thorn Hill section indicate that three zones of high amplitude reflections would be seen on reflection records obtained over this 3,327 meter thick sequence. differences are seen at some interfaces in the Mississippian-Devonian interval, which are more reflective to shear waves, and in the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation, which appears more reflective to compressional waves.

  7. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-01

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  8. The propagation of horizontally polarized shear waves in plates bordered with viscous liquid.

    PubMed

    Gitis, Alexander; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Requirements for ultrasonic horizontally polarized shear waves based viscosity sensors and their applicability for continuous in-line measurement are presented and discussed. The results reveal, that sensors using non-piezoelectric plates as well as wave guides and sensing surface have application-oriented advantages in corrosive and hot liquids. For such non-piezoelectric plate sensors, the dispersion relations are found and the linking equation among propagation velocity as well as attenuation coefficient and Newtonian liquid parameters are obtained. The findings show that in presence of viscous liquids the propagation parameters of horizontally polarized shear waves (HPSW) in non-piezoelectric plate change and a viscosity depending attenuation occurs. It is shown that the measurement sensitivity, in physical terms, of the investigated device highly depends on plate thickness, shear wave impedance of the plate material, and the shear wave impedance of the ambient liquid. Further, reasonable geometrical optimizations and suited plate materials are discussed. PMID:27423968

  9. A hybrid wave-mode formulation for the vibro-acoustic analysis of 2D periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, C.; Zhou, C.; Ichchou, M. N.; Lainé, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of vibrational analysis of 2D periodic waveguides, Floquet-Bloch theorem is widely applied for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics. In this context, the Wave Finite Element Method (WFEM) combines Periodic Structure Theory (PST) with standard FE packages, enabling wave dispersion analysis of waveguides involving structurally realistic unit-cells. For such applications, the computational efficiency of the WFEM depends on the choice of the formulation and can lead to numerical issues, worsen by extensive computational cost. This paper presents a coupled wave-mode approach for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics in structurally advanced periodic structures. It combines two scales of model order reduction. At the unit-cell's scale, Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) provides the displacement field associated with local resonances of the periodic structure, while the free wave propagation is considered using a spectral problem projection on a reduced set of shape functions associated with propagating waves, thus providing considerable reduction of the computational cost. An application is provided for a bi-directionally stiffened panel and the influence of reduction parameters is discussed, as well as the robustness of the numerical results.

  10. Nonlinear shear wave in a non Newtonian visco-elastic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2012-06-15

    An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau-Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as in biological systems.

  11. Contactless remote induction of shear waves in soft tissues using a transcranial magnetic stimulation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Miller-Jolicoeur, Erika; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear waves induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitudes of 5 and 0.5 μm were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  12. Generating Shear Waves in the Human Brain for Ultrasound Elastography: A new Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Callé, Samuel; Remenieras, Jean-Pierre

    One of the challenges of brain elastography is the generation of the shear waves inside the brain. The generation system has to bypass the body's natural protection while keeping a good level of comfort for the patient. We propose a shear wave inducing system for brain ultrasound elastography. In this paper we will validate this system in vitro on a tissue mimicking phantom by doing shear wave velocity measurements. The system proves to work well on phantoms and to be comfortable for the patient. Further work will include measurements in vivo.

  13. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography.

    PubMed

    Hashemiyan, Z; Packo, P; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  14. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  15. Atmospheric waves and the nature of buoyancy turbulence in the context of the waves VS 2D-turbulence debate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewan, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of how to empirically distinguish between velocity fluctuations due to turbulence and those due to atmospheric waves is addressed. The physical differences between waves and turbulence are reviewed. New theoretical ideas on the subject of bouyancy range turbulence are presented. A unique scale K sub B is given that allows one to differentiate between waves and turbulence for the special case of theta = 0 (i.e., horizontal propagating waves).

  16. On the Precision of Time-of-Flight Shear Wave Speed Estimation in Homogeneous Soft Solids: Initial Results using a Matrix Array Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A system capable of tracking radiation force induced shear wave propagation in a 3D volume using ultrasound is presented. In contrast to existing systems, which use 1D array transducers, a 2D matrix array is used for tracking shear wave displacements. A separate single element transducer is used for radiation force excitation. This system allows shear wave propagation in all directions away from the push to be observed. It is shown that for a limit of 64 tracking beams, by placing the beams at the edges of the measurement region of interest (ROI) at multiple directions from the push, time-of-flight (TOF) shear wave speed (SWS) measurement uncertainty can theoretically be reduced by 40% compared to equally spacing the tracking beams within the ROI along a single plane, as is typical when using a 1D array for tracking. This was verified by simulation, and a reduction of 30% was experimentally observed on a homogeneous phantom. Analytical expressions are presented for the relationship between TOF SWS measurement uncertainty and various shear wave imaging parameters. It is shown that TOF SWS uncertainty is inversely proportional to ROI size, and inversely proportional to the square root of the number of tracking locations for a given distribution of beam locations relative to the push. TOF SWS uncertainty is shown to increase with the square of the SWS, indicating that TOF SWS measurements are intrinsically less precise for stiffer materials. PMID:23549536

  17. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  18. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  19. Studying fast wave propagation and absorption at any cyclotron harmonic using a 2D finite element area coordinates wave equation solver

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, Ernesto; Van Eester, Dirk

    2011-12-23

    Fourier analysis in the poloidal direction is a standard ingredient in present-day 2D wave equation solvers describing radio frequency waves in hot tokamak plasmas. Although a powerful and elegant technique, Fourier analysis has the disadvantage that a large number of modes is needed to describe the field pattern on a magnetic surface if a short wavelength mode exists on any - even very small - subpart of the particle trajectory. The present paper examines the potential of a method that does not suffer from this drawback: a finite element technique relying on simple linear or cubic area base functions that are defined on irregular elementary surfaces of triangular shape. The wave equation is solved in its weak Galerkin variational form and for realistic 2D tokamak geometry, accounting for the toroidal curvature but assuming the toroidal angle is ignorable, allowing to study the wave pattern for each of the independent toroidal modes excited by the antenna individually.The locally uniform full hot plasma dielectric tensor to all orders in finite Larmor radius was adopted. As the main intended application is the study of fast wave behavior (heating and current drive) at arbitrary harmonics, the wave vector complex amplitude appearing in the dielectric tensor is determined through a local dispersion root evaluation. High frequency fast wave propagation and damping is provided as an illustration in view of possible application of this type of current drive in future high density reactor-like tokamaks.

  20. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  1. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    compressional wave energy may be generated within the shear radiation node of the source. Interestingly, in some cases this shear wave may arise as a coherent pulse, which may be used to improve seismic imaging efforts. In the third and fourth chapters, I discuss the results of a numerical analysis and field study of seismic near-surface tunnel detection methods. Detecting unknown tunnels and voids, such as old mine workings or solution cavities in karst terrain, is a challenging prob- lem in geophysics and has implications for geotechnical design, public safety, and domestic security. Over the years, a number of different geophysical methods have been developed to locate these objects (microgravity, resistivity, seismic diffraction, etc.), each with varying results. One of the major challenges facing these methods is understanding the influence of geologic heterogeneity on their results, which makes this problem a natural extension of the modeling work discussed in previous chapters. In the third chapter, I present the results of a numerical study of surface-wave based tunnel detection methods. The results of this analysis show that these methods are capable of detecting a void buried within one wavelength of the surface, with size potentially much less than one wavelength. In addition, seismic surface- wave based detection methods are effective in media with moderate heterogeneity (epsilon < 5 %), and in fact, this heterogeneity may serve to increase the resolution of these methods. In the fourth chapter, I discuss the results of a field study of tunnel detection methods at a site within the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, near Antioch California. I use a com- bination of surface wave backscattering, 1D surface wave attenuation, and 2D attenuation tomography to locate and determine the condition of two tunnels at this site. These results compliment the numerical study in chapter 3 and highlight their usefulness for detecting tunnels at other sites.

  2. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Ground motions recorded within sedimentary basins are variable over short distances. One important cause of the variability is that local soil properties are variable at all scales. Regional hazard maps developed for predicting site effects are generally derived from maps of surficial geology; however, recent studies have shown that mapped geologic units do not correlate well with the average shear-wave velocity of the upper 30 m, Vs(30). We model the horizontal variability of near-surface soil shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area to estimate values in unsampled locations in order to account for site effects in a continuous manner. Previous geostatistical studies of soil properties have shown horizontal correlations at the scale of meters to tens of meters while the vertical correlations are on the order of centimeters. In this paper we analyze shear-wave velocity data over regional distances and find that surface shear-wave velocity is correlated at horizontal distances up to 4 km based on data from seismic cone penetration tests and the spectral analysis of surface waves. We propose a method to map site effects by using geostatistical methods based on the shear-wave velocity correlation structure within a sedimentary basin. If used in conjunction with densely spaced shear-wave velocity profiles in regions of high seismic risk, geostatistical methods can produce reliable continuous maps of site effects. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effect of Subducting Slabs in Global Shear Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-03-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave travel time dataset for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the travel time anomalies produced by the 3D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw travel time anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88%. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs - potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41%. We tested two source relocation procedures - an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitude of artifact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5% S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large scale lower mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the starting models in global

  4. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  5. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  6. Improvement of Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Harmonic Imaging in Healthy Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of liver elasticity is a major application of shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) to non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis stages. SWEI measurements can be highly affected by ultrasound image quality. Ultrasound harmonic imaging has exhibited a significant improvement in ultrasound image quality as well as for SWEI measurements. This was previously illustrated in cardiac SWEI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liver shear wave particle displacement detection and shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements with fundamental and filter-based harmonic ultrasound imaging. In a cohort of 17 patients with no history of liver disease, a 2.9-fold increase in maximum shear wave displacement, a 0.11 m/s decrease in the overall interquartile range and median SWV and a 17.6% increase in the success rate of SWV measurements were obtained when filter-based harmonic imaging was used instead of fundamental imaging. PMID:26803391

  7. The Effect of Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy in a Transversely Isotropic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic monitoring of fluid distributions in the subsurface requires an understanding of the effect of fluid saturation on the anisotropic properties of layered media. Austin Chalk is a carbonate rock composed mainly of calcite (99.9%) with fine bedding caused by a weakly-directed fabric. In this paper, we assess the shear-wave anisotropy of Austin Chalk and the effect of saturation on interpreting anisotropy based on shear wave velocity, attenuation and spectral content as a function of saturation. In the laboratory, we performed full shear-waveform measurements on several dry cubic samples of Austin Chalk with dimensions 50mm x 50mm x 50mm. Two shear-wave contact transducers (central Frequency 1 MHz) were use to send and receive signals. Data was collected for three orthogonal orientations of the sample and as a function of shear wave polarization relative to the layers in the sample. For the waves propagated parallel to the layers, both fast and slow shear waves were observed with velocities of 3444 m/s and 3193 m/s, respectively. It was noted that the minimum and maximum shear wave velocities did not occur when the shear wave polarization were perpendicular or parallel to the layering in the sample but occurred at an orientation of ~25 degrees from the normal to the layers. The sample was then vacuum saturated with water for approximately ~15 hours. The same measurements were performed on the saturated sample as those on the dry sample. Both shear wave velocities observed decreased upon water-saturation with corresponding velocities of 3155 m/s and 2939 m/s, respectively. In the dry condition the difference between the fast and slow shear wave velocities was 250 m/s. This difference decreased to 215 m/s after fluid saturation. In both the dry and saturated condition, the shear wave velocity for waves propagated perpendicularly to the layers was independent of polarization and had the same magnitude as that of the slow shear wave. A wavelet analysis was

  8. Effects of shallow density structure on the inversion for crustal shear wave speeds in surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Guangchi; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    Surface wave tomography routinely uses empirically scaled density model in the inversion of dispersion curves for shear wave speeds of the crust and uppermost mantle. An improperly selected empirical scaling relationship between density and shear wave speed can lead to unrealistic density models beneath certain tectonic formations such as sedimentary basins. Taking the Sichuan basin east to the Tibetan plateau as an example, we investigate the differences between density profiles calculated from four scaling methods and their effects on Rayleigh wave phase velocities. Analytical equations for 1-D layered models and adjoint tomography for 3-D models are used to examine the trade-off between density and S-wave velocity structures at different depth ranges. We demonstrate that shallow density structure can significantly influence phase velocities at short periods, and thereby affect the shear wave speed inversion from phase velocity data. In particular, a deviation of 25 per cent in the initial density model can introduce an error up to 5 per cent in the inverted shear velocity at middle and lower crustal depths. Therefore one must pay enough attention in choosing a proper velocity-density scaling relationship in constructing initial density model in Rayleigh wave inversion for crustal shear velocity structure.

  9. KEEN and KEEPN wave simulations from 2D to 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrenberger, Michel; Afeyan, Bedros; Larson, David; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Casas, Fernando; Faou, Erwan; Dodhy, Adila; Sonnendrucker, Eric; Shoucri, Magdi

    2015-11-01

    We show for well-driven KEEN (Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear) waves and their analogs in pair plasmas KEEPN (Positron) waves, how the dynamics is captured in a variety of complimentary numerical approaches. Symplectic integration and quadrature node based techniques are deployed to achieve satisfactory results in the long time evolution of highly nonlinear, kinetic, non-stationary, self-organized structures in phase space. Fixed and composite velocity grid arbitrary-order interpolation approaches have advantages we highlight. Adaptivity to local phase space density morphological structures will be discussed starting within the framework of the Shape Function Kinetics (SFK) approach. Fine resolution in velocity only in the range affected by KEEN waves makes for more efficient simulations, especially in higher dimensions. We explore the parameter space of unequal electron and positron temperatures as well as the effects of a relative drift velocity in their initial conditions. Ponderomotively driven KEEPN waves have many novelties when compared to KEEN waves, such as double, staggered, vortex structures, which we highlight. Work supported by the AFOSR and OFES.

  10. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Finite difference modelling to evaluate seismic P wave and shear wave field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, T.; Beilecke, T.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P wave and a SH wave reflection seismic profile measured at the same location on Föhr island, and applied reflection seismic processing to the field data as well as finite difference modelling of the seismic wavefield (SOFI FD-code). The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P wave and 800 m long SH wave profiles. A Ricker-Wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth are taken from borehole data, VSP measurements and cross-plot relations. The first simulation of the P wave wavefield was based on a simplified hydrogeological model of the survey location containing six lithostratigraphic units. Single shot data were compared and seismic sections created. Major features like direct wave, refracted waves and reflections are imaged, but the reflectors describing a prominent till layer at ca. 80 m depth was missing. Therefore, the P wave input model was refined and 16 units assigned. These define a laterally more variable velocity model (vP = 1600-2300 m s-1) leading to a much better reproduction of the field data. The SH wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of key parameters determining the

  12. Seismic Anisotropy of the Mexican Subduction Zone Based on the Surface Waves, Shear Wave Splitting, and Higher Modes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubailo, I.; Davis, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexico subduction zone is characterized by both steep and flat subduction, and a volcanic arc that appears to be oblique to the trench. It has excellent seismic data coverage due to the 2005-2007 Middle America Subduction Experiment (MASE) and the permanent Mexican stations. Here, we study the anisotropy of the region using Surface waves, shear-wave splitting measurements, and higher modes. Our goal is to verify and complement the three-dimensional model of shear-wave velocity and anisotropy in the region constructed using Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements (Stubailo et al., JGR, 2012) and constrain the depth of the shear-wave splitting anisotropy with the help of the n1-3 overtones. The 3D model contains lateral variations in shear wave velocity consistent with the presence of flat and steep subduction, as well as variations in azimuthal anisotropy, that suggest a tear between the flat and steep portions of the slab. Shear-wave splitting is effective for studying mantle anisotropy beneath the receivers and has a better lateral resolution than the Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements, although it suffers from a poor depth resolution. To better resolve the anisotropy at depth, we also calculate the anisotropy based on the higher mode surface waves of different overtones for Mexican stations using least-squares fitting of the synthetic higher mode seismograms to the data collected from the deep earthquakes. The three methods allow us to separate the anisotropy and its strength at different depths. We will report on our shear-wave splitting and higher mode results, and their comparison, and present evidence that anisotropy under Mexico is of deep origin.

  13. Shear Horizontal Wave Propagation Speed in Mylar Sheet and Coated Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, M.; Karppinen, T.; Hæggström, E.; Stor-Pellinen, J.

    2006-03-01

    Soft plate-like membranes find application e.g. as pill or paper coatings, bio-filter membranes, and gas seals in food products. For these applications the integrity and the mechanical properties of the membrane are important. Mechanical properties of these products can be determined by stretching or bending tests, but such methods can damage these fragile products. We propose a rapid nondestructive acoustic method to estimate mechanical film characteristics with shear horizontal (in-plane shear) waves. A 23 kHz, 1-cycle square signal was excited into a thin foil with a piezoceramic pickup and received with an inductive pickup. The SNR (power) was 20 dB in 1 kHz -50 kHz bandwidth. This actuation-detection scheme can be used to excite in-plane longitudinal, shear and even elliptic waves in a thin foil. The method was validated by measuring in-plane shear wave and longitudinal wave time-of-flight TOF at different actuator-receiver separations and calculating the corresponding longitudinal and shear modulus. The samples were Mylar® sheet and coated paper. The anisotropy of MOE for Mylar sheet was close to the manufacturer specifications. For coated paper a maximum shear modulus anisotropy of 5% and a shear modulus dependence on temperature of 0.7 MPa/°C were found. Laser doppler vibrometry showed that the excited waves were confined in-plane.

  14. Research on measurement of bed shear stress under wave-current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Xia, Yun-feng; Ma, Bing-he; Hao, Si-yu; Zhang, Shi-zhao; Du, De-jun

    2015-06-01

    The movement of sediment in estuary and on coast is directly restricted by the bed shear stress. Therefore, the research on the basic problem of sediment movement by the bed shear stress is an important way to research the theory of sediment movement. However, there is not a measuring and computing method to measure the bed shear stress under a complicated dynamic effect like wave and current. This paper describes the measurement and test research on the bed shear stress in a long launder of direct current by the new instrument named thermal shearometer based on micro-nanotechnology. As shown by the research results, the thermal shearometer has a high response frequency and strong stability. The measured results can reflect the basic change of the bed shear stress under wave and wave-current effect, and confirm that the method of measuring bed shear stress under wave-current effect with thermal shearometer is feasible. Meanwhile, a preliminary method to compute the shear stress compounded by wave-current is put forward according to the tested and measured results, and then a reference for further study on the basic theory of sediment movement under a complicated dynamic effect is provided.

  15. Seismic wavefield propagation in 2D anisotropic media: Ray theory versus wave-equation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Hu, Guang-yi; Zhang, Yan-teng; Li, Zhong-sheng

    2014-05-01

    Despite the ray theory that is based on the high frequency assumption of the elastic wave-equation, the ray theory and the wave-equation simulation methods should be mutually proof of each other and hence jointly developed, but in fact parallel independent progressively. For this reason, in this paper we try an alternative way to mutually verify and test the computational accuracy and the solution correctness of both the ray theory (the multistage irregular shortest-path method) and the wave-equation simulation method (both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method) in anisotropic VTI and TTI media. Through the analysis and comparison of wavefield snapshot, common source gather profile and synthetic seismogram, it is able not only to verify the accuracy and correctness of each of the methods at least for kinematic features, but also to thoroughly understand the kinematic and dynamic features of the wave propagation in anisotropic media. The results show that both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method are able to yield the same results even for complex anisotropic media (such as a fault model); the multistage irregular shortest-path method is capable of predicting similar kinematic features as the wave-equation simulation method does, which can be used to mutually test each other for methodology accuracy and solution correctness. In addition, with the aid of the ray tracing results, it is easy to identify the multi-phases (or multiples) in the wavefield snapshot, common source point gather seismic section and synthetic seismogram predicted by the wave-equation simulation method, which is a key issue for later seismic application.

  16. Sketches of a hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasbrouck, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Generation of shear waves in shallow seismic investigations (those to depths usually less than 100 m) can be accomplished by horizontally striking with a hammer either the end of a wood plank or metal structure embedded at the ground surface. The dimensioned sketches of this report are of a steel, hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source. It has been used on outcrops and in a desert environment and for conducting experiments on the effect of rotating source direction.

  17. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  18. A centre manifold approach to solitary waves in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, W. B.; Velarde, M. G.

    The centre manifold approach is used to derive an approximate equation for nonlinear waves propagating in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer. The evolution equation matches limiting forms derived by other methods, including the inviscid, long wave approximation leading to the Korteweg- deVries equation. The model given here allows large modulations of the height of the waveguide. This permits the crude modelling of shear layer instabilities at the upper material surface of the waveguide which excite solitary internal waves in the waveguide. An energy argument is used to support the existence of these waves.

