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Sample records for 2-d time-dependent creep

  1. Time-dependent Brittle Creep in Rock: The Influence of Confining Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2009-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle creep deformation is fundamental to understanding the long-term evolution and dynamics of the Earth’s crust. The presence of water promotes environment-dependent stress corrosion cracking that allows rock to deform at a constant stress below its short-term failure stress over extended periods of time. Here we report illustrative results from an experimental study of the influence of an elevated temperature on time-dependent brittle creep in water-saturated samples of Bentheim sandstone (initial porosity, Φ = 23%), Darley Dale sandstone (Φ = 13%) and Crab Orchard sandstones (Φ = 4%). We present data obtained from both conventional, constant stress creep experiments and from stress-stepping creep experiments performed under effective confining pressures in the range 10 MPa to 50 MPa and at temperatures from 20° to 75°C. Deformation was monitored throughout each experiment by measuring simultaneously three proxies for evolving crack damage: (1) axial strain, (2) porosity change and (3) the output of acoustic emission (AE) energy, all as functions of time. Results from conventional creep experiments demonstrate that the primary control on creep strain rate and time-to-failure is the applied differential stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of crack damage beyond which deformation accelerates and ultimately leads to sample failure on a localized fault. The influence of effective confining pressure was investigated in stress-stepping experiments. In addition to the expected mechanical influence of elevated effective pressure, our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion cracking is inhibited at higher effective confining pressures, with creep strain rates reduced by about 3 orders of magnitude as effective confining pressure is increased from 10 to 50MPa. We have used the same technique to investigate the influence of an elevated temperature. Our results show that, for the same applied

  2. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  3. Multi-Scale Creep Analysis of Plain-Woven Laminates Using Time-Dependent Homogenization Theory:. Effects of Laminate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, multi-scale creep analysis of plain-woven GFRP laminates is performed using the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. First, point-symmetry of internal structures of plain-woven laminates is utilized for a boundary condition of unit cell problems, reducing the domain of analysis to 1/4 and 1/8 for in-phase and out-of-phase laminate configurations, respectively. The time-dependent homogenization theory is then reconstructed for these domains of analysis. Using the present method, in-plane creep behavior of plain-woven glass fiber/epoxy laminates subjected to a constant stress is analyzed. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The in-plane creep behavior of the plain-woven GFRP laminates exhibits marked anisotropy. (2) The laminate configurations considerably affect the creep behavior of the laminates.

  4. Time-Dependent Behavior of Diabase and a Nonlinear Creep Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wendong; Zhang, Qiangyong; Li, Shucai; Wang, Shugang

    2014-07-01

    Triaxial creep tests were performed on diabase specimens from the dam foundation of the Dagangshan hydropower station, and the typical characteristics of creep curves were analyzed. Based on the test results under different stress levels, a new nonlinear visco-elasto-plastic creep model with creep threshold and long-term strength was proposed by connecting an instantaneous elastic Hooke body, a visco-elasto-plastic Schiffman body, and a nonlinear visco-plastic body in series mode. By introducing the nonlinear visco-plastic component, this creep model can describe the typical creep behavior, which includes the primary creep stage, the secondary creep stage, and the tertiary creep stage. Three-dimensional creep equations under constant stress conditions were deduced. The yield approach index (YAI) was used as the criterion for the piecewise creep function to resolve the difficulty in determining the creep threshold value and the long-term strength. The expression of the visco-plastic component was derived in detail and the three-dimensional central difference form was given. An example was used to verify the credibility of the model. The creep parameters were identified, and the calculated curves were in good agreement with the experimental curves, indicating that the model is capable of replicating the physical processes.

  5. Dynamic Creep Buckling: Analysis of Shell Structures Subjected to Time-dependent Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. A complete, true ab-initio rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformations, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of metric and curvature in two coordinate systems: fixed (spatial) and convected (material). The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivative (gradient) were developed for curved space and motion, so the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rates of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  6. Compaction creep of sands due to time-dependent grain failure: Effects of chemical environment, applied stress, and grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzesowsky, R. H.; Hangx, S. J. T.; Brantut, N.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    Time-dependent brittle creep plays a role in controlling compaction of sands and sandstones under upper crustal conditions, influencing phenomena such as production-induced reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and induced seismicity. Brittle creep also plays a role in determining the mechanical behavior of gouge-rich faults. We performed uniaxial creep experiments on sand to investigate the effects of chemical environment (dry versus solution flooded), grain size (d = 196-378 µm), and applied effective stress (σa up to 30 MPa), at room temperature conditions favoring grain-scale brittle processes. Creep measurements were complemented with acoustic emission (AE) detection and microstructural analysis to characterize the main creep mechanism. Wet samples showed much higher creep strains than dry-tested samples. AE event counts showed a direct relation between grain failure and creep strain, with higher AE rates occurring in the wet samples. Therefore, we inferred that time-dependent deformation was dominated by subcritical crack growth, resulting in grain failure accompanied by intergranular sliding rearrangements, and that crack growth in the presence of chemically active fluids was controlled by stress corrosion. The sensitivity of the compaction rate of the sands to d and σa can be expressed as ɛ˙∝diσaj where i ≈ 6 and j ≈ 21 under dry conditions and i ≈ 9 and j ≈ 15 under wet conditions. Our results were compared to a simple model based on Hertzian contact theory, linear elastic fracture mechanics, and subcritical crack growth. This model showed agreement between the observed stress and grain size sensitivities of creep, within a factor of 2.

  7. Computational modelling on 2D magnetohydrodynamic flow of Sisko fluid over a time dependent stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T.; Shahzad, A.; Iqbal, Z.; Ahmed, J.; Khan, M.

    A study is presented for the flow and heat transfer of Sisko fluid model over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of uniform magnetic field. While taking newly developed similarity transformations, the governing time dependent partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of the reduced nonlinear differential equations are found by employing Shooting method. The influence of physical parameters of interest on the velocity and temperature profiles are highlighted graphically and examined in detail. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated against influential parameters. Skin friction coefficient increases with unsteadiness parameter, magnetic field and suction parameter.

  8. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  9. An Investigation into Reducing Time Dependent Creep of a Polyethylene Geotextile using Glass Fiber Yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jun

    An investigation has been carried out to reduce the deformation behavior of polyethylene (PE) woven geotextile fabric by making PE fabric-glass yarn composite structure using stitching and laminating. The results showed that reinforcement significantly reduced the creep and IED as long as the tensile stress is lower than the total load bearing capacity of the glass yarns in the composite structure. However, the strength of PE-glass composite fabric was solely dependent on the strength of the glass yarns. The strength from PE yarns only contributes when all glass yarns are broken. Cast result of concrete columns using the glass yarn reinforced PE fabric by stitching method suggested that the glass yarn must face outside of the fabric formwork to avoid damage of both fabric surface and column surface.

  10. Strengthening of synthetic quartz-rich sediments during time-dependent compaction due to pressure solution-precipitation compaction creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Okazaki, K.; Katayama, I.

    2013-12-01

    During diagenesis, incohesive sediments are compacted and gain strength against shear deformation for a geologically long time scale. The evolution of shear strength as well as the change in the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics under shear deformation is of significant importance in considering deformation at shallow part of the subduction zones and in accretionary prisms. Sediments after induration due to time-dependent diagenesis process probably deform with increases in porosity and permeability much more significantly than normally compacted incohesive sediments. An active fault in a shallow incohesive medium may favor thermal pressurization of pore fluid when slid rapidly, while the lack of time-dependent healing effect may cause stable (e.g., rate-strengthening) frictional property there. On the other hand, indurated sediments may deform with significant post-failure weakening, and thus exhibit localization of deformation or unstable behavior. In order to investigate how the time-dependent compaction and induration affect the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of sediments under deformation, we have conducted a series of compaction experiments under hydrothermal conditions (at temperatures from R.T. to 500 °C, 200 MPa confining pressure, 100 MPa pore water pressure, and for various time), and following triaxial deformation experiments for the compacted samples, with monitoring permeability and storage capacity with pore pressure oscillation method [Fischer and Paterson, 1992]. Previous work [e.g., Niemeijer et at., 2003] reported that under the adopted conditions, quartz aggregate deforms by pressure solution-precipitation creep. The initial synthetic sediments have been prepared by depositing commercially available crushed quartzite the grain size of which is about 6 μm on average. 4 cm long samples have been extracted from the middle of 10 cm long deposited columns. The experiments have been performed with a gas-medium apparatus in Hiroshima

  11. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  12. A finite analytic method for solving the 2-D time-dependent advection diffusion equation with time-invariant coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas; Li, Shu-Guang

    2005-02-01

    Difficulty in solving the transient advection-diffusion equation (ADE) stems from the relationship between the advection derivatives and the time derivative. For a solution method to be viable, it must account for this relationship by being accurate in both space and time. This research presents a unique method for solving the time-dependent ADE that does not discretize the derivative terms but rather solves the equation analytically in the space-time domain. The method is computationally efficient and numerically accurate and addresses the common limitations of numerical dispersion and spurious oscillations that can be prevalent in other solution methods. The method is based on the improved finite analytic (IFA) solution method [Lowry TS, Li S-G. A characteristic based finite analytic method for solving the two-dimensional steady-state advection-diffusion equation. Water Resour Res 38 (7), 10.1029/2001WR000518] in space coupled with a Laplace transformation in time. In this way, the method has no Courant condition and maintains accuracy in space and time, performing well even at high Peclet numbers. The method is compared to a hybrid method of characteristics, a random walk particle tracking method, and an Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method using various degrees of flow-field heterogeneity across multiple Peclet numbers. Results show the IFALT method to be computationally more efficient while producing similar or better accuracy than the other methods.

  13. Vibrational dynamics and solvatochromism of the label SCN in various solvents and hemoglobin by time dependent IR and 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Kern-Michler, Daniela; Müller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2014-09-28

    We investigated the characteristics of the thiocyanate (SCN) functional group as a probe of local structural dynamics for 2D-IR spectroscopy of proteins, exploiting the dependence of vibrational frequency on the environment of the label. Steady-state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy are performed on the model compound methylthiocyanate (MeSCN) in solvents of different polarity, and compared to data obtained on SCN as a local probe introduced as cyanylated cysteine in the protein bovine hemoglobin. The vibrational lifetime of the protein label is determined to be 37 ps, and its anharmonicity is observed to be lower than that of the model compound (which itself exhibits solvent-independent anharmonicity). The vibrational lifetime of MeSCN generally correlates with the solvent polarity, i.e. longer lifetimes in less polar solvents, with the longest lifetime being 158 ps. However, the capacity of the solvent to form hydrogen bonds complicates this simplified picture. The long lifetime of the SCN vibration is in contrast to commonly used azide labels or isotopically-labeled amide I and better suited to monitor structural rearrangements by 2D-IR spectroscopy. We present time-dependent 2D-IR data on the labeled protein which reveal an initially inhomogeneous structure around the CN oscillator. The distribution becomes homogeneous after 5 picoseconds so that spectral diffusion has effectively erased the 'memory' of the CN stretching frequency. Therefore, the 2D-IR data of the label incorporated in hemoglobin demonstrate how SCN can be utilized to sense rearrangements in the local structure on a picosecond timescale.

  14. A quantum time-dependent wave-packet study of intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P0, 1, 2) + D2(v = 0, j = 0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan

    2013-04-01

    We investigated spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing effects in the title reaction by the time-dependent wave-packet method combined with an extended split operator scheme. We performed non-adiabatic calculations of the fine-structure-resolved cross section and adiabatic calculations of integral cross section. The calculations are based on the potential energy surfaces of 3A' and the two degenerate 3A'' states [S. Rogers, D. Wang, A. Kuppermann, and S. Walch, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2308 (2000)], 10.1021/jp992985g, together with the spin-orbit coupling matrix [B. Maiti and G. C. Schatz, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 12360 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1623481 and singlet 1A' potential energy surface [J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles, Faraday Discuss. 110, 247 (1998)]. The results of the O(3P) + D2 are similar to those of the O(3P) + H2 reaction. The product spin state-resolved reaction cross section and the total reaction cross section both show that the adiabatic channel is dominant in all cases, and the non-adiabatic channels have cross sections of several orders of magnitude smaller than the adiabatic channels at high collision energy. Although the cross sections caused by the intersystem crossing effects in the O(3P) + D2 reaction are larger than those in the O(3P) + H2 reaction, the differences in non-adiabaticity between these two reaction systems are quite modest. Based on the results of the O(3P) + H2 reaction, we can predict that the influence of spin-orbit on the total reaction cross sections of the O(3P) + D2 reaction is also insignificant. However, these non-adiabatic effects can be reflected in the presence of some forward-scattering in the angular distribution for the OD product.

  15. Spatial fluctuations in transient creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurson, Lasse; Rosti, Jari; Koivisto, Juha; Miksic, Amandine; Alava, Mikko J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the spatial fluctuations of transient creep deformation of materials as a function of time, both by digital image correlation (DIC) measurements of paper samples and by numerical simulations of a crystal plasticity or discrete dislocation dynamics model. This model has a jamming or yielding phase transition, around which power law or Andrade creep is found. During primary creep, the relative strength of the strain rate fluctuations increases with time in both cases—the spatially averaged creep rate obeys the Andrade law epsilont ~ t - 0.7, while the time dependence of the spatial fluctuations of the local creep rates is given by Δepsilont ~ t - 0.5. A similar scaling for the fluctuations is found in the logarithmic creep regime that is typically observed for lower applied stresses. We review briefly some classical theories of Andrade creep from the point of view of such spatial fluctuations. We consider these phenomenological, time-dependent creep laws in terms of a description based on a non-equilibrium phase transition separating evolving and frozen states of the system when the externally applied load is varied. Such an interpretation is discussed further by the data collapse of the local deformations in the spirit of absorbing state/depinning phase transitions, as well as deformation-deformation correlations and the width of the cumulative strain distributions. The results are also compared with the order parameter fluctuations observed close to the depinning transition of the 2d linear interface model or the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  16. Time Dependent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the flow characteristics of thixotropic and negative thixotropic fluids; various theories underlying the thixotropic behavior; and thixotropic phenomena exhibited in drilling muds, commercial paints, pastes, and greases. Inconsistencies in the terminology used to label time dependent effects are revealed. (CC)

  17. Time dependent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka

    One of the most important results emerging from string theory is the gauge gravity duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) which tells us that certain problems in particular gravitational backgrounds can be exactly mapped to a particular dual gauge theory a quantum theory very similar to the one explaining the interactions between fundamental subatomic particles. The chief merit of the duality is that a difficult problem in one theory can be mapped to a simpler and solvable problem in the other theory. The duality can be used both ways. Most of the current theoretical framework is suited to study equilibrium systems, or systems where time dependence is at most adiabatic. However in the real world, systems are almost always out of equilibrium. Generically these scenarios are described by quenches, where a parameter of the theory is made time dependent. In this dissertation I describe some of the work done in the context of studying quantum quench using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We recover certain universal scaling type of behavior as the quenching is done through a quantum critical point. Another question that has been explored in the dissertation is time dependence of the gravity theory. Present cosmological observations indicate that our universe is accelerating and is described by a spacetime called de-Sitter(dS). In 2011 there had been a speculation over a possible duality between de-Sitter gravity and a particular field theory (Euclidean SP(N) CFT). However a concrete realization of this proposition was still lacking. Here we explicitly derive the dS/CFT duality using well known methods in field theory. We discovered that the time dimension emerges naturally in the derivation. We also describe further applications and extensions of dS/CFT. KEYWORDS: Holography, AdS/CFT correspondence, Quantum Quench, dS/CFT correspondence, Chaos.

  18. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  19. Time-dependent compaction band formation in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2015-07-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence, background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry and thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  20. Time-Dependent Erosion of Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Anderson, John R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate prediction of thruster life requires time-dependent erosion estimates for the ion optics assembly. Such information is critical to end-of-life mechanisms such as electron backstreaming. CEX2D was recently modified to handle time-dependent erosion, double ions, and multiple throttle conditions in a single run. The modified code is called "CEX2D-t". Comparisons of CEX2D-t results with LDT and ELT post-tests results show good agreement for both screen and accel grid erosion including important erosion features such as chamfering of the downstream end of the accel grid and reduced rate of accel grid aperture enlargement with time.

  1. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  2. A Time Dependent Transport Equation Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Using TWIGL Mesh Spacing ............. 63 11 Initial FEMP2D Flux Using 2X TWIGL Mesh Spacing ........ .. 64 12 Time Dependent Thermal Absorption...energy group, and g = G is the lowest ( thermal ) energy group. ?oo(r, E, t) the coefficient in the P approximation that phys- ically r’iDresents the total...than these MrPs. This suggest that the thermal flux calculations could be suspect. Indeed, both the FEMP2D and FMP2DT calculations showed that the

  3. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  4. Time-dependent drift Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The lowest-order drift equations are given in a canonical magnetic coordinate form for time-dependent magnetic and electric fields. The advantages of the canonical Hamiltonian form are also discussed.

  5. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  6. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  7. Modelling long term rockslide displacements with non-linear time-dependent relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Caro, Mattia; Volpi, Giorgio; Castellanza, Riccardo; Crosta, Giovanni; Agliardi, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides undergoing rapid changes in behaviour pose major risks in alpine areas, and require careful characterization and monitoring both for civil protection and mitigation activities. In particular, these instabilities can undergo very slow movement with occasional and intermittent acceleration/deceleration stages of motion potentially leading to collapse. Therefore, the analysis of such instabilities remains a challenging issue. Rockslide displacements are strongly conditioned by hydrologic factors as suggested by correlations with groundwater fluctuations, snowmelt, with a frequently observed delay between perturbation and system reaction. The aim of this work is the simulation of the complex time-dependent behaviour of two case studies for which also a 2D transient hydrogeological simulation has been performed: Vajont rockslide (1960 to 1963) and the recent Mt. de La Saxe rockslide (2009 to 2012). Non-linear time-dependent constitutive relationships have been used to describe long-term creep deformation. Analyses have been performed using a "rheological-mechanical" approach that fits idealized models (e.g. viscoelastic, viscoplastic, elasto-viscoplastic, Burgers, nonlinear visco-plastic) to the experimental behaviour of specific materials by means of numerical constants. Bidimensional simulations were carried out using the finite difference code FLAC. Displacements time-series, available for the two landslides, show two superimposed deformation mechanisms: a creep process, leading to movements under "steady state" conditions (e.g. constant groundwater level), and a "dynamic" process, leading to an increase in displacement rate due to changes of external loads (e.g. groundwater level). For both cases sliding mass is considered as an elasto-plastic body subject to its self-weight, inertial and seepage forces varying with time according to water table fluctuation (due to snowmelt or changing in reservoir level) and derived from the previous hydrogeological

  8. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  9. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  10. Time-Dependent Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Natta, Antonella

    1995-01-01

    We present theoretical models of the time-dependent thermal and chemical structure of molecular gas suddenly exposed to far-ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) radiation fields and the consequent time- dependent infrared emission of the gas. We focus on the response of molecular hydrogen for cloud densities ranging from n = 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 6)/cu cm and FUV fluxes G(sub 0) = 10(exp 3)-10(exp 6) times the local FUV interstellar flux. For G(sub 0)/n greater than 10(exp -2) cu cm, the emergent H(sub 2) vibrational line intensities are initially larger than the final equilibrium values. The H(sub 2) lines are excited by FUV fluorescence and by collisional excitation in warm gas. Most of the H(sub 2) intensity is generated at a characteristic hydrogen column density of N approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, which corresponds to an FUV optical depth of unity caused by dust opacity. The time dependence of the H(sub 2) intensities arises because the initial abundances of H(sub 2) at these depths is much higher than the equilibrium values, so that H(sub 2) initially competes more effectively with dust in absorbing FUV photons. Considerable column densities of warm (T approximately 1000) K H(sub 2) gas can be produced by the FUV pumping of H(sub 2) vibrational levels followed by collisional de-excitation, which transfers the energy to heat. In dense (n greater than or approximately 10(exp 5)/cu cm) gas exposed to high (G(sub 0) greater than or approximately 10(exp 4)) fluxes, this warm gas produces a 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(l) H(sub 2) line ratio of approximately 0.1, which mimics the ratio found in shocked gas. In lower density regions, the FUV pumping produces a pure-fluorescent ratio of approximately 0.5. We also present calculations of the time dependence of the atomic hydrogen column densities and of the intensities of 0 I 6300 A, S II 6730 A, Fe II 1.64 microns, and rotational OH and H20 emission. Potential applications include star-forming regions, clouds

  11. Creeping eruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Creeping eruption is a human infection with dog or cat hookworm larvae (immature worms). Causes Hookworm eggs are found in the stool of infected dogs and cats. When the eggs hatch, the larvae ...

  12. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  13. The time-dependence of compaction localization in a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally-extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time-dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry, thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that, as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  14. Time-dependent Brittle Deformation in Etna Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2008-12-01

    Mt Etna is the largest and most active volcano in Europe. Due to the high permeability of its volcanic rocks, the volcanic edifice hosts one of the biggest hydrogeologic reservoirs of Sicily (Ogniben, 1966). Pre-eruptive patterns of flank eruptions, closely monitored by means of ground deformation and seismicity, revealed the slow development of fracture systems at different altitudes, marked by repeated bursts of seismicity and accelerating/decelerating deformation patterns acting over the scale of months to days. The presence of a fluid phase in cracks within rock has been shown to dramatically affect both mechanical and chemical interactions. Chemically, it promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through such mechanisms as stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Such crack growth is highly non-linear and accelerates towards dynamic failure over extended periods of time, even under constant applied stress; a phenomenon known as 'brittle creep'. Stress corrosion is considered to be responsible for the acceleratory cracking and seismicity prior to volcanic eruptions and is invoked as an important mechanism in forecasting models. Here we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water-saturated samples of Etna basalt (EB) under triaxial stress conditions (confining pressure of 50 MPa and pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa). Samples of EB were loaded at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 to a pre-determined percentage of the short- term strength and left to deform under constant stress until failure. Crack damage evolution was monitored throughout each experiment by measuring the independent damage proxies of axial strain, pore volume change and output of acoustic emission (AE) energy, during brittle creep of creep strain rates ranging over four orders of magnitude. Our data demonstrate that the applied differential stress exerts a crucial influence on both time-to-failure and

  15. Time Dependent Nuclear Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David

    2005-04-01

    A new time dependent method for calculating scattering matrix elements of two and three body nuclear collisions below 50 Mev is being developed. The procedure closely follows the channel packet method (CPM) used to compute scattering matrix elements for non-adiabatic molecular reactions.ootnotetextT.A.Niday and D.E.Weeks, Chem. Phys. Letters 308 (1999) 106 Currently, one degree of freedom calculations using a simple square well have been completed and a two body scattering calculation using the Yukawa potential is anticipated. To perform nuclear scattering calculations with the CPM that will incorporate the nucleon-nucleon tensor force, we plan to position initial reactant and product channel packets in the asymptotic limit on single coupled potential energy surfaces labeled by the spin, isospin, and total angular momentum of the reactant nucleons. The wave packets will propagated numerically using the split operator method augmented by a coordinate dependant unitary transformation used to diagonalize the potential. Scattering matrix elements will be determined by the Fourier transform of the correlation function between the evolving reactant and product wave packets. A brief outline of the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potentialootnotetextR.B.Wiringa, V.G.J.Stoks, and R.Schiavilla, Physical Review C 51(1995) 38 and the proposed wave packet calculations will be presented.

  16. Network-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding.

  17. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  18. Time dependence of PEB effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagishita, Yuichiro; Shigematsu, Kazumasa; Yanagida, Kimio

    1990-06-01

    Though simulations of PEB (Post Exposure Bake) on the basis of PAC diffusion mode! have been carried out by a number of researchers '' (2) , it has never been confirmed that those could predict experimental data caused by PEB' s effects accurately . Because no details of chemical reactions thernlly induced by PEB are known, fundamental parameters which determine PEB' s effects must be obtained experimentally. We have acquired the volume of changes of development rate function, RATE(M) by PEB with DRM monitoring for some types of photoresist . The values of diffusion length have been obtained by means of compareing experimental B (exposure ener) vs T (development time to clear) curves with simulated ones which is based on RATEOA) data. Their dependence on the baking time has been investigated with fixed FEB temperature and it has been proved that a progress of the diffusion saturates only in less than a few seconds when the diffusion length is about lO'-l5ncn, which is much shorter than the standing wave length(= 66nm, for G-line). Profiles of low contrast resist patterns can be improved by the decrease in development rate of slightly exposed areas by PEB. The effects on these resists depend on the baking time because the volume of the decrease grows with increasing FEB time. On the other hands, for high contrast resists PEB' s diffusion enhances their resolution while the decreases in development rate have little effect on them. Time dependence cannot be observed for these resists because the diffusion length remains constant with increasing FEB time.

  19. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  20. Time-dependent deformations on marine clays on submarine slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, A.J.; Brandes, H.; Sadd, M.H.; Tian, W.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Evidence from geological and geophysical records indicates that time-dependent deformations occur on or within many submarine slopes. Laboratory studies on marine clays from the slope/rise and the ocean's basin have shown that these clays are generally quite viscous and therefore can be expected to deform in the field even under such small stresses as those caused by the downslope component of gravity on relatively gentle slopes. The nature and extent of these deformations has important geologic and engineering applications and depends on a number of factors. A research program at the University of Rhode Island is under way to study these factors, make predictions on rates of displacement, and identify environmental conditions that may lead to catastrophic mass failures. A laboratory testing program on the time-dependent characteristics of marine clays has been under way for a number of years. The data include, among others, long-term drained triaxial, one-dimensional, and direct simple shear creep tests. These results along with practical considerations are used to select a constitutive model for inclusion in the numerical code. Sediment deposits encountered on the continental slope and rise can vary substantially both in composition and behavior over relatively short distances. To analyze the integrated behavior of such a continuum, the authors have selected the finite element method. The code being developed will initially include a numerical model proposed by other investigators. With the aid of the developed methodology, creep deformations can be studied for a number of field cases of interest.

  1. Infrared Blobs : Time-dependent Flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Mack, J.; Dulude, M.; Hilbert, B.

    2014-10-01

    We describe the creation of time-dependent flags for pixels associated with "blobs" on the WFC3 IR detector. We detect the blobs on flat fields obtained by repeated observations of the night side of the Earth. We provide the most complete census of IR blobs' positions, radii, and times of first appearance. In aggregate, a set of 46 blobs, 27 "strong" and 19 "medium" in their effective scattering cross section, affect slightly less than 1% of the pixels of the detector. A second set of 81 "weak" (and typically smaller) blobs affect another 1% of the pixels. In the past, the "blob" flag, bit 9 (i.e. value = 512) in the data quality (DQ) array described in Table 2.5 of the WFC3 Data Handbook (Rajan et al. 2010) has been a static 2-D array; henceforth a set of such arrays, each associated with a "use after" date corresponding to the appearance of one or more new blobs, can be used. We prepared such DQ arrays using the 46 "strong" and "medium" blobs and discuss why we did not include the fainter blobs therein. As an added data product, we create and test a blob flat field that corrects the effects of blobs on extended emission; however, it should not be applied if stellar photometry is the goal.

  2. Time-dependent damage in predictions of fatigue behaviour of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail M.; Bailey, Soraya J.; Schwab, Timothy D.

    2015-08-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous tissues that connect bones across a joint and are exposed daily to creep and fatigue loading. Ligaments are tensile load-bearing tissues; therefore, fatigue loading will have a component of time-dependent damage from the non-zero mean stress and cycle-dependent damage from the oscillating stress. If time-dependent damage is not sufficient to completely predict the fatigue response, then cycle-dependent damage could be an important contributor. Using data from normal ligaments (current study and Thornton et al., Clin. Biomech. 22:932-940, 2007a) and healing ligaments (Thornton and Bailey, J. Biomech. Eng. 135:091004-1-091004-6, 2013), creep data was used to predict the fatigue response considering time-dependent damage. Relationships between creep lifetime and test stress or initial strain were modelled using exponential or power-law regression. In order to predict fatigue lifetimes, constant rates of damage were assumed and time-varying stresses were introduced into the expressions for time-dependent damage from creep. Then, the predictions of fatigue lifetime were compared with curvefits to the fatigue data where exponential or power-law regressions were used to determine the relationship between fatigue lifetime and test stress or initial strain. The fatigue prediction based on time-dependent damage alone greatly overestimated fatigue lifetime suggesting that time-dependent damage alone cannot account for all of the damage accumulated during fatigue and that cycle-dependent damage has an important role. At lower stress and strain, time-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor for normal ligaments than healing ligaments; however, cycle-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor with incremental increases in stress or strain for normal ligaments than healing ligaments.

  3. Computer program for predicting creep behavior of bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R.; Greenbaum, G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, CRAB, uses finite-element method to calculate creep behavior and predict steady-state stresses in an arbitrary body of revolution subjected to a time-dependent axisymmetric load. Creep strains follow a time hardening law and a Prandtl-Reuss stress-strain relationship.

  4. A Generalized Plasticity-Based Model for Sandstone Considering Time-Dependent Behavior and Wetting Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Meng-Chia

    2014-07-01

    Based on the concept of generalized plasticity, this study proposes a constitutive model to describe the time-dependent behavior and wetting deterioration of sandstone. The proposed model (1) exhibits nonlinear elasticity under hydrostatic and shear loading, (2) follows the associated flow rule for viscoplastic deformation, (3) adopts a creep modulus that varies with the stress ratio, (4) considers the primary and secondary creep behaviors of rock, and (5) considers the effect of wetting deterioration. This model requires 13 material parameters, comprising 3 for elasticity, 7 for plasticity, and 3 for creep. All parameters can be determined easily by following the suggested procedures. The proposed model is first validated by comparison with triaxial tests of sandstone under different hydrostatic stress and cyclic loading conditions. In addition, the model is versatile in simulating time-dependent behavior through a series of multistage creep tests. Finally, to consider the effects of wetting deterioration, triaxial and creep tests under dry and water-saturated conditions are simulated. Comparison of the simulated and experimental data shows that the proposed model can predict the behavior of sandstone in dry and saturated conditions.

  5. Time dependency of strainrange partitioning life relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, S.; Manson, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of exposure time (or creep rate) on the CP life relationship is established by conducting isothermal CP tests at varying exposure times on 316 Ss at 1300 and 1500 F. A reduction in the CP cycle life is observed with an increase in the exposure time of the CP test at a given inelastic strain-range. This phenomenon is characterized by modifying the Manson-Coffin type of CP relationship. Two new life relationships: (1) the Steady State Creep Rate (SSRC) Modified CP life relationship, and (2) the Failure Time (FT) Modified CP life relationship, are developed in this report. They account for the effect of creep rate and exposure time within the CP type of waveform. The reduction in CP cyclic life in the long exposure time tests is attributed to oxidation and the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries.

  6. Time-Dependent Behavior of High-Strength Kevlar and Vectran Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2014-01-01

    High-strength Kevlar and Vectran webbings are currently being used by both NASA and industry as the primary load-bearing structure in inflatable space habitation modules. The time-dependent behavior of high-strength webbing architectures is a vital area of research that is providing critical material data to guide a more robust design process for this class of structures. This paper details the results of a series of time-dependent tests on 1-inch wide webbing including an initial set of comparative tests between specimens that underwent realtime and accelerated creep at 65 and 70% of their ultimate tensile strength. Variability in the ultimate tensile strength of the webbings is investigated and compared with variability in the creep life response. Additional testing studied the effects of load and displacement rate, specimen length and the time-dependent effects of preconditioning the webbings. The creep test facilities, instrumentation and test procedures are also detailed. The accelerated creep tests display consistently longer times to failure than their real-time counterparts; however, several factors were identified that may contribute to the observed disparity. Test setup and instrumentation, grip type, loading scheme, thermal environment and accelerated test postprocessing along with material variability are among these factors. Their effects are discussed and future work is detailed for the exploration and elimination of some of these factors in order to achieve a higher fidelity comparison.

  7. Spectral methods for time dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    Spectral approximations are reviewed for time dependent problems. Some basic ingredients from the spectral Fourier and Chebyshev approximations theory are discussed. A brief survey was made of hyperbolic and parabolic time dependent problems which are dealt with by both the energy method and the related Fourier analysis. The ideas presented above are combined in the study of accuracy stability and convergence of the spectral Fourier approximation to time dependent problems.

  8. Creep Effects in Pultruded FRP Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscato, G.; Casalegno, C.; Russo, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of two creep tests on pultruded open-section GFRP beams aimed to evaluate the long-term deformations, the residual deflection after unloading, and the influence of creep strains on the flexuraltorsional buckling phenomenon. Two beams were subjected to a constant load for about one year. Then one of the beams was unloaded to evaluate its residual deflection. For the other beam, the load was increased up to failure, and the residual buckling strength was compared with that of a similar beam tested up to failure. The parameters of the Findley power law are evaluated, and the experimental results are compared with those of numerical analyses and with available formulations for prediction of the time-dependent properties of composite beams. Results of the investigation testify, in particular, to a noninsignificant time-dependent increment in deflections of the beams and to a significant reduction in their buckling strength due to creep deformations.

  9. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  10. Creep of SiC Hot-Pressed with Al, B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, Mark Eldon

    2000-03-31

    The creep of a high strength, high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C was investigated. For elevated temperature applications, the time-dependent deformation, creep response, must be fully characterized for candidate materials. The mechanisms responsible for high temperature deformation in ABC-SiC were evaluated. The creep response was compared to materials that have glassy grain boundary phases but do not have interlocked grains. The creep mechanisms were assessed.

  11. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  12. Time-Dependent Behavior of a Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite and the Effects of Stress and Physical Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. Isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers were adapted for testing of the composite material. Time dependent transverse and shear compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(8) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress.

  13. Stability on Time-Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the key differences in the stability picture between extended systems on time-fixed and time-dependent spatial domains. As a paradigm, we take the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a finite critical wavenumber, and use it to study dynamic pattern formation and evolution on time-dependent spatial domains in translationally invariant systems, i.e., when dilution effects are absent. In particular, we discuss the effects of a time-dependent domain on the stability of spatially homogeneous and spatially periodic base states, and explore its effects on the Eckhaus instability of periodic states. New equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the pattern wavenumber on time-dependent domains are derived, and the results compared with those on fixed domains. Pattern coarsening on time-dependent domains is contrasted with that on fixed domains with the help of the Cahn-Hilliard equation extended here to time-dependent domains. Parallel results for the evolution of the Benjamin-Feir instability on time-dependent domains are also given.

  14. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  15. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  16. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  17. Birefringence in time-dependent moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirong; Zhang, Ruoyang; Zhai, Yanwang; Wei, Jianye; Zhao, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in one- and two-dimensional time-dependent moving media is investigated in this paper. We identify another origin of linear birefringence caused by the component of the flow perpendicular to the wave vector. Previously, birefringence is induced by applying external electric and magnetic fields to non-crystalline material. Here it is shown that the time-varying velocity field also contributes to such a phenomenon. Our results indicate that the parallel component, time-dependent or not, will not yield birefringence. Furthermore, the time-dependent flow also results in a frequency shift. One-dimensional simulation is conducted to demonstrate these effects.

  18. A multilayer model of time dependent deformation following an earthquake on a strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer model of the Earth to calculate finite element of time dependent deformation and stress following an earthquake on a strike slip fault is discussed. The model involves shear properties of an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard viscoelastic linear solid lower lithosphere, a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere and an elastic mesosphere. Systematic variations of fault and layer depths and comparisons with simpler elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic asthenosphere calculations are analyzed. Both the creep of the lower lithosphere and astenosphere contribute to the postseismic deformation. The magnitude of the deformation is enhanced by a short distance between the bottom of the fault (slip zone) and the top of the creep region but is less sensitive to the thickness of the creeping layer. Postseismic restressing is increased as the lower lithosphere becomes more viscoelastic, but the tendency for the width of the restressed zone to growth with time is retarded.

  19. The relationship between indentation and uniaxial creep in amorphous selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Poisl, W.H.; Oliver, W.C.; Fabes, B.D.

    1995-08-01

    Ultralow load indentation techniques can be used to obtain time-dependent mechanical properties, termed indentation creep, of materials. However, the comparison of indentation creep data to that obtained during conventional creep testing is difficult, mainly due to the determination of the strain rate experienced by the material during indentation. Using the power-law creep equation and the equation for Newtonian viscosity as a function of stress and strain rate, a relationship between indentation strain rate,{center_dot}{epsilon}{sub {ital l}}={ital @};Dh/{ital h}, and the effective strain rate occurring during the indentation creep process is obtained. Indentation creep measurements on amorphous selenium in the Newtonian viscous flow regime above the glass transition temperature were obtained. The data was then used to determine that the coefficient relating indentation strain rate to the effective strain rate is equal to 0.09, or{center_dot}{epsilon}=0.0{center_dot}{epsilon}{sub {ital l}}.

  20. Time-Dependent 2D Modeling of Magnetron Plasma Torch in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lincun; Xia, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to describe the electromagnetic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena within a magnetron plasma torch and in the resultant plume, by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Specific calculations are presented for a pure argon system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an argon environment), operated in a turbulent mode. An important finding of this work is that the external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of arc plasma and thus affects the resulting plume. The AMF impels the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. As a result, the plasma intensity distribution on the cross section of torch seems to be more uniform. Numerical results also show that with AMF, the highest plasma temperature decreases and the anode arc root moves upstream significantly, while the current density distribution at the anode is more concentrated with a higher peak value. In addition, the use of AMF then induces a strong backflow at the torch spout and its magnitude increases with the AMF strength but decreases with the inlet gas velocity.

  1. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  2. Invariants for time-dependent Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Struckmeier, J; Riedel, C

    2001-08-01

    An exact invariant is derived for n-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems with general time-dependent potentials. The invariant is worked out in two equivalent ways. In the first approach, we define a special Ansatz for the invariant and determine its time-dependent coefficients. In the second approach, we perform a two-step canonical transformation of the initially time-dependent Hamiltonian to a time-independent one. The invariant is found to contain a function of time f(2)(t), defined as a solution of a linear third-order differential equation whose coefficients depend in general on the explicitly known configuration space trajectory that follows from the system's time evolution. It is shown that the invariant can be interpreted as the time integral of an energy balance equation. Our result is applied to a one-dimensional, time-dependent, damped non-linear oscillator, and to a three-dimensional system of Coulomb-interacting particles that are confined in a time-dependent quadratic external potential. We finally show that our results can be used to assess the accuracy of numerical simulations of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems.

  3. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  4. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  5. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Time dependent notch sensitivity was observed in Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings between 1000 and 1400 F (538 -760 C), but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy and Inconel 718, it occurred in notched specimens loaded below the yield strength when the creep deformation was localized. For each alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined that characterizes the notch sensitive behavior.

  6. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  7. Time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior in single crystal ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Jae; Yun, Tae Gwang; Choi, In-Chul; Kim, Sungwoong; Park, Won Il; Han, Seung Min; Jang, Jae-il

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale time-dependent mechanical-electrical coupled behavior of single crystal ZnO nanorods was systematically explored, which is essential for accessing the long-term reliability of the ZnO nanorod-based flexible devices. A series of compression creep tests combined with in-situ electrical measurement was performed on vertically-grown single crystal ZnO nanorods. Continuous measurement of the current (I)-voltage (V) curves before, during, after the creep tests revealed that I is non-negligibly increased as a result of the time-dependent deformation. Analysis of the I-V curves based on the thermionic emission-diffusion theory allowed extraction of nanorod resistance, which was shown to decrease as time-dependent deformation. Finally, based on the observations in this study, a simple analytical model for predicting the reduction in nanorod resistance as a function of creep strain that is induced from diffusional mechanisms is proposed, and this model was demonstrated to be in an excellent agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25982962

  8. Algorithms for elasto-plastic-creep postbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the development of an improved constrained time stepping scheme which can efficiently and stably handle the pre-post-buckling behavior of general structure subject to high temperature environments. Due to the generality of the scheme, the combined influence of elastic-plastic behavior can be handled in addition to time dependent creep effects. This includes structural problems exhibiting indefinite tangent properties. To illustrate the capability of the procedure, several benchmark problems employing finite element analyses are presented. These demonstrate the numerical efficiency and stability of the scheme. Additionally, the potential influence of complex creep histories on the buckling characteristics is considered.

