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Sample records for 2-de protein spots

  1. Using a cross-model loadings plot to identify protein spots causing 2-DE gels to become outliers in PCA.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Luise Cederkvist; Jacobsen, Susanne; Jessen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Bo M

    2010-04-01

    The multivariate method PCA is an exploratory tool often used to get an overview of multivariate data, such as the quantified spot volumes of digitized 2-DE gels. PCA can reveal hidden structures present in the data, and thus enables identification of potential outliers and clustering. Based on PCA, we here present an approach for identification of protein spots causing 2-DE gels to become outliers. The approach can potentially obviate analytical exclusion of entire 2-DE gels.

  2. High MS-compatibility of silver nitrate-stained protein spots from 2-DE gels using ZipPlates and AnchorChips for successful protein identification.

    PubMed

    Nebrich, Grit; Herrmann, Marion; Sagi, Dijana; Klose, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    The availability of easy-to-handle, sensitive, and cost-effective protein staining protocols for 2-DE, in conjunction with a high compatibility for subsequent MS analysis, is still a prerequisite for successful proteome research. In this article we describe a quick and easy-to-use methodological protocol based on sensitive, homogeneous, and MS-compatible silver nitrate protein staining, in combination with an in-gel digestion, employing the Millipore 96-well ZipPlate system for peptide preparation. The improved quality and MS compatibility of the generated protein digests, as compared to the otherwise weakly MS-compatible silver nitrate staining, were evaluated on real tissue samples by analyzing 192 Coomassie-stained protein spots against their counterparts from a silver-stained 2-DE gel. Furthermore, the applicability of the experimental setup was evaluated and demonstrated by the analysis of a large-scale MALDI-TOF MS experiment, in which we analyzed an additional ~1000 protein spots from 2-DE gels from mouse liver and mouse brain tissue.

  3. From a 2DE-Gel Spot to Protein Function: Lesson Learned From HS1 in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Benedetta; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Restuccia, Umberto; Ranghetti, Pamela; Barbaglio, Federica; Ghia, Paolo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Scielzo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The identification of molecules involved in tumor initiation and progression is fundamental for understanding disease’s biology and, as a consequence, for the clinical management of patients. In the present work we will describe an optimized proteomic approach for the identification of molecules involved in the progression of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). In detail, leukemic cell lysates are resolved by 2-dimensional Electrophoresis (2DE) and visualized as “spots” on the 2DE gels. Comparative analysis of proteomic maps allows the identification of differentially expressed proteins (in terms of abundance and post-translational modifications) that are picked, isolated and identified by Mass Spectrometry (MS). The biological function of the identified candidates can be tested by different assays (i.e. migration, adhesion and F-actin polymerization), that we have optimized for primary leukemic cells. PMID:25350848

  4. Protein extraction from the earthworm Eisenia fetida for 2-DE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Chang, Li; Wang, Gaochan; Sun, Zhenjun; Ma, Hongbo; Sun, Qian; Li, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We identified an efficient protocol for extracting proteins from whole earthworm, Eisenia fetida, for 2-DE. Sample preparation is a critical step in a 2-DE proteome approach and is absolutely essential for obtaining good results. Six protein extraction protocols based on different protein precipitation agents were tested and evaluated using 2-DE. The methods generated remarkably different 2-DE protein spot patterns. We conclude that trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-A eliminates interfering compounds, thus allowing for the efficient resolubilization of proteins. TCA-A gives good distinction, more bands in 1-DE gels, and the most number of protein spots in 2-DE gels. It is also rapid, provides the higher protein yield, and has the less number of steps. To demonstrate the quality of the extracted proteins, we cut several protein spots that were common to four methods from 2-DE gels, analyzed them using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and tentatively identified them. The classic TCA-A method proved to be most useful as a standard method of extracting proteins from E. fetida.

  5. Protein extraction for 2DE.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Our protein extraction protocol for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) was updated to meet current needs in the field of proteomics. This protocol summarizes our experience using this method since its introduction over 30 years ago. We provide a total as well as fractionated extraction protocol. The former is easy and fast to use, suitable for most standard 2DE applications, whereas the latter is used for special applications such as the extraction of membrane or nuclear proteins.Both extraction protocols stress the need that protease inhibitors are added early to still deep frozen tissue to preclude an activation of proteases which destroy proteins and make them inaccessible to analysis. We also emphasize that, to remain soluble, proteins need to stay in an environment resembling a living cell as closely as possible. Sample dilution is therefore kept to a minimum and the pH of the extract is close to in vivo conditions at pH 7.1. In addition there are no precipitation/resolubilization steps which could irreversibly remove proteins from the extract. Furthermore, the total extraction does not even require centrifugation. Our extraction protocol is compatible with recent advances in 2DE-staining techniques such as differential in gel electrophoresis and fluorescence staining as well as mass spectrometry.

  6. Evaluation of extraction procedures for 2-DE analysis of aphid proteins.

    PubMed

    Yiou, Pan; Shaoli, An; Kebin, Li; Tao, Wang; Kui, Fang; Hua, Zhang; Yu, Sun; Xun, Yang; Jinghui, Xi

    2013-02-01

    Protein sample preparation is a crucial step in a 2-DE proteomics approach. In order to establish a routine protocol for the application of proteomics analysis to aphids, this study focuses on the specific protein extraction problems in insect tissues and evaluates four methods to bypass them. The approaches of phenol extraction methanol/ammonium acetate precipitation (PA), TCA/acetone precipitation, PEG precipitation, and no precipitation were evaluated for proteins isolation and purification from apterous adult aphids, Sitobion avenae. For 2-DE, the PA protocol was optimal, resulting in good IEF and clear spots. PA method yielded the greatest amount of protein and displayed most protein spots in 2-DE gels, as compared with the TCA/acetone precipitation, PEG precipitation and no precipitation protocols. Analysis of protein yield, image quality and spot numbers demonstrate that the TCA/acetone precipitation protocol is a reproducible and reliable method for extracting proteins from aphids. The PEG precipitation approach is a newly developed protein extraction protocol for aphids, from which more unique protein spots can be detected, especially for detection of acid proteins. These protocols are expected to be applicable to other insects or could be of interest to laboratories involved in insect proteomics, despite the amounts and types of interfering compounds vary considerably in different insects.

  7. Evaluation of protein extraction protocols for 2DE in marine ecotoxicoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huifeng; Ji, Chenglong; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Jianmin

    2013-11-01

    In ecotoxicoproteomics, an accurate and reproducible extraction of proteins is a critical step for 2DE analysis and further protein identification using MS. The criteria for the assessment of protein extraction quality include protein yield, protein spots resolved in a 2DE gel, matched protein spots in replicate gels, reproducibility, and compatibility with MS. In this work, we evaluated three protein extraction systems, straightforward lysis buffer, trichloroacetic acid-acetone, and TRIzol reagent with some modifications, for the protein extraction from three animal species including mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, flounder Paralichthys olivaceus, and polychaete Nereis diversicolor used in marine ecotoxicology. Our results indicated that these methods could extract significantly different protein profiles. The method using TRIzol reagent resulted in the most matched protein spots resolved in four replicate 2DE gels and highest reproducibilities for the gill of M. galloprovincialis and liver of P. olivaceus. However, a modified trichloroacetic acid-acetone solvent system was best for the whole soft tissue of N. diversicolor. This work provides the fundamental information of the extraction quality of protein extraction protocols from different marine animals, which may facilitate the selection of a suitable protein extraction protocol for ecotoxicoproteomics.

  8. A novel method of protein extraction from perennial Bupleurum root for 2-DE.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Pan, Shengli; Liu, Shufen; Ye, Kan; Huo, Keke

    2007-03-01

    The perennial Bupleurum root is thick and woody and contains high levels of interfering compounds. Common protein extraction methods have proved refractory towards the isolation of proteins suitable for 2-DE, due to the presence of interfering compounds. A novel method for extracting proteins suitable for 2-DE was established to overcome these problems. The main characteristic of this protocol is the partitioning of the proteins into the aqueous (fraction A-2), chloroform and isoamyl alcohol phases (A-3), and the interphase (A-1). The proteins are then extracted from each of these phases. From A-1, 85% (extracted protein against total proteins) proteins could be extracted and purified. For fraction A-2, a novel phenol extraction step is employed for the extraction of proteins. Based on the well-resolved 2-DE patterns, our protein preparation is free of interfering compounds. Using these methods (A-1, A-2, and A-3-3), a total of 3662 (1526 + 1128 + 1008) spots could be separated, and a protein yield of about 1.41 mg per 1.0 g fresh root material was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a protocol for protein extraction from perennial Bupleurum root has been reported that gives reproducible results. The protocol is expected to be applicable to other recalcitrant plant tissues as well.

  9. A simple protocol for protein extraction of recalcitrant fruit tissues suitable for 2-DE and MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Braun, Gordon; Bevis, Eric; Doncaster, Kristen

    2006-08-01

    Fruit tissues are considered recalcitrant plant tissue for proteomic analysis. Three phenol-free protein extraction procedures for 2-DE were compared and evaluated on apple fruit proteins. Incorporation of hot SDS buffer, extraction with TCA/acetone precipitation was found to be the most effective protocol. The results from SDS-PAGE and 2-DE analysis showed high quality proteins. More than 500 apple polypeptides were separated on a small scale 2-DE gel. The successful protocol was further tested on banana fruit, in which 504 and 386 proteins were detected in peel and flesh tissues, respectively. To demonstrate the quality of the extracted proteins, several protein spots from apple and banana peels were cut from 2-DE gels, analyzed by MS and have been tentatively identified. The protocol described in this study is a simple procedure which could be routinely used in proteomic studies of many types of recalcitrant fruit tissues.

  10. Optimal protein extraction methods from diverse sample types for protein profiling by using Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2DE).

    PubMed

    Tan, A A; Azman, S N; Abdul Rani, N R; Kua, B C; Sasidharan, S; Kiew, L V; Othman, N; Noordin, R; Chen, Y

    2011-12-01

    There is a great diversity of protein samples types and origins, therefore the optimal procedure for each sample type must be determined empirically. In order to obtain a reproducible and complete sample presentation which view as many proteins as possible on the desired 2DE gel, it is critical to perform additional sample preparation steps to improve the quality of the final results, yet without selectively losing the proteins. To address this, we developed a general method that is suitable for diverse sample types based on phenolchloroform extraction method (represented by TRI reagent). This method was found to yield good results when used to analyze human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), Vibrio cholerae, Cryptocaryon irritans cyst and liver abscess fat tissue. These types represent cell line, bacteria, parasite cyst and pus respectively. For each type of samples, several attempts were made to methodically compare protein isolation methods using TRI-reagent Kit, EasyBlue Kit, PRO-PREP™ Protein Extraction Solution and lysis buffer. The most useful protocol allows the extraction and separation of a wide diversity of protein samples that is reproducible among repeated experiments. Our results demonstrated that the modified TRI-reagent Kit had the highest protein yield as well as the greatest number of total proteins spots count for all type of samples. Distinctive differences in spot patterns were also observed in the 2DE gel of different extraction methods used for each type of sample.

  11. Median-modified Wiener filter provides efficient denoising, preserving spot edge and morphology in 2-DE image processing.

    PubMed

    Cannistraci, Carlo V; Montevecchi, Franco M; Alessio, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Denoising is a fundamental early stage in 2-DE image analysis strongly influencing spot detection or pixel-based methods. A novel nonlinear adaptive spatial filter (median-modified Wiener filter, MMWF), is here compared with five well-established denoising techniques (Median, Wiener, Gaussian, and Polynomial-Savitzky-Golay filters; wavelet denoising) to suggest, by means of fuzzy sets evaluation, the best denoising approach to use in practice. Although median filter and wavelet achieved the best performance in spike and Gaussian denoising respectively, they are unsuitable for contemporary removal of different types of noise, because their best setting is noise-dependent. Vice versa, MMWF that arrived second in each single denoising category, was evaluated as the best filter for global denoising, being its best setting invariant of the type of noise. In addition, median filter eroded the edge of isolated spots and filled the space between close-set spots, whereas MMWF because of a novel filter effect (drop-off-effect) does not suffer from erosion problem, preserves the morphology of close-set spots, and avoids spot and spike fuzzyfication, an aberration encountered for Wiener filter. In our tests, MMWF was assessed as the best choice when the goal is to minimize spot edge aberrations while removing spike and Gaussian noise.

  12. Protein extraction and 2-DE of water- and lipid-soluble proteins from bovine pericardium, a low-cellularity tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Leigh G; Choe, Leila; Lee, Kelvin H; Reardon, Kenneth F; Orton, E Christopher

    2008-11-01

    Bovine pericardium (BP) is an important biomaterial used in the production of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves and tissue-engineering applications. The ability to perform proteomic analysis on BP is useful for a range of studies, including investigation of immune rejection after implantation. However, proteomic analysis of fibrous tissues such as BP is challenging due to their relative low-cellularity and abundance of extracellular matrix. A variety of methods for tissue treatment, protein extraction, and fractionation were investigated with the aim of producing high-quality 2-DE gels for both water- and lipid-soluble BP proteins. Extraction of water-soluble proteins with 3-(benzyldimethylammonio)-propanesulfonate followed by n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside extraction and ethanol precipitation for lipid-soluble proteins provided the best combination of yield, spot number, and resolution on 2-DE gels (Protocol E2). ESI-quadrupole/ion trap or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS protein identifications were performed to confirm bovine origin and appropriate subcellular prefractionation of resolved proteins. Twenty-five unique, predominantly cytoplasmic bovine proteins were identified from the water-soluble fraction. Thirty-two unique, predominantly membrane bovine proteins were identified from the lipid-soluble fraction. These results demonstrated that the final protocol produced high-quality proteomic data from this important tissue for both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins.

  13. Quantification, 2DE analysis and identification of enriched glycosylated proteins from mouse muscles: Difficulties and alternatives.

    PubMed

    de Fátima MenegociEugênio, Patrícia; Assunção, Nilson Antonio; Sciandra, Francesca; Aquino, Adriano; Brancaccio, Andrea; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    One of the problems with 2DE is that proteins present in low amounts in a sample are usually not detected, since their signals are masked by the predominant proteins. The elimination of these abundant proteins is not a guaranteed solution to achieve the desired results. The main objective of this study was the comparison of common and simple methodologies employed for 2DE analysis followed by MS identification, focusing on a pre-purified sample using a wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) column. Adult male C57Black/Crj6 (C57BL/6) mice were chosen as the model animal in this study; the gastrocnemius muscles were collected and processed for the experiments. The initial fractionation with succinylated WGA was successful for the elimination of the most abundant proteins. Two quantification methods were employed for the purified samples, and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) was proven to be most reliable for the quantification of glycoproteins. The gel staining method, however, was found to be decisive for the detection of specific proteins, since their structures affect the interaction of the dye with the peptide backbone. The Coomassie Blue R-250 dye very weakly stained the gel with the WGA purified sample. When the same gel was stained with silver nitrate, however, MS could positively assign 12 new spots. The structure of the referred proteins was not found to be prone to interaction with Coomassie blue.

  14. Structural hot spots for the solubility of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ashok; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Beerten, Jacinte; Brams, Marijke; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Van der Kant, Rob; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ramakers, Meine; Langenberg, Tobias; Wilkinson, Hannah; De Smet, Frederik; Ulens, Chris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2016-02-24

    Natural selection shapes protein solubility to physiological requirements and recombinant applications that require higher protein concentrations are often problematic. This raises the question whether the solubility of natural protein sequences can be improved. We here show an anti-correlation between the number of aggregation prone regions (APRs) in a protein sequence and its solubility, suggesting that mutational suppression of APRs provides a simple strategy to increase protein solubility. We show that mutations at specific positions within a protein structure can act as APR suppressors without affecting protein stability. These hot spots for protein solubility are both structure and sequence dependent but can be computationally predicted. We demonstrate this by reducing the aggregation of human α-galactosidase and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis through mutation. Our results indicate that many proteins possess hot spots allowing to adapt protein solubility independently of structure and function.

  15. Structural hot spots for the solubility of globular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Ashok; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Beerten, Jacinte; Brams, Marijke; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Van der Kant, Rob; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ramakers, Meine; Langenberg, Tobias; Wilkinson, Hannah; De Smet, Frederik; Ulens, Chris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Natural selection shapes protein solubility to physiological requirements and recombinant applications that require higher protein concentrations are often problematic. This raises the question whether the solubility of natural protein sequences can be improved. We here show an anti-correlation between the number of aggregation prone regions (APRs) in a protein sequence and its solubility, suggesting that mutational suppression of APRs provides a simple strategy to increase protein solubility. We show that mutations at specific positions within a protein structure can act as APR suppressors without affecting protein stability. These hot spots for protein solubility are both structure and sequence dependent but can be computationally predicted. We demonstrate this by reducing the aggregation of human α-galactosidase and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis through mutation. Our results indicate that many proteins possess hot spots allowing to adapt protein solubility independently of structure and function. PMID:26905391

  16. Analysis of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells proteome by 2-DE and MS: analytical and biological variability in the protein expression level and protein identification.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Boo, María; Garrido, Juan J; Ogueta, Samuel; Calvete, Juan J; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; Moreno, Angela

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we present the protein map corresponding to the porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to better understand the role of these cells in the pig immune system. To conform the map, the proteins were separated by 2-DE using a 5-8 range pH gradient in IEF and approximately 800 spots were detected. Due to the high level of indeterminate variability associates to the 2-DE, analytical and biological variances were analyzed. The analytical variance was calculated for 50 proteins in three replicate 2-DE gels from the same protein extract whereas the biological variance was determined by comparison of the patterns obtained for the same 50 proteins in different animals. Values of 15.13 and 33.70% were determined for analytical and biological variances, respectively. These average variances will provide a quantified and statistical basis for future proteomic studies directed to evaluate relevant quantitative changes in the biological response. A representative set of the major proteins was subjected to MALDI-TOF analysis and over 75% of the proteins were identified on the basis of their similarity with its human homologue proteins. A large number of cytoskeletal and metabolic proteins were found as well as some proteins related to cell mobility and immunological functions. Finally, other proteins implicated in the cell signaling process, transport or apoptosis were also identified giving a wide overview of the porcine PBMC protein map.

  17. [Fast Implementation Method of Protein Spots Detection Based on CUDA].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Bangshu; Ye, Yijia; Ou, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Haodong

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of protein spots detection, a fast detection method based on CUDA was proposed. Firstly, the parallel algorithms of the three most time-consuming parts in the protein spots detection algorithm: image preprocessing, coarse protein point detection and overlapping point segmentation were studied. Then, according to single instruction multiple threads executive model of CUDA to adopted data space strategy of separating two-dimensional (2D) images into blocks, various optimizing measures such as shared memory and 2D texture memory are adopted in this study. The results show that the operative efficiency of this method is obviously improved compared to CPU calculation. As the image size increased, this method makes more improvement in efficiency, such as for the image with the size of 2,048 x 2,048, the method of CPU needs 52,641 ms, but the GPU needs only 4,384 ms.