  19. Shear wave velocity estimation in the metropolitan area of Málaga (S Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavero, D.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; López-Casado, C.; Delgado, J.; Galiana-Merino, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    We carry out a seismic noise study based on array measurements at three sites in the Málaga basin, South Spain, for the further estimation of shear wave velocity profiles. For this purpose, we use both the H/V method and the f-k technique in order to characterize the different materials present in the zone, i.e., Quaternary sediments and Pliocene sedimentary rocks above the bedrock. The H/V analysis shows frequency peaks going from 1 Hz, in areas close to the border of the basin, to 0.3 Hz in places located toward the center of the formation. The f-k analysis allows obtaining the dispersion curves associated with each site and subsequently, estimating the Vs profiles by inversion of the respective group velocities. In this way, the basin basement can be characterized by S-wave velocities greater than 2000 m/s. Regarding the basin fill, it is divided into three layers defined by different wave velocity intervals. The shallowest one is featured by velocities ranging from 150 to 400 m/s and comprises the Quaternary sediments, while velocities going from 550-700 to1200-1600 m/s characterize the two underlying layers composed by Pliocene sediments. Finally, the information provided by the three Vs profiles is integrated in a 2D cross-section of the basin to have a spatial view of its sedimentary structure. The results obtained here, in addition to providing useful information about the infill of the basin near the metropolitan area of Málaga, will be very helpful for future seismic zonation studies in the region.

  20. Linking the viscous grain-shearing mechanism of wave propagation in marine sediments to fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vikash; Holm, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    An analogy is drawn between the diffusion-wave equations derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model and those obtained from Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] of wave propagation in saturated, unconsolidated granular materials. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional wave equation and shear wave equation derived from the GS model turn out to be the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative wave equation and the fractional diffusion-wave equation respectively. Also, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional-order present in the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative wave equation and time-fractional diffusion-wave equation is inferred from the GS model. The shear wave equation from the GS model predicts both diffusion and wave propagation in the fractional framework. The overall goal is intended to show that fractional calculus is not just a mathematical framework which can be used to curve-fit the complex behavior of materials, but rather it can be justified from real physical process of grain-shearing as well.

  1. Simulations of P-SV wave scattering due to cracks by the 2-D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuji; Shiina, Takahiro; Kawahara, Jun; Okamoto, Taro; Miyashita, Kaoru

    2013-12-01

    We simulate P-SV wave scattering by 2-D parallel cracks using the finite difference method (FDM). Here, special emphasis is put on simplicity; we apply a standard FDM (second-order velocity-stress scheme with a staggered grid) to media including traction-free, infinitesimally thin cracks, which are expressed in a simple manner. As an accuracy test of the present method, we calculate the displacement discontinuity along an isolated crack caused by harmonic waves using the method, which is compared with the corresponding results based on a reliable boundary integral equation method. The test resultantly indicates that the present method yields sufficient accuracy. As an application of this method, we also simulate wave propagation in media with randomly distributed cracks. We experimentally determine the attenuation and velocity dispersion induced by scattering from the synthetic seismograms, using a waveform averaging technique. It is shown that the results are well explained by a theory based on the Foldy approximation, if the crack density is sufficiently low. The theory appears valid with a crack density up to at least 0.1 for SV wave incidence, whereas the validity limit appears lower for P wave incidence.

  2. Apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Forster, G.A.

    An apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers comprises a first planar surface for mounting the shear-wave transducer, a second planar surface inclined at a predetermined angle to the first surface to generate longitudinal waves by mode conversion, and a third planar surface disposed at a second predetermined angle to the first for mounting a longitudinal-wave ultransonic transducer. In an alternate embodiment, two second planar surfaces at the predetermined angle are placed at an angle to each other. The magnitude of the shear wave is a function of the angle between the direction of polarization of the transducer and the mode-conversion surface.

  3. Apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers comprises a first planar surface for mounting the shear-wave transducer, a second planar surface inclined at a predetermined angle to the first surface to generate longitudinal waves by mode conversion, and a third planar surface disposed at a second predetermined angle to the first for mounting a longitudinal-wave ultrasonic transducer. In an alternate embodiment, two second planar surfaces at the predetermined angle are placed at an angle to each other. The magnitude of the shear wave is a function of the angle between the direction of polarization of the transducer and the mode-conversion surface.

  4. Assessment of the Cervix in Pregnant Women Using Shear Wave Elastography: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Muller, Marie; Aït-Belkacem, Dora; Hessabi, Mahdieh; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Grangé, Gilles; Goffinet, François; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Cabrol, Dominique; Tanter, Mickaël; Tsatsaris, Vassilis

    2015-11-01

    The quantitative assessment of the cervix is crucial for the estimation of pre-term delivery risk and the prediction of the success of labor induction. We conducted a cross-sectional study using shear wave elastography based on the supersonic shear imaging technique. The shear wave speed (SWS) of the lower anterior part of the cervix was quantified over an 8-mm region of interest in 157 pregnant women. Cervical SWS is slightly but significantly reduced in patients diagnosed with pre-term labor and in patients who actually delivered pre-term. PMID:26278635

  5. Over-reflection of slow magnetosonic waves by homogeneous shear flow: Analytical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Z. D.; Maneva, Y. G.; Hristov, T. S.; Mishonov, T. M.

    2011-08-15

    We have analyzed the amplification of slow magnetosonic (or pseudo-Alfvenic) waves (SMW) in incompressible shear flow. As found here, the amplification depends on the component of the wave-vector perpendicular to the direction of the shear flow. Earlier numerical results are consistent with the general analytic solution for the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations, derived here for the model case of pure homogeneous shear (without Coriolis force). An asymptotically exact analytical formula for the amplification coefficient is derived for the case when the amplification is sufficiently large.

  6. Use of shear wave reflection amplitude in geotechnial investigations: new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.

    2003-04-01

    Shear waves are important to the geotechnical engineers because shear-wave velocity (V_S) offers the small-strain (˜10-6) rigidity (G_0) of the subsoil layers. G_0 is the key parameter used in evaluating the soil behaviour under any kind of dynamic loading e.g., vibrations, earthquakes, etc. Traditionally, the one-way traveltime of shear-wave is measured in a borehole as a function of depth, and the profile of in-situ G_o is obtained. As an alternative, the 1-D V_S structure is derived by the inversion of surface wave dispersion curves. In geotechnical engineering, surface seismic using shear waves has remained restricted to refraction surveys and some reflection works using large sledgehammer sources to map laterally the soil layers. The amplitude of shear waves has not yet been used in geotechnical site investigation. The difficulties to obtain reliable amplitudes of the shallow reflection events and the field acquisition challenges that are specific to shear-wave surveys have been the main obstacles. Recently, we have investigated the information potential of the shear-wave reflection amplitudes in the shallow subsoil, and evaluated the geotechnical merits. The use of an electromagnetic vibrator recently developed for generating high-frequency shear waves has been crucial to make breakthrough progress in our understanding of the potential of shear-wave reflections. Special attention has been paid to accurately monitor the amplitude and the phase of the shear-wave source. This, in turn, has allowed us to perform deterministic source signature deconvolution of the raw vibrograms. The resolution is significantly improved. Shot-to-shot variation is minimized. The receiver coupling effect still needs to be corrected for. However, once the source function is uniformly removed from the raw data, the amplitude information of the high-resolution reflection events reveal remarkable, new features of the subsoil that were otherwise not visible. Further, from the angle

  7. Shear Wave Velocity Imaging Using Transient Electrode Perturbation: Phantom and ex vivo Validation

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tomy; Madsen, Ernest L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new shear wave velocity imaging technique to monitor radio-frequency and microwave ablation procedures, coined electrode vibration elastography. A piezoelectric actuator attached to an ablation needle is transiently vibrated to generate shear waves that are tracked at high frame rates. The time-to-peak algorithm is used to reconstruct the shear wave velocity and thereby the shear modulus variations. The feasibility of electrode vibration elastography is demonstrated using finite element models and ultrasound simulations, tissue-mimicking phantoms simulating fully (phantom 1) and partially ablated (phantom 2) regions, and an ex vivo bovine liver ablation experiment. In phantom experiments, good boundary delineation was observed. Shear wave velocity estimates were within 7% of mechanical measurements in phantom 1 and within 17% in phantom 2. Good boundary delineation was also demonstrated in the ex vivo experiment. The shear wave velocity estimates inside the ablated region were higher than mechanical testing estimates, but estimates in the untreated tissue were within 20% of mechanical measurements. A comparison of electrode vibration elastography and electrode displacement elastography showed the complementary information that they can provide. Electrode vibration elastography shows promise as an imaging modality that provides ablation boundary delineation and quantitative information during ablation procedures. PMID:21075719

  8. Spin wave theory for 2D disordered hard-core bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Zúñiga, Juan Pablo Álvarez; Lemarié, Gabriel; Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2014-08-20

    A spin-wave (SW) approach for hard-core bosons is presented to treat the problem of two dimensional boson localization in a random potential. After a short review of the method to compute 1/S-corrected observables, the case of random on-site energy is discussed. Whereas the mean-field solution does not display a Bose glass (BG) phase, 1/S corrections do capture BG physics. In particular, the localization of SW excitations is discussed through the inverse participation ratio.

  9. Unusually large shear wave anisotropy for chlorite in subduction zone settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David

    2014-03-01

    Using first principle simulations we calculated the elasticity of chlorite. At a density ρ~ 2.60 g cm-3, the elastic constant tensor reveals significant elastic anisotropy: VP ~27%, VS1 ~56%, and VS2 ~43%. The shear anisotropy is exceptionally large for chlorite and enhances upon compression. Upon compression, the shear elastic constant component C44 and C55 decreases, whereas C66 shear component stiffens. The softening in C44 and C55 is reflected in shear modulus, G, and the shear wave velocity, VS. Our results on elastic anisotropy at conditions relevant to the mantle wedge indicates that a 10-20 km layer of hydrated peridotite with serpentine and chlorite could account for the observed shear polarization anisotropy and associated large delay times of 1-2 s observed in some subduction zone settings. In addition, chlorite could also explain the low VP/VS ratios that have been observed in recent high-resolution seismological studies.

  10. Global Subducting Slab Entrainment of Oceanic Asthenosphere: Re-examination of Sub-Slab Shear-Wave Splitting Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T.; Liu, L.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic asthenosphere is characterized as a low seismic velocity, low viscosity, and strongly anisotropic channel separating from the oceanic lithosphere through a sharp shear wave velocity contrast. It has been a great challenge to reconcile all these observations and ultimately illuminate the fate of oceanic asthenosphere near convergent plate margins. Sub-slab shear wave splitting patterns are particularly useful to address the fate of oceanic asthenosphere since they are directly linked to deformation induced by the mantle flow beneath the subducting slab. To address slab entrainment of oceanic asthenosphere through shear wave splitting, it is important to recognize that oceanic asthenosphere is characterized by azimuthal anisotropy (1-3%) as well as strong P wave and S wave radial anisotropy (3-7%) for horizontally travelling P wave (VPH > VPV) and S wave (VSH > VSV), making it effectively an orthorhombic medium. Here we show that entrained asthenosphere predicts sub-slab SKS splitting pattern, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-normal under shallow subduction zones to predominantly trench-parallel under relatively steep subduction zones. This result can be recognized by the 90 degrees shift in the polarization of the fast wave at about 20 degrees incident angle, where VSH equals to VSV forming a classical point singularity (Crampin, 1991). The thickness of the entrained asthenosphere is estimated to be on the order of 100 km, which predicts SKS splitting time varying from 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds. After briefly discussing improvement of the millefeuille model (Kawakatsu et al. 2009) of the asthenosphere upon this new constraint and long wave Backus averaging of orthorhombic solid and melt, we will illustrate that, in the range of observed trench migration speed, dynamic models of 2-D mantle convection with temperature-dependent viscosity do support thick subducting slab entrainment of asthenosphere under ranges of

  11. Trapped Particles by Large-Amplitude Waves in 2D Yukawa Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Lujing; Piel, Alexander

    2008-09-07

    In an ordinary plasma, trapping of a particle of velocity {nu} occurs when its kinetic energy in the wave frame is smaller than the wave potential, i.e., when q{phi}{sub pp}>(1/2)m({nu}-{nu}{sub {phi}}){sup 2}. However, simulation with Brownian Dynamics method shows that the situation is quite different in a strongly-coupled complex plasma (SCCP), where trapping of a particle requires additional energy to overcome the potential barrier formed by all the other particles (the ''cage''), and the trapping condition then reads: q{phi}{sub pp}>(1/2)m({nu}-{nu}{sub {phi}}){sup 2}+{phi}{sub c}. It is found that, because of strong-coupling effect, the particle trapping has no direct connection with so-called ''resonant'' particles. Meanwhile, detrapping process becomes significant in SCCP, and all trapped particles have a finite trapping lifetime decaying exponentially with a rate related to its mean free path.

  12. Flexible 2D Crystals of Polycyclic Aromatics Stabilized by Static Distortion Waves

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxy of many organic films on inorganic substrates can be classified within the framework of rigid lattices which helps to understand the origin of energy gain driving the epitaxy of the films. Yet, there are adsorbate–substrate combinations with distinct mutual orientations for which this classification fails and epitaxy cannot be explained within a rigid lattice concept. It has been proposed that tiny shifts in atomic positions away from ideal lattice points, so-called static distortion waves (SDWs), are responsible for the observed orientational epitaxy in such cases. Using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we provide direct experimental evidence for SDWs in organic adsorbate films, namely hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene on graphite. They manifest as wave-like sub-Ångström molecular displacements away from an ideal adsorbate lattice which is incommensurate with graphite. By means of a density-functional-theory based model, we show that, due to the flexibility in the adsorbate layer, molecule–substrate energy is gained by straining the intermolecular bonds and that the resulting total energy is minimal for the observed domain orientation, constituting the orientational epitaxy. While structural relaxation at an interface is a common assumption, the combination of the precise determination of the incommensurate epitaxial relation, the direct observation of SDWs in real space, and their identification as the sole source of epitaxial energy gain constitutes a comprehensive proof of this effect. PMID:27014920

  13. Flexible 2D Crystals of Polycyclic Aromatics Stabilized by Static Distortion Waves.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Matthias; Sojka, Falko; Matthes, Lars; Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-07-26

    The epitaxy of many organic films on inorganic substrates can be classified within the framework of rigid lattices which helps to understand the origin of energy gain driving the epitaxy of the films. Yet, there are adsorbate-substrate combinations with distinct mutual orientations for which this classification fails and epitaxy cannot be explained within a rigid lattice concept. It has been proposed that tiny shifts in atomic positions away from ideal lattice points, so-called static distortion waves (SDWs), are responsible for the observed orientational epitaxy in such cases. Using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we provide direct experimental evidence for SDWs in organic adsorbate films, namely hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene on graphite. They manifest as wave-like sub-Ångström molecular displacements away from an ideal adsorbate lattice which is incommensurate with graphite. By means of a density-functional-theory based model, we show that, due to the flexibility in the adsorbate layer, molecule-substrate energy is gained by straining the intermolecular bonds and that the resulting total energy is minimal for the observed domain orientation, constituting the orientational epitaxy. While structural relaxation at an interface is a common assumption, the combination of the precise determination of the incommensurate epitaxial relation, the direct observation of SDWs in real space, and their identification as the sole source of epitaxial energy gain constitutes a comprehensive proof of this effect. PMID:27014920

  14. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  15. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  16. Shear wave polarization anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath Honshu, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamazaki, F.

    1983-07-10

    Shear wave polarization anisotropy in the wedge portion of the upper mantle between a subducting plate and the earth's surface is investigated using three-component seismograms of intermediate depth and deep earthquakes recorded at 14 local stations in Honshu, Japan. Eighty nine high-quality seismograms were selected from a period of 3 years. The data used in this study are restricted such that incidence angles are smaller than the critical angle of 30/sup 0/ to the earth's surface in order to avoid phase shifts in the shear wave train. To find directions of the maximum and minimum velocities in split shear waves, where shear waves are resolved into two phases with the maximum time separation, each set of the two horizontal component seismograms is rotated in the horizontal plane. The split shear waves thus obtained are again recombined after the correction of anisotropy, and the anisotropy-corrected particle motion is compared with the focal mechanism for a cross-check of the observed anisotropy. Directions of the maximum axes are plotted on azimuth-incidence angle stereograms at each station. The stereograms and the cross sections of seismic ray paths show that (1) the anisotropic material is distributed at intermediate locations between earthquake sources and receiving stations, and (2) the anisotropic region is separated into two parts: one in the north of the present study area with the polarization of the maximum velocity shear wave trending 0/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/ from the north (north anisotropy) and the other in the south with it trending 90/sup 0/ to 120/sup 0/ (south anisotropy). The maximum time delays between the two shear waves along a vertical seismic ray is about 1 s for both the anisotropic regions. The horizontal extent of the anisotropic area in the north is 50 km at depths of 50 to 150 km. perhaps prevalent in west Honshu.

  17. Rayleigh surface wave interaction with the 2D exciton Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Boev, M. V.; Kovalev, V. M.

    2015-06-15

    We describe the interaction of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW) traveling on the semiconductor substrate with the excitonic gas in a double quantum well located on the substrate surface. We study the SAW attenuation and its velocity renormalization due to the coupling to excitons. Both the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms of the SAW-exciton interaction are considered. We focus on the frequency and excitonic density dependences of the SAW absorption coefficient and velocity renormalization at temperatures both above and well below the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of the excitonic gas. We demonstrate that the SAW attenuation and velocity renormalization are strongly different below and above the critical temperature.

  18. Stability of Solitary Waves and Vortices in a 2D Nonlinear Dirac Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Saxena, Avadh; Comech, Andrew; Lan, Ruomeng

    2016-05-01

    We explore a prototypical two-dimensional massive model of the nonlinear Dirac type and examine its solitary wave and vortex solutions. In addition to identifying the stationary states, we provide a systematic spectral stability analysis, illustrating the potential of spinor solutions to be neutrally stable in a wide parametric interval of frequencies. Solutions of higher vorticity are generically unstable and split into lower charge vortices in a way that preserves the total vorticity. These conclusions are found not to be restricted to the case of cubic two-dimensional nonlinearities but are found to be extended to the case of quintic nonlinearity, as well as to that of three spatial dimensions. Our results also reveal nontrivial differences with respect to the better understood nonrelativistic analogue of the model, namely the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  19. Stability of Solitary Waves and Vortices in a 2D Nonlinear Dirac Model.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Saxena, Avadh; Comech, Andrew; Lan, Ruomeng

    2016-05-27

    We explore a prototypical two-dimensional massive model of the nonlinear Dirac type and examine its solitary wave and vortex solutions. In addition to identifying the stationary states, we provide a systematic spectral stability analysis, illustrating the potential of spinor solutions to be neutrally stable in a wide parametric interval of frequencies. Solutions of higher vorticity are generically unstable and split into lower charge vortices in a way that preserves the total vorticity. These conclusions are found not to be restricted to the case of cubic two-dimensional nonlinearities but are found to be extended to the case of quintic nonlinearity, as well as to that of three spatial dimensions. Our results also reveal nontrivial differences with respect to the better understood nonrelativistic analogue of the model, namely the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. PMID:27284659

  20. Wave propagation in a 2D nonlinear structural acoustic waveguide using asymptotic expansions of wavenumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Prakash, S.; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in an infinite rectangular waveguide is investigated. The upper boundary of this waveguide is a nonlinear elastic plate, whereas the lower boundary is rigid. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid with zero mean flow. The focus is restricted to non-planar modes having finite amplitudes. The approximate solution to the acoustic velocity potential of an amplitude modulated pulse is found using the method of multiple scales (MMS) involving both space and time. The calculations are presented up to the third order of the small parameter. It is found that at some frequencies the amplitude modulation is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The first objective here is to study the nonlinear term in the NLSE. The sign of the nonlinear term in the NLSE plays a role in determining the stability of the amplitude modulation. Secondly, at other frequencies, the primary pulse interacts with its higher harmonics, as do two or more primary pulses with their resultant higher harmonics. This happens when the phase speeds of the waves match and the objective is to identify the frequencies of such interactions. For both the objectives, asymptotic coupled wavenumber expansions for the linear dispersion relation are required for an intermediate fluid loading. The novelty of this work lies in obtaining the asymptotic expansions and using them for predicting the sign change of the nonlinear term at various frequencies. It is found that when the coupled wavenumbers approach the uncoupled pressure-release wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is stable. On the other hand, near the rigid-duct wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is unstable. Also, as a further contribution, these wavenumber expansions are used to identify the frequencies of the higher harmonic interactions. And lastly, the solution for the amplitude modulation derived through the MMS is validated using these asymptotic expansions.

  1. Integrating Shear-Wave Reflection and Resistivity Profiling to Improve Subsurface Characterization of Glacial Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T. H.; Ismail, A. M.; Thomason, J.; Curry, B.; Stumpf, A.; Dey, W.