  9. Time-dependent Flare Models with MALI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašparová, J.; Heinzel, P.; Varady, M.; Karlický, M.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal variations of Hα line profile intensities related to electron beams are presented. We show first results of time dependent simulations of a chromospheric response to a 1 sec monoenergetic electron beam. 1-D hydrodynamic code together with particle representation of the beam have been used to calculate atmospheric evolution. Time dependent radiative transfer problem has been solved for the resulting atmosphere in the MALI approach, using the Crank-Nicholson implicit scheme. Non-thermal collisional rates were included in linearised equations of statistical equilibrium.

  10. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  11. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent freezing rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period in time when the parcel remains stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles under isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to three-fold variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  12. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The Time-Dependent Freezing Rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period at time with the parcel remaining stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time-dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles at isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to factors of about 3 variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time-dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  13. Eigenfunction expansions for time dependent hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauslin, H. R.; Guerin, S.; Deroussiaux, A.

    We describe a generalization of Floquet theory for non periodic time dependent Hamiltonians. It allows to express the time evolution in terms of an expansion in eigenfunctions of a generalized quasienergy operator. We discuss a conjecture on the extension of the adiabatic theorem to this type of systems, which gives a procedure for the physical preparation of Floquet states. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A3418380 00004

  14. Thermally activated creep and fluidization in flowing disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabia, Samy; Detcheverry, François

    2016-11-01

    When submitted to a constant mechanical load, many materials display power law creep followed by fluidization. A fundamental understanding of these processes is still far from being achieved. Here, we characterize creep and fluidization on the basis of a mesoscopic viscoplastic model that includes thermally activated yielding events and a broad distribution of energy barriers, which may be lowered under the effect of a local deformation. We relate the creep exponent observed before fluidization to the width of barrier distribution and to the specific form of stress redistribution following yielding events. We show that Andrade creep is accompanied by local strain hardening driven by stress redistribution and find that the fluidization time depends exponentially on the applied stress. The simulation results are interpreted in the light of a mean-field analysis, and should help in rationalizing the creep phenomenology in disordered materials.

  15. On time-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streater, A.; Cooper, J.; Sandle, W.

    1987-01-01

    An integral equation is developed for application to time-dependent laboratory experiments in which partial redistribution effects are important. The equation of transport with the Heasly-Kneer (1976) emission coefficient and the equation of statistical equilibrium lead to a time-dependent redistribution function containing an absorption - reemission term which decays exponentially in time and a scattering term which is instantaneous. This integral equation does not agree with an equation written by Payne et al. (1974) that has been used to compare theory with experiments. The difference between the Payne equation and the equation developed here needs to be examined in detail, since it might under some circumstances be on the same order as the difference between partial and complete redistribution.

  16. On time-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streater, A.; Cooper, J.; Sandle, W.

    1987-02-01

    An integral equation is developed for application to time-dependent laboratory experiments in which partial redistribution effects are important. The equation of transport with the Heasly-Kneer (1976) emission coefficient and the equation of statistical equilibrium lead to a time-dependent redistribution function containing an absorption - reemission term which decays exponentially in time and a scattering term which is instantaneous. This integral equation does not agree with an equation written by Payne et al. (1974) that has been used to compare theory with experiments. The difference between the Payne equation and the equation developed here needs to be examined in detail, since it might under some circumstances be on the same order as the difference between partial and complete redistribution.

  17. Time-dependent species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Fox, David R; Billoir, Elise

    2013-02-01

    Time is a central component of toxicity assessments. However, current ecotoxicological practice marginalizes time in concentration-response (C-R) modeling and species sensitivity distribution (SSD) analyses. For C-R models, time is invariably fixed, and toxicity measures are estimated from a function fitted to the data at that time. The estimated toxicity measures are used as inputs to the SSD modeling phase, which similarly avoids explicit recognition of the temporal component. The present study extends some commonly employed probability models for SSDs to derive theoretical results that characterize the time-dependent nature of hazardous concentration (HCx) values. The authors' results show that even from very simple assumptions, more complex patterns in the SSD time dependency can be revealed.

  18. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  19. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV. F. Billy1, D. Coisne1,2, L. Sanchez1... mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially...upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction. Keywords- Mitral Valve , Prolapsus, Regurgitation Flow

  20. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  1. Time Dependent Behavior in the Weissenberg Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Michael M.; Andereck, C. David

    1997-03-01

    The Weissenberg effect is the climb of a non-Newtonian fluid up a rotating rod. We have found novel transitional effects in the behavior of a particular climbing fluid, STP(STP Oil Treatment distributed by First Brands Corporation.). The first state is a time-independent axisymmetric concave climb. As the rotation rate of the rod is increased, the first transition is to an axisymmetric climb with an ``onion dome'' shape. At higher rotation rates, the flow undergoes a symmetry breaking bifurcation to a time-dependent state. This time-dependent state exhibits an oscillation with a single frequency. Upon further increase of the rod rotation rate, the oscillation becomes modulated by a second frequency. The nature of each transition will be characterized, including the measurement of oscillation amplitudes and the frequency (or frequencies) of the time dependent states. These results will be compared with previous work.(G.S. Beavers, D.D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 69), 475 (1975).(D.D. Joseph, R.L. Fosdick, Arch. Rational Mech. 49), 321 (1973).

  2. Endochronic theory of transient creep and creep recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Chen, L.

    1979-01-01

    Short time creep and creep recovery were investigated by means of the endochronic theory of viscoplasticity. It is shown that the constitutive equations for constant-strain-rate stress-strain behavior, creep, creep recovery, and stress relaxation can all ber derived from the general constitutive equation by imposing appropriate constraints. In this unified approach, the effect of strain-hardening is naturally accounted for when describing creep and creep recovery. The theory predicts with reasonable accuracy the creep and creep recovery behaviors for Aluminum 1100-0 at 150 C. It was found that the strain-rate history at prestraining stage affects the subsequent creep. A critical stress was also established for creep recovery. The theory predicts a forward creep for creep recovery stress greater than the critical stress. For creep recovery stress less than the critical stress, the theory then predicts a normal strain recovery.

  3. Viscous Creep in Dry Unconsolidated Gulf of Mexico Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Zoback, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate creep characteristics of dry unconsolidated shale recovered from the pathfinder well, Gulf of Mexico (GOM). We subjected jacketed cylindrical specimens (25.4 mm diameter) to hydrostatic pressure that increased from 10 to 50 MPa in steps of 5 MPa. We kept the pressure constant in each step for at least 6 hours and measured axial and lateral strains (provided by LVDTs) and ultrasonic velocities (provided by seismic-wave transducers). The dry shale exhibited pronounced creep strain at all pressure levels, indicating that the dry frame of the shale possesses an intrinsic viscous property. Interestingly, the creep behavior of the shale is different above and below 30 MPa confining pressure. Above 30 MPa, the amount of creep strain in 6 hours is nearly constant with equal pressurization steps, indicating a linear viscous rheology. Below 30 MPa, the amount of creep increases linearly as pressure is raised in constant incremental steps, suggesting that the creep deformation accelerates as pressure increases within this pressure range. Thus, the general creep behavior of the GOM shale is characterized by a bilinear dependence on pressure magnitude. This creep characteristic is quite different from that observed in unconsolidated reservoir sands (Hagin and Zoback, 2002), which exhibited nearly constant amount of creep regardless of the pressure magnitude for equal increasing steps of pressure. The shale exhibits a lack of creep (and nearly negligible strain recovery) when unloaded, suggesting that the creep strain is irrecoverable and can be considered viscoplastic deformation. SEM observations show that the major mechanism of compaction of the dry shale appears to be packing of clay and a progressive collapse of pore (void) spaces. Creep compaction is considerably more significant than compaction that occurs instantaneously, indicating that the process of shale compaction is largely time-dependent.

  4. A Contribution to Time-Dependent Damage Modeling of Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treasurer, Paul; Poirette, Yann; Perreux, Dominique; Thiebaud, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a new damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue. The model, developed within a continuum damage mechanics framework, is based on the idea of a time-dependent damage spectrum, some elements of which occur rapidly and others slowly. The use of this spectrum allows a single damage kinematic to model creep and fatigue damage and to take into account the effect of stress amplitude, R ratio, and frequency. The evolution equations are based on similar equation than the one describing the viscoelasticity model and are relatively easy to implement. The new model is compared to the experimental results on carbon fiber/epoxy tubes. Quasi-static, creep and fatigue tests are performed on filament-wound tubular specimens to characterize the elastic, viscoelastic and plastic behavior of the composite material. Varying amounts of damage are observed and discussed depending on stress level and R ratio. The experimental work aims to develop and validate the damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue.

  5. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  6. Time-dependent Hartree approximation and time-dependent harmonic oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J. P.; Schulz, H.

    1982-03-01

    We present an analytically soluble model for studying nuclear collective motion within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. The model reduces the TDH equations to the Schrödinger equation of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator. Using canonical transformations and coherent states we derive a few properties of the time-dependent harmonic oscillator which are relevant for applications. We analyse the role of the normal modes in the time evolution of a system governed by TDH equations. We show how these modes couple together due to the anharmonic terms generated by the non-linearity of the theory.

  7. Time-dependent Dyson orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2016-08-21

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the tool of choice for real-time propagation of the electron density ρ(N)(t) of N-electron systems, it also encounters problems in this application. The first problem is the neglect of memory effects stemming from the, in TDDFT virtually unavoidable, adiabatic approximation, the second problem is the reliable evaluation of the probabilities P(n)(t) of multiple photoinduced ionization, while the third problem (which TDDFT shares with other approaches) is the reliable description of continuum states of the electrons ejected in the process of ionization. In this paper time-dependent Dyson orbital theory (TDDOT) is proposed. Exact TDDOT equations of motion (EOMs) for time-dependent Dyson orbitals are derived, which are linear differential equations with just static, feasible potentials of the electron-electron interaction. No adiabatic approximation is used, which formally resolves the first TDDFT problem. TDDOT offers formally exact expressions for the complete evolution in time of the wavefunction of the outgoing electron. This leads to the correlated probability of single ionization P(1)(t) as well as the probabilities of no ionization (P(0)(t)) and multiple ionization of n electrons, P(n)(t), which formally solves the second problem of TDDFT. For two-electron systems a proper description of the required continuum states appears to be rather straightforward, and both P(1)(t) and P(2)(t) can be calculated. Because of the exact formulation, TDDOT is expected to reproduce a notorious memory effect, the "knee structure" of the non-sequential double ionization of the He atom.

  8. Time-Dependent Protein Thermostability Assay.

    PubMed

    Vandecaetsbeek, Ilse; Vangheluwe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein purification often yields rather unstable proteins impeding functional and structural protein characterization. Low protein stability also leads to low purification yields as a result of protein degradation, aggregation, precipitation, and folding instability. It is often required to optimize buffer conditions through numerous iterations of trial and error to improve the homogeneity, stability, and solubility of the protein sample demanding high amounts of purified protein. Therefore we have set up a fast, simple, and high-throughput time-dependent thermostability-based assay at low protein cost to identify protein stabilizing factors to facilitate the handling and characterization of membrane proteins by subsequent structural and functional studies.

  9. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  10. Time-dependent hygrothermomechanical properties of a structural adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jianmin

    This research determines the effect of hygro-thermal environment and strain rate on the tensile properties and develop a method to determine the long-term durability of structural adhesive FM300k. Topics related to structural adhesives are reviewed, including development history, classification, application, and chemical structure. Most high performance structural adhesives are epoxies with viscoelastic behavior which is greatly affected by relative humidity (RH), temperature, and strain rate. Theories for modeling the viscoelastic materials are also investigated. A testing system was developed with which the time-dependent hygro-thermo-mechanical properties of structural adhesives can be measured. This effort consists of building tensiometers and environmental chambers, controlling RH and temperature, preparing and conditioning specimens, applying displacements with a computer-controlled stepper motor, developing C++ and LabVIEW programs, and acquiring data automatically. Tests performed in the present study include thermal expansion and moisture swelling, tensile creep and stress relaxation, monotonic tensile tests, and adiabatic cooling. Tensile stress-strain curves are measured at different RHs (15%, 50% and 85%), temperature (--15°, 30° and 50°C) and strain rate (10-2, 10-4, 10-6 and 10 -8 s-1) to determine the effects of batch, loading method, environment, strain rate, and adhesive. Results from the five series of tests show very good correlation and indicate the excellent performance, high reliability, and reproducibility of the testing system developed in the present study. Mathematical models of creep and stress relaxation are used to predict the long-term durability of structural adhesive FM 300k. The concept of a master stress-strain curve for polymeric materials is introduced based on the results of the monotonic tensile tests. Using a master stress-strain curve, the long-term hygro-thermo-mechanical properties of structural adhesive FM300k can be

  11. Exact time dependence of solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohe, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Solutions of the Schrödinger equation with an exact time dependence are derived as eigenfunctions of dynamical invariants which are constructed from time-independent operators using time-dependent unitary transformations. Exact solutions and a closed form expression for the corresponding time evolution operator are found for a wide range of time-dependent Hamiltonians in d dimensions, including non-Hermitean {\\cal PT} -symmetric Hamiltonians. Hamiltonians are constructed using time-dependent unitary spatial transformations comprising dilatations, translations and rotations and solutions are found in several forms: as eigenfunctions of a quadratic invariant, as coherent state eigenfunctions of boson operators, as plane wave solutions from which the general solution is obtained as an integral transform by means of the Fourier transform, and as distributional solutions for which the initial wavefunction is the Dirac δ-function. For the isotropic harmonic oscillator in d dimensions radial solutions are found which extend known results for d = 1, including Barut-Girardello and Perelomov coherent states (i.e., vector coherent states), which are shown to be related to eigenfunctions of the quadratic invariant by the ζ-transformation. This transformation, which leaves the Ermakov equation invariant, implements SU(1, 1) transformations on linear dynamical invariants. \\mathfrak{su}(1, 1) coherent states are derived also for the time-dependent linear potential. Exact solutions are found for Hamiltonians with electromagnetic interactions in which the time-dependent magnetic and electric fields are not necessarily spatially uniform. As an example, it is shown how to find exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the Dirac magnetic monopole in the presence of time-dependent magnetic and electric fields of a specified form.

  12. Time-dependent diffusion in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, G.; Stift, M. J.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical peculiarities of Ap stars are due to abundance stratifications produced by atomic diffusion in their outer layers. Theoretical models can predict such stratifications, but so far only provide equilibrium solutions which correspond to the maximum depth-dependent abundances for each element that can be supported by the radiation field. However, these stratifications are actually built up through a non-linear, time-dependent process which has never been modelled for realistic stellar atmospheres. Here, we present the first numerical simulations of time-dependent diffusion. We solve the continuity equation after having computed, as accurately as possible, atomic diffusion velocities (with and without a magnetic field) for a simplified fictitious - but still realistic - chemical element: cloudium. The direct comparison with existing observations is not the immediate aim of this work but rather a general understanding of how the stratification build-up proceeds in time and space. Our results raise serious questions as to the relevance of equilibrium solutions and reinforce the suspicion that certain accumulations of chemical elements might prove unstable.

  13. Analysis of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe-Nb alloy 718 is a widely used material in elevated- temperature applications. Currently, it is approved by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code only as a bolting material for elevated-temperature nuclear service. This report presents analyses of available creep and creep-rupture data for commercially heat-treated alloy 718 toward the development of allowable stress levels for this material in general elevated-temperature nuclear service. Available data came from 14 heats of bar, plate, and forging material over the temperature range from 538 to 704{degrees}C. The longest rupture time encompassed by the data was almost 87,000 h. Generalized regression analyses were performed to yield an analytical expression for rupture life as a function of stress and temperature. Heat-to-heat variations were accounted for by lot-centering'' the data. Effects of different solution heat treatment temperatures (T{sub s}) were accounted for by normalizing the creep stresses to the data for T{sub s} = 954{degrees}C. Thus, the results are strictly applicable only for material with this solution treatment. Time and strain to tertiary creep were predicted as functions of rupture life. Creep strain-time data were represented by normalization to the time and strain to tertiary creep and development of master creep curves.'' The results allow estimation of time-dependent allowable stress per American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Class N-47, and the creep strain-time relationships can be used to develop isochronous stress-strain curves. 29 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  15. Determination of Time Dependent Virus Inactivation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Vogler, E. T.

    2003-12-01

    A methodology is developed for estimating temporally variable virus inactivation rate coefficients from experimental virus inactivation data. The methodology consists of a technique for slope estimation of normalized virus inactivation data in conjunction with a resampling parameter estimation procedure. The slope estimation technique is based on a relatively flexible geostatistical method known as universal kriging. Drift coefficients are obtained by nonlinear fitting of bootstrap samples and the corresponding confidence intervals are obtained by bootstrap percentiles. The proposed methodology yields more accurate time dependent virus inactivation rate coefficients than those estimated by fitting virus inactivation data to a first-order inactivation model. The methodology is successfully applied to a set of poliovirus batch inactivation data. Furthermore, the importance of accurate inactivation rate coefficient determination on virus transport in water saturated porous media is demonstrated with model simulations.

  16. Time-dependent landslide probability mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Russell H.; Bernknopf, Richard L.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Case studies where time of failure is known for rainfall-triggered debris flows can be used to estimate the parameters of a hazard model in which the probability of failure is a function of time. As an example, a time-dependent function for the conditional probability of a soil slip is estimated from independent variables representing hillside morphology, approximations of material properties, and the duration and rate of rainfall. If probabilities are calculated in a GIS (geomorphic information system ) environment, the spatial distribution of the result for any given hour can be displayed on a map. Although the probability levels in this example are uncalibrated, the method offers a potential for evaluating different physical models and different earth-science variables by comparing the map distribution of predicted probabilities with inventory maps for different areas and different storms. If linked with spatial and temporal socio-economic variables, this method could be used for short-term risk assessment.

  17. Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan Liwen Chenab, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc (mma@earth.sinica.edu.tw)(wchi@gate.sinica.edu.tw) ; aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan ; cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Earthquake-induced groundwater flows have been observed recently. Such fluid flow might temporarily change the temperature field in the crust. Here we used seismically detected gas hydrate under seafloor to study the temperature fields at a few hundred meters subbottom depth before, and after the 2006 Henchuan earthquake (Mw7.0). We used the hydrate-related bottom-simulating-reflector (BSR) in seismic profiles to study the effects of gas/fluid migration on the BSR attributes. We have conducted two seismic experiments before and after the earthquake across the same transects near the hypocenter of the earthquake using similar air gun arrays and streamers. By analyzing this unique dataset, we found enhanced BSR reflectivity in average after the earthquake (~0.03), but the Sea-floor reflectivity is very similar (~0.5). We also found changed amplitudes versus offset (AVO) in the dataset (the gradient of reflection coefficient versus the angles was ~-0.34). We interpret these results as a consequence of earthquake-induced gas and fluid migration, bringing the gases underneath the BSR, thus the enhanced reflection coefficients. Next we will explore new methods to use the BSR as a flow meter. Using time-dependent seismic attribute analyses across transects before and after a large earthquake, we found strong evidences of earthquake-related fluid migrations and possibly associated temperature perturbations. This is among the first studies to document such feature in the offshore region.

  18. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings was observed between 1000 and 1400 F (538-760 C) but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for Modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy, Rene 41, Inconel 718, and TD-NiCr, it occurred when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength and when creep deformation was localized. For each gamma-prime strengthened alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined to characterize the notch-sensitive behavior.

  19. Micromechanics of Brittle Creep Under Triaxial Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail (i) at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and (ii) even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we provide a micromechanical model and experimental results describing time-dependent brittle creep of water-saturated granite under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of microcracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing-crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strain and strain rates are then computed from the change in energy potential due to microcrack growth. They are non-linear, and compare well with complementary experimental results obtained on granite samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decreasing crack growth rate , due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as merely an inflexion between the two end-member phases.

  20. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  1. Creep and creep rupture of laminated graphite/epoxy composites. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1979 - 30 Sep. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    An incremental numerical procedure based on lamination theory is developed to predict creep and creep rupture of general laminates. Existing unidirectional creep compliance and delayed failure data is used to develop analytical models for lamina response. The compliance model is based on a procedure proposed by Findley which incorporates the power law for creep into a nonlinear constitutive relationship. The matrix octahedral shear stress is assumed to control the stress interaction effect. A modified superposition principle is used to account for the varying stress level effect on the creep strain. The lamina failure model is based on a modification of the Tsai-Hill theory which includes the time dependent creep rupture strength. A linear cumulative damage law is used to monitor the remaining lifetime in each ply.

  2. Creep and recovery behavior analysis of space mesh structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yaqiong; Li, Tuanjie; Ma, Xiaofei

    2016-11-01

    The Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory and nonlinear force-density method have been investigated to analyze the creep and recovery behaviors of space deployable mesh reflectors in this paper. Based on Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic theory, we establish the creep and recovery constitutive model for cables whose pretensions were applied stepwise in time. This constitutive model has been further used for adjustment of cables' elongation rigidity. In addition, the time-dependent tangent stiffness matrix is calculated by the partial differentiation of the corresponding load vector with respect to the nodal coordinate vector obtained by the nonlinear force-density method. An incremental-iterative solution based on the Newton-Raphson method is adopted for solving the time-dependent nonlinear statics equations. Finally, a hoop truss reflector antenna is presented as a numerical example to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method for the creep and recovery behavior analysis of space deployable mesh structures.

  3. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  4. Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalife, A.; Pathak, U.; Richert, R.

    2011-10-01

    Steady state and time-resolved dielectric relaxation experiments are performed at high fields on viscous glycerol and the effects of energy absorption from the electric field are studied. Time resolution is obtained by a sinusoidal field whose amplitude is switched from a low to a high level and by recording voltage and current traces with an oscilloscope during this transition. Based on their distinct time and frequency dependences, three sources of modifying the dynamics and dielectric loss via an increase in the effective temperature can be distinguished: electrode temperature, real sample temperature, and configurational temperatures of the modes that absorbed the energy. Isothermal conditions that are desired for focusing on the configurational temperature changes (as in dielectric hole burning and related techniques) are maintained only for very thin samples and for moderate power levels. For high frequencies, say ν > 1 MHz, changes of the real temperature will exceed the effects of configurational temperatures in the case of macroscopic samples. Regarding microwave chemistry, heating via cell phone use, and related situations in which materials are subject to fields involving frequencies beyond the MHz regime, we conclude that changes in the configurational (or fictive) temperatures remain negligible compared with the increase of the real temperature. This simplifies the assessment of how time dependent electric fields modify the properties of materials.

  5. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  6. Time dependent particle emission from fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Shannon T; Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Decay heating following nuclear fission is an important factor in the design of nuclear facilities; impacting a variety of aspects ranging from cooling requirements to shielding design. Calculations of decay heat, often assumed to be a simple product of activity and average decay product energy, are complicated by the so called 'pandemonium effect'. Elucidated in the 1970's this complication arises from beta-decays feeding high-energy nuclear levels; redistributing the available energy between betas and gammas. Increased interest in improving the theoretical predictions of decay probabilities has been, in part, motivated by the recent experimental effort utilizing the Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) to determine individual beta-decay transition probabilities to individual nuclear levels. Accurate predictions of decay heating require a detailed understanding of these transition probabilities, accurate representation of particle decays as well as reliable predictions of temporal inventories from fissioning systems. We will discuss a recent LANL effort to provide a time dependent study of particle emission from fission products through a combination of Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) predictions of beta-decay probabilities, statistical Hauser-Feshbach techniques to obtain particle and gamma-ray emissions in statistical Hauser-Feshbach and the nuclear inventory code, CINDER.

  7. Time dependent friction in a free gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Sisti, Francesco; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a body moving in a perfect gas, described by the mean-field approximation and interacting elastically with the body, we study the friction exerted by the gas on the body fixed at constant velocities. The time evolution of the body in this setting was studied in Caprino et al. [Math. Phys. 264, 167-189 (2006)], Caprino et al. [Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 17, 1369-1403 (2007)], and Cavallaro [Rend. Mat. Appl. 27, 123-145 (2007)] for object with simple shape; the first study where a simple kind of concavity was considered was in Sisti and Ricciuti [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46, 3759-3611 (2014)], showing new features in the dynamic but not in the friction term. The case of more general shape of the body was left out for further difficulties, and we believe indeed that there are actually non-trivial issues to be faced for these more general cases. To show this and in the spirit of getting a more realistic perspective in the study of friction problems, in this paper, we focused our attention on the friction term itself, studying its behavior on a body with a more general kind of concavity and fixed at constant velocities. We derive the expression of the friction term for constant velocities, we show how it is time dependent, and we give its exact estimate in time. Finally, we use this result to show the absence of a constant velocity in the actual dynamic of such a body.

  8. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  9. Methodology for determining time-dependent mechanical properties of tuff subjected to near-field repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.; Andersen, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have established a methodology to determine the time dependence of strength and transport properties of tuff under conditions appropriate to a nuclear waste repository. Exploratory tests to determine the approximate magnitudes of thermomechanical property changes are nearly complete. In this report we describe the capabilities of an apparatus designed to precisely measure the time-dependent deformation and permeability of tuff at simulated repository conditions. Preliminary tests with this new apparatus indicate that microclastic creep failure of tuff occurs over a narrow strain range with little precursory Tertiary creep behavior. In one test, deformation under conditions of slowly decreasing effective pressure resulted in failure, whereas some strain indicators showed a decreasing rate of strain.

  10. Transient Crack Growth Behavior Under Cycle/Time-Dependent Step Loading for Pb-Containing and Pb-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakpan, Kittichai; Otsuka, Yuichi; Miyashita, Yukio; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Kohsoku

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, fatigue crack growth tests of Pb-containing [Sn-37Pb (wt.%)] and Pb-free [Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%)] solders were performed under cycle/time-dependent step loading at a constant J-integral range (Δ J). The C * parameter was also estimated for discussing time-dependent crack growth behavior. The experimental results indicated that acceleration of the crack growth rate at the beginning of the second loading step was induced when the C * value for the first loading step was high, regardless of time- or cycle-dependent crack growth and for both Sn-37Pb and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solders. The length of the acceleration region of the crack growth rate for both solders was in good agreement with the creep damage zone size estimated by the creep zone model proposed by Riedel and Rice.

  11. Application Of Elastic Perfectly Plastic Cyclic Analysis To Assessment Of Creep Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A cyclic elastic-perfectly plastic analysis method is proposed which provides a conservative estimate to cyclic creep strain accumulation within the ratchet boundary. The method is to check for ratcheting based on an elastic-perfectly material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined by temperature, time and stress to give 1% creep strain. It does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. This simplified method could be used as a rapid screening calculation, with full time-dependent creep analysis used if necessary.

  12. Relationship of mechanical characteristics and microstructural features to the time-dependent edge notch sensitivity of inconel 718 sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet was observed at 900 F to 1200 F (482 - 649 C). It occurred when edge-notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength and smooth specimen tests showed that small amounts of creep consumed large rupture life fractions. The severity of the notch sensitivity was reduced by decreasing the solution temperature, increasing the time and/or temperature of aging and increasing the test temperature to 1400 F (760 C). Elimination of time-dependent notch sensitivity correlated with a change in dislocation motion mechanism from shearing to by-passing precipitate particles.

  13. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  14. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM02, or about 7.509M02 ≈ 6.268 × 1076(M0/Msolar)2, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M02 ≈ 1.254 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2, and then decreases back down to 4πM02 = 1.049 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2.

  15. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  16. Creep properties of catalyst coated membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Habisch, Aronne; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Creep as a time-dependent mechanical damage acting either independently or in conjunction with other degradation mechanisms is known to reduce the membrane durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Due to the important ionomer coupling of membrane and catalyst layers in PEFCs, the present work evaluates membrane creep when constrained within a catalyst coated membrane (CCM). Three key factors dominating creep life in commonly used perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes, including creep stress, temperature, and relative humidity, were investigated by applying ex-situ creep loading and unloading experiments under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The creep strain and recovery of the CCM were found to be highly dependent on the environmental conditions and applied stress levels, where the temperature effect on creep strain was the most significant. Repetitive creep - recovery cycles revealed that significant creep damage can accumulate in the material over time. This accumulated creep damage was found to be independent of the loading frequency while both peak strain and permanent deformation increased with the stress duration. Based on the present findings, it is recommended to reduce the operating temperature and ensure adequate membrane hydration in order to mitigate harmful creep effects in PEFCs.

  17. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, RANDAL S.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and the Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D (slab, two

  18. Differences in time-dependent mechanical properties between extruded and molded hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Ersumo, N; Witherel, CE; Spiller, KL

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of hydrogels used in biomaterials and tissue engineering applications are critical determinants of their functionality. Despite the recent rise of additive manufacturing, and specifically extrusion-based bioprinting, as a prominent biofabrication method, comprehensive studies investigating the mechanical behavior of extruded constructs remain lacking. To address this gap in knowledge, we compared the mechanical properties and swelling properties of crosslinked gelatin-based hydrogels prepared by conventional molding techniques or by 3D bioprinting using a BioBots Beta pneumatic extruder. A preliminary characterization of the impact of bioprinting parameters on construct properties revealed that both Young's modulus and optimal extruding pressure increased with polymer content, and that printing resolution increased with both printing speed and nozzle gauge. High viability (>95%) of encapsulated NIH 3T3 fibroblasts confirmed the cytocompatibility of the construct preparation process. Interestingly, the Young's moduli of extruded and molded constructs were not different, but extruded constructs did show increases in both the rate and extent of time-dependent mechanical behavior observed in creep. Despite similar polymer densities, extruded hydrogels showed greater swelling over time compared to molded hydrogels, suggesting that differences in creep behavior derived from differences in microstructure and fluid flow. Because of the crucial roles of time-dependent mechanical properties, fluid flow, and swelling properties on tissue and cell behavior, these findings highlight the need for greater consideration of the effects of the extrusion process on hydrogel properties. PMID:27550945

  19. Time-Dependent Rate Phenomenon in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the most fundamental questions in viral evolutionary biology are how fast viruses evolve and how evolutionary rates differ among viruses and fluctuate through time. Traditionally, viruses are loosely classed into two groups: slow-evolving DNA viruses and fast-evolving RNA viruses. As viral evolutionary rate estimates become more available, it appears that the rates are negatively correlated with the measurement timescales and that the boundary between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses might not be as clear as previously thought. In this study, we collected 396 viral evolutionary rate estimates across almost all viral genome types and replication strategies, and we examined their rate dynamics. We showed that the time-dependent rate phenomenon exists across multiple levels of viral taxonomy, from the Baltimore classification viral groups to genera. We also showed that, by taking the rate decay dynamics into account, a clear division between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses as well as reverse-transcribing viruses could be recovered. Surprisingly, despite large differences in their biology, our analyses suggested that the rate decay speed is independent of viral types and thus might be useful for better estimation of the evolutionary time scale of any virus. To illustrate this, we used our model to reestimate the evolutionary timescales of extant lentiviruses, which were previously suggested to be very young by standard phylogenetic analyses. Our analyses suggested that these viruses are millions of years old, in agreement with paleovirological evidence, and therefore, for the first time, reconciled molecular analyses of ancient and extant viruses. IMPORTANCE This work provides direct evidence that viral evolutionary rate estimates decay with their measurement timescales and that the rate decay speeds do not differ significantly among viruses despite the vast differences in their molecular features. After adjustment for the rate decay dynamics, the

  20. Time-dependent statistical failure of fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Amanda; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of time-dependent stochastic failure of fiber network have been performed by using a central-force, triangular lattice model. This two-dimensional (2D) network can be seen as the next level of structural hierarchy to fiber bundles, which have been investigated for many years both theoretically and numerically. Unlike fiber bundle models, the load sharing of the fiber network is determined by the network mechanics rather than a preassigned rule, and its failure is defined as the point of avalanche rather than the total fiber failure. We have assumed that the fiber in the network follows Coleman's probabilistic failure law [B. D. Coleman, J. Appl. Phys. 29, 968 (1958), 10.1063/1.1723343] with the Weibull shape parameter β =1 (memory less fiber). Our interests are how the fiber-level probabilistic failure law is transformed into the one for the network and how the failure characteristics and disorders on the fiber level influence the network failure response. The simulation results showed that, with increasing the size of the network (N ), weakest-link scaling (WLS) appeared and each lifetime distribution at a given size approximately followed Weibull distribution. However, the scaling behavior of the mean and the Weibull shape parameter clearly deviate from what we can predict from the WLS of Weibull distribution. We have found that a characteristic distribution function has, in fact, a double exponential form, not Weibull form. Accordingly, for the 2D network system, Coleman's probabilistic failure law holds but only approximately. Comparing the fiber and network failure properties, we found that the network structure induces an increase of the load sensitivity factor ρ (more brittle than fiber) and Weibull shape parameter β (less uncertainty of lifetime). Superimposed disorders on the fiber level reduce all these properties for the network.

  1. Buckling Analysis in Creep Conditions: Review and Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Turbat, Andre; Drubay, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    In the case of structures operating at high temperature in normal or accidental conditions, the influence of creep has to be considered at the design stage because this phenomenon may reduce the lifetime significantly. This is true in particular for buckling analysis: in creep conditions, the buckling sometimes occurs after a long period under a compressive load which is lower than the critical load assessed when considering an instantaneous buckling. The main reason is that creep deformations induce an amplification of the initial geometrical imperfections and consequently a reduction of the buckling load. Some Design Codes incorporate special rules and/or methods to take creep buckling into account. Creep buckling analysis methods aim at evaluating critical loading for a given hold period with creep or alternatively critical creep time for a given loading. The Codes where creep buckling is considered also define margins with respect to critical loading: it shall be demonstrated that creep instability will not occur during the whole lifetime when multiplying the specified loading by a coefficient (design factor) depending on the situation level. For the design of NPP, specific creep buckling rules exist in the US, France and Russia. In the US, ASME, Section III, Subsection NH, which is dedicated to high temperature components design, provides limits which are applicable to general geometrical configurations and loading conditions that may cause buckling due to creep behaviour of the material. For load-controlled time-dependent creep buckling, the design factors to apply to the specified loadings are 1.5 for levels A, B or C service loadings and 1.25 for level D service loadings. A design factor is not required in the case of purely strain-controlled buckling. No specific method is provided to obtain critical loading or critical time for creep instability. In France, creep buckling rules included in RCC-MR, Chapter RB or RC 3200 are similar to those of ASME

  2. A time-dependent variational principle and the time-dependent Hartree approximation in hydrodynamical form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lill, J. V.; Haftel, M. I.; Herling, G. H.

    1989-05-01

    A quantum mechanical time-dependent variational principle is generalized using the classical theory of fluids to obtain a variational principle suitable for the fluid dynamical description of mixed state quantum mechanics. A newly derived set of moment equations, in both standard and renormalized form, can be derived with the aid of this principle through minimization of the error in expressing the total derivative of the Wigner function. Coupled systems are studied in the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation using a novel variational principle, and the renormalization procedure used earlier in the examination of single particle dynamics is extended to the TDH analysis. Use of a local Maxwellian ansatz for each particle results in a particularly simple ``two-fluid'' theory, the TDH/LM approximation, which does not violate the standard and renormalized energy conservation theorems derived earlier for the single particle equations. The fluid dynamical TDH/LM approximation is shown to possess a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  3. Mechanisms of time-dependent deformation in porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2014-07-01

    We performed triaxial deformation experiments on a water-saturated porous limestone under constant strain rate and constant stress (creep) conditions. The tests were conducted at room temperature and at low effective pressures Peff=10 and Peff=20 MPa, in a regime where the rock is nominally brittle when tested at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. Under these conditions and at constant stress, the phenomenon of brittle creep occurs. At Peff=10 MPa, brittle creep follows similar trends as those observed in other rock types (e.g., sandstones and granites): only small strains are accumulated before failure, and damage accumulation with increasing strain (as monitored by P wave speeds measurements during the tests) is not strongly dependent on the applied stresses. At Peff=20 MPa, brittle creep is also macroscopically observed, but when the creep strain rate is lower than ≈10-7 s-1, we observe that (1) much larger strains are accumulated, (2) less damage is accumulated with increasing strain, and (3) the deformation tends to be more compactant. These observations can be understood by considering that another deformation mechanism, different from crack growth, is active at low strain rates. We explore this possibility by constructing a deformation mechanism map that includes both subcritical crack growth and pressure solution creep processes; the increasing contribution of pressure solution creep at low strain rates is consistent with our observations.

  4. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  5. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  6. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  7. Numerical modeling of shallow fault creep triggered by nearby earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapha Mw 7.2 earthquake is the largest earthquake that strikes southern California in the last 18 years. It has triggered shallow fault creep on many faults in Salton Trough, Southern California, making it at least the 8th time in the last 42 years that a local or regional earthquake has done so. However, the triggering mechanism of fault creep and its implications to seismic hazard and fault mechanics is still poorly understood. For example, what determines the relative importance of static triggering and dynamic triggering of fault creep? What can we learn about the local frictional properties and normal stress from the triggering of fault creep? To understand the triggering mechanism and constrain fault frictional properties, we simulate the triggered fault creep on the Superstition Hills Fault (SHF), Salton Trough, Southern California. We use realistic static and dynamic shaking due to nearby earthquakes as stress perturbations to a 2D (in a 3D medium) planar fault model with rate-and-state frictional property variations both in depth and along strike. Unlike many previous studies, we focus on the simulation of triggered shallow fault creep instead of earthquakes. Our fault model can reproduce the triggering process, by static, dynamic , and combined stress perturbation. Preliminary results show that the magnitude of perturbation relative to the original stress level is an important parameter. In the static case, perturbation of 1% of normal stress trigger delayed fault creep whereas 10% of normal stress generate instantaneous creep. In the dynamic case, a change of two times in magnitude of perturbation can result in difference of triggered creep in several orders of magnitude. We explore combined triggering with different ratio of static and dynamic perturbation. The timing of triggering in a earthquake cycle is also important. With measurements on triggered creep on the SHF, we constrain local stress level and frictional parameters, which

  8. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  9. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  10. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  11. Birefringence of Polymer Solutions in Time-Dependent Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy-Aguilar, Enrique

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of changes of conformation of macromolecules in polymeric solutions which are subjected to time-dependent extensional flows generated by a two -roll mill flow device. The flows produced by the two-roll mill are linear, and two-dimensional. It has a stagnation point at the center of the flow field where the magnitudes of the strain-rates are greater than the vorticity. This study of conformational changes is based on data around the vicinity of the stagnation point, I for steady state flows, and several transient flow histories such as start -up, cessation, and double-step flows. We also present an analytical solution for the creeping flow generated by an infinitely long two-roll mill embedded in an unbounded fluid. This solution is used as a benchmark to compare the behavior of the polymer solutions when subjected to flows with different values for the ratio of rate-of-strain to vorticity. The conformational changes are determined experimentally using the Two-color Flow-Birefringence which provides an instantaneous and point-wise measure of the anisotropy of the fluid, together with the relative orientation of the anisotropy with respect to the principal axes of the flow field. Based on relaxation of the fluid anisotropy the characteristic time-scales of the polymer have been evaluated as a function of the flow field properties and the degree of conformational change of the macromolecules. Data for two polymeric solutions is presented. The first polymer system is the so-called test-fluid M1. This polymeric solution is shown to degrade significantly, even for small values of the velocity gradient, as measured by the changes in the macroscopic relaxation time-scales. The second solution is a concentrated polystyrene solution that presents overshoots and undershoots of the polymer conformation dependent of the ratio of vorticity to rate-of-strain. When subjected to large deformations, this polystyrene solution shows not only the possibility of a

  12. Time dependent deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily Kvietka Desmarais

    to a decollement structure 8 km under the south flank, and the locations of the microearthquakes suggest that both occur on the same structure. In 2007, Episode 56 of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupianaha eruption occurred. This episode was exciting both because it was the largest intrusion in the last decade, and because it occurred concurrently with a flank slow-slip event. The intrusion started on Father's day (June 17th), 2007 with increased seismicity and abrupt tilts at the summit and rift zones. Quasi-static models of the total deformation determined from GPS, tilt, and InSAR indicate that the intrusion occurred on two en echelon dike segments in the upper East Rift Zone along with deformation consistent with slow-slip in the same areas of previous events. The ˜ 2 m maximum opening occurred on the eastern segment near Makaopui crater. Unlike previous intrusions in 1997, 1999, and 2000, the dike model was not sufficient to explain deformation on the western flank. Additionally, a coastal tiltmeter installed in anticipation of a slow-slip event recorded tilts consistent with those observed during the 2005 slow-slip event. These observations led to the conclusion that a concurrent slow-slip event occurred. Geodetic models indicate a similar amount of decollement slip occurred as in previous slow-slip events. Sub-daily GPS positions were used to study the spatio-temporal distribution of the dike intrusion. The time-dependent intrusion model shows that the intrusion began on the western en echelon segment before jumping to the eastern segment, which accumulated the majority of the 2 m of opening. Sub-daily GPS positions limit the number of stations available since there are very few continuous stations north of the East Rift Zone, where coverage is critical for separating the intrusion from the slow-slip. However, an ENVISAT interferogram at 08:22 on June 18, 2007 provides additional spatial coverage of deformation up to that point. Combining this image with the GPS and tilt

  13. A new numerical method to calculate inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation of two-dimensional geodynamic flows with application to diapirism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, L.; Schmeling, H.