  18. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  19. Selected Bioinformatic Tools and MS (MALDI-TOF, PMF) Techniques Used in the Strategy for the Identification of Oat Proteins After 2-DE.

    PubMed

    Szerszunowicz, Iwona; Nałęcz, Dorota; Dziuba, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Computer analysis of protein maps obtained from the separation of proteins with two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis and selected bioinformatic tools is used in the strategy for the identification of oat proteins. In proteomic research the most often used MS technique is the combination of ion sources: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and the analyzer of the time of flight (TOF), i.e., MALDI-TOF MS.This chapter describes the possibilities of the use of selected bioinformatic tools (UniProtKB database, ProtParam, Compute pI/MW programs) for initial identification of separated oat proteins (especially prolamin fractions) with the 2-DE technique. Also the procedure of preparation of samples obtained from cut out protein spots for analysis with the MALDI-TOF MS and peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) technique is presented.Among oat prolamins separated with the 2-DE technique (see Chapter 17 ), 13 protein spots are considered to be the most characteristic (range of MW 27.0-34.6 kDa, pI 5.7-7.6) for this fraction of proteins. Among them there are four protein spots (MW 27.0-28.0 kDa) and two spots (MW 31.4-32.1 kDa) which can correspond to avenins (Accession numbers (AC) in UniProtKB: L0L5I0, I4EP88, I4EP64, L0L4I8 and F2Q9W5, L0L6J0, respectively).

  20. Small Molecules Engage Hot Spots through Cooperative Binding To Inhibit a Tight Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Xu, David; Liu, Min; Knabe, William Eric; Yuan, Cai; Zhou, Donghui; Huang, Mingdong; Meroueh, Samy O

    2017-03-28

    Protein-protein interactions drive every aspect of cell signaling, yet only a few small-molecule inhibitors of these interactions exist. Despite our ability to identify critical residues known as hot spots, little is known about how to effectively engage them to disrupt protein-protein interactions. Here, we take advantage of the ease of preparation and stability of pyrrolinone 1, a small-molecule inhibitor of the tight interaction between the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its binding partner, the urokinase-type plasminogen activator uPA, to synthesize more than 40 derivatives and explore their effect on the protein-protein interaction. We report the crystal structure of uPAR bound to previously discovered pyrazole 3 and to pyrrolinone 12. While both 3 and 12 bind to uPAR and compete with a fluorescently labeled peptide probe, only 12 and its derivatives inhibit the full uPAR·uPA interaction. Compounds 3 and 12 mimic and engage different hot-spot residues on uPA and uPAR, respectively. Interestingly, 12 is involved in a π-cation interaction with Arg-53, which is not considered a hot spot. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations reveal that 3 and 12 exhibit dramatically different correlations of motion with residues on uPAR. Free energy calculations for the wild-type and mutant uPAR bound to uPA or 12 show that Arg-53 interacts with uPA or with 12 in a highly cooperative manner, thereby altering the contributions of hot spots to uPAR binding. The direct engagement of peripheral residues not considered hot spots through π-cation or salt-bridge interactions could provide new opportunities for enhanced small-molecule engagement of hot spots to disrupt challenging protein-protein interactions.

  1. Specificity analysis of protein lysine methyltransferases using SPOT peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-11-29

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs.

  2. Specificity Analysis of Protein Lysine Methyltransferases Using SPOT Peptide Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs. PMID:25489813

  3. Comparative fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using a gel strip sandwich assembly for the simultaneous on-gel generation of a reference protein spot grid.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Doreen; Wang, Weiqun; Streipert, Benjamin; Geib, Birgit; Grün, Lothar; König, Simone

    2012-05-01

    The comparison of proteins separated on 2DE is difficult due to gel-to-gel variability. Here, a method named comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) is presented, which allows the generation of an artificial protein grid in parallel to the separation of an analytical sample on the same gel. Different fluorescent stains are used to distinguish sample and marker on the gel. The technology combines elements of 1DE and 2DE. Special gel combs with V-shaped wells are placed in a stacking gel above the pI strip. Proteins separated on the pI strip are electrophoresed at the same time as marker proteins (commercially available purified protein of different molecular weight) placed in V-wells. In that way, grids providing approximately 100 nodes as landmarks for the determination of protein spot coordinates are generated. Data analysis is possible with commercial 2DE software capable of warping. The method improves comparability of 2DE protein gels, because they are generated in combination with regular in-gel anchor points formed by protein standards. This was shown here for two comparative experiments with three gels each using Escherichia coli lysate. For a set of 47 well-defined samples spots, the deviation of the coordinates was improved from 7% to less than 1% applying warping using the marker grid. Conclusively, as long as the same protein markers, the same size of pI-strips and the same technology are used, gel matching is reproducibly possible. This is an important advancement for projects involving comparison of 2DE-gels produced over several years and in different laboratories.

  4. Comparison of Proteins in Whole Blood and Dried Blood Spot Samples by LC/MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Hardie, Darryl B.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling methods are desirable for population-wide biomarker screening programs because of their ease of collection, transportation, and storage. Immunoassays are traditionally used to quantify endogenous proteins in these samples but require a separate assay for each protein. Recently, targeted mass spectrometry (MS) has been proposed for generating highly-multiplexed assays for biomarker proteins in DBS samples. In this work, we report the first comparison of proteins in whole blood and DBS samples using an untargeted MS approach. The average number of proteins identified in undepleted whole blood and DBS samples by liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS was 223 and 253, respectively. Protein identification repeatability was between 77 %-92 % within replicates and the majority of these repeated proteins (70 %) were observed in both sample formats. Proteins exclusively identified in the liquid or dried fluid spot format were unbiased based on their molecular weight, isoelectric point, aliphatic index, and grand average hydrophobicity. In addition, we extended this comparison to include proteins in matching plasma and serum samples with their dried fluid spot equivalents, dried plasma spot (DPS), and dried serum spot (DSS). This work begins to define the accessibility of endogenous proteins in dried fluid spot samples for analysis by MS and is useful in evaluating the scope of this new approach.

  5. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1987-09-04

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a dc power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. 8 figs.

  6. Comparison of protein expression profiles of the hepatopancreas in Fenneropenaeus chinensis challenged with heat-inactivated Vibrio anguillarum and white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Jiquan; Zhang, Jinkang; Huang, Bingxin; Yu, Yang; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-02-01

    Fenneropenaeus chinensis (Chinese shrimp) culture industry, like other Penaeidae culture, has been seriously affected by the shrimp diseases caused by bacteria and virus. To better understand the mechanism of immune response of shrimp to different pathogens, proteome research approach was utilized in this study. Firstly, the soluble hepatopancreas protein samples in adult Chinese shrimp among control, heat-inactivated Vibrio-challenged and white spot syndrome virus-infected groups were separated by 2-DE (pH range, 4-7; sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and pH range, 3-10; tricine-SDS-PAGE). Then the differentially expressed protein spots (≥1.5-fold or ≤0.67-fold averagely of controls) were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Using Mascot online database searching algorithm and SEQUEST searching program, 48 and 49 differentially expressed protein spots were successfully identified in response to Vibrio and white spot syndrome virus infection, respectively. Based on these results, we discussed the mechanism of immune response of the shrimp and shed light on the differences between immune response of shrimp toward Vibrio and white spot syndrome virus. This study also set a basis for further analyses of some key genes in immune response of Chinese shrimp.

  7. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1989-04-25

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower and of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a DC power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. A high percentage extraction of proteins is achieved. The extracted proteins can be removed and subjected to partial digestion by trypsin or the like, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, resulting in a gel slab having a pattern of peptide gel spots which can be cored out and subjected to electrophoretic extraction to extract individual peptides.

  8. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a DC power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. A high percentage extraction of proteins is achieved. The extracted proteins can be removed and subjected to partial digestion by trypsin or the like, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, resulting in a gel slab having a pattern of peptide gel spots which can be cored out and subjected to electrophoretic extraction to extract individual peptides.

  9. Analysis of protein composition of rabbit aqueous humor following two different cataract surgery incision procedures using 2-DE and LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    mechanism of protein release for each type of incision procedure could be different. Although the total protein concentration was increased (at 0.5 and 2 hour time points and between types of surgery) many of 2-DE protein spots were similar based on 2-DE and MS analyses, and only a small number of protein spots changed with either the time points or surgical conditions (0.4 -1.9%). This suggests that the high protein content is due to an increase in the concentration of the same proteins with only a few unique proteins being altered per time point and with the different surgery type. This is the first report on the comparison of AH protein composition following two different cataract surgery procedures and it establishes the basis for better understanding of protein release into AH during events such as cataract surgery or other possible intervention to the eyes. PMID:21306621

  10. Prediction of protein interaction hot spots using rough set-based multiple criteria linear programming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhang, Zhiwang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xinyang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Yong

    2011-01-21

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamentally important in many biological processes and it is in pressing need to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis studies have found that only a small fraction of surface residues, known as hot spots, are responsible for the physical binding in protein complexes. However, revealing hot spots by mutagenesis experiments are usually time consuming and expensive. In order to complement the experimental efforts, we propose a new computational approach in this paper to predict hot spots. Our method, Rough Set-based Multiple Criteria Linear Programming (RS-MCLP), integrates rough sets theory and multiple criteria linear programming to choose dominant features and computationally predict hot spots. Our approach is benchmarked by a dataset of 904 alanine-mutated residues and the results show that our RS-MCLP method performs better than other methods, e.g., MCLP, Decision Tree, Bayes Net, and the existing HotSprint database. In addition, we reveal several biological insights based on our analysis. We find that four features (the change of accessible surface area, percentage of the change of accessible surface area, size of a residue, and atomic contacts) are critical in predicting hot spots. Furthermore, we find that three residues (Tyr, Trp, and Phe) are abundant in hot spots through analyzing the distribution of amino acids.

  11. Changes in the 2-DE protein profile during zygotic embryogenesis in the Brazilian Pine (Araucaria angustifolia).

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Tiago S; Silveira, Vanildo; Junqueira, Magno; Dias, Leonardo L C; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Shevchenko, Andrej; Floh, Eny I S

    2009-04-13

    Araucaria angustifolia is the only native conifer of economic importance in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. Due to a clear-cutting form of exploitation this species has received the status of vulnerable. The aim of this work was to investigate and characterize changes in protein expression profile during seed development of this endangered species. For this, the proteome of developing seeds was characterized by 2-DE and LC-MS/MS. Ninety six proteins were confidently identified and classified according to their biological function and expression profile. Overaccumulated proteins in early seed development indicated a higher control on oxidative stress metabolism during this phase. In contrast, highly expressed proteins in late stages revealed an active metabolism, leading to carbon assimilation and storage compounds accumulation. Comprehensive protein expression profiles and identification of overaccumulated proteins provide new insights into the process of embryogenesis in this recalcitrant species. Considerations on the improvement and control of somatic embryogenesis through medium manipulation and protein markers screening using data generated are also discussed.

  12. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D. G.; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D. S.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Moreira, Irina S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set. PMID:27472327

  13. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Moreira, Irina S

    2016-07-27

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set.

  14. Characterization of interfacial solvent in protein complexes and contribution of wet spots to the interface description.

    PubMed

    Teyra, Joan; Pisabarro, M T

    2007-06-01

    Water networks in protein interfaces can complement direct interactions contributing significantly to molecular recognition, function, and stability of protein association. Thus, water can be seen as an extension or addition of protein structural features, which may add plenty of information to protein interfacial definition. However, solvent is frequently neglected in protein interaction studies. Analysis of the interfacial information contained in the PDB is essential to achieve more accurate descriptions of protein interfaces. With this aim, we have used the SCOWLP database (http://www.scowlp.org) and applied computational geometry methods to extract and analyze interfacial information of a high-resolution nonredundant dataset of 176 protein complexes containing obligate and transient interfaces. We have identified all interfacial residues and characterized them in terms of temperature factors, secondary structure, residue composition, and pairing preferences to understand their contribution to the interface description. We have paid special attention to water-bridged residues; focusing on those that interact only mediated by a water molecule called wet spots. Our results show that 40.1% of the interfacial residues are interacting through water and that wet spots represent a 14.5% of the total, emphasizing the importance of the inclusion of solvent in protein interaction studies, and the contribution of wet spots to interfacial description. Wet spots present similar characteristics to residues binding buried water molecules in the core or cavities of proteins; being preferably located in nonregular secondary structures and establishing hydrogen bonds by their main-chains. We observe that obligate and transient interfaces present a comparable amount of solvent. Moreover, the role of solvent in both complex types differs according to the different nature of their interfaces. The information obtained in our studies will assist in the process of accomplishing more

  15. Continuous scaling 3d micro flow printing for improved spot morphology in protein microarrays - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Gale, Bruce; Eckman, Josh; Miles, Adam; Brooks, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray platform while innovative still poses a number of challenges which can only be met through creative and sophisticated system design. Pin printing while allowing for flexibility as to the type of medium printed does not offer the kind of spot reproducibility that a very sensitive application may require. The Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM) was designed to not only allow for flexibility and reproducibility but to also achieve solution stability through flow scaling. This study uses the emerging CFM for printing protein and antibodies three dimensionally for general protein microarray applications. Consistent spot morphology, a continual and persistent problem in traditional pin printed microarrays, was compared under variable printed flow rates. The final assessment was performed using a rudimentary shear model. Force effects discussion and statistical data was used to demonstrate the versatility of the system.

  16. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots.

  17. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  18. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in recognition of beta-integrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Qing-Hui; Huang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that beta-integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of beta-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was examined. The results showed that envelope proteins VP26, VP31, VP37, VP90 and nucleocapsid protein VP136 interacted with LvInt. RGD-, YGL- and LDV-related peptide functioned as motifs of WSSV proteins binding with beta-integrin. The beta-integrin ligand of RGDT had better blocking effect compared with that of YGL- and LDV-related peptides. In vivo assay indicated that RGD-, LDV- and YGL-related peptides could partially block WSSV infection. These data collectively indicate that multiple proteins were involved in recognition of beta-integrin. Identification of proteins in WSSV that are associated with beta-integrin will assist development of new agents for effective control of the white spot syndrome.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of a novel nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, Choy L.

    2006-08-01

    The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. Native protein was purified and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. To facilitate purification, a cleavable His{sub 6} tag was introduced at the N-terminus. The native protein was purified and crystallized by vapour diffusion against mother liquor containing 2 M sodium acetate, 100 mM MES pH 6.3, 25 mM cadmium sulfate and 3% glycerol. Crystals were obtained within 7 d and diffracted to 2.2 Å; they belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.13, b = 78.21, c = 78.98 Å and four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The selenomethionine-labelled protein produced isomorphous crystals that diffracted to approximately 3.3 Å.

  20. Functional Characteristics of Tumor-Associated Protein Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Responsive Protein Spot14 (S14) is known to be necessary for high rate de novo fatty acid synthesis in tissues that synthesize lipid; however, S14 is also...gene expression for various glycolysis, pentose phosphate shunt, and de novo fatty acid synthesis mRNAs; but unexpectedly, loss of Spot14 increased...the glycolysis pathway to somehow tip metabolism towards fatty acid synthesis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS THRSP (Spot14), Cancer Metabolism, Fatty Acid

  1. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjie; Wu, Jinlu; Chen, Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan, Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  2. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Shiung, Hui-Jui; Lo, Chu-Fang; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Lee, Tai-Lin; Huang, Wei-Tung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Chang, Yun-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570), and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  3. Construction and application of a protein interaction map for white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    PubMed

    Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Chu, Yu-Fei; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Meemetta, Watcharachai; Senapin, Saengchan; Huang, Wei-Pang; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Flegel, Timothy W; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is currently the most serious global threat for cultured shrimp production. Although its large, double-stranded DNA genome has been completely characterized, most putative protein functions remain obscure. To provide more informative knowledge about this virus, a proteomic-scale network of WSSV-WSSV protein interactions was carried out using a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid analysis. An array of yeast transformants containing each WSSV open reading frame fused with GAL4 DNA binding domain and GAL4 activation domain was constructed yielding 187 bait and 182 prey constructs, respectively. On screening of ∼28,000 pairwise combinations, 710 interactions were obtained from 143 baits. An independent coimmunoprecipitation assay (co-IP) was performed to validate the selected protein interaction pairs identified from the yeast two-hybrid approach. The program Cytoscape was employed to create a WSSV protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The topology of the WSSV PPI network was based on the Barabási-Albert model and consisted of a scale-free network that resembled other established viral protein interaction networks. Using the RNA interference approach, knocking down either of two candidate hub proteins gave shrimp more protection against WSSV than knocking down a nonhub gene. The WSSV protein interaction map established in this study provides novel guidance for further studies on shrimp viral pathogenesis, host-viral protein interaction and potential targets for therapeutic and preventative antiviral strategies in shrimp aquaculture.

  4. Solvent accessible surface area-based hot-spot detection methods for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Pimenta, António C; Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Melo, André; Cordeiro, Maria N D S; Moreira, Irina S

    2015-05-26

    Due to the importance of hot-spots (HS) detection and the efficiency of computational methodologies, several HS detecting approaches have been developed. The current paper presents new models to predict HS for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions with better statistics compared with the ones currently reported in literature. These models are based on solvent accessible surface area (SASA) and genetic conservation features subjected to simple Bayes networks (protein-protein systems) and a more complex multi-objective genetic algorithm-support vector machine algorithms (protein-nucleic acid systems). The best models for these interactions have been implemented in two free Web tools.

  5. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  6. The Role of Water Occlusion for the Definition of a Protein Binding Hot-Spot.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina S

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems rely on the establishment of interactions between biomolecules, which take place in the aqueous environment of the cell. It was already demonstrated that a small set of residues at the interface, Hot-Spots(HS), contributes significantly to the binding free energy. However, these energetic determinants of affinity and specificity are still not fully understood. Moreover, the contribution of water to their HS character is also poorly characterized. In this review, we have focused on the structural data available that support the occlusion of HS from solvent, and therefore the "O-ring theory"not only on protein-protein but also on protein-DNA complexes. We also emphasized the use of Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) features in a variety of machine-learning approaches that aim to detect binding HS.