    2012-12-01

    In Illinois, both high resolution seismic reflection and 2-D resistivity profiling have become fairly common tools for mapping glacial sediments. Over the past several years we have been using the two methods in combination to improve the characterization of these sediments and to refine geologic and hydrogeologic models. We demonstrate our approach with several case studies where high-resolution shear (S)-wave reflection and electrical resistivity profiling surveys were acquired at the same locations in northern and central Illinois. The two geophysical methods measure the mechanical and the electrical properties of these sediments in the subsurface which together improve our understanding of the sedimentary sequences and the underlying bedrock surface. We present results from measurements made along co-located geophysical lines which vary in length from 400 m to greater than 2300 m. Typically, the S-wave reflection profiles have greater vertical resolution and provide better imaging of depositional surfaces than the corresponding resistivity profiles. On the other hand, the resistivity profiles better express the horizontal variability within individual units compared to the reflection profiles. The reflection profiles more reliably image the bedrock surface, whereas the resistivity profiles are more sensitive to variations in moisture content, mineral content and cementation within the glacial sediments. Together, the overall geometry of depositional packages can be inferred from reflection surfaces, while compositional variations within those packages can be inferred from variations primarily in the resistivity data and secondarily in the seismic data. Geophysical and geological interpretations are constrained by core data and downhole geophysical data from boreholes located on or near the geophysical profiles.

  2. Rayleigh Wave and Shear Wave Tomography of Northeastern China: Results Coconstrained by Multiple Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Chen, J.; Han, J.; Tian, Y.; Wu, M.; Yang, Y.; Ning, J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate crustal and upper mantle phase velocity structures beneath NorthEastern China (NEC, 40°-54°N, 112°-135°E), a tectonically active region with continental volcanicity divided by active faults. Rayleigh wave phase velocity is obtained respectively by Ambient Noise Method (ANM, Lin et al., GJI, 2009), Two Station Method (TSM, Meier et al., GJI, 2004) and Two Plane Wave Method (TPWM, Yang and Forsyth, JGR, 2005), assuring good frequency coverage. Two-year' events with magnitude Ms>5.5 and epicentral distance Δ>30°recorded by NECESSArray and some permanent stations of CEA are together used in TPWM and TSM, while 1 s continuous seismic observations in the same period are employed in ANM. The period of Rayleigh wave phase velocity spans from 6 s to 150 s, i.e., from 6 s to 30 s (ANM); 30 s to 100 s (TPWM) and 30 s to 150 s (TSM). Shear wave velocity structure of the research region is obtained by Weighted Least Squares Inversion, in which the weight is adopted as function of data quality. Our results not only display close relation with tectonics of this region, such as mountains, sedimentary basins, faults, but also reveal variation feature of crustal thickness. Moreover, our results clearly show that all volcanos in this region have their roots — low velocity zones, among them the roots of Changbai, Jingbohu, Wudalianchi are obviously connected, while the biggest one of Daxinganling is separated. This feature might be result of an early intense eruption in western NEC and a late weak one in eastern NEC.

  3. Validation of recent shear wave velocity models in the United States with full-wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying; Shen, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Interpretations of dynamic processes and the thermal and chemical structure of the Earth depend on the accuracy of Earth models. With the growing number of velocity models constructed with different tomographic methods and seismic data sets, there is an increasing need for a systematic way to validate model accuracy and resolution. This study selects five shear wave velocity models in the U.S. and simulates full-wave propagation within the 3-D structures. Surface-wave signals extracted from ambient seismic noise and regional earthquakes are compared with synthetic waveforms at multiple-frequency bands. Phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between observed and synthetic waveforms allow us to compare and validate these models quantitatively. In general, measurements from regional earthquakes are consistent with ambient noise results, but appear more scattered, which may result from uncertainty of the earthquake source location, origin time, and moment tensor. Our results show the improvement of model prediction with the increase of seismic data sets and implement of advanced methods. There exists a positive linear trend between phase delay and interstation distance for three models, indicating that on average, these models are faster than the real Earth structure. The phase delays from the jointly inverted model of ambient noise and receiver function have negative means at all periods while without obvious dependence on the interstation distance. The full-wave ambient noise tomographic model predicts more accurate phase arrivals compared to other models. This study suggests a need for an integrated model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of anisotropy and attenuation.

  4. Estimation of shear wave velocity in gelatin phantoms utilizing PhS-SSOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manapuram, Ravi Kiran; Aglyamov, S.; Menodiado, F. M.; Mashiatulla, M.; Wang, Shang; Baranov, S. A.; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, S.; Larin, K. V.

    2012-09-01

    We report a method for measuring shear wave velocity in soft materials using phase stabilized swept source optical coherence tomography (PhS-SSOCT). Wave velocity was measured in phantoms with various concentrations of gelatin and therefore different stiffness. Mechanical waves of small amplitudes (˜10 μm) were induced by applying local mechanical excitation at the surface of the phantom. Using the phase-resolved method for displacement measurement described here, the wave velocity was measured at various spatially distributed points on the surface of the tissue-mimicking gelatin-based phantom. The measurements confirmed an anticipated increase in the shear wave velocity with an increase in the gelatin concentrations. Therefore, by combining the velocity measurements with previously reported measurements of the wave amplitude, viscoelastic mechanical properties of the tissue such as cornea and lens could potentially be measured.

  5. Changes in shear-wave splitting before volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Crampin, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    We have shown that observations of shear-wave splitting (SWS) monitor stress-accumulation and stress-relaxation before earthquakes which allows the time, magnitude, and in some circumstances fault-plane of impending earthquakes to be stress-forecast. (We call this procedure stress-forecasting rather than predicting or forecasting to emphasise the different formalism.) We have stress-forecast these parameters successfully three-days before a 1988 M5 earthquake in SW Iceland, and identified characteristic anomalies retrospectively before ~16 other earthquakes in Iceland and elsewhere. SWS monitors microcrack geometry and shows that microcracks are so closely spaced that they verge on fracturing and earthquakes. Phenomena verging on failure in this way are critical-systems with 'butterfly wings' sensitivity. Such critical-systems are very common. The Earth is an archetypal complex heterogeneous interactive phenomenon and must be expected to be a critical-system. We claim this critical system as a New Geophysics of a critically-microcracked rock mass. Such critical systems impose a range of fundamentally-new properties on conventional sub-critical physics/geophysics, one of which is universality. Consequently it is expected that we observe similar stress-accumulation and stress-relaxation before volcanic eruptions to those before earthquakes. There are three eruptions where appropriate changes in SWS have been observed similar to those observed before earthquakes. These are: the 1996 Gjálp fissure eruption, Vatnajökull, Iceland; a 2001 flank eruption on Mount Etna, Sicily (reported by Francesca Bianco, INGV, Naples); and the 2010 Eyjafjajökull ash-cloud eruption, SW Iceland. These will be presented in the same normalised format as is used before earthquakes. The 1996 Gjálp eruption showed a 2½-month stress-accumulation, and a ~1-year stress-relaxation (attributed to the North Atlantic Ridge adjusting to the magma injection beneath the Vatnajökull Ice Cap). The

  6. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  7. Joint Inversion for Bulk Sound and Shear Wave Velocity Heterogeneity Beneath the Mediterranean Plate Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, C.; van der Lee, S.; Giardini, D.

    2005-12-01

    We present new 3-D models for shear wave and compressional wave velocity anomalies for the mantle beneath the Mediterranean plate boundary region down to a depth of ~1500 km. These new models are based on a combined set of P and S body-wave arrival time data, which was measured by interstation cross-correlation. Stations used were from the MIDSEA deployment and permanent networks in the region. We invert these data jointly for bulk sound and shear wave velocity heterogeneity. The resulting models of P and S velocity heterogeneity are similar to each other. P wave velocity heterogeneity appears to be dominated by variations in shear modulus. We do not find evidence for large scale anti-correlation between bulk sound and shear wave velocity heterogeneity. We further constrain the mantle's S-velocity with regional S and surface waves and Moho detections. The Mediterranean region is substantially slower than the global average at shallow mantle depths and faster than average at transition zone depths. Our models show high velocities related to present and recent subduction northwards beneath the Hellenic trench, northwestwards beneath the Calabrian Arc, and a much shorter slab dipping southwestwards beneath the Apennines. Our models show somewhat surprising evidence of past subduction in the transition zone beneath the western Mediterranean and in the lower mantle beneath northeastern Africa. The only significantly slower region at transition zone depths is found beneath the Ionian Sea.

  8. The Shear Wave Velocity on Elastography Correlates with the Clinical Symptoms and Histopathological Features of Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Satoko; Yoshikawa, Katsuhiro; Katayama, Yasuhiro; Enoshiri, Tatsuki; Naitoh, Motoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Keloids present as red, painful lesions causing serious functional and cosmetic problems; however, there is no consensus regarding tools for objectively evaluating keloids. To demonstrate the utility of shear wave elastography in keloids, we investigated the correlations between clinical symptoms, ultrasound shear wave velocity, and histopathological findings. Methods: Three patients with keloids containing both red hypertrophic and mature areas were evaluated using the shear wave velocity and histopathological findings. Results: The results indicate that the shear wave velocity is high in active hypertrophic areas and low in mature areas. The areas with high elastography values exhibited numerous fibrillar collagenous matrices forming a whorled pattern with hyalinized tissue on hematoxylin-eosin staining corresponding with metachromasia on toluidine blue staining. In the mature area, the collagen fibers were oriented parallel to each other without metachromasia. Conclusions: Shear wave elastography provides quantitative estimates of tissue stiffness that correlate with the clinical symptoms and histopathological findings of the keloid lesions and can be used to assess the activity of keloids. PMID:26301153

  9. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  10. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  11. Visualizing ultrasonically-induced shear wave propagation using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for dynamic elastography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Huang, Zhihong; O’Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to detect and track temporally and spatially shear wave propagation within tissue induced by ultrasound radiation force. Kilohertz-range shear waves are remotely generated in sample using focused ultrasound emission and their propagation is tracked using PhS-OCT. Cross-sectional maps of the local shear modulus are reconstructed from local estimates of shear wave speed in tissue-mimicking phantoms. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining ultrasound radiation force and PhS-OCT to perform high-resolution mapping of the shear modulus. PMID:24562220

  12. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting.

  13. Shear wave identification near by shallow seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimír.; Živor, Roman

    2010-05-01

    Interference of P- and S-waves occurs during the first period of P-wave when the shallow seismic measurement is realized near the seismic source (the distance is less or equal to one P-wave wavelength). Polarization analysis method (particle motion) is suitable for the determination of S-wave arrival time in these conditions. Three component geophones are usually used in this case for the registration of seismic waves generated by a hammer blow. With regard to P- and S-waves polarization it is advantageous to orientate the three component orthogonal system of geophones so that separate components make an angle of 35.26° to horizontal plane (Galperin geophone configuration). Azimuth angle between separate components is 120° in this case. This configuration insures the equivalent gravity force moments affect all the three components in the same way. It is in the contrast to the standard arrangement of the three component geophone with two horizontal and one vertical component. The inclined arrangement results in equal frequency responses for all the three components. Phase and amplitude characteristics between the components should therefore be the same. This facilitates the S-wave arrival detection. An example of application of this method to the determination of seismic wave propagation velocity anisotropy is presented.

  14. Nonlinear electron acoustic waves in presence of shear magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-12-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied in a quasineutral plasma in the presence of a variable magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary positively charged ion background. Linear analysis of the governing equations manifests dispersion relation of electron magneto sonic wave. Whereas, nonlinear wave dynamics is being investigated by introducing Lagrangian variable method in long wavelength limit. It is shown from finite amplitude analysis that the nonlinear wave characteristics are well depicted by KdV equation. The wave dispersion arising in quasineutral plasma is induced by transverse magnetic field component. The results are discussed in the context of plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

  15. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Guyot, H.; Laubschat, C.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Asensio, M. C.

    2008-03-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (Tc = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below Tc). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities.

  16. A meshfree local RBF collocation method for anti-plane transverse elastic wave propagation analysis in 2D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Wang, Yuesheng; Sladek, Jan; Sladek, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a meshfree or meshless local radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is proposed to calculate the band structures of two-dimensional (2D) anti-plane transverse elastic waves in phononic crystals. Three new techniques are developed for calculating the normal derivative of the field quantity required by the treatment of the boundary conditions, which improve the stability of the local RBF collocation method significantly. The general form of the local RBF collocation method for a unit-cell with periodic boundary conditions is proposed, where the continuity conditions on the interface between the matrix and the scatterer are taken into account. The band structures or dispersion relations can be obtained by solving the eigenvalue problem and sweeping the boundary of the irreducible first Brillouin zone. The proposed local RBF collocation method is verified by using the corresponding results obtained with the finite element method. For different acoustic impedance ratios, various scatterer shapes, scatterer arrangements (lattice forms) and material properties, numerical examples are presented and discussed to show the performance and the efficiency of the developed local RBF collocation method compared to the FEM for computing the band structures of 2D phononic crystals.

  17. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  18. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speeds in compacted, polycrystalline ice lh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on laboratory measurements of compressional- and shear-wave speeds in a compacted, polycrystalline ice-Ih sample. The sample was made from triply distilled water that had been frozen into single crystal ice, ground into small grains, and sieved to extract the 180-250 ??m diameter fraction. Porosity was eliminated from the sample by compacting the granular ice between a hydraulically driven piston and a fixed end plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Based on simultaneous compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements, we calculated Poisson's ratio and compressional-wave, bulk, and shear moduli from -20 to -5??C and 22 to 33 MPa.

  19. Gravity shear waves atop the cirrus layer of intense convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobie, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent visual satellite photographs of certain intense convective storms have revealed concentric wave patterns. A model for the generation and growth of these waves is proposed. The proposed initial generating mechanism is similar to the effect noticed when a pebble is dropped into a calm pond. The penetration of the tropopause by overshooting convection is analogous to the pebble's penetration of the water's surface. The model for wave growth involves instability due to the wind shear resulting from the cirrus outflow. This model is based on an equation for the waves' phase speed which is similar to the Helmholtz equation. It, however, does not assume an incompressible atmosphere, but rather assumes density is a logarithmic function of height. Finally, the model is evaluated on the two mid-latitude and three tropical cases. The data indicate that shearing instability may be a significant factor in the appearance of these waves.

  20. Shear wave velocity and attenuation from pulse-echo studies of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Douglas H.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1994-06-01

    The pulse-echo spectral-ratio technique has been adapted to the determination of ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in sandstone at variable states of saturation and pressure. The method can measure shear attenuation coefficients in the range 0.5 dB/cm to 8 dB/cm to within +/- 0.5 dB/cm. For the Berea sandstone, this range corresponds to values of the shear quality factor Q(sub s) between 10 and 100. Spectra Q(sub s) show that between 600 and 1110 kHz, Q(sub s) decreases with frequency, particularly at high pressures (up to 70 MPa). Ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in a 90% water-saturated sample was intermediate between that for dry samples and the relatively high attenuation in fully saturated rock. Strong pressure dependence is seen in the shear attentuation for all saturation states, indicating a dominant role of dissipation mechanisms operating within open and compliant cracks. Substantial shear attenuation remains at the highest effective pressure applied to the saturated sample, which may be due to a more 'global' fluid-flow loss mechanism. Scattering losses as described by weak scattering theories for compressional waves, do not appear to be dominant at these frequencies.

  1. Wave modes in shear-deformed two-dimensional plasma crystals.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Röcker, T B; Couëdel, L; Nosenko, V; Du, C-R

    2015-06-01

    A theory of wave modes in shear-deformed two-dimensional plasma crystals is presented. Modification of the dispersion relations upon the pure and simple shear, and the resulting effect on the onset of the mode-coupling instability, are studied. In particular, it is explained why the velocity fluctuation spectra measured in experiments with sheared crystals exhibit asymmetric "hot spots": It is shown that the coupling of the in-plane compressional and the out-of-plane modes, leading to the formation of an unstable hybrid mode and generation of the hot spots, is enhanced in a certain direction determined by deformation. PMID:26172809

  2. Parallel-velocity-shear-modified drift wave in negative ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, R.; Kaneko, T.; Hayashi, K.; Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of a parallel velocity shear and negative ions on the collisionless drift wave instability has for the first time been realized by simultaneously using a segmented tungsten hot plate of a Q-machine and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas in a magnetized potassium plasma. The parallel velocity shear of the positive ion flow tends to decrease the fluctuation level of the drift wave. The introduction of negative ions first increases the fluctuation level and then starts to decrease it at the negative ion exchange fraction of around 10%, while keeping the above-mentioned shear effect qualitatively. In addition, a simple dispersion relation based on the local model has been calculated to show that it can predict wave characteristics similar to the experimental results. Our findings provide a potential for gaining a more profound insight into the physics of space/circumterrestrial plasmas.

  3. Imaging of Shear Waves Induced by Lorentz Force in Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, P.; Souchon, R.; Cartellier, F.; Zorgani, A.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Lafon, C.; Catheline, S.

    2014-07-01

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 μm. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  5. Effects of shallow density structure on the inversion for crustal shear wavespeeds in surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Guangchi; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-03-01

    Surface wave tomography routinely uses empirically scaled density model in the inversion of dispersion curves for shear wavespeeds of the crust and uppermost mantle. An improperly selected empirical scaling relationship between density and shear wavespeedcan lead to unrealistic density models beneath certain tectonic formations such as sedimentary basins. Taking the Sichuan basin east to the Tibetan plateau as an example, we investigate the differences between density profiles calculated from four scaling methods and their effects on Rayleigh wave phase velocities. Analytical equations for 1-D layered models and adjoint tomography for 3-D models are used to examine the tradeoff between density and S-wave velocity structures at different depth ranges. We demonstrate that shallow density structure can significantly influence phase velocities at short periods, and thereby affect the shear wavespeed inversion from phase velocity data. In particular, a deviation of 25% in the initial density model can introduce an error up to 5% in the inverted shear velocity at middle and lower crustal depths. Therefore one must pay enough attention in choosing a proper velocity-density scaling relationship in constructing initial density model in Rayleigh wave inversion for crustal shear velocity structure.

  6. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu-White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun-Yu; Yue, Cheng-Qi; Liang, Yi-Qiang; Song, Zhi-Xiang; Ling, Su; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu-White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu-White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu-White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand-clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu-White model for sand-clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu-White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu-White model.

  7. Improving the uniqueness of shear wave velocity profiles derived from the inversion of multiple-mode surface wave dispersion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supranata, Yosep Erwin

    One of the factors, which contributes to errors in shear wave velocity profile obtained from the inversion of surface wave dispersion data is non-uniqueness due to the limited number of field dispersion data. In this research, a new procedure is developed to improve the uniqueness of the shear wave velocity profile resulting from the inversion. A new forward modeling algorithm using the smallest absolute eigenvalue as the screening parameter to generate Rayleigh wave modes from a theoretical model is developed. The theoretical model adopted in this research is the Dynamic Stiffness Matrix. The results indicate that the new technique is more reliable than the traditional method using the determinant as the screening parameter. The performance of the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are evaluated in this research to determine the most suitable gradient method for surface wave inversion. Comparison of the performance of the two methods shows that the Levenberg-Marquardt method produces more accurate results than the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. An updated inversion technique which divides the inversion process into a number of stages, with each successive stage utilizing the shear wave velocities obtained from the previous stage as its initial model, is introduced. The number of stages is the same as the highest Rayleigh wave mode number, and the kth stage of the inversion utilizes the dispersion data from the 1st through kth modes. Shear wave velocities obtained from the updated inversion technique are more accurate than those obtained from the inversion procedure using an initial model constructed from fundamental mode dispersion data.

  8. On the kinetic dispersion for shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lysak, R.L.; Lotko, W.

    1996-03-01

    Kinetic Alfven waves have been invoked is association with auroral currents and particle acceleration since the pioneering work of Hasegawa. However, to date, no work has considered the dispersion relation including the full kinetic effects for both electrons and ions. Results from such a calculation are presented, with emphasis on the role of Landua damping in dissipating Alfven waves which propogate from the warm plasma of the outer magnetosphere to the cold plasma present in the ionosphere. It is found that the Landua damping is not important when the perpendicular wavelength is larger than the ion acoustic gyroradius and the electron inertial length. In addition, ion gyroradius effects lead to a reduction in the Landua damping by raising the parallel phase velocity of the wave above the electron thermal speed in the short perpendicular wavelength regime. These results indicate that low-frequency Alfven waves with perpendicular wavelengths greater than the order of 10 km when mapped to the ionosphere will not be significantly affected by Landau damping. While these results based on the local dispersion relation, are strictly valid only for short parallel wavelength Alfven waves, they do give an indication of the importance of Landua damping for longer parallel wavelength waves such as field line resonances. 26 refs., 5 fig.

  9. The effect of convection and shear on the damping and propagation of pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Barry Vincent

    Combustion instability is the positive feedback between heat release and pressure in a combustion system. Combustion instability occurs in the both air breathing and rocket propulsion devices, frequently resulting in high amplitude spinning waves. If unchecked, the resultant pressure fluctuations can cause significant damage. Models for the prediction of combustion instability typically include models for the heat release, the wave propagation and damping. Many wave propagation models for propulsion systems assume negligible flow, resulting in the wave equation. In this research the effect of flow on wave propagation was studied both numerically and experimentally. Two experiential rigs were constructed, one with axial flow to study the longitudinal waves, the other with swirling flow to study circumferential waves. The rigs were excited with speakers and the resultant pressure was measured simultaneously at many locations. Models of the rig were also developed. Equations for wave propagation were derived from the Euler Equations. The resultant resembled the wave equation with three additional terms, two for the effect of the convection and a one for the effect of shear of the mean flow on wave propagation. From the experimental and numerical data several conclusions were made. First, convection and shear both act as damping on the wave propagation, reducing the magnitude of the Frequency Response Function and the resonant frequency of the modes. Second, the energy extracted from the mean flow as a result of turbulent shear for a given condition is frequency dependent, decreasing with increasing frequency. The damping of the modes, measured for the same shear flow, also decreased with frequency. Finally, the two convective terms cause the anti-nodes of the modes to no longer be stationary. For both the longitudinal and circumferential waves, the anti-nodes move through the domain even for mean flow Mach numbers less than 0.10. It was concluded that convection

  10. Fracture characterization at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility using shear-wave anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, S.A.; MacBeth, C.D.; Queen, J.; Rizer, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two multi-component near-offset VSP experiments are used, in conjunction with borehole data, to characterise the subsurface fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma. Time delays between the fast and slow split shear-waves are observed to correlate with the heavily fractured sandstone formations. Inversion of the shear-wave splitting estimates is achieved using a Genetic Algorithm which incorporates an anisotropic ray tracing scheme. The inversion results suggest that the fracture orientation is sub-vertical. A method of determining fracture dip using an opposite azimuth VSP method is suggested.