    2013-08-01

    A key to understand many geodynamic processes is studying the associated large deformation fields. Finite deformation can be measured in the field by using geological strain markers giving the logarithmic strain f = log 10(R), where R is the ellipticity of the strain ellipse. It has been challenging to accurately quantify finite deformation of geodynamic models for inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation cases. We present a new formulation invoking a 2-D marker-in-cell approach. Mathematically, one can describe finite deformation by a coordinate transformation to a Lagrangian reference frame. For a known velocity field the deformation gradient tensor, F, can be calculated by integrating the differential equation DtFij = LikFkj, where L is the velocity gradient tensor and Dt the Lagrangian derivative. The tensor F contains all information about the minor and major semi-half axes and orientation of the strain ellipse and the rotation. To integrate the equation centrally in time and space along a particle's path, we use the numerical 2-D finite difference code FDCON in combination with a marker-in-cell approach. For a sufficiently high marker density we can accurately calculate F for any 2-D inhomogeneous and time-dependent creeping flow at any point for a deformation f up to 4. Comparison between the analytical and numerical solution for the finite deformation within a Poiseuille-Couette flow shows an error of less than 2 per cent for a deformation up to f = 1.7. Moreover, we determine the finite deformation and strain partitioning within Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) of different viscosity and layer thickness ratios. These models provide a finite strain complement to the RTI benchmark of van Keken et al. Large finite deformation of up to f = 4 accumulates in RTIs within the stem and near the compositional boundaries. Distinction between different stages of diapirism shows a strong correlation between a maximum occurring deformation of f = 1, 3 and

  14. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  15. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  16. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  17. Time-Dependent Lattice Methods for Ion-Atom Collisions in Cartesian and Cylindrical Coordinate Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, Michael S; Schultz, David Robert

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent lattice methods in both Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates are applied to calculate excitation cross sections for p+H collisions at 40 keV incident energy. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved using a previously formulated Cartesian coordinate single-channel method on a full 3D lattice and a newly formulated cylindrical coordinate multichannel method on a set of coupled 2D lattices. Cartesian coordinate single-channel and cylindrical coordinate five-channel calculations are found to be in reasonable agreement for excitation cross sections from the 1s ground state to the 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, and 3d excited states. For extension of the time-dependent lattice method to handle the two electron dynamics found in p+He collisions, the cylindrical coordinate multichannel method appears promising due to the reduced dimensionality of its lattice.

  18. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  19. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  20. Finite Element Prediction of Creep-Plastic Ratchetting and Low Cycle Creep-Fatigue for a Large SPF Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Leen, S. B.; Hyde, T. H.

    2010-06-01

    Industrial experience shows that large superplastic forming (SPF) tools suffer from distortion due to thermal cycling, which apparently causes high temperature creep and plasticity. In addition to distortion, thermomechanical fatigue and fatigue-creep interaction can lead to cracking. The aim of this study is to predict the life-limiting thermomechanical behavior of a large SPF tool under realistic forming conditions using elastic-plastic-creep FE analyses. Nonlinear time-dependent, sequentially coupled FE analyses are performed using temperature-dependent monotonic and cyclic material data for a high-nickel, high-chromium tool material, XN40F (40% Ni and 20% Cr). The effect of monotonic and cyclic material data is compared vis-à-vis the anisothermal, elastic-plastic-stress response of the SPF tool. An uncoupled cyclic plasticity-creep material model is employed. Progressive deformation (ratchetting) is predicted locally, transverse to the predominant direction of the creep-fatigue cycling, but at the same spatial location, due to creep and cyclic plasticity, during the so-called minor cycles, which correspond to comparatively small-amplitude temperature changes associated with opening of the press doors during part loading and unloading operations.

  1. Deterministic Multiaxial Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancements for CARES/Creep Integrated Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of sum, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of Ns methodology and the

  2. Does Mt Etna creep in a brittle manner?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    Time-dependent brittle deformation is a fundamental and pervasive process operating in the Earth’s upper crust. Its characterization is a pre-requisite to understanding and unravelling the complexities of crustal evolution and dynamics. The preferential chemical interaction between pore fluids and strained atomic bonds at crack tips, a mechanism known as stress corrosion, allows rock to fail under a constant stress that is well below its short-term strength over an extended period of time; a process known as brittle creep. Here we present the first experimental measurements of brittle creep in a basic rock (basalt from Mt Etna volcano) under triaxial stress conditions. Results from conventional creep experiments demonstrate that creep strain rates are highly and non-linearly dependent on the level of applied stress; with a 20% increase in stress producing close to three orders of magnitude increase in creep strain rate. Results from stress-stepping creep experiments show that creep strain rates are also highly dependent on the effective confining pressure. Stress corrosion reactions are inhibited at higher effective confining pressures, and this is interpreted as being due to a reduction in crack aperture that restricts the transport of reactive species to crack tips. Overall, our results also suggest that a critical level of crack damage is required before the deformation starts to accelerate to failure, regardless of the level of applied stress and the time taken to reach this point. The experimental results are discussed in terms of microstructural observations and fits to a macroscopic creep law, and compared with the observed deformation history at Mt Etna volcano.

  3. Dimensional crossover in Rayleigh Taylor flows driven by time dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the nature of dimensional crossover i.e. transition between the nearly isotropic 3D square bubbflows les to highly anisotropic 2D flows in Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability. Power law time dependence of the acceleration is considered with the emphasis on sub-regime, where the behavior is RT type. We consider flow with rectangular symmetry and obtain the 3D square and 2D limits with leading order rectangular corrections. Solutions evolve as power law and solutions form a two parameter family parametrized by the principal curvatures of the bubble. The bubbles with ``near circular contour'' separate the 2-dimensional solution space into two distinct regimes having distinct properties under the dimensional crossover. In one regime, the elongated bubbles transform to 2D solutions, whereas in the other the elongated bubbles flatten under a dimensional crossover. 3D square bubbles are universally stable whereas 2D bubbles are unstable with respect to 3D modulations, implying that the dimensional crossover is discontinuous. The time dependence affects the growth/decay of perturbations and has no consequence on the overall stability properties of the solution. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  4. Studies of time dependence of fields in TEVATRON superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Herrup, D.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1988-08-22

    The time variation in the magnetic field of a model Tevatron dipole magnet at constant excitation current has been studied. Variations in symmetry allowed harmonic components over long time ranges show a log t behavior indicative of ''flux creep.'' Both short time range and long time range behavior depend in a detailed way on the excitation history. Similar effects are seen in the remnant fields present in full-scale Tevatron dipoles following current ramping. Both magnitudes and time dependences are observed to depend on details for the ramps, such as ramp rate, flattop duration, and number of ramps. In a few magnets, variations are also seen in symmetry unallowed harmonics. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  6. Review of time-dependent fatigue behavior and life prediction for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Majumdar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Available data on creep-fatigue life and fracture behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel are reviewed. Whereas creep-fatigue interaction is important for Type 304 stainless steel, oxidation effects appear to dominate the time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Four of the currently available predictive methods - the Linear Damage Rule, Frequency Separation Equation, Strain Range Partitioning Equation, and Damage Rate Equation - are evaluated for their predictive capability. Variations in the parameters for the various predictive methods with temperature, heat of material, heat treatment, and environment are investigated. Relative trends in the lives predicted by the various methods as functions of test duration, waveshape, etc., are discussed. The predictive methods will need modification in order to account for oxidation and aging effects in the 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Future tests that will emphasize the difference between the various predictive methods are proposed.

  7. Passive microrheology in the effective time domain: analyzing time dependent colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Bhavna M; Orpe, Ashish V; Kaushal, Manish; Joshi, Yogesh M

    2016-10-21

    We studied the aging dynamics of an aqueous suspension of LAPONITE®, a model time dependent soft glassy material, using a passive microrheology technique. This system is known to undergo physical aging during which its microstructure evolves progressively to explore lower free energy states. Optical microscopy is used to monitor the motion of micron-sized tracer probes embedded in a sample kept between two glass plates. The mean square displacements (MSD) obtained from the motion of the tracer particles show a systematic change from a purely diffusive behavior at short aging times to a subdiffusive behavior as the material ages. Interestingly, the MSDs at all the aging times as well as different LAPONITE® concentrations superpose remarkably to show a time-aging time master curve when the system is transformed from the real time domain to the effective time domain, which is obtained by rescaling the material clock to account for the age dependent relaxation time. The transformation of the master curve from the effective time domain to the real time domain leads to the prediction of the MSD in real time over a span of 5 decades when the measured data at individual aging times are only over 2 decades. Since the MSD obtained from microrheology is proportional to the creep compliance of a material, by using the Boltzmann superposition principle along with the convolution relation in the effective time domain, we predict the stress relaxation behavior of the system in real time. This work shows that the effective time approach applied to microrheology facilitates the prediction of long time creep and relaxation dynamics of a time dependent soft material by carrying out short time experiments at different aging times.

  8. Time-dependent edge notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet in the temperature range 900 to 1400 F (482 to 760 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet occurred at 900 to 1200 F when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength, and tests on smooth specimens showed that small amounts of creep consumed large fractions of creep-rupture life. The severity of the notch sensitivity decreased with decreasing solution treatment temperature and increasing time and/or temperature of the aging treatment. Elimination of the notch sensitivity was correlated with a change in the dislocation mechanism from shearing to by-passing precipitate particles.

  9. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  10. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  11. A time-dependent vector field topology based on streak surfaces.

    PubMed

    Uffinger, Markus; Sadlo, Filip; Ertl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    It was shown recently how the 2D vector field topology concept, directly applicable to stationary vector fields only, can be generalized to time-dependent vector fields by replacing the role of stream lines by streak lines. The present paper extends this concept to 3D vector fields. In traditional 3D vector field topology separatrices can be obtained by integrating stream lines from 0D seeds corresponding to critical points. We show that in our new concept, in contrast, 1D seeding constructs are required for computing streak-based separatrices. In analogy to the 2D generalization we show that invariant manifolds can be obtained by seeding streak surfaces along distinguished path surfaces emanating from intersection curves between codimension-1 ridges in the forward and reverse finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. These path surfaces represent a time-dependent generalization of critical points and convey further structure in time-dependent topology of vector fields. Compared to the traditional approach based on FTLE ridges, the resulting streak manifolds ease the analysis of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) with respect to visual quality and computational cost, especially when time series of LCS are computed. We exemplify validity and utility of the new approach using both synthetic examples and computational fluid dynamics results.

  12. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  13. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Adam J. Lee, John C.

    2016-02-15

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  14. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na{sub 4} cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na{sub 4} cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  15. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Peng, Qing; Carter, Emily A

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na4 cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na4 cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  16. Plasmon excitations in sodium atomic planes: a time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ji; Xu, Yuehua; Ke, San-Huang

    2012-08-07

    The collective electronic excitation in planar sodium clusters is studied by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The formation and development of the resonances in photoabsorption spectra are investigated in terms of the shape and size of the two-dimensional (2D) systems. The nature of these resonances is revealed by the frequency-resolved induced charge densities present on a real-space grid. For long double chains, the excitation is similar to that in long single atomic chains, showing longitudinal modes, end and central transverse modes. However, for 2D planes consisting of (n × n) atoms with n being up to 16, new 2D characteristic modes emerge regardless of the symmetries considered. For in-plane excitations, besides the equivalent end mode, mixed modes with contrary polarity occur. The relation between the frequency of the primary modes and the system size is similar to the case of a 2D electron gas but with a correction due to the realistic atomic structure. For excitations perpendicular to the plane there are corner, side center, bulk center, and circuit modes. Our calculation reveals the importance of dimensionality for plasmon excitation and how it evolves from 1D to 2D.

  17. Modeling the time-dependent flexural response of wood-plastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Scott E.

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) are moisture sensitive bimodal anisotropic nonlinear viscoelastic materials, with time and temperature having the greatest effect on mechanical behavior. As WPC producers seek to manufacture structural bending members, such as beams and joists, it is important that the material's time and temperature-dependent mechanical behavior be understood and characterized. The complicated time-dependent behavior means that WPC bending deflections cannot be adequately predicted for even practical design purposes using simple linear-elastic models. Instead, mechanics-based models that incorporate the observed time-dependent and nonlinear responses are necessary. This dissertation presents an experimental and modeling program used to test and characterize the axial and shear behaviors of seven different WPC products (primarily polyethylene and polypropylene) subjected to both quasi-static and creep loading at multiple temperatures. These data were used to develop a mechanics based model that can predict bending deflections of complex sections at any time or temperature. Additionally, a practical design method and standardized test procedures were created for use in typical long-term bending situations. A mechanical model for WPCs must combine time-dependent material characterization with a tool that can simulate mode dependence, temperature dependence, changing neutral axis location, and nonlinear axial stress distributions that vary over the length of a member and evolve with time. Finite-element (FE) modeling was chosen as the most practical way to satisfy these requirements. The model developed in this study uses an FE model with a custom-designed material model. Bending deflection predictions from the model were compared to experimental testing and the model showed some success despite the difficulties created by the material variability. The practical method created for designing WPC structural bending members utilizes four material constants

  18. Time-dependent evolution of rock slopes by a multi-modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzano, F.; Della Seta, M.; Martino, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-modelling approach that incorporates contributions from morpho-evolutionary modelling, detailed engineering-geological modelling and time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling to analyse the rheological evolution of a river valley slope over approximately 102 kyr. The slope is located in a transient, tectonically active landscape in southwestern Tyrrhenian Calabria (Italy), where gravitational processes drive failures in rock slopes. Constraints on the valley profile development were provided by a morpho-evolutionary model based on the correlation of marine and river strath terraces. Rock mass classes were identified through geomechanical parameters that were derived from engineering-geological surveys and outputs of a multi-sensor slope monitoring system. The rock mass classes were associated to lithotechnical units to obtain a high-resolution engineering-geological model along a cross section of the valley. Time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling reproduced the main morpho-evolutionary stages of the valley slopes. The findings demonstrate that a complex combination of eustatism, uplift and Mass Rock Creep (MRC) deformations can lead to first-time failures of rock slopes when unstable conditions are encountered up to the generation of stress-controlled shear zones. The multi-modelling approach enabled us to determine that such complex combinations may have been sufficient for the first-time failure of the S. Giovanni slope at approximately 140 ka (MIS 7), even without invoking any trigger. Conversely, further reactivations of the landslide must be related to triggers such as earthquakes, rainfall and anthropogenic activities. This failure involved a portion of the slope where a plasticity zone resulted from mass rock creep that evolved with a maximum strain rate of 40% per thousand years, after the formation of a river strath terrace. This study demonstrates that the multi-modelling approach presented herein is a useful

  19. Early age stresses and creep-shrinkage interaction of restrained concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoubat, Salah Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed to characterize the early age tensile creep and shrinkage behavior of concrete. A uniaxial restrained shrinkage test was developed. The experiment tested two identical specimens: restrained and unrestrained. The test was controlled by computer, and the shrinkage deformation was checked continuously and compared to a threshold value of 5 mum, which when exceeded, triggered an increase in tensile load to recover the shrinkage strain in the restrained specimen. Thus, a restrained condition is achieved and the stress generated by shrinkage mechanisms was measurable. The experiment revealed how shrinkage stresses developed and how creep mechanisms reduced shrinkage strain. The tests revealed that shrinkage stresses in the first days after casting are significant and caused fracture of the concrete. The rate of stress evolution influenced the time and stress of first cracking. The tensile creep of concrete formed a substantial part of the time dependent deformation and reduced the shrinkage stresses by 50%. A method separating drying creep mechanisms of concrete into stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking was developed. The method required measurement of creep and shrinkage of concrete under drying, sealed, and moist curing conditions. The moist-curing test produce the basic creep; the sealed test provided data on basic creep and stress-induced shrinkage, and the drying test provided data on basic creep, stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking. The basic creep results of young concrete indicated a high creep rate in the initial 10--20 hours after loading. Then, the rate decreased and the creep function approached a stable value. The initial rate of creep was sensitive to age at loading in the first two days, and became age-independent after a few days. The analysis revealed stress-induced shrinkage as a major mechanism of drying creep for plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC). Microcracking forms a significant

  20. Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-16

    1 LEVEL NRL Memorandum Report 3W tO Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase E.S. ORAN, ’T.R. YOUNG and J.P. BORIS Laboratory for...34-• TIME DEPENDENT STUDIES OF REACTIVE SHOCKS IN THE GAS PHASE I. Introduction This paper presents results obtained from a detailed numerical...chemical kinetics, reaction products, and intermediates produced in reactive gas mixtures ignited by the propagation of a shock front. The model is based

  1. One Dimensional Time-Dependent Tunnelling of Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcullen, Patrick; Salayka-Ladouceur, Logan; Malmgren, Kevin; Reid, Matthew; Shegelski, Mark R. A.

    2017-03-01

    We study the time-dependent tunnelling of excitons in one dimension using numerical integration based on the Crank-Nicholson method. A complete development of the time-dependent simulator is provided. External barriers studied include single and double delta barriers. We find that the appearance of transmission resonances depends strongly on the dielectric constant, relative effective masses, and initial spatial spread of the wavefunction. A discussion regarding applications to realistic systems is provided.

  2. Time Dependent Universal Conductance Fluctuations In AuPd, Ag, And Au Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trionfi, A.; Lee, S.; Natelson, D.

    2006-09-01

    Quantum transport phenomena allow experimental determinations of the phase coherence information in metals. We report quantitative comparisons of inferred coherence lengths from independent measurements of the weak localization magnetoresistance and time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations' magnetic field dependence. Strong agreement is observed in both quasi-2D and quasi-1D AuPd samples. However, quantitative agreement is not seen in quasi-1D Ag wires below 10 K and quasi-1D Au wires below 14 K. A possible explanation for this disagreement will be discussed. Attempts to produce changes in the coherence length in Au by annealing have also been made and results will be reported.

  3. Numerical solution of the two-dimensional time-dependent incompressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, David L.; Taylor, Lafayette K.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the artificial compressibility form of the 2D time-dependent incompressible Euler equations. The approach is based on using an approximate Riemann solver for the cell face numerical flux of a finite volume discretization. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and presented for all boundaries and in-flow out-flow situations. The system of algebraic equations is solved using the discretized Newton-relaxation (DNR) implicit method. Numerical results are presented for both steady and unsteady flow.

  4. Radiation and temperature effects on the time-dependent response of T300/934 graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, Robert N.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1988-01-01

    A time-dependent characterization study was performed on T300/934 graphite/epoxy in a simulated space environment. Creep tests on irradiated and nonirradiated graphite/epoxy and bulk resin specimens were carried out at temperatures of 72 and 250 F. Irradiated specimens were exposed to dosages of penetrating electron radiation equal to 30 years exposure at GEO-synchronous orbit. Radiation was shown to have little effect on the creep response of both the composite and bulk resin specimens at 72 F while radiation had a significant effect at 250 F. A healing process was shown to be present in the irradiated specimens where broken bonds in the epoxy due to radiation recombined over time to form cross-links in the 934 resin structure. An analytical micromechanical model was also developed to predict the viscoelastic response of fiber reinforced composite materials. The model was shown to correlate well with experimental results for linearly viscoelastic materials with relatively small creep strains.

  5. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  6. Creep Measurement Video Extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark; Vickerman, Mary; Padula, Santo, II; Juhas, John

    2011-01-01

    Understanding material behavior under load is critical to the efficient and accurate design of advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Technologies such as the one disclosed here allow accurate creep measurements to be taken automatically, reducing error. The goal was to develop a non-contact, automated system capable of capturing images that could subsequently be processed to obtain the strain characteristics of these materials during deformation, while maintaining adequate resolution to capture the true deformation response of the material. The measurement system comprises a high-resolution digital camera, computer, and software that work collectively to interpret the image.

  7. Time-dependent bridging and life prediction of SiC/SiC in a hypothetical fusion environment

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Lewinsohn, C.A.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1996-10-01

    Growth of subcritical cracks in SiC/SiC composites of CG-Nicalon fibers with a {approximately}1 {mu}m C-interphase has been measured on a related Basic Energy Sciences program using environments of purified argon and mixtures of argon and oxygen at 1073K to 1373K. Companion thermo-gravimetric (TGA) testing measured mass loss in identical environments. The TGA mass loss was from C-interphase oxidation to CO and CO{sub 2}, which was undetectable in argon and linear with oxygen concentration in argon-oxygen mixtures, and was converted into an interphase linear recession rate. Crack growth in pure argon indicated that fiber creep was causing time-dependent crack bridging to occur, while crack growth in argon-oxygen mixtures indicated that time-dependent C-interphase recession was also causing time-dependent bridging with different kinetics. A model of time-dependent bridging was used to compute crack growth rates in argon and in argon-oxygen mixtures and gave an estimate of useable life of about 230 days at 1073K in a He + 1.01 Pa O{sub 2} (10 ppm) environment.

  8. Time dependent behavior of a graphite/thermoplastic composite and the effects of stress and physical aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Two complimentary studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. The first of these studies, experimental in nature, used isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers and adapted them for testing of the composite material. From these tests, the time dependent transverse (S22) and shear (S66) compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(sub g) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress. The second part of the study relied upon isothermal uniaxial tension tests of IM7/8320 to determine the effects of physical aging on the nonlinear material behavior at elevated temperature. An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to quantify the effects of aging on the rate-independent plastic and rate-dependent viscoplastic response. Sensitivity of the material constants required by the model to aging time were determined for aging times up to 65 hours. Verification of the analytical model indicated that the effects of prior aging on the nonlinear stress/strain/time data of matrix dominated laminates can be predicted.

  9. Information theories for time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Daeyeoul; Maamache, Mustapha; Menouar, Salah; Nahm, In Hyun

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator based on invariant operator method. > Time dependence of entropies and entropic uncertainty relation. > Characteristics of Shannon information and Fisher information. > Application of information theories to particular systems that have time-dependent behavior. - Abstract: Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator are described on the basis of invariant operator method. We obtained entropic uncertainty relation of the system and discussed whether it is always larger than or equal to the physically allowed minimum value. Shannon information and Fisher information are derived by means of density operator that satisfies Liouville-von Neumann equation and their characteristics are investigated. Shannon information is independent of time, but Fisher information is explicitly dependent on time as the time functions of the Hamiltonian vary. We can regard that the Fisher information is a local measure since its time behavior is largely affected by local arrangements of the density, whilst the Shannon information plays the role of a global measure of the spreading of density. To promote the understanding, our theory is applied to special systems, the so-called quantum oscillator with time-dependent frequency and strongly pulsating mass system.

  10. Time-dependent stochastic Bethe-Salpeter approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Eran; Baer, Roi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    A time-dependent formulation for electron-hole excitations in extended finite systems, based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), is developed using a stochastic wave function approach. The time-dependent formulation builds on the connection between time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory and the configuration-interaction with single substitution (CIS) method. This results in a time-dependent Schrödinger-like equation for the quasiparticle orbital dynamics based on an effective Hamiltonian containing direct Hartree and screened exchange terms, where screening is described within the random-phase approximation (RPA). To solve for the optical-absorption spectrum, we develop a stochastic formulation in which the quasiparticle orbitals are replaced by stochastic orbitals to evaluate the direct and exchange terms in the Hamiltonian as well as the RPA screening. This leads to an overall quadratic scaling, a significant improvement over the equivalent symplectic eigenvalue representation of the BSE. Application of the time-dependent stochastic BSE (TDsBSE) approach to silicon and CdSe nanocrystals up to size of ≈3000 electrons is presented and discussed.

  11. Watching excitons move: the time-dependent transition density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Carsten

    2012-02-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory allows one to calculate excitation energies and the associated transition densities in principle exactly. The transition density matrix (TDM) provides additional information on electron-hole localization and coherence of specific excitations of the many-body system. We have extended the TDM concept into the real-time domain in order to visualize the excited-state dynamics in conjugated molecules. The time-dependent TDM is defined as an implicit density functional, and can be approximately obtained from the time-dependent Kohn-Sham orbitals. The quality of this approximation is assessed in simple model systems. A computational scheme for real molecular systems is presented: the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are solved with the OCTOPUS code and the time-dependent Kohn-Sham TDM is calculated using a spatial partitioning scheme. The method is applied to show in real time how locally created electron-hole pairs spread out over neighboring conjugated molecular chains. The coupling mechanism, electron-hole coherence, and the possibility of charge separation are discussed.

  12. Numerical implementation of inelastic time dependent and time independent, finite strain constitutive equtions in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Krieg, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A number of complex issues are addressed which will allow the incorporation of finite strain, inelastic material behavior into the piecewise numerical construction of solutions in solid mechanics. Without recourse to extensive continuum mechanics preliminaries, an elementary time independent plasticity model, an elementary time dependent creep model, and a viscoelastic model are introduced as examples of constitutive equations which are routinely used in engineering calculations. The constitutive equations are all suitable for problems involving large deformations and finite strains. The plasticity and creep models are in rate form and use the symmetric part of the velocity gradient or the stretching to compute the co-rotational time derivative of the Cauchy stress. The viscoelastic model computes the current value of the Cauchy stress from a hereditary integral of a materially invariant form of the stretching history. The current configuration is selected for evaluation of equilibrium as opposed to either the reference configuration or the last established equilibrium configuration. The process of strain incrementation is examined in some depth and the stretching evaluated at the midinterval multiplied by the time step is identified as the appropriate finite strain increment to use with the selected form of the constitutive equations. Discussed is the conversion of rotation rates based on the spin into incremental orthogonal rotations which are then used to update stresses and state variables due to rigid body rotation during the load increment. Comments and references to the literature are directed at numerical integration of the constitutive equations with an emphasis on doing this accurately, if not exactly, for any time step and stretching. This material taken collectively provides an approach to numerical implementation which is marked by its simplicity.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  14. Full-counting statistics of time-dependent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-11-01

    We develop a scheme for the computation of the full-counting statistics of transport described by Markovian master equations with an arbitrary time dependence. It is based on a hierarchy of generalized density operators, where the trace of each operator yields one cumulant. This direct relation offers a better numerical efficiency than the equivalent number-resolved master equation. The proposed method is particularly useful for conductors with an elaborate time dependence stemming, e.g., from pulses or combinations of slow and fast parameter switching. As a test bench for the evaluation of the numerical stability, we consider time-independent problems for which the full-counting statistics can be computed by other means. As applications, we study cumulants of higher order for two time-dependent transport problems of recent interest, namely steady-state coherent transfer by adiabatic passage (CTAP) and Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interference in an open double quantum dot.

  15. Time-dependent perturbation theory for inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R. J.

    1982-08-01

    We show by numerical integration that the first-order, time-dependent, Magnus approximation agrees with the first-order, exponential, distorted-wave approximation to within a few percent, provided that the trajectory used for the time-dependent calculation is characterized by the arithmetic mean of the initial and final velocities and the arithmetic mean of the initial and final orbital angular momenta. Calculations are done for rotational energy transfer from an exponentially repulsive potential characteristic of He+H2 and for a Lennard-Jones potential characteristic of Ar+N2.

  16. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystals (André J-M and Jonnard P 2015 J. Opt. 17 085609) and also by extending the Takagi-Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry.

  17. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian; Gu, Yu-qiu

    2017-04-01

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  18. Enhanced thermopower under a time-dependent gate voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépieux, Adeline; Šimkovic, Fedor; Cambon, Benjamin; Michelini, Fabienne

    2011-04-01

    We derive formal expressions of time-dependent energy and heat currents through a nanoscopic device using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function technique. Numerical results are reported for a metal-dot-metal junction where the dot level energy is abruptly changed by a step-shaped voltage pulse. Analytical linear responses are obtained for the time-dependent thermoelectric coefficients. We show that in the transient regime the Seebeck coefficient can be enhanced by an amount (as much as 40%) controlled by both the dot energy and the height of the voltage step.

  19. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  20. Choice of Variables and Preconditioning for Time Dependent Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Vatsa, Verr N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the use of low speed preconditioning for time dependent problems. These are solved using a dual time step approach. We consider the effect of this dual time step on the parameter of the low speed preconditioning. In addition, we compare the use of two sets of variables, conservation and primitive variables, to solve the system. We show the effect of these choices on both the convergence to a steady state and the accuracy of the numerical solutions for low Mach number steady state and time dependent flows.

  1. Creep fracture during solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Henshall, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    Creep fracture behavior has been studied in Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Mn alloys undergoing solute-drag creep and in microduplex stainless steel undergoing both solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation. Failure in these materials is found to be controlled by two mechanisms, neck formation and cavitation. The mechanism of creep fracture during solute-drag creep in Al-Mg is found to change from necking-controlled fracture to cavitation-controlled fracture as Mn content is increased. Binary Al-Mg material fails by neck formation during solute-drag creep, and cavities are formed primarily in the neck region due to high hydrostatic stresses. Ternary alloys of Al-Mg- Mn containing 0.25 and 0.50 wt % Mn exhibit more uniform cavitation, with the 0.50 Mn alloy clearly failing by cavity interlinkage. Failure in the microduplex stainless steel is dominated by neck formation during solute-drag creep deformation but is controlled by cavity growth and interlinkage during superplastic deformation. Cavitation was measured at several strains, and found to increase as an exponential function of strain. An important aspect of cavity growth in the stainless steel is the long latency time before significant cavitation occurs. For a short latency period, cavitation acts to significantly reduce ductility below that allowed by neck growth alone. This effect is most pronounced in materials with a high strain-rate sensitivity, for which neck growth occurs very slowly.

  2. Rationalization of Creep Data of Creep-Resistant Steels on the Basis of the New Power Law Creep Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Yang, M.; Song, X. L.; Jia, J.; Xiang, Z. D.

    2016-07-01

    The conventional power law creep equation (Norton equation) relating the minimum creep rate to creep stress and temperature cannot be used to predict the long-term creep strengths of creep-resistant steels if its parameters are determined only from short-term measurements. This is because the stress exponent and activation energy of creep determined on the basis of this equation depend on creep temperature and stress and these dependences cannot be predicted using this equation. In this work, it is shown that these problems associated with the conventional power law creep equation can be resolved if the new power law equation is used to rationalize the creep data. The new power law creep equation takes a form similar to the conventional power law creep equation but has a radically different capability not only in rationalizing creep data but also in predicting the long-term creep strengths from short-term test data. These capabilities of the new power law creep equation are demonstrated using the tensile strength and creep test data measured for both pipe and tube grades of the creep-resistant steel 9Cr-1.8W-0.5Mo-V-Nb-B (P92 and T92).

  3. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Vito; Nissley, David; Lin, Li-Sen Jim

    1985-01-01

    The first two years of a two-phase program aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components are discussed. In Phase 1 (baseline) effort, low cycle fatigue (LCF) models, using a data base generated for a cast nickel base gas turbine hot section alloy (B1900+Hf), were evaluated for their ability to predict the crack initiation life for relevant creep-fatigue loading conditions and to define data required for determination of model constants. The variables included strain range and rate, mean strain, strain hold times and temperature. None of the models predicted all of the life trends within reasonable data requirements. A Cycle Damage Accumulation (CDA) was therefore developed which follows an exhaustion of material ductility approach. Material ductility is estimated based on observed similarities of deformation structure between fatigue, tensile and creep tests. The cycle damage function is based on total strain range, maximum stress and stress amplitude and includes both time independent and time dependent components. The CDA model accurately predicts all of the trends in creep-fatigue life with loading conditions. In addition, all of the CDA model constants are determinable from rapid cycle, fully reversed fatigue tests and monotonic tensile and/or creep data.

  4. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  5. Stability on time-dependent domains: convective and dilution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechetnikov, R.; Knobloch, E.

    2017-03-01

    We explore near-critical behavior of spatially extended systems on time-dependent spatial domains with convective and dilution effects due to domain flow. As a paradigm, we use the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a non-zero critical wavenumber, to study dynamic pattern formation on time-dependent domains. A universal amplitude equation governing weakly nonlinear evolution of patterns on time-dependent domains is derived and proves to be a generalization of the standard Ginzburg-Landau equation. Its key solutions identified here demonstrate a substantial variety-spatially periodic states with a time-dependent wavenumber, steady spatially non-periodic states, and pulse-train solutions-in contrast to extended systems on time-fixed domains. The effects of domain flow, such as bifurcation delay due to domain growth and destabilization due to oscillatory domain flow, on the Eckhaus instability responsible for phase slips in spatially periodic states are analyzed with the help of both local and global stability analyses. A nonlinear phase equation describing the approach to a phase-slip event is derived. Detailed analysis of a phase slip using multiple time scale methods demonstrates different mechanisms governing the wavelength changing process at different stages.

  6. Advances in time-dependent methods for multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses recent theoretical results on above threshold ionization harmonic generation and high-frequency, high intensity suppression of ionization. These studies of multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules for short, intense pulsed optical lasers have been carried out using techniques which involve the explicit solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Time dependent solution for acceleration of tau-leaping

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-02-15

    The tau-leaping method is often effective for speeding up discrete stochastic simulation of chemically reacting systems. However, when fast reactions are involved, the speed-up for this method can be quite limited. One way to address this is to apply a stochastic quasi-steady state assumption. However we must be careful when using this assumption. If the fast subsystem cannot reach a steady distribution fast enough, the quasi-steady-state assumption will propagate error into the simulation. To avoid these errors, we propose to use the time dependent solution rather than the quasi-steady-state. Generally speaking, the time dependent solution is not easy to derive for an arbitrary network. However, for some common motifs we do have time dependent solutions. We derive the time dependent solutions for these motifs, and then show how they can be used with tau-leaping to achieve substantial speed-ups, including for a realistic model of blood coagulation. Although the method is complicated, we have automated it.

  8. Student Understanding of Time Dependence in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing…

  9. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain.

  10. Jet methods in time-dependent Lagrangian biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an ‘ordinary’ autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for a particular movement. This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. By this extension, using techniques from fibre bundles, we defined the biomechanical configuration bundle. On the biomechanical bundle we define vector-fields, differential forms and affine connections, as well as the associated jet manifolds. Using the formalism of jet manifolds of velocities and accelerations, we develop the time-dependent Lagrangian biomechanics. Its underlying geometric evolution is given by the Ricci flow equation.

  11. Jet methods in time-dependent Lagrangian biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Tijana

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for a particular movement. This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. By this extension, using techniques from fibre bundles, we defined the biomechanical configuration bundle. On the biomechanical bundle we define vector-fields, differential forms and affine connections, as well as the associated jet manifolds. Using the formalism of jet manifolds of velocities and accelerations, we develop the time-dependent Lagrangian biomechanics. Its underlying geometric evolution is given by the Ricci flow equation.

  12. Noncommutative quantum mechanics in a time-dependent background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sanjib; Fring, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    We investigate a quantum mechanical system on a noncommutative space for which the structure constant is explicitly time dependent. Any autonomous Hamiltonian on such a space acquires a time-dependent form in terms of the conventional canonical variables. We employ the Lewis-Riesenfeld method of invariants to construct explicit analytical solutions for the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The eigenfunctions are expressed in terms of the solutions of variants of the nonlinear Ermakov-Pinney equation and discussed in detail for various types of background fields. We utilize the solutions to verify a generalized version of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations for which the lower bound becomes a time-dependent function of the background fields. We study the variance for various states, including standard Glauber coherent states with their squeezed versions and Gaussian Klauder coherent states resembling a quasiclassical behavior. No type of coherent state appears to be optimal in general with regard to achieving minimal uncertainties, as this feature turns out to be background field dependent.

  13. Time dependent solution for acceleration of tau-leaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-02-01

    The tau-leaping method is often effective for speeding up discrete stochastic simulation of chemically reacting systems. However, when fast reactions are involved, the speed-up for this method can be quite limited. One way to address this is to apply a stochastic quasi-steady state assumption. However we must be careful when using this assumption. If the fast subsystem cannot reach a steady distribution fast enough, the quasi-steady-state assumption will propagate error into the simulation. To avoid these errors, we propose to use the time dependent solution rather than the quasi-steady-state. Generally speaking, the time dependent solution is not easy to derive for an arbitrary network. However, for some common motifs we do have time dependent solutions. We derive the time dependent solutions for these motifs, and then show how they can be used with tau-leaping to achieve substantial speed-ups, including for a realistic model of blood coagulation. Although the method is complicated, we have automated it.

  14. Pedagogical Aspects of Time-Dependent Rotation Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the reformulation of a classical magnetic moment interacting with various magnetic field configurations in terms of coordinate-free, time-dependent rotation operators. This approach provides useful exercises for the manipulation of three-dimensional rotation operators and provides examples for a number of quantum-mechanics related…

  15. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  16. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro–Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro–Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate. PMID:27274696

  17. Modeling Creep Processes in Aging Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olali, N. V.; Voitovich, L. V.; Zazimko, N. N.; Malezhik, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    The photoelastic method is generalized to creep in hereditary aging materials. Optical-creep curves and mechanical-creep or optical-relaxation curves are used to interpret fringe patterns. For materials with constant Poisson's ratio, it is sufficient to use mechanical- or optical-creep curves for this purpose

  18. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  19. Time-Dependent SSC Cooling Effects on Blazar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Michael; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Blazars are among the most violent sources in the cosmos exhibiting flaring states with remarkably different variability time scales. Especially rapid flares with flux doubling time scales of the order of minutes have been puzzling for quite some time. Many modeling attempts use the well known linear and steady-state scenario for the cooling and emission processes in the jet, albeit the obvious strongly time-dependent nature of flares. Due to the feedback of the self-produced synchrotron radiation with additional scattering by the relativistic electrons, the synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) effect is inherently time-dependent. Recently, an analytical analysis on the effects of this nonlinear behavior has been presented. Here, we summarize these results concerning the effect of the time-dependent SSC cooling on the spectral energy distribution (SED), and the synchrotron lightcurves of blazars. For that, we calculated analytically the synchrotron, SSC and external Compton (EC) component of the SED, giving remarkably different spectral features compared to the standard linear approach. The resulting fluxes strongly depend on the parameters, and SSC might have a strong effect even in sources with strong external photon fields (such as FSRQs). For the synchrotron lightcurve we considered the effects of retardation, including the geometry of the source. The retardation might smear out some effects of the time-dependent cooling, but since lightcurves and SEDs have to be fitted simultaneously with the same set of parameters, the results give nonetheless important clues about the source. Thus, we argue for a wide utilization of the time-dependent treatment in modeling (especially rapid) blazar flares, since it accounts for features in the SED and the lightcurves that are usually accounted for by introducing several breaks in the electron distribution without any physical justification.

  20. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  1. Sandia/Stanford Unified Creep Plasticity Damage Model for ANSYS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, David M.; Vianco, Paul T.; Fossum, Arlo F.