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of a novel nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. To facilitate purification, a cleavable His{sub 6} tag was introduced at the N-terminus. The native protein was purified and crystallized by vapor diffusion against mother liquor containing 2 M sodium acetate, 100 mM MES pH 6.3, 25 mM cadmium sulfate and 3% glycerol. Crystals were obtained within 7 d and diffracted to 2.2 Angstroms; they belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.13, b = 78.21, c = 78.98 Angstroms and four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The selenomethionine-labeled protein produced isomorphous crystals that diffracted to approximately 3.3 Angstroms.

  8. Identification of Hot Spots in Protein Structures Using Gaussian Network Model and Gaussian Naive Bayes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Shan, Guogen

    2016-01-01

    Residue fluctuations in protein structures have been shown to be highly associated with various protein functions. Gaussian network model (GNM), a simple representative coarse-grained model, was widely adopted to reveal function-related protein dynamics. We directly utilized the high frequency modes generated by GNM and further performed Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB) to identify hot spot residues. Two coding schemes about the feature vectors were implemented with varying distance cutoffs for GNM and sliding window sizes for GNB based on tenfold cross validations: one by using only a single high mode and the other by combining multiple modes with the highest frequency. Our proposed methods outperformed the previous work that did not directly utilize the high frequency modes generated by GNM, with regard to overall performance evaluated using F1 measure. Moreover, we found that inclusion of more high frequency modes for a GNB classifier can significantly improve the sensitivity. The present study provided additional valuable insights into the relation between the hot spots and the residue fluctuations. PMID:27882325

  9. The role of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) VP466 protein in shrimp antiviral phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Zong, Rongrong; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2012-08-01

    Widespread evidence indicates that the structural proteins of virus play very important roles in virus-host interactions. However, the effect of viral proteins on host immunity has not been addressed. Our previous studies revealed that the host shrimp Rab6 (termed as PjRab previously), tropomyosin, β-actin and the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope protein VP466 formed a complex. In this study, the VP466 protein was shown to be able to bind host Rab6 protein and increase its GTPase activity in vivo and vitro. Thus, VP466 could function as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) of Rab6. In the VP466-Rab-actin pathway, the increase of the Rab6 activity induced rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, resulting in the formation of actin stress fibers which promoted the phagocytosis against virus. Therefore our findings revealed that a viral protein could be employed by host to initiate the host immunity, representing a novel molecular mechanism in the virus-host interaction. Our study would help to better understand the molecular events in immune response against virus infection in invertebrates.

  10. Influence of buffer composition on the distribution of inkjet printed protein molecules and the resulting spot morphology.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; van Amerongen, Aart; Norde, Willem

    2012-08-30

    Producing high quality protein microarrays on inexpensive substrates like polystyrene is a big challenge in the field of diagnostics. Using a non-contact inkjet printer we have produced microarrays on polystyrene slides for two different biotinylated biomolecules, bovine serum albumin (BSA-biotin) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG-biotin), and studied the influence of buffer (composition and pH) on the spot morphology and signal intensity. Atomic force microscopy revealed the morphological pattern of the (biomolecule) spots printed from phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.6). The spots showed an irregular crust-like appearance when printed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4), mainly due to the high NaCl content, whereas spots of biomolecules printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) showed a smooth morphology. In addition, the rinsing of these dried spots led to the loss of a considerable fraction of the biomolecules, leaving behind a small fraction that is compatible with the (mono)layer. It was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy that the quality of the spots with respect to the uniformity and distribution of the biomolecules therein was superior when printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) as compared to other buffer systems. Particularly, spotting in PBS yielded spots having a very irregular distribution and morphology.

  11. Antibacterial and protein-repellent orthodontic cement to combat biofilms and white spot lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives White spot lesions are the most undesired side-effect of fixed orthodontic treatments. The objectives of this study were to combine nanoparticles of silver (NAg) with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) to develop a modified resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI) as orthodontic cement with double benefits of antibacterial and protein-repellent capabilities for the first time. Methods NAg and MPC were incorporated into a commercial RMGI. Another commercial orthodontic adhesive also served as control. Enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined. Protein adsorption was measured via a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was tested. Biofilms adherent on the cement samples and planktonic bacteria in the culture medium away from the cement surfaces were both evaluated for bacterial metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Results Adding 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC to RMGI, and water-aging for 30 days, did not adversely affect the SBS, compared to the unmodified RMGI control (p>0.1). The modified RMGI containing 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC achieved the greatest reduction in protein adsorption, bacterial adhesion, CFU, metabolic activity and lactic acid production. The RMGI containing 0.1% NAg and 3% MPC inhibited not only the bacteria on its surface, but also the bacteria away from the surface in the culture medium. Conclusions The incorporation of double agents (antibacterial NAg + protein-repellent MPC) into RMGI achieved much stronger inhibition of biofilms than using each agent alone. The novel antibacterial and protein-repellent RMGI with substantially-reduced biofilm acids is promising as an orthodontic cement to combat white spot lesions in enamel. PMID:26427311

  12. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-06-17

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process.

  13. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins’ stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  14. Crystal Structure of Major Envelope Protein VP24 from White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lifang; Su, Yintao; Zhao, Yanhe; Fu, Zheng-qing; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major and most serious pathogen in the shrimp industry. As one of the most abundant envelope protein, VP24 acts as a core protein interacting with other structure proteins and plays an important role in virus assembly and infection. Here, we have presented the crystal structure of VP24 from WSSV. In the structure, VP24 consists of a nine-stranded β–barrel fold with mostly antiparallel β-strands, and the loops extending out the β–barrel at both N-terminus and C-terminus, which is distinct to those of the other two major envelope proteins VP28 and VP26. Structural comparison of VP24 with VP26 and VP28 reveals opposite electrostatic surface potential properties of them. These structural differences could provide insight into their differential functional mechanisms and roles for virus assembly and infection. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, suggesting a likely natural conformation of VP24 in viral envelope. Therefore, in addition to confirming the evolutionary relationship among the three abundant envelope proteins of WSSV, our structural studies also facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying special roles of VP24 in WSSV assembly and infection. PMID:27572278

  15. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution.

  16. Disease proteomics of high-molecular-mass proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with agarose gels in the first dimension (Agarose 2-DE).

    PubMed

    Oh-Ishi, Masamichi; Maeda, Tadakazu

    2007-04-15

    Agarose gel is the preferred electrophoretic medium currently used for separating high molecular mass (HMM) proteins (MW>100 kDa). Agarose gels are widely used for both SDS-agarose gel electrophoresis and agarose isoelectric focusing (IEF). A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis method employing agarose gels in the first dimension (agarose 2-DE) that is sufficiently good at separating up to 1.5mg of HMM proteins with molecular masses as large as 500 kDa has been used to separate proteins from various diseased tissues and cells. Although resolution of the agarose 2-DE pattern always depends on the tissue being analyzed, sample preparation procedures including (i) protein extraction with an SDS sample buffer; (ii) ultracentrifugation of a tissue homogenate; and (iii) 1% SDS in both stacking and separation gels of the second-dimension SDS-PAGE gel, are generally effective for HMM protein detection. In a comprehensive prostate cancer proteome study using agarose 2-DE, the HMM region of the gel was rich in proteins of particular gene/protein expression groups (39.1% of the HMM proteins but only 28.4% of the LMM ones were classified as transcription/translation-related proteins). Examples include transcription factors, DNA or RNA binding proteins, and ribosomal proteins. To understand oxidative stress-induced cellular damage at the protein level, a novel proteomic method, in which protein carbonyls were derivatized with biotin hydrazide followed by agarose 2-DE, was useful for detecting HMM protein carbonyls in tissues of both a diabetes model Ostuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat and a control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rat. In this paper, we review the use of agarose gels for separation of HMM proteins and disease proteomics of HMM proteins in general, with particular attention paid to our proteome analyzes based on the use of agarose 2-DE for protein separation followed by the use of mass spectrometry for protein identification.

  17. Envelope protein VP24 from White spot syndrome virus: expression, purification and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifang; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major shrimp pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP24 is one of the major envelope proteins of WSSV. In order to facilitate purification, crystallization and structure determination, the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of approximately 26 amino acids was truncated from VP24 and several mutants were prepared to increase the proportion of selenomethionine (SeMet) residues for subsequent structural determination using the SAD method. Truncated VP24, its mutants and the corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified, and the native and SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of VP24 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5, 2.75 M ammonium acetate with a drop volume ratio of two parts protein solution to one part reservoir solution. Notably, ATP was added as a critical additive to the drop with a final concentration of 10 mM. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP24 mutant diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and those of the native diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; the crystals belonged to space group I213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 140 Å.

  18. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  19. Functional Characteristics of Tumor-Associated Protein Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Thyroid Hormone Responsive Protein Spot14 (S14) is known to be necessary for high rate de novo fatty acid ...systems. 15. SUBJECT TERMS THRSP (Spot14), Cancer Metabolism, Fatty Acid Synthesis, 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...cancers are often characterized by elevated fatty acid synthesis [2], and those increases correlate with reduced disease free survival of breast cancer

  20. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kanda, Ayami; Ohnishi, Jun; Ohki, Takehiro; Tsuda, Shinya

    2009-08-01

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  1. Separation of basic proteins from Leishmania using a combination of Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) and 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) under basic conditions.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Marie-Christine; Racine, Gina; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Basic proteins, an important class of proteins in intracellular organisms such as Leishmania, are usually underrepresented on 2D gels. This chapter describes a method combining basic proteins fractionation using Free flow electrophoresis in isoelectric focusing mode (IEF-FFE) followed by protein separation using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in basic conditions. The combination of these two techniques represents a great improvement for the visualization of Leishmania proteins with basic pI using 2D gels.

  2. Envelope Proteins of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Interact with Litopenaeus vannamei Peritrophin-Like Protein (LvPT).

    PubMed

    Xie, Shijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiquan; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp cultures. The interactions between viral proteins and their receptors on the surface of cells in a frontier target tissue are crucial for triggering an infection. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library was constructed using cDNA obtained from the stomach and gut of Litopenaeus vannamei, to ascertain the role of envelope proteins in WSSV infection. For this purpose, VP37 was used as the bait in the Y2H library screening. Forty positive clones were detected after screening. The positive clones were analyzed and discriminated, and two clones belonging to the peritrophin family were subsequently confirmed as genuine positive clones. Sequence analysis revealed that both clones could be considered as the same gene, LV-peritrophin (LvPT). Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between LvPT and VP37. Further studies in the Y2H system revealed that LvPT could also interact with other WSSV envelope proteins such as VP32, VP38A, VP39B, and VP41A. The distribution of LvPT in tissues revealed that LvPT was mainly expressed in the stomach than in other tissues. In addition, LvPT was found to be a secretory protein, and its chitin-binding ability was also confirmed.

  3. Determining degradation and synthesis rates of arabidopsis proteins using the kinetics of progressive 15N labeling of two-dimensional gel-separated protein spots.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A Harvey

    2012-06-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a (15)N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (K(S)) and degradation (K(D)) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify K(S) and K(D) for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. K(S) and K(D) correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive (15)N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability.

  4. Determining Degradation and Synthesis Rates of Arabidopsis Proteins Using the Kinetics of Progressive 15N Labeling of Two-dimensional Gel-separated Protein Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a 15N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (KS) and degradation (KD) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify KS and KD for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. KS and KD correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive 15N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability. PMID:22215636

  5. Identification of domains of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deletion and alanine-substitution mutants of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein were generated to identify domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology, using a heterologous expression system derived from Tobacco mosaic virus. Two regions of NSm were required for both tub...

  6. VP24 Is a Chitin-Binding Protein Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaipeng; Han, Yali; Xu, Limei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral ingestion is the major route of infection for the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). However, the mechanism by which virus particles in the digestive tract invade host cells is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that WSSV virions can bind to chitin through one of the major envelope proteins (VP24). Mutagenesis analysis indicated that amino acids (aa) 186 to 200 in the C terminus of VP24 were required for chitin binding. Moreover, the P-VP24186–200 peptide derived from the VP24 chitin binding region significantly inhibited the VP24-chitin interaction and the WSSV-chitin interaction, implying that VP24 participates in WSSV binding to chitin. Oral inoculation experiments showed that P-VP24186–200 treatment reduced the number of virus particles remaining in the digestive tract during the early stage of infection and greatly hindered WSSV proliferation in shrimp. These data indicate that binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection and provide new ideas for preventing WSSV infection in shrimp farms. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show that WSSV can bind to chitin through the envelope protein VP24. The chitin-binding domain of VP24 maps to amino acids 186 to 200 in the C terminus. Binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection. These findings not only extend our knowledge of WSSV infection but also provide new insights into strategies to prevent WSSV infection in shrimp farms. PMID:26512091

  7. ICP35 Is a TREX-Like Protein Identified in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Phairoh, Panapat; Suthibatpong, Thana; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Jongruja, Nujarin; Senapin, Saengchan; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    ICP35 is a non-structural protein from White spot syndrome virus believed to be important in viral replication. Since ICP35 was found to localize in the host nucleus, it has been speculated that the function of ICP35 might be involved in the interaction of DNA. In this study, we overexpressed, purified and characterized ICP35. The thioredoxin-fused ICP35 (thio-ICP35) was strongly expressed in E. coli and be able to form itself into dimers. Investigation of the interaction between ICP35 and DNA revealed that ICP35 can perform DNase activity. Structural model of ICP35 was successfully built on TREX1, suggesting that ICP35 might adopt the folding similar to that of TREX1 protein. Several residues important for dimerization in TREX1 are also conserved in ICP35. Residue Asn126 and Asp132, which are seen to be in close proximity to metal ions in the ICP35 model, were shown through site-directed mutagenesis to be critical for DNase activity. PMID:27348862

  8. Expression, Purification, Crystallization of Two Major Envelope Proteins from White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 {angstrom}. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 {angstrom}, and diffracts to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution.

  9. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Melissa R.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Ju, Shulin; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Orwig, Susan D.; Kozakov, Dima; Brenke, Ryan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Beglov, Dmitry; Vajda, Sandor; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2010-08-04

    The identification of hot spots, i.e., binding regions that contribute substantially to the free energy of ligand binding, is a critical step for structure-based drug design. Here we present the application of two fragment-based methods to the detection of hot spots for DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase (GCase), targets for the development of therapeutics for Parkinson's and Gaucher's diseases, respectively. While the structures of these two proteins are known, binding information is lacking. In this study we employ the experimental multiple solvent crystal structures (MSCS) method and computational fragment mapping (FTMap) to identify regions suitable for the development of pharmacological chaperones for DJ-1 and GCase. Comparison of data derived via MSCS and FTMap also shows that FTMap, a computational method for the identification of fragment binding hot spots, is an accurate and robust alternative to the performance of expensive and difficult crystallographic experiments.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline 2-DE: Optimization and application to comparative proteome analysis of flagellate life stages

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Adriana D; Charneau, Sébastien; Paba, Jaime; Guércio, Rafael AP; Teixeira, Antonio RL; Santana, Jaime M; Sousa, Marcelo V; Ricart, Carlos AO

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellate protozoan, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a chronic illness that causes irreversible damage to heart and digestive tract in humans. Previous 2-DE analyses of T. cruzi proteome have not focused on basic proteins, possibly because of inherent difficulties for optimizing 2-DE in the alkaline pH range. However, T. cruzi wide pH range 2-DE gels have shown few visible spots in the alkaline region, indicating that the parasite either did not have an appreciable amount of alkaline proteins or that these proteins were underrepresented in the 2-DE gels. Results Different IEF conditions using 6–11 pH gradient strips were tested for separation of T. cruzi alkaline proteins. The optimized methodology described here was performed using anodic "paper bridge" sample loading supplemented by increased concentration of DTT and Triton X-100 on Multiphor II (GE Healthcare) equipment and an electrode pad embedded in DTT- containing solution near the cathode in order to avoid depletion of reducing agent during IEF. Landmark proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting allowing the production of an epimastigote 2-DE map. Most identified proteins corresponded to metabolic enzymes, especially those related to amino acid metabolism. The optimized 2-DE protocol was applied in combination with the "two-in-one gel" method to verify the relative expression of the identified proteins between samples from epimastigote and trypomastigote life stages. Conclusion High resolution 2-DE gels of T. cruzi life forms were achieved using the optimized methodology and a partial epimastigote alkaline 2-DE map was built. Among 700 protein spots detected, 422 were alkaline with a pI above 7.0. The "two-in-one gel" method simplified the comparative analysis between T. cruzi life stages since it minimized variations in spot migration and silver-stained spot volumes. The comparative data were in agreement with biological traits of T. cruzi life

  11. Minichromosome maintenance protein 7 regulates phagocytosis in kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicas against white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Minichromosome maintenance protein (MCM7) belongs to the MCM protein family and participates in the MCM complex by playing a role in the cell replication cycle and chromosome initiation of eukaryotes. Previously, we found that several genes, including MCM7, were over-expressed in Drosophila melanogaster after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, we aimed to further research the MCM7 of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (mjMCM7) and determine its role in the innate immune system. To this end, we cloned the entire 2307-bp mjMCM7 sequence, including a 1974-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 658-aa-long protein. Real-time PCR showed that the gene was primarily expressed in the hemolymph and hepatopancreas and over-expressed in shrimp challenged with WSSV. Gene function study was carried out by knocking down the expression of MCM7 using small interference RNA (siRNA). The results revealed that β-actin, hemocyanin, prophenoloxidase (proPO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were up-regulated while the cytoskeleton proteins such as myosin and Rho were significantly down-regulated at 24 h after treatment. The results indicate a possible relationship between mjMCM7 and the innate immune system, and suggest that mjMCM7 may play a role in phagocytosis. After WSSV challenge, WSSV copies and mortality count were both higher in the MCM7-siRNA-treated groups at 60 h after treatment, and the mortality count approached that of the control groups over time. The phagocytosis rate was significantly lower in the MCM7-siRNA-treated group than in the WSSV group. The findings of this study confirm that mjMCM7 positively regulates phagocytosis and plays an important role against WSSV. These results could help researchers to further understand the function of the MCM7 protein and reveal its potential role in the innate immunity of invertebrates.

  12. Lyophilization, a practical way to store and transport tissues prior to protein extraction for 2DE analysis?

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sebastien C; Dens, Koen; Van den houwe, Ines; Swennen, Rony; Panis, Bart

    2007-09-01

    To date, lyophilized samples are rarely utilized in proteomics experiments. This is most likely because researchers are concerned about inducing cross-linking of proteins via amide bonds, leading to artefactual charge modification and thus resulting in irreproducible results and bad gels. Indeed, it is known that lyophilization can cause crosslinking. The potential reaction is a reaction of free amino groups of a protein (N-terminal alpha-amino groups and epsilon-amino groups from lysine) with the reducing group of sugar molecules. The rate and extent of this reaction depends on the sugar content of the sample, the efficiency of lyophilization process, the residual water content of the material and the storage temperature. Lyophilization is a cheap, practical and safe alternative for the storage and transportation of samples prior to protein extraction, separation and quantification via 2DE, when care is taken (i) to dry the samples to the lowest practicable moisture content, (ii) to transport and store them under water- and airtight conditions and (iii) to avoid heating of the sample.