  11. Grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2014-07-01

    The author has shown that measured shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand can be predicted by using a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) [Kimura, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 144-155 (2013)]. In this study, the grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes is measured and calculated. As a result, the grain-size dependence of the aspect ratio in the BIMGS model can be validated and the effects of multiple scattering for larger grain sizes are demonstrated. PMID:24993238

  12. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers. PMID:27106346

  13. In-vitro quantification of rat liver viscoelasticity with shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-rong; Chen, Xin; Lin, Haoming; Zhang, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    As a new imaging method for tissue mechanical properties, ultrasound elastography has always been the research focus in the field of medical ultrasound imaging ever since it has been proposed. This paper developed an ultrasound viscoelasticity measurement system based on shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV). This system applied acoustic radiation force to excite harmonic vibration in soft tissue. The propagation of the shear wave induced by the vibration was detected and the tissue viscoelasticity properties were calculated. Based on this system, rat livers were measured in vitro. The results shows that the system can measure the viscoelasticity reliably, offering a potential alternative to diagnosis of liver fibrosis. PMID:24110087

  14. Nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a 2D magnetic X-point: oscillatory reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; De Moortel, I.; Hood, A. W.; Brady, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This paper extends the models of Craig & McClymont (1991, ApJ, 371, L41) and McLaughlin & Hood (2004, A&A, 420, 1129) to include finite β and nonlinear effects. Aims: We investigate the nature of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves about a 2D magnetic X-point. Methods: We solve the compressible and resistive MHD equations using a Lagrangian remap, shock capturing code (Arber et al. 2001, J. Comp. Phys., 171, 151) and consider an initial condition in {v}×{B} \\cdot {hat{z}} (a natural variable of the system). Results: We observe the formation of both fast and slow oblique magnetic shocks. The nonlinear wave deforms the X-point into a “cusp-like” point which in turn collapses to a current sheet. The system then evolves through a series of horizontal and vertical current sheets, with associated changes in connectivity, i.e. the system exhibits oscillatory reconnection. Our final state is non-potential (but in force balance) due to asymmetric heating from the shocks. Larger amplitudes in our initial condition correspond to larger values of the final current density left in the system. Conclusions: The inclusion of nonlinear terms introduces several new features to the system that were absent from the linear regime. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Guided torsional wave generation of a linear in-plane shear piezoelectric array in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wensong; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Shi, Tonglu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical guided waves based techniques are effective and promising tools for damage detection in long pipes. The essential operations are generation and reception of guided waves in the structures utilizing transducers. A novel in-plane shear (d36 type) PMNT wafer is proposed to generate and receive the guided wave, especially the torsional waves, in metallic pipes. In contrast to the traditional wafer, this wafer will directly introduce in-plane shear deformation when electrical field is conveniently applied through its thickness direction. A single square d36 PMNT wafer is bonded on the surface of the pipe positioned collinearly with its axis, when actuated can predominantly generate torsional (T) waves along the axial direction, circumferential shear horizontal (C-SH) waves along circumferential direction, and other complex cylindrical Lamb-like wave modes along other helical directions simultaneously. While a linear array of finite square size d36 PMNT wafers was equally spaced circumferentially, when actuated simultaneously can nearly uniform axisymmetric torsional waves generate in pipes and non-symmetric wave modes can be suppressed greatly if the number of the d36 PMNT wafer is sufficiently large. This paper first presents the working mechanism of the linear d36 PMNT array from finite element analysis (FEA) by examining the constructive and destructive displacement wavefield phenomena in metallic pipes. Furthermore, since the amplitude of the received fundamental torsional wave signal strongly depends on frequency, a series of experiments are conducted to determine the frequency tuning curve for the torsional wave mode. All results indicate the linear d36 PMNT array has potential for efficiently generating uniform torsional wavefield of the fundamental torsional wave mode, which is more effective in monitoring structural health in metallic pipes. PMID:26548525

  16. Shear wave velocity and attenuation structure for the shallow crust of the southern Korean peninsula from short period Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heeok; Jang, Yong-seok; Lee, Jung Mo; Moon, Wooil M.; Baag, Chang-Eob; Kim, Ki Young; Jo, Bong Gon

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the short period Rayleigh waves from the first crustal-scale seismic refraction experiment in the Korean peninsula, KCRUST2002, to determine the shear wave velocity and attenuation structure of the uppermost 1 km of the crust in different tectonic zones of the Korean peninsula and to examine if this can be related to the surface geology of the study area. The experiment was conducted with two large explosive sources along a 300-km long profile in 2002. The seismic traces, recorded on 170 vertical-component, 2-Hz portable seismometers, show distinct Rayleigh waves in the period range between 0.2 s and 1.2 s, which are easily recognizable up to 30-60 km from the sources. The seismic profiles, which traverse three tectonic regions (Gyeonggi massif, Okcheon fold belt and Yeongnam massif), were divided into five subsections based on tectonic boundaries as well as lithology. Group and phase velocities for the five subsections obtained by a continuous wavelet transform method and a slant stack method, respectively, were inverted for the shear wave models. We obtained shear wave velocity models up to a depth of 1.0 km. Overall, the shear wave velocity of the Okcheon fold belt is lower than that of the Gyeonggi and Yeongnam massifs by ˜ 0.4 km/s in the shallowmost 0.2 km and by 0.2 km/s at depths below 0.2 km. Attenuation coefficients, determined from the decay of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, were used to obtain the shear wave attenuation structures for three subsections (one for each of the three different tectonic regions). We obtained an average value of Qβ- 1 in the upper 0.5 km for each subsection. Qβ- 1 for the Okcheon fold belt (˜ 0.026) is approximately three times larger than Qβ- 1 for the massif areas (˜ 0.008). The low shear wave velocity in the Okcheon fold belt is consistent with the high attenuation in this region.

  17. Effect of two ion species on the propagation of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, S. T.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2010-05-15

    The results of a theoretical modeling study and experimental investigation of the propagation properties of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale in a plasma with two ion species are reported. In the two ion plasma, depending on the mass of the heavier species, ion kinetic effects can become prominent, and significant parallel electric fields result in electron acceleration. The theory predicts the appearance of frequency propagation gaps at the ion-ion hybrid frequency and between harmonics of the lower cyclotron frequency. Within these frequency bands spatial structures arise that mix the cone-propagation characteristics of Alfven waves with radially expanding ion Bernstein modes. The experiments, performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BaPSF) at UCLA, consist of the spatial mapping of shear waves launched by a loop antenna. Although a variety of two ion-species combinations were explored, only results from a helium-neon mix are reported. A clear signature of a shear wave propagation gap, as well as propagation between multiple harmonics, is found for this gas combination. The evanescence of shear waves beyond the reflection point at the ion-ion hybrid frequency in the presence of an axial magnetic field gradient is also documented.

  18. Measurement of mechanical properties of homogeneous tissue with ultrasonically induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2007-03-01

    Fundamental mechanical properties of tissue are altered by many diseases. Regional and systemic diseases can cause changes in tissue properties. Liver stiffness is caused by cirrhosis and fibrosis. Vascular wall stiffness and tone are altered by smoking, diabetes and other diseases. Measurement of tissue mechanical properties has historically been done with palpation. However palpation is subjective, relative, and not quantitative or reproducible. Elastography in which strain is measured due to stress application gives a qualitative estimate of Young's modulus at low frequency. We have developed a method that takes advantage of the fact that the wave equation is local and shear wave propagation depends only on storage and loss moduli in addition to density, which does not vary much in soft tissues. Our method is called shearwave dispersion ultrasonic velocity measurement (SDUV). The method uses ultrasonic radiation force to produce repeated motion in tissue that induces shear waves to propagate. The shear wave propagation speed is measured with pulse echo ultrasound as a function of frequency of the shear wave. The resulting velocity dispersion curve is fit with a Voight model to determine the elastic and viscous moduli of the tissue. Results indicate accurate and precise measurements are possible using this "noninvasive biopsy" method. Measurements in beef along and across the fibers are consistent with the literature values.

  19. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: a New Method to Measure in-vivo Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an elastography method to measure localized viscoelastic properties of tendon and to present initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction specific wave speeds were calculated using Local Frequency Estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel wise curve-fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels to those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as function of frequency that highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon showed that it is feasible to quantify local viscoeasltic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon showed a substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential of evaluating localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties due to injury and during recovery in a clinical setting. PMID:25796414

  20. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  1. Planar shear horizontal guided wave inspection of a plate using piezoelectric fiber transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soorgee, M. H.; Lissenden, C. J.; Rose, J. L.; Yousefi-Koma, A.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Shear Horizontal (SH0) guided waves have been simulated using finite element software in order to locate a crack in a plate structure. Long but narrow piezoelectric fiber composite strips have been considered as transducers to excite and receive SH guided waves. A segmented transducer, which enables piecewise sensing, has been shown by finite element analysis to be capable of locating a tiny through-thickness crack. The main benefits are that SH waves could be used to inspect fluid loaded structures and that it is possible to detect a crack oriented parallel to the wave vector.

  2. Turbulence generation by mountain wave breaking in flows with directional wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria Guarino, Maria; Teixeira, Miguel A. C.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, wave breaking, and the potential for the generation of turbulence in the atmosphere, is investigated using high-resolution numerical simulations of idealized atmospheric flows with directional wind shear over a three-dimensional isolated mountain. These simulations, which use the WRF-ARW model, differ in degree of flow non-linearity and directional wind shear intensity, quantified through the dimensionless mountain height and the Richardson number of the incoming flow. The aim is to predict wave breaking occurrence based on large-scale variables. The simulation results have been used to produce a regime diagram representing a description of wave breaking behavior in parameter space. By selecting flow overturning occurrence as a discriminating factor, it was possible to split the regime diagram in two sub-regions representing: a non-wave breaking regime and a wave breaking regime. The regime diagram shows that in the presence of directional shear wave breaking may occur over lower mountains that in a constant-wind case. When mountain waves break, the associated convective instability can lead to turbulence generation (known as Clear Air Turbulence or CAT in a non-cloudy atmosphere), thus, regions within the simulation domain where wave breaking and potential development of CAT are expected have been identified. The extent of these regions is variable and increases with the background shear intensity. In contrast with constant-wind flows, where wave breaking occurs in the stream-wise direction aligned with the mountain, for the helical wind profiles considered in this study as prototypes of flows with directional wind shear, flow overturning regions have a more three-dimensional geometry. The analysis of the model outputs, supported by theoretical arguments, suggest the existence of a link between wave breaking and the relative orientation of the incoming wind vector and the horizontal velocity perturbation vector. In particular, in a wave breaking

  3. Modeling of magnetoelastic shear waves due to point source in a viscoelastic crustal layer over an inhomogeneous viscoelastic half space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Pato; Sharma, Vikash Kumar; Modi, Chitra

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, propagation of magnetoelastic shear wave due to a momentary point source in a viscoelastic crustal layer over inhomogeneous viscoelastic half space has been discussed. Green's function technique and Fourier transform along with method of successive approximation are used to find the closed-form solutions for displacement and generalized shear wave period equation. Attenuation of the resultant shear wave is computed and effects of magnetic field, width of the layer, complex wave number, viscosity, and inhomogeneity parameters are distinctly marked on dissipation curves using two-dimensional and surface plots. It is found that effect of layer's magnetoelastic coupling parameter on attenuation pattern of shear wave is just the reverse of half space magnetoelastic coupling parameter. Similarly, internal friction of layer has somewhat different effect on shear wave angular frequency than lower half space viscosity. Certain published results are also derived as special cases to the present study.

  4. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezoe, R. Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  5. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Kyle S. Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-28

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic.

  6. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  7. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, R. J.; Clayton, E. H.; Bayly, P. V.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed-form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical 'phantoms' of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100-400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier's equation using a total least-squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G' (Re[G*]) and loss modulus G'' (Im[G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20-200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G' increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100-400 Hz, n = 6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06-0.14 (20-200 Hz, DST) and 0.11-0.23 (100-400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE.

  8. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, R J; Clayton, E H; Bayly, P V

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed-form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical 'phantoms' of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100-400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier's equation using a total least-squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G' (Re[G*]) and loss modulus G″ (Im[G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20-200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G' increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100-400 Hz, n = 6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06-0.14 (20-200 Hz, DST) and 0.11-0.23 (100-400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE. PMID:21908903

  9. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: a comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, RJ; Clayton, EH; Bayly, PV

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical “phantoms” of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100 to 400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier’s equation using a total least squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G′ (Re[G*]) and loss modulus, G″ (Im [G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20 – 200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G′ increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100–400 Hz, n=6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06 to 0.14 (20 – 200 Hz, DST) and 0.1 to 0.23 (100 – 400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE. PMID:21908903

  10. The barotropic normal modes in certain shear flows and the traveling waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping

    1993-01-01

    It is shown analytically and numerically that in certain shear flows the linearized nondivergent barotropic vorticity equation has a limited number of neutral normal modes. The latitudinal structures of these shear flows can be expressed as polynomials of the sine of latitude. The first few such shear flows resemble the gross features of the zonal winds in the atmosphere of the earth at different times and altitudes. The spatial structures of the neutral normal modes in these shear flows are spherical harmonics, and, as a consequence, these modes are also the exact solutions of the fully nonlinear equation because the nonlinear interaction term vanishes identically. The spatial structures of the observed 5-, 4-, 2-, and 16-day free traveling waves in the atmosphere are often identified with the spherical harmonics with indices of (m, n) = ( 1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 3), and ( 1, 4), which are known previously as the neutral normal modes of the nondivergent barotropic vorticity equation in a motionless background state. Our results could explain why these free traveling waves can survive the shearing effects of zonal flows that are far different from rest because these spherical harmonics are also normal modes in certain shear flows that resemble the observations of the atmosphere.

  11. Imaging shear wave propagation for elastic measurement using OCT Doppler variance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Miao, Yusi; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) method for the visualization of the shear wave and the calculation of the shear modulus based on the OCT Doppler variance method. The vibration perpendicular to the OCT detection direction is induced by the remote acoustic radiation force (ARF) and the shear wave propagating along the OCT beam is visualized by the OCT M-scan. The homogeneous agar phantom and two-layer agar phantom are measured using the ARFOE-OCE system. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to measure the shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth. The OCT Doppler variance method, instead of the OCT Doppler phase method, is used for vibration detection without the need of high phase stability and phase wrapping correction. An M-scan instead of the B-scan for the visualization of the shear wave also simplifies the data processing.

  12. Compressional and shear wave velocities in granular materials to 2.5 kilobars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, P.; Nur, A.; Kovach, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The velocities of seismic compressional waves and, for the first time, shear wave velocities in silica sand, volcanic ash, and basalt powder were determined under hydrostatic confining pressures to 2.5 kb. Simultaneously, the porosity of these materials was obtained as a function of confining pressure. The presented results have important implications for the self-compaction hypothesis that has been postulated to explain the lunar near-surface seismic velocity variation.

  13. Guided Lamb wave based 2-D spiral phased array for structural health monitoring of thin panel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byungseok

    2011-12-01

    In almost all industries of mechanical, aerospace, and civil engineering fields, structural health monitoring (SHM) technology is essentially required for providing the reliable information of structural integrity of safety-critical structures, which can help reduce the risk of unexpected and sometimes catastrophic failures, and also offer cost-effective inspection and maintenance of the structures. State of the art SHM research on structural damage diagnosis is focused on developing global and real-time technologies to identify the existence, location, extent, and type of damage. In order to detect and monitor the structural damage in plate-like structures, SHM technology based on guided Lamb wave (GLW) interrogation is becoming more attractive due to its potential benefits such as large inspection area coverage in short time, simple inspection mechanism, and sensitivity to small damage. However, the GLW method has a few critical issues such as dispersion nature, mode conversion and separation, and multiple-mode existence. Phased array technique widely used in all aspects of civil, military, science, and medical industry fields may be employed to resolve the drawbacks of the GLW method. The GLW-based phased array approach is able to effectively examine and analyze complicated structural vibration responses in thin plate structures. Because the phased sensor array operates as a spatial filter for the GLW signals, the array signal processing method can enhance a desired signal component at a specific direction while eliminating other signal components from other directions. This dissertation presents the development, the experimental validation, and the damage detection applications of an innovative signal processing algorithm based on two-dimensional (2-D) spiral phased array in conjunction with the GLW interrogation technique. It starts with general backgrounds of SHM and the associated technology including the GLW interrogation method. Then, it is focused on the

  14. Shear-wave velocity variation in jointed rock: an attempt to measure tide-induced variations

    SciTech Connect

    Beem, L.I.

    1987-08-01

    The use of the perturbation of seismic wave velocities by solid earth tides as a possible method of exploration for fractured media is discussed. Velocity of compressional seismic waves in fractured homogeneous rock has been observed to vary through solid earth tide cycles by a significant 0.5-0.9%. This variation of seismic velocities may be attributed to the opening and closing of joints by tidal stresses. In an attempt to see if shear-wave velocities show a similar velocity variation, a pneumatic shear-wave generator was used for the source. The 5 receivers, 3-component, 2.0 Hz, moving-coil geophones, were connected to a GEOS digital recorder. The two receivers located 120 m and 110 m from the source showed large shear-to-compression amplitude ratio and a high signal-to-noise ratio. A glaciated valley was chosen for the experiment site, since topography is flat and the granodiorite is jointed by a set of nearly orthogonal vertical joints, with superimposed horizontal sheeting joints. A slight velocity variation was noted in the first 200 consecutive firings; after which, the amplitude of the shear-wave begun to increase. This increase has been attributed to the compacting of the soil beneath the shear-wave generator (SWG). In the future, the soil will be compacted prior to placing the SWG or the SWG will be coupled directly to the rock to alleviate the amplitude fluctuation problem. This research may have application in exploration for fracture permeability in the rock mass between existing wells, by measuring seismic velocities from well to well through the tidal cycle.

  15. Development of a low frequency shear horizontal piezoelectric transducer for the generation of plane SH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Guillaume; Viens, Martin; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The shear horizontal guided wave fundamental mode (SH0) has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive plate guided wave mode. This characteristic makes this ultrasonic guided wave mode very attractive in non-destructive testing, facilitating signal processing for long range inspections. It is, however, difficult to generate only a single guided wave mode when using piezoelectric transduction. This work aims to develop a piezoelectric transducer capable of generating a virtually pure plane zeroth order shear horizontal wave. The chosen material was the PZT-5H for its dominant d15 piezoelectric constant, which makes it a perfect candidate for SH-wave generation. The transducer dimensions were optimised using an analytical model based on the Huygens' principle of superposition and the dipole pattern of a shear point source. A 3D multiphysics finite element model was then used to validate the analytical model results. Experimental validation was finally conducted with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system. Excellent agreement between the analytical model, finite element model and experimental validation was seen.