    2006-09-03

    A unified creep plasticity (UCP) model was developed, based upon the time-dependent and time-independent deformation properties of the 95.5Sn-3.9Ag-0.6Cu (wt.%) soldier that were measured at Sandia. Then, a damage parameter, D, was added to the equation to develop the unified creep plasticity damage (UCPD) model. The parameter, D, was parameterized, using data obtained at Sandia from isothermal fatigue experiments on a double-lap shear test. The softwae was validated against a BGA solder joint exposed to thermal cycling. The UCPD model was put into the ANSYS finite element as a subroutine. So, the softwae is the subroutine for ANSYS 8.1.

  2. Time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J. G.; Lario, D.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study exploring heliospheric consequences of time-dependent changes at the Sun. We selected a 2 month period in the beginning of year 2008 that was characterized by very low solar activity. The heliosphere in the equatorial region was dominated by two coronal holes whose changing structure created temporal variations distorting the classical steady state picture of the heliosphere. We used the Air Force Data Assimilate Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model to obtain daily updated photospheric magnetograms and drive the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model of the corona. This leads to a formulation of a time-dependent boundary condition for our three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, LFM-helio, which is the heliospheric adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation code. The time-dependent coronal conditions were propagated throughout the inner heliosphere, and the simulation results were compared with the spacecraft located near 1 astronomical unit (AU) heliocentric distance: Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A and STEREO-B), and the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft that was in cruise phase measuring the heliospheric magnetic field between 0.35 and 0.6 AU. In addition, during the selected interval MESSENGER and ACE aligned radially allowing minimization of the effects of temporal variation at the Sun versus radial evolution of structures. Our simulations show that time-dependent simulationsreproduce the gross-scale structure of the heliosphere with higher fidelity, while on smaller spatial and faster time scales (e.g., 1 day) they provide important insights for interpretation of the data. The simulations suggest that moving boundaries of slow-fast wind transitions at 0.1 AU may result in the formation of inverted magnetic fields near pseudostreamers which is an intrinsically time-dependent process

  3. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    SciTech Connect

    Lissenden, Cliff; Hassan, Tasnin; Rangari, Vijaya

    2014-10-30

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-­by-­analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel-­base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-­controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-­fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-­ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched

  4. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  5. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  6. Time dependent flare model with non-LTE radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Karlický, M.; Kašparová, J.; Heinzel, P.

    2002-12-01

    The first results of a time dependent simulation of chromospheric response to a high energy electron beam are presented. The hybrid code, i.e. a combination of a 1-D hydrodynamic code and a test particle code, has been used to calculate the energy losses of a high energy electron beam propagating through the solar atmosphere and the consequent response of the ambient solar plasma to the energy deposition. The resulting time evolution of the solar plasma temperature, density, velocity and energy deposit on hydrogen has then been used as an input for a time dependent radiative transfer code in the MALI approach to determine the time variation of the Hα line profile. Non-thermal collisional rates have been included in the linearised ESE.

  7. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  8. Statistical time-dependent model for the interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerola, H.; Kafatos, M.; Mccray, R.

    1974-01-01

    We present models for temperature and ionization structure of low, uniform-density (approximately 0.3 per cu cm) interstellar gas in a galactic disk which is exposed to soft X rays from supernova outbursts occurring randomly in space and time. The structure was calculated by computing the time record of temperature and ionization at a given point by Monte Carlo simulation. The calculation yields probability distribution functions for ionized fraction, temperature, and their various observable moments. These time-dependent models predict a bimodal temperature distribution of the gas that agrees with various observations. Cold regions in the low-density gas may have the appearance of clouds in 21-cm absorption. The time-dependent model, in contrast to the steady-state model, predicts large fluctuations in ionization rate and the existence of cold (approximately 30 K), ionized (ionized fraction equal to about 0.1) regions.

  9. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  10. Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several models exist to predict the time dependent behavior of bouyant puffs that result from explosions. This paper presents a new model that is derived from the strong conservative form of the conservation partial differential equations that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This model permits the cloud to evolve from an intial spherical shape not an ellipsoidal shape. It ignores the Boussinesq approximation, and treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric tubulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff cloud rise history was found to depend no only on the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments.

  11. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  12. Sublinear scaling for time-dependent stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-21

    A stochastic approach to time-dependent density functional theory is developed for computing the absorption cross section and the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. The core idea of the approach involves time-propagation of a small set of stochastic orbitals which are first projected on the occupied space and then propagated in time according to the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The evolving electron density is exactly represented when the number of random orbitals is infinite, but even a small number (≈16) of such orbitals is enough to obtain meaningful results for absorption spectrum and the RPA correlation energy per electron. We implement the approach for silicon nanocrystals using real-space grids and find that the overall scaling of the algorithm is sublinear with computational time and memory.

  13. Coherent states and their time dependence in fractional dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagam, A.; Lohe, M. A.

    2007-08-01

    We construct representations of the Lie algebra \\mathfrak{su}(1,1) using representations of the momentum and position operators satisfying the R-deformed Heisenberg relations, in which the fractional dimension d and angular momentum ell appear as parameters. The Bargmann index κ, which characterizes representations of the positive discrete series of \\mathfrak{su}(1,1) , can take any positive value. We construct coherent states in fractional dimensions, in particular we extend the two well-known analytic representations of coherent states for \\mathfrak{su}(1,1) , Perelomov and Barut-Girardello states, from dimension one to any dimension d. We generalize this construction to time-dependent coherent states by means of the \\mathfrak{su}(1,1) symmetries of the quantum time-dependent harmonic oscillator in fractional dimensions. We investigate the uncertainty relations of the momentum and position operators with respect to these coherent states, and their dependence on the dimension.

  14. Holonomic Quantum Computation by Time dependent Decoherence Free Subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. N.; Liang, Y.; Yang, H. D.; Gui, J.; Wu, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    We show how to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in time-dependent decoherence free subspaces (TDFSs). In our scheme, the holonomy is not generated by computational bases in DFSs but time-dependent bases of TDFSs. Therefore, different from the traditional DFSs, the ancillary systems are not necessary in inducing holonomy, which saves qubits used in the holonomic quantum computation. We also analyze the symmetry of the N-qubits system which couples to a common squeezed field. The results show that, there are several independent DFSs presented in Hilbert space, which is determined by eigenvalues of Lindblad operators. Combining the scheme and the model proposed in this paper, we show that, the one-qubit controllable phase gate can be realized by only two physical qubits.

  15. Generalization of DT equations for time dependent sources.

    PubMed

    Neri, Lorenzo; Tudisco, Salvatore; Musumeci, Francesco; Scordino, Agata; Fallica, Giorgio; Mazzillo, Massimo; Zimbone, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    New equations for paralyzable, non paralyzable and hybrid DT models, valid for any time dependent sources are presented. We show how such new equations include the equations already used for constant rate sources, and how it's is possible to correct DT losses in the case of time dependent sources. Montecarlo simulations were performed to compare the equations behavior with the three DT models. Excellent accordance between equations predictions and Montecarlo simulation was found. We also obtain good results in the experimental validation of the new hybrid DT equation. Passive quenched SPAD device was chosen as a device affected by hybrid DT losses and active quenched SPAD with 50 ns DT was used as DT losses free device.

  16. Time dependent electromagnetic fields and 4-dimensional Stokes' theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andosca, Ryan; Singleton, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Stokes' theorem is central to many aspects of physics—electromagnetism, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and Wilson loops to name a few. However, the pedagogical examples and research work almost exclusively focus on situations where the fields are time-independent so that one need only deal with purely spatial line integrals (e.g., ∮ A . d x ) and purely spatial area integrals (e.g., ∫ ( ∇ × A ) . d a = ∫ B . d a ). Here, we address this gap by giving some explicit examples of how Stokes' theorem plays out with time-dependent fields in a full 4-dimensional spacetime context. We also discuss some unusual features of Stokes' theorem with time-dependent fields related to gauge transformations and non-simply connected topology.

  17. Holonomic Quantum Computation by Time dependent Decoherence Free Subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. N.; Liang, Y.; Yang, H. D.; Gui, J.; Wu, S. L.

    2017-04-01

    We show how to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in time-dependent decoherence free subspaces (TDFSs). In our scheme, the holonomy is not generated by computational bases in DFSs but time-dependent bases of TDFSs. Therefore, different from the traditional DFSs, the ancillary systems are not necessary in inducing holonomy, which saves qubits used in the holonomic quantum computation. We also analyze the symmetry of the N-qubits system which couples to a common squeezed field. The results show that, there are several independent DFSs presented in Hilbert space, which is determined by eigenvalues of Lindblad operators. Combining the scheme and the model proposed in this paper, we show that, the one-qubit controllable phase gate can be realized by only two physical qubits.

  18. Time-dependent ion transport in heterogeneous permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-06-01

    The current study extends previous analytical and numerical solutions of chronopotentiometric response of one-dimensional systems consisting of three layers to the more realistic two-dimensional (2D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium. An analytical solution for the transient concentration-polarization problem, under the local electroneutrality approximation and assumption of ideal permselectivity, was obtained using the Laplace transform and separation of variables technique. Then the 2D electric potential was obtained numerically and was compared to the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck solution. It was then shown that the resultant voltage drop across the system varies between the initial Ohmic response and that of the steady state accounting for concentration polarization. Also, the field-focusing effect in a 2D system is shown to result in a faster depletion of ions at the permselective interface.

  19. The Role of Environment on Time Dependent Crack Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    reaction control and transport control terms. More recently, Wei and Shim (41) have extended these terms to represent frequency and temperature effects in...accelerate time dependent crack growth under either static loading (SCC or HE) or dynamic loading conditions. In some cases, the rate controlling ...processes of these phenomena have been related to surface controlled reactions, while in other cases bulk reactions such as diffusion appear to be rate

  20. Autoionization in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, V.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the exact exchange-correlation potential of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for the correlated process of autoionization. The potential develops barriers which regulate the autoionization rate. TDDFT employing known and practicable exchange-correlation potentials does not capture any autoionization dynamics. Approximate exchange-correlation potentials capturing such dynamics would necessarily require memory effects and are unlikely to be developed, as will be illustrated.

  1. Excitons in Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Carsten A; Yang, Zeng-hui

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the description of the optical and dielectric properties of bulk insulators and semiconductors in time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), with an emphasis on excitons. We review the linear-response formalism for periodic solids, discuss excitonic exchange-correlation kernels, calculate exciton binding energies for various materials, and compare the treatment of excitons with TDDFT and with the Bethe-Salpeter equation.

  2. Quasinormal modes in a time-dependent black hole background

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Chenggang; Wang Bin; Abdalla, Elcio; Su Rukeng

    2005-02-15

    We have studied the evolution of the massless scalar field propagating in a time-dependent charged Vaidya black hole background. A generalized tortoise coordinate transformation was used to study the evolution of the massless scalar field. It is shown that, for the slowest damped quasinormal modes, the approximate formulas in the stationary Reissner-Nordstroem black hole turn out to be a reasonable prescription, showing that results from quasinormal mode analysis are rather robust.

  3. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v(t)=? a(t) dt (1) and x(t)=? v(t) dt. Mobile devices such as…

  4. Spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations is reviewed. When the domain is periodic Fourier methods are presented while for nonperiodic problems both Chebyshev and Legendre methods are discussed. The theory is presented for both hyperbolic and parabolic systems using both Galerkin and collocation procedures. While most of the review considers problems with constant coefficients the extension to nonlinear problems is also discussed. Some results for problems with shocks are presented.

  5. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  6. Time-Dependent 5D Solutions of the Einstein Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L. A.

    2010-07-12

    In this work are obtained 5D time-dependent solutions of Einstein equations, one is obtained by means of equiping a cylindrically symmetry solution (JEKK) with a scalar field, then lifting it to a fifth dimension. The other is obtained transforming the Myers-Perry solution via Wick rotation. The two solutions can be interpreted as gravitational waves in some cases. The singularities and C-energy are addressed.

  7. The time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.; Ruth, A. A.; Vaughan, S.; Varma, R. M.; Orphal, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first in situ detection of molecular iodine emitted from the brown macroalga Laminaria digitata under natural stress conditions. We show that the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with a complex time signature. The new data indicate that algal control of I2 release in the form of an oscillatory time-dependence may be based on a nonlinear autocatalytic reaction scheme which is closely linked to the production of H2O2.

  8. The time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.; Ruth, A. A.; Vaughan, S.; Varma, R. M.; Orphal, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the first in situ detection of molecular iodine emitted from the brown macroalga Laminaria digitata under natural stress conditions. We show that the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with a complex time signature. The new data indicate that algal control of I2 release in the form of an oscillatory time-dependence may be based on a nonlinear autocatalytic reaction scheme which is closely linked to the production of H2O2.

  9. Quantum anholonomies in time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm rings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Atushi; Cheon, Taksu

    2010-08-15

    Anholonomies in eigenstates are studied through time-dependent variations of a magnetic flux in an Aharonov-Bohm ring. The anholonomies in the eigenenergy and the expectation values of eigenstates are shown to persist beyond the adiabatic regime. The choice of the gauge of the magnetic flux is shown to be crucial to clarify the relationship of these anholonomies to the eigenspace anholonomy, which is described by a non-Abelian connection in the adiabatic limit.

  10. Brans-Dicke cosmology with time-dependent cosmological term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marcelo Samuel

    1990-12-01

    Berman and Som's solution for a Brans-Dicke cosmology with time-dependent cosmological term, Robertson-Walker metric, perfect fluid, and perfect gas law of state solves the horizon, homogeneity, and isotropy problems without requiring any unnatural fine tuning in the very early universe, thus being an alternative model to inflation. The model also does not need recourse to quantum cosmology, and solves the flatness and magnetic monopole problems.

  11. Time-Dependent Effect of Chlorhexidine Surgical Prep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-15

    Time-dependent effect of chlorhexidine surgical prep D.J. Stinner*, C.A. Krueger, B.D. Masini, J.C. Wenke United States Army Institute of Surgical ...2011 by J.A. Child Available online 15 October 2011 Keywords: Chlorhexidine Surgical site infection s u m m a r y Despite continued advances in...preoperative preventive measures and aseptic technique, surgical site infections remain a problem. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time

  12. Stochastic protein production and time-dependent current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA. We model this process using driven lattice gases and take into account the finite lifetime of mRNA. The stochastic properties of the translation process can then be determined from the time-dependent current fluctuations of the lattice gas model. We illustrate our ideas with a totally asymmetric exclusion process with extended objects.

  13. Gamma time-dependency in Blaxter's compartmental model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matis, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A new two-compartment model for the passage of particles through the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants is proposed. In this model, a gamma distribution of lifetimes is introduced in the first compartment; thereby, passage from that compartment becomes time-dependent. This modification is strongly suggested by the physical alteration which certain substances, e.g. hay particles, undergo in the digestive process. The proposed model is applied to experimental data.

  14. Creep of dry clinopyroxene aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, Misha; Mackwell, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have determined diffusional and dislocation creep rheologies for clinopyroxenite Ca1.0Mg0.8Fe0.2Si2O6 under dry conditions by deforming natural and hot-pressed samples at confining pressures of 300-430 MPa and temperatures of 1100°-1250°C with the oxygen fugacity buffered by either nickel-nickel oxide or iron-wüstite powders. The coarse-grained natural Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite yielded a stress exponent of n = 4.7 ± 0.2 and an activation energy for creep of Q = 760 ± 40 kJ mol-1, consistent with deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The strength of the natural clinopyroxenite is consistent with previous high-temperature measurements of dislocation creep behavior of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] and Boland and Tullis [1986]. Fine-grained clinopyroxenite was prepared from ground powders of the natural clinopyroxenite. Hot-pressed samples were deformed under similar conditions to the natural samples. Mixed-mode deformation behavior was observed, with diffusional creep (n = 1) at lower differential stresses and dislocation creep (with n and Q similar to those of the natural samples) at higher differential stresses. Within the dislocation creep field the predried hot-pressed samples generally yielded creep rates that were about an order of magnitude faster than the natural samples. Thus, even at the highest differential stresses, a component of strain accommodation by grain boundary diffusion was present in the hot-pressed samples. Optical and electron microscope investigations of the deformation microstructures of the natural and hot-pressed samples show evidence for mechanical twinning and activation of dislocation slip systems. When extrapolated to geological conditions expected in the deep crust and upper mantle on Earth and other terrestrial planets, the strength of dry single-phase clinopyroxene aggregates is very high, exceeding that of dry olivine-rich rocks.

  15. Time-dependent neutron and photon dose-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-11-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The code Pandemonium, originally designed to determine flux and dose rates only, has been improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. The photon model has been significantly enhanced by expanding the energy range to 10 MeV to include fission photons, and by including a set of new buildup factors, the result of an extensive study into the previously unknown "purely-angular effect" on photon buildup. Purely-angular photon buildup factors are determined using discrete ordinates and coupled electron-photon cross sections to account for coherent and incoherent scattering and secondary photon effects of bremsstrahlung and florescence. Improvements to Pandemonium result in significant modeling capabilities for processing facilities using intense neutron and photon sources, and the code obtains comparable results to Monte Carlo calculations but within a fraction of the time required to run such codes as MCNPX.

  16. Time dependent inelastic deformation of shocked soda-lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.

    2005-07-01

    Shock wave compression of soda-lime glass (SLG) has received considerable attention in recent years. To understand inelastic deformation in shocked soda-lime glass between 3 and 10.8 GPa, we have carried out plate impact experiments. In-material, time-resolved, measurements were obtained using longitudinal and lateral stress gauges (4.6 to 10.8 GPa), and electromagnetic particle velocity gauges (2.9 to 6 GPa) at comparable sample thicknesses. The 4.6 and 6 GPa experiments revealed time-dependent inelastic response along with time-dependent loss of material strength. The combination of our experimental results and related analyses demonstrate that previous interpretations of shocked SLG response in terms of a propagating failure wave are not valid. At higher peak stresses (˜ 10GPa), the SLG results do not display time-dependent strength loss. The shock response of SLG over the 4-10GPa range is complex and depends significantly on the peak stress. The experimental results and simulations from a phenomenological continuum model will be discussed. Work supported by DOE. Much of this work was carried out by Dr. Hari Simha.

  17. Eisenhart lifts and symmetries of time-dependent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariglia, M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horváthy, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Certain dissipative systems, such as Caldirola and Kannai's damped simple harmonic oscillator, may be modelled by time-dependent Lagrangian and hence time dependent Hamiltonian systems with n degrees of freedom. In this paper we treat these systems, their projective and conformal symmetries as well as their quantisation from the point of view of the Eisenhart lift to a Bargmann spacetime in n + 2 dimensions, equipped with its covariantly constant null Killing vector field. Reparametrisation of the time variable corresponds to conformal rescalings of the Bargmann metric. We show how the Arnold map lifts to Bargmann spacetime. We contrast the greater generality of the Caldirola-Kannai approach with that of Arnold and Bateman. At the level of quantum mechanics, we are able to show how the relevant Schrödinger equation emerges naturally using the techniques of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, since a covariantly constant null Killing vector field gives rise to well defined one particle Hilbert space. Time-dependent Lagrangians arise naturally also in cosmology and give rise to the phenomenon of Hubble friction. We provide an account of this for Friedmann-Lemaître and Bianchi cosmologies and how it fits in with our previous discussion in the non-relativistic limit.

  18. Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity depends on dendritic location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froemke, Robert C.; Poo, Mu-ming; Dan, Yang

    2005-03-01

    In the neocortex, each neuron receives thousands of synaptic inputs distributed across an extensive dendritic tree. Although postsynaptic processing of each input is known to depend on its dendritic location, it is unclear whether activity-dependent synaptic modification is also location-dependent. Here we report that both the magnitude and the temporal specificity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification vary along the apical dendrite of rat cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. At the distal dendrite, the magnitude of long-term potentiation is smaller, and the window of pre-/postsynaptic spike interval for long-term depression (LTD) is broader. The spike-timing window for LTD correlates with the window of action potential-induced suppression of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors; this correlation applies to both their dendritic location-dependence and pharmacological properties. Presynaptic stimulation with partial blockade of NMDA receptors induced LTD and occluded further induction of spike-timing-dependent LTD, suggesting that NMDA receptor suppression underlies LTD induction. Computer simulation studies showed that the dendritic inhomogeneity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification leads to differential input selection at distal and proximal dendrites according to the temporal characteristics of presynaptic spike trains. Such location-dependent tuning of inputs, together with the dendritic heterogeneity of postsynaptic processing, could enhance the computational capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  19. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  20. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  1. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  2. Analytic controllability of time-dependent quantum control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunhua; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Chi, Quo-Shin; Clark, John W.

    2005-05-01

    The question of controllability is investigated for a quantum control system in which the Hamiltonian operator components carry explicit time dependence which is not under the control of an external agent. We consider the general situation in which the state moves in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, a drift term is present, and the operators driving the state evolution may be unbounded. However, considerations are restricted by the assumption that there exists an analytic domain, dense in the state space, on which solutions of the controlled Schrödinger equation may be expressed globally in exponential form. The issue of controllability then naturally focuses on the ability to steer the quantum state on a finite-dimensional submanifold of the unit sphere in Hilbert space—and thus on analytic controllability. A relatively straightforward strategy allows the extension of Lie-algebraic conditions for strong analytic controllability derived earlier for the simpler, time-independent system in which the drift Hamiltonian and the interaction Hamiltonian have no intrinsic time dependence. Enlarging the state space by one dimension corresponding to the time variable, we construct an augmented control system that can be treated as time independent. Methods developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the one-dimension-reduced system defined by the original time-dependent Schrödinger control problem. The applicability of the resulting theorem is illustrated with selected examples.

  3. Analytic controllability of time-dependent quantum control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lan Chunhua; Tarn, T.-J.; Chi, Q.-S.; Clark, John W.

    2005-05-01

    The question of controllability is investigated for a quantum control system in which the Hamiltonian operator components carry explicit time dependence which is not under the control of an external agent. We consider the general situation in which the state moves in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, a drift term is present, and the operators driving the state evolution may be unbounded. However, considerations are restricted by the assumption that there exists an analytic domain, dense in the state space, on which solutions of the controlled Schroedinger equation may be expressed globally in exponential form. The issue of controllability then naturally focuses on the ability to steer the quantum state on a finite-dimensional submanifold of the unit sphere in Hilbert space--and thus on analytic controllability. A relatively straightforward strategy allows the extension of Lie-algebraic conditions for strong analytic controllability derived earlier for the simpler, time-independent system in which the drift Hamiltonian and the interaction Hamiltonian have no intrinsic time dependence. Enlarging the state space by one dimension corresponding to the time variable, we construct an augmented control system that can be treated as time independent. Methods developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the one-dimension-reduced system defined by the original time-dependent Schroedinger control problem. The applicability of the resulting theorem is illustrated with selected examples.

  4. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  5. Brittle creep, damage, and time to failure in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, David; Helmstetter, AgnèS.

    2006-11-01

    We propose a numerical model based on static fatigue laws in order to model the time-dependent damage and deformation of rocks under creep. An empirical relation between time to failure and applied stress is used to simulate the behavior of each element of our finite element model. We review available data on creep experiments in order to study how the material properties and the loading conditions control the failure time. The main parameter that controls the failure time is the applied stress. Two commonly used models, an exponential tf-exp (-bσ/σ0) and a power law function tf-σb' fit the data as well. These time-to-failure laws are used at the scale of each element to simulate its damage as a function of its stress history. An element is damaged by decreasing its Young's modulus to simulate the effect of increasing crack density at smaller scales. Elastic interactions between elements and heterogeneity of the mechanical properties lead to the emergence of a complex macroscopic behavior, which is richer than the elementary one. In particular, we observe primary and tertiary creep regimes associated respectively with a power law decay and increase of the rate of strain, damage event and energy release. Our model produces a power law distribution of damage event sizes, with an average size that increases with time as a power law until macroscopic failure. Damage localization emerges at the transition between primary and tertiary creep, when damage rate starts accelerating. The final state of the simulation shows highly damaged bands, similar to shear bands observed in laboratory experiments. The thickness and the orientation of these bands depend on the applied stress. This model thus reproduces many properties of rock creep, which were previously not modeled simultaneously.

  6. Solvable time-dependent models in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Soto, Ricardo J.

    In the traditional setting of quantum mechanics, the Hamiltonian operator does not depend on time. While some Schrodinger equations with time-dependent Hamiltonians have been solved, explicitly solvable cases are typically scarce. This thesis is a collection of papers in which this first author along with Suslov, Suazo, and Lopez, has worked on solving a series of Schrodinger equations with a time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian that has applications in problems of quantum electrodynamics, lasers, quantum devices such as quantum dots, and external varying fields. In particular the author discusses a new completely integrable case of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation in Rn with variable coefficients for a modified oscillator, which is dual with respect to the time inversion to a model of the quantum oscillator considered by Meiler, Cordero-Soto, and Suslov. A second pair of dual Hamiltonians is found in the momentum representation. Our examples show that in mathematical physics and quantum mechanics a change in the direction of time may require a total change of the system dynamics in order to return the system back to its original quantum state. The author also considers several models of the damped oscillators in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics in a framework of a general approach to the dynamics of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation with variable quadratic Hamiltonians. The Green functions are explicitly found in terms of elementary functions and the corresponding gauge transformations are discussed. The factorization technique is applied to the case of a shifted harmonic oscillator. The time-evolution of the expectation values of the energy related operators is determined for two models of the quantum damped oscillators under consideration. The classical equations of motion for the damped oscillations are derived for the corresponding expectation values of the position operator. Finally, the author constructs integrals of motion for several models

  7. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  8. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  9. Low-symmetric coherent structures and dimensional crossover in Rayleigh Taylor flows driven by time dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the nature of the dimensional crossover i.e. transition between the nearly isotropic 3D periodic flows with group p4mm (square) to highly anisotropic 2D periodic flows with group p2m1 in Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability. Power law time dependence of the acceleration is considered with the emphasis on sub-regime, where the behavior is the RT type. We consider flow with group p2mm (rectangle) and obtain the 3D square and 2D limits with leading order rectangular corrections. Regular asymptotic solutions evolve as power law and form a two parameter family parametrized by the principal curvatures of the bubble. The bubbles with "near circular contour" separate the 2-dimensional solution space into two sub-regimes having distinct properties under the dimensional crossover. In one sub-regime, the elongated bubbles transform to 2D solutions, whereas in the other they flatten. 3D square bubbles are universally stable whereas 2D bubbles are unstable with respect to 3D modulations, implying that the dimensional crossover is discontinuous. We find that the time dependence affects the growth/decay of perturbations and has no consequence on the overall stability properties of the solution. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  10. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  12. Time-dependent tomographic reconstruction of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vibert, D.; Peillon, C.; Lamy, P.; Frazin, R. A.; Wojak, J.

    2016-10-01

    Solar rotational tomography (SRT) applied to white-light coronal images observed at multiple aspect angles has been the preferred approach for determining the three-dimensional (3D) electron density structure of the solar corona. However, it is seriously hampered by the restrictive assumption that the corona is time-invariant which introduces significant errors in the reconstruction. We first explore several methods to mitigate the temporal variation of the corona by decoupling the "fast-varying" inner corona from the "slow-moving" outer corona using multiple masking (either by juxtaposition or recursive combination) and radial weighting. Weighting with a radial exponential profile provides some improvement over a classical reconstruction but only beyond ≈ 3R⊙. We next consider a full time-dependent tomographic reconstruction involving spatio-temporal regularization and further introduce a co-rotating regularization aimed at preventing concentration of reconstructed density in the plane of the sky. Crucial to testing our procedure and properly tuning the regularization parameters is the introduction of a time-dependent MHD model of the corona based on observed magnetograms to build a time-series of synthetic images of the corona. Our procedure, which successfully reproduces the time-varying model corona, is finally applied to a set of 53 LASCO-C2 pB images roughly evenly spaced in time from 15 to 29 March 2009. Our procedure paves the way to a time-dependent tomographic reconstruction of the coronal electron density to the whole set of LASCO-C2 images presently spanning 20 years.

  13. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  14. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  15. Recent results on time-dependent Hamiltonian oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robnik, M.

    2016-09-01

    Time-dependent Hamilton systems are important in modeling the nondissipative interaction of the system with its environment. We review some recent results and present some new ones. In time-dependent, parametrically driven, one-dimensional linear oscillator, the complete analysis can be performed (in the sense explained below), also using the linear WKB method. In parametrically driven nonlinear oscillators extensive numerical studies have been performed, and the nonlinear WKB-like method can be applied for homogeneous power law potentials (which e.g. includes the quartic oscillator). The energy in time-dependent Hamilton systems is not conserved, and we are interested in its evolution in time, in particular the evolution of the microcanonical ensemble of initial conditions. In the ideal adiabatic limit (infinitely slow parametric driving) the energy changes according to the conservation of the adiabatic invariant, but has a Dirac delta distribution. However, in the general case the initial Dirac delta distribution of the energy spreads and we follow its evolution, especially in the two limiting cases, the slow variation close to the adiabatic regime, and the fastest possible change - a parametric kick, i.e. discontinuous jump (of a parameter), where some exact analytic results are obtained (the so-called PR property, and ABR property). For the linear oscillator the distribution of the energy is always, rigorously, the arcsine distribution, whose variance can in general be calculated by the linear WKB method, while in nonlinear systems there is no such universality. We calculate the Gibbs entropy for the ensembles of noninteracting nonlinear oscillator, which gives the right equipartition and thermostatic laws even for one degree of freedom.

  16. Time dependence of fast electron beam divergence in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Storm, M J; McMahon, M; Jiang, S; Ovchinnikov, V; Schumacher, D W; Freeman, R R; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2012-08-01

    We report on the measurement and computer simulation of the divergence of fast electrons generated in an ultraintense laser-plasma interaction (LPI) and the subsequent propagation in a nonrefluxing target. We show that, at Iλ(2) of 10(20) Wcm(-2)μm(2), the time-integrated electron beam full divergence angle is (60±5)°. However, our time-resolved 2D particle-in-cell simulations show the initial beam divergence to be much smaller (≤30°). Our simulations show the divergence to monotonically increase with time, reaching a final value of (68±7)° after the passage of the laser pulse, consistent with the experimental time-integrated measurements. By revealing the time-dependent nature of the LPI, we find that a substantial fraction of the laser energy (~7%) is transported up to 100 μm with a divergence of 32°.

  17. Painlevé V and time-dependent Jacobi polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basor, Estelle; Chen, Yang; Ehrhardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the simplest deformation on a sequence of orthogonal polynomials. This in turn induces a deformation on the moment matrix of the polynomials and associated Hankel determinant. We replace the original (or reference) weight w0(x) (supported on \\mathbb {R} or subsets of \\mathbb {R}) by w0(x) e-tx. It is a well-known fact that under such a deformation the recurrence coefficients denoted as αn and βn evolve in t according to the Toda equations, giving rise to the time-dependent orthogonal polynomials and time-dependent determinants, using Sogo's terminology. If w0 is the normal density e^{-x^2},\\;x\\in \\mathbb {R}, or the gamma density xα e-x, x\\in \\mathbb {R}_{+}, α > -1, then the initial value problem of the Toda equations can be trivially solved. This is because under elementary scaling and translation the orthogonality relations reduce to the original ones. However, if w0 is the beta density (1 - x)α(1 + x)β, x in [ - 1, 1], α, β > -1, the resulting 'time-dependent' Jacobi polynomials will again satisfy a linear second-order ode, but no longer in the Sturm-Liouville form, which is to be expected. This deformation induces an irregular singular point at infinity in addition to three regular singular points of the hypergeometric equation satisfied by the Jacobi polynomials. We will show that the coefficients of this ode, as well as the Hankel determinant, are intimately related to a particular Painlevé V. In particular we show that \\\\textsf {p}_1(n,t), where \\\\textsf {p}_1(n,t) is the coefficient of zn-1 of the monic orthogonal polynomials associated with the 'time-dependent' Jacobi weight, satisfies, up to a translation in t, the Jimbo-Miwa σ-form of the same PV; while a recurrence coefficient αn(t) is up to a translation in t and a linear fractional transformation PV(α2/2, - β2/2, 2n + 1 + α + β, - 1/2). These results are found from combining a pair of nonlinear difference equations and a pair of Toda equations. This

  18. Time-dependent scalar fields as candidates for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakolkalami, B.; Mahmoodzadeh, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study some properties of what is called the oscillaton, a spherically symmetric object made of a real time-dependent scalar field. Using an exponential scalar potential instead of a quadratic one discussed in previous works, as a new choice, we investigate the oscillaton properties with this potential. Solving the differential equation system resulting from the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations reveals the importance of the oscillatons as candidates for dark matter. Meanwhile, a simplification called the stationary limit procedure is also carried out.

  19. Efficient auxiliary-mode approach for time-dependent nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Bogdan Stefan; Croy, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    A new scheme for numerically solving the equations arising in the time-dependent non-equilibrium Green's function formalism is developed. It is based on an auxiliary-mode expansion of the self-energies which convert the complicated set of integro-differential equations into a set of ordinary differential equations. In the new scheme all auxiliary matrices are replaced by vectors or scalars. This drastically reduces the computational effort and memory requirements of the method, rendering it applicable to topical problems in electron quantum optics and molecular electronics. As an illustrative example we consider the dynamics of a Leviton wave-packet in a 1D wire.

  20. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  1. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  2. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  3. Time-dependent correlations in quantum magnets at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauseweh, B.; Groitl, F.; Keller, T.; Rolfs, K.; Tennant, D. A.; Habicht, K.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate the time dependence of the gap mode of copper nitrate at various temperatures. We combine state-of-the-art theoretical calculations with high precision neutron resonance spin-echo measurements to understand the anomalous decoherence effects found previously in this material. It is shown that the time domain offers a complementary view on this phenomenon, which allows us to directly compare experimental data and theoretical predictions without the need of further intensive data analysis, such as (de)convolution.

  4. Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation: Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Dufty

    2007-04-28

    This is the Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-2ER54677 award “Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation - Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas”. Research has focused on the nonequilibrium dynamics of electrons in the presence of ions, both via basic quantum theory and via semi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In addition, fundamental notions of dissipative dynamics have been explored for models of grains and dust, and for scalar fields (temperature) in turbulent edge plasmas. The specific topics addressed were Quantum Kinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters, Semi-classical MD Simulation of Plasmas , and Effects of Dissipative Dynamics.

  5. Time-dependent Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggenthaler, M.; Mackenroth, F.; Bauer, D.

    2011-10-15

    We prove a generalization of the van Leeuwen theorem toward quantum electrodynamics, providing the formal foundations of a time-dependent Kohn-Sham construction for coupled quantized matter and electromagnetic fields. We circumvent the symmetry-causality problems associated with the action-functional approach to Kohn-Sham systems. We show that the effective external four-potential and four-current of the Kohn-Sham system are uniquely defined and that the effective four-current takes a very simple form. Further we rederive the Runge-Gross theorem for quantum electrodynamics.

  6. Perspective: Fundamental aspects of time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Neepa T.

    2016-06-01

    In the thirty-two years since the birth of the foundational theorems, time-dependent density functional theory has had a tremendous impact on calculations of electronic spectra and dynamics in chemistry, biology, solid-state physics, and materials science. Alongside the wide-ranging applications, there has been much progress in understanding fundamental aspects of the functionals and the theory itself. This Perspective looks back to some of these developments, reports on some recent progress and current challenges for functionals, and speculates on future directions to improve the accuracy of approximations used in this relatively young theory.

  7. Time-dependent thermoelectric transport for nanoscale thermal machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daré, A.-M.; Lombardo, P.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze an electronic nanoscale thermal machine driven by time-dependent environment: besides bias and gate voltage variations, we consider also the less prevailing time modulation of the couplings between leads and dot. We provide energy and heat current expressions in such situations, as well as expressions for the power exchanged between the dot+leads system and its outside. Calculations are made in the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function framework. We apply these results to design a cyclic refrigerator, circumventing the ambiguity of defining energy flows between subsystems in the case of strong coupling. For fast lead-dot coupling modulation, we observe transient currents which cannot be ascribed to charge tunneling.

  8. Time-dependent, lattice approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Recent progress in developing and applying methods of direct numerical solution of atomic collision problems is described. Various forms of the three-body problem are used to illustrate these techniques. Specifically, the process of ionization in proton-, antiproton-, and electron-impact of atomic hydrogen is considered in applications ranging in computational intensity from collisions simulated in two spatial dimensions to treatment of the three-dimensional, fully correlated two-electron Schroedinger equation. These examples demonstrate the utility and feasibility of treating strongly interacting atomic systems through time-dependent, lattice approaches.

  9. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  10. Mechanism of spontaneous and triggered shallow creep events - Implications for shallow fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Kaneko, Y.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    of the recovery time depends on the size of triggered slip therefore the magnitude and duration of perturbation. Perturbations that temporally increase effective normal stress do not have significant influence on the timings of future creep events. We applied our theoretical models to the Salton Trough, California, where both shallow creep events and earthquakes are common. We systematically analyzed the level of dynamic and static triggering from nearby earthquakes for the last 30 years, including moderate (> M5) to large (>M6) earthquakes. By incorporating these triggering to our fault model, we are trying to understand 1) which mechanism is dominant, static or dynamic; 2) whether a critical threshold exists, like in the generic model with synthetic dynamic perturbations for the instantaneous triggering of shallow creep events in Salton Trough; 3) the effect of fault orientation with respect to the incoming seismic waves. By developing state-of-the-art models and constraining parameters with rich datasets from Southern California, we aim to transition from a conceptual understanding of fault creep towards a quantitative and predictive understanding of the physical mechanism of creep events on continental strike-slip faults.

  11. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  12. Fiber creep rate and high-temperature properties of SiC/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, C.A.; Jones, R.H.; Youngblood, G.E.; Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Results of studies aimed at relating the fiber creep rate to the subcritical crack growth rate and fracture properties of SiC/SiC composites have demonstrated that the crack growth rate in a bulk composite is controlled by the fiber creep rate. This result was demonstrated for Nicalon-CG and Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced material where a 50--75 c shift in the creep strength of the fiber resulted in a similar shift in the crack growth rate of the composite. Irradiation enhanced creep of SiC fibers and matrix must also be considered in the performance assessment of SiC/SiC composites. The shape of the displacement versus time curve for composites containing Hi-Nicalon fibers were similar to those of the previously tested materials, containing Ceramic-grade fibers, that exhibited subcritical crack growth controlled by time-dependent relaxation of the fiber-bridging stresses due to fiber creep. The crack velocity in the CG-C composites at 1100 C in argon was very close to that of the Hi-C materials at 1150--1175 C, this roughly corresponds to the temperature differential shown by DiCarlo et al. to obtain the same relaxation in 1 hour bend stress relaxation (BSR) tests in the two fibers. This supports the hypothesis that subcritical crack growth in SiC/SiC composites is controlled by fiber creep.

  13. Creep-Fatigue Relationsihps in Electroactive Polymer Systems and Predicted Effects in an Actuator Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandra M.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Henslee, Issac

    2009-01-01

    The paper concerns the time-dependent behavior of electroactive polymers (EAP) and their use in advanced intelligent structures for space exploration. Innovative actuator design for low weight and low power valves required in small plants planned for use on the moon for chemical analysis is discussed. It is shown that in-depth understanding of cyclic loading effects observed through accelerated creep rates due to creep-fatigue interaction in polymers is critical in terms of proper functioning of EAP based actuator devices. In the paper, an overview of experimental results concerning the creep properties and cyclic creep response of a thin film piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is presented. The development of a constitutive creep-fatigue interaction model to predict the durability and service life of electroactive polymers is discussed. A novel method is proposed to predict damage accumulation and fatigue life of polymers under oyclic loading conditions in the presence of creep. The study provides a basis for ongoing research initiatives at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in the pursuit of new technologies using EAP as active elements for lunar exploration systems.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a time-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of time, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical regimes of self-similar RT mixing-acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with time-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  15. Time-dependent Models of Magnetospheric Accretion onto Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. E.; Owen, J. E.; Espaillat, C. C.; Adams, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    Accretion onto Classical T Tauri stars is thought to take place through the action of magnetospheric processes, with gas in the inner disk being channeled onto the star’s surface by the stellar magnetic field lines. Young stars are known to accrete material in a time-variable manner, and the source of this variability remains an open problem, particularly on the shortest (∼day) timescales. Using one-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations that follow the field line geometry, we find that for plausibly realistic young stars, steady-state transonic accretion occurs naturally in the absence of any other source of variability. However, we show that if the density in the inner disk varies smoothly in time with ∼day-long timescales (e.g., due to turbulence), this complication can lead to the development of shocks in the accretion column. These shocks propagate along the accretion column and ultimately hit the star, leading to rapid, large amplitude changes in the accretion rate. We argue that when these shocks hit the star, the observed time dependence will be a rapid increase in accretion luminosity, followed by a slower decline, and could be an explanation for some of the short-period variability observed in accreting young stars. Our one-dimensional approach bridges previous analytic work to more complicated multi-dimensional simulations and observations.