  13. Myofibrillar Z-discs Are a Protein Phosphorylation Hot Spot with Protein Kinase C (PKCα) Modulating Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Lena; Wiese, Heike; Leber, Yvonne; Schwäble, Anja N; Fricke, Anna L; Rohland, Anne; Knapp, Bettina; Peikert, Christian D; Drepper, Friedel; van der Ven, Peter F M; Radziwill, Gerald; Fürst, Dieter O; Warscheid, Bettina

    2017-03-01

    The Z-disc is a protein-rich structure critically important for the development and integrity of myofibrils, which are the contractile organelles of cross-striated muscle cells. We here used mouse C2C12 myoblast, which were differentiated into myotubes, followed by electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to generate contracting myotubes comprising mature Z-discs. Using a quantitative proteomics approach, we found significant changes in the relative abundance of 387 proteins in myoblasts versus differentiated myotubes, reflecting the drastic phenotypic conversion of these cells during myogenesis. Interestingly, EPS of differentiated myotubes to induce Z-disc assembly and maturation resulted in increased levels of proteins involved in ATP synthesis, presumably to fulfill the higher energy demand of contracting myotubes. Because an important role of the Z-disc for signal integration and transduction was recently suggested, its precise phosphorylation landscape further warranted in-depth analysis. We therefore established, by global phosphoproteomics of EPS-treated contracting myotubes, a comprehensive site-resolved protein phosphorylation map of the Z-disc and found that it is a phosphorylation hotspot in skeletal myocytes, underscoring its functions in signaling and disease-related processes. In an illustrative fashion, we analyzed the actin-binding multiadaptor protein filamin C (FLNc), which is essential for Z-disc assembly and maintenance, and found that PKCα phosphorylation at distinct serine residues in its hinge 2 region prevents its cleavage at an adjacent tyrosine residue by calpain 1. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments indicated that this phosphorylation modulates FLNc dynamics. Moreover, FLNc lacking the cleaved Ig-like domain 24 exhibited remarkably fast kinetics and exceedingly high mobility. Our data set provides research community resource for further identification of kinase-mediated changes in myofibrillar protein interactions

  14. Consensus Brain-derived Protein, Extraction Protocol for the Study of Human and Murine Brain Proteome Using Both 2D-DIGE and Mini 2DE Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Jumeau, Fanny; Derisbourg, Maxime; Burnouf, Sylvie; Tran, Hélène; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Obriot, Hélène; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Mitchell, Valérie; Lefranc, Didier; Hamdane, Malika; Blum, David; Buée, Luc; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is a powerful tool to uncover proteome modifications potentially related to different physiological or pathological conditions. Basically, this technique is based on the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point in a first step, and secondly according to their molecular weights by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In this report an optimized sample preparation protocol for little amount of human post-mortem and mouse brain tissue is described. This method enables to perform both two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mini 2DE immunoblotting. The combination of these approaches allows one to not only find new proteins and/or protein modifications in their expression thanks to its compatibility with mass spectrometry detection, but also a new insight into markers validation. Thus, mini-2DE coupled to western blotting permits to identify and validate post-translational modifications, proteins catabolism and provides a qualitative comparison among different conditions and/or treatments. Herein, we provide a method to study components of protein aggregates found in AD and Lewy body dementia such as the amyloid-beta peptide and the alpha-synuclein. Our method can thus be adapted for the analysis of the proteome and insoluble proteins extract from human brain tissue and mice models too. In parallel, it may provide useful information for the study of molecular and cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative diseases as well as potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24747743

  15. Consensus brain-derived protein, extraction protocol for the study of human and murine brain proteome using both 2D-DIGE and mini 2DE immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Jumeau, Fanny; Derisbourg, Maxime; Burnouf, Sylvie; Tran, Hélène; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Obriot, Hélène; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Mitchell, Valérie; Lefranc, Didier; Hamdane, Malika; Blum, David; Buée, Luc; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2014-04-10

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is a powerful tool to uncover proteome modifications potentially related to different physiological or pathological conditions. Basically, this technique is based on the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point in a first step, and secondly according to their molecular weights by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In this report an optimized sample preparation protocol for little amount of human post-mortem and mouse brain tissue is described. This method enables to perform both two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mini 2DE immunoblotting. The combination of these approaches allows one to not only find new proteins and/or protein modifications in their expression thanks to its compatibility with mass spectrometry detection, but also a new insight into markers validation. Thus, mini-2DE coupled to western blotting permits to identify and validate post-translational modifications, proteins catabolism and provides a qualitative comparison among different conditions and/or treatments. Herein, we provide a method to study components of protein aggregates found in AD and Lewy body dementia such as the amyloid-beta peptide and the alpha-synuclein. Our method can thus be adapted for the analysis of the proteome and insoluble proteins extract from human brain tissue and mice models too. In parallel, it may provide useful information for the study of molecular and cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative diseases as well as potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis and Differentially Expressed Proteins in Response to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Badillo-Vargas, I. E.; Rotenberg, D.; Schneweis, D. J.; Hiromasa, Y.; Tomich, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis in a persistent propagative manner. Despite the extensive replication of TSWV in midgut and salivary glands, there is little to no pathogenic effect on F. occidentalis. We hypothesize that the first-instar larva (L1) of F. occidentalis mounts a response to TSWV that protects it from pathogenic effects caused by virus infection and replication in various insect tissues. A partial thrips transcriptome was generated using 454-Titanium sequencing of cDNA generated from F. occidentalis exposed to TSWV. Using these sequences, the L1 thrips proteome that resolved on a two-dimensional gel was characterized. Forty-seven percent of the resolved protein spots were identified using the thrips transcriptome. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis of virus titer in L1 thrips revealed a significant increase in the normalized abundance of TSWV nucleocapsid RNA from 2 to 21 h after a 3-h acquisition access period on virus-infected plant tissue, indicative of infection and accumulation of virus. We compared the proteomes of infected and noninfected L1s to identify proteins that display differential abundances in response to virus. Using four biological replicates, 26 spots containing 37 proteins were significantly altered in response to TSWV. Gene ontology assignments for 32 of these proteins revealed biological roles associated with the infection cycle of other plant- and animal-infecting viruses and antiviral defense responses. Our findings support the hypothesis that L1 thrips display a complex reaction to TSWV infection and provide new insights toward unraveling the molecular basis of this interaction. PMID:22696645

  17. Active protease mapping in 2DE gels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Russell, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    Proteases act as the molecular mediators of many vital biological processes. To understand the function of each protease, it needs to be separated from other proteins and characterized in its natural, biologically active form. In the method described in this chapter, proteases in a biological sample are separated under nonreducing conditions in 2DE gels. A specific small protease substrate, tagged with a fluorescent dye, is copolymerized into the SDS gel in the second dimension. After electrophoresis, the proteins are renatured by washing the gel with Triton X-100 solution or Milli Q water to remove SDS. The gel is then incubated in a protease assay buffer. The hydrolysis of the tagged specific substrate by the renatured protease releases the free fluorescent dye, which fluoresces in situ. The fluorescent spots indicate the location of the specific proteases in the gel and the specificity of the proteases.

  18. Identifying binding hot spots on protein surfaces by mixed-solvent molecular dynamics: HIV-1 protease as a test case.

    PubMed

    Ung, Peter M U; Ghanakota, Phani; Graham, Sarah E; Lexa, Katrina W; Carlson, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) simulations use full protein flexibility and competition between water and small organic probes to achieve accurate hot-spot mapping on protein surfaces. In this study, we improved MixMD using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease (HIVp) as the test case. We used three probe-water solutions (acetonitrile-water, isopropanol-water, and pyrimidine-water), first at 50% w/w concentration and later at 5% v/v. Paradoxically, better mapping was achieved by using fewer probes; 5% simulations gave a superior signal-to-noise ratio and far fewer spurious hot spots than 50% MixMD. Furthermore, very intense and well-defined probe occupancies were observed in the catalytic site and potential allosteric sites that have been confirmed experimentally. The Eye site, an allosteric site underneath the flap of HIVp, has been confirmed by the presence of a 5-nitroindole fragment in a crystal structure. MixMD also mapped two additional hot spots: the Exo site (between the Gly16-Gly17 and Cys67-Gly68 loops) and the Face site (between Glu21-Ala22 and Val84-Ile85 loops). The Exo site was observed to overlap with crystallographic additives such as acetate and dimethyl sulfoxide that are present in different crystal forms of the protein. Analysis of crystal structures of HIVp in different symmetry groups has shown that some surface sites are common interfaces for crystal contacts, which means that they are surfaces that are relatively easy to desolvate and complement with organic molecules. MixMD should identify these sites; in fact, their occupancy values help establish a solid cut-off where "druggable" sites are required to have higher occupancies than the crystal-packing faces.

  19. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis of 2DE-separated mouse spinal cord and rat hippocampus proteins suggests an NGxG motif of importance for in vivo deamidation.

    PubMed

    Mikkat, Stefan; Kischstein, Timo; Kreutzer, Michael; Glocker, Michael O

    2013-06-01

    Asparagine deamidation is a common nonenzymatic post-translational modification comprising the conversion of asparaginyl residues to aspartyl and isoaspartyl residues, respectively. As a result an additional negative charge is introduced that can affect the tertiary structure as well as the biological activity of a protein. Since deamidation reduces the protein's pI value, differentially deamidated forms of a protein can be separated in 2D gels. We have analyzed a dataset of 430 protein spots from 2D gels that contained mouse spinal cord proteins and estimated that roughly 10% of the spots in a Coomassie-stained gel derive from in vivo deamidation at particular asparaginyl residues. Several of the deamidated protein forms, e.g. tropomodulin-2, V-type proton ATPase subunit B, and protein disulfide-isomerase A3 were also found in 2D gels of proteins extracted from rat hippocampus. All identified deamidation sites contained a glycine residue on the carboxyl side of the asparaginyl residue. Strikingly, a second glycine residue at the +3 position was found in the majority of the deamidated peptides. We propose that the NGxG motif confers exceptional susceptibility to in vivo asparagine deamidation.

  20. Protein profiling in the gut of Penaeus monodon gavaged with oral WSSV-vaccines and live white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amod D; Kiron, Viswanath; Rombout, Jan H W M; Brinchmann, Monica F; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu S; Singh, Bright I S

    2014-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a pathogen that causes considerable mortality of the farmed shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Candidate 'vaccines', WSSV envelope protein VP28 and formalin-inactivated WSSV, can provide short-lived protection against the virus. In this study, P. monodon was orally intubated with the aforementioned vaccine candidates, and protein expression in the gut of immunised shrimps was profiled. The alterations in protein profiles in shrimps infected orally with live-WSSV were also examined. Seventeen of the identified proteins in the vaccine and WSSV-intubated shrimps varied significantly compared to those in the control shrimps. These proteins, classified under exoskeletal, cytoskeletal, immune-related, intracellular organelle part, intracellular calcium-binding or energy metabolism, are thought to directly or indirectly affect shrimp's immunity. The changes in the expression levels of crustacyanin, serine proteases, myosin light chain, and ER protein 57 observed in orally vaccinated shrimp may probably be linked to immunoprotective responses. On the other hand, altered expression of proteins linked to exoskeleton, calcium regulation and energy metabolism in WSSV-intubated shrimps is likely to symbolise disturbances in calcium homeostasis and energy metabolism.

  1. A cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic immobilized-enzyme reactor for rapid digestion of proteins from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Bert; Dapic, Irena; Valkenburg, Thalassa S E; Wouters, Sam; Niezen, Leon; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Corthals, Garry L; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-03-31

    A critical step in the bottom-up characterization of proteomes is the conversion of proteins to peptides, by means of endoprotease digestion. Nowadays this method typically uses overnight digestion and as such represents a considerable bottleneck for high-throughput analysis. This report describes protein digestion using an immobilized-enzyme reactor (IMER), which enables accelerated digestion times that are completed within seconds to minutes. For rapid digestion to occur, a cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic reactor was constructed containing trypsin immobilized on a polymer monolithic material through a 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone linker. The IMER was applied for the rapid offline digestion of both singular protein standards and a complex protein mixture prior to liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. The effects of protein concentration and residence time in the IMER were assessed for protein standards of varying molecular weight between 11 and 240kDa. Compared to traditional in-solution digestion, IMER-facilitated protein digestion at room temperature for 5min yielded similar results in terms of sequence coverage and number of identified peptides. Good repeatability was demonstrated with a relative standard deviation of 6% for protein-sequence coverage. The potential of the IMER was also demonstrated for a complex protein mixture in the analysis of dried blood spots. Compared to a traditional workflow a similar number of proteins could be identified, while reducing the total analysis time from 22.5h to 4h and importantly omitting the sample-pre-treatment steps (denaturation, reduction, and alkylation). The identified proteins from two workflows showed similar distributions in terms of molecular weight and hydrophobic character.

  2. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha.

  3. The Hexapeptide Repeated Segment LIAGY is a Hot Spot of Aggregation of the Pseudomonas syringae Ice Nucleation Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation proteins (INPs) form oligomeric structures by self-assembly and aggregation. We looked for the presence of potential aggregating sequences inside the INP from Pseudomonas syringae by a computational approach with the AGGRESCAN, FOMDAMYLOID and TANGO softwares. A total of 38 hot spots of aggregation were predicted in the INP sequence: 7 localized in the Nterminal domain, 2 in the C-terminal region, 28 in the highly repetitive central (HRC) region and 1 shared between the HRC and the Carboxyl-terminus regions of the protein. All the hot spots of aggregation identified in the HRC domain overlapped a 8-residue low fidelity repeat including a LIAGYrelated sequence. We confirmed the predictions by an experimental approach using synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the INP central sequence, absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in the presence of Congo red (CR) or Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. Peptide 620-SFIIAGYG-627 predicted to aggregate by the three softwares induced an increase in fluorescence of ThT. Peptide 729-GFKSILTAGY-738 predicted to aggregate by AGGRESCAN and FOLDAMYLOID induced a shift in the maximum of absorbance of CR. Peptide 1124-SVLTAGA-1130 predicted to aggregate only by TANGO did not interfere with CR absorbance or ThT fluorescence. In conclusion, the use of three aggregation prediction algorithms and two biochemical assays showed that the hexapeptide repeated segment LIAGY, previously shown to form a hairpin loop may be involved in the aggregation of the P. syringae INP.

  4. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  5. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  6. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  7. The inter- and intra-operator variability in manual spot segmentation and its effect on spot quantitation in two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis.

    PubMed

    Millioni, Renato; Sbrignadello, Stefano; Tura, Andrea; Iori, Elisabetta; Murphy, Ellen; Tessari, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Separation of complex mixtures of proteins by 2-DE is a fundamental component of current proteomic technology. Quantitative analysis of the images generated by digitization of such gels is critical for identifying alterations in protein expression within a given biological system. Software packages are designed for this purpose. The accurate definition of protein spot boundaries, using a suitable method of image segmentation, is a key requirement for image analysis. It is often necessary for operators to intervene manually to correct mistakes in spot segmentation; therefore operator subjectivity and differences in ability can weaken the analysis. We estimated the error in spot quantification after manual spot segmentation, which was performed by different operators, using two different software packages. Our results clearly show that this operation was associated with significant inter- and intra-variability and an overestimation of subsequent spot intensity, especially when spots were weak. For comparative studies, we suggest separately analysing spots which have been manually segmented by imposing a requirement for at least a threefold difference in spot intensity in addition to use of statistical tests.

  8. 2-DE proteomic analysis of HSP70 in mollusc Chamelea gallina.

    PubMed

    Jurgen, Foschi; Valerio, Matozzo; Roberto, Rosmini; Paolo, Serrazanetti Gian; Marta, Monari

    2011-02-01

    Bidimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) protocols were adapted on Chamelea gallina digestive glands studies by the analysis of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) compared with monodimensional electrophoresis (1-DE) results. Because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) act on HSPs, C. gallina specimens were exposed to 0.5 mg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) for 24 h, 7 and 12 days. Immunoblotting after 1-DE showed a single band of 70 kDa significantly induced after 7 days of B[a]P exposure. After 2-DE, eight major high-resolved spots between 17 and 98 kDa were revealed. Three spots fell within the range of 62-98 kDa and of 5-6 pI, parameters which could include HSP70. Two spots of 77 and 72 kDa, obtained after 2-DE immunoblotting, could correspond to constitutive HSC70 and to inducible HSP70 forms respectively. Changes observed in inducible and in constitutive forms might be related to an adaptation to stress and to a normal protein synthesis capability, respectively. Employment of 2-DE and relationship between HSP70 and HSC70 may be useful to clarify their role in molluscs subjected to stress events.

  9. External Quality Control for Dried Blood Spot Based C-reactive Protein Assay: Experience from the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peifeng; Herningtyas, Elizabeth H.; Kale, Varsha; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Risbud, Arun R.; McCreath, Heather; Lee, Jinkook; Strauss, John; O’Brien, Jennifer C.; Bloom, David E.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, in dried blood spots has been increasingly incorporated in community-based social surveys internationally. Although the dried blood spot based CRP assay protocol has been validated in the United States, it remains unclear whether laboratories in other less developed countries can generate C-reactive protein results of similar quality. We therefore conducted external quality monitoring for dried blood spot based C-reactive protein measurement for the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India. Our results show that dried blood spot based C-reactive protein results in these two countries have excellent and consistent correlations with serum-based values and dried blood spot based results from the reference laboratory in the United States. Even though the results from duplicate samples may have fluctuations in absolute values over time, the relative order of C-reactive protein levels remains similar and the estimates are reasonably precise for population-based studies that investigate the association between socioeconomic factors and health. PMID:25879265

  10. Enzyme E2 from Chinese white shrimp inhibits replication of white spot syndrome virus and ubiquitinates its RING domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome pathway (UPP) is closely related to immune defense. We have identified a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, E2, from the Chinese white shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis (FcUbc). Injection of recombinant FcUbc protein (rFcUbc) reduced the mortality of shrimp infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and inhibited replication of WSSV. rFcUbc, but not a mutant FcUbc (mFcUbc), bound to WSSV RING domains (WRDs) from four potential E3 ligase proteins of WSSV in vitro. Importantly, rFcUbc could ubiquitinate the RING domains (named WRD2 and WRD3) of WSSV277 and WSSV304 proteins in vitro and the two proteins in WSSV-infected Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of FcUbc increased ubiquitination of WSSV277 and WSSV304 during WSSV infection. In summary, our study demonstrates that FcUbc from Chinese white shrimp inhibited WSSV replication and could ubiquitinate WSSV RING domain-containing proteins. This is the first report about antiviral function of Ubc E2 in shrimp.