  16. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-07-01

    The 2D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2 M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional 2nd-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy in space and (2 N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra computational

  17. Shear flow driven drift waves and the counter-rotating vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the drift waves can become unstable due to the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field. The modified Rayleigh instability condition is obtained which is applicable to both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is proposed that the shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas as well as electron-ion plasmas. A particular form of the shear flow can give rise to counter-rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains. The speed and amplitude of the structures are affected by the presence of positrons in the electron ion plasma. The relevance of this investigation to laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

  18. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  19. Virtual Touch Tissue Imaging Quantification Shear Wave Elastography: Prospective Assessment of Cervical Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai Lun; Choi, Young Jun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of Virtual Touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ) shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant cervical lymph nodes in routine clinical practice. Shear wave velocity was analyzed using VTIQ in 100 patients with 100 histologically proven cervical lymph nodes. Diagnostic performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and leave-one-out cross-validation. Agreement between measurements was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients. The mean shear wave velocity was significantly higher in metastatic lymphadenopathy (4.46 ± 1.46 m/s) than in benign lymphadenopathy (2.71 ± 0.85 m/s) (p < 0.001) at a cutoff level of 3.34 m/s. The cross-validated accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 77%, 78.9% and 74.4%, respectively. Agreement of measurements with VTIQ was excellent (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.961). VTIQ shear wave elastography may be a feasible quantitative imaging method for differentiating benign and malignant cervical lymph nodes. PMID:26553206

  20. Thyroid Nodules and Shear Wave Elastography: A New Tool in Thyroid Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Ghobad; Keller, James M; Mayo, Michelle L; Piper, Kelé; Puett, David; Earp, Karly M; Malchoff, Carl D

    2015-11-01

    This study determines the performance of virtual touch imaging quantification (VTIQ), a non-invasive shear wave elastography method for measuring thyroid nodule (TN) stiffness, in distinguishing benign from malignant TNs. This prospective study evaluates 707 TNs in 676 patients with fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Before FNAB, both conventional B-mode ultrasound and shear wave elastography were performed. Surgical resection was recommended for FNAB results that were not clearly benign. Surgical pathology confirmed 82 malignant TNs. The receiver operating curve identified a single cut-off of 3.54 m/s as the maximum shear wave velocity (SWV) for predicting thyroid cancer (TC). The sensitivity and specificity were 79.27% and 71.52%, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) was 26.75% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 96.34%. Compared with B-mode US features for predicting malignancy, SWV ≥3.54 m/s has a higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. TN stiffness measured by VTIQ-generated shear wave elastography is an independent predictor of TC. PMID:26277203

  1. Shear wave pulse compression for dynamic elastography using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the biomechanical properties of soft tissue provides clinically valuable information to supplement conventional structural imaging. In the previous studies, we introduced a dynamic elastography technique based on phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to characterize submillimetric structures such as skin layers or ocular tissues. Here, we propose to implement a pulse compression technique for shear wave elastography. We performed shear wave pulse compression in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using a mechanical actuator to generate broadband frequency-modulated vibrations (1 to 5 kHz), induced displacements were detected at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz using a PhS-OCT. The recorded signal was digitally compressed to a broadband pulse. Stiffness maps were then reconstructed from spatially localized estimates of the local shear wave speed. We demonstrate that a simple pulse compression scheme can increase shear wave detection signal-to-noise ratio (>12 dB gain) and reduce artifacts in reconstructing stiffness maps of heterogeneous media.

  2. Shear wave pulse compression for dynamic elastography using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Assessing the biomechanical properties of soft tissue provides clinically valuable information to supplement conventional structural imaging. In the previous studies, we introduced a dynamic elastography technique based on phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to characterize submillimetric structures such as skin layers or ocular tissues. Here, we propose to implement a pulse compression technique for shear wave elastography. We performed shear wave pulse compression in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using a mechanical actuator to generate broadband frequency-modulated vibrations (1 to 5 kHz), induced displacements were detected at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz using a PhS-OCT. The recorded signal was digitally compressed to a broadband pulse. Stiffness maps were then reconstructed from spatially localized estimates of the local shear wave speed. We demonstrate that a simple pulse compression scheme can increase shear wave detection signal-to-noise ratio (>12  dB gain) and reduce artifacts in reconstructing stiffness maps of heterogeneous media. PMID:24441876

  3. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  4. Hemispherical Parker waves driven by thermal shear in planetary dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Schmitt, D.; Wicht, J.

    2013-11-01

    Planetary and stellar magnetic fields are thought to be sustained by helical motions (α-effect) and, if present, differential rotation (Ω-effect). In the Sun, the strong differential rotation in the tachocline is responsible for an efficient Ω-effect creating a strong axisymmetric azimuthal magnetic field. This is a prerequisite for Parker dynamo waves that may be responsible for the solar cycle. In the liquid iron cores of terrestrial planets, the Coriolis force organizes convection into columns with a strong helical flow component. These likely dominate magnetic field generation while the Ω-effect is of secondary importance. Here we use numerical simulations to show that the planetary dynamo scenario may change when the heat flux through the outer boundary is higher in one hemisphere than in the other. A hemispherical dynamo is promoted that is dominated by fierce thermal wind responsible for a strong Ω-effect. As a consequence Parker dynamo waves are excited equivalent to those predicted for the Sun. They obey the same dispersion relation and propagation characteristics. We suggest that Parker waves may therefore also play a role in planetary dynamos for all scenarios where zonal flows become an important part of convective motions.

  5. Joint seismic tomography for bulk sound and shear wave speed in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Widiyantoro, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    1998-06-01

    High-quality P and S travel times are now available from careful reprocessing of data reported to international agencies. A restricted data set has been extracted for which comparable ray coverage is achieved for P and S, and used for a joint inversion to produce a three-dimensional model for shear and bulk sound velocities represented in terms of 2° × 2° cells and 18 layers in depth through the mantle. About 106 times for each of P and S are combined to produce 312,549 summary rays for each wave type. Linearizing about the ak135 reference model, 583,200 coupled tomographic equations are solved using an iterative partitioned scheme. Clear high-resolution images are obtained for both bulk-sound speed and shear wavespeed. The bulk and shear moduli have differing sensitivity to temperature and mineral composition, and so the images of the two velocity distributions help to constrain the nature of the processes which produce the variations. Different heterogeneity regimes can be recognised in the upper mantle, the transition zone, most of the lower mantle, and the lowermost mantle. In the upper mantle, many features can be explained by thermal effects; but in some orogenic zones (e.g. western North America), the opposite sense of the bulk-sound and shear wave speed variation requires compositional effects or volatiles to outweigh any thermal effects. In the lower mantle, pronounced narrow structures which may represent remnant subduction are most marked in shear. The level of large-scale variations in bulk sound speed compared to shear diminishes with depth in the lower mantle reaching a minimum near 2000 km. Below this depth, the variability of both wave speeds increases. Near the core-mantle boundary the variations of the two wave speeds show little concordance, suggesting the presence of widespread chemical heterogeneity.

  6. Shear Wave Elastography of Passive Skeletal Muscle Stiffness: Influences of Sex and Age throughout Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Sarah F.; Cloud, Beth A.; Brandenburg, Joline E.; Giambini, Hugo; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous structural and compositional changes – related not only to age, but also activity level and sex – may affect skeletal muscle stiffness across the adult age-span. Measurement techniques available thus far have largely limited passive stiffness evaluations to those of entire joints and muscle-tendon units. Shear wave elastography is an increasingly popular ultrasound technique for evaluating the mechanical properties of skeletal muscle tissue. The purpose of this study was to quantify the passive stiffness, or shear modulus, of the biceps brachii throughout adulthood in flexed and extended elbow positions. We hypothesized that shear modulus would be higher in males relative to females, and with advanced age in both sexes. Methods Shear wave elastography quantified biceps brachii stiffness at 90° elbow flexion and full extension in a large sample of adults between 21–94 years old (n=133; 47 males). Findings Regression analysis found sex and age were significant parameters for older adults (>60 years) in full extension. As expected, shear modulus values increased with advancing age; however, shear modulus values for females tended to be higher than those for males. Interpretation This study begins to establish normative trends for skeletal muscle shear modulus throughout adulthood. Specifically, this work establishes for the first time that the higher passive joint torque often found in males relative to females likely relates to parameters other than muscle shear modulus. Indeed, perhaps increases in skeletal muscle passive stiffness, though potentially altering the length-tension curve, serve a protective role – maintaining the tendon-muscle-tendon length-tension curve within a functional range. PMID:25483294

  7. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  8. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocities and quality factors using multichannel analysis of surface-wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianghai

    2014-04-01

    This overview article gives a picture of multichannel analysis of high-frequency surface (Rayleigh and Love) waves developed mainly by research scientists at the Kansas Geological Survey, the University of Kansas and China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) during the last eighteen years by discussing dispersion imaging techniques, inversion systems, and real-world examples. Shear (S)-wave velocities of near-surface materials can be derived from inverting the dispersive phase velocities of high-frequency surface waves. Multichannel analysis of surface waves—MASW used phase information of high-frequency Rayleigh waves recorded on vertical component geophones to determine near-surface S-wave velocities. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode simultaneously can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. Multichannel analysis of Love waves—MALW used phase information of high-frequency Love waves recorded on horizontal (perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation) component geophones to determine S-wave velocities of shallow materials. Because of independence of compressional (P)-wave velocity, the MALW method has some attractive advantages, such as 1) Love-wave dispersion curves are simpler than Rayleigh wave's; 2) dispersion images of Love-wave energy have a higher signal to noise ratio and more focused than those generated from Rayleigh waves; and 3) inversion of Love-wave dispersion curves is less dependent on initial models and more stable than Rayleigh waves.

  9. Shear-wave splitting in Quaternary sediments: Neotectonic implications in the central New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the extent and location of surface/near-surface structural deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is very important for evaluating earthquake hazards. A shallow shear-wave splitting experiment, located near the crest of the Lake County uplift (LCU) in the central NMSZ, shows the presence of near-surface azimuthal anisotropy believed to be associated with neotectonic deformation. A shallow fourcomponent data set, recorded using a hammer and mass source, displayed abundant shallow reflection energy on records made with orthogonal source-receiver orientations, an indicator of shear-wave splitting. Following rotation of the data matrix by 40??, the S1 and S2 sections (principal components of the data matrix) were aligned with the natural coordinate system at orientations of N35??W and N55??E, respectively. A dynamic mis-tie of 8 ms at a two-way traveltime of 375 ms produced an average azimuthal anisotropy of ???2% between the target reflector (top of Quaternary gravel at a depth of 35 m) and the surface. Based on the shear-wave polarization data, two explanations for the azimuthal anisotropy in the study area are (1) fractures/cracks aligned in response to near-surface tensional stress produced by uplift of the LCU, and (2) faults/fractures oriented parallel to the Kentucky Bend scarp, a recently identified surface deformation feature believed to be associated with contemporary seismicity in the central NMSZ. In addition to increased seismic resolution by the use of shear-wave methods in unconsolidated, water-saturated sediments, measurement of near-surface directional polarizations, produced by shear-wave splitting, may provide valuable information for identifying neotectonic deformation and evaluating associated earthquake hazards.

  10. Dispersion relations of short surface gravity waves over vertically sheared currents from stereo-video measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The stereo-video reconstuction method [Leckler et al. 2015] allows now for the full reconstruction of 3D frequency-wavenumber spectra of short waves. A new field campaign in 2013 on the Katsiveli platform (Black Sea) provided such spectra in various wind and waves conditions, and particularly a stormy event, after which very mature waves had been generated. The short waves energies are found to be mostly located around a dispersion relation of the form, () ° ----------- ω ⃗k = gktanh(kH)+ ⃗kṡ ⃗Ueff The effective advection velocity [Kirby and Chen 1989] ⃗Ueff(k) integrates contributions from both the Stokes drift and quasi-eulerian current [Groeneweg and Klopman 1998]. We find that the effective drift velocity has a very weak wavenumber dependancy, as a result the eulerian current must be vertically sheared. This shear is relevant to the breaking of small scale waves [Banner and Phillips 1974]. It is possible that in field conditions the wind drift is much less important than in the laboratory. Bibliography Banner, M. L. and Phillips, O. M., On the incipient breaking of small scale waves, J. Fluid Mech., 1974, 65, 647. Groeneweg, J. and Klopman, G., Changes of the mean velocity profiles in the combined wave-current motion described in a GLM formulation, J. Fluid Mech., 1998, 370, 271-296. Kirby, J. T. and Chen, T. M., Surface waves on vertically sheared flows : Approximate dispersion relations, J. Geophys. Res., 1989, 94, 1013. Leckler, F., Ardhuin, F., Peureux, C.,Benetazzo, A., Bergamasco, F. and Dulov, V., Analysis and interpretation of frequency-wavenumber spectra of young wind-waves, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2015, 45, 2484-2496.

  11. On the possibility of wave-induced chaos in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, W. B.; Velarde, M. G.

    Shear flow in a stable stratification provides a waveguide for internal gravity waves. In the inviscid approximation, internal gravity waves are known to be unstable below a threshold in Richardson number. However, in a viscous fluid, at low enough Reynolds number, this threshold recedes to Ri = 0. Nevertheless, even the slightest viscosity strongly damps internal gravity waves when the Richardson number is small (shear forces dominate buoyant forces). In this paper we address the dynamics that approximately govern wave propagation when the Richardson number is small and the fluid is viscous. When Ri << 1, to a first approximation, the transport equations for thermal energy and momentum decouple. Thus, a large amplitude temperature wave then has little effect on the fluid velocity. Under such conditions in the atmosphere, a small amplitude "turbulent burst" is observed, transporting momentum rapidly and seemingly randomly. A regular perturbation scheme from a base state of a passing temperature wave and no velocity disturbance is developed here. Small thermal energy convection-momentum transport coupling is taken into account. The elements of forcing, wave dispersion, (turbulent) dissipation under strong shearing, and weak nonlinearity lead to this dynamical equation for the amplitude A of the turbulent burst in velocity: Aξ = λ1A + λ2Aξξ + λ3Aξξξ + λ4AAξ + b(ξ) where ξ is the coordinate of the rest frame of the passing temperature wave whose horizontal profile is b(ξ). The parameters λi are constants that depend on the Reynolds number. The above dynamical system is know to have limit cycle and chaotic attrators when forcing is sinusoidal and wave attenuation negligible.

  12. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  13. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  14. Surface shear strains induced by quasi-steady sweeping detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Lawrence; Briggs, Matthew; Faulkner, James

    2012-03-01

    Sweeping wave experiments create conditions of greater shear than corresponding onedimensional motion experiments, and are of current interest for material damage characterization. Sweeping waves are also important with regards to the spectrum of applications of explosives driving metals. The intensity of the shear developed in a sweeping wave experiment may be monitored using crossed beams of Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). During the time the material is traversing the volume defined by the crossed beams, the interferometer is measuring the velocity of the same mass element (approximately) from two directions. It is known that PDV measures the velocity component that lies along the beam direction, so that with crossed beams, two independent directions are simultaneously measured and therefore the vector velocity (both magnitude and direction) are captured. The vector velocity is readily related to the strain rates on the surface (after removing the rigid rotation rates), and the equations are integrated to obtain the strains.

  15. Bias of shear wave elasticity measurements in thin layer samples and a simple correction strategy.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianqiang; Xu, Hao; Qiang, Bo; Giambini, Hugo; Kinnick, Randall; An, Kai-Nan; Chen, Shigao; Luo, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an emerging technique for measuring biological tissue stiffness. However, the application of SWE in thin layer tissues is limited by bias due to the influence of geometry on measured shear wave speed. In this study, we investigated the bias of Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer gelatin-agar phantoms, and compared the result with finite element method and Lamb wave model simulation. The result indicated that the Young's modulus measured by SWE decreased continuously when the sample thickness decreased, and this effect was more significant for smaller thickness. We proposed a new empirical formula which can conveniently correct the bias without the need of using complicated mathematical modeling. In summary, we confirmed the nonlinear relation between thickness and Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer samples, and offered a simple and practical correction strategy which is convenient for clinicians to use. PMID:27588234

  16. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  17. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements.

  19. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  20. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g., Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep (RFIC) method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  1. Kinetic theory for electrostatic waves due to transverse velocity shears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    A kinetic theory in the form of an integral equation is provided to study the electrostatic oscillations in a collisionless plasma immersed in a uniform magnetic field and a nonuniform transverse electric field. In the low temperature limit the dispersion differential equation is recovered for the transverse Kelvin-Helmholtz modes for arbitrary values of K parallel, where K parallel is the component of the wave vector in the direction of the external magnetic field assumed in the z direction. For higher temperatures the ion-cyclotron-like modes described earlier in the literature by Ganguli, Lee and Plamadesso are recovered. In this article, the integral equation is reduced to a second-order differential equation and a study is made of the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz and ion-cyclotron-like modes that constitute the two branches of oscillation in a magnetized plasma including a transverse inhomogeneous dc electric field.

  2. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  3. Mantle shear-wave tomography and the fate of subducted slabs.

    PubMed

    Grand, Steven P

    2002-11-15

    A new seismic model of the three-dimensional variation in shear velocity throughout the Earth's mantle is presented. The model is derived entirely from shear bodywave travel times. Multibounce shear waves, core-reflected waves and SKS and SKKS waves that travel through the core are used in the analysis. A unique aspect of the dataset used in this study is the use of bodywaves that turn at shallow depths in the mantle, some of which are triplicated. The new model is compared with other global shear models. Although competing models show significant variations, several large-scale structures are common to most of the models. The high-velocity anomalies are mostly associated with subduction zones. In some regions the anomalies only extend into the shallow lower mantle, whereas in other regions tabular high-velocity structures seem to extend to the deepest mantle. The base of the mantle shows long-wavelength high-velocity zones also associated with subduction zones. The heterogeneity seen in global tomography models is difficult to interpret in terms of mantle flow due to variations in structure from one subduction zone to another. The simplest interpretation of the seismic images is that slabs in general penetrate to the deepest mantle, although the flow is likely to be sporadic. The interruption in slab sinking is likely to be associated with the 660 km discontinuity. PMID:12460476

  4. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  5. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank. PMID:16793108

  6. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  7. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  8. Shear wave seismic interferometry for lithospheric imaging: Application to southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J. G.; Ruigrok, E. N.; Wapenaar, K.

    2014-07-01

    Seismic interferometry allows for the creation of new seismic traces by cross correlating existing ones. With sufficient sampling of remote-source positions, it is possible to create a virtual source record by transforming a receiver location into a virtual source. The imaging technique developed here directly retrieves reflectivity information from the subsurface. Other techniques, namely receiver-function and tomography, rely on mode-converted energy and perturbations in a velocity field, respectively, to make inferences regarding structure. We select shear phases as an imaging source because of their lower propagation velocity, sensitivity to melt, and ability to treat vertical shear and horizontal shear wavefields independently. Teleseismic shear phases approximate a plane wave due to the extent of wavefront spread compared to a finite receiver array located on the free surface. The teleseismic shear phase transmission responses are used as input to the seismic interferometry technique. We create virtual shear source records by converting each receiver in the array into a virtual source. By cross correlating the received signals, the complex source character of distant earthquakes is imprinted on the virtual source records as the average autocorrelation of individual source-time functions. We demonstrate a technique that largely removes this imprint by filtering in the common-offset domain. A field data set was selected from the Meso-America Subduction Experiment. Despite the suboptimal remote-source sampling, an image of the lithosphere was produced that confirms features of the subduction zone that were previously found with the receiver-function technique.

  9. Geodynamical Interpretation of Crustal and Mantle Shear-Wave Velocity Structures Beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong; Stuart, Graham; Houseman, Gregory; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Hegedüs, Endre; Radovanović, Slavica; Shen, Yang; South Carpathian Project working Group

    2013-04-01

    The Carpathian-Pannonian system of Eastern and Central Europe represents a unique opportunity to study the interaction between surface tectonic processes involving convergence and extension, and convective processes in the upper mantle. The South Carpathian Project (SCP), a major temporary deployment (2009-2011) of seismic broadband systems extending across the eastern Pannonian Basin and the South Carpathian Mountains was set up with the purpose of bringing constraints on the geodynamical processes that have shaped the region. Imaging the seismic velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle helps us to understand the structure and geodynamical evolution of this part of central Europe. Here, we present high-resolution images of both crustal and upper mantle shear-wave velocity structures beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian region using surface waves obtained from ambient noise tomography, and finite-frequency teleseismic tomography using S-wave arrivals, from 54 stations of the South Carpathian Project (SCP, 2009-2011), 56 stations of the Carpathian Basins Project (CBP, 2005-2007) and 131 national network broadband stations. For ambient noise tomography, we computed cross-correlations of vertical component continuous ambient seismic noise recordings for all possible pairs of stations and stacked the correlated waveforms over 1-2 years for the temporary stations and up to 5 years for permanent stations to estimate Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions. Over 5700 final Rayleigh wave Green's functions were selected for the measurement of group velocity dispersion curves between 4s and 40s using the multiple-filter analysis technique. Group velocity maps are first computed on a grid discretized with 0.2°x0.2° steps from a non-linear 2-D tomographic inversion of measured group velocity dispersion curves. We then inverted the Rayleigh wave group velocity at each location to obtain the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath

  10. Coupling of the Okuda-Dawson model with a shear current-driven wave and the associated instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Saleem, H.; Saleem

    2013-12-01

    It is pointed out that the Okuda-Dawson mode can couple with the newly proposed current-driven wave. It is also shown that the Shukla-Varma mode can couple with these waves if the density inhomogeneity is taken into account in a plasma containing stationary dust particles. A comparison of several low-frequency electrostatic waves and instabilities driven by shear current and shear plasma flow in an electron-ion plasma with and without stationary dust is also presented.