  16. Time-dependent depolarization of aligned HD molecules.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Nate C-M; Miller, Daniel J; Zare, Richard N; Alexander, Andrew J; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2009-01-07

    An aligned sample of HD(v = 1, J = 2, M(J) = 0) molecules is prepared under collision-free conditions using the S(0) stimulated Raman pumping transition. Subsequent coupling to the spins of the deuteron I(D) and the proton I(H) causes the initial degree of alignment to oscillate and decrease as monitored over the time range from 0-13 mus via the O2 line of the [2 + 1] REMPI E,F(1)Sigma-X(1)Sigma (0,1) band. The time dependence of the rotational alignment is also calculated using both a hierarchical coupling scheme in which the rotational angular momentum J is regarded first to couple to I(D), and then the resultant F(i) to couple to I(H), to form the total angular momentum F and a non-hierarchical coupling scheme in which the HD energy level structure is not assumed to be diagonal in the |I(H)(JI(D))F(i)FM(F)> basis set. The experimental data is in good agreement with the non-hierarchical calculation but not with the hierarchical calculation, as expected for this system. Additionally, we calculate the time dependence of the H and D nuclear spin polarizations.

  17. A time-dependent embedding calculation of surface electron emission.

    PubMed

    Inglesfield, J E

    2011-08-03

    The Dirac-Frenkel variational principle is used to derive the embedding method for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Embedding allows the time evolution of the wavefunction to be calculated explicitly in a limited region of space, the region of physical interest, the embedding potential ensuring that the wavefunction satisfies the correct boundary conditions for matching on to the rest of the system. This is applied to a study of the excitation of electrons at a metal surface, represented by a one-dimensional model potential for Cu(111). Time-dependent embedding potentials are derived for replacing the bulk substrate, and the image potential and vacuum region outside the surface, so that the calculation of electron excitation by a surface perturbation can be restricted to the surface itself. The excitation of the Shockley surface state and a continuum bulk state is studied, and the time structure of the resulting currents analysed. There is a distinction between emission from the localized surface state, where the charge is steadily depleted, and the extended continuum state, where the current emitted into the vacuum is compensated by current approaching the surface from the bulk. The time taken for the current to arrive outside the surface is studied.

  18. Equivalent emergence of time dependence in classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John S.

    2015-05-01

    Beginning with the principle that a closed mechanical composite system is timeless, time can be defined by the regular changes in a suitable position coordinate (clock) in the observing part, when one part of the closed composite observes another part. Translating this scenario into both classical and quantum mechanics allows a transition to be made from a time-independent mechanics for the closed composite to a time-dependent description of the observed part alone. The use of Hamilton-Jacobi theory yields a very close parallel between the derivations in classical and quantum mechanics. The time-dependent equations, Hamilton-Jacobi or Schrödinger, appear as approximations since no observed system is truly closed. The quantum case has an additional feature in the condition that the observing environment must become classical in order to define a real classical time variable. This condition leads to a removal of entanglement engendered by the interaction between the observed system and the observing environment. Comparison is made to the similar emergence of time in quantum gravity theory.

  19. Time Circular Birefringence in Time-Dependent Magnetoelectric Media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhai, Yan-Wang; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhao, Qing; Wen, Weijia; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Light traveling in time-dependent media has many extraordinary properties which can be utilized to convert frequency, achieve temporal cloaking, and simulate cosmological phenomena. In this paper, we focus on time-dependent axion-type magnetoelectric (ME) media, and prove that light in these media always has two degenerate modes with opposite circular polarizations corresponding to one wave vector , and name this effect “time circular birefringence” (TCB). By interchanging the status of space and time, the pair of TCB modes can appear simultaneously via “time refraction” and “time reflection” of a linear polarized incident wave at a time interface of ME media. The superposition of the two TCB modes causes the “time Faraday effect”, namely the globally unified polarization axes rotate with time. A circularly polarized Gaussian pulse traversing a time interface is also studied. If the wave-vector spectrum of a pulse mainly concentrates in the non-traveling-wave band, the pulse will be trapped with nearly fixed center while its intensity will grow rapidly. In addition, we propose an experimental scheme of using molecular fluid with external time-varying electric and magnetic fields both parallel to the direction of light to realize these phenomena in practice. PMID:26329928

  20. Mesoscopic structure of neuronal tracts from time-dependent diffusion.

    PubMed

    Burcaw, Lauren M; Fieremans, Els; Novikov, Dmitry S

    2015-07-01

    Interpreting brain diffusion MRI measurements in terms of neuronal structure at a micrometer level is an exciting unresolved problem. Here we consider diffusion transverse to a bundle of fibers, and show theoretically, as well as using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements in a phantom made of parallel fibers mimicking axons, that the time dependent diffusion coefficient approaches its macroscopic limit slowly, in a (ln t)/t fashion. The logarithmic singularity arises due to short range disorder in the fiber packing. We identify short range disorder in axonal fibers based on histological data from the splenium, and argue that the time dependent contribution to the overall diffusion coefficient from the extra-axonal water dominates that of the intra-axonal water. This dominance may explain the bias in measuring axon diameters in clinical settings. The short range disorder is also reflected in the asymptotically linear frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient measured with oscillating gradients, in agreement with recent experiments. Our results relate the measured diffusion to the mesoscopic structure of neuronal tissue, uncovering the sensitivity of diffusion metrics to axonal arrangement within a fiber tract, and providing an alternative interpretation of axonal diameter mapping techniques.

  1. Broken scale invariance in time-dependent trapping potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharashi, Seyed Ebrahim; Blume, D.

    2016-12-01

    The response of a cold atom gas with contact interactions to a smoothly varying external harmonic confinement in the nonadiabatic regime is studied. The time variation of the angular frequency is varied such that the system is, for vanishing or infinitely strong contact interactions, scale invariant. The time evolution of the system with broken scale invariance (i.e., the time evolution of the system with finite interaction strength) is contrasted with that for a scale invariant system, which exhibits Efimovian-like expansion dynamics that is characterized by log-periodic oscillations with unique period and amplitude. It is found that the breaking of the scale invariance by the finiteness of the interactions leads to a time dependence of the oscillation period and amplitude. It is argued, based on analytical considerations for atomic gases of arbitrary size and numerical results for two one-dimensional particles, that the oscillation period approaches that of the scale-invariant system at large times. The role of the time-dependent contact in the expansion dynamics is analyzed.

  2. Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b {yields} s Penguins

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.

    2006-07-11

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup 0}, {eta}'K{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}(782)K{sub S}{sup 0} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays based on a sample of 386 x 106BB(bar sign) pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider. These decays are dominated by the b {yields} s gluonic penguin transition and are sensitive to new CP-violating phases from physics beyond the standard model. One neutral meson is fully reconstructed in one of the specified decay channels, and the flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays. We also perform measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma} decay that is dominated by the b {yields} s radiative penguin.

  3. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  4. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons, consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness, meridional tendons. This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons. The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation, whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent. Upon inflation and pressurization, the "instantaneous", i.e. linear-elastic strain and stress distribution in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction. However, over time, and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the material, the hoop strains increase and the meridional stresses decrease, whereas the remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged. These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission, both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon. An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter, 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented. The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature. The results show good correlation with a numerical study, using the ABAQUS finite-element package, that includes a widely used model of the visco-elastic response of the gore material:

  5. Time-dependent mixing in strongly stratified sheared turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Salehipour, Hesam; Peltier, W. R.

    2016-11-01

    We consider the time-dependent turbulent mixing of two flows with initial velocity U ̲ (z , 0)ex =U0ex tanh (z / d) and density ρ (z , 0) =ρr +ρ0 1 - tanh (z / δ) , with Re =U0 d / ν = 4000 , Pr = ν / κ = 8 , and Rib = gρ0 d /ρrU02 = 0 . 16 . When the length scale ratio R = d / δ = 1 , the flow is susceptible to a primary Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) which exhibits a rapid burst of turbulence, associated with an overturning of the relatively wide density interface, before entering a relatively rapid decay phase. Conversely, when R =√{ Pr } , the flow is susceptible to a primary Holmboe wave instability (HWI) which is much longer lived and 'scours' but does not disrupt the relatively sharp density interface. For both flows we see evidence of a kx- 5 / 3 power law in the streamwise turbulent kinetic energy spectrum for length scales larger than the Ozmidov scale l0 = (E /N3)1/2 where N2 = 2 Rib /Lz is the buoyancy frequency and E is the dissipation rate. However, the time-dependent evolution of the mixing efficiency η = M / (M + E) is markedly different, as shown by the time evolution of the two flows in Reb - η space, where Reb = E / νN2 .

  6. Time-dependent behavior of passive skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamed, T.; Rubin, M. B.; Trimmer, B. A.; Dorfmann, L.

    2016-03-01

    An isotropic three-dimensional nonlinear viscoelastic model is developed to simulate the time-dependent behavior of passive skeletal muscle. The development of the model is stimulated by experimental data that characterize the response during simple uniaxial stress cyclic loading and unloading. Of particular interest is the rate-dependent response, the recovery of muscle properties from the preconditioned to the unconditioned state and stress relaxation at constant stretch during loading and unloading. The model considers the material to be a composite of a nonlinear hyperelastic component in parallel with a nonlinear dissipative component. The strain energy and the corresponding stress measures are separated additively into hyperelastic and dissipative parts. In contrast to standard nonlinear inelastic models, here the dissipative component is modeled using an evolution equation that combines rate-independent and rate-dependent responses smoothly with no finite elastic range. Large deformation evolution equations for the distortional deformations in the elastic and in the dissipative component are presented. A robust, strongly objective numerical integration algorithm is used to model rate-dependent and rate-independent inelastic responses. The constitutive formulation is specialized to simulate the experimental data. The nonlinear viscoelastic model accurately represents the time-dependent passive response of skeletal muscle.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  8. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  9. Endocannabinoids mediate bidirectional striatal spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Paillé, Vincent; Xu, Hao; Genet, Stéphane; Delord, Bruno; Fino, Elodie; Berry, Hugues; Venance, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Key points Although learning can arise from few or even a single trial, synaptic plasticity is commonly assessed under prolonged activation. Here, we explored the existence of rapid responsiveness of synaptic plasticity at corticostriatal synapses in a major synaptic learning rule, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). We found that spike-timing-dependent depression (tLTD) progressively disappears when the number of paired stimulations (below 50 pairings) is decreased whereas spike-timing-dependent potentiation (tLTP) displays a biphasic profile: tLTP is observed for 75–100 pairings, is absent for 25–50 pairings and re-emerges for 5–10 pairings. This tLTP induced by low numbers of pairings (5–10) depends on activation of the endocannabinoid system, type-1 cannabinoid receptor and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1. Endocannabinoid-tLTP may represent a physiological mechanism operating during the rapid learning of new associative memories and behavioural rules characterizing the flexible behaviour of mammals or during the initial stages of habit learning. Abstract Synaptic plasticity, a main substrate for learning and memory, is commonly assessed with prolonged stimulations. Since learning can arise from few or even a single trial, synaptic strength is expected to adapt rapidly. However, whether synaptic plasticity occurs in response to limited event occurrences remains elusive. To answer this question, we investigated whether a low number of paired stimulations can induce plasticity in a major synaptic learning rule, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is known that 100 pairings induce bidirectional STDP, i.e. spike-timing-dependent potentiation (tLTP) and depression (tLTD) at most central synapses. In rodent striatum, we found that tLTD progressively disappears when the number of paired stimulations is decreased (below 50 pairings) whereas tLTP displays a biphasic profile: tLTP is observed for 75–100 pairings, absent for 25

  10. Time-dependent radiation hazard estimations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the out of magnetosphere crewed flights. The cosmic radiation uncrewed flights inside heliosphere and crewed flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot time flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long term crewed missions set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition term. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and coronal mass ejections (CME). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. CME are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but are much more energetic. The probability of CME increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and affection of CME and GCR would be minimized. Applying time dependent models of GCR spectra [1] and estimations of CME we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in a realistic human phantom [2] inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow of secondary induced particles and

  11. Time-dependent inhibition of human drug metabolizing cytochromes P450 by tricyclic antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Miners, John O

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To investigate time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of human drug metabolizing CYP enzymes by tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). METHODS CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A/CYP3A4 activities were investigated following co- and preincubation with TCAs using human liver microsomes (HLM) and human recombinant CYP proteins (expressed in Escherichia coli) as the enzyme sources. A two-step incubation method was employed to examine the in vitro mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) criteria. Potential metabolite–intermediate complex (MIC) formation was studied by spectral analysis. RESULTS TCAs generally exhibited significant TDI of recombinant CYP1A2, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 (>10% positive inhibition differences between co- and preincubation conditions). TDI of recombinant CYP2C9 was minor (<10%), and was minor or absent in experiments utilizing recombinant CYP3A4 or HLM as the enzyme sources. Where observed, TDI of recombinant CYP occurred via alkylamine MIC formation, but evidence to support similar behaviour in HLM was limited. Indeed, only secondary amine TCAs reduced the apparent P450 content of HLM (3–6%) consistent with complexation. As a representative TCA, nortriptyline fulfilled the in vitro MBI criteria using recombinant CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 (KI and kinact values of 4 µm and 0.19 min−1, and 70 µm and 0.06 min−1), but not with the human liver microsomal enzymes. CONCLUSIONS TCAs appear to have minimal potential for MBI of human liver microsomal CYP enzymes involved in drug metabolism. HLM and recombinant CYP (expressed in E. coli) are not equivalent enzyme sources for evaluating the TDI associated with some drugs. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Much of the literature evidence for mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of CYP by tricyclic antidepressants is limited to studies in rat liver microsomes. One report from this laboratory characterized MBI of human recombinant CYP2C8 by nortriptyline. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Tricyclic antidepressants form

  12. Theory of electric creep and electromechanical coupling with domain evolution for non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Yang; Zhong, Zheng; Weng, George J.

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mechanical creep with inelastic deformation, electric creep with domain evolution is a rarely studied subject. In this paper, we present a theory of electric creep and related electromechanical coupling for both non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics. We consider electric creep to be a time-dependent process, with an initial condition lying on the D (electric displacement) versus E (electric field) hysteresis loop. Both processes are shown to share the same Gibbs free energy and thermodynamic driving force, but relative to creep, the hysteresis loop is just a field-dependent process. With this view, we develop a theory with a single thermodynamic driving force but with two separate kinetic equations, one for the field-dependent loops in terms of a Lorentzian-like function and the other for the time-dependent D in terms of a dissipation potential. We use the 0°-90° and then 90°-180° switches to attain these goals. It is demonstrated that the calculated results are in broad agreement with two sets of experiments, one for a non-poled PIC-151 and the other for a fully poled PZT-5A. The theory also shows that creep polarization tends to reach a saturation state with time and that the saturated polarization has its maximum at the coercive field.

  13. Theory of electric creep and electromechanical coupling with domain evolution for non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Yang; Zhong, Zheng; Weng, George J

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mechanical creep with inelastic deformation, electric creep with domain evolution is a rarely studied subject. In this paper, we present a theory of electric creep and related electromechanical coupling for both non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics. We consider electric creep to be a time-dependent process, with an initial condition lying on the D (electric displacement) versus E (electric field) hysteresis loop. Both processes are shown to share the same Gibbs free energy and thermodynamic driving force, but relative to creep, the hysteresis loop is just a field-dependent process. With this view, we develop a theory with a single thermodynamic driving force but with two separate kinetic equations, one for the field-dependent loops in terms of a Lorentzian-like function and the other for the time-dependent D in terms of a dissipation potential. We use the 0°-90° and then 90°-180° switches to attain these goals. It is demonstrated that the calculated results are in broad agreement with two sets of experiments, one for a non-poled PIC-151 and the other for a fully poled PZT-5A. The theory also shows that creep polarization tends to reach a saturation state with time and that the saturated polarization has its maximum at the coercive field.

  14. The time-dependent Aharonov-Casher effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Douglas; Ulbricht, Jaryd

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we give a covariant expression for Aharonov-Casher phase. This expression is a combination of the canonical electric field, Aharonov-Casher phase plus a magnetic field phase shift. We use this covariant expression for the Aharonov-Casher phase to investigate the case of a neutral particle with a non-zero magnetic moment moving in the time dependent electric and magnetic fields of a plane electromagnetic wave background. We focus on the case where the magnetic moment of the particle is oriented so that both the electric and magnetic fields lead to non-zero phases, and we look at the interplay between these electric and magnetic phases.

  15. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  16. Origin of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won; Choi, M. Y.

    2016-08-01

    A biological synapse changes its efficacy depending on the difference between pre- and post-synaptic spike timings. Formulating spike-timing-dependent interactions in terms of the path integral, we establish a neural-network model, which makes it possible to predict relevant quantities rigorously by means of standard methods in statistical mechanics and field theory. In particular, the biological synaptic plasticity rule is shown to emerge as the optimal form for minimizing the free energy. It is further revealed that maximization of the entropy of neural activities gives rise to the competitive behavior of biological learning. This demonstrates that statistical mechanics helps to understand rigorously key characteristic behaviors of a neural network, thus providing the possibility of physics serving as a useful and relevant framework for probing life.

  17. Exponential time-dependent perturbation theory in rotationally inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R. J.

    1983-08-01

    An exponential form of time-dependent perturbation theory (the Magnus approximation) is developed for rotationally inelastic scattering. A phase-shift matrix is calculated as an integral in time over the anisotropic part of the potential. The trajectory used for this integral is specified by the diagonal part of the potential matrix and the arithmetic average of the initial and final velocities and the average orbital angular momentum. The exponential of the phase-shift matrix gives the scattering matrix and the various cross sections. A special representation is used where the orbital angular momentum is either treated classically or may be frozen out to yield the orbital sudden approximation. Calculations on Ar+N2 and Ar+TIF show that the theory generally gives very good agreement with accurate calculations, even where the orbital sudden approximation (coupled-states) results are seriously in error.

  18. Dendritic Synapse Location and Neocortical Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.; Letzkus, Johannes J.; Kampa, Björn M.; Hang, Giao B.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    While it has been appreciated for decades that synapse location in the dendritic tree has a powerful influence on signal processing in neurons, the role of dendritic synapse location on the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity has only recently been explored. Here, we review recent work revealing how learning rules for spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) in cortical neurons vary with the spatial location of synaptic input. A common principle appears to be that proximal synapses show conventional STDP, whereas distal inputs undergo plasticity according to novel learning rules. One crucial factor determining location-dependent STDP is the backpropagating action potential, which tends to decrease in amplitude and increase in width as it propagates into the dendritic tree of cortical neurons. We discuss additional location-dependent mechanisms as well as the functional implications of heterogeneous learning rules at different dendritic locations for the organization of synaptic inputs. PMID:21423515

  19. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  20. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  1. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time1, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v (t ) =∫ a (t ) d t (1) and x (t ) =∫ v (t ) dt. Mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets have accelerometers that capture slowly evolving acceleration with respect to time and can deliver those measurements as a CSV file. A recent example measured the oscillations of the elevator as it starts its motion.2 In the application presented here the mobile device is used to estimate the height of the elevator ride. By estimating the functional form of the acceleration of an elevator ride, it is possible to estimate the height of the ride through Eqs. (1) and (2).

  2. Observation of Broadband Time-Dependent Rabi Shifting in Microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, Ryan; Filin, Alex; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2009-11-13

    Coherent broadband radiation in the form of Rabi sidebands is observed when a ps probe laser propagates through a weakly ionized, electronically excited microplasma generated in the focus of an intense pump beam. The sidebands arise from the interaction of the probe beam with pairs of excited states of a constituent neutral atom via the probe-induced Rabi oscillation. Sideband shifting of >90 meV from the probe carrier frequency results in an effective bandwidth of 200 meV. The sidebands are controlled by the intensity and temporal profile of the probe pulse; with amplitude and shift in agreement with the predictions of a time-dependent generalized Rabi cycling model.

  3. Random walks for spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alan; Leen, Todd K.; Roberts, Patrick D.

    2004-08-01

    Random walk methods are used to calculate the moments of negative image equilibrium distributions in synaptic weight dynamics governed by spike-timing-dependent plasticity. The neural architecture of the model is based on the electrosensory lateral line lobe of mormyrid electric fish, which forms a negative image of the reafferent signal from the fish’s own electric discharge to optimize detection of sensory electric fields. Of particular behavioral importance to the fish is the variance of the equilibrium postsynaptic potential in the presence of noise, which is determined by the variance of the equilibrium weight distribution. Recurrence relations are derived for the moments of the equilibrium weight distribution, for arbitrary postsynaptic potential functions and arbitrary learning rules. For the case of homogeneous network parameters, explicit closed form solutions are developed for the covariances of the synaptic weight and postsynaptic potential distributions.

  4. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process.

  5. Extended time-dependent mean-field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Portes, D.A. Jr. |; Kodama, T.; de Toledo Piza, A.F.

    1996-09-01

    The time-dependent mean-field approximation for two dynamically coupled subsystems is extended to include correlation effects between the subsystems, allowing for decorrelation processes to develop in the reduced density matrices. The extended scheme is formulated in terms of the truncation to {ital M} terms of the Schmidt decomposition of the full density matrix. This {ital M} natural orbitals truncation scheme is compared to the exact numerical solution for a system of two coupled anharmonic oscillators in a factorized initial state. It is found that the approximation {ital M}=3 gives a good approximation to the exact results over several characteristic times of the system. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Measuring time-dependent diffusion in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Pilli, Siva Prasad; Smith, Lloyd V.; Shutthanandan, V.

    2014-11-01

    Moisture plays a significant role in influencing the mechanical behavior and long-term durability of polymer matrix composites (PMC’s). The common methods used to determine the moisture diffusion coefficients of PMCs are based on the solution of Fickian diffusion in the one-dimensional domain. Fick’s Law assumes that equilibrium between the material surface and the external vapor is established instantaneously. A time dependent boundary condition has been shown to improve correlation with some bulk diffusion measurements, but has not been validated experimentally. The surface moisture content in a Toray 800S/3900-2B toughened quasi-isotropic laminate system, [0/±60]s, was analyzed experimentally using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). It was found that the surface moisture content showed a rapid increase to an intermediate concentration C0, followed by a slow linear increase to the saturation level.

  7. Measuring time-dependent diffusion in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilli, Siva P.; Smith, Lloyd V.; Vaithiyalingam, Shutthanandan

    2014-11-01

    Moisture plays a significant role in influencing the mechanical behavior and long-term durability of polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The common methods used to determine the moisture diffusion coefficients of PMCs are based on the solution of Fickian diffusion in the one-dimensional domain. Fick's Law assumes that equilibrium between the material surface and the external vapor is established instantaneously. A time-dependent boundary condition has been shown to improve correlation with some bulk diffusion measurements, but has not been validated experimentally. The surface moisture content in a Toray 800S/3900-2B toughened quasi-isotropic laminate system, [0/±60] s , was analyzed experimentally using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). It was found that the surface moisture content showed a rapid increase to an intermediate concentration C 0, followed by a slow linear increase to the saturation level.

  8. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  9. Cosmological consequences of a time-dependent Λ term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.; Lima, J. A. S.; Waga, I.

    1992-09-01

    The phenomenological approach to investigate the decay of the effective cosmological constant, as recently proposed by Chen and Wu, is generalized to include a term proportional to H2 on the time dependence of Λ, where H is the Hubble parameter. This new term can modify some features of the standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and its free parameter may be adjusted in accordance with nucleosynthesis constraints. The model also allows a deceleration parameter q0 assuming negative values so that the density parameter Ω0 is smaller than 2/3 and the age of the Universe is always bigger than H-10. In these cases, the usual matter creation rate appearing in models with a decaying vacuum energy is smaller than the one present in the steady-state model.

  10. Optimization of Time-Dependent Particle Tracing Using Tetrahedral Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenwright, David; Lane, David

    1995-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is presented for computing particle paths, streak lines and time lines in time-dependent flows with moving curvilinear grids. The integration, velocity interpolation and step-size control are all performed in physical space which avoids the need to transform the velocity field into computational space. This leads to higher accuracy because there are no Jacobian matrix approximations or expensive matrix inversions. Integration accuracy is maintained using an adaptive step-size control scheme which is regulated by the path line curvature. The problem of cell-searching, point location and interpolation in physical space is simplified by decomposing hexahedral cells into tetrahedral cells. This enables the point location to be done analytically and substantially faster than with a Newton-Raphson iterative method. Results presented show this algorithm is up to six times faster than particle tracers which operate on hexahedral cells yet produces almost identical particle trajectories.

  11. Time-Dependent Photoionization of Gas Outflows in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussieny, Ehab E.; Bautista, M.; Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Gas outflows are fundamental components of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) activity. Time-variability of ionizing radiation, which is characteristic of AGN in various different time scales, may produce non-equilibrium photoionization conditions over a significant fraction of the flow and yields supersonically moving cooling/heating fronts. These fast fronts create pressure imbalances that can only be resolved by fragmentation of the flow and acceleration of such fragments. This mechanism can explain the kinematic structure of low ionization BAL systems (FeLoBAL). This mechanism may also have significant effects on other types of outflows given the wide range of variability time scales in AGN. We will study these effects in detail by constructing time-dependent photoionization models of the outflows and incorporating these models into radiative-hydrodynamic simulations.

  12. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  13. SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent Symmetric Tandem Mirror Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D; Fowler, T

    2004-06-15

    A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport model in symmetric tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of symmetric mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-symmetric transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior.

  14. Fermion Mass Renormalization Using Time-dependent Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnink, Timothy; Santrach, Amelia; Hocket, Sarah; Barcus, Scott; Petridis, Athanasios

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent electromagnetically self-coupled Dirac equation is solved numerically by means of the staggered-leap-frog algorithm with refcecting boundary conditions. The stability region of the method versus the interaction strength and the spatial-grid size over time-step ratio is established. The expectation values of several dynamic operators are then evaluated as functions of time. These include the fermion and electromagnetic energies and the fermion dynamic mass, as the self-interacting spinors are no longer mass-eigenfunctions. There is a characteristic, non-exponential, oscillatory dependence leading to asymptotic constants of these expectation values. In the case of the fermion mass this amounts to renormalization. The dependence of the expectation values on the spatial-grid size is evaluated in detail. Statistical regularization is proposed to remove the grid-size dependence.

  15. Timing Intervals Using Population Synchrony and Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Baker, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model by which ensembles of regularly spiking neurons can encode different time intervals through synchronous firing. We show that a neuron responding to a large population of convergent inputs has the potential to learn to produce an appropriately-timed output via spike-time dependent plasticity. We explain why temporal variability of this population synchrony increases with increasing time intervals. We also show that the scalar property of timing and its violation at short intervals can be explained by the spike-wise accumulation of jitter in the inter-spike intervals of timing neurons. We explore how the challenge of encoding longer time intervals can be overcome and conclude that this may involve a switch to a different population of neurons with lower firing rate, with the added effect of producing an earlier bias in response. Experimental data on human timing performance show features in agreement with the model's output. PMID:27990109

  16. Unsupervised Learning of Visual Features through Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Masquelier, Timothée; Thorpe, Simon J

    2007-01-01

    Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a learning rule that modifies synaptic strength as a function of the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic spikes. When a neuron is repeatedly presented with similar inputs, STDP is known to have the effect of concentrating high synaptic weights on afferents that systematically fire early, while postsynaptic spike latencies decrease. Here we use this learning rule in an asynchronous feedforward spiking neural network that mimics the ventral visual pathway and shows that when the network is presented with natural images, selectivity to intermediate-complexity visual features emerges. Those features, which correspond to prototypical patterns that are both salient and consistently present in the images, are highly informative and enable robust object recognition, as demonstrated on various classification tasks. Taken together, these results show that temporal codes may be a key to understanding the phenomenal processing speed achieved by the visual system and that STDP can lead to fast and selective responses. PMID:17305422

  17. Time-dependent reliability analysis of ceramic engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing either the power or Paris law relations. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled using either the principle of independent action (PIA), the Weibull normal stress averaging method (NSA), or the Batdorf theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. Two example problems demonstrating proof testing and fatigue parameter estimation are given.

  18. GABAergic circuits control spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paille, Vincent; Fino, Elodie; Du, Kai; Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Perez, Sylvie; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren; Venance, Laurent

    2013-05-29

    The spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a synaptic learning rule for encoding learning and memory, relies on relative timing of neuronal activity on either side of the synapse. GABAergic signaling has been shown to control neuronal excitability and consequently the spike timing, but whether GABAergic circuits rule the STDP remained unknown. Here we show that GABAergic signaling governs the polarity of STDP, because blockade of GABAA receptors was able to completely reverse the temporal order of plasticity at corticostriatal synapses in rats and mice. GABA controls the polarity of STDP in both striatopallidal and striatonigral output neurons. Biophysical simulations and experimental investigations suggest that GABA controls STDP polarity through depolarizing effects at distal dendrites of striatal output neurons by modifying the balance of two calcium sources, NMDARs and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. These findings establish a central role for GABAergic circuits in shaping STDP and suggest that GABA could operate as a Hebbian/anti-Hebbian switch.

  19. Energy equipartitioning in the classical time-dependent Hartree approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, John E.; Karplus, Martin

    1991-05-01

    In the classical time-dependent Hartree approximation (TDH), the dynamics of a single molecule is approximated by that of a ``field'' (each field being N ``copies'' of the molecule which are transparent to one another while interacting with the system via a scaled force). It is shown that when some molecules are represented by a field of copies, while other molecules are represented normally, the average kinetic energy of the system increases linearly with the number of copies and diverges in the limit of large N. Nevertheless, the TDH method with appropriate energy scaling can serve as a useful means of enhancing the configurational sampling for problems involving coupled systems with disparate numbers of degrees of freedom.

  20. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous time-dependent solutions of massive gravity generalise the plane wave solutions of the linearised Fierz-Pauli equations for a massive spin-two particle, as well as the Kasner solutions of General Relativity. We show that they also allow a clear counting of the degrees of freedom and represent a simplified framework to work out the constraints, the equations of motion and the initial value formulation. We work in the vielbein formulation of massive gravity, find the phase space resulting from the constraints and show that several disconnected sectors of solutions exist some of which are unstable. The initial values determine the sector to which a solution belongs. Classically, the theory is not pathological but quantum mechanically the theory may suffer from instabilities. The latter are not due to an extra ghost-like degree of freedom.

  1. Time-Dependent Rock Failure in a Heterogeneous Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Kemeny, J.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent rock failure is an important aspect in the analysis of long-term rock stability for slopes, dam and bridge foundations, and underground storage facilities. An on-going project at the University of Arizona is using Kartchner Caverns in Benson, Arizona as a natural analog to study such failure by reconstructing the process of natural cave breakdown with subcritical crack growth modeling. Breakdown is thought to occur along joints through the time-dependent failure of rock bridges: sections of intact rock separating discontinuities in a rock mass. The Escabrosa limestone composing the caverns ranges from a more homogenous, even-grained texture to a more heterogeneous texture consisting of coarse-grained veins and solution cavities set in a fine-grained matrix. To determine if the veined regions are more susceptible to fracturing and act as the nuclei of rock bridge failure, fracture toughness tests were conducted for both textures. The subcritical crack growth parameters were calculated using the constant stress-rate method. Results indicate that the more heterogeneous limestone has a higher fracture strength, fracture toughness, and subcritical crack growth index n than the more homogeneous limestone. This is in agreement with previous studies which found that a more complex and heterogeneous microstructure produces a larger microcrack process zone, leading to higher fracture energies and lower susceptibility to subcritical crack growth. Thus, despite their solution cavities, the calcite veins do not localize failure or act as planes of weakness; instead, rock bridges fail through the more homogeneous limestone matrix.

  2. Time-dependent changes in altruistic punishment following stress.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Zorn, Jelle V; Cornelisse, Sandra; Koot, Susanne; Houtepen, Lotte C; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Kalenscher, Tobias; Joëls, Marian

    2013-09-01

    Decisions are rarely made in social isolation. One phenomenon often observed in social interactions is altruistic punishment, i.e. the punishment of unfair behavior by others at a personal cost. The tendency for altruistic punishment is altered by affective states including those induced by stress exposure. Stress is thought to exert bi-directional effects on behavior: immediately after stress, reflex-like and habitual behavior is promoted while later on more far-sighted, flexible and goal-directed behavior is enhanced. We hypothesized that such time-dependent effects of stress would also be present in the context of altruistic punishment behavior. Healthy male participants (N=80) were exposed to either a grouped stress test or a control condition. Participants were tested in prosocial decision making tasks either directly after stress or 75 min later. Altruistic punishment was assessed using the Ultimatum Game. General altruism was assessed with a one-shot version of the Dictator Game in which an anonymous donation could be offered to a charitable organization. We found that stress caused a bi-directional effect on altruistic punishment, with decreased rejection rates in the late aftermath of stress in response to ambiguous 30% offers. In the Dictator Game, stressed participants were less generous than controls, but no time-dependent effect was observed, indicating that the general reward sensitivity remained unchanged at various time-points after stress. Overall, during the late aftermath after acute stress exposure (i.e. 75 min later), participants acted more consistent with their own material self-interest, and had a lower propensity for altruistic punishment, possibly through upregulation of cognitive self-control mechanisms. Thus, our findings underscore the importance of time as a factor in simple, real-life economic decisions in a stressful social context.

  3. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows.

  4. Understanding and Predicting Time-Dependent Dune Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Stockdon, H. F.; Smith, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The vulnerability of coastal ecosystems, habitats, and infrastructure is largely dictated by how protective sand dunes respond to extreme waves and water levels during storms. Predicting the type of dune response (e.g., scarping, overwashing, breaching) is often done with conditional storm-impact scale models (e.g. Sallenger 2000) however, these models do not describe the magnitude of expected changes or account for the continuum of dune responses throughout the duration of a storm event. Alternatively, process-based dune erosion models like XBeach explicitly compute interactions between waves, water levels, and sediment transport but are limited in regional applications due to computational requirements and inadequate knowledge of required boundary conditions. Using historical observations of storm-induced coastal change, we are developing and testing a variety of new static, probabilistic, and time-dependent models for dune erosion. Model development is informed by the observed dune response from four events that impacted geomorphically diverse regions along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines. Results from the static models indicate that alongshore differences in the magnitude of dune elevation change can be related to the depth of water over of the dune crest (e.g. freeboard) but that increasing freeboard does not always correspond to an increased lowering of the dune crest. Applying the concept of dune freeboard in a time-dependent approach that incorporates rising water levels that cause a dune to sequentially experience collision, overwash and then inundation shows that reasonable estimates of dune erosion are obtained. The accuracy of each of the models is now being evaluated along the large and diverse regions of coast that were impacted by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 where dune response was highly variable.

  5. Time-dependent degenerative transformations in the lipidome of chalazia

    PubMed Central

    Wojtowicz, Jadwiga C.; Butovich, Igor A.; McMahon, Anne; Hogan, Robert N.; Itani, Kamel M.; Mancini, Ronald; Molai, Mike; Linsenbardt, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to conduct histopathologic and lipidomic analyses of chalazia, in order to evaluate time-dependent changes in the lesion. Samples of surgically excised chalazia were collected over a period of 12 months from 10 patients (mean age 41 years; range, 23–58) with clinically diagnosed chalazia, who underwent scheduled surgery. The ages of chalazia varied from 2 to 28 weeks. To confirm the clinical diagnoses, the morphology of collected tissue samples was evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin staining. The lipids from individual chalazia were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared with authentic lipid standards and with the lipids of meibum collected from normal controls. We observed gradual, lesion age-dependent transformation of the lipidome of chalazia from an almost normal meibum-like composition to a very different kind of lipidome. A rapid initial increase in the free cholesterol content was followed by a gradual replacement of extremely long chain meibomian-type lipids with a mixture of shorter-chain cholesteryl esters of the C14-C18 family, triacylglycerols, ceramides, phospholipids and sphingomyelins. In addition, a rapid disappearance of wax esters and cholesteryl esters of (1-O)-acyl-omega-hydroxy fatty acids from the lipidome of aging chalazia was observed. Our results are indicative of dramatic, time-dependent changes in the lesion that may involve cholesterol as a trigger and/or a marker of subsequent degeneration of the meibomian lipidome. We hypothesize that early inhibition of these transformations may be useful in reversing the course of the disease. PMID:25150086

  6. Time Dependence of Collision Probabilities During Satellite Conjunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Doyle T.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team has recently implemented updated software to calculate the probability of collision (P (sub c)) for Earth-orbiting satellites. The algorithm can employ complex dynamical models for orbital motion, and account for the effects of non-linear trajectories as well as both position and velocity uncertainties. This “3D P (sub c)” method entails computing a 3-dimensional numerical integral for each estimated probability. Our analysis indicates that the 3D method provides several new insights over the traditional “2D P (sub c)” method, even when approximating the orbital motion using the relatively simple Keplerian two-body dynamical model. First, the formulation provides the means to estimate variations in the time derivative of the collision probability, or the probability rate, R (sub c). For close-proximity satellites, such as those orbiting in formations or clusters, R (sub c) variations can show multiple peaks that repeat or blend with one another, providing insight into the ongoing temporal distribution of risk. For single, isolated conjunctions, R (sub c) analysis provides the means to identify and bound the times of peak collision risk. Additionally, analysis of multiple actual archived conjunctions demonstrates that the commonly used “2D P (sub c)” approximation can occasionally provide inaccurate estimates. These include cases in which the 2D method yields negligibly small probabilities (e.g., P (sub c)) is greater than 10 (sup -10)), but the 3D estimates are sufficiently large to prompt increased monitoring or collision mitigation (e.g., P (sub c) is greater than or equal to 10 (sup -5)). Finally, the archive analysis indicates that a relatively efficient calculation can be used to identify which conjunctions will have negligibly small probabilities. This small-P (sub c) screening test can significantly speed the overall risk analysis computation for large numbers of conjunctions.

  7. Creep and Creep-Fatigue of Alloy 617 Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jill K.; Carroll, Laura J.; Wright, Richard N.

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is the primary candidate material for the heat exchanger of a very high temperature gas cooled reactor intended to operate up to 950°C. While this alloy is currently qualified in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for non-nuclear construction, it is not currently allowed for use in nuclear designs. A draft Code Case to qualify Alloy 617 for nuclear pressure boundary applications was submitted in 1992, but was withdrawn prior to approval. Prior to withdrawal of the draft, comments were received indicating that there was insufficient knowledge of the creep and creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 welds. In this report the results of recent experiments and analysis of the creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 617 welds prepared using the gas tungsten arc process with Alloy 617 filler wire. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue properties of weldments are also discussed. The experiments cover a range of temperatures from 750 to 1000°C to support development of a new Code Case to qualify the material for elevated temperature nuclear design. Properties of the welded material are compared to results of extensive characterization of solution annealed plate base metal.

  8. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  9. Creep of ice: Further studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, H. C.; Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed studies have been done of ice creep as related to the icy satellites, Ganymede and Callisto. Included were: (1) the flow of high-pressure water ices II, III, and V, and (2) frictional sliding of ice I sub h. Work was also begun on the study of the effects of impurities on the flow of ice. Test results are summarized.

  10. Multiple-creep-test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Simplified, compact apparatus uses fixtures that can test three samples at once for flexure, compression, or double-shear creep. Each fixture uses series of rods and plates to divide one load equally among three samples. Fixtures could be expanded to carry more samples by adding more rods and plates.