  11. Studies of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53, a receptor of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Xiao; Huang, Jie; Liang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The specific binding between viral attachment proteins (VAPs) of a virus and its cellular receptors on host cells mediates virus entry into host cells, which triggers subsequent viral infections. Previous studies indicate that F1 ATP synthase β subunit (named BP53), is found on the surface of shrimp cells and involved in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection by functioning as a potential viral receptor. Herein, in a far-western blotting assay, three WSSV proteins with molecular weights of 28 kDa, 37 kDa, and >50 kDa were found to interact with BP53. The 28 kDa and 37 kDa proteins were identified as the envelope protein VP28 and VP37 of WSSV respectively, which could be recognized by the polyclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent binding assays revealed that VP37 contributed to almost 80% of the binding capability for BP53 compared with the same amount of total WSSV protein. The relationship between BP53 and its complementary interacting protein, VP37, was visualized using a co-localization assay. Bound VP37 on the cell surface co-localized with BP53 and shared a similar subcellular location on the outer surface of shrimp cells. Pearson's correlation coefficients reached to 0.67 ± 0.05 and the Mander's overlap coefficients reached 0.70 ± 0.05, which indicated a strong relationship between the localization of BP53 and bound rVP37. This provides evidence for an interaction between BP53 and VP37 obtained at the molecular and cellular levels, supporting the hypothesis that BP53 serves as a receptor for WSSV by binding to VP37. The identification of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53 is helpful for better understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of WSSV to infect shrimp at the cellular level.

  12. Proteomic analysis of cellular soluble proteins from human bronchial smooth muscle cells by combining nondenaturing micro 2DE and quantitative LC‐MS/MS. 2. Similarity search between protein maps for the analysis of protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ya; Yuan, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Manabe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle cell soluble proteins were analyzed by a combined method of nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel‐cutting, and quantitative LC‐MS/MS and a native protein map was prepared for each of the identified 4323 proteins [1]. A method to evaluate the degree of similarity between the protein maps was developed since we expected the proteins comprising a protein complex would be separated together under nondenaturing conditions. The following procedure was employed using Excel macros; (i) maps that have three or more squares with protein quantity data were selected (2328 maps), (ii) within each map, the quantity values of the squares were normalized setting the highest value to be 1.0, (iii) in comparing a map with another map, the smaller normalized quantity in two corresponding squares was taken and summed throughout the map to give an “overlap score,” (iv) each map was compared against all the 2328 maps and the largest overlap score, obtained when a map was compared with itself, was set to be 1.0 thus providing 2328 “overlap factors,” (v) step (iv) was repeated for all maps providing 2328 × 2328 matrix of overlap factors. From the matrix, protein pairs that showed overlap factors above 0.65 from both protein sides were selected (431 protein pairs). Each protein pair was searched in a database (UniProtKB) on complex formation and 301 protein pairs, which comprise 35 protein complexes, were found to be documented. These results demonstrated that native protein maps and their similarity search would enable simultaneous analysis of multiple protein complexes in cells. PMID:26031785

  13. Proteomic analysis of cellular soluble proteins from human bronchial smooth muscle cells by combining nondenaturing micro 2DE and quantitative LC-MS/MS. 2. Similarity search between protein maps for the analysis of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Yuan, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle cell soluble proteins were analyzed by a combined method of nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS and a native protein map was prepared for each of the identified 4323 proteins [1]. A method to evaluate the degree of similarity between the protein maps was developed since we expected the proteins comprising a protein complex would be separated together under nondenaturing conditions. The following procedure was employed using Excel macros; (i) maps that have three or more squares with protein quantity data were selected (2328 maps), (ii) within each map, the quantity values of the squares were normalized setting the highest value to be 1.0, (iii) in comparing a map with another map, the smaller normalized quantity in two corresponding squares was taken and summed throughout the map to give an "overlap score," (iv) each map was compared against all the 2328 maps and the largest overlap score, obtained when a map was compared with itself, was set to be 1.0 thus providing 2328 "overlap factors," (v) step (iv) was repeated for all maps providing 2328 × 2328 matrix of overlap factors. From the matrix, protein pairs that showed overlap factors above 0.65 from both protein sides were selected (431 protein pairs). Each protein pair was searched in a database (UniProtKB) on complex formation and 301 protein pairs, which comprise 35 protein complexes, were found to be documented. These results demonstrated that native protein maps and their similarity search would enable simultaneous analysis of multiple protein complexes in cells.

  14. Identification of the interaction domains of white spot syndrome virus envelope proteins VP28 and VP24.

    PubMed

    Li, Zaipeng; Chen, Weiyu; Xu, Limei; Li, Fang; Yang, Feng

    2015-03-16

    VP28 and VP24 are two major envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The direct interaction between VP28 and VP24 has been described in previous studies. In this study, we confirmed this interaction and mapped the interaction domains of VP28 and VP24 by constructing a series of deletion mutants. By co-immunoprecipitation, two VP28-binding domains of VP24 were located at amino acid residues 46-61 and 148-160, while VP24-binding domain of VP28 was located at amino acid residues 31-45. These binding domains were further corroborated by peptide blocking assay, in which synthetic peptides spanning the binding domains were able to inhibit VP28-VP24 interaction, whereas same-size control peptides from non-binging regions did not.

  15. The nucleoprotein of Tomato spotted wilt virus as protein tag for easy purification and enhanced production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Lacorte, Cristiano; Ribeiro, Simone G; Lohuis, Dick; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2007-09-01

    Upon infection, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) forms ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) that consist of nucleoprotein (N) and viral RNA. These aggregates result from the homopolymerization of the N protein, and are highly stable in plant cells. These properties feature the N protein as a potentially useful protein fusion partner. To evaluate this potential, the N protein was fused to the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP), either at the amino or carboxy terminus, and expressed in plants from binary vectors in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves were infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens and evaluated after 4 days, revealing an intense GFP fluorescence under UV light. Microscopic analysis revealed that upon expression of the GFP:N fusion a small number of large aggregates were formed, whereas N:GFP expression led to a large number of smaller aggregates scattered throughout the cytoplasm. A simple purification method was tested, based on centrifugation and filtration, yielding a gross extract that contained large amounts of N:GFP aggregates, as confirmed by GFP fluorescence and Western blot analysis. These results show that the homopolymerization properties of the N protein can be used as a fast and simple way to purify large amounts of proteins from plants.

  16. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of truncated VP28 protein of white spot syndrome virus in Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Du, Hua-Hua; Hou, Chong-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Guo; Xie, Rong-hui; Wang, Yi-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies identify VP28 envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) as its main antigenic protein. Although implicated in viral infectivity, its functional role remains unclear. In the current study, we described the production of polyclonal antibodies to recombinant truncated VP28 proteins including deleted N-terminal (rVP28ΔN), C-terminal (rVP28ΔC) and middle (rVP28ΔM). In antigenicity assays, antibodies developed from VP28 truncations lacking the N-terminal or middle regions showed significantly lowered neutralization of WSSV in crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. Further immunogenicity analysis showed reduced relative percent survival (RPS) in crayfish vaccinating with these truncations before challenge with WSSV. These results indicated that N-terminal (residues 1-27) and middle region (residues 35-95) were essential to maintain the neutralizing linear epitopes of VP28 and responsible in eliciting immune response. Thus, it is most likely that these regions are exposed on VP28, and will be useful for rational design of effective vaccines targeting VP28 of WSSV.

  17. Interactions of xenobiotics with steroid hormone receptors and the sex-steroid binding protein in spotted seatrout

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.; Ghosh, S.; Pinter, J.; Sperry, T.; Breckenridge-Miller, D.; Laidley, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    A variety of xenobiotics, such as DDT, methoxychlor and PCB mixtures and Kepone have estrogenic actions and disrupt reproduction in mammals by binding to nuclear estrogen receptors (ER). These xenobiotics were tested for their ability to bind to the hepatic ER of a marine fish, spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus). Several of the DDT derivatives, Kepone and PCB mixtures also bound to the seatrout ER over a range of 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}3}M. Moreover, Kepone was shown to have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic actions in an in vitro liver slice vitellogenesis assay. These estrogenic compounds were also tested for their ability to bind to nuclear and plasma membrane progestogen (20{beta}-S) receptors in ovarian tissues and to the sex-steroid binding protein in seatrout plasma. Kepone, methoxychlor and o,p{prime}-DDT caused concentration dependent displacement of {sup 3}H2O{beta}-S from its plasma membrane receptor and inhibition of 20{beta}-S induced final maturation in an in vitro assay over the range of 10{sup {minus}7}--10{sup {minus}3}M, but did not alter steroid binding to the nuclear progestogen receptor. Significant binding of methoxychlor and the other organochlorines to the sex steroid binding protein was also observed. It is concluded from these studies that a variety of xenobiotics with estrogenic actions can also bind to other steroid receptors and binding proteins to influence other endocrine-mediated processes.

  18. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  19. Prohibitin Interacts with Envelope Proteins of White Spot Syndrome Virus and Prevents Infection in the Red Swamp Crayfish, Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jiang-Feng; Li, Xin-Cang; Sun, Jie-Jie; Gong, Jing; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Li-Jie; Weng, Yu-Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Prohibitins (PHBs) are ubiquitously expressed conserved proteins in eukaryotes that are associated with apoptosis, cancer formation, aging, stress responses, cell proliferation, and immune regulation. However, the function of PHBs in crustacean immunity remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a PHB in Procambarus clarkii red swamp crayfish, which was designated PcPHB1. PcPHB1 was widely distributed in several tissues, and its expression was significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge at the mRNA level and the protein level. These observations prompted us to investigate the role of PcPHB1 in the crayfish antiviral response. Recombinant PcPHB1 (rPcPHB1) significantly reduced the amount of WSSV in crayfish and the mortality of WSSV-infected crayfish. The quantity of WSSV in PcPHB1 knockdown crayfish was increased compared with that in the controls. The effects of RNA silencing were rescued by rPcPHB1 reinjection. We further confirmed the interaction of PcPHB1 with the WSSV envelope proteins VP28, VP26, and VP24 using pulldown and far-Western overlay assays. Finally, we observed that the colloidal gold-labeled PcPHB1 was located on the outer surface of the WSSV, which suggests that PcPHB1 specifically binds to the envelope proteins of WSSV. VP28, VP26, and VP24 are structural envelope proteins and are essential for attachment and entry into crayfish cells. Therefore, PcPHB1 exerts its anti-WSSV effect by binding to VP28, VP26, and VP24, preventing viral infection. This study is the first report on the antiviral function of PHB in the innate immune system of crustaceans. PMID:24049173

  20. Prohibitin Interacts with envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus and prevents infection in the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiang-Feng; Li, Xin-Cang; Sun, Jie-Jie; Gong, Jing; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Li-Jie; Weng, Yu-Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-12-01

    Prohibitins (PHBs) are ubiquitously expressed conserved proteins in eukaryotes that are associated with apoptosis, cancer formation, aging, stress responses, cell proliferation, and immune regulation. However, the function of PHBs in crustacean immunity remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a PHB in Procambarus clarkii red swamp crayfish, which was designated PcPHB1. PcPHB1 was widely distributed in several tissues, and its expression was significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge at the mRNA level and the protein level. These observations prompted us to investigate the role of PcPHB1 in the crayfish antiviral response. Recombinant PcPHB1 (rPcPHB1) significantly reduced the amount of WSSV in crayfish and the mortality of WSSV-infected crayfish. The quantity of WSSV in PcPHB1 knockdown crayfish was increased compared with that in the controls. The effects of RNA silencing were rescued by rPcPHB1 reinjection. We further confirmed the interaction of PcPHB1 with the WSSV envelope proteins VP28, VP26, and VP24 using pulldown and far-Western overlay assays. Finally, we observed that the colloidal gold-labeled PcPHB1 was located on the outer surface of the WSSV, which suggests that PcPHB1 specifically binds to the envelope proteins of WSSV. VP28, VP26, and VP24 are structural envelope proteins and are essential for attachment and entry into crayfish cells. Therefore, PcPHB1 exerts its anti-WSSV effect by binding to VP28, VP26, and VP24, preventing viral infection. This study is the first report on the antiviral function of PHB in the innate immune system of crustaceans.

  1. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  2. Arabidopsis-derived shrimp viral-binding protein, PmRab7 can protect white spot syndrome virus infection in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Thagun, Chonprakun; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Sojikul, Punchapat

    2012-09-15

    White spot syndrome virus is currently the leading cause of production losses in the shrimp industry. Penaeus monodon Rab7 protein has been recognized as a viral-binding protein with an efficient protective effect against white spot syndrome infection. Plant-derived recombinant PmRab7 might serve as an alternative source for in-feed vaccination, considering the remarkable abilities of plant expression systems. PmRab7 was introduced into the Arabidopsis thaliana T87 genome. Arabidopsis-derived recombinant PmRab7 showed high binding activity against white spot syndrome virus and a viral envelope, VP28. The growth profile of Arabidopsis suspension culture expressing PmRab7 (ECR21# 35) resembled that of its counterpart. PmRab7 expression in ECR21# 35 reached its maximum level at 5 mg g(-1) dry weight in 12 days, which was higher than those previously reported in Escherichia coli and in Pichia. Co-injection of white spot syndrome virus and Arabidopsis crude extract containing PmRab7 in Litopenaeus vannamei showed an 87% increase in shrimp survival rate at 5 day after injection. In this study, we propose an alternative PmRab7 source with higher production yield, and cheaper culture media costs, that might serve the industry's need for an in-feed supplement against white spot syndrome infection.

  3. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  4. Co-interactive DNA-binding between a novel, immunophilin-like shrimp protein and VP15 nucleocapsid protein of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Senapin, Saengchan; Huang, Wei-Pang; Lo, Chu-Fang; Flegel, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most serious pathogens of penaeid shrimp. Although its genome has been completely characterized, the functions of most of its putative proteins are not yet known. It has been suggested that the major nucleocapsid protein VP15 is involved in packaging of the WSSV genome during virion formation. However, little is known in its relationship with shrimp host cells. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach to screen a shrimp lymphoid organ (LO) cDNA library for proteins that might interact with VP15, a protein named PmFKBP46 was identified. It had high sequence similarity to a 46 kDa-immunophilin called FKBP46 from the lepidopteran Spodoptera frugiperda (the fall armyworm). The full length PmFKBP46 consisted of a 1,257-nucleotide open reading frame with a deduced amino acid sequence of 418 residues containing a putative FKBP-PPIase domain in the C-terminal region. Results from a GST pull-down assay and histological co-localization revealed that VP15 physically interacted with PmFKBP46 and that both proteins shared the same subcellular location in the nucleus. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that PmFKBP46 possessed DNA-binding activity and functionally co-interacted with VP15 in DNA binding. The overall results suggested that host PmFKBP46 might be involved in genome packaging by viral VP15 during virion assembly.

  5. Horizontal comparative fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for improved spot coordinate detection.

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Marina; König, Simone

    2014-04-01

    Vertical comparative 2D fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) has recently been shown to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots, in particular in singular experiments, which cannot be investigated using DIGE. The method applies a standardized marker grid formed by a set of purified proteins to the sample proteome in a conglomerate of 1DE, 2DE, and DIGE. Here, improvements are demonstrated by transferring CoFGE to horizontal 2DE. These include the elimination of the protein modification by residual acrylamide monomer unavoidable in vertical CoFGE, reduced buffer volumes, and highly efficient laboratory procedures. Spot patterns are well defined and can be easily analyzed using commercially available warping algorithms. With horizontal CoFGE also a correction for changes in pI was introduced using a third fluorescent dye. Horizontal CoFGE holds high promises in comparative proteomics.

  6. An immediate-early protein of white spot syndrome virus modulates the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huasong; Ruan, Lingwei; Xu, Xun

    2011-10-25

    WSSV interacts with integrin during infection of shrimps and modulate the focal adhesion kinase which is known as a regulator of several downstream signaling pathways. Viral protein kinases are thought to be important for virus infection by regulating the host signaling pathways. WSV083 is an immediate-early gene of white spot syndrome virus that contains a Ser/Thr protein kinase domain. So, does WSSV modulate FAK phosphorylation via the WSV083 molecule? In this study, co-transfection of WSV083 and MjFAK genes proceeded in insect cells revealed that the MjFAK phosphorylation and cell adhesion activity could be inhibited by the expression of WSV083. Kinase domain mutants of WSV083 lost its ability of inhibiting FAK phosphorylation. Moreover, silencing of FAK gene through RNAi accelerated the shrimp death rate upon WSSV challenge. These results demonstrate for the first time that modulation of FAK phosphorylation by WSV083 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of WSSV infection.

  7. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  8. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation.

  9. Transcript Analysis of White spot syndrome virus Latency and Phagocytosis Activating Protein Genes in Infected Shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Shekhar, M S; Dillikumar, M; Vinaya Kumar, K; Gopikrishna, G; Rajesh, S; Kiruthika, J; Ponniah, A G

    2012-12-01

    Viral latency has been recently observed to be associated with White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in shrimp. In the present study, shrimp samples (Penaeus monodon) surviving WSSV infection were examined for presence of WSSV in latent phase. Virus latency was observed in shrimp which were either experimentally challenged with WSSV and survived the infection or those which survived the natural infection. Three viral transcripts (ORFs 427, 151, 366) associated with latency were analyzed by real-time PCR. The shrimp surviving the natural WSSV infection on estimation with RT-PCR were found to have low grade of WSSV infection (less than 56 copies of WSSV). All the shrimp samples were RT-PCR negative for structural protein genes of WSSV, VP24 and VP28, indicating that these samples were harboring latent phase virus. RT-PCR of all the shrimp samples which survived WSSV infection revealed amplification of phagocytosis activating protein (PAP) gene (435 bp) with higher gene expression levels in experimentally challenged shrimp when compared to naturally infected shrimp. The expression of PAP in WSSV infected shrimp samples indicates its possible role in host response for resistance against WSSV infection. PAP was cloned and expressed as recombinant protein for protection studies. Shrimp were injected with three doses (5, 15 and 20 μg g(-1) body weight) of recombinant PAP. Relative percent survival of 10 % was observed in shrimp immunized with the dose of 15 μg g(-1) body weight of recombinant PAP. The expression of both WSSV latency associated and PAP genes obtained from shrimp surviving the WSSV infection, indicates the possible role of these genes in host-pathogen interaction.