  11. Transmission, attenuation and reflection of shear waves in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Erik H; Genin, Guy M; Bayly, Philip V

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by acceleration of the skull or exposure to explosive blast, but the processes by which mechanical loads lead to neurological injury remain poorly understood. We adapted motion-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure the motion of the human brain in vivo as the skull was exposed to harmonic pressure excitation (45, 60 and 80 Hz). We analysed displacement fields to quantify the transmission, attenuation and reflection of distortional (shear) waves as well as viscoelastic material properties. Results suggest that internal membranes, such as the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli, play a key role in reflecting and focusing shear waves within the brain. The skull acts as a low-pass filter over the range of frequencies studied. Transmissibility of pressure waves through the skull decreases and shear wave attenuation increases with increasing frequency. The skull and brain function mechanically as an integral structure that insulates internal anatomic features; these results are valuable for building and validating mathematical models of this complex and important structural system. PMID:22675163

  12. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  13. Deep Mantle Large Low Shear-Wave Velocity Provinces: Principally Thermal Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The two large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate lower-mantle structure may hold key information on Earth's thermal and chemical evolution. It is generally accepted that these provinces are hotter than background mantle and are likely the main source of mantle plumes. Increasingly, it is also proposed that they hold a dense (primitive and/or recycled) compositional component. The principle evidence that LLSVPs may represent thermo-chemical `piles' comes from seismic constraints, including: (i) their long-wavelength nature; (ii) sharp gradients in shear-wave velocity at their margins; (iii) non-Gaussian distributions of deep mantle shear-wave velocity anomalies; (iv) anti-correlated shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity anomalies (and elevated ratios between shear- and compressional-wave velocity anomalies); (v) anti-correlated shear-wave and density anomalies; and (vi) 1-D/radial profiles of seismic velocity that deviate from those expected for an isochemical, well-mixed mantle. In addition, it has been proposed that hotspots and the reconstructed eruption sites of large igneous provinces correlate in location with LLSVP margins. Here, we review recent results, which indicate that the majority of these constraints do not require thermo-chemical piles: they are equally well (or poorly) explained by thermal heterogeneity alone. Our analyses and conclusions are largely based on comparisons between imaged seismic structure and synthetic seismic structures from a set of thermal and thermo-chemical mantle convection models, which are constrained by 300 Myr of plate motion histories. Modelled physical structure (temperature, pressure and composition) is converted into seismic velocities via a thermodynamic approach that accounts for elastic, anelastic and phase contributions and, subsequently, a tomographic resolution filter is applied to account for the damping and geographic bias inherent to seismic imaging. Our results indicate that, in terms of

  14. Excitation and detection of shear horizontal waves with electromagnetic acoustic transducers for nondestructive testing of plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qingzeng; Jiao, Jingpin; Hu, Ping; Zhong, Xi; Wu, Bin; He, Cunfu

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal(SH0) wave has several unique features that are attractive for long-range nondestructive testing(NDT). By a careful design of the geometric configuration, electromagnetic acoustic transducers(EMATs) have the capability to generate a wide range of guided wave modes, such as Lamb waves and shear-horizontal(SH) waves in plates. However, the performance of EMATs is influenced by their parameters. To evaluate the performance of periodic permanent magnet(PPM) EMATs, a distributed-line-source model is developed to calculate the angular acoustic field cross-section in the far-field. Numerical analysis is conducted to investigate the performance of such EMATs with different geometric parameters, such as period and number of magnet arrays, and inner and outer coil widths. Such parameters have a great influence on the directivity of the generated SH0 waves that arises mainly in the amplitude and width of both main and side lobes. According to the numerical analysis, these parameters are optimized to obtain better directivity. Optimized PPM EMATs are designed and used for NDT of strip plates. Experimental results show that the lateral boundary of the strip plate has no perceivable influence on SH0-wave propagation, thus validating their used in NDT. The proposed model predicts the radiation pattern of PPM EMATs, and can be used for their parameter optimization.

  15. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  16. New Hybridized Surface Wave Approach for Geotechnical Modeling of Shear Wave Velocity at Strong Motion Recording Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Carkin, B.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Strong motion recording (SMR) networks often have little or no shear wave velocity measurements at stations where characterization of site amplification and site period effects is needed. Using the active Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, and passive H/V microtremor method we have investigated nearly two hundred SMR sites in California, Alaska, Japan, Australia, China and Taiwan. We are conducting these studies, in part, to develop a new hybridized method of site characterization that utilizes a parallel array of harmonic-wave sources for active-source SASW, and a single long period seismometer for passive-source microtremor measurement. Surface wave methods excel in their ability to non-invasively and rapidly characterize the variation of ground stiffness properties with depth below the surface. These methods are lightweight, inexpensive to deploy, and time-efficient. They have been shown to produce accurate and deep soil stiffness profiles. By placing and wiring shakers in a large parallel circuit, either side-by-side on the ground or in a trailer-mounted array, a strong in-phase harmonic wave can be produced. The effect of arraying many sources in parallel is to increase the amplitude of waves received at far-away spaced seismometers at low frequencies so as to extend the longest wavelengths of the captured dispersion curve. The USGS system for profiling uses this concept by arraying between two and eight electro-mechanical harmonic-wave shakers. With large parallel arrays of vibrators, a dynamic force in excess of 1000 lb can be produced to vibrate the ground and produce surface waves. We adjust the harmonic wave through a swept-sine procedure to profile surface wave dispersion down to a frequency of 1 Hz and out to surface wave-wavelengths of 200-1000 meters, depending on the site stiffness. The parallel-array SASW procedure is augmented using H/V microtremor data collected with the active source turned off. Passive array microtremor data

  17. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  18. Exact solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in sheared relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuperman, S.; Heristchi, D.

    1992-08-01

    The transcendental dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves propagating in the slow mode in sheared non-neutral relativistic cylindrical electron beams in strong applied magnetic fields is solved exactly. Thus, rather than truncated power series for the modified Bessel functions involved, use is made of modern algorithms able to compute such functions up to 18-digit accuracy. Consequently, new and significantly more important branches of the velocity shear instability are found. When the shear-factor and/or the geometrical parameter a/b (pipe-to-beam radius ratio) are increased, the unstable branches join, and the higher-frequency, larger-wavenumber modes are significantly enhanced. Since analytical solutions of the exact dispersion relation cannot be obtained, it is suggested that in all similar cases the methods proposed and demonstrated here should be used to carry out a rigorous stability analysis.

  19. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  20. Experimental verification of nanofluid shear-wave reconversion in ultrasonic fields.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Huang, Jinrui; Pinfield, Valerie J; Luppé, Francine

    2016-03-14

    Here we present the verification of shear-mediated contributions to multiple scattering of ultrasound in suspensions. Acoustic spectroscopy was carried out with suspensions of silica of differing particle sizes and concentrations in water to find the attenuation at a broad range of frequencies. As the particle sizes approach the nanoscale, commonly used multiple scattering models fail to match experimental results. We develop a new model, taking into account shear mediated contributions, and find excellent agreement with the attenuation spectra obtained using two types of spectrometer. The results determine that shear-wave phenomena must be considered in ultrasound characterisation of nanofluids at even relatively low concentrations of scatterers that are smaller than one micrometre in diameter. PMID:26763173

  1. The uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of eastern Africa from Rayleigh wave tomography: constraints on rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Adams, A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.

    2013-08-01

    An expanded model of the 3-D shear wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Africa has been developed using earthquakes recorded by the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from permanent stations and previously deployed temporary stations. The combined data set comprises 331 earthquakes recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this study, data from 149 earthquakes were used to determine fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 s using the two-plane wave method, and then combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the uppermost mantle. New features in the model include (1) a low-velocity region in western Zambia, (2) a high-velocity region in eastern Zambia, (3) a low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania and (4) low-velocity regions beneath the Lake Malawi rift. When considered in conjunction with mapped seismicity, these results support a secondary western rift branch striking southwestwards from Lake Tanganyika, likely exploiting the relatively weak lithosphere of the southern Kibaran Belt between the Bangweulu Block and the Congo Craton. We estimate a lithospheric thickness of ˜150-200 km for the substantial fast shear wave anomaly imaged in eastern Zambia, which may be a southward subsurface extension of the Bangweulu Block. The low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania suggests that the eastern rift branch trends southeastwards offshore eastern Tanzania coincident with the purported location of the northern margin of the proposed Ruvuma microplate. Pronounced velocity lows along the Lake Malawi rift are found beneath the northern and southern ends of the lake, but not beneath the central portion of the lake.

  2. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim; Lekic, Vedran; Schumacher, Lina; Ito, Garrett; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primordial mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has accumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateral gradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth), or hereinafter referred to as "deep distinct domains" (DDD). Seismic sensitivity calculations suggest that DDDs are more likely to be composed of primordial mantle material than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primordial bottom domain (or DDD) and a basaltic shallow domain. We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primordial and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within these piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB, as well as out-of-plane reflections on LLSVP sides over a range of depths. Predicted geometry of thermochemical piles is compared to LLSVP and DDD shapes as constrained by seismic cluster analysis. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and

  3. The eddy, wave, and interface structure of turbulent shear layers below/above stably stratified regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Julian C. R.; Moustaoui, Mohamed; Mahalov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    High resolution three-dimensional simulations are presented of the interactions between turbulent shear flows moving with mean relative velocity ΔU below a stably stratified region with buoyancy frequency (N+). An artificial forcing in the simulation, with a similar effect as a small negative eddy viscosity, leads to a steady state flow which models thin interfaces. Characteristic eddies of the turbulence have length scale L. If the bulk Richardson number Rib=(LN+/ΔU)2 lies between lower and upper critical values denoted as Ri∗(<1/5) and R~i(˜ 1), a "detached" layer is formed in the stable region with thickness L+ greater than L, in which rotational fluctuations and inhomogeneous turbulence are induced above an interface with large gradients of density/temperature. Comparisons are made with shear turbulent interfaces with no stratification. When Rib>R~i, vertical propagating waves are generated, with shear stresses carrying significant momentum flux and progressively less as Rib increases. Simulations for a jet and a turbulent mixing layer show similar results. A perturbation analysis, using inhomogeneous Rapid Distortion Theory, models the transition zone between shear eddies below the interface and the fluctuations in the stratified region, consistent with the simulations. It demonstrates how the wave-momentum-flux has a maximum when Rib˜2 and then decreases as Rib increases. This coupling mechanism between eddies and waves, which is neglected in eddy viscosity models for shear layers, can drive flows in the stratosphere and the deeper ocean, with significant consequences for short- and long-term flow phenomena. The "detached layer" is a mechanism that contributes to the formation of stratus clouds and polluted layers above the atmospheric boundary layer.

  4. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  5. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and wave propagation at the San Jose, California, dense seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.; Harmsen, S.; Zerva, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion records from a 52-element dense seismic array near San Jose, California, are analyzed to obtain site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and plane-wave propagation characteristics. The array, located on the eastern side of the Santa Clara Valley south of the San Francisco Bay, is sited over the Evergreen basin, a 7-km-deep depression with Miocene and younger deposits. Site response values below 4 Hz are up to a factor of 2 greater when larger, regional records are included in the analysis, due to strong surface-wave development within the Santa Clara Valley. The pattern of site amplification is the same, however, with local or regional events. Site amplification increases away from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley, reaching a maximum over the western edge of the Evergreen basin, where the pre-Cenozoic basement shallows rapidly. Amplification then decreases further to the west. This pattern may be caused by lower shallow shear-wave velocities and thicker Quaternary deposits further from the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and generation/trapping of surface waves above the shallowing basement of the western Evergreen basin. Shear-wave velocities from the inversion of site response spectra based on smaller, local earthquakes compare well with those obtained independently from our seismic reflection/refraction measurements. Velocities from the inversion of site spectra that include larger, regional records do not compare well with these measurements. A mix of local and regional events, however, is appropriate for determination of site response to be used in seismic hazard evaluation, since large damaging events would excite both body and surface waves with a wide range in ray parameters. Frequency-wavenumber, plane-wave analysis is used to determine the backazimuth and apparent velocity of coherent phases at the array. Conventional, high-resolution, and multiple signal characterization f-k power spectra and stacked slowness power spectra are

  6. Self-organization of ULF electromagnetic wave structures in the shear flow driven dissipative ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G.; Chargazia, K.; Kharshiladze, O.; Zimbardo, G.

    2014-08-01

    This work is devoted to investigation of nonlinear dynamics of planetary electromagnetic (EM) ultra-low-frequency wave (ULFW) structures in the rotating dissipative ionosphere in the presence of inhomogeneous zonal wind (shear flow). Planetary EM ULFW appears as a result of interaction of the ionospheric medium with the spatially inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The shear flow driven wave perturbations effectively extract energy of the shear flow increasing own amplitude and energy. These perturbations undergo self organization in the form of the nonlinear solitary vortex structures due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbation's front. Depending on the features of the velocity profiles of the shear flows the nonlinear vortex structures can be either monopole vortices, or dipole vortex, or vortex streets and vortex chains. From analytical calculation and plots we note that the formation of stationary nonlinear vortex structure requires some threshold value of translation velocity for both non-dissipation and dissipation complex ionospheric plasma. The space and time attenuation specification of the vortices is studied. The characteristic time of vortex longevity in dissipative ionosphere is estimated. The long-lived vortices transfer the trapped medium particles, energy and heat. Thus they represent structural elements of turbulence in the ionosphere.

  7. Primary Analysis of Shear-Wave Splitting Aroundbohai Sea Area in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, L.; Gao, Y.; Shi, Y.; Sun, J.

    2012-12-01

    Bohai Sea area locates at eastern China, including 3 provinces ( Hebei, Liaoning and Shandong ) and 2 metropolitan cities ( Beijing and Tianjin ). There are 5 tectonic units (Yanshan uplift, Taihang uplift, Liaodong uplift, Luxi uplift and Jizhong depression), where is within North China (in short, NC). Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt, an important seismotectonic zone in eastern China and Tanlu fault, the largest fault in eastern China, intersect in this zone, so that the tectonics are complicated. Earthquake activity is very strong in this zone, which is famous of earthquakes with large magnitude and high frequency. This study used a system analysis method of shear-wave splitting, namely SAM method (GAO et al, 2004). It includes mainly three aspects, i.e., calculation of cross-correlation function, elimination of time delay and check of polarization analysis. Preliminarily, we obtained the 378 seismic data within shear-wave window recorded by 27 stations around Bohai Sea area. The polarizations of fast shear-waves show different local features so that we divide the studied zone into 3 different areas, west of Bohai Sea gulf (including Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei province), north of Bohai Sea gulf (Liaoning province) and south of Bohai Sea gulf (Shandong province). In the west of Bohai Sea gulf, we divided the area into 3 parts. In south of Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt, the predominant polarizations of fast shear-waves are a little scattered, lots of stations strike to nearly E-W, consistent with the direction of the in situ principal stress, consistent with the direction of regional tectonic stress in north part of NC, which strikes to nearly WNW or E-W, while some stations strike to NNE or NW, different from the direction of the regional principal stress field. It may be influenced by local tectonics or shallow crust structure. Within Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt, the predominant polarizations of fast shear-waves are in direction of nearly E-W, consistent with

  8. Numerical and experimental study of the nonlinear interaction between a shear wave and a frictional interface.

    PubMed

    Blanloeuil, Philippe; Croxford, Anthony J; Meziane, Anissa

    2014-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of shear waves with a frictional interface are presented and modeled using simple Coulomb friction. Analytical and finite difference implementations are proposed with both in agreement and showing a unique trend in terms of the generated nonlinearity. A dimensionless parameter ξ is proposed to uniquely quantify the nonlinearity produced. The trends produced in the numerical study are then validated with good agreement experimentally. This is carried out loading an interface between two steel blocks and exciting this interface with different amplitude normal incidence shear waves. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical results, suggesting the simple friction model does a reasonable job of capturing the fundamental physics. The resulting approach offers a potential way to characterize a contacting interface; however, the difficulty in activating that interface may ultimately limit its applicability. PMID:25234971

  9. Energetic particle destabilization of shear Alfven waves in stellarators and tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Weller, A.

    1994-12-31

    An important issue for ignited devices is the resonant destabilization of shear Alfven waves by energetic populations. These instabilities have been observed in a variety of toroidal plasma experiments in recent years, including: beam-destabilized toroidal Alfven instabilities (TAE) in low magnetic field tokamaks, ICRF destabilized TAE`s in higher field tokamaks, and global Alfven instabilities (GAE) in low shear stellarators. In addition, excitation and study of these modes is a significant goal of the TFIR-DT program and a component of the ITER physics tasks. The authors have developed a gyrofluid model which includes the wave-particle resonances necessary to excite such instabilities. The TAE linear mode structure is calculated nonperturbatively, including many of the relevant damping mechanisms, such as: continuum damping, non-ideal effects (ion FLR and electron collisionality), and ion/electron Landau damping. This model has been applied to both linear and nonlinear regimes for a range of experimental cases using measured profiles.

  10. Development of a low frequency omnidirectional piezoelectric shear horizontal wave transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Pierre; Boivin, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) may offer an alternative to time based maintenance of safety critical components. Ultrasonic guided waves have recently emerged as a prominent option because their propagation carries information regarding the location, severity and types of damage. The fundamental shear horizontal ultrasonic guided wave mode has recently attracted interest in SHM because of its unique properties. This mode is not dispersive and has no attenuation due to fluid loading. In order to cover large areas using an SHM system, omnidirectional transduction is desired. Omnidirectional transduction of SH0 is challenging because of the required torsional surface stress. This paper presents a concept based on the discretisation of a torsional surface stress source using shear piezoelectric trapezoidal elements. Finite element simulation and experimental results are used to demonstrate the performance of this concept. The experimental modal selectivity is 17 dB and the transducer has a true omnidirectional behaviour.

  11. Scattering of shear waves by an elliptical cavity in a radially inhomogeneous isotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Baoping; Yang, Zailin; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    Complex function and general conformal mapping methods are used to investigate the scattering of elastic shear waves by an elliptical cylindrical cavity in a radially inhomogeneous medium. The conformal mappings are introduced to solve scattering by an arbitrary cavity for the Helmholtz equation with variable coefficient through the transformed standard Helmholtz equation with a circular cavity. The medium density depends on the distance from the origin with a power-law variation and the shear elastic modulus is constant. The complex-value displacements and stresses of the inhomogeneous medium are explicitly obtained and the distributions of the dynamic stress for the case of an elliptical cavity are discussed. The accuracy of the present approach is verified by comparing the present solution results with the available published data. Numerical results demonstrate that the wave number, inhomogeneous parameters and different values of aspect ratio have significant influence on the dynamic stress concentration factors around the elliptical cavity.

  12. Seismic anisotropy across the east African plateau from shear wave splitting analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, B. C.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G.; Tugume, F.

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies of the east African plateau reveal complicated patterns of seismic anisotropy that are not easily explained by a single mechanism. The pattern is defined by rift-parallel fast directions for stations within or near Cenozoic rift valleys, and near-null results in Precambrian terrains away from the rift. Data from 65 temporary Africa Array stations deployed between 2007 and 2011 are being used to make new shear wave splitting measurements. The stations span the east African plateau and cover both the eastern and western branches of the east African rift system, as well as unrifted Proterozoic and Archean terrains in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia. Through analysis of shear wave splitting we will better constrain the distribution of seismic anisotropy, and and from it gain new insight into the tectonic evolution of east Africa.

  13. Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C. L.; Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G.; Sotnikov, V.

    2014-06-15

    In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (Ω{sub i} ≪ ω ≪ Ω{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5 kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E × B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

  14. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  15. Design procedures for Strain Hardening Cement Composites (SHCC) and measurement of their shear properties by mechanical and 2-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswani, Karan

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the behaviour and applications of strain hardening cement composites (SHCC). Application of SHCC for use in slabs of common configurations was studied and design procedures are prepared by employing yield line theory and integrating it with simplified tri-linear model developed in Arizona State University by Dr. Barzin Mobasher and Dr. Chote Soranakom. Intrinsic material property of moment-curvature response for SHCC was used to derive the relationship between applied load and deflection in a two-step process involving the limit state analysis and kinematically admissible displacements. For application of SHCC in structures such as shear walls, tensile and shear properties are necessary for design. Lot of research has already been done to study the tensile properties and therefore shear property study was undertaken to prepare a design guide. Shear response of textile reinforced concrete was investigated based on picture frame shear test method. The effects of orientation, volume of cement paste per layer, planar cross-section and volume fraction of textiles were investigated. Pultrusion was used for the production of textile reinforced concrete. It is an automated set-up with low equipment cost which provides uniform production and smooth final surface of the TRC. A 3-D optical non-contacting deformation measurement technique of digital image correlation (DIC) was used to conduct the image analysis on the shear samples by means of tracking the displacement field through comparison between the reference image and deformed images. DIC successfully obtained full-field strain distribution, displacement and strain versus time responses, demonstrated the bonding mechanism from perspective of strain field, and gave a relation between shear angle and shear strain.

  16. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  17. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed.

  18. Convective and Diffusive Energetic Particle Losses Induced by Shear Alfven Waves in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.; Voornveld, R. van; Classen, I. G. J.; Jaemsae, S.

    2010-05-07

    We present here the first phase-space characterization of convective and diffusive energetic particle losses induced by shear Alfven waves in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. While single toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and Alfven cascades (AC) eject resonant fast ions in a convective process, an overlapping of AC and TAE spatial structures leads to a large fast-ion diffusion and loss. Diffusive fast-ion losses have been observed with a single TAE above a certain threshold in the fluctuation amplitude.