  11. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  12. A theoretical model of accelerated irradiation creep at low temperatures by transient interstitial absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed using the reaction rate theory of radiation effects to explain experimental results that showed higher than expected values of irradiation creep at low temperatures in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The customary assumption that the point defect concentrations are at steady state was not made; rather, the time dependence of the vacancy and interstitial concentrations and the creep rate were explicitly calculated. For temperatures below about 100 to 200{degree}C, the time required for the vacancy concentration to reach steady state exceeds the duration of the experiment. For example, if materials parameters typical of austenitic stainless steel are used, the calculated vacancy transient dose at 100{degree}C is about 100 dpa. At 550{degree}C this transient is over by 10{sup {minus}8} dpa. During the time that the vacancy population remains lower than its steady state value, dislocation climb is increased since defects of primarily one type are being absorbed. Using the time-dependent point defect concentrations, the dislocation climb velocity has been calculated as a function of time and a climb-enabled glide creep model had been invoked. The extended transient time for the vacancies leads to high creep rates at low temperatures. In agreement with the experimental observations, a minimum in the temperature dependence of creep is predicted at a temperature between 50 and 350{degree}C. The temperature at which the minimum occurs decreases as the irradiation dose increases. Predicted values of creep at 8 dpa are in good agreement with the results of the ORR-MFE-6J/7J experiment.

  13. Experimental Creep Life Assessment for the Advanced Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to develop the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for potential use on future space missions. The ASRG provides substantial efficiency and specific power improvements over radioisotope power systems of heritage designs. The ASRG would use General Purpose Heat Source modules as energy sources and the free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) to convert heat into electrical energy. Lockheed Martin Corporation of Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, is integrating the ASRG systems, and Sunpower, Inc., of Athens, Ohio, is designing and building the ASC. NASA Glenn Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio, manages the Sunpower contract and provides technology development in several areas for the ASC. One area is reliability assessment for the ASC heater head, a critical pressure vessel within which heat is converted into mechanical oscillation of a displacer piston. For high system efficiency, the ASC heater head operates at very high temperature (850 C) and therefore is fabricated from an advanced heat-resistant nickel-based superalloy Microcast MarM-247. Since use of MarM-247 in a thin-walled pressure vessel is atypical, much effort is required to assure that the system will operate reliably for its design life of 17 years. One life-limiting structural response for this application is creep; creep deformation is the accumulation of time-dependent inelastic strain under sustained loading over time. If allowed to progress, the deformation eventually results in creep rupture. Since creep material properties are not available in the open literature, a detailed creep life assessment of the ASC heater head effort is underway. This paper presents an overview of that creep life assessment approach, including the reliability-based creep criteria developed from coupon testing, and the associated heater head deterministic and probabilistic analyses. The approach also

  14. Time-dependent simulations of a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Bateman, G.

    1988-05-01

    Detailed simulations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak are carried out using a 1-1/2-D transport code. The calculations include time-varying densities, fields, and plasma shape. It is shown that ignition can be achieved in this device if somewhat better than L-mode energy confinement time scaling is possible. We also conclude that the performance of such a compact, short-pulse device can depend greatly on how the plasma is evolved to its flat-top parameters. Furthermore, in cases such as the ones discussed here, where there is not a great deal of ignition margin and the electron density is held constant, ignition ends if the helium ash is not removed. In general, control of the deuterium--tritium density is equivalent to burn control. 48 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics aremore » common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.« less

  16. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2014-11-11

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range 650° to 732°C at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common amongst the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non Nb bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. Creep Deformation of Allvac 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert W.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Nasrollahzadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The creep deformation behavior of Allvac 718Plus was studied over the temperature range of 923 K to 1005 K (650 °C to 732 °C) at initial applied stress levels ranging from 517 to 655 MPa. Over the entire experimental temperature-stress regime this alloy exhibits Class M-type creep behavior with all creep curves exhibiting a decelerating strain rate with strain or time throughout primary creep. However, unlike pure metals or simple solid solution alloys, this gamma prime strengthened superalloy does not exhibit steady-state creep. Rather, primary creep is instantly followed by a long duration of accelerating strain rate with strain or time. These creep characteristics are common among the gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Allvac 718Plus also exhibits a very high temperature dependence of creep rate. Detailed TEM examination of the deformation structures of selected creep samples reveals dislocation mechanisms similar to those found in high volume fraction gamma prime strengthened superalloys. Strong evidence of microtwinning is found in several of the deformation structures. The presence of microtwinning may account for the strong temperature dependence of creep rate observed in this alloy. In addition, due to the presence of Nb and thus, grain boundary delta phase, matrix dislocation activity which is not present in non-Nb-bearing superalloys occurs in this alloy. The creep characteristics and dislocation mechanisms are presented and discussed in detail.

  18. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  19. Time-dependent cavitation in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneidman, Vitaly A.

    2016-12-01

    Kinetics of nucleation and growth of empty bubbles in a nonvolatile incompressible fluid under negative pressure is considered within the generalized Zeldovich framework. The transient matched asymptotic solution obtained earlier for predominantly viscous nucleation is used to evaluate the distribution of growing cavities over sizes. Inertial effects described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation are further included. The distributions are used to estimate the volume occupied by cavities, which leads to increase of pressure and eventual self-quenching of nucleation. Numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytics. Due to rapid expansion of cavities the conventional separation of the nucleation and the growth time scales can be less distinct, which increases the role of transient effects. In particular, in the case of dominant viscosity a typical power-law tail of the quasistationary distribution is replaced by a time-dependent exponential tail. For fluids of the glycerin type such distributions can extend into the micrometer region, while in low-viscosity liquids (water, mercury) exponential distributions are short lived and are restricted to nanometer scales due to inertial effects.

  20. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity123

    PubMed Central

    Pecevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p* that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p* contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference. PMID:27419214

  1. Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a new model for explosive puff rise histories that is derived from the strong conservative form of the partial differential equations of mass, momenta, and total energy that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). By allowing the dimensions of the puff to evolve laterally and horizontally, the initial rising spherical shaped puff evolves into a rising ellipsoidal shaped mushroom cloud. This model treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric turbulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff rise history was found to depend not only upon the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the local stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere through which the puff rises. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments, ranging from unstable to very stable atmospheric conditions; the agreement of the model history curves with these experimental curves was within 10%.

  2. The time dependence of chromospheric decay for solar type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. C.; Hege, K.; Cromwell, R. H.

    1984-02-01

    For solar type stars in clusters ranging from 10 million to 6 billion years in age, a lower resolution (2.5 A) analog of the Mount Wilson S index of stellar chromospheric activity has been measured. This was done in an attempt to surmount the problem of cluster star faintness. The new index is found by forming the ratio of the residual flux at the bottoms of H and K to the height of the local pseudo-continuum as defined by flux maxima near 3775-3815 and 4010-4030 A. The lower resolution analog is just the quantity (1 - KH), where KH is a measure of the calcium H and K line depths. A temperature-corrected analog (1 - HK0) is also formed. Because of the uncertainties in assigning accurate ages and the scarcity of data for both intermediate and old age clusters, the data do not yet identify a unique form for the time dependence of chromospheric decay. However, they do place far more restrictive constraints on theory than previously available. Further observations of intermediate and old clusters are required to distinguish between the two empirical models developed.

  3. Recovery of time-dependent volatility in option pricing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zui-Cha; Hon, Y. C.; Isakov, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate an inverse problem of determining the time-dependent volatility from observed market prices of options with different strikes. Due to the non linearity and sparsity of observations, an analytical solution to the problem is generally not available. Numerical approximation is also difficult to obtain using most of the existing numerical algorithms. Based on our recent theoretical results, we apply the linearisation technique to convert the problem into an inverse source problem from which recovery of the unknown volatility function can be achieved. Two kinds of strategies, namely, the integral equation method and the Landweber iterations, are adopted to obtain the stable numerical solution to the inverse problem. Both theoretical analysis and numerical examples confirm that the proposed approaches are effective. The work described in this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Research Grant Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Project No. CityU 101112) and grants from the NNSF of China (Nos. 11261029, 11461039), and NSF grants DMS 10-08902 and 15-14886 and by Emylou Keith and Betty Dutcher Distinguished Professorship at the Wichita State University (USA).

  4. Time Dependent Hadronic Modeling of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diltz, C.; Böttcher, M.; Fossati, G.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new time-dependent lepto-hadronic model for blazar emission that takes into account the radiation emitted by secondary particles, such as pions and muons, from photo hadronic interactions. Starting from a baseline parameter set guided by a fit to the spectral energy distribution of the blazar 3C 279, we perform a parameter study to investigate the effects of perturbations of the input parameters to mimic different flaring events to study the resulting light curves in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E\\gt 100 MeV), and very-high-energy (E\\gt 100 GeV) γ-rays as well as the neutrino emission associated with charged-pion and muon decay. We find that flaring events from an increase in the efficiency of Fermi II acceleration will produce a positive correlation between all bandpasses and a marked plateau in the HE γ-ray lightcurve. We also predict a distinctive dip in the HE lightcurve for perturbations caused by a change in the proton injection spectral index. These plateaus/dips could be a tell tale signature of hadronic models for perturbations that lead to more efficient acceleration of high-energy protons in parameter regimes where pion and muon synchrotron emission is non-negligible.

  5. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  6. Time-dependent numerical simulation of vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Csanak, G.; So, L.L.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Campbell, M.

    1994-12-31

    To simulate vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), the authors are developing a three-dimensional, time-dependent field-gain model with absorption in bulk dielectric regions and gain in quantum well regions. Since the laser linewidth is narrow, the bulk absorption coefficient is assumed to be independent of frequency with a value determined by the material and the lattice temperature. In contrast, the frequency-dependent gain regions must be solved consistently in the time domain. Treatment of frequency-dependent media in a finite-difference time-domain code is computationally intensive. However, because the volume of the quantum well regions is small relative to the volume of the multilayer dielectric (MLD) mirror regions, the computational overhead is reasonable. A key issue is the calculation of the fields in the MLD mirror regions. Although computationally intensive, good agreement has been obtained between simulation results and matrix equation solutions for the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and bandwidth of MLD mirrors. The authors discuss the development and testing of the two-dimensional field-gain model. This field-gain model will be integrated with a carrier transport model to form the self-consistent laser code, VCSEL.

  7. Aspects of time-dependent solutions of string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabinger, Michal

    Most of our present knowledge of string theory pertains to time-independent backgrounds. Time-dependent backgrounds are in general much harder to understand, and pose a number of interesting questions. In the first part of this dissertation, we study light-like singularities in string theory. We discuss physical properties of the parabolic orbifold and the null-brane orbifold of Minkowski space, and we show how a large class of light-like singularities gets repaired by string worldsheet instantons. The second part of the dissertation is devoted to the study of physical systems related to double analytic continuations of black holes. In particular, we discuss M-theory compactified on a non-supersymmetric interval, which can decay by nucleation of bubbles of nothing. We also study the evolution of spacetimes obtained by a double analytic continuation of Kerr black holes. We compute particle creation in these spacetimes, and explain its relation to non-local deformations of the string worldsheet action. The main motivation for the work presented in the last part of the dissertation is to gain information about a possible holographic description of de Sitter space. We study the entropy of de Sitter flux compactifications, and the entropy of their deformations containing D-brane domain walls. We find a string scale correspondence point at which the thermodynamic entropy of the spacetime and the statistical entropy on the D-brane domain walls agree up to coefficients of order one.

  8. A time-dependent model for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of the passive electrical resistance of biological tissues through biogalvanic characterisation has been proposed as a simple means of distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. This method has the potential to provide valuable real-time information when integrated into surgical tools. Characterised tissue resistance values have been shown to be particularly sensitive to external load switching direction and rate, bringing into question the stability and efficacy of the technique. These errors are due to transient variations observed in measurement data that are not accounted for in current electrical models. The presented research proposes the addition of a time-dependent element to the characterisation model to account for losses associated with this transient behaviour. Influence of switching rate has been examined, with the inclusion of transient elements improving the repeatability of the characterised tissue resistance. Application of this model to repeat biogalvanic measurements on a single ex vivo human colon tissue sample with healthy and cancerous (adenocarcinoma) regions showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between tissue types. In contrast, an insignificant difference (p > 0.05) between tissue types was found when measurements were subjected to the current model, suggesting that the proposed model may allow for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

  9. Time-dependent simulations of disk-embedded planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stökl, A.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    At the early stages of evolution of planetary systems, young Earth-like planets still embedded in the protoplanetary disk accumulate disk gas gravitationally into planetary atmospheres. The established way to study such atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. Furthermore, such models rely on the specification of a planetary luminosity, attributed to a continuous, highly uncertain accretion of planetesimals onto the surface of the solid core. We present for the first time time-dependent, dynamic simulations of the accretion of nebula gas into an atmosphere around a proto-planet and the evolution of such embedded atmospheres while integrating the thermal energy budget of the solid core. The spherical symmetric models computed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) range from the surface of the rocky core up to the Hill radius where the surrounding protoplanetary disk provides the boundary conditions. The TAPIR-Code includes the hydrodynamics equations, gray radiative transport and convective energy transport. The results indicate that diskembedded planetary atmospheres evolve along comparatively simple outlines and in particular settle, dependent on the mass of the solid core, at characteristic surface temperatures and planetary luminosities, quite independent on numerical parameters and initial conditions. For sufficiently massive cores, this evolution ultimately also leads to runaway accretion and the formation of a gas planet.

  10. Some Consequences of a Time Dependent Speed of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felix T.

    2007-06-01

    For reasons connected with both cosmology (the flatness and horizon problems) and atomic physics (n-body Dirac equation, etc.), various proposals have been made to modify general or special relativity(SR) to accommodate a cosmologically decreasing light speed [J. Magueijo, Rep. Prog. Phys. 66, 2025 (2003)]. Two such theories, projective SR [S.N. Manida, gr-qc/9905046; S. S. Stepanov, physics/9909009 and Phys. Rev. D, 62, 023507 (2000)] and symmetric SR [F.T. Smith, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie, 30, 179 (2005)] adapt special relativity to in different ways to an expanding, hyperbolically curved position space and predict time-dependences of c within reach of measurement but differing by a factor of two. Both theories bring in a new constant λ-1=σ=c^2H0-1. As Magueijo points, out the role of c in physics and cosmology is so profound that many deep changes must follow if is not absolutely invariant in space and time. In particular, symmetric SR brings a new light to the Dirac large-number relationship between the constants of gravitation and atomic physics.

  11. Gap vortex streets and turbulence in time-dependent streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Dan; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2016-11-01

    Gap vortex streets form in axial flows in highly eccentric annular channels, tightly packed rod bundles and other channels having narrow gap regions flanked by wider ones. The characteristics of these vortices and the flow and turbulence distributions in some of these channels have in the past documented for steady streams; in particular, the vortex generation frequency was found to be proportional to the bulk Reynolds number. The present study extends these findings to both accelerating and decelerating air flows in a large-scale rod bundle, configured as a wind tunnel with a by-pass branch equipped with a controlled movable flap just downstream of the blower. Time-dependent statistical properties in a gap and a subchannel centre were determined by phase-averaging velocity measurements collected with hot-wire anemometers and the time history of the phase-averaged vortex street frequency was determined with the use of a wavelet transform. Contrary to expectations, the results show that deviations of the vortex frequency and other flow characteristics from the corresponding values in steady flows at the same bulk Reynolds number were significant during acceleration and much less so during deceleration. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories.

  12. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pecevski, Dejan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p (*) that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p (*) contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference.

  13. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  14. Self-Consistent and Time-Dependent Solar Wind Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Suess, S. T.; Sulkanen, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the first results from a self-consistent study of Alfven waves for the time-dependent, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind equations, using a modified version of the ZEUS MHD code. The wind models we examine are radially symmetrical and magnetized; the initial outflow is described by the standard Parker wind solution. Our study focuses on the effects of Alfven waves on the outflow and is based on solving the full set of the ideal nonlinear MHD equations. In contrast to previous studies, no assumptions regarding wave linearity, wave damping, and wave-flow interaction are made; thus, the models naturally account for the back-reaction of the wind on the waves, as well as for the nonlinear interaction between different types of MHD waves. Our results clearly demonstrate when momentum deposition by Alfven waves in the solar wind can be sufficient to explain the origin of fast streams in solar coronal holes; we discuss the range of wave amplitudes required to obtained such fast stream solutions.

  15. Stochastic Time-Dependent Current-Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Static and dynamical density functional methods have been applied with a certain degree of success to a variety of closed quantum mechanical systems, i.e., systems that can be described via a Hamiltonian dynamics. However, the relevance of open quantum systems - those coupled to external environments, e.g., baths or reservoirs - cannot be overestimated. To investigate open quantum systems with DFT methods we have introduced a new theory, we have named Stochastic Time-Dependent Current Density Functional theory (S-TDCDFT) [1]: starting from a suitable description of the system dynamics via a stochastic Schrödinger equation [2], we have proven that given an initial quantum state and the coupling between the system and the environment, there is a one-to-one correspondence between the ensemble-averaged current density and the external vector potential applied to the system.In this talk, I will introduce the stochastic formalism needed for the description of open quantum systems, discuss in details the theorem of Stochastic TD-CDFT, and provide few examples of its applicability like the dissipative dynamics of excited systems, quantum-measurement theory and other applications relevant to charge and energy transport in nanoscale systems.[1] M. Di Ventra and R. D'Agosta, Physical Review Letters 98, 226403 (2007)[2] N.G. van Kampen, Stochastic processes in Physics and Chemistry, (North Holland, 2001), 2nd ed.

  16. Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Prokin, Ilya; Xu, Hao; Delord, Bruno; Genet, Stephane; Venance, Laurent; Berry, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a cardinal cellular mechanism for learning and memory. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as a pivotal pathway for synaptic plasticity because of its widely characterized ability to depress synaptic transmission on short- and long-term scales. Recent reports indicate that eCBs also mediate potentiation of the synapse. However, it is not known how eCB signaling may support bidirectionality. Here, we combined electrophysiology experiments with mathematical modeling to question the mechanisms of eCB bidirectionality in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses. We demonstrate that STDP outcome is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Moreover, we show that eCB-tLTD requires active calcineurin whereas eCB-tLTP necessitates the activity of presynaptic PKA. Therefore, just like glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system to encode learning and memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13185.001 PMID:26920222

  17. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  18. Time-dependent density-functional description of nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The basic concepts and recent developments in the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for describing nuclear dynamics at low energy are presented. The symmetry breaking is inherent in nuclear energy density functionals, which provides a practical description of important correlations at the ground state. Properties of elementary modes of excitation are strongly influenced by the symmetry breaking and can be studied with TDDFT. In particular, a number of recent developments in the linear response calculation have demonstrated their usefulness in the description of collective modes of excitation in nuclei. Unrestricted real-time calculations have also become available in recent years, with new developments for quantitative description of nuclear collision phenomena. There are, however, limitations in the real-time approach; for instance, it cannot describe the many-body quantum tunneling. Thus, the quantum fluctuations associated with slow collective motions are explicitly treated assuming that time evolution of densities is determined by a few collective coordinates and momenta. The concept of collective submanifold is introduced in the phase space associated with the TDDFT and used to quantize the collective dynamics. Selected applications are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and quality of the new approaches. Finally, conceptual differences between nuclear and electronic TDDFT are discussed, with some recent applications to studies of electron dynamics in the linear response and under a strong laser field.

  19. Time-dependent CP asymmetries in D and B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, A. J.; Inguglia, G.; Meadows, B.

    2011-12-01

    We examine measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries that could be made in new and future flavour facilities. In charm decays, where they can provide a unique insight into the flavor changing structure of the Standard Model, we examine a number of decays to CP eigenstates and describe a framework that can be used to interpret the measurements. Such measurements can provide a precise determination of the charm mixing phase, as well as constraints on the Standard Model description of CP violation an possible new physics contributions. We make a preliminary assessment, based on statistical considerations, of the relative capabilities of LHCb with data from pp collisions, with Belle II and Super B using data from Bd, Bs and charm thresholds. We discuss the measurements required to perform direct and indirect tests of the charm unitarity triangle and its relationship with the usual Bd triangle. We find that, while theoretical and experimental systematic uncertainties may limit their interpretation, useful information on the unknown charm mixing phase, and on the possible existence of new physics can be obtained. We point out that, for Bd decays, current experimental bounds on ΔΓBd will translate into a significant systematic uncertainty on future measurements of sin⁡2β from b→cc¯s decays. The possibilities for simplified Bs decay asymmetry measurements at Super B and Belle II are also reviewed.

  20. Nuclear inertia from the time dependent pairing equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a dynamical system, the momenta of inertia and the effective masses are not adiabatic quantities, but are dynamical ones that depend on the dissipated energy accumulated during motion. However, these parameters are calculated for adiabatic nuclear systems, leaving no room for dissipated energy. In this work, a formalism is elaborated in order to derive simultaneously the nuclear momenta of inertia and the effective masses by taking into account the appearance of dissipated energy for large amplitude motion of the nuclear system. The expressions that define the inertia are obtained from the variational principle. The same principle manages the time dependent pairing equations, offering estimations of the averaged dissipation energy for large amplitude motions. The model is applied to 232Th fission. The fission barrier was calculated along the least action trajectory. The dissipation energy, effective mass and moment of inertia are determined for different values of the collective velocities. The dissipation increases with the internuclear velocity in binary disintegration processes and modifies the effective mass parameters. We observed that the inertia decreases as long as the collective velocity increases to some moderate values and begins to grow for larger collective velocities. So, a dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced. In order to investigate the overall effect, the half-lives are predicted for adiabatic and dynamics simulations.

  1. Analysis of Accelerometer Data from a Woven Inflatable Creep Burst Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George H.; Grygier, Michael; Selig, Molly M.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerometers were used to montor an inflatable test article during a creep test to failure. The test article experienced impulse events that were classified based on the response of the sensors and their time-dependent manifestation. These impulse events required specialized techniques to process the structural dynamics data. However, certain phenomena were defined as worthy of additional study. An assessment of one phenomena (a frequency near 1000Hz) showed a time dependent frequency and an amplitude that increased significantly near the end of the test. Hence, these observations are expected to drive future understanding of and utility in inflatable space structures.

  2. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  3. Micromechanics of brittle creep and implications for the strength of the upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water or other aqueous solutions promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we present a new micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modelled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' power law description of stress corrosion crack growth. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non-linear and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain rate) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain rate as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep, with apparently constant strain rate, arises as merely an inflexion between these two end-member phases. The strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature conditions, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term differential stress as a function of depth in the upper crust for tectonic loading rates: sub-critical cracking induces an offset of the rock strength, which is equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. For porous rocks, the competition between sub

  4. Stability of two-dimensional (2D) natural convection flows in air-filled differentially heated cavities: 2D/3D disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Following our previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of flows in differentially heated cavities filled with air, we studied the stability of 2D natural convection flows in these cavities with respect to 3D periodic perturbations. The basis of the numerical methods is a time-stepping code using the Chebyshev spectral collocation method and the direct Uzawa method for velocity-pressure coupling. Newton's iteration, Arnoldi's method and the continuation method have been used in order to, respectively, compute the 2D steady-state base solution, estimate the leading eigenmodes of the Jacobian and perform linear stability analysis. Differentially heated air-filled cavities of aspect ratios from 1 to 7 were investigated. Neutral curves (Rayleigh number versus wave number) have been obtained. It turned out that only for aspect ratio 7, 3D stationary instability occurs at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers than the onset of 2D time-dependent flow and that for other aspect ratios 3D instability always takes place before 2D time-dependent flows. 3D unstable modes are stationary and anti-centro-symmetric. 3D nonlinear simulations revealed that the corresponding pitchfork bifurcations are supercritical and that 3D instability leads only to weak flow in the third direction. Further 3D computations are also performed at higher Rayleigh number in order to understand the effects of the weak 3D fluid motion on the onset of time-dependent flow. 3D flow structures are responsible for the onset of time-dependent flow for aspect ratios 1, 2 and 3, while for larger aspect ratios they do not alter the transition scenario, which was observed in the 2D cases and that vertical boundary layers become unstable to traveling waves.

  5. Mechanical creep as a life-limiting factor of radio frequency microswitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Clarke, D. R.

    2005-10-01

    One of the characteristic failure mechanisms of microelectromechanical switches is stiction. Measurements, made using an instrumented nanoindentor, indicate that the adhesion force between hemispherical and flat gold contacts increases logarithmically with the number of actuation cycles. Concurrently, the electrical conductance increases with actuation time and the contact area increases. These time-dependent behaviors are a result of creep of the gold contacts under load, which sets a design limit for the maximum life of a contact switch before stiction failure occurs.

  6. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  7. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  8. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  9. Variation in the inhibitory potency of terbinafine among genetic variants of CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takeshi; Ishiuchi, Miho; Imaoka, Ayuko; Ohtani, Hisakazu

    2015-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a highly polymorphic enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of many drugs. Terbinafine (TER) is a CYP2D6 inhibitor and causes persistent drug interactions in the clinical setting; however, its inhibitory mechanism and the differences in its inhibitory potency among genetic variants of CYP2D6 remain to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of TER and the differences in its inhibitory potency among three CYP2D6 variants, CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10. In a competitive inhibition study, the metabolic activity of the CYP2D6 was assessed based on their demethylation of dextromethorphan in the presence or absence of TER, and the time-dependency of the inhibitory effects were examined by preincubating the enzymes with TER. TER had weaker inhibitory effects on CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 than on CYP2D6.1; i.e., TER exhibited Ki values (the concentration of inhibitor that results in half-maximal inhibition) of 0.0525, 0.355, and 1.85 μM for CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10, respectively. The inhibitory effects of TER were not time-dependent. Since TER's Ki value for CYP2D6.10 was 35.2-fold higher than its Ki value for CYP2D6.1, the CYP2D6 genotype of subjects should be taken into account when estimating the severity of drug interactions involving TER.

  10. Time dependence of energy storage across multiple ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. E.; Frank, J. M.; Ewers, B. E.; Desai, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow through ecosystems plays a critical role in processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, from monthly growing season length of landscapes to sub-diurnal responses of soil respiration to temperature, photosynthesis and water inputs. The interaction of solar radiation and ecosystems is complex with terrestrial canopies and aquatic structure both connecting above- and below-ground processes via energy fluxes. Previous work by Leuning et al has shown that at 30-minute timescales, only 8% of eddy covariance sites in the La Thuile dataset observe energy closure and when averaged to 24-hour timescales, this goes up to 45%. This work examines the effect of temporal lags in energy storage in both terrestrial (shrub and forest) and aquatic (lake) ecosystems. Analyses show energy storage terms have unique temporal lags that vary between ecosystem and time of year, from having zero lag to several hour timescales within terrestrial ecosystems, depending primarily on water content. Large differences between ecosystem types are also highlighted as aquatic ecosystems have lags that range between daily and monthly timescales. Furthermore, ecosystem disturbance can alter time lags as well and results from a native bark beetle disturbance show vegetation lag decreasing while soil lag increasing following changes in water content. Energy storage lags can improve site energy closure by several percent, and these results will lead to a better understanding of surface energy budget closure, an as-of-yet unresolved issue in the flux community, as well as highlighting the importance of time-dependency of ecosystem energy fluxes as a unique method to examine ecosystem processes.

  11. Time dependent processing in a parallel pipeline architecture.

    PubMed

    Biddiscombe, John; Geveci, Berk; Martin, Ken; Moreland, Kenneth; Thompson, David

    2007-01-01

    Pipeline architectures provide a versatile and efficient mechanism for constructing visualizations, and they have been implemented in numerous libraries and applications over the past two decades. In addition to allowing developers and users to freely combine algorithms, visualization pipelines have proven to work well when streaming data and scale well on parallel distributed-memory computers. However, current pipeline visualization frameworks have a critical flaw: they are unable to manage time varying data. As data flows through the pipeline, each algorithm has access to only a single snapshot in time of the data. This prevents the implementation of algorithms that do any temporal processing such as particle tracing; plotting over time; or interpolation, fitting, or smoothing of time series data. As data acquisition technology improves, as simulation time-integration techniques become more complex, and as simulations save less frequently and regularly, the ability to analyze the time-behavior of data becomes more important. This paper describes a modification to the traditional pipeline architecture that allows it to accommodate temporal algorithms. Furthermore, the architecture allows temporal algorithms to be used in conjunction with algorithms expecting a single time snapshot, thus simplifying software design and allowing adoption into existing pipeline frameworks. Our architecture also continues to work well in parallel distributed-memory environments. We demonstrate our architecture by modifying the popular VTK framework and exposing the functionality to the ParaView application. We use this framework to apply time-dependent algorithms on large data with a parallel cluster computer and thereby exercise a functionality that previously did not exist.

  12. Time-dependent effects of amphetamine on feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    White, Wesley; Sherrill, Luke K.; White, Ilsun M.

    2007-01-01

    Following administration of a moderate dose of amphetamine, rats appear to pass through a sequence of physiological/ psychological states, including stimulant and depressant states. The present research evaluated whether these states could be inferred from time-dependent changes in feeding-related measures. Male rats were housed in individual stations (light-dark 12-12 hr, free access to water) where, at three hour intervals, they could respond for food for one hour. The work requirement was fixed ratio 1, and each lever press produced 6 94-mg food pellets. When the pattern of responding for food stabilized across the light-dark cycle, a series of 6 or 7 tests was run. During each test, rats received a saline treatment (1.0 ml/ kg, subcutaneously) followed by a 48-hour monitoring period, and then they received an amphetamine treatment (2.0 mg/ kg, subcutaneously) followed by a 72-hour monitoring period. Different groups were treated at either light onset or light offset. Lever presses and head-in-feeding-bin responses were monitored throughout these tests. Administration of amphetamine at light onset and at light offset produced cumulative food intake functions having four regions: post-treatment hours 1-6 (hypophagia), 7-12 (normal intake), 13-27 (hypophagia), and 28 and beyond (normal intake). The sequence, duration, and quality of the amphetamine-induced changes in food intake resembled those formerly seen in cue state and activity, and provided further evidence of a transient withdrawal state 20-24 hr post-amphetamine treatment. Section: Regulatory Systems PMID:17764665

  13. Time-dependent computational studies of flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, Elaine S.; Kailasanath, K.

    1989-01-01

    The research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program is described. The primary focus was on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in Earth gravity and in microgravity environments. The approach was to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. A combination of one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations was used to investigate the effects of curvature and dilution on ignition and propagation of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the mechanism leading to cellular instability, and to study the effects of gravity on the transition to cellular structure. A flame in a microgravity environment can be extinguished without external losses, and the mechanism leading to cellular structure is not preferential diffusion but a thermo-diffusive instability. The simulations have also lead to a better understanding of the interactions between buoyancy forces and the processes leading to thermo-diffusive instability.

  14. Gestation Time-Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous (+)-Methamphetamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah; Laurenzana, Elizabeth; Hendrickson, Howard; Gentry, W. Brooks

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in (+)-methamphetamine (METH) disposition during late rat pregnancy could lead to increased vulnerability to acute METH effects. The disposition of a single 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose was studied during early (gestation day 7, GD7) and late (GD21) gestation. Results showed gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics, characterized by a significantly higher area under the METH serum concentration versus time curve and a lower clearance on GD21 (p < 0.05; total, renal, and nonrenal clearance). The terminal elimination half-life (t1/2λz) of METH and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; a pharmacologically active metabolite of METH) were not different on GD7, but by GD21, AMP t1/2λz was 37% longer than METH t1/2λz (p < 0.05). To identify the mechanism for AMP metabolite changes, intravenous AMP pharmacokinetics on GD21 were compared with AMP metabolite pharmacokinetics after intravenous METH. The intravenous AMP t1/2λz was significantly shorter than metabolite AMP t1/2λz (p < 0.05), which suggested AMP metabolite formation (not elimination) was the rate-limiting process. To understand the medical consequence of METH use during late-stage pregnancy, timed-pregnant rats received an intravenous dose of saline or METH (1, 3, or 5.6 mg/kg) on GD21, 0 to 2 days antepartum. Although one rat died and another had stillbirths at term after the 5.6-mg/kg dose, the pharmacokinetic values for all of the other animals were not significantly different. In conclusion, late-gestational clearance reductions lengthen METH exposure time, possibly increasing susceptibility to adverse effects, including death. PMID:21632964

  15. A History of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Markram, Henry; Gerstner, Wulfram; Sjöström, Per Jesper

    2011-01-01

    How learning and memory is achieved in the brain is a central question in neuroscience. Key to today’s research into information storage in the brain is the concept of synaptic plasticity, a notion that has been heavily influenced by Hebb's (1949) postulate. Hebb conjectured that repeatedly and persistently co-active cells should increase connective strength among populations of interconnected neurons as a means of storing a memory trace, also known as an engram. Hebb certainly was not the first to make such a conjecture, as we show in this history. Nevertheless, literally thousands of studies into the classical frequency-dependent paradigm of cellular learning rules were directly inspired by the Hebbian postulate. But in more recent years, a novel concept in cellular learning has emerged, where temporal order instead of frequency is emphasized. This new learning paradigm – known as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) – has rapidly gained tremendous interest, perhaps because of its combination of elegant simplicity, biological plausibility, and computational power. But what are the roots of today’s STDP concept? Here, we discuss several centuries of diverse thinking, beginning with philosophers such as Aristotle, Locke, and Ribot, traversing, e.g., Lugaro’s plasticità and Rosenblatt’s perceptron, and culminating with the discovery of STDP. We highlight interactions between theoretical and experimental fields, showing how discoveries sometimes occurred in parallel, seemingly without much knowledge of the other field, and sometimes via concrete back-and-forth communication. We point out where the future directions may lie, which includes interneuron STDP, the functional impact of STDP, its mechanisms and its neuromodulatory regulation, and the linking of STDP to the developmental formation and continuous plasticity of neuronal networks. PMID:22007168

  16. Gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics of intravenous (+)-methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah; Laurenzana, Elizabeth; Hendrickson, Howard; Gentry, W Brooks; Owens, S Michael

    2011-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in (+)-methamphetamine (METH) disposition during late rat pregnancy could lead to increased vulnerability to acute METH effects. The disposition of a single 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose was studied during early (gestation day 7, GD7) and late (GD21) gestation. Results showed gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics, characterized by a significantly higher area under the METH serum concentration versus time curve and a lower clearance on GD21 (p < 0.05; total, renal, and nonrenal clearance). The terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2λz)) of METH and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; a pharmacologically active metabolite of METH) were not different on GD7, but by GD21, AMP t(1/2λz) was 37% longer than METH t(1/2λz) (p < 0.05). To identify the mechanism for AMP metabolite changes, intravenous AMP pharmacokinetics on GD21 were compared with AMP metabolite pharmacokinetics after intravenous METH. The intravenous AMP t(1/2λz) was significantly shorter than metabolite AMP t(1/2λz) (p < 0.05), which suggested AMP metabolite formation (not elimination) was the rate-limiting process. To understand the medical consequence of METH use during late-stage pregnancy, timed-pregnant rats received an intravenous dose of saline or METH (1, 3, or 5.6 mg/kg) on GD21, 0 to 2 days antepartum. Although one rat died and another had stillbirths at term after the 5.6-mg/kg dose, the pharmacokinetic values for all of the other animals were not significantly different. In conclusion, late-gestational clearance reductions lengthen METH exposure time, possibly increasing susceptibility to adverse effects, including death.

  17. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  18. Solving the time dependent vehicle routing problem by metaheuristic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johar, Farhana; Potts, Chris; Bennell, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The problem we consider in this study is Time Dependent Vehicle Routing Problem (TDVRP) which has been categorized as non-classical VRP. It is motivated by the fact that multinational companies are currently not only manufacturing the demanded products but also distributing them to the customer location. This implies an efficient synchronization of production and distribution activities. Hence, this study will look into the routing of vehicles which departs from the depot at varies time due to the variation in manufacturing process. We consider a single production line where demanded products are being process one at a time once orders have been received from the customers. It is assumed that order released from the production line will be loaded into scheduled vehicle which ready to be delivered. However, the delivery could only be done once all orders scheduled in the vehicle have been released from the production line. Therefore, there could be lateness on the delivery process from awaiting all customers' order of the route to be released. Our objective is to determine a schedule for vehicle routing that minimizes the solution cost including the travelling and tardiness cost. A mathematical formulation is developed to represent the problem and will be solved by two metaheuristics; Variable Neighborhood Search (VNS) and Tabu Search (TS). These algorithms will be coded in C ++ programming and run using 56's Solomon instances with some modification. The outcome of this experiment can be interpreted as the quality criteria of the different approximation methods. The comparison done shown that VNS gave the better results while consuming reasonable computational efforts.

  19. Reconsolidation of Motor Memories Is a Time-Dependent Process

    PubMed Central

    de Beukelaar, Toon T.; Woolley, Daniel G.; Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation is observed when a consolidated stable memory is recalled, which renders it transiently labile and requires re-stabilization. Motor memory reconsolidation has previously been demonstrated using a three-day design: on day 1 the memory is encoded, on day 2 it is reactivated and experimentally manipulated, and on day 3 memory strength is tested. The aim of the current study is to determine specific boundary conditions in order to consistently degrade motor memory through reconsolidation paradigms. We investigated a sequence tapping task (n = 48) with the typical three-day design and confirmed that reactivating the motor sequence briefly (10 times tapping the learned motor sequence) destabilizes the memory trace and makes it susceptible to behavioral interference. By systematically varying the time delay between memory reactivation and interference while keeping all other aspect constant we found that a short delay (i.e., 20 s) significantly decreased performance on day 3, whereas performance was maintained or small (but not significant) improvements were observed for longer delays (i.e., 60 s). We also tested a statistical model that assumed a linear effect of the different time delays (0 s, 20 s, 40 s, 60 s) on the performance changes from day 2 to day 3. This linear model revealed a significant effect consistent with the interpretation that increasing time delays caused a gradual change from performance degradation to performance conservation across groups. These findings indicate that re-stabilizing motor sequence memories during reconsolidation does not solely rely on additional motor practice but occurs with the passage of time. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that reconsolidation is a time-dependent process with a transition phase from destabilization to re-stabilization. PMID:27582698

  20. Time dependent calibration of a sediment extraction scheme.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, Alakendra N

    2006-04-01

    Sediment extraction methods to quantify metal concentration in aquatic sediments usually present limitations in accuracy and reproducibility because metal concentration in the supernatant is controlled to a large extent by the physico-chemical properties of the sediment that result in a complex interplay between the solid and the solution phase. It is suggested here that standardization of sediment extraction methods using pure mineral phases or reference material is futile and instead the extraction processes should be calibrated using site-specific sediments before their application. For calibration, time dependent release of metals should be observed for each leachate to ascertain the appropriate time for a given extraction step. Although such an approach is tedious and time consuming, using iron extraction as an example, it is shown here that apart from quantitative data such an approach provides additional information on factors that play an intricate role in metal dynamics in the environment. Single step ascorbate, HCl, oxalate and dithionite extractions were used for targeting specific iron phases from saltmarsh sediments and their response was observed over time in order to calibrate the extraction times for each extractant later to be used in a sequential extraction. For surficial sediments, an extraction time of 24 h, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h was ascertained for ascorbate, HCl, oxalate and dithionite extractions, respectively. Fluctuations in iron concentration in the supernatant over time were ubiquitous. The adsorption-desorption behavior is possibly controlled by the sediment organic matter, formation or consumption of active exchange sites during extraction and the crystallinity of iron mineral phase present in the sediments.