  10. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  11. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  12. Hitting the sweet spot-glycans as targets of fungal defense effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus

    2015-05-06

    Organisms which rely solely on innate defense systems must combat a large number of antagonists with a comparably low number of defense effector molecules. As one solution of this problem, these organisms have evolved effector molecules targeting epitopes that are conserved between different antagonists of a specific taxon or, if possible, even of different taxa. In order to restrict the activity of the defense effector molecules to physiologically relevant taxa, these target epitopes should, on the other hand, be taxon-specific and easily accessible. Glycans fulfill all these requirements and are therefore a preferred target of defense effector molecules, in particular defense proteins. Here, we review this defense strategy using the example of the defense system of multicellular (filamentous) fungi against microbial competitors and animal predators.

  13. 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, M; Borrajo, A; Bermúdez, J; Lores, M; Alonso, J; López, M; Santalla, M; De Ron, A M; Zapata, C; Alvarez, G

    2011-02-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for direct human consumption. Proteomic studies in legumes have increased significantly in the last years but few studies have been performed to date in P. vulgaris. We report here a proteomic analysis of bean seeds by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Three different protein extraction methods (TCA-acetone, phenol and the commercial clean-up kit) were used taking into account that the extractome can have a determinant impact on the level of quality of downstream protein separation and identification. To demonstrate the quality of the 2-DE analysis, a selection of 50 gel spots was used in protein identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF). The results showed that a considerable proportion of spots (70%) were identified in spite of incomplete genome/protein databases for bean and other legume species. Most identified proteins corresponded to storage protein, carbohydrate metabolism, defense and stress response, including proteins highly abundant in the seed of P. vulgaris such as the phaseolin, the phytohemagglutinin and the lectin-related α-amylase inhibitor.

  14. A Comparison of Antiserum and Protein A as Secondary Reagents to Assess Toxoplasma gondii Antibody Titers in Cats and Spotted Hyenas.

    PubMed

    Wait, L F; Srour, A; Smith, I G; Cassey, P; Sims, S K; McAllister, M M

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoal parasite with worldwide distribution that is able to infect a wide variety of mammals and birds. Our main goal was to screen for T. gondii antibody titers in a previously untested species, the spotted hyena ( Crocuta crocuta); however, this goal first required us to investigate serological procedures that could be suitable for hyenas. Cats are the closest domestic relations of hyenas, so T. gondii antibody titers were first compared in 26 feral cats with specific or nonspecific fluorophore-labeled secondary reagents, i.e., anti-cat IgG or protein A. Substitution of anti-cat IgG with protein A caused a statistically significant drop in titer measurements in cats (P = 0.01) with a reduction of the geometric mean titer equivalent to 1 doubling-dilution. The same procedures were then applied to captive spotted hyenas. Titers measured in 9 of 10 hyenas were identical whether anti-cat IgG or protein A was used as the secondary reagent: 5 had titers <1:16, 2 had titers of 1:16, and 2 had titers of 1:32. One hyena had maximum titers of 1:64 or 1:32 when anti-cat IgG or protein A was used, respectively. The use of protein A as the secondary reagent in serologic assays can be applied to a range of mammalian species and seems unlikely to affect test specificity; however, the use of protein A may reduce test sensitivity, as suggested in the present study using cats. Despite a control program, some exposure to T. gondii had occurred in the Zoo's spotted hyenas.

  15. Effects of High Toxic Boron Concentration on Protein Profiles in Roots of Two Citrus Species Differing in Boron-Tolerance Revealed by a 2-DE Based MS Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Wen; Huang, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Lin-Tong; Guo, Peng; Ye, Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2017-01-01

    Citrus are sensitive to boron (B)-toxicity. In China, B-toxicity occurs in some citrus orchards. So far, limited data are available on B-toxicity-responsive proteins in higher plants. Thirteen-week-old seedlings of “Sour pummelo” (Citrus grandis) and “Xuegan” (Citrus sinensis) was fertilized every other day until dripping with nutrient solution containing 10 μM (control) or 400 μM (B-toxicity) H3BO3 for 15 weeks. The typical B-toxic symptom only occurred in 400 μM B-treated C. grandis leaves, and that B-toxicity decreased root dry weight more in C. grandis seedlings than in C. sinensis ones, demonstrating that C. sinensis was more tolerant to B-toxicity than C. grandis. Using a 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) based MS approach, we identified 27 up- and four down-accumulated, and 28 up- and 13 down-accumulated proteins in B-toxic C. sinensis and C. grandis roots, respectively. Most of these proteins were isolated only from B-toxic C. sinensis or C. grandis roots, only nine B-toxicity-responsive proteins were shared by the two citrus species. Great differences existed in B-toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles between C. sinensis and C. grandis roots. More proteins related to detoxification were up-accumulated in B-toxic C. grandis roots than in B-toxic C. sinensis roots to meet the increased requirement for the detoxification of the more reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds such as aldehydes in the former. For the first time, we demonstrated that the active methyl cycle was induced and repressed in B-toxic C. sinensis and C. grandis roots, respectively, and that C. sinensis roots had a better capacity to keep cell wall and cytoskeleton integrity than C. grandis roots in response to B-toxicity, which might be responsible for the higher B-tolerance of C. sinensis. In addition, proteins involved in nucleic acid metabolism, biological regulation and signal transduction might play a role in the higher B-tolerance of C. sinensis

  16. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assays of Palmitoyl Protein Thioesterase 1 and Tripeptidyl Peptidase Activity in Dried Blood Spots for the Detection of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report new substrates for quantitative enzyme activity measurements of human palmitoyl protein thioesterase (PPT1) and tripeptidyl peptidase (TPP1) in dried blood spots from newborns using tandem mass spectrometry. Deficiencies in these enzyme activities due to inborn errors of metabolism cause neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The assays use synthetic compounds that were designed to mimic the natural substrates. Incubation produces nanomole quantities of enzymatic products per a blood spot that are quantified by tandem mass spectrometry using synthetic internal standards and selected reaction monitoring. The assays utilize a minimum steps for sample workup and can be run in a duplex format for the detection of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses or potentially multiplexed with other mass spectrometry-based assays for newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:25019629

  17. The tubule-forming NSm protein from Tomato spotted wilt virus complements cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of Tobacco mosaic virus hybrids.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Dennis J; Adkins, Scott

    2005-11-10

    A Florida isolate of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was able to complement cell-to-cell movement of a movement-defective Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector expressing the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP). To test for complementation of movement in the absence of other TSWV proteins, the open reading frame for the NSm protein was expressed from TMV constructs encoding only the TMV replicase proteins. NSm was expressed from either the coat protein or movement protein subgenomic promoter, creating virus hybrids that moved cell to cell in inoculated leaves of tobacco, providing the first functional demonstration that NSm is the TSWV movement protein. Furthermore, these CP-deficient hybrids moved into upper leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating that NSm can support long-distance movement of viral RNAs. Tubules, characteristic of the NSm protein, were also formed in tobacco protoplasts infected with the TMV-TSWV hybrids. The C-terminus of the NSm protein was shown to be required for movement. TMV-TSWV hybrids expressing NSm and GFP moved within inoculated leaves. Our combination of single-cell and intact plant experiments to examine multiple functions of a heterologous viral protein provides a generalized strategy with wider application to other viruses also lacking a reverse genetic system.

  18. Automated clustering of probe molecules from solvent mapping of protein surfaces: new algorithms applied to hot-spot mapping and structure-based drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Michael G.; Meagher, Kristin L.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2008-10-01

    Use of solvent mapping, based on multiple-copy minimization (MCM) techniques, is common in structure-based drug discovery. The minima of small-molecule probes define locations for complementary interactions within a binding pocket. Here, we present improved methods for MCM. In particular, a Jarvis-Patrick (JP) method is outlined for grouping the final locations of minimized probes into physical clusters. This algorithm has been tested through a study of protein-protein interfaces, showing the process to be robust, deterministic, and fast in the mapping of protein "hot spots." Improvements in the initial placement of probe molecules are also described. A final application to HIV-1 protease shows how our automated technique can be used to partition data too complicated to analyze by hand. These new automated methods may be easily and quickly extended to other protein systems, and our clustering methodology may be readily incorporated into other clustering packages.

  19. SPOT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; Zimmerman, Patrick L.; Khatri, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  20. Interaction between Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 and viral protein WSV477 reduces the replication of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ponprateep, Sirikwan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2013-09-01

    White spot syndrome (WSS) is a viral disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) which leads to severe mortality in cultured penaeid shrimp. In response to WSSV infection in Penaeus monodon, a Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2, normally stored in the granules of granular and semi-granular hemocytes is up-regulated and found to deter the viral replication. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a viral target protein, namely WSV477. Instead of being a proteinase, the WSV477 was reported to be a Cys2/Cys2-type zinc finger regulatory protein having ATP/GTP-binding activity. In vitro pull down assay confirmed the protein-protein interaction between rSPIPm2 and rWSV477. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the SPIPm2 and WSV477 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of shrimp hemocytes. Using RNA interference, the silencing of WSV477 resulted in down-regulated of viral late gene VP28, the same result obtained with SPIPm2. In this instance, the SPIPm2 does not function as proteinase inhibitor but inhibit the regulatory function of WSV477.

  1. Dark Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Dark spots (left) and 'fans' appear to scribble dusty hieroglyphics on top of the Martian south polar cap in two high-resolution Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera images taken in southern spring. Each image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  2. Spot morphology of non-contact printed protein molecules on non-porous substrates with a range of hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-01-21

    Non-contact inkjet printing technology is one of the most promising tools for producing microarrays. The quality of the microarray depends on the type of the substrate used for printing biomolecules. Various porous and non-porous substrates have been used in the past, but due to low production cost and easy availability, non-porous substrates like glass and plastic are preferred over porous substrates. On these non-porous substrates, obtaining spot uniformity and a high signal to noise ratio is a big challenge. In our research work, we have modified pristine glass slides using various silanes to produce a range of hydrophobic glass substrates. The hydrophobicities of the slides expressed in the contact angle (θ) of a sessile drop of water were 49°, 61°, 75°, 88° and 103°. Using a non-contact inkjet printer, microarrays of biotinylated biomolecules (BSA and IgG) were produced on these modified glass substrates, pristine (untreated) glass and also on HTA polystyrene slides. The uniformity of the spots, reflecting the distribution of the biomolecules in the spots, was analyzed and compared using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The quality of the spots was superior on the glass slide with a contact angle of ∼75°. We also investigated the influence of the hydrophobicity of the substrate on a two-step, real diagnostic antibody assay. This nucleic acid microarray immunoassay (NAMIA) for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus showed that on highly hydrophilic (θ < 10°) and hydrophobic substrates (θ > 100°) the assay signal was low, whereas an excellent signal was obtained on the substrates with intermediate contact angles, θ ∼ 61° and θ ∼ 75°, respectively.

  3. Two new anti-apoptotic proteins of white spot syndrome virus that bind to an effector caspase (PmCasp) of the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon.

    PubMed

    Lertwimol, Tareerat; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Senapin, Saengchan; Phongdara, Amornrat; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Flegel, Timothy W

    2014-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus proteins WSSV134 and WSSV322 have been shown to bind with the p20 domain (residues 55-214) of Penaeus monodon caspase (PmCasp) protein through yeast two-hybrid screening. Binding was confirmed for the p20 domain and the full-length caspase by co-immunoprecipitation. WSSV134 is also known as the WSSV structural protein VP36A, but no function or conserved domains have been ascribed to WSSV322. Discovery of the caspase binding activity of these two proteins led to an investigation of their possible anti-apoptotic roles. Full-length PmCasp was confirmed to be an effector caspase by inducing apoptosis in transfected Sf-9 cells as assessed by DAPI staining. Using the same cell model, comparison of cells co-transfected with PmCasp and either WSSV134 or WSSV322 revealed that both of the binding proteins had anti-apoptotic activity. However, using the same Sf-9 protocol with anti-apoptosis protein-1 (AAP-1; also called WSSV449) previously shown to bind and inactivate a different effector caspase from P. monodon (Pm caspase) did not block apoptosis induced by PmCasp. The results revealed diversity in effector caspases and their viral protein inhibitors in P. monodon.

  4. Defrosting Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    3 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, defrosting spots formed on a polygon-cracked plain in the south polar region of Mars. The surface was covered with carbon dioxide frost during the previous winter. In spring, the material begins to sublime away, creating a pattern of dark spots that sometimes have wind streaks emanating from them, as wind carries away or erodes the frost.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  5. Effective protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of Jerusalem artichoke leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meide; Shen, Shihua

    2013-07-01

    Protein extraction is a crucial step for proteomics studies. To establish an effective protein extraction protocol suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) analysis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), three different protein extraction methods-trichloroacetic acid/acetone, Mg/NP-40, and phenol/ammonium acetate-were evaluated using Jerusalem artichoke leaves as source materials. Of the three methods, trichloroacetic acid/acetone yielded the best protein separation pattern and highest number of protein spots in 2DE analysis. Proteins highly abundant in leaves, such as Rubisco, are typically problematic during leaf 2DE analysis, however, and this disadvantage was evident using trichloroacetic acid/acetone. To reduce the influence of abundant proteins on the detection of low-abundance proteins, we optimized the trichloroacetic acid/acetone method by incorporating a PEG fractionation approach. After optimization, 363 additional (36.2%) protein spots were detected on the 2DE gel. Our results suggest that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method is a better protein extraction technique than Mg/NP-40 and phenol/ammonium acetate in Jerusalem artichoke leaf 2DE analysis, and that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method combined with PEG fractionation procedure is the most effective approach for leaf 2DE analysis of Jerusalem artichoke.

  6. Molecular docking and simulation studies of 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 against VP26 and VP28 proteins of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sudharsana, S; Rajashekar Reddy, C B; Dinesh, S; Rajasekhara Reddy, S; Mohanapriya, A; Itami, T; Sudhakaran, R

    2016-10-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), an aquatic virus infecting shrimps and other crustaceans, is widely distributed in Asian subcontinents including India. The infection has led to a serious economic loss in shrimp farming. The WSSV genome is approximately 300 kb and codes for several proteins mediating the infection. The envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 play a major role in infection process and also in the interaction with the host cells. A comprehensive study on the viral proteins leading to the development of safe and potent antiviral therapeutic is of adverse need. The novel synthesized compound 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 is proved to have potent antiviral activity against WSSV. The compound antiviral activity is validated in freshwater crabs (Paratelphusa hydrodomous). An in silico molecular docking and simulation analysis of the envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 with the ligand 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 are carried out. The docking analysis reveals that the polar amino acids in the pore region of the envelope proteins were involved in the ligand binding. The influence of the ligand binding on the proteins is validated by the molecular dynamics and simulation study. These in silico approaches together demonstrate the ligand's efficiency in preventing the trimers from exhibiting their physiological function.

  7. Crystal Structures of Major Envelope Proteins VP26 and VP28 from White Spot Syndrome Virus Shed Light on Their Evolutionary Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Wu, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virulent pathogen known to infect various crustaceans. It has bacilliform morphology with a tail-like appendage at one end. The envelope consists of four major proteins. Envelope structural proteins play a crucial role in viral infection and are believed to be the first molecules to interact with the host. Here, we report the localization and crystal structure of major envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 from WSSV at resolutions of 2.2 and 2.0 {angstrom}, respectively. These two proteins alone account for approximately 60% of the envelope, and their structures represent the first two structural envelope proteins of WSSV. Structural comparisons among VP26, VP28, and other viral proteins reveal an evolutionary relationship between WSSV envelope proteins and structural proteins from other viruses. Both proteins adopt {beta}-barrel architecture with a protruding N-terminal region. We have investigated the localization of VP26 and VP28 using immunoelectron microscopy. This study suggests that VP26 and VP28 are located on the outer surface of the virus and are observed as a surface protrusion in the WSSV envelope, and this is the first convincing observation for VP26. Based on our studies combined with the literature, we speculate that the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of VP26 and VP28 may anchor on the viral envelope membrane, making the core {beta}-barrel protrude outside the envelope, possibly to interact with the host receptor or to fuse with the host cell membrane for effective transfer of the viral infection. Furthermore, it is tempting to extend this host interaction mode to other structural viral proteins of similar structures. Our finding has the potential to extend further toward drug and vaccine development against WSSV.

  8. 2-DE analysis indicates that Acinetobacter baumannii displays a robust and versatile metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Nelson C; Cabral, Maria P; Parreira, José R; Gayoso, Carmen; Barba, Maria J; Bou, Germán

    2009-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that has been associated with outbreak infections in hospitals. Despite increasing awareness about this bacterium, its proteome remains poorly characterised, however recently the complete genome of A. baumannii reference strain ATCC 17978 has been sequenced. Here, we have used 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF approach to characterise the proteome of this strain. Results The membrane and cytoplasmatic protein extracts were analysed separately, these analyses revealed the reproducible presence of 239 and 511 membrane and cytoplamatic protein spots, respectively. MALDI-TOF/TOF characterisation identified a total of 192 protein spots (37 membrane and 155 cytoplasmatic) and revealed that the identified membrane proteins were mainly transport-related proteins, whereas the cytoplasmatic proteins were of diverse nature, although mainly related to metabolic processes. Conclusion This work indicates that A. baumannii has a versatile and robust metabolism and also reveal a number of proteins that may play a key role in the mechanism of drug resistance and virulence. The data obtained complements earlier reports of A. baumannii proteome and provides new tools to increase our knowledge on the protein expression profile of this pathogen. PMID:19785748

  9. Expression profile of key immune-related genes in Penaeus monodon juveniles after oral administration of recombinant envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2016-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most catastrophic pathogen the shrimp industry has ever encountered. VP28, the abundant envelope protein of WSSV was expressed in bacteria, the purified protein administered orally to Penaeus monodon juveniles and its immune modulatory effects examined. The results indicated significant up-regulation of caspase, penaeidin, crustin, astakine, syntenin, PmRACK, Rab7, STAT and C-type lectin in animals orally administered with this antigen. This revealed the immune modulations in shrimps followed by oral administration of rVP28P which resulted in the reduced transcription of viral gene vp28 and delay in mortality after WSSV challenge. The study suggests the potential of rVP28P to elicit a non-specific immune stimulation in shrimps.