  19. Arterial Stiffness Estimation by Shear Wave Elastography: Validation in Phantoms with Mechanical Testing.

    PubMed

    Maksuti, Elira; Widman, Erik; Larsson, David; Urban, Matthew W; Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor found to correlate with a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. It has been suggested that shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to quantitatively measure local arterial shear modulus, but an accuracy assessment of the technique for arterial applications has not yet been performed. In this study, the influence of confined geometry on shear modulus estimation, by both group and phase velocity analysis, was assessed, and the accuracy of SWE in comparison with mechanical testing was measured in nine pressurized arterial phantoms. The results indicated that group velocity with an infinite medium assumption estimated shear modulus values incorrectly in comparison with mechanical testing in arterial phantoms (6.7 ± 0.0 kPa from group velocity and 30.5 ± 0.4 kPa from mechanical testing). To the contrary, SWE measurements based on phase velocity analysis (30.6 ± 3.2 kPa) were in good agreement with mechanical testing, with a relative error between the two techniques of 8.8 ± 6.0% in the shear modulus range evaluated (40-100 kPa). SWE by phase velocity analysis was validated to accurately measure stiffness in arterial phantoms. PMID:26454623

  20. Shear wave velocity models retrieved using Rg wave dispersion data in shallow crust in some regions of southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian; Motazedian, Dariush; Corchete, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Many crucial tasks in seismology, such as locating seismic events and estimating focal mechanisms, need crustal velocity models. The velocity models of shallow structures are particularly important in the simulation of ground motions. In southern Ontario, Canada, many small shallow earthquakes occur, generating high-frequency Rayleigh ( Rg) waves that are sensitive to shallow structures. In this research, the dispersion of Rg waves was used to obtain shear-wave velocities in the top few kilometers of the crust in the Georgian Bay, Sudbury, and Thunder Bay areas of southern Ontario. Several shallow velocity models were obtained based on the dispersion of recorded Rg waves. The Rg waves generated by an m N 3.0 natural earthquake on the northern shore of Georgian Bay were used to obtain velocity models for the area of an earthquake swarm in 2007. The Rg waves generated by a mining induced event in the Sudbury area in 2005 were used to retrieve velocity models between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River. The Rg waves generated by the largest event in a natural earthquake swarm near Thunder Bay in 2008 were used to obtain a velocity model in that swarm area. The basic feature of all the investigated models is that there is a top low-velocity layer with a thickness of about 0.5 km. The seismic velocities changed mainly within the top 2 km, where small earthquakes often occur.

  1. Nonlinear evolution of interacting oblique waves on two-dimensional shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Choi, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of critical layer nonlinearity are considered on spatially growing oblique instability waves on nominally two-dimensional shear layers between parallel streams. The analysis shows that three-dimensional effects cause nonlinearity to occur at much smaller amplitudes than it does in two-dimensional flows. The nonlinear instability wave amplitude is determined by an integro-differential equation with cubic type nonlinearity. The numerical solutions to this equation are worked out and discussed in some detail. The numerical solutions always end in a singularity at a finite downstream distance.

  2. Propagation of shear elastic and electromagnetic waves in one dimensional piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Shi, P; Chen, C Q; Zou, W N

    2015-01-01

    Coupled shear (SH) elastic and electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating oblique to a one dimensional periodic piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composite are investigated using the transfer matrix method. Closed-form expression of the dispersion relations is derived. We find that the band structures of the periodic composite show simultaneously the features of phononic and photonic crystals. Strong interaction between the elastic and EM waves near the center of the Brillouin zone (i.e., phonon-polariton) is revealed. It is shown the elastic branch of the band structures is more sensitive to the piezoelectric effect while the phonon-polariton is more sensitive to the piezomagnetic effect of the composite. PMID:25200701

  3. Quasi-plane shear wave propagation induced by acoustic radiation force with a focal line region: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Abbott, Derek; Lu, Minhua; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave propagation speed has been regarded as an attractive indicator for quantitatively measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues. While most existing techniques use acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation with focal spot region based on linear array transducers, we try to employ a special ARF with a focal line region and apply it to viscoelastic materials to create shear waves. First, a two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with 64 × 128 fully controllable elements is realised and simulated to generate this special ARF. Then three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the resulting shear wave propagation through tissue phantom materials. Three different phantoms are explored in our simulation study using: (a) an isotropic viscoelastic medium, (b) within a cylindrical inclusion, and (c) a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium. For each phantom, the ARF creates a quasi-plane shear wave which has a preferential propagation direction perpendicular to the focal line excitation. The propagation of the quasi-plane shear wave is investigated and then used to reconstruct shear moduli sequentially after the estimation of shear wave speed. In the phantom with a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium, the anisotropy results in maximum speed parallel to the fiber direction and minimum speed perpendicular to the fiber direction. The simulation results show that the line excitation extends the displacement field to obtain a large imaging field in comparison with spot excitation, and demonstrate its potential usage in measuring the mechanical properties of anisotropic tissues. PMID:26768475

  4. Recent developments in IR metrology using quadri wave lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, W.; Bourgeois, G.; Deprez, M.; Homassel, E.; Wattellier, B.

    2015-10-01

    We present various applications of Quadri Wave Lateral Shearing Interferometry to infrared optical metrology. Phasics has developed wave front sensors compatible with wavelengths ranging from 193nm to 14 μm. Several camera technologies are integrated with patented diffractive optics adapted to the various spectral ranges. In the infrared range, InGaAs, MCT and microbolometers are used as light sensors. We developed a bench to qualify lenses with diameter from 2mm to 100mm in the LWIR spectral range. Thanks to an innovative ray-trace algorithm, we are able to compare the wave front measurement to the optical design enabling a feedback between lens manufacture and design. We also developed a VSWIR wave front sensor with a constant accuracy from 0.4μm to 1.7 μm. It also includes the Extended Tilt feature that enables sub-mrad accuracy on tilt measurement over a range of more than +-30°.

  5. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate: anomalously slow crust in southwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Ward, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The Anatolian Plate is composed of different lithospheric blocks and ribbon continents amalgamated during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean and Neotethys Ocean along a subduction margin. Using ambient noise tomography, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate. A total of 215 broad-band seismic stations were used spanning 7 yr of recording to compute 13 778 cross-correlations and obtain Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements for periods between 8 and 40 s. We then perform a shear wave inversion to calculate the seismic velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show that the overall crustal shear wave velocities of the Anatolian crust are low (˜3.4 km s-1), indicative of a felsic overall composition. We find that prominent lateral seismic velocity gradients correlate with Tethyan suture zones, supporting the idea that the neotectonic structures of Turkey are exploiting the lithospheric weaknesses associated with the amalgamation of Anatolia. Anomalously slow shear wave velocities (˜3.15 km s-1 at 25 km) are located in the western limb of the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey. In the upper crust, we find that these low shear wave velocities correlate well with the projected location of a carbonate platform unit (Bey Dağlari) beneath the Lycian Nappe complex. In the lower crust and upper mantle of this region, we propose that the anomalously slow velocities are due to the introduction of aqueous fluids related to the underplating of accretionary material from the underthrusting of a buoyant, attenuated continental fragment similar to the Eratosthenes seamount. We suggest that this fragment controlled the location of the formation of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator fault in the eastern Aegean Sea during rapid slab rollback of the Aegean Arc in early Miocene times. Lastly, we observe that the uppermost mantle beneath continental Anatolia is generally slow (˜4.2 km s-1

  6. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  7. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  8. Anatomy of Drift Ridges Revealed by Shallow Seismic Shear Wave Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ridges, up to 30 m high and generally oriented NE-SW across the Illinois Episode drift plain in southern Illinois, USA, have been variously interpreted as eskers, crevasse fills, moraines, and kames. The ice contact diamictons and sorted sediments that occur in these ridges are typically Illinois Episode in age and likely record the final melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet near its southernmost extent in the continental U.S. Shallow shear wave seismic profiles across several of these ridges help reveal their complex origins. Borehole control includes sediment cores with shear wave and natural gamma logs. The shear wave profiles reveal m-scale features of drift and bedrock over a depth range of 1 up to 100 m. Terrapin Ridge overlies a bedrock valley with drift up to 70 m thick. Dipping seismic reflectors on the stoss side are interpreted as imbricated till sheets, whereas horizontal reflectors on the lee side are interpreted as mainly outwash sediments over basal till and glacilacustrine sediment. Although most ridges were probably formed during the Illinois Episode, based on current data, the core of this particular ridge may be a remnant moraine from a pre-Illinois Episode glaciation.

  9. Seismic Anisotropy Determined by Shear-Wave Splitting Beneath the Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Yang, Jiansi; Tian, Baofeng; Zheng, Yu

    2016-02-01

    We monitored shear-wave splitting of SKS phase in global teleseismic data recorded by 36 seismic stations in the eastern Tibetan Plateau (95°-100°E, 31°-36°N) from May to October 2010, to obtain the characteristics of upper-mantle anisotropy beneath the study area. Although the observation duration was short, we had a dense station coverage in the study area and the results are believed valid. The results suggest the presence of moderate to strong seismic anisotropy in the mantle beneath the plateau. The polarization directions of fast shear-wave in the Qiangtang block and the Ganzi-Yushu fault are southeast, which is in agreement with the previous results and the strikes of regional faults. The northeast and southeast trending polarization directions in the Bayan Har block can be explained by the northward movement of the plate. Combining the results of shear-wave splitting in the crust and upper-mantle provides the characteristics of lithospheric deformation. Our results suggest that the crust and upper-mantle in this area have vertically coherent deformation. The delay time is in the range of 0.68-2.31 s which mainly comes from the upper-mantle, suggesting strong anisotropy in the mantle beneath the study area.

  10. Shear Wave Elastography in the Living, Perfused, Post-Delivery Placenta.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Stephen A; Parker, Kevin J; Ormachea, Juvenal; Wood, Ronald W; Stodgell, Christopher J; Katzman, Philip J; Pressman, Eva K; Miller, Richard K

    2016-06-01

    The placenta is the critical interface between the mother and the developing fetus and is essential for survival and growth. Despite the widespread use of ultrasound imaging and Doppler in obstetrics and gynecology and the recent growth of elastographic technologies, little is known about the biomechanical (elastic shear wave) properties of the placenta and the range of normal and pathologic parameters that are present. This study uses a well-developed protocol for perfusing whole placentas, post-delivery, to maintain tissue integrity and function for hours. In this model, the placenta is living, whole and maintained within normal physiologic parameters such as flow, arterial pressure and oxygen, throughout examination by ultrasound, Doppler and shear wave elastography. The preliminary results indicate that normal placental tissue on the fetal side has shear wave speeds on the order of 2 m/s, in a range similar to those of animal livers. Some abnormalities are found outside this range, and thus, elastographic measures of the placenta may provide useful assessments related to the state of the tissue. PMID:27006269

  11. Shear wave velocity profiling and evaluation of liquefaction potential in northeast Arkansas using simplified equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, A.; Haran, S.

    2010-03-01

    Soil liquefaction in Northeast Arkansas (NEA) is expected to result in substantial damage during seismic events. Insitu shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of the subsurface, to a depth of at least 30-meters (according to the International Building Code or IBC), is necessary for determining the "Site Class", which is subsequently used in the structural analysis of buildings, and can be used as a screening tool to evaluate the depth and thickness of potentially liquefiable soil layers. Shear wave velocity profiles at 3 sites in Craighead County, AR were determined utilizing simplified equipment by means of a non-invasive technique. The results indicated good agreement with previous work performed by other researchers. These profiles were used to evaluate the liquefaction resistance at these sites using the simplified procedure by Seed and Idriss (Vs approach). The liquefaction resistance was also evaluated using the Standard Penetration Test (SPT approach) results from the geotechnical investigations that were conducted by others. The equipment and procedure should allow governmental agencies and engineering professional to determine the shear wave velocity profiles of the upper soil zones at relatively low cost. These profiles can aid different agencies in mapping areas of interest and assessing seismic hazard potential during planning future development or evaluating current facilities.

  12. Shear-Wave Splitting around Hawaii: Is it Resolving Upwelling-Related Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. T.; Bolelmann, G. H.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2001-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting observations allow us to study mantle deformation, and it can thus help to constrain mantle flow in the vicinity of hotspots. Hypotheses for the cause of shear-wave splitting (and thus seismic anisotropy) in this environment include the "parabolic asthenospheric flow" model: radial flow from a mantle plume impinging on a moving lithosphere is dragged by the plate in the direction of absolute plate motion. In map view, this gives a parabolic pattern of flow, opening in the direction of relative plate motion. We present new shear-wave splitting observations from land and ocean stations near the Hawaiian Islands that are explained by the parabolic flow model, suggesting that anisotropy is primarily asthenospheric. At greater distances from Hawaii, splitting seems to be primarily controlled by lithospheric anisotropy that was fossilized into the plate during the process of sea-floor spreading. We speculate that this change in depth of anisotropy may be explained if (1) dislocation-creep persists to deeper depths there than in other regions, perhaps due to the higher temperatures near hotspots and (2) most of the fossilized anistropy around Hawaii was erased due to lithospheric reheating. >http://pangea.stanford.edu/ ~ktwalker/Hawaii

  13. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5wt% NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5 MPa to 10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  14. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  15. Modeling and analysis of a tunable piezoelectric structure for transverse shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenagani, Shiva S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2008-03-01

    An analytical investigation of the transverse shear wave mode tuning with a resonator mass (packing mass) on a Lead Zirconium Titanate (PZT) crystal bonded together with a host plate and its equivalent electric circuit parameters are presented. The energy transfer into the structure for this type of wave modes are much higher in this new design. The novelty of the approach here is the tuning of a single wave mode in the thickness direction using a resonator mass. First, a one-dimensional constitutive model assuming the strain induced only in the thickness direction is considered. As the input voltage is applied to the PZT crystal in the thickness direction, the transverse normal stress distribution induced into the plate is assumed to have parabolic distribution, which is presumed as a function of the geometries of the PZT crystal, packing mass, substrate and the wave penetration depth of the generated wave. For the PZT crystal, the harmonic wave guide solution is assumed for the mechanical displacement and electric fields, while for the packing mass, the former is solved using the boundary conditions. The electromechanical characteristics in terms of the stress transfer, mechanical impedance, electrical displacement, velocity and electric field are analyzed. The analytical solutions for the aforementioned entities are presented on the basis of varying the thickness of the PZT crystal and the packing mass. The results show that for a 25% increase in the thickness of the PZT crystal, there is ~38% decrease in the first resonant frequency, while for the same change in the thickness of the packing mass, the decrease in the resonant frequency is observed as ~35%. Most importantly the tuning of the generated wave can be accomplished with the packing mass at lower frequencies easily. To the end, an equivalent electric circuit, for tuning the transverse shear wave mode is analyzed.

  16. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  17. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  18. Production seismology: The use of shear waves to monitor and mode production in a poro-reactive and interactive reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Crampin, S.; Zatsepin, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new understanding of stressed fluid-saturated porous rock shows that rock responds to small changes in stress, pressure, and other phenomena, by modifying the micro-scale geometry of intergranular microcracks and pores. We show that shear-wave propagation is directly coupled to this internal fluid/rock geometry, so that the micro-scale deformation can be monitored by analyzing the behavior of seismic shear waves. The shear waves carry three-dimensional information and are much more sensitive than P-waves to the possibly-marginal anisotropic changes in reservoirs during hydrocarbon production. These fluid/rock changes can be numerically modeled, and can be monitored in detail by analyzing shear waves along a few appropriate ray paths. Consequently, shear-wave technology could provide a feedback mechanism for production engineers for controlling the progress of production fronts and in the development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In order to implement such techniques, high-frequency shear waves need to be recorded along comparatively short ray paths within the reservoir itself. This a new requirement for seismology which existing exploration technologies cannot meet. Possible techniques for production seismology are suggested.

  19. On the theory of MHD waves in a shear flow of a magnetized turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.; Dimitrov, Zlatan D.; Hristov, Tihomir S.

    The set of equations for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a shear flow is consecutively derived. This investigation is devoted on the wave heating of space plasmas. The proposed scenario involves the presence of a self-sustained turbulence and magnetic field. In the framework of Langevin--Burgers approach the influence of the turbulence is described by an additional external random force in the MHD system. Kinetic equation for the spectral density of the slow magnetosonic (Alfvénic) mode is derived in the short wavelength (WKB) approximation. The results show a pressing need for conduction of numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with a random driver to take into account the influence of the long wavelength modes and to give a more precise analytical assessment of the short ones. Realistic MC calculations for the heating rate and shear stress tensor should give an answer to the perplexing problem for the missing viscosity in accretion disks and reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. It is supposed that the heating mechanism by alfvén waves absorption is common for many kinds of space plasmas from solar corona to active galactic nuclei and the solution of these longstanding puzzles deserves active interdisciplinary research. The work is illustrated by typical solutions of MHD equations and their spectral densities obtained by numerical calculations or by analytical solutions with the help of Heun functions. The amplification coefficient of slow magnetosonic wave in shear flow is analytically calculated. Pictorially speaking, if in WKB approximation we treat Alfvén waves as particles -- this amplification is effect of ``lasing of alfvons.''

  20. Generation of shear Alfvén waves by repetitive electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Van Compernolle, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-01-01

    ELF/ULF waves are powerful tools for submarine communication, geophysical mapping, and radiation belt remediation. However, due to their large wavelength (on the order of 102-104 km or 0.1-10 RE) it is difficult to launch them using ground-based antennas. Alternatively, these waves can be generated by modulating the temperature of the ionosphere using ground-based HF transmitters. The paper reports a detailed laboratory study on the generation of shear Alfvén waves by repetitive electron heating. The experiments were conducted on the large plasma device at University of California, Los Angeles. In the experiment, 10 pulses of high-power microwaves (250 kW, 1 µs each) near the plasma frequency modulated at a variable fraction between 0.1 and 1.0 of fci are launched transverse to the background field. In addition to bulk electron heating the interaction generates a population of fast electrons in the tail of the distribution function. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acts as an antenna that radiates shear Alfvén waves. It is demonstrated that a shear Alfvén wave at a controllable, arbitrary frequency (f < fci) can be coherently driven by the repetitive microwave pulses. The radiation pattern and power dependence of the virtual antenna are also presented. The experiments provide a novel virtual antenna concept relevant to the equatorial region where the Earth's magnetic field is horizontal and the field-aligned plasma density gradient is small. The results are important to design of new mobile ionospheric heaters for equatorial and middle latitude locations.

  1. A shear-wave velocity model of the European upper mantle from automated inversion of seismic shear and surface waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C.; Meier, T.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.; Viereck-Götte, L.

    2012-04-01

    Broadband waveforms recorded at stations in Europe and surrounding regions were inverted for shear-wave velocity of the European upper mantle. For events between 1995 and 2007 seismograms were collected from all permanent stations for which data are available via the data centers ORFEUS, GEOFON, ReNaSs and IRIS. In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments, including SVEKALAPKO, TOR, Eifel Plume, EGELADOS and other projects. Automated Multimode Inversion of surface and S-wave forms was applied to extract structural information from the seismograms, in the form of linear equations with uncorrelated uncertainties. Successful waveform fits for about 70,000 seismograms yielded over 300,000 independent linear equations that were solved together for a three-dimensional tomographic model. Resolution of the imaging is particularly high in the mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere. The highest velocities in the mantle lithosphere of the East European Craton are found at about 150 km depth. There are no indications for a large scale deep cratonic root below about 330 km depth. Lateral variations within the cratonic mantle lithosphere are resolved by our model as well. The locations of diamond bearing kimberlites correlate with reduced S-wave velocities in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. This anomaly is present in regions of both Proterozoic and Archean crust, pointing to an alteration of the mantle lithosphere after the formation of the craton. Strong lateral changes in S-wave velocity are found at the western margin of the East European Craton and hint to erosion of cratonic mantle lithosphere beneath the Scandes by hot asthenosphere. The mantle lithosphere beneath Western Europe and between the Tornquist-Teyissere Zone and the Elbe Line shows moderately high velocities and is of an intermediate character, between cratonic lithosphere and the thin lithosphere of central Europe. In central Europe, Caledonian and Variscian sutures are not associated with

  2. Shear-wave polarization anisotropy in the mantle wedge beneath the southern part of Tohoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, J.; Nakajima, J.; Hasegawa, A.