  1. Reconsolidation of Motor Memories Is a Time-Dependent Process.

    PubMed

    de Beukelaar, Toon T; Woolley, Daniel G; Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation is observed when a consolidated stable memory is recalled, which renders it transiently labile and requires re-stabilization. Motor memory reconsolidation has previously been demonstrated using a three-day design: on day 1 the memory is encoded, on day 2 it is reactivated and experimentally manipulated, and on day 3 memory strength is tested. The aim of the current study is to determine specific boundary conditions in order to consistently degrade motor memory through reconsolidation paradigms. We investigated a sequence tapping task (n = 48) with the typical three-day design and confirmed that reactivating the motor sequence briefly (10 times tapping the learned motor sequence) destabilizes the memory trace and makes it susceptible to behavioral interference. By systematically varying the time delay between memory reactivation and interference while keeping all other aspect constant we found that a short delay (i.e., 20 s) significantly decreased performance on day 3, whereas performance was maintained or small (but not significant) improvements were observed for longer delays (i.e., 60 s). We also tested a statistical model that assumed a linear effect of the different time delays (0 s, 20 s, 40 s, 60 s) on the performance changes from day 2 to day 3. This linear model revealed a significant effect consistent with the interpretation that increasing time delays caused a gradual change from performance degradation to performance conservation across groups. These findings indicate that re-stabilizing motor sequence memories during reconsolidation does not solely rely on additional motor practice but occurs with the passage of time. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that reconsolidation is a time-dependent process with a transition phase from destabilization to re-stabilization.

  2. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  3. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  4. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Creep in Topopah Spring Member welded tuff. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S.; Price, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A laboratory investigation has been carried out to determine the effects of elevated temperature and stress on the creep deformation of welded tuffs recovered from Busted Butte in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water saturated specimens of tuff from thermal/mechanical unit TSw2 were tested in creep at a confining pressure of 5.0 MPa, a pore pressure of 4.5 MPa, and temperatures of 25 and 250 C. At each stress level the load was held constant for a minimum of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 5} seconds and for as long as 1.8 {times} 10{sup 6} seconds. One specimen was tested at a single stress of 80 MPa and a temperature of 250 C. The sample failed after a short time. Subsequent experiments were initiated with an initial differential stress of 50 or 60 MPa; the stress was then increased in 10 MPa increments until failure. The data showed that creep deformation occurred in the form of time-dependent axial and radial strains, particularly beyond 90% of the unconfined, quasi-static fracture strength. There was little dilatancy associated with the deformation of the welded tuff at stresses below 90% of the fracture strength. Insufficient data have been collected in this preliminary study to determine the relationship between temperature, stress, creep deformation to failure, and total failure time at a fixed creep stress.

  6. Development of a simplified procedure for rocket engine thrust chamber life prediction with creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badlani, M. L.; Porowski, J. S.; Odonnell, W. J.; Peterson, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical method for predicting engine thrust chamber life is developed. The method accounts for high pressure differentials and time-dependent creep effects both of which are significant in limiting the useful life of the shuttle main engine thrust chamber. The hot-gas-wall ligaments connecting adjacent cooling channels ribs and separating the coolant flow from the combustion gas are subjected to a high pressure induced primary stress superimposed on an alternating cyclic thermal strain field. The pressure load combined with strain-controlled cycling produces creep ratcheting and consequent bulging and thinning of these ligaments. This mechanism of creep-enhanced ratcheting is analyzed for determining the hot-gas-wall deformation and accumulated strain. Results are confirmed by inelastic finite element analysis. Fatigue and creep rupture damage as well as plastic tensile instability are evaluated as potential failure modes. It is demonstrated for the NARloy Z cases analyzed that when pressure differentials across the ligament are high, creep rupture damage is often the primary failure mode for the cycle times considered.

  7. Time dependent weak localization of a 2DEG in the presence of Andreev reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, H.; Harris, J.; Yuh, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on superconducting-normal-superconducting, SNS, junctions, comprised of Nb-2D InAs - Nb, exhibit AC currents at v = 4eV/h, twice the Josephson frequency. These currents can be ascribed to time dependent weak localization in the 2D InAs electron gas modulated by the presence of superconducting electrodes. The change of the current-voltage characteristic of a SNS structure under far-infrared (FIR) illumination (180GHz, 300GHz) has been investigated as a function of temperature, FIR power and magnetic field. The sample is an InAs/AlSb quantum well with a 1{mu}m-period Nb grating contacting the InAs. In the experiments a series connection of N = 300 junctions is measured. The differential resistance of the sample shows a very clear subharmonic gap structure, indicating multiple Andreev reflections between the SN-interfaces. Below a temperature of about T = 5K the sample is superconductive. At sufficiently high temperatures (T > 6K) the photoresponse of the sample under FIR illumination exhibits only a single resonance. This resonance is at V = Nhv/4e, that is half the voltage at which the first step of the AC Josephson effect would occur. B.Z. Spivak and D.E. Khmel`nitskii predicted this effect which arises from the quantum correction of the conductivity of a normal state electron gas due to Andreev reflections. Electrons and holes that are Andreev reflected at the superconductor interface acquire a phase shift that is determined by the phase {Phi} of the superconductor. Interference terms of time reversed paths that include Andreev reflections on adjacent superconductor stripes oscillate with 2({Phi}{sub 2}-{Phi}{sub 1}) = 4eVt/h and therefore lead to a time-dependent conductivity. The manifestation of the oscillating conductivity in the experiments is similar to the Shapiro steps of the AC Josephson effect but with twice the frequency. The experiments show that this effect is very sensitive to an applied magnetic field.

  8. Presynaptic Spike Timing-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Paulsen, Ole; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a Hebbian learning rule important for synaptic refinement during development and for learning and memory in the adult. Given the importance of the hippocampus in memory, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms and functions of hippocampal STDP. In the present work, we investigated the requirements for induction of hippocampal spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) and spike timing-dependent long-term depression (t-LTD) and the mechanisms of these 2 forms of plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in young (P12–P18) mouse hippocampus. We found that both t-LTP and t-LTD can be induced at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses by pairing presynaptic activity with single postsynaptic action potentials at low stimulation frequency (0.2 Hz). Both t-LTP and t-LTD require NMDA-type glutamate receptors for their induction, but the location and properties of these receptors are different: While t-LTP requires postsynaptic ionotropic NMDA receptor function, t-LTD does not, and whereas t-LTP is blocked by antagonists at GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors, t-LTD is blocked by GluN2C or GluN2D subunit-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists. Both t-LTP and t-LTD require postsynaptic Ca2+ for their induction. Induction of t-LTD also requires metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, phospholipase C activation, postsynaptic IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, postsynaptic endocannabinoid (eCB) synthesis, activation of CB1 receptors and astrocytic signaling, possibly via release of the gliotransmitter d-serine. We furthermore found that presynaptic calcineurin is required for t-LTD induction. t-LTD is expressed presynaptically as indicated by fluctuation analysis, paired-pulse ratio, and rate of use-dependent depression of postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents by MK801. The results show that CA3-CA1 synapses display both NMDA receptor-dependent t-LTP and t-LTD during development and identify a

  9. Time-dependent edge-notch sensitivity of oxide and gamma prime dispersion strengthened sheet materials at 1000 to 1800 F (538 - 982 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Research was carried out to determine whether an oxide dispersion hardened alloy, TD-Ni, Cr, and low volume fraction gamma prime strengthened nickel-base alloy, Modified Waspaloy, were susceptible to time-dependent edge-notch sensitivity. The results were evaluated in terms of the mechanical characteristics of the alloys and the dislocation motion mechanisms operative. As far as could be determined, the results of the investigation were consistent with the following important concepts developed for Waspaloy and Inconel 718: (1) Time-dependent edge-notch sensitivity occurs when notched specimens are loaded below the approximate 0.2 percent smooth specimen offset yield strength and when data from smooth specimens indicate that small amounts of creep consume large rupture life fractions. (2) When precipitate particles are sheared by dislocations, the deformation is localized and time-dependent notch sensitivity occurs. When dislocations by-pass precipitate particles the deformation is homogeneous. Under these conditions, no time-dependent notch sensitivity has been observed.

  10. Time-dependent Computational Studies of Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Oran, Elaine S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program. The primary focus of this research is on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. Recently more advanced wall boundary conditions such as isothermal and no-slip have been added to the model. This enables the simulation of flames propagating in more practical systems than before. We have used the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of heat losses and buoyancy forces on the structure and stability of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the interaction between the various processes leading to flame instabilities and extinguishment, and to study the dynamics of cell formation and splitting. Our studies have been able to bring out the differences between upward- and downward-propagating flames and predict the zero-gravity behavior of these flames. The simulations have also highlighted the dominant role of wall heat losses in the case of downward-propagating flames. The simulations have been able to qualitatively predict the

  11. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing.

    PubMed

    Newman, W I; Phoenix, S L

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent rho. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of rho that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2< or =rho< or =1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at rho=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a

  12. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  13. Time dependence and local structure of tracer dispersion in oscillating liquid Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roht, Y. L.; Auradou, H.; Hulin, J.-P.; Salin, D.; Chertcoff, R.; Ippolito, I.

    2015-10-01

    Passive tracer dispersion in oscillating Poiseuille liquid flows of zero net velocity is studied experimentally in a Hele-Shaw cell and numerically by 2D simulations: this study is particularly focused on the time dependence and local properties of the dispersion. The dispersion mechanism is found to be controlled by the ratio τm/T of the molecular diffusion time across the gap and the oscillation period (when molecular diffusion parallel to the flow is negligible). The 2D numerical simulations complement the experiments by providing the local concentration c(x, z, t) at a given distance z from the cell walls (instead of only the average over z). Above a time lapse scaling like τm, the variation of c with the distance x along the flow becomes a Gaussian of width constant with z while the mean distance x ¯ may depend both on z and t. For τm/T ≲ 2, the front spreads through Taylor-like dispersion and the normalized dispersivity scales as τm/T. The front oscillates parallel to the flow with an amplitude constant across the gap; its width increases monotonically at a rate modulated at twice the flow frequency, due to variations of the instantaneous dispersivity. For τm/T ≳ 20, the molecular diffusion distance during a period of the flow is smaller than the gap and the normalized dispersivity scales as (τm/T)-1. The oscillations of the different points of the front follow the local fluid velocity: this produces a reversible modulation of the global front width at twice the flow frequency and in quadrature with that in the Taylor-like regime.

  14. Fortran programs for the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a fully anisotropic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muruganandam, P.; Adhikari, S. K.

    2009-10-01

    Here we develop simple numerical algorithms for both stationary and non-stationary solutions of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation describing the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates at ultra low temperatures. In particular, we consider algorithms involving real- and imaginary-time propagation based on a split-step Crank-Nicolson method. In a one-space-variable form of the GP equation we consider the one-dimensional, two-dimensional circularly-symmetric, and the three-dimensional spherically-symmetric harmonic-oscillator traps. In the two-space-variable form we consider the GP equation in two-dimensional anisotropic and three-dimensional axially-symmetric traps. The fully-anisotropic three-dimensional GP equation is also considered. Numerical results for the chemical potential and root-mean-square size of stationary states are reported using imaginary-time propagation programs for all the cases and compared with previously obtained results. Also presented are numerical results of non-stationary oscillation for different trap symmetries using real-time propagation programs. A set of convenient working codes developed in Fortran 77 are also provided for all these cases (twelve programs in all). In the case of two or three space variables, Fortran 90/95 versions provide some simplification over the Fortran 77 programs, and these programs are also included (six programs in all). Program summaryProgram title: (i) imagetime1d, (ii) imagetime2d, (iii) imagetime3d, (iv) imagetimecir, (v) imagetimesph, (vi) imagetimeaxial, (vii) realtime1d, (viii) realtime2d, (ix) realtime3d, (x) realtimecir, (xi) realtimesph, (xii) realtimeaxial Catalogue identifier: AEDU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data

  15. Creep of Oxide Single Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    literature data on Gd 3Ga5O1 2 (8) indicate that garnets may be highly deformation resistant at temperatures very close to their melting points...Data for Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Single Crystals Temperature Stress Creep Rate (sec 1 ) for Given Stress Direction (0C) (MPa) [111] [110] [100] 1650...Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Single Crystals," J.Mat.Sci., 17, 878-884 (1982). 9. B.M. Wanklyn, Clarendon Laboratory, personal communicaticn. 10. S.B. Austerman

  16. Compression creep of filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graesser, D. L.; Tuttle, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Axial and transverse strain fields induced in composite laminates subjected to compressive creep loading were compared for several types of laminate layups. Unidirectional graphite/epoxy as well as multi-directional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK layups were studied. Specimens with and without holes were tested. The specimens were subjected to compressive creep loading for a 10-hour period. In-plane displacements were measured using moire interferometry. A computer based data reduction scheme was developed which reduces the whole-field displacement fields obtained using moire to whole-field strain contour maps. Only slight viscoelastic response was observed in matrix-dominated laminates, except for one test in which catastrophic specimen failure occurred after a 16-hour period. In this case the specimen response was a complex combination of both viscoelastic and fracture mechanisms. No viscoelastic effects were observed for fiber-dominated laminates over the 10-hour creep time used. The experimental results for specimens with holes were compared with results obtained using a finite-element analysis. The comparison between experiment and theory was generally good. Overall strain distributions were very well predicted. The finite element analysis typically predicted slightly higher strain values at the edge of the hole, and slightly lower strain values at positions removed from the hole, than were observed experimentally. It is hypothesized that these discrepancies are due to nonlinear material behavior at the hole edge, which were not accounted for during the finite-element analysis.

  17. Flexural creep behaviour of jute polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Harichandra; Chaudhari, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Present study is about the flexural creep behaviour of jute fabric reinforced polypropylene (Jute-PP) composites. The PP sheet and alkali treated jute fabric is stacked alternately and hot pressed in compression molding machine to get Jute-PP composite laminate. The flexural creep study is carried out on dynamic mechanical analyzer. The creep behaviour of the composite is modeled using four-parameter Burgers model. Short-term accelerated creep testing is conducted which is later used to predict long term creep behaviour. The feasibility of the construction of a master curve using the time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle to predict long term creep behavior of unreinforced PP and Jute-PP composite is investigated.

  18. Earthquake Lights: Time-dependent Earth Surface - Ionosphere Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.

    2012-12-01

    Co-seismic luminescence, commonly referred to as Earthquake lights (EQLs), is an atmospheric luminous phenomenon occurring during strong earthquakes and lasting from a fraction of a second to a few minutes [e.g., Derr, J. S., Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 63, 2177, 1973; St-Laurent, F., et al., Phys. Chem. Earth, 31, 305, 2006; Herauld and Lira, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1025, 2011]. Laboratory experiments of Freund, F. T., et al. [JGR, 105, 11001, 2000; JASTP, 71, 1824, 2009, and references therein] demonstrate that rocks subjected to stress force can generate electric currents. During earthquakes these currents can deliver significant amounts of net positive charge to the ground-air interface leading to enhancements in the electric field and corona discharges around ground objects [Freund et al., 2009]. The eyewitness reports [Herauld and Lira, 2011] indicate similarities of the blue glow observed during EQLs to St. Elmo's fire observed during thunderstorms around wing tips of airplanes or around the tall masts of sailing ships [e.g., Wescott, E.M., et al., GRL, 23, 3687, 1996]. Recent work indicates that the vertical currents induced in the stressed rock can map to ionospheric altitudes and create 10s of % variations in the total electron content in the Earth's ionosphere above the earthquake active region [Kuo, C. L., et al., JGR, 116, A10317, 2011]. The magnitudes of the vertical currents estimated by Kuo et al. [2011] based on work by Freund et al. [2009] range from 0.01 to 10 μA/m2. In this talk we report results from a new time-dependent model allowing to calculate currents induced in the ambient atmosphere and corona currents under application of vertical stressed rock currents with arbitrary time variation. We will report test results documenting the model performance under conditions: (1) relaxation toward the classic global electric circuit conditions in fair weather regions when ionosphere is maintained at 300 kV with respect to the ground; (2

  19. Failure of fibrous composites: Elastic and time-dependent stress analyses, Monte Carlo simulation, and probability modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerlein, Irene Jane

    modulus. Chapter 3 develops an efficient computational technique for the time-dependent, stress redistribution in a planar composite containing random fiber discontinuities. The matrix creeps in shear following a viscoelastic power-law creep function, but without the elastic component. Calculations yield the time evolution of the stresses and strains for various matrix creep law exponents. Results are presented and compared for a composite lamina of infinite extent and one with a periodic microstructure.

  20. Time Dependent Nonequilibrium Ionization of Transition Region Lines Observed with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Gudiksen, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  1. Quantitative analysis of coronary dynamics by time-dependent ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marraccini, Paolo; Salvetti, Ovidio; Braccini, Giovanni; Bragagni, Paolo; Levorato, Dianora; L'Abbate, Antonio; Marzilli, Mario

    1995-04-01

    Intravascular ultrasound imaging is a new technique that displays information on lumen and arterial walls, and is capable of providing real-time monitoring of cross-sectional high- resolution images. This technique has potential application for studying the dynamics of the arterial wall with respect to the presence or absence of pathology and the vascular response to physiological or pharmacological stimuli. Although the extraction of information related to coronary dynamics and wall pathologies is possible by manual procedures it is very time consuming and influenced by intra- and interobserver errors. We developed an evaluation system for analyzing 3D spaces defined by digitized cross-sectional ultrasound images of coronaries quantifying the vasomotion in relation to the morphology of the arterial wall. Sequences of echographic images were obtained and recorded as ordered stacks of 2D frames on a VHS videotape. For each image, an automatic lumen edge segmentation was performed, then 3D reconstruction was obtained to evaluate time-dependent lumen and vessel wall changes. These 3D representations serve to demonstrate dynamic phenomena and to perform quantitative analyses (e.g., area/hemidiameter variations, projections, sections, 'carving,' etc.).

  2. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Gudiksen, Boris

    2016-01-20

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  3. Pulse Shape and Timing Dependence on the Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity Response of Ion-Conducting Memristors as Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kristy A.; Drake, Kolton T.; Barney Smith, Elisa H.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-conducting memristors comprised of the layered materials Ge2Se3/SnSe/Ag are promising candidates for neuromorphic computing applications. Here, the spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) application is demonstrated for the first time with a single memristor type operating as a synapse over a timescale of 10 orders of magnitude, from nanoseconds through seconds. This large dynamic range allows the memristors to be useful in applications that require slow biological times, as well as fast times such as needed in neuromorphic computing, thus allowing multiple functions in one design for one memristor type—a “one size fits all” approach. This work also investigated the effects of varying the spike pulse shapes on the STDP response of the memristors. These results showed that small changes in the pre- and postsynaptic pulse shape can have a significant impact on the STDP. These results may provide circuit designers with insights into how pulse shape affects the actual memristor STDP response and aid them in the design of neuromorphic circuits and systems that can take advantage of certain features in the memristor STDP response that are programmable via the pre- and postsynaptic pulse shapes. In addition, the energy requirement per memristor is approximated based on the pulse shape and timing responses. The energy requirement estimated per memristor operating on slower biological timescales (milliseconds to seconds) is larger (nanojoules range), as expected, than the faster (nanoseconds) operating times (~0.1 pJ in some cases). Lastly, the memristors responded in a similar manner under normal STDP conditions (pre- and post-spikes applied to opposite memristor terminals) as they did to the case where a waveform corresponding to the difference between pre- and post-spikes was applied to only one electrode, with the other electrode held at ground potential. By applying the difference signal to only one terminal, testing of the memristor in various

  4. Creep Deformation of B2 Alumindes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  5. Creep characterization of solder bumps using nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingjie; Liu, Xiao Hu; Fu, Boshen; Shaw, Thomas M.; Lu, Minhua; Wassick, Thomas A.; Bonilla, Griselda; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    Current nanoindentation techniques for the measurement of creep properties are applicable to viscoplastic materials with negligible elastic deformations. A new technique for characterization of creep behavior is needed for situations where the elastic deformation plays a significant role. In this paper, the effect of elastic deformation on the determination of creep parameters using nanoindentation with a self-similar nanoindenter tip is evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). It is found that the creep exponent measured from nanoindentation without taking into account of the contribution of elastic deformation tends to be higher than the actual value. An effective correction method is developed to consider the elastic deformation in the calculation of creep parameters. FEA shows that this method provides accurate creep exponent. The creep parameters, namely the creep exponent and activation energy, were measured for three types of reflowed solder bumps using the nanoindentation method. The measured parameters were verified using FEA. The results show that the new correction approach allows extraction of creep parameters with precision from nanoindentation data.

  6. Creep deformation of B2 aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1992-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  7. Electrochemical control of creep in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xing-Long; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2013-11-11

    We have investigated the mechanical stability of nanoporous gold (npg) in an electrochemical environment, using in situ dilatometry and compression experiments. It is demonstrated that the gold nano-ligaments creep under the action of surface stress which leads to spontaneous volume contractions in macroscopic npg samples. The creep of npg, under or without external forces, can be controlled electrochemically. The creep rate increases with increasing potential in double-layer potential region, and deceases to almost zero when the gold surface is adsorbed with oxygen. Surprisingly, we also noticed a correlation between creep and surface diffusivity, which links the deformation of nanocrystals to mobility of surface atoms.

  8. Strength Behavior, Creep Failure and Permeability Change of a Tight Marble Under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zaobao; Shao, Jianfu

    2017-03-01

    The coupled hydro-mechanical behaviors of a tight marble are investigated by a series of laboratory tests with continuous gas injection during the hydrostatic compression, triaxial compression and compressive creep tests. Hydrostatic compression tests are firstly carried out in three steps to identify the viscous effect of hydrostatic stress on deformation and permeability of the marble. Coupled triaxial tests are then conducted at a constant axial strain rate under five different confining pressures ( P c) with continuous gas injection. Coupled creep behaviors of the marble are also characterized by a constant deviatoric stress test under P c = 30 MPa with gas flowing at a constant injection pressure. The high-stress unloading failure behavior of the marble is finally investigated by an unloading test with a previous multi-step creep phase to realize a high-stress state as well as to investigate the time-dependent deformation of marble under different deviatoric stresses. Experimental results reveal that gas permeability of the marble shows an evident rate-dependent effect in hydrostatic compression. Mechanical behaviors of the tight marble are closely depended on the applied P c in triaxial tests, and its permeability exhibits a decrease phase at initial deviatoric loading and turns to increase at a critical stress corresponding to the initial yield stress. Marble can withstand more important plastic deformation under high P c than under lower ones. Gas flow seems to be more sensitive than the strains to characterize the creep behaviors of the marble. No time-dependent strains are observed when deviatoric creep stress is lower than 50% of its peak strength under P c = 30 MPa.

  9. An improved substrate cocktail for assessing direct inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of multiple cytochrome P450s

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong-hua; Zhang, Su-xing; Long, Na; Lin, Li-shan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Fei-peng; Lv, Xue-qin; Ye, Pei-zhen; Li, Ning; Zhang, Ke-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The substrate cocktail is frequently used to evaluate cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug interactions and potential interactions among the probe substrates. Here, we re-optimized the substrate cocktail method to increase the reliability and accuracy of screening for candidate compounds and expanded the method from a direct CYP inhibition assay to a time-dependent inhibition (TDI) assay. Methods: In the reaction mixtures containing human liver microsome (0.1 mg/mL), both the concentrations of a substrate cocktail (phenacetin for 1A2, coumarin for 2A6, bupropion for 2B6, diclofenac for 2C9, dextromethorphan for 2D6, and testosterone for 3A4) and the incubation time were optimized. Metabolites of the substrate probes were simultaneously analyzed by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) using a routine LC/MS/MS. Direct CYP inhibition was validated using 7 inhibitors (α-naphthoflavone, tranylcypromine, ticlopidine, fluconazole, quinidine, ketoconazole and 1-ABT). The time-dependent inhibition was partially validated with 5 inhibitors (ketoconazole, verapamil, quinidine, paroxetine and 1-ABT). Results: The inhibition curve profiles and IC50 values of 7 CYP inhibitors were approximate when a single substrate and the substrate cocktail were tested, and were consistent with the previously reported values. Similar results were obtained in the IC50 shifts of 5 inhibitors when a single substrate and the substrate cocktail were tested in the TDI assay. Conclusion: The 6-in-1 substrate cocktail (for 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A) is reliable for assessing CYP inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of drug candidates. PMID:27063220

  10. Slow crack propagation in glass and creep prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Celine; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2013-04-01

    The context of our study is the observation of the time-dependent deformation of cracked glass. The aim of our study is to observe the slow crack propagation, to quantify it and to predict finally the creep behavior. We performed creep experiments in compaction conditions in a triaxial cell, on cracked boro-silicate glass samples. The chemical composition of the investigated glass is very close to the composition of waste vitrified packages. The matrix of the original glass (OG) is perfectly amorphous, without porosity. A few isolated air bubbles are trapped during the glass flow. Cracks are introduced in the OG through thermal shocks. Strain and acoustic emission (AE) are recorded. Several experiments are performed at different confining pressures (15 or 25 MPa), different pore fluid conditions (with argon gas, considered as the dry case, with tap water saturated porosity, or with distilled water) and different temperatures (ambiant temperature, 50oC or 80oC). Linear increase of the volumetric strain is first observed. A dilatancy increase is recorded. Note that dilatancy does not appear in constant strain rate tests. Constant stress tests show that dilatancy develops during a time interval that depends on the stress level. In addition AE rate are recorded. A non zero AE rate is an evidence of crack propagation. We use a micro-mechanical model that gives the stress intensity factor at the crack tips. This factor depends on stress and geometrical parameters (all known). An exponential law describe the rate of crack propagation, as a function of temperature, environment and applied stresses. This model allows us to predict the creep rate in glass. Assuming a constant crack aspect ratio, crack length and volumetric strain are related. The volumetric strain rate is calculated from model and compared to the data.

  11. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  12. Non-Hermitian Swanson model with a time-dependent metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Moussa, Miled H. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We provide further nontrivial solutions to the recently proposed time-dependent Dyson and quasi-Hermiticity relation. Here, we solve them for the generalized version of the non-Hermitian Swanson Hamiltonian with time-dependent coefficients. We construct time-dependent solutions by employing the Lewis-Riesenfeld method of invariants and discuss concrete physical applications of our results.

  13. Exact solution of a quantum forced time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu Hwang; George, Thomas F.; Um, Chung IN

    1992-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation is used to exactly evaluate the propagator, wave function, energy expectation values, uncertainty values, and coherent state for a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency and an external driving time dependent force. These quantities represent the solution of the classical equation of motion for the time dependent harmonic oscillator.

  14. Effect of temperature on the time-dependent behavior of geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Xu, Shuo; Teng, Jidong; Xiong, Yonglin

    2016-08-01

    In many geotechnical engineering applications, such as nuclear waste disposal and geothermal extraction and storage, it is necessary to consider the long-term mechanical properties. The effect of temperature could have a complicated influence on the creep damage behavior of soft rock. As a consequence, it is meaningful, both in theory and in practice, to establish a constitutive model that can describe the creep damage behavior. Within the framework of continuum mechanics, a thermo-visco-elastoplastic model is proposed on the basis of a sub-loading Cam-clay model and the concept of equivalent stress. Triaxial creep tests under different confining pressures for Tage stone were conducted to validate the proposed model. The experimental results show that an optimum temperature exists for a certain stress state, and this temperature significantly slows down the creep damage rate. In addition, both the retarding and accelerating effects on creep rupture due to limited warming are observed for the same material, and this phenomenon can be predicted well by the proposed model. Finally, a parametric analysis is performed, and the influence of the material parameter on creep regularity is discussed in detail.

  15. The antioxidative power AP—A new quantitative time dependent (2D) parameter for the determination of the antioxidant capacity and reactivity of different plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Katinka; Richter, J.; Kabrodt, K.; Lücke, I. M.; Schellenberg, I.; Herrling, Th.

    2006-03-01

    In the last decade, naturally occurring antioxidants continue to play an important role in the food-supplement industry. The content of antioxidants in a plant depends on the species, temperature, humidity, period of growth, harvest month, part of the plant used and many other variables. Herein, we present a new method able to determine the all over antioxidative power (AP) of plant extracts or lyophilised plant parts based on the reducing activity against a stable test radical. The method is performed by ESR spectroscopy and is based on the well-known 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) method with the major difference that both the antioxidative capacity and the antioxidative activity are used to characterise an antioxidant. The resulting antioxidative power is expressed in antioxidative units (AU), where 1 AU corresponds to the activity of a 1 ppm solution of Vitamin C as a benchmark. This method allows a rapid, unexpensive and general applicable technique for the measurement of the antioxidative power of very different kinds of substances. The inclusion of the kinetic behaviour of the reducing process of the antioxidant for the determination of the AP allows the identification of the main antioxidant present in a sample. Herein, we present the application example of seeds, sprouts and adult parts of dandelion, amaranth, quinoa, fenugreek, broccoli, red clover and mugwort, where the AP method permits to characterise the plants with the highest antioxidant capacity and reaction velocity. The method permits to select active plant extracts for the food and nutrition industry.

  16. Ag/AgO Nanoparticles Grown via Time Dependent Double Mechanism in a 2D Layered Ni-PCP and Their Antibacterial Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.; Gupta, Neeraj K.; Singh, Rajan; Nigam, Shivansh; Ateeq, Bushra

    2017-01-01

    A simple synthesis route for growth of Ag/AgO nanoparticles (NPs) in large quantitative yields with narrow size distribution from a functional, non-activated, Ni (II) based highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) as a template has been demonstrated. This template is a stable storage media for the NPs larger than the pore diameters of the PCP. From EPR study it was concluded that NPs were synthesized via two mechanisms i.e. acid formation and the redox activity of the framework. Size range of Ag/AgO NPs is sensitive to choice of solvent and reaction time. Direct use of Ag/AgO@Ni-PCP shows influential growth inhibition towards Escherichia coli and the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium at extremely low concentrations. The pristine template shows no cytotoxic activity, even though it contains Ni nodes in the framework. PMID:28322256

  17. Ag/AgO Nanoparticles Grown via Time Dependent Double Mechanism in a 2D Layered Ni-PCP and Their Antibacterial Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.; Gupta, Neeraj K.; Singh, Rajan; Nigam, Shivansh; Ateeq, Bushra

    2017-03-01

    A simple synthesis route for growth of Ag/AgO nanoparticles (NPs) in large quantitative yields with narrow size distribution from a functional, non-activated, Ni (II) based highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) as a template has been demonstrated. This template is a stable storage media for the NPs larger than the pore diameters of the PCP. From EPR study it was concluded that NPs were synthesized via two mechanisms i.e. acid formation and the redox activity of the framework. Size range of Ag/AgO NPs is sensitive to choice of solvent and reaction time. Direct use of Ag/AgO@Ni-PCP shows influential growth inhibition towards Escherichia coli and the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium at extremely low concentrations. The pristine template shows no cytotoxic activity, even though it contains Ni nodes in the framework.

  18. An experimental and theoretical study of creep in woven polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, S.

    The creep behavior of woven polymer composites has been investigated through both analytical and experimental methods with emphasis on the high temperature creep behavior. Experiments were carried out on composites manufactured through both autoclave (vacuum bag) and compression molding methods while the analysis included consideration of the geometry and constitution which were related to the curing cycle in a previous research. In the experimental study, composites made of epoxy-based and PMR-based composites were manufactured and tested. As these two resins have different operating temperature ranges, the experiments provided valuable information about their resistance to creep at elevated temperatures. The compression-molded PMR15 specimens were manufactured to contain different resin and void contents and were used to provide experimental data on the effects of varying constituent ratios. An automated material testing system along with a strain measurement system was designed and assembled to facilitate the experimental study. The experimental data was later analyzed using theoretical visco-elastic and geometric models. Initially an existing geometric model was used to analyze the creep behavior of the composite laminate. A modified version of this which considered the presence of voids in a Gaussian (random) distribution was developed later to consider the presence of a void-filled polymer matrix. Using the Arrhenius free energy equations, the high temperature behavior of the polymer and fibers were accounted for. Through these models, the material parameters associated with creep and other time dependent phenomena were obtained using inverse simulation on the experimental data. A new tool that extends this modeling to predict the behavior under any random loading was introduced. The modeling has been shown to successfully predict the creep and other visco-elastic behavior in the composite.

  19. Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1998-03-01

    A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200--300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

  20. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  1. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  2. Microstructure and creep properties of alumina.

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J. M. C.; Lopez, A. R.; Rodriguez, A. D.; Routbort, J. L.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Seville

    1995-01-01

    High temperature creep of two zirconia toughened alumina ceramics, fabricated by powder processing and sol-gel precursors processing, has been studied in order to determine plastic deformation mechanisms. Compressive creep tests were carried out between 1300 and 1450 C, under stresses from 10 to 150 MPa. For the sample fabricated from powders, a stress exponent of 1.4 and an activation energy of 580 kJ/mol were found below a critical stress of 40 MPa. For larger stresses, accelerated creep rates developed. In the specimens processed from precursors, values of 1.8 for the stress exponent and 540 kJ/mol for the activation energy, over the entire range of stresses have been determined. Creep parameters and microstructural evolution of the samples during the experiments have been correlated with models to establish the dominant creep mechanism.

  3. Probing the Elastic-Plastic, Time-Dependant Response of Test Fasteners using Finite Element Analysis (FEA)

    SciTech Connect

    ML Renauld; H Lien

    2004-12-13

    The evolution of global and local stress/strain conditions in test fasteners under test conditions is investigated using elastic-plastic, time-dependent finite element analyses (FEA). For elastic-plastic response, tensile data from multiple specimens, material heats and test temperatures are integrated into a single, normalized flow curve from which temperature dependency is extracted. A primary creep model is calibrated with specimen- and fastener-based thermal relaxation data generated under a range of times, temperatures, stress levels and environments. These material inputs are used in analytical simulations of experimental test conditions for several types of fasteners. These fastener models are constructed with automated routines and contact conditions prescribed at all potentially mating surfaces. Thermal or mechanical room temperature pre-loading, as appropriate for a given fastener, is followed by a temperature ramp and a dwell time at constant temperature. While the amount of thermal stress relaxation is limited for the conditions modeled, local stress states are highly dependent upon geometry (thread root radius, for example), pre-loading history and thermal expansion differences between the test fastener and test fixture. Benefits of this FE approach over an elastic methodology for stress calculation will be illustrated with correlations of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) initiation time and crack orientations in stress concentrations.

  4. Variational Bounds for Creeping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In the paper time dependent variational bounds are derived based on Extended Hashin-Shtrikman variational principles. Direct calculation leads to explicit formulas to be presented in the text. For various mechanical properties easy coding in Excel, say, can be used and verification of accuracy for numerical procedures is available using the derived formulas.

  5. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  6. Exploratory time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C R; Strizak, J P; Booker, M K; Sikka, V K

    1981-06-01

    We review various aspects of time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Specifically, the roles of dynamic strain aging, environmental interaction, and classical creep damage (voidage) are discussed. Examples of results from exploratory test efforts show the strong waveform-environment synergism that occurs in this material. Plans are presented for future exploratory time-dependent fatigue testing of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Results indicate that the continuous-cycle fatigue resistance of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo is superior to that of standard 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and annealed 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel in the high-cycle region. Limited results from time-dependent fatigue tests on modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel have indicated that compressive hold periods are more damaging than tensile holds and that cyclic waveform effects similar to those seen in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel also occur in modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. 26 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Creep-assisted slow crack growth in bio-inspired dental multilayers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Niu, Xinrui; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-06-01

    Ceramic crown structures under occlusal contact are often idealized as flat multilayered structures that are deformed under Hertzian contact loading. Previous models treated each layer as linear elastic materials and resulted in differences between the measured and predicted critical loads. This paper examines the combined effects of creep (in the adhesive and substrate layers) and creep-assisted slow crack growth (in the ceramic layer) on the contact-induced deformation of bio-inspired, functionally graded multilayer (FGM) structures and the conventional tri-layers. The time-dependent moduli of each of the layers were determined from constant load creep tests. The resulting modulus-time characteristics were modeled using Prony series. These were then incorporated into a finite element model for the computation of stress distributions in the sub-surface regions of the top ceramic layer, in which sub-surface radial cracks, are observed as the clinical failure mode. The time-dependent stresses are incorporated into a slow crack growth (SCG) model that is used to predict the critical loads of the dental multilayers under Hertzian contact loading. The predicted loading rate dependence of the critical loads is shown to be consistent with experimental results. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust dental multilayers.

  8. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  9. Is it possible to infer the frequency-dependent seismic attenuation of fractured materials from high-strain creep tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mallet, celine; quintal, beatriz; caspari, eva; holliger, klaus

    2016-04-01

    The seismic and hydraulic characterization of fractured rocks is an important objective for reservoir development in general and the production of geothermal energy in particular. The attenuation of seismic waves in saturated fractured media is governed by local displacements of the fluid relative to the solid induced by the compressions and extensions associated with the passing wavefield. This phenomenon is generally referred to as wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF). Recent evidence suggests that this energy dissipation mechanism is sensitive to the interconnectivity of the fractures, which offers the perspective of linking seismic observations to the hydraulic properties of fractured rocks. Here, we consider the results of laboratory experiments, which are referred to as creep tests. Such tests consist of applying a constant stress to a water-saturated thermally cracked glass sample and recording the resulting strain response as a function of time. The primary advantages of the considered material are (i) that the fracture network is well documented and (ii) that the homogeneous and non-porous glass matrix limits WIFF to the fracture network. Due to the high stress levels as well as other technical issues, creep tests are not commonly used for laboratory-based measurements of energy dissipation. Therefore, an objective of this study is to explore whether and to what extent such data can be interpreted in terms of the seismic attenuation characteristics of the probed samples, as this might open access to a vast reservoir of corresponding data, notably for cracked materials. Transforming the observed time-dependent stress-strain relation into the Fourier domain, allows us to infer the corresponding frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics, which we then seek to interpret through numerical simulations based on Biot's quasi-static poroelastic equations. The 2D geometry of the fracture network considered in these simulations is derived from a scanning electron

  10. Steady-State Creep of a Composite Rod in Tension in the Presence of an Aggressive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, L.

    2017-01-01

    The stress-strain state of a composite tensile rod in creep under conditions of an aggressive environment is investigated. The creep of each part of the rod is described by a power-type model with different parameters. The effect of the aggressive environment is determined by the diffusive penetration of its elements into the material of the rod. To solve the diffusion equation, an approximate method based on introduction of the diffusion front is used. The distribution of stresses in time is analyzed provided the aggressive environment penetrates into different parts of the rod with different diffusion coefficients. Conditions at which the values of stresses in parts of the rod come closer or diverge in time, are obtained. The characteristic parameters of the diffusion and creep processes are determined. The graphs of time-dependent stresses are constructed for different parts of the rod with account of the conditions found.

  11. Integrated Design Software Predicts the Creep Life of Monolithic Ceramic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Significant improvements in propulsion and power generation for the next century will require revolutionary advances in high-temperature materials and structural design. Advanced ceramics are candidate materials for these elevated-temperature applications. As design protocols emerge for these material systems, designers must be aware of several innate features, including the degrading ability of ceramics to carry sustained load. Usually, time-dependent failure in ceramics occurs because of two different, delayedfailure mechanisms: slow crack growth and creep rupture. Slow crack growth initiates at a preexisting flaw and continues until a critical crack length is reached, causing catastrophic failure. Creep rupture, on the other hand, occurs because of bulk damage in the material: void nucleation and coalescence that eventually leads to macrocracks which then propagate to failure. Successful application of advanced ceramics depends on proper characterization of material behavior and the use of an appropriate design methodology. The life of a ceramic component can be predicted with the NASA Lewis Research Center's Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) integrated design programs. CARES/CREEP determines the expected life of a component under creep conditions, and CARES/LIFE predicts the component life due to fast fracture and subcritical crack growth. The previously developed CARES/LIFE program has been used in numerous industrial and Government applications.

  12. Dynamic simulation of viscoelastic soft tissue in acoustic radiation force creep imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) creep imaging applies step ARF excitation to induce creep displacement of soft tissue, and the corresponding time-dependent responses are used to estimate soft tissue viscoelasticity or its contrast. Single degree of freedom (SDF) and homogeneous analytical models have been used to characterize soft tissue viscoelasticity in ARF creep imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate the fundamental limitations of the commonly used SDF and homogeneous assumptions in ARF creep imaging. In this paper, finite element (FE) models are developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of viscoelastic soft tissue subjected to step ARF. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous models are studied with different soft tissue viscoelasticity and ARF configurations. The results indicate that the SDF model can provide good estimations for homogeneous soft tissue with high viscosity, but exhibits poor performance for low viscosity soft tissue. In addition, a smaller focal region of the ARF is desirable to reduce the estimation error with the SDF models. For heterogeneous media, the responses of the focal region are highly affected by the local heterogeneity, which results in deterioration of the effectiveness of the SDF and homogeneous simplifications.