  10. Evaluation of different protein extraction methods for banana (Musa spp.) root proteome analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vaganan, M Mayil; Sarumathi, S; Nandakumar, A; Ravi, I; Mustaffa, M M

    2015-02-01

    Four protocols viz., the trichloroacetic acid-acetone (TCA), phenol-ammonium acetate (PAA), phenol/SDS-ammonium acetate (PSA) and trisbase-acetone (TBA) were evaluated with modifications for protein extraction from banana (Grand Naine) roots, considered as recalcitrant tissues for proteomic analysis. The two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) separated proteins were compared based on protein yield, number of resolved proteins, sum of spot quantity, average spot intensity and proteins resolved in 4-7 pI range. The PAA protocol yielded more proteins (0.89 mg/g of tissues) and protein spots (584) in 2-DE gel than TCA and other protocols. Also, the PAA protocol was superior in terms of sum of total spot quantity and average spot intensity than TCA and other protocols, suggesting phenol as extractant and ammonium acetate as precipitant of proteins were the most suitable for banana rooteomics analysis by 2-DE. In addition, 1:3 ratios of root tissue to extraction buffer and overnight protein precipitation were most efficient to obtain maximum protein yield.

  11. The bioactivity of teleost IL-6: IL-6 protein in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) induces Th2 cell differentiation pathway and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Han-Tso; Foung, Yi-Fan; Han-You Lin, John

    2012-10-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a protein secreted by T cells and macrophages and plays an important role in immune response. IL-6 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of T cells, and elicits immunoglobulin production in B cells. In this study, the cDNA il-6 (gil-6) sequence of the orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was obtained. The deduced IL-6 (gIL-6) protein comprised 223 amino acids, the sequence shared approximately 30% similarity with mammalian IL-6, and between 47% and 69% similarity with other available teleost IL-6. The protein comprises the signal peptide, the IL-6 family signature, and conserved amino acid residues found in IL-6 sequences of other teleost. In order to understand the bioactivity and influence of gIL-6 on humoral immune response, recombinant gIL-6 (rgIL-6) synthesized by prokaryotes was injected into orange spotted groupers, and the immune-related gene expression at various times in various organs was observed. Our results revealed that the Th1 specific transcription factor t-bet was down-regulated and Th2 specific transcription factors gata3, and c-maf were up-regulated in immune organs, following IL-6 stimulation. Additionally, higher levels of igm mRNA and translated protein were detected in rgIL-6 stimulated fish. These results indicate that IL-6 in groupers regulates the differentiation of naїve T helper cells into Th2 cells and elicits the production of antibodies.

  12. Optimization of a protein extraction technique for fungal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Peng, You-Liang

    2010-10-01

    Protein extraction is a critical step in any proteomics study. Since most fungi possess a robust cell wall, efficient isolation of total proteins has become challenge to fungal proteomics. To circumvent this bottleneck of fungal proteomics, we standardized a protocol named as Mg/CHAPS extraction by comparing with an established method of protein extraction (Tris/EDTA extraction), using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS. Total mycelial proteins were isolated using both protocols from Magnaporthe grisea (causal agent of rice blast disease). Six hundred forty two proteins were resolved on two 2-DE gels corresponding to mycelial proteomes isolated by Mg/CHAPS and Tris/EDTA. Mycelial proteome extracted by Mg/CHAPS showed higher number protein spots than to Tris/EDTA. Quantitative analysis of mycelial proteome, histogram and MS analyses of a protein spot suggested that Mg/CHAPS extraction is more effective than the widely used protocol i.e. Tris/EDTA.

  13. Identification of a Novel Nonstructural Protein, VP9, from White Spot Syndrome Virus: Its Structure Reveals a Ferredoxin Fold with Specific Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Wu, J.; Song, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  14. PmTBC1D20, a Rab GTPase-activating protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, is involved in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yingvilasprasert, Wanchart; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-02-01

    TBC (TRE2/BUB2/CDC16) domain proteins contain an ≈ 200-amino-acid motif and function as Rab GTPase-activating proteins that are required for regulating the activity of Rab proteins, and so, in turn, endocytic membrane trafficking in cells. TBC domain family member 20 (TBC1D20) has recently been reported to mediate Hepatitis C virus replication. Herein, PmTBC1D20 identified from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was characterized and evaluated for its role in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. The full-length cDNA sequence of PmTBC1D20 contains 2003 bp with a predicted 1443 bp open reading frame encoding a deduced 480 amino acid protein. Its transcript levels were significantly up-regulated at 24 and 48 h by ≈ 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively, after systemic infection with WSSV. In addition, depletion of PmTBC1D20 transcript in shrimps by double stranded RNA interference led to a decrease in the level of transcripts of three WSSV genes (VP28, ie1 and wsv477). This suggests the importance of PmTBC1D20 in WSSV infection. This is the first report of TBC1D20 in a crustacean and reveals the possible mechanism used by WSSV to modulate the activity of the host protein, PmTBC1D20, for its benefit in viral trafficking and replication.

  15. Mongolian spots.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Mongolian spots (MS) are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis.

  16. The novel white spot syndrome virus-induced gene, PmERP15, encodes an ER stress-responsive protein in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jiann-Horng; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Chung-Yen; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-04-01

    By microarray screening, we identified a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-strongly induced novel gene in gills of Penaeus monodon. The gene, PmERP15, encodes a putative transmembrane protein of 15 kDa, which only showed some degree of similarity (54-59%) to several unknown insect proteins, but had no hits to shrimp proteins. RT-PCR showed that PmERP15 was highly expressed in the hemocytes, heart and lymphoid organs, and that WSSV-induced strong expression of PmERP15 was evident in all tissues examined. Western blot analysis likewise showed that WSSV strongly up-regulated PmERP15 protein levels. In WSSV-infected hemocytes, immunofluorescence staining showed that PmERP15 protein was colocalized with an ER enzyme, protein disulfide isomerase, and in Sf9 insect cells, PmERP15-EGFP fusion protein colocalized with ER -Tracker™ Red dye as well. GRP78, an ER stress marker, was found to be up-regulated in WSSV-infected P. monodon, and both PmERP15 and GRP78 were up-regulated in shrimp injected with ER stress inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Silencing experiments showed that although PmERP15 dsRNA-injected shrimp succumbed to WSSV infection more rapidly, the WSSV copy number had no significant changes. These results suggest that PmERP15 is an ER stress-induced, ER resident protein, and its induction in WSSV-infected shrimp is caused by the ER stress triggered by WSSV infection. Furthermore, although PmERP15 has no role in WSSV multiplication, its presence is essential for the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp.

  17. Cross sectional longitudinal study of spot morning urine protein:creatinine ratio, 24 hour urine protein excretion rate, glomerular filtration rate, and end stage renal failure in chronic renal disease in patients without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, P.; Gaspari, F.; Perna, A.; Remuzzi, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a reliable indicator of 24 hour urinary protein excretion and predicts the rate of decline of glomerular filtration rate and progression to end stage renal failure in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cross sectional correlation between the ratio and urinary protein excretion rate. Univariate and multivariate analysis of baseline predictors, including the ratio and 24 hour urinary protein, of decline in glomerular filtration rate and end stage renal failure in the long term. SETTING: Research centre in Italy. SUBJECTS: 177 non-diabetic outpatients with chronic renal disease screened for participation in the ramipril efficacy in nephropathy study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of decline in filtration rate evaluated by repeated measurements of unlabelled iohexol plasma clearance and rate of progression to renal failure. RESULTS: Protein:creatinine ratio was significantly correlated with absolute and log transformed 24 hour urinary protein values (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively.) Ratios also had high predictive value for rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate (univariate P = 0.0003, multivariate P = 0.004) and end stage renal failure (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04). Baseline protein:creatinine ratios and rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate were also significantly correlated (P < 0.0005). In the lowest third of the protein:creatinine ratio (< 1.7) there was 3% renal failure compared with 21.2% in the highest third (> 2.7) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a precise indicator of proteinuria and a reliable predictor of progression of disease in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathies and represents a simple and inexpensive procedure in establishing severity of renal disease and prognosis. PMID:9501711

  18. PmVRP15, a novel viral responsive protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, promoted white spot syndrome virus replication.

    PubMed

    Vatanavicharn, Tipachai; Prapavorarat, Adisak; Jaree, Phattarunda; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization of Penaeus monodon hemocytes challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has identified the viral responsive gene, PmVRP15, as the highest up-regulated gene ever reported in shrimps. Expression analysis by quantitative real time RT-PCR revealed 9410-fold up-regulated level at 48 h post WSSV injection. Tissue distribution analysis showed that PmVRP15 transcript was mainly expressed in the hemocytes of shrimp. The full-length cDNA of PmVRP15 transcript was obtained and showed no significant similarity to any known gene in the GenBank database. The predicted open reading frame of PmVRP15 encodes for a deduced 137 amino acid protein containing a putative transmembrane helix. Immunofluorescent localization of the PmVRP15 protein revealed it accumulated around the nuclear membrane in all three types of shrimp hemocytes and that the protein was highly up-regulated in WSSV-infected shrimps. Double-stranded RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of PmVRP15 in P. monodon significantly decreased WSSV propagation compared to the control shrimps (injected with GFP dsRNA). The significant decrease in cumulative mortality rate of WSSV-infected shrimp following PmVRP15 knockdown was observed. These results suggest that PmVRP15 is likely to be a nuclear membrane protein and that it acts as a part of WSSV propagation pathway.

  19. Tissue protein imaging at 1 μm laser spot diameter for high spatial resolution and high imaging speed using transmission geometry MALDI TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Hayden, Kevin; Vestal, Marvin; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    We have achieved protein imaging mass spectrometry capabilities at sub-cellular spatial resolution and at high acquisition speed by integrating a transmission geometry ion source with time of flight mass spectrometry. The transmission geometry principle allowed us to achieve a 1 μm laser spot diameter on target. A minimal raster step size of the instrument was 2.5 μm. Use of 2,5-dihydroxyacetophenone robotically sprayed on top of a tissue sample as a matrix together with additional sample preparation steps resulted in single pixel mass spectra from mouse cerebellum tissue sections having more than 20 peaks in a range 3–22 kDa. Mass spectrometry images were acquired in a standard step raster microprobe mode at 5 pixels/s and in a continuous raster mode at 40 pixels/s. PMID:25673247

  20. A shared antigen among Vibrio species: outer membrane protein-OmpK as a versatile Vibriosis vaccine candidate in Orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Li, Ningqiu; Yang, Zhihui; Bai, Junjie; Fu, Xiaozhe; Liu, Lihui; Shi, Cunbin; Wu, Shuqin

    2010-01-01

    The outer membrane protein-OmpK has been considered as a vaccine candidate for the prevention of infections due to Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in fish. Interestingly, the polyclonal antibody raised against the recombinant OmpK from V. harveyi strain EcGs020802 recognized the OmpK homologues from other strains of Vibrio species by immunoblotting. The ompK genes from 19 Vibrio strains including V. harveyi (11), V. alginolyticus (6) and V. parahaemolyticus (2) were then cloned and sequenced. Alignment analysis based on the amino acid sequences indicated that the OmpK from V. harveyi strain EcGs020802 had 71.7-99.2% of identities with those from V. harveyi, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus. Western blot analysis revealed that the corresponding native proteins ranged between 28 and 31 kDa, consistent with predicated molecular weight of OmpK in Vibrio strains. Furthermore, the cross-protective property of recombinant OmpK was evaluated through challenge with heterogeneous virulent Vibrio strains in Orange-spotted groupers (Epinephelus coioides). Orange-spotted groupers vaccinated with recombinant OmpK were more tolerant of the infection by virulent Vibrio strains and their relative percentage survival (RPS) was correlative with the degree of the identity of deduced amino acid sequences of their OmpK. Taken together, the OmpK is a conserved protective antigen among tested Vibrio species and might be a potentially versatile vaccine candidate for the prevention of infections due to V. harveyi, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus.

  1. Molecular cloning, expression of orange-spotted grouper goose-type lysozyme cDNA, and lytic activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhi-Xin; He, Jian-Guo; Deng, Wei-Xin; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2003-07-08

    Lysozyme acts as a non-specific innate-immunity molecule against the invasion of bacteria pathogens. A leukocyte cDNA library of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides was constructed and the goose-type (g-type) lysozyme cDNA was isolated. The complete cDNA consists of an open reading frame of 585 bp encoding a protein of 194 amino acids. This protein shows a 72.2% amino acid sequence identity with the flounder g-type lysozyme. Similar to most other species, the glu catalytic residue in g-type lysozymes of the grouper is conserved. Furthermore, like the flounder and carp, the 4 conserved cysteine residues identified in avian and mammalian g-type lysozymes were also absent from the grouper. Northern blot analysis indicated that the g-type lysozyme was expressed in intestine, liver, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, gill, muscle and leukocytes. In addition, RT-PCR analysis detected the g-type lysozyme transcripts in the stomach, brain and ovary. When an orange-spotted grouper was injected with Vibrio alginolyticus, the number of lysozyme mRNA transcripts detected in the stomach, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, brain and leucocytes increased 72 h after injection. Recombinant grouper g-type lysozyme produced in the Escherichia coli expression system showed lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus, V. alginolyticus from Epinephelus fario, V. vulnificus from culture water, Aeromonas hydrophila from soft-shell turtle, A. hydrophila from goldfish and V. parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas fluorescens and V. fluvialis from culture water.

  2. SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 mediates viral immediate-early protein SUMOylation in crayfish to facilitate reproduction of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host "arms race" and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses.

  3. SUMO-Conjugating Enzyme E2 UBC9 Mediates Viral Immediate-Early Protein SUMOylation in Crayfish To Facilitate Reproduction of White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host “arms race” and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses. PMID:23097446

  4. Expression Profile of Penaeus monodon Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme (PmUbc) at Protein Level in White spot syndrome virus Challenged Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Keezhedath, Jeena; Kurcheti, Pani Prasad; Pathan, Mujahid Khan; Babu, Gireesh P; Tripathi, Gayatri; Sudhagar, Arun; Rao, Srinivas P

    2013-06-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. Four proteins of WSSV are predicted to encode a RING H2 domain, which in presence of ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) in shrimps can function as viral E3 ligase and modulate the host ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Modulation of host ubiquitin proteasome pathway by viral proteins is implicated in viral pathogenesis. In the present study, expression profile of Penaeus monodon Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (PmUbc) was studied at protein level in WSSV challenged shrimp. A time point analysis of the expression of PmUbc was carried out at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h post WSSV challenge in P. monodon. Recombinant PmUbc (rPmUbc) was produced in prokaryotic expression vector, BL21 (DE3) pLys S. The PmUbc expression pattern was studied by ELISA with rPmUbc antibodies raised in rabbit. A significant increase in PmUbc expression at 24 h post infection (hpi) was observed followed by a decline till 72 hpi. Since the up-regulation and a tremendous decline of PmUbc protein expression was observed at 24 and in 72 hpi respectively in ELISA, it can be speculated that these proteins might interact with host ubiquitination pathway for viral pathogenesis. Many findings have shown that viral infection can up-regulate expression of ubiquitin and that the ubiquitin system plays a key role in the course of viral infection. The present study reveals the expression patterns of PmUbc at protein level in WSSV infected P. monodon. However, further studies are to be carried out to unfold the molecular mechanism of interaction between host and virus to devise efficient control strategies for this major culprit in shrimp culture industry.

  5. White spot syndrome virus IE1 and WSV056 modulate the G1/S transition by binding to the host retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiaozhuo; Bian, Xiaofang; Ji, Yongchang; Yan, Xiumin; Yang, Feng; Li, Fang

    2013-12-01

    DNA viruses often target cellular proteins to modulate host cell cycles and facilitate viral genome replication. However, whether proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) requires regulation of the host cell cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we show that two WSSV paralogs, IE1 and WSV056, can interact with Litopenaeus vannamei retinoblastoma (Rb)-like protein (lv-RBL) through the conserved LxCxE motif. Further investigation revealed that IE1 and WSV056 could also bind to Drosophila retinoblastoma family protein 1 (RBF1) in a manner similar to how they bind to lv-RBL. Using the Drosophila RBF-E2F pathway as a model system, we demonstrated that both IE1 and WSV056 could sequester RBF1 from Drosophila E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) and subsequently activate E2F1 to stimulate the G1/S transition. Our findings provide the first evidence that WSSV may regulate cell cycle progression by targeting the Rb-E2F pathway.

  6. 2-DE based proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild and K+ transport-affected mutant (trk1,2) strains at the growth exponential and stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Curto, Miguel; Valledor, Luis; Navarrete, Clara; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Sychrova, Hana; Ramos, José; Jorrin, Jesús

    2010-11-10

    By using a 2-DE based workflow, the proteome of wild and potassium transport mutant trk1,2 under optimal growth potassium concentration (50mM) has been analyzed. At the exponential and stationary phases, both strains showed similar growth, morphology potassium content, and Vmax of rubidium transport, the only difference found being the Km values for this potassium analogue transport, higher for the mutant (20mM) than for the wild (3-6mM) cells. Proteins were buffer-extracted, precipitated, solubilized, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the 5-8 pH range. More differences in protein content (37-64mgg(-1) cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (178-307) were found between growth phases than between strains. In all, 164 spots showed no differences between samples and a total of 105 were considered to be differential after ANOVA test. 171 proteins, corresponding to 71 unique gene products have been identified, this set being dominated by cytosolic species and glycolitic enzymes. The ranking of the more abundant spots revealed no differences between samples and indicated fermentative metabolism, and active cell wall biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, biosynthesis of amino acids, coenzymes, nucleotides, and RNA, and protein turnover, apart from cell division and growth. PCA analysis allowed the separation of growth phases (PC1 and 2) and strains at the stationary phase (PC3 and 4), but not at the exponential one. These results are also supported by clustering analysis. As a general tendency, a number of spots newly appeared at the stationary phase in wild type, and to a lesser extent, in the mutant. These up-accumulated spots corresponded to glycolitic enzymes, indicating a more active glucose catabolism, accompanied by an accumulation of methylglyoxal detoxification, and redox-homeostasis enzymes. Also, more extensive proteolysis was observed at the stationary phase with this resulting in an accumulation of low Mr protein species.