    2003-12-01

    We investigated shear-wave polarization anisotropy in the mantle wedge beneath the southern part of Tohoku, Japan, by using waveform data of intermediate depth earthquakes with M>2.5 recorded by the seismic networks of Tohoku University and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). We selected waveform data with ray paths whose incident angles to the surface are 35 degrees or less to avoid contamination of particle motions by converted phases. All the seismograms thus selected were filtered with bandpassed ranges of 2-8 Hz. Cross-correlation method [Ando et al., 1983] was used for determining delay time between the leading and following shear-waves (delay time) and the leading shear-wave polarization direction (fast direction). Two horizontal components of observed seismograms were rotated with the direction from 0 to 180 degrees with an interval of 5 degrees, and shifted one horizontal component by a time lag. The time lag varied from 0 to 1 s with an interval of 0.01 s. The length of time window used to calculate correlation coefficient was set to be nearly equal to one cycle of the shear-wave. We do not use the data whose maximum correlation coefficient is less than 0.8. Obtained results show that most of the fast directions at stations in the back-arc side are nearly E-W, whereas those at stations in the fore-arc side are N-S. We infer that the anisotropy caused by lattice-preferred orientation of olivine, which is probably produced by flow in the mantle wedge, is a likely candidate for the observed shear-wave splitting with E-W trend fast directions in the back-arc side. Although it is not certain what causes the N-S trend fast directions in the for-arc side, the same trend is seen in the previous studies of other areas in Tohoku [Okada et al.,1995; Nakajima, 2002]. Observed delay times are mostly 0.1-0.3 s, which is consistent with the results of Okada et al. [1995] and Nakajima [2002]. Acknowledgments: We are grateful to the staff of the JMA for allowing us to use

  3. Phase velocities and attenuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L).

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-12-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb-Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb-Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb-Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0-500 Hz are presented. PMID:22225009

  4. A cumulative shear mechanism for tissue damage initiation in shock-wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Colonius, Tim; Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in the renal injury incurred during shock-wave lithotripsy. However, it is unclear how tissue damage is initiated, and significant injury typically occurs only after a sufficient dose of shock waves. While it has been suggested that shock-induced shearing might initiate injury, estimates indicate that individual shocks do not produce sufficient shear to do so. In this paper, we hypothesize that the cumulative shear of the many shocks is damaging. This mechanism depends upon whether there is sufficient time between shocks for tissue to relax to its unstrained state. We investigate the mechanism with a physics-based simulation model wherein the the basement membranes that define the tubules and vessels in the inner medulla are represented as elastic shells surrounded by viscous fluid. Material properties are estimated from in vitro tests of renal basement membranes and documented mechanical properties of cells and extracellular gels. Estimates for the net shear deformation from a typical lithotripter shock (~ 0.1%) are found from a separate dynamic shock simulation. The results suggest that the larger interstitial volume (~ 40%) near the papilla tip gives the tissue there a relaxation time comparable to clinical shock delivery rates (~ 1Hz), thus allowing shear to accumulate. Away from the papilla tip, where the interstitial volume is smaller (≲ 20%), the model tissue relaxes completely before the next shock would be delivered. Implications of the model are that slower delivery rates and broader focal zones should both decrease injury, consistent with some recent observations. PMID:17507147

  5. Cluster observations of Shear-mode surface waves diverging from Geomagnetic Tail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Dombeck, J. P.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S. A.; Mouikis, C.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first Cluster spacecraft study of the intense (δB/B~0.5, δE/VAB~0.5) equatorial plane surface waves diverging from magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail at ~17 Re. Using phase lag analysis with multi-spacecraft measurements, we quantitatively determine the wavelength and phase velocity of the waves with spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.03 Hz to 1 Hz and wavelengths from much larger (4Re) than to comparable to the H+ gyroradius (~300km). The phase velocities track the strong variations in the equatorial plane projection of the reconnection outflow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation direction and wavelength of the observed surface waves resemble those of flapping waves of the magnetotail current sheet, suggesting a same origin shared by both of these waves. The observed waves appear ubiquitous in the outflows near magnetotail reconnection. Evidence is found that the observed waves are associated with velocity shear in reconnection outflows. Analysis shows that observed waves are associated with strong field-aligned Alfvenic Poynting flux directed away from the reconnection region toward Earth. These observations present a scenario in which the observed surface waves are driven and convected through a velocity-shear type instability by high-speed (~1000km) reconnection outflows tending to slow down due to power dissipation through Poynting flux. The mapped Poynting flux (100ergs/cm2s) and longitudinal scales (10-100 km) to 100km altitude suggest that the observed waves and their motions are an important boundary condition for night-side aurora. Figure: a) The BX-GSM in the geomagnetic tail current sheet. b) The phase difference wavelet spectrum between Bz_GSM from SC2 and SC3, used to determine the wave phase velocity, is correlated with the reconnection outflow velocity (represented by H+ VX-GSM) c) The spacecraft trajectory through magnetotail reconnection. d) The observed equatorial plane surface wave

  6. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  7. Measurement of the Viscosity-Density Product Using Multiple Reflections of Ultrasonic Shear Horizontal Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Adamson, Justus D.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14-MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45°-90° fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo is obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid. The reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface is obtained by plotting the natural logarithm of the ratio (amplitude for liquid/amplitude for water) versus the echo number and determining the slope. Because the slope of this line is not affected by changes in the pulser voltage and/or system electronics, the sensor is self-calibrating and a very accurate measurement of the reflection coefficient results. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. Since these solutions are Newtonian fluids, the data obtained from reflection coefficient measurements yield a value of the viscosity-density product. In tests, the viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14 seconds and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank.

  8. Shear-wave reflection seismics as bridge between georadar and deeper subsurface surveying - a case study for quick-clay landslides in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Malehmir, Alireza; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2013-04-01

    As part of a joint project studying clay-related landslides in Nordic countries, we successfully tested the use of shear-wave reflection seismics to survey shallow structures that are known to be related to quick-clay landslide processes. Co-sponsored via the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) program 'Geoscientists Without Borders (GWB)', several international groups apply a suite of applied geophysical and geotechnical methods to understand structural and physical conditions and the conditioning of this type of liquefaction. For this purpose, three 2D profiles were recorded in Frastad, southern Sweden, above the main slide plane area. Using a 120 m long streamer of 120 SH-geophones at 1 m spacing, and the ELVIS micro-vibrator as source, shear-wave data of very high quality were gathered, allowing a vertical resolution of 1 m and less. The longest profile along a paved road shows clear internal structuring of the up to 50 m thick marine sediments as well as strong undulations of top basement underneath. Different sedimentary sequences can be distinguished, and the quick clay sequence is interpreted in 15-20 m depth, which correlates well with the height of the most recent scarp. The sedimentary shear wave velocities suggest extremely low values of 100-120 m/s, which geotechnically prohibits building areas. In addition, test measurements on a stubble field showed the first time that the suppression of Love waves is not only restricted to paved surfaces and may also be achieved if reflection contrasts and low dispersion allow a suitable data processing. This opens new possibilities for a wide range of applications and specialized equipment adaptions with respect to reflection seismic surveying. In addition, the gap between structural data from georadar and P-wave seismic can be closed.

  9. Laboratory study of spiky potential structures associated with multi-harmonic shear-driven EIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlino, Robert; Ganguli, Guru; Kim, Su-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    A ubiquitous feature of electric fields observed in the Earth's auroral region is their spiky, repetitive nature, and appearance as either unipolar or bipolar pulses. They have been observed on a number of satellites including S3-3, Polar, Viking, and FAST. These spiky structures have been associated with regions of upward ion flows with transverse shear, and multi-harmonic electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves. The occurrence of these spiky structures has been attributed to various nonlinear processes, e.g., solitary waves. We will present results of a laboratory experiment performed in a double-ended Q machine, in which spiky potential waveforms were observed in association with coherent multi-harmonic EIC waves in a current-less plasma having a region of parallel ion flow with transverse shear. The spiky waveforms are shown to result from the linear superposition of phase-coherent EIC waves. Work at UI supported by NSF and DOE, work at NRL supported by ONR.

  10. Determination of shear wave velocity structure in the Rio Grande rift through receiver function and surface wave analysis, appendix B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-08-01

    Waveform modeling of radial component receiver functions from ANMO (Albuquerque, New Mexico Observatory) for three source back azimuths (northwest, southeast, and southwest) was performed. The receiver functions were derived through source equalization deconvolution of merged long period and short period digital three component seismograms. Derived S-wave velocity models reflect dominantly intermediate composition granitic rock in the upper crust (above 15 km depth, Vs 3.5 km/sec) and middle crust (15-25 km depth, Vs 3.5-3.7 km/sec). Lower crustal shear velocities of approximately 3.75-3.85 km/sec may be representative of intermediate-to-mafic granulite facies, possibly together with previously underplated mafic material and other precursor crustal rocks. Shear wave attenuation between about 30-34 km may indicate a lower crustal partial melt zone. A 3-to-6 km thick interval is interpreted as a partial melt zone in the upper mantle leading into less depleted spinel peridotite (Vs = 4.25-4.35 km/sec) near 37 km. Inversion of EPT-ALQ interstation dispersion data for average S-wave velocity structure produces a satisfactory velocity tie to the middle and lower crust portions of the southwest back azimuth model.

  11. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  12. An omnidirectional shear-horizontal guided wave EMAT for a metallic plate.

    PubMed

    Seung, Hong Min; Park, Chung Il; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for generation and measurement of omnidirectional shear-horizontal (SH) guided waves in metallic plates. The proposed EMAT requires a magnetic circuit configuration that allows omnidirectional SH wave transduction. It consists of a pair of ring-type permanent magnets that supply static magnetic fluxes and a specially wound coil that induces eddy currents. The Lorentz force acting along the circumferential direction is induced by the vertical static magnetic flux and the radial eddy current in a plate, resulting in omnidirectional SH wave generation. To maximize the transducer output at given excitation frequencies, optimal EMAT configurations are determined by numerical simulations and validated by experiments. The omnidirectivity of the proposed EMAT is also confirmed by the simulations and experiments. PMID:27058629

  13. Assessment of the performance of different EMAT configurations for shear horizontal and torsional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribichini, R.; Cegla, F.; Nagy, P. B.; Cawley, P.

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave-mode in plates and the torsional mode T(0,1) in pipe-like structures are extensively used in guided wave inspection. Different Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) configurations can be employed: Lorentz force Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) or magnetostrictive EMATs, directly applied on the sample or with a bonded strip of highly magnetostrictive material on the structure. This work compares the performance of these solutions on steel plates. The analysis shows that magnetostrictive EMATs directly applied on steel plates have comparatively poor performance, while large signal amplitudes can be achieved when a layer of highly magnetostrictive material is attached on the structure. PPM EMATs generate intermediate wave amplitudes while being non-contact.

  14. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Kümpel, H.-J.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD) of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a) elastic subsurface parameters and (b) zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003). The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami flooded region.

  15. High-n ideal and resistive shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Ideal and resistive MHD equations for the shear Alfven waves are studied in a low-..beta.. toroidal model by employing the high-n ballooning formalism. The ion sound effects are neglected. For an infinite shear slab, the ideal MHD model gives rise to a continuous spectrum of real frequencies and discrete eigenmodes (Alfven-Landau modes) with complex frequencies. With toroidal coupling effects due to nonuniform toroidal magnetic field, the continuum is broken up into small continuum bands and new discrete toroidal eigenmodes can exist inside the continuum gaps. Unstable ballooning eigenmodes are also introduced by the bad curvature when ..beta.. > ..beta../sub c/. The resistivity (n) can be considered perturbatively for the ideal modes. In addition, four branches of resistive modes are induced by the resistivity: (1) Resistive entropy modes which are stable (..delta..' < 0) with frequencies approaching zero as n/sup 3/5/, (3) Resistive periodic shear Alfven waves which approach the finite frequency end points of the continuum bands and n/sup 1/2, and (4) Resistive ballooning modes which are purely growing with growth rate proportional to eta/sup 1/3/..beta../sup 2/3/ as eta ..-->.. O and ..beta.. ..-->.. O.

  16. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotemberg, V.; Palmeri, M.; Nightingale, R.; Rouze, N.; Nightingale, K.

    2012-01-01

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0-35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s-1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively.

  17. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of planar defects in plates using low-frequency shear horizontal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunko, C. M.; King, R. B.; Tan, M.

    1982-05-01

    An ultrasonic technique is described that allows the determination of the through-thickness dimension and limited localization of planar defects (cracks) in an isotropic metal plate. The scattering of horizontally polarized shear (SH) plate waves by edge and buried planar defects is investigated using a variational integral expression. Numerical results are presented that allow the calculation of the SH plate wave signal amplitudes as a function of defect through-thickness dimension and location within a plate for two-dimensional cracks. It is shown that SH waves are particularly useful for detecting and sizing of crack-like defects. In addition, it is demonstrated that in plates, which can support a number of propagating SH plate waves, it is also possible to determine the relative position of a defect from interference phenomena. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally using an electromagnetic-acoustic transducer system to generate and detect 454-kHz SH wave signals along the normal to the circumference of a 1.22-m-diam steel pipe with a 15.9-mm wall thickness. The experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of using SH wave signals in quantitative nondestructive evaluation of butt welds.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  20. Areal and Shear Strain Coupling of PBO Borehole Strainmeters From Teleseismic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeloffs, E.; McCausland, W.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare borehole strainmeter data with tectonic models, we must know the coupling parameters relating elastic deformation of the strainmeter to strain in the surrounding rock. At least two coupling parameters are required: the ratios of instrument areal and shear strain to formation areal and shear strain, respectively. These coupling parameters depend on the relative elastic moduli of the formation, grout, and strainmeter, and typical elastic moduli yield nominal coupling parameters of 1.5 and 3. More accurate coupling parameters must be determined by analyzing each strainmeter's response to a known deformation source after the instrument has been grouted into the borehole. Borehole strainmeters installed by the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consist of four gauges, sampled at 20 Hz, that measure extension along distinct azimuths. Teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves that produce fractional gauge elongations > 10-7 , such as those from the M8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake of November 15, 2006, can be used to constrain the coupling parameters. A planar Love or Rayleigh wave is expected to have a simple strain field that produces the same waveform on all four gauges of a strainmeter. The two-parameter coupling model is consistent with the variation of surface wave amplitudes as functions of azimuth for the borehole strainmeter data analyzed to date, although most of the PBO strainmeters require that differences in the relative gains of the four gauges be estimated as well. Fits to the data can be improved for some strainmeters by allowing for two distinct shear strain coupling parameters, and/or for a small (<10 degrees) error in the orientation of the strainmeter as measured during installation. However, data from more earthquakes will need to be analyzed before these refinements can be called significant. The Rayleigh wave data provide tight constraints on the ratio of shear to areal coupling. For borehole

  1. Investigation of Mantle Kinematics beneath Hellenic-Subduction Zone by using Teleseismic Direct Shear Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confal, Judith; Eken, Tuna; Tilmann, Frederik; Yolsal-evikbilen, Seda; Çubuk, Yeşim; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2016-04-01

    Direct shear-wave splitting measurements based on the Reference Station Technique in the southern Aegean Sea revealed significant seismic anisotropy. The technique overcomes possible contamination from the source-side anisotropy on direct S-wave signals recorded at a station pair by maximizing the correlation between the seismic traces at reference and target stations after correcting the reference stations for known receiver-side anisotropy and the target stations for arbitrary splitting parameters probed via a grid search. We initially determined receiver-side anisotropy derived from SKS splitting measurements performed at four broadband stations. Following the bootstrap approach, in which only these four stations with well-constrained SKS splitting parameters are used as seeds to determine the splitting parameters of seismic stations of the EGELADOS temporary network in an iterative manner, we obtained splitting parameters at 35 stations with good-quality S-wave signals extracted from 82 teleseismic events. The fast polarization directions (φ) show a general trend of NNE-SSW orientation that ranges from 5.8° to 51.8°. Two stations in the west close to the Hellenic Trench and one in the east show N-S oriented fast polarizations. In the back-arc region three stations exhibit NE-SW orientation. Split time delays (δt) vary between 1.0s and 1.6s. Employing direct S-waves enabled more stable and reliable splitting measurements, with an average of 46 individual measurements. The overall fast polarization variations tend to be similar to those obtained from previous SKS splitting studies in the region but indicate a more consistent pattern. Splitting analyses on direct shear waves resulted in larger split time delays compared to the previous studies, possibly because they travel along a longer path in the same anisotropic structure. Observed differences between direct shear waves-derived (this study) and previous SKS splitting measurements could be due to the fact

  2. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  3. The critical layer for gravity waves in sheared rotating stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois

    2012-11-01

    We re-examined the propagation of gravity waves through a critical layer surrounded by two inertial levels in the case of a constant vertically sheared flow. This problem involves a transition from balanced (where the quasi-geostrophic approximation applies) to sheared gravity waves. The three-dimensional disturbance is described analytically using both an exact solution and a WKB approximation valid for large Richardson numbers. In contradiction with past studies which show that there is finite reflection and did not analyse the transmission (Yamanaka and Tanaka, 1984), we find that reflection is extremely too small to be significant. The reasons that previous authors made incorrect evaluations are related to the fact that (i) the equations yielding to these results are extremely involved and (ii) the values of reflection and transmission coefficients are exponentially small or null, e.g. quite difficult to cross check numerically. Interestingly, these values are exactly like in the much simpler non-rotating case analysed by Booker and Bretherton (1966). Some practical implications for the problem of the emission of gravity waves by potential vorticity anomalies, analysed recently in Lott et al. (2013), are also discussed.

  4. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  5. Layer stripping of shear-wave splitting in marine PS waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R. Ross; Westbrook, Graham K.; Peacock, Sheila

    2009-03-01

    The properties of split S waves can be used to infer: (1) the state of stress and strain in the Earth; (2) the directional dependence of hydraulic conductivity and (3) small changes in pore-fluid pressure in the rock mass that occur in response to dynamic processes, such as the earthquake cycle. Measurements of split S waves are particularly useful in shallow (<1000 m subseabed) marine sediments, where S-wave splitting from an azimuthal elastic anisotropy is typically produced by the presence of near-vertical aligned cracks. Here we present a method of measuring small amounts of S-wave splitting in marine P-to-S mode-converted waves, and illustrate the technique with data from an ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) deployed on the west Svalbard continental slope. The analysis applies a modified version of the Alford rotation and layer-stripping technique developed for zero-offset S-wave sources and treats PS waves that undergo mode conversion at reflectors that are close to the seabed in comparison with the overlying water depth. When the seismic record contains coherent signal on both the in-plane and out-of-plane components, the layer-stripping technique is capable of decoupling the S-wave splitting from the effects of P-wave velocity anisotropy and reflector dip that influence the downgoing, P wave, part of the ray path. The amount of S-wave splitting in the data is small, however, and we find that this causes a greater practical problem for the analysis than the known theoretical limitations of the layer-stripping theory (such as use of a finite-offset source). For the analysis of the example data we develop a number of procedures that are necessary to mitigate the low signal-to-noise levels. These include using a wide range of shot-receiver azimuths to generate data redundancy, methods of identifying and rejecting poor measurements, and a predictive layer-stripping approach that minimizes the propagation of errors through the analysis that arise from scatter in the

  6. Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Around the Korean Peninsula Using the Rayleigh Wave Signature of the North Korea Underground Nuclear Explosion on May 25, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Shin, J.; Chi, H. C.; Sheen, D.; Park, J.; Cho, C.

    2011-12-01

    The crustal structure around the Korean Peninsula was investigated by analyzing the Rayleigh waves generated from the 2nd North Korea underground nuclear explosion on May 25, 2009. Group velocity dispersion curves were measured from vertical component waveforms of 20 broadband stations in the range of 194 to 1183 km from the test site. The measured dispersion curves were inverted to get shear-wave velocity models for depths from 0 to 50 km. The dispersion curves and the velocity models clearly show lateral variations in the crustal structure, which could be more clearly classified into the North Korea-Northeast China group, the Western Margin of the East Sea group, and the Japan Basin group. For each group, an averaged dispersion curve and an averaged velocity model were measured. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the North Korea-Northeast China group shows that the mean shear-wave velocity of the Moho discontinuity, which is known to be located at approximately 35 km, is 4.37 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.15 km/s. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Japan Basin group shows a mean shear-wave velocity of 4.26 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.14 km/s in the layer between 16 and 22 km. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Western Margin of the East Sea group shows characteristics of a transition zone between the North Korea-Northeast China group, which represents continental crust, and the Japan Basin group, which represents oceanic crust. The mean shear-wave velocity in the layer between 16 and 22 km is 4.12 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.05 km/s.

  7. Anisotropy Orientation from SKS Shear Wave Splitting, along the Southeastern Margin of Arabia, Dhofar Region, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Lazki, A.; Ebinger, C.; Kendall, M.; Helffrich, G.; Leroy, S.; Tiberi, C.; Stuart, G.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Dhofar-Socotra Broadband Seismic Experiment, eighteen broadband stations were temporarily deployed on the southeast margin of Arabia in Dhofar region, Sultanate of Oman. The Dhofar-Socotra seismic experiment stations were deployed for the period September-2005 to August-2006 and covered an area of about 250km along and 100km across the margin. The spacing between stations is about 20 kilometers. The objective of this deployment is to map the structure and rheology of the crust and upper mantle of the young Gulf of Aden passive margins. This deployment is aimed at studying the transition zone across the passive margin. In this study we use shear wave splitting methodology to map upper mantle lateral anisotropy variation beneath the study area. We have categorically selected events that were at epicenter distances larger than 85 degrees. The SKS and few PKS splitting results show roughly N-S orientations for stations located on the eastern parts of the study area. This agrees with observation on stations located on the exposed Arabian shield region, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Since most of the events were coming from east, this made the analyses more difficult (i.e., only one shear-wave is excited). However, a more NW-SE orientation is consistently observed on the three most westerly stations. Generally the splitting magnitudes are small (~0.6sec). Anisotropy variations were observed to occur along the margin (not across). Such variations require careful analysis of the pre-Tertiary rocks and basement that are masked by the Tertiary deposits. Keywords: Arabia, SKS, Shear Wave Splitting, anisotropy, passive continental margin