  13. Deformation by grain boundary sliding and slip creep versus diffusional creep

    SciTech Connect

    Ruano, O A; Sherby, O D; Wadsworth, J

    1998-11-04

    A review is presented of the debates between the present authors and other investigators regarding the possible role of diffusional creep in the plastic flow of polycrystalline metals at low stresses. These debates are recorded in eleven papers over the past seventeen years. ln these papers it has been shown that the creep rates of materials in the so-called "diffusional creep region" are almost always higher than those predicted by the diffusional creep theory. Additionally, the predictions of grain size effects and stress exponents from diffusional creep theory are often not found in the experimental data. Finally, denuded zones have been universally considered to be direct evidence for diffusional creep; but, those reported in the literature are shown to be found only under conditions where a high stress exponent is observed. Also, the locations of the denuded zones do not match those predicted. Alternative mechanisms are described in which diffusion-controlled dislocation creep and/or grain boundary sliding are the dominant deformation processes in low-stress creep. It is proposed that denuded zones are formed by stress-directed grain boundary migration with the precipitates dissolving in the moving grain boundaries. The above observations have led us to the conclusion that grain boundary sliding and slip creep are in fact the principal mechanisms for observations of plastic flow in the so-called "diffusional creep regions".

  14. Capturing nonlocal effects in 2D granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamrin, Ken; Koval, Georg

    2013-03-01

    There is an industrial need, and a scientific desire, to produce a continuum model that can predict the flow of dense granular matter in an arbitrary geometry. A viscoplastic continuum approach, developed over recent years, has shown some ability to approximate steady flow and stress profiles in multiple inhomogeneous flow environments. However, the model incorrectly represents phenomena observed in the slow, creeping flow regime. As normalized flow-rate decreases, granular stresses are observed to become largely rate-independent and a dominating length-scale emerges in the mechanics. This talk attempts to account for these effects, in the simplified case of 2D, using the notion of nonlocal fluidity, which has proven successful in treating nonlocal effects in emulsions. The idea is to augment the local granular fluidity law with a diffusive second-order term scaled by the particle size, which spreads flowing zones accordingly. Below the yield stress, the local contribution vanishes and the fluidity becomes rate-independent, as we require. We implement the modified law in multiple geometries and validate its flow and stress predictions in multiple geometries compared against discrete particle simulations. In so doing, we demonstrate that the nonlocal relation proposed is satisfied universally in a seemingly geometry-independent fashion.

  15. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  16. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  17. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  18. Prediction of creep of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Khristova, Yu.; Aniskevich, K.

    1995-11-01

    We studied the applicability of the phenomenological approach to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete consisting of polyester binder with diabase filler and diabase aggregate. We discovered that the principles of temperature-time analogy, of moisture-time analogy, and of temperature-moisture-time analogy are applicable to the description of the diagrams of short-time creep and to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete at different temperatures and constant moisture content of the material.

  19. Thermodynamic approach to creep and plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Loefstedt, R.

    1997-06-01

    A solid subjected to a small load distorts rapidly in the manner predicted by elasticity theory. On a much longer time scale, the solid will creep. This dissipative motion is an important consideration in the engineering design of, for example, aircraft engines, but the macroscopic equations of motion describing this deformation are based on empirical observations. The principles of thermodynamics specify the dissipative fluxes appropriate to the classical equations of elasticity, which include one, unique to solids, which describes creep. The thermodynamic theory is presented, and the insights into the underlying microscopic mechanisms of creep, gleaned from the macroscopic formalism, are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Creep deformation of TD-nickel chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the mechanical behavioral characteristics of thoria-dispersed (TD) NiCr materials at elevated temperatures. The experimental procedure used is discussed along with the significance of the obtained results. Attention is given to basic creep behavior and creep thermal activation parameter measurements. It is found that the overall creep behavior of TD-NiCr can be explained on the basis of the relative contributions of two parallel-concurrent deformation mechanisms, including diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and dislocation motion.

  1. Creep substructure formation in sodium chloride single crystals in the power law and exponential creep regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pharr, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests conducted on NaCl single crystals in the temperature range from 373 to 1023 K show that true steady state creep is obtained only above 873 K when the ratio of the applied stress to the shear modulus is less than or equal to 0.0001. Under other stress and temperature conditions, corresponding to both power law and exponential creep, the creep rate decreases monotonically with increasing strain. The transition from power law to exponential creep is shown to be associated with increases in the dislocation density, the cell boundary width, and the aspect ratio of the subgrains along the primary slip planes. The relation between dislocation structure and creep behavior is also assessed.

  2. Creep of Refractory Fibers and Modeling of Metal and Ceramic Matrix Composite Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Our concentration during this research was on the following subprograms. (1) Ultra high vacuum creep tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires, temperature range from 1100 K to 1500 K, creep time of 1 to 500 hours. (2) High temperature vacuum tensile tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires. (3) Air and vacuum tensile creep tests on polycrystalline and single crystal alumina fibers, such as alumina-mullite Nextel fiber, yttrium aluminum ganet (YAG) and Saphikon, temperature range from 1150 K to 1470 K, creep time of 2 to 200 hours. (4) Microstructural evaluation of crept fibers, TEM study on the crept metal wires, SEM study on the fracture surface of ceramic fibers. (5) Metal Matrix Composite creep models, based on the fiber creep properties and fiber-matrix interface zone formation.

  3. Field quantization and squeezed states generation in resonators with time-dependent parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodonov, V. V.; Klimov, A. B.; Nikonov, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic field quantization is usually considered in textbooks under the assumption that the field occupies some empty box. The case when a nonuniform time-dependent dielectric medium is confined in some space region with time-dependent boundaries is studied. The basis of the subsequent consideration is the system of Maxwell's equations in linear passive time-dependent dielectric and magnetic medium without sources.

  4. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of time-dependent global attractor and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fengjuan; Liu, Cuncai

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with infinite dimensional dynamical systems in time-dependent space. First, we characterize some necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the time-dependent global attractor by using a measure of noncompactness. Then, we give a new method to verify the sufficient condition. As a simple application, we prove the existence of the time-dependent global attractor for the damped equation in strong topological space.

  5. Multi-spacecraft testing of time-dependent interplanetary MHD models for operational forecasting of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.; Smith, Z. K.

    1989-01-01

    An MHD 2-1/2D, time-dependent model is used, together with observations of six solar flares during February 3-7, 1986, to demonstrate global, large-scale, compound disturbances in the solar wind over a wide range of heliolongitudes. This scenario is one that is likely to occur many times during the cruise, possibly even encounter, phases of the Multi-Comet Mission. It is suggested that a model such as this one should be tested with multi-spacecraft data (such as the MCM and earth-based probes) with several goals in view: (1) utility of the model for operational real-time forecasting of geomagnetic storms, and (2) scientific interpretation of certain forms of cometary activities and their possible association with solar-generated activity.

  6. The University of Bern Ion Model: Time-Dependent Modeling of the Ions in the Stratosphere, Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Kopp, E.

    2001-12-01

    The University of Bern Atmospheric Ion Model (UBAIM) is a time-dependent, pseudo-2D model of the ion chemistry in the earth atmosphere. It covers the latitudes between 85oS and 85oN and the (log-p) altitudes between 20 and 120km. On this grid, the system of differential equations describing the ion chemistry is integrated numerically until a dynamic equilibrium, governed by the diurnal changes in the incident radiation, is reached. Densities of main and minor atmospheric constituents are taken from the NCAR two-dimensional neutral SOCRATES model, the solar flux data are computed by the SOLAR2000 model. With this combination of models, it is possible to investigate the diurnal changes of the ion densities in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere.

  7. Elastic-plastic-creep analysis of brazed carbon-carbon/OFHC divertor tile concepts for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, E.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The 7.5 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux requirements for the TPX divertor necessitate the use of high conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) tiles that are brazed to annealed copper (OFHC) coolant tubes. Significant residual stresses are developed in the C-C tiles during the braze process due to large differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between these materials. Analyses which account for only the elastic-plastic strains developed in the OFHC tube may not accurately characterize the behavior of the tube during brazing. The elevated temperature creep behavior of the copper coolant tubes intuitively should reduce the calculated residual stresses in the C-C tiles. Two divertor tile concepts, the monoblock and the archblock, were analyzed for residual stress using 2-D finite element analysis for elastic-plastic-creep behavior of the OFHC tube during an assumed braze cooldown cycle. The results show that the inclusion of elevated temperature creep effects decrease the calculated residual stresses by only about 10% when compared to those analyses in which only elastic-plastic behavior of the OFHC is accounted for. The primary reason that creep effects at higher temperatures are not more significant is due to the low yield stress and nearly flat-top stress-strain curve of annealed OFHC. Since high temperature creep plays less of a role in the residual stress levels than previously thought, future scoping studies can be done in an elastic-plastic analysis with confidence that the stresses will be within approximately 10% of an elastic-plastic-creep analysis.

  8. Construction of exact Ermakov-Pinney solutions and time-dependent quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Kim, Won

    2016-11-01

    The harmonic oscillator with a time-dependent frequency has a family of linear quantum invariants for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which are determined by any two independent solutions to the classical equation of motion. Ermakov and Pinney have shown that a general solution to the time-dependent oscillator with an inverse cubic term can be expressed in terms of two independent solutions to the time-dependent oscillator. We explore the connection between linear quantum invariants and the Ermakov-Pinney solution for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator. We advance a novel method to construct Ermakov-Pinney solutions to a class of time-dependent oscillators and the wave functions for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We further show that the first and the second Pöschl-Teller potentials belong to a special class of exact time-dependent oscillators. A perturbation method is proposed for any slowly-varying time-dependent frequency.

  9. Time-dependent displacements during and after the April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise, revealed by interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froger, Jean-Luc; Famin, Vincent; Cayol, Valérie; Augier, Aurélien; Michon, Laurent; Lénat, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    From March 30 to May 1 2007, Piton de la Fournaise, La Réunion Island, experienced a major eruptive crisis, characterized by the largest emitted lava volume (210 × 106 m3) of the 20th and 21st centuries, and by a 340 m deep caldera collapse. The event was captured by InSAR data from the ENVISAT and ALOS-1 satellites. From this data, we computed the EW and vertical components of the displacement that occurred on the entire edifice during the co-eruptive period and in the following months. Our results reveal unusually large and time-dependent displacements of the Central Cone and the Eastern Flank of Piton de la Fournaise, both of which continued to deform for at least a year after the end of the eruption. The analysis of InSAR displacement combined with other geophysical and field observations allows us to propose conceptual models to explain the Central Cone and the Eastern Flank displacements. We propose that the April 2007 caldera collapse induced a sudden decompression of the hydrothermal system, which had been previously pressurized and heated by temporary sealing of its upper part. This sudden decompression resulted in a strong centripetal subsidence. This then decreased exponentially as poro-elastic compaction and creep of the Central Cone propagated from the collapsed rock column to more distal parts of the hydrothermal system. For the Eastern Flank, we propose that the displacement is related to an intrusion within the Grandes Pentes. While propagating to the surface, the intrusion may have encountered a pre-existing structural discontinuity, intruded it and activated it as a detachment surface. It is likely that the detachment slip, by reducing the minimum principal stress close to the summit, allowed the injection of the dyke that fed the brief March 30-31 eruption. Then it may have promoted the migration of magma from the main magma storage zone, beneath the Central Cone, to the distal April 2 eruption site. The EW extensional stress field resulting

  10. Effects of cryopreservation, decellularization and novel extracellular matrix conditioning on the quasi-static and time-dependent properties of the pulmonary valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Converse, Gabriel L; Armstrong, Matt; Quinn, Rachael W; Buse, Eric E; Cromwell, Michael L; Moriarty, Sara J; Lofland, Gary K; Hilbert, Stephen L; Hopkins, Richard A

    2012-07-01

    Decellularized allografts offer potential as heart valve substitutes and scaffolds for cell seeding. The effects of decellularization on the quasi-static and time-dependent mechanical behavior of the pulmonary valve leaflet under biaxial loading conditions have not previously been reported in the literature. In the current study, the stress-strain, relaxation and creep behaviors of the ovine pulmonary valve leaflet were investigated under planar-biaxial loading conditions to determine the effects of decellularization and a novel post-decellularization extracellular matrix (ECM) conditioning process. As expected, decellularization resulted in increased stretch along the loading axes. A reduction in relaxation was observed following decellularization. This was accompanied by a reduction in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Based on previous implant studies, these changes may be of little functional consequence in the short term; however, the long term effects of decreased relaxation and GAG content remain unknown. Some restoration of relaxation was observed following ECM conditioning, especially in the circumferential specimen direction, which may help mitigate any detrimental effects due to decellularization. Regardless of processing, creep under biaxial loading was negligible.

  11. Fourth order real space solver for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with singular Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorosi, Szilárd; Czirják, Attila

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel numerical method and algorithm for the solution of the 3D axially symmetric time-dependent Schrödinger equation in cylindrical coordinates, involving singular Coulomb potential terms besides a smooth time-dependent potential. We use fourth order finite difference real space discretization, with special formulae for the arising Neumann and Robin boundary conditions along the symmetry axis. Our propagation algorithm is based on merging the method of the split-operator approximation of the exponential operator with the implicit equations of second order cylindrical 2D Crank-Nicolson scheme. We call this method hybrid splitting scheme because it inherits both the speed of the split step finite difference schemes and the robustness of the full Crank-Nicolson scheme. Based on a thorough error analysis, we verified both the fourth order accuracy of the spatial discretization in the optimal spatial step size range, and the fourth order scaling with the time step in the case of proper high order expressions of the split-operator. We demonstrate the performance and high accuracy of our hybrid splitting scheme by simulating optical tunneling from a hydrogen atom due to a few-cycle laser pulse with linear polarization.

  12. Tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a SiC-fiber-Si3N4-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, John W.; Park, Yong H.; Jones, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a hot-pressed unidirectional SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 C in air, in order to determine how various sustained and cyclic creep loading histories would influence the creep rate, accumulated creep strain, and the amount of strain recovered upon specimen unloading. The data accumulated indicate that the fundamental damage mode for sustained tensile creep at stresses of 200 and 250 MPa was periodic fiber fracture and that the creep life and the failure mode at 250 MPa were strongly influenced by the rate at which the initial creep stress was applied. Cyclic loading significantly lowered the duration of primary creep and the overall creep-strain accumulation. The implications of the results for microstructural and component design are discussed.

  13. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  14. Creep behavior of niobium alloy PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The high vacuum creep and creep-rupture behavior of a Nb-1Zr-.1C alloy (PWC 11) was investigated at 1350 and 1400 K with an applied stress of 40 MPa. The material was tested in the following four conditions: annealed (1 hr 1755 K/2 hr 1475 K); annealed plus EB welded; annealed plus aged for 1000 hr at 1350 or 1400 K; and annealed, welded, and aged. It was found that the material in the annealed state was the most creep-resistant condition tested, and that aging the alloy for 1000 hr without an applied stress greatly reduced that strength; however, it was still approximately three times as creep resistant as Nb-1Zr. Additionally, the EB weld region was stronger than the base metal in each condition tested, and phase extraction of the dispersed precipitate revealed the presence of a 70%ZrC-30%NbC cubic monocarbide phase.

  15. Some stochastic aspects of intergranular creep cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, S.J.; Farris, J.P.; Harlow, D.G.; Delph, T.J.

    1987-10-01

    We present some results obtained from a simplified stochastic model of intergranular creep cavitation. The probabilistic features of the model arise from the inclusion of random cavity placement on the grain boundary and time-discrete stochastic cavity nucleation. Among the predictions of the model are Weibull-distributed creep rupture failure times and a Weibull distribution of cavity radii. Both of these predictions have qualitative experimental support. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Note on the Time-Dependent Damped and Forced Harmonic Oscillator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, P. G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the time-dependent damped and forced harmonic oscillator is derived. A simple time-dependent linear canonical transformation transforms the Hamiltonian to one whose solution is readily obtained. The wave function for the corresponding quantum mechanical problem is given. (Author/GA)

  17. Modeling Tear Film Dynamics on a 2-D Eye-shaped Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longfei; Braun, Richard; Maki, Kara; Henshaw, William

    2012-11-01

    We study tear film dynamics on a 2-D eye-shaped domain using a lubrication model. Time dependent flux boundary conditions that model the lacrimal gland tear supply and punctal drainage are imposed. We solved the model equations with Overture computational framework. Results reveals our model captures the hydraulic connectivity and other key physics of human tear film observed in vivo. Comparisons are made with existing models and experiments. Should time permit, osmolarity dynamics (salt ion concentration) will be included.

  18. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  19. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  20. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  1. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  2. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  3. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  4. Time dependence of the mechanical properties of an immiscible polymer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jennifer Krystyna

    Lifetime of a 35/65 PS/HDPE immiscible polymer blend, IMPB, railroad crosstie was investigated. Predictive techniques were developed to predict creep and stress relaxation behavior from short-term compressive stress-strain experiments, and predicted values were compared with experimental results. The weathering effect on the IMPB mechanical properties and the environmental benefits of replacing chemically treated wood crossties with IMPB crossties were investigated. Creep and stress relaxation experiments were performed under conditions simulating the maximum lateral load acting on a crosstie on a Class 1 railroad, and spike pull out experiments were performed using cut spikes. Cyclic uniaxial compressive creep experiments left nearly no residual strain remaining in the IMPB samples. Experimental results suggest the track gage will not widen more than 1/8 of an inch when IMPB crossties are utilized. Thus, creep and track gage widening do not limit the lifetime of IMPB crossties in track. Uniaxial compressive stress relaxation experiments and spike pull out experiments conducted at various time intervals from the day of installation were performed to illustrate the similarity of a spike pull out force versus time from the day of installation curve and a stress relaxation curve. The force decreases exponentially with time, in both cases. Research determined that spike killing due to biological attack is irrelevant, and there is no evidence of spike killing on any IMPB crossties currently in track. Predicted creep strain and stress relaxation were in good agreement with experimental data. A correlation is drawn between predicted long-term creep behavior for the IMPB and experimental creep behavior of polyethylene over 25 years. Theories developed for this work were determined reasonable and provide an alternative to performing long-term experiments. Natural and accelerated weathering experiments indicated no degradation in IMPB mechanical properties. Accelerated

  5. The Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Banerjee, Rahul; Varshochi, Hilda; Khan, Manoranjan; Lawrie, Andrew; Variable g RT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    From detailed numerical simulations of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories, we report on several findings of relevance to the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules. The incompressible, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) were performed in two- and three-dimensions, and over a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We have investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles g(t) of the general form tn, with n > -2. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations are compared with a potential flow model developed and reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with an extension to the drag buoyancy model with modifications for time-dependent acceleration histories. We have come up with simple analytic solutions to the Drag Buoyancy model for variable g flows, and compared the solution with the 2D and 3D DNS results. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  6. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  7. Viscoelastic creep and relaxation of dielectric elastomers characterized by a Kelvin-Voigt-Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Ru, Jie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen; Lu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    For dielectric elastomers (DEs), the inherent viscoelasticity leads to a time-dependent deformation during actuation. To describe such a viscoelastic behavior, a constitutive model is developed by utilizing a combined Kelvin-Voigt-Maxwell (KVM) model. The established model captures both the initial jumping deformation and the following slow creeping. Subsequently, with an employment of VHB 4910 elastomer, experiments are performed to validate the viscoelastic KVM model. The results indicate a good agreement between the simulation and experimental data. Effect of the parameters in KVM model on the viscoelastic deformation of DEs is also investigated.

  8. A creep-rupture model of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jan D.; Hackett, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    The creep-rupture model is that of a quasi-isotropic filament-wound spherical pressure vessel, subjected to internal pressurization. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal damage resulting from the relaxation of the matrix and the corresponding increase in microcracks is represented by a functional relationship between circumferential strain and transverse modulus. The numerical solution to this nonlinear problem is an iterative technique, whereby the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle is employed. In the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution is obtained and this solution is inverted by the multidata method to yield the time-dependent solution.

  9. Evaluation of creep-fatigue life-prediction models for the solar central receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyzak, J. M.; Hughes, D. A.

    1981-09-01

    The applicability of several creep fatigue models to life prediction of boiler tubes in a solar central receiver (SCR) was evaluated. The SCR boiler tubes will experience compressive strain dwell loading with hold times up to 6 to 8 hours at temperatures where time dependent deformation will occur. The evaluation criteria include the ability of the model to account for mean stress effects and to be practical in the long life, small strain range regime. A correlation between maximum tensile stress and fatigue life is presented. Using this correlation, compressive dwell behavior is predicted based on continuous cycling data. The limits of this predictive scheme are addressed.

  10. Squeezing in a 2-D generalized oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castanos, Octavio; Lopez-Pena, Ramon; Manko, Vladimir I.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional generalized oscillator with time-dependent parameters is considered to study the two-mode squeezing phenomena. Specific choices of the parameters are used to determine the dispersion matrix and analytic expressions, in terms of standard hermite polynomials, of the wavefunctions and photon distributions.

  11. Hayward fault: Large earthquakes versus surface creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; Borchardt, Glenn; Borchardt, Glenn; Hirschfeld, Sue E.; Lienkaemper, James J.; McClellan, Patrick H.; Williams, Patrick L.; Wong, Ivan G.

    1992-01-01

    The Hayward fault, thought a likely source of large earthquakes in the next few decades, has generated two large historic earthquakes (about magnitude 7), one in 1836 and another in 1868. We know little about the 1836 event, but the 1868 event had a surface rupture extending 41 km along the southern Hayward fault. Right-lateral surface slip occurred in 1868, but was not well measured. Witness accounts suggest coseismic right slip and afterslip of under a meter. We measured the spatial variation of the historic creep rate along the Hayward fault, deriving rates mainly from surveys of offset cultural features, (curbs, fences, and buildings). Creep occurs along at least 69 km of the fault's 82-km length (13 km is underwater). Creep rate seems nearly constant over many decades with short-term variations. The creep rate mostly ranges from 3.5 to 6.5 mm/yr, varying systemically along strike. The fastest creep is along a 4-km section near the south end. Here creep has been about 9mm/yr since 1921, and possibly since the 1868 event as indicated by offset railroad track rebuilt in 1869. This 9mm/yr slip rate may approach the long-term or deep slip rate related to the strain buildup that produces large earthquakes, a hypothesis supported by geoloic studies (Lienkaemper and Borchardt, 1992). If so, the potential for slip in large earthquakes which originate below the surficial creeping zone, may now be 1/1m along the southern (1868) segment and ≥1.4m along the northern (1836?) segment. Substracting surface creep rates from a long-term slip rate of 9mm/yr gives present potential for surface slip in large earthquakes of up to 0.8m. Our earthquake potential model which accounts for historic creep rate, microseismicity distribution, and geodetic data, suggests that enough strain may now be available for large magnitude earthquakes (magnitude 6.8 in the northern (1836?) segment, 6.7 in the southern (1868) segment, and 7.0 for both). Thus despite surficial creep, the fault may be

  12. Creep events and creep noise in gravitational-wave interferometers: Basic formalism and stationary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    In gravitational-wave interferometers, test masses are suspended on thin fibers which experience considerable tension stress. Sudden microscopic stress release in a suspension fiber, which I call a “creep event,” would excite motion of the test mass that would be coupled to the interferometer’s readout. The random test-mass motion due to a time sequence of creep events is referred to as “creep noise.” In this paper I present an elastodynamic calculation for the test-mass motion due to a creep event. I show that within a simple suspension model, the main coupling to the optical readout occurs via a combination of a “dc” horizontal displacement of the test mass and excitation of the violin and pendulum modes, and not, as was thought previously, via lengthening of the fiber. When the creep events occur sufficiently frequently and their statistics is time independent, the creep noise can be well approximated by a stationary Gaussian random process. I derive the functional form of the creep noise spectral density in this limit, with the restrictive assumption that the creep events are statistically independent from each other.

  13. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  14. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Hochella, W. A.; Lytton, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructural changes which occur during primary creep for two important types of engineering alloys: (1) alloys strengthened by solid-solution additions, and (2) dispersion-strengthened alloys. The metals chosen for study are unalloyed titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, and the cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188. Results to date on NGR 47-004-108 show that development of prior dislocation substructure in Haynes 188 by 10% prestrain and annealing for one hour at 1800 F increases the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F by more than an order of magnitude for creep stresses from 3 to 20 ksi. For creep at 1800 F, similar results were obtaind for stresses above 7 ksi, but the prior substructure decreases creep resistance below 7 ksi. This effect appears to be related to instability of grain structure at 1800 F in prestrained material.

  15. Comparison of statistical approaches dealing with time-dependent confounding in drug effectiveness studies.

    PubMed

    Karim, Mohammad Ehsanul; Petkau, John; Gustafson, Paul; Platt, Robert W; Tremlett, Helen

    2016-09-21

    In longitudinal studies, if the time-dependent covariates are affected by the past treatment, time-dependent confounding may be present. For a time-to-event response, marginal structural Cox models are frequently used to deal with such confounding. To avoid some of the problems of fitting marginal structural Cox model, the sequential Cox approach has been suggested as an alternative. Although the estimation mechanisms are different, both approaches claim to estimate the causal effect of treatment by appropriately adjusting for time-dependent confounding. We carry out simulation studies to assess the suitability of the sequential Cox approach for analyzing time-to-event data in the presence of a time-dependent covariate that may or may not be a time-dependent confounder. Results from these simulations revealed that the sequential Cox approach is not as effective as marginal structural Cox model in addressing the time-dependent confounding. The sequential Cox approach was also found to be inadequate in the presence of a time-dependent covariate. We propose a modified version of the sequential Cox approach that correctly estimates the treatment effect in both of the above scenarios. All approaches are applied to investigate the impact of beta-interferon treatment in delaying disability progression in the British Columbia Multiple Sclerosis cohort (1995-2008).

  16. Second quantized scalar QED in homogeneous time-dependent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-12-15

    We formulate the second quantization of a charged scalar field in homogeneous, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, in which the Hamiltonian is an infinite system of decoupled, time-dependent oscillators for electric fields, but it is another infinite system of coupled, time-dependent oscillators for magnetic fields. We then employ the quantum invariant method to find various quantum states for the charged field. For time-dependent electric fields, a pair of quantum invariant operators for each oscillator with the given momentum plays the role of the time-dependent annihilation and the creation operators, constructs the exact quantum states, and gives the vacuum persistence amplitude as well as the pair-production rate. We also find the quantum invariants for the coupled oscillators for the charged field in time-dependent magnetic fields and advance a perturbation method when the magnetic fields change adiabatically. Finally, the quantum state and the pair production are discussed when a time-dependent electric field is present in parallel to the magnetic field.

  17. Creep, stick-slip, and dry-friction dynamics: Experiments and a heuristic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslot, F.; Baumberger, T.; Perrin, B.; Caroli, B.; Caroli, C.

    1994-06-01

    We perform an extensive study of the dry-friction dynamics of a paper-on-paper system. We explore the dynamical phase diagram by systematically varying the relevant control parameters (driving velocity V, slider mass M, and loading machine stiffness k). A set of experimental results gives strong proof that the low-velocity dynamics is controlled by a creep process, in agreement with previous results from rock mechanics and metals [C. H. Scholz, The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1990), Chap. 2 and references therein; E. Rabinowicz, Proc. Phys. Soc. 71, 668 (1958) and references therein]. At higher velocities, a crossover to inertial dynamics is observed. In each regime, when k is increased, the system bifurcates from periodic stick-slip to steady sliding: in the creep regime, the bifucation is a direct Hopf one; in the inertial regime it becomes subcritical. We identify, from comparison of the time dependence of the static friction coefficient μs(t) and of the velocity dependence of the stationary dynamic one, μd(V), a memory length of the order of 1 μm. The V dependence of μd(V) changes from V weakening to V strengthening at the creep-inertial crossover. We propose a heuristic model of low-velocity friction based on two main ingredients: (i) following and extending the ideas of Ruina [J. Geophys. Res. 88, 10 359 (1983)], we define a phenomenological contact age accounting for the renewal of physical contacts on the scale of the memory length, and (ii) we assume that the dynamics is controlled by the Brownian motion of an effective creeping volume in a pinning potential, the strength of which increases with age. The crossover from creep to inertial motion then naturally appears as the runaway threshold between thermally activated and free motion. The bifurcation analysis in the creep regime is compared in detail with experimental results, yielding a very satisfactory agreement. When confronted with rock mechanics

  18. Effect of solute interactions in columbium /Nb/ on creep strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Metcalfe, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The creep strength of 17 ternary columbium (Nb)-base alloys was determined using an abbreviated measuring technique, and the results were analyzed to identify the contributions of solute interactions to creep strength. Isostrength creep diagrams and an interaction strengthening parameter, ST, were used to present and analyze data. It was shown that the isostrength creep diagram can be used to estimate the creep strength of untested alloys and to identify compositions with the most economical use of alloy elements. Positive values of ST were found for most alloys, showing that interaction strengthening makes an important contribution to the creep strength of these ternary alloys.

  19. Steady State Creep of Zirconium at High and Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Hayes, T.A.

    2000-04-08

    Creep of zirconium and zirconium alloys has been labeled ''anomalous.'' Researchers often report that zirconium and its alloys never reach true steady state creep and have stress exponents that continuously change with stress and temperature. Many varied interpretations have been offered explaining the creep behavior of zirconium. Some have suggested that creep is diffusion controlled, while others maintain that creep is dislocation glide controlled. Cumulative zirconium creep data will be presented based on an extensive literature review. An interpretation of results will be presented and compared to previous interpretations.

  20. Multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons: Many-body dynamics of bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-03-01

    The evolution of Bose-Einstein condensates is amply described by the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field theory which assumes all bosons to reside in a single time-dependent one-particle state throughout the propagation process. In this work, we go beyond mean field and develop an essentially exact many-body theory for the propagation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of N interacting identical bosons. In our theory, the time-dependent many-boson wave function is written as a sum of permanents assembled from orthogonal one-particle functions, or orbitals, where both the expansion coefficients and the permanents (orbitals) themselves are time-dependent and fully determined according to a standard time-dependent variational principle. By employing either the usual Lagrangian formulation or the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle we arrive at two sets of coupled equations of motion, one for the orbitals and one for the expansion coefficients. The first set comprises of first-order differential equations in time and nonlinear integrodifferential equations in position space, whereas the second set consists of first-order differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. We call our theory multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons, or MCTDHB(M) , where M specifies the number of time-dependent orbitals used to construct the permanents. Numerical implementation of the theory is reported and illustrative numerical examples of many-body dynamics of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates are provided and discussed. The convergence of the method with a growing number M of orbitals is demonstrated in a specific example of four interacting bosons in a double well.

  1. Investigating the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault using ALOS PALSAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Wortham, C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, time-series InSAR techniques have been used to study the temporal characteristics of various geophysical phenomena that produce surface deformation including earthquakes and magma migration in volcanoes. Conventional InSAR and time-series InSAR techniques have also been successfully used to study aseismic creep across faults in urban areas like the Northern Hayward Fault in California [1-3]. However, application of these methods to studying the time-dependent creep across the Central San Andreas Fault using C-band ERS and Envisat radar satellites has resulted in limited success. While these techniques estimate the average long-term far-field deformation rates reliably, creep measurement close to the fault (< 3-4 Km) is virtually impossible due to heavy decorrelation at C-band (6cm wavelength). Shanker and Zebker (2009) [4] used the Persistent Scatterer (PS) time-series InSAR technique to estimate a time-dependent non-uniform creep signal across a section of the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault. However, the identified PS network was spatially very sparse (1 per sq. km) to study temporal characteristics of deformation of areas close to the fault. In this work, we use L-band (24cm wavelength) SAR data from the PALSAR instrument on-board the ALOS satellite, launched by Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in 2006, to study the temporal characteristics of creep across the Central San Andreas Fault. The longer wavelength at L-band improves observed correlation over the entire scene which significantly increased the ground area coverage of estimated deformation in each interferogram but at the cost of decreased sensitivity of interferometric phase to surface deformation. However, noise levels in our deformation estimates can be decreased by combining information from multiple SAR acquisitions using time-series InSAR techniques. We analyze 13 SAR acquisitions spanning the time-period from March 2007 to Dec 2009 using the Short Baseline

  2. On the dynamics of a time-dependent mesoscopic LC circuit with a negative inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, I. A.; Nogueira, E.; Guedes, I.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the problem of a mesoscopic LC circuit with a negative inductance ruled by a time-dependent Hermitian Hamiltonian. Classically, we find unusual expressions for the Faraday’s law and for the inductance of a solenoid. Quantum mechanically, we solve exactly the time-dependent Schrödinger equation through the Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant operator method and construct Gaussian wave packet solutions for this time-dependent LC circuit. We also evaluate the expectation values of the charge and the magnetic flux in these Gaussian states, their quantum fluctuations and the corresponding uncertainty product.

  3. Time-dependent Kramers escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; Yin, Cangtao

    2016-05-01

    The probability distribution of Brownian particles moving in an overdamped complex system follows the generalized Smoluchowski equation, which can be rigorously proven that the exact time-dependent solution for this equation follows Tsallis form. Time-dependent escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distributions is then established based on the flux over population theory. The stationary state escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution which has been obtained before based on mean first passage time theory is recovered from time-dependent escape rate as time toward infinity.

  4. Cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators with time-dependent parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2004-10-01

    A formalism presented in a previous paper for the analysis of cumulative beam breakup (BBU) with arbitrary time dependence of the beam current and with misalignment of the cavities and focusing elements [J. R. Delayen, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6, 084402 (2003)] is extended to include time dependence of the focusing and coupling between the beam and the dipole modes. Such time dependence, which could result from an energy chirp imposed on the beam or from rf focusing, is known to be effective in reducing BBU-induced instabilities and emittance growth. The analytical results are presented and applied to practical accelerator configurations and compared to numerical simulations.

  5. Dynamics of a Hogg-Huberman Model with Time Dependent Reevaluation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshijiro; Kurihara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The dynamical behavior of the Hogg-Huberman model with time-dependent reevaluation rates is studied. The time dependence of the reevaluation rate that agents using one of resources decide to consider their resource choice is obtained in terms of states of the system. It is seen that the change of fraction of agents using one resource is suppressed to be smaller than that in the case of a fixed reevaluation rate and the chaos control in the system associated with time-dependent reevaluation rates can be performed by the system itself.

  6. Comparison between two models of absorption of matter waves by a thin time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    2015-11-01

    We report a quantitative, analytical, and numerical comparison between two models of the interaction of a nonrelativistic quantum particle with a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by a set of time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions, which are closely related to Kottler boundary conditions used in stationary-wave optics as a mathematical basis for Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The second model mimics the absorbing barrier with an off-diagonal δ potential with a time-dependent amplitude. We show that the two models of absorption agree in their predictions in a semiclassical regime, the regime readily accessible in modern experiments with ultracold atoms.

  7. A TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATIVE MODEL FOR THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE ECCENTRIC EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Iro, N.; Deming, L. D. E-mail: leo.d.deming@nasa.go

    2010-03-20

    We present a time-dependent radiative model for the atmosphere of extrasolar planets that takes into account the eccentricity of their orbit. In addition to the modulation of stellar irradiation by the varying planet-star distance, the pseudo-synchronous rotation of the planets may play a significant role. We include both of these time-dependent effects when modeling the planetary thermal structure. We investigate the thermal structure and spectral characteristics for time-dependent stellar heating for two highly eccentric planets. Finally, we discuss observational aspects for those planets suitable for Spitzer measurements and investigate the role of the rotation rate.

  8. Granular controls of hillslope deformation and creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Ortiz, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment transport on hillslopes has been described as "creep", and has been modeled as a "diffusive" process by invoking random disturbance of soil in the presence of a gradient. In this framework, physical and biological agents are envisioned to cause dilation of the soil that is greatest at the surface and decays with depth. Thus, there is a kind of internal energy of the sediment that allows flow, even below the angle of repose. This transport has not yet been connected, however, to the more general phenomenon of creep in disordered, particulate systems. Work in such "soft matter" materials has shown that disordered solids are fragile, and may deform slowly by localized particle rearrangement under static loads much smaller than the yield stress at which fluid-like flow occurs. The transition from creep to granular flow has not been thoroughly examined. Here we use particle dynamics simulations to examine creep and granular flow dynamics and the transition between them, and to test the ability of a granular physics model to describe observations of hillslope soil creep. We employ a well-developed discrete element model, with frictional and over-damped interactions among grains to approximate the conditions of earth hillslopes. Transient and equilibrium particle dynamics are described for a range of inclination angles that transit the angle of repose. We verify that sub-threshold creep occurs, even in the absence of internal energy, and describe its dynamic signature. Moreover, simulations show that the transition from creeping to a sustained granular flow is continuous as the angle of repose is crossed. We then perturb the granular system with acoustic vibrations, to directly compare the model with previously-reported laboratory experiments of acoustically-driven hillslope transport. We test the ability of the model to reproduce the heuristic nonlinear hillslope flux law. Results reveal that the bulk movement of hillslope sediment over long timescales may be

  9. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  10. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  11. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  12. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  13. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sources of Variation in Creep Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Creep rupture is an important material characteristic for the design of rocket engines. It was observed during the characterization of GRCop-84 that the complete data set had nearly 4 orders of magnitude of scatter. This scatter likely confounded attempts to determine how creep performance was influenced by manufacturing. It was unclear if this variation was from the testing, the material, or both. Sources of variation were examined by conducting tests on identically processed specimens at the same specified stresses and temperatures. Significant differences existed between the five constant-load creep frames. The specimen temperature was higher than the desired temperature by as much as 43 C. It was also observed that the temperature gradient was up to 44 C. Improved specimen temperature control minimized temperature variations. The data from additional tests demonstrated that the results from all five frames were comparable. The variation decreased to 1/2 order of magnitude from 2 orders of magnitude for the baseline data set. Independent determination of creep rates in a reference load frame closely matched the creep rates determined after the modifications. Testing in helium tended to decrease the sample temperature gradient, but helium was not a significant improvement over vacuum.

  17. Some problems on the theory of creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabotnov, Y N

    1953-01-01

    The term creep of metals is applied to the phenomenon in which, at temperatures beyond a certain limit, the metal subjected to a load slowly undergoes deformation with time. For the case of steel, the creep phenomenon must be taken into account at temperatures above 400 degrees C. Very slow deformations for a prolonged period are cumulative and lead either to inadmissible changes in the dimensions of a structural part or to its failure. The theory of creep constitutes part of the mechanics of dense media and the mechanical formulation of the problem may be given as the following: a body is subjected to the action of a given system of forces, or initial displacements are prescribed on its surface. It is required to find the stress distribution in the body and the changes or its deformations with time. For the solution of the problem of creep as thus formulated, a mechanical theory of creep is required. Such theory must necessarily bear an external, overall character based, not on the investigation of microprocesses, but on the results of mechanical tests.

  18. Perturbation theory for Maxwell's equations with a time-dependent current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, T.; Ghosh, S.; Bhattacharjee, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Using a set of ideas discussed in the second volume of Feynman Lectures, we develop a perturbation-theoretic scheme for solving Maxwell's equations for time-dependent currents which are switched on at t = 0.

  19. Time-Dependent Dark Energy Density and Holographic DE Model with Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Saadat, A. M.

    2011-05-01

    In this article we consider holographic dark energy model with interaction and space curvature. We calculate cosmic scale factor by using the time-dependent dark energy density. Then we obtain phenomenological interaction between holographic dark energy and matter.

  20. Coherent states and uncertainty relations for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Um, Chung-In; George, Thomas F.; Pandey, Lakshmi N.

    1993-01-01

    Starting with evaluations of propagator and wave function for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, exact coherent states are constructed. These coherent states satisfy the properties which coherent states should generally have.