  7. Southern Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03092 Southern Spots

    This VIS image of the south polar region was collected during the summer season. The markings of the pole are very diverse and easy to see after the winter frost has been removed.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79.7S, Longitude 56.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    The term 'hot spot' emerged in the 1960s from speculations that Hawaii might have its origins in an unusually hot source region in the mantle. It subsequently became widely used to refer to volcanic regions considered to be anomalous in the then-new plate tectonic paradigm. It carried with it the implication that volcanism (a) is emplaced by a single, spatially restricted, mongenetic melt-delivery system, assumed to be a mantle plume, and (b) that the source is unusually hot. This model has tended to be assumed a priori to be correct. Nevertheless, there are many geological ways of testing it, and a great deal of work has recently been done to do so. Two fundamental problems challenge this work. First is the difficulty of deciding a 'normal' mantle temperature against which to compare estimates. This is usually taken to be the source temperature of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However, Earth's surface conduction layer is ˜200 km thick, and such a norm is not appropriate if the lavas under investigation formed deeper than the 40-50 km source depth of MORB. Second, methods for estimating temperature suffer from ambiguity of interpretation with composition and partial melt, controversy regarding how they should be applied, lack of repeatability between studies using the same data, and insufficient precision to detect the 200-300 °C temperature variations postulated. Available methods include multiple seismological and petrological approaches, modelling bathymetry and topography, and measuring heat flow. Investigations have been carried out in many areas postulated to represent either (hot) plume heads or (hotter) tails. These include sections of the mid-ocean spreading ridge postulated to include ridge-centred plumes, the North Atlantic Igneous Province, Iceland, Hawaii, oceanic plateaus, and high-standing continental areas such as the Hoggar swell. Most volcanic regions that may reasonably be considered anomalous in the simple plate-tectonic paradigm have been

  9. Activating Transcription Factor 4 and X Box Binding Protein 1 of Litopenaeus vannamei Transcriptional Regulated White Spot Syndrome Virus Genes Wsv023 and Wsv083

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Pang, Li-Ran; Chen, Yong-Gui; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Yi-Hong; He, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    In response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the signaling pathway termed unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. To investigate the role of UPR in Litopenaeus vannamei immunity, the activating transcription factor 4 (designated as LvATF4) which belonged to a branch of the UPR, the [protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase, (PERK)]-[eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit alpha (eIF2α)] pathway, was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvATF4 was 1972 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1299 bp long that encoded a 432 amino acid protein. LvATF4 was highly expressed in gills, intestines and stomach. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, LvATF4 was upregulated in the gills after 3 hpi and increased by 1.9-fold (96 hpi) compared to the mock-treated group. The LvATF4 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in a lower cumulative mortality of L. vannamei under WSSV infection. Reporter gene assays show that LvATF4 could upregulate the expression of the WSSV gene wsv023 based on the activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate response element (ATF/CRE). Another transcription factor of L. vannamei, X box binding protein 1 (designated as LvXBP1), has a significant function in [inositol-requiring enzyme-1(IRE1) – (XBP1)] pathway. This transcription factor upregulated the expression of the WSSV gene wsv083 based on the UPR element (UPRE). These results suggest that in L. vannamei UPR signaling pathway transcription factors are important for WSSV and might facilitate WSSV infection. PMID:23638122

  10. Marine derived compounds as binders of the White spot syndrome virus VP28 envelope protein: In silico insights from molecular dynamics and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, K C; Sajeevan, T P; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-10-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) remains as one of the most dreadful pathogen of the shrimp aquaculture industry owing to its high virulence. The cumulative mortality reaches up to 100% within in 2-10days in a shrimp farm. Currently, no chemotherapeutics are available to control WSSV. The viral envelope protein, VP28, located on the surface of the virus particle acts as a vital virulence factor in the initial phases of inherent WSSV infection in shrimp. Hence, inhibition of envelope protein VP28 could be a novel way to deal with infection by inhibiting its interaction in the endocytic pathway. In this direction, a timely attempt was made to recognize a potential drug candidate of marine origin against WSSV using VP28 as a target by employing in silico docking and molecular dynamic simulations. A virtual library of 388 marine bioactive compounds was extracted from reports published in Marine Drugs. The top ranking compounds from docking studies were chosen from the flexible docking based on the binding affinities (ΔGb). In addition, the MD simulation and binding free energy analysis were implemented to validate and capture intermolecular interactions. The results suggested that the two compounds obtained a negative binding free energy with -40.453kJ/mol and -31.031kJ/mol for compounds with IDs 30797199 and 144162 respectively. The RMSD curve indicated that 30797199 moves into the hydrophobic core, while the position of 144162 atoms changes abruptly during simulation and is mostly stabilized by water bridges. The shift in RMSD values of VP28 corresponding to ligand RMSD gives an insight into the ligand induced conformational changes in the protein. This study is first of its kind to elucidate the explicit binding of chemical inhibitor to WSSV major structural protein VP28.

  11. Sulfated galactans isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri target the envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus and protect against viral infection in shrimp haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2014-05-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating an underlying mechanism of the antiviral activity of the sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in haemocytes of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Primary culture of haemocytes from Penaeus monodon was performed and inoculated with WSSV, after which the cytopathic effect (CPE), cell viability and viral load were determined. Haemocytes treated with WSSV-SG pre-mix showed decreased CPE, viral load and cell mortality from the viral infection. Solid-phase virus-binding assays revealed that SG bound to WSSV in a dose-related manner. Far Western blotting analysis indicated that SG bound to VP 26 and VP 28 proteins of WSSV. In contrast to the native SG, desulfated SG did not reduce CPE and cell mortality, and showed low binding activity with WSSV. The current study suggests that SG from Gracilaria fisheri elicits its anti-WSSV activity by binding to viral proteins that are important for the process of viral attachment to the host cells. It is anticipated that the sulfate groups of SG are important for viral binding.

  12. Generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to study structure-function of envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus from shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuzhen; Zhang Xiaohua; Yuan Li; Xu Tao; Rao Yu; Li Jia; Dai Heping

    2008-08-08

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP28 is one of the most important envelope proteins of WSSV. In this study, a recombinant antibody library, as single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format, displayed on phage was constructed using mRNA from spleen cells of mice immunized with full-length VP28 expressed in Escherichia coli. After several rounds of panning, six scFv antibodies specifically binding to the epitopes in the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal regions of VP28, respectively, were isolated from the library. Using these scFv antibodies as tools, the epitopes in VP28 were located on the envelope of the virion by immuno-electron microscopy. Neutralization assay with these antibodies in vitro suggested that these epitopes may not be the attachment site of WSSV to host cell receptor. This study provides a new way to investigate the structure and function of the envelope proteins of WSSV.

  13. The movement protein (NSm) of Tomato spotted wilt virus is the avirulence determinant in the tomato Sw-5 gene-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Ana; Cañizares, M Carmen; Rubio, Luis; López, Carmelo; Moriones, Enrique; Aramburu, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The avirulence determinant triggering the resistance conferred by the tomato gene Sw-5 against Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Sequence comparison showed two substitutions (C118Y and T120N) in the movement protein NSm present only in TSWV resistance-breaking (RB) isolates. In this work, transient expression of NSm of three TSWV isolates [RB1 (T120N), RB2 (C118Y) and non-resistance-breaking (NRB)] in Nicotiana benthamiana expressing Sw-5 showed a hypersensitive response (HR) only with NRB. Exchange of the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) with NSm supported cell-to-cell and systemic transport of the chimeric AMV RNAs into N. tabacum with or without Sw-5, except for the constructs with NBR when Sw-5 was expressed, although RB2 showed reduced cell-to-cell transport. Mutational analysis revealed that N120 was sufficient to avoid the HR, but the substitution V130I was required for systemic transport. Finally, co-inoculation of RB and NRB AMV chimeric constructs showed different prevalence of RB or NBR depending on the presence or absence of Sw-5. These results indicate that NSm is the avirulence determinant for Sw-5 resistance, and mutations C118Y and T120N are responsible for resistance breakdown and have a fitness penalty in the context of the heterologous AMV system.

  14. Effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of Brassica napus phloem sap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of phloem sap exudates from Brassica napus using 2-DE (IEF-SDS PAGE). The experiment was repeated thrice and two technical replicates per treatment were done. Two hundred sixty-three spots were consistently detected...

  15. Anti-melanization mechanism of the white spot syndrome viral protein, WSSV453, via interaction with shrimp proPO-activating enzyme, PmproPPAE2.

    PubMed

    Sutthangkul, Jantiwan-; Amparyup, Piti-; Eum, Jai Hoon; Strand, Michael R; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-01-28

    Inhibition of the host melanization reaction, activated by the prophenoloxidase activating (proPO) system, is one of the crucial evasion strategies of pathogens. Recently, the shrimp pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), was found to inhibit melanization in the shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The viral protein WSSV453 was previously shown to interact with PO-activating enzyme 2 (PmPPAE2) and reported to be involved in suppressing the shrimp melanization response after WSSV infection. Here, we characterized how WSSV453 inhibits melanization. WSSV453 is a non-structural viral protein, which was first detected in shrimp hemocytes at 6 hours post infection (hpi) by WSSV and in shrimp plasma at 24 hpi. We produced recombinant proteins for three components of the P. monodon, proPO system: PmproPPAE2, PmproPO1 and PmproPO2. Functional assays showed that active PmPPAE2 processed PmproPO1 and 2 to produce functional PO. Incubation of WSSV453 with PmproPPAE2 dose-dependently reduced PmPPAE2 activity toward PmPO1 or PmPO2. In contrast, WSSV453 had no effect on activated PmPPAE2. The addition of active PmPPAE2 to WSSV-infected shrimp plasma at day 2 post-infection also rescued PO activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-melanization activity of WSSV is due to WSSV453, which interacts with PmproPPAE2 and interferes its activation to active PmPPAE2.

  16. The inventory and chemical characterization of dissolved proteins in oceanic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Namiha; Tanoue, Eiichiro

    2006-04-01

    One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) were applied to separate protein molecules in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from oceanic waters. Results were: (1) The 2-DE distinguished a total of 412 protein spots in 10 samples from five water columns over the Pacific, although fewer than 30 proteins were resolved as bands from the identical samples by SDS-PAGE. (2) Major and ubiquitous protein bands (34 and 39 kDa proteins) on the SDS-PAGE gel were resolved into horizontally spread arrays (trains) of spots on the 2-DE gels, indicating that these bands were a mixture of protein species that have the same molecular weight (MW) but different isoelectric points (p Is). (3) Proteins that exhibited such electrophoretic patterns on the 2-DE gels were glycosylated with variable linkages between the sugar and polypeptide chains. (4) N-terminal amino-acid sequencing demonstrated that individual spots within each train of spots had identical N-terminal amino-acid sequences. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of the 39 and 34 kDa glycoprotein spots in samples collected at different sites were also identical. Protein isoforms with the same amino-acid sequence but different glycosylation profiles, termed glycoforms, were often observed on the 2-DE gel. Thirty-one and 24 spots on the 2-DE gels were glycoforms of two glycoproteins with MWs of 39 and 34 kDa, respectively; they were one protein species. The glycoforms of the 39 kDa protein were identified as a low molecular weight alkaline phosphatase (L-AP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by a homology search through five amino-acid sequence databases. The present and earlier work indicates that all identified source organisms of dissolved proteins belong to the Pseudomonas group. We propose the hypothesis that proteins associated with membrane vesicles liberated from a minor member of the bacterioplankton assemblage, the marine

  17. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge.

  18. Shrimp STAT was hijacked by white spot syndrome virus immediate-early protein IE1 involved in modulation of viral genes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Defu; Ruan, Lingwei; Lu, Huasong; Shi, Hong; Xu, Xun

    2016-12-01

    STATs are a family of transcription factors that regulate a cascade of cellular processes including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immune responses. However, they are usually targeted by viruses to assist infection. In this study, we identified that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) immediate-early protein IE1 interacted with Litopenaeus vannamei STAT (LvSTAT) and thereby led to its phosphorylation activation. In addition, we demonstrated that LvSTAT could bind to the promoters of the viral immediate-early genes wsv051 and ie1 through STAT-binding motifs in vitro and vivo, allowing the enhancement of their promoters' activities. Moreover, IE1 could promote the transcriptional activation activity of LvSTAT to augment the transcription of wsv051 and ie1. In conclusion, our findings revealed a novel linkage between WSSV IE1 and shrimp STAT, which was a clue to well understand how WSSV adopted the active strategies to modulate the shrimp signaling pathway.

  19. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J.; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  20. Evaluating two-dimensional electrophoresis profiles of the protein phaseolin as markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    López-Pedrouso, María; Bernal, Javier; Franco, Daniel; Zapata, Carlos

    2014-07-23

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of the protein phaseolin, the major seed storage protein of common bean, display great number of spots with differentially glycosylated and phosphorylated α- and β-type polypeptides. This work aims to test whether these complex profiles can be useful markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in bean populations. The 2-DE phaseolin profile and the amino acid composition were examined in bean seeds from 18 domesticated and wild accessions belonging to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools. We found that proteomic distances based on 2-DE profiles were successful in identifying the accessions belonging to each gene pool and outliers distantly related. In addition, accessions identified as outliers from proteomic distances showed the highest levels of methionine content, an essential amino acid deficient in bean seeds. These findings suggest that 2-DE phaseolin profiles provide valuable information with potential of being used in common bean genetic improvement.

  1. Mongolian blue spots (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly ... back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with ...

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of ...

  3. A simple, economical and reproducible protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elisete Pains; Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; da Silva Batista, Jesiane Stefânia; Huergo, Luciano; Hungria, Mariangela

    2012-06-01

    Sample preparation is a critical step in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) of plant tissues. Here we describe a phenol/SDS procedure that, although greatly simplified, produced well-resolved and reproducible 2-DE profiles of protein extracts from soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merril] roots. Extractions were made in three replicates using both the original and simplified procedure. To evaluate the quality of the extracted proteins, ten spots were randomly selected and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). The 2-DE gels were equally well resolved, with no streaks or smears, and no significant differences were observed in protein yield, reproducibility, resolution or number of spots. Mass spectra of the ten selected spots were compared with database entries and allowed high-quality identification of proteins. The simplified protocol described here presents considerable savings of time and reagents without compromising the quality of 2-DE protein profiles and compatibility with MS analysis, and may facilitate the progress of proteomics studies of legume-rhizobia interactions.

  4. The influence of barley malt protein modification on beer foam stability and their relationship to the barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-I (BDAI-I) as a possible foam-promoting protein.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshihiro; Iimure, Takashi; Takoi, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Takafumi; Kihara, Makoto; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kazutoshi; Sato, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    2008-02-27

    The foam stability of beer is one of the important key factors in evaluating the quality of beer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the level of malt modification (degradation of protein, starch, and so on) and the beer foam stability. This was achieved by examining foam-promoting proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). We found that the foam stability of beer samples brewed from the barley malts of cultivars B and C decreased as the level of malt modification increased; however, the foam stability of cultivar A did not change. To identify the property providing the increased foam stability of cultivar A, we analyzed beer proteins using 2DE. We analyzed three fractions that could contain beer foam-promoting proteins, namely, beer whole proteins, salt-precipitated proteins, and the proteins concentrated from beer foam. As a result, we found that in cultivar A, some protein spots did not change in any of these three protein fractions even when the level of malt modification increased, although the corresponding protein spots in cultivars B and C decreased. We analyzed these protein spots by peptide mass finger printing using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As a result, all of these spots were identified as barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-I (BDAI-I). These results suggest that BDAI-I is an important contributor to beer foam stability.

  5. Comparison of the Proteome Profiling of Iranian isolates of Leishmania tropica, L. major and L. infantum by Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) and Mass-spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    HAJJARAN, Homa; MOHAMMADI BAZARGANI, Mitra; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; BURCHMORE, Richard; HOSSEINI SALEKDEH, Ghasem; KAZEMI-RAD, Elham; KHORAMIZADEH, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of virulence and species differences of Leishmania parasites are under the influence of gene expression regulations at posttranscriptional stages. In Iran, L. major and L. tropica are known as principal agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis, while L. infantum causes visceral leishmaniasis. Methods: As a preliminary study, we compared the proteome mapping of the above three Iranian isolates of Leishmania species through the 2-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE), and identified the prominent proteins by Liquid Chromatography (LC) mass spectrometry. Results: We reproducibly detected about 700 protein spots in each species by using the Melanie software. Totally, 264 proteins exhibited significant changes among 3 species. Forty nine protein spots identified in both L. tropica and L. major were similar in position in the gel, whereas only 35 of L. major proteins and 10 of L. tropica proteins were matched with those of L. infantum. Having identified 24 proteins in the three species, we sought to provide possible explanations for their differential expression patterns and discuss their relevance to cell biology. Conclusion: The comparison of proteome profiling pattern of the 3 species identified limit up and limit down regulated or absent /present proteins. In addition, the LC-MS data analysis showed that most of the protein spots with differential abundance in the 3 species are involved in cell motility and cytoskeleton, cell signaling and vesicular trafficking, intracellular survival / proteolysis, oxidative stress defense, protein synthesis, protein ubiquitination / proteolysis, and stress related proteins. Differentially proteins distributed among the species maybe implicated in host pathogenecity interactions and parasite tropism to cutaneous or visceral tissue macrophages. PMID:26811718

  6. 2-DE Mapping of the Blue Mussel Gill Proteome: The Usual Suspects Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rocher, Béatrice; Bultelle, Florence; Chan, Philippe; Le Foll, Frank; Letendre, Julie; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Olivier, Stéphanie; Péden, Romain; Poret, Agnès; Vaudry, David; Knigge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis, L. 1758) is an ecologically important and commercially relevant bivalve. Because of its ability to bioconcentrate xenobiotics, it is also a widespread sentinel species for environmental pollution, which has been used in ecotoxicological studies for biomarker assessment. Consequently, numerous proteomics studies have been carried out in various research contexts using mussels of the genus Mytilus, which intended to improve our understanding of complex physiological processes related to reproduction, adaptation to physical stressors or shell formation and for biomarker discovery. Differential-display 2-DE proteomics relies on an extensive knowledge of the proteome with as many proteoforms identified as possible. To this end, extensive characterization of proteins was performed in order to increase our knowledge of the Mytilus gill proteome. On average, 700 spots were detected on 2-DE gels by colloidal blue staining, of which 122 different, non-redundant proteins comprising 203 proteoforms could be identified by tandem mass spectrometry. These proteins could be attributed to four major categories: (i) “metabolism”, including antioxidant defence and degradation of xenobiotics; (ii) “genetic information processing”, comprising transcription and translation as well as folding, sorting, repair and degradation; (iii) “cellular processes”, such as cell motility, transport and catabolism; (iv) “environmental information processing”, including signal transduction and signalling molecules and interaction. The role of cytoskeleton proteins, energetic metabolism, chaperones/stress proteins, protein trafficking and the proteasome are discussed in the light of the exigencies of the intertidal environment, leading to an enhanced stress response, as well as the structural and physiological particularities of the bivalve gill tissue. PMID:28248261

  7. Proteomic Profiling Of Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Protein Expression Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Norhaiza; Zhang, J.; Brown, P. J.; James, D. C.; Birch, J. R.; Racher, A. J.; Smales, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have undertaken two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomic profiling on a series of cell lines with different recombinant antibody production rates. Due to the nature of 2-DE proteomic investigations there will always be `process variability' factors in any data set collected in this way. Some of this variation will arise during sample preparation, gel running and staining, while further variation will arise from the gel analysis procedure. Therefore, in order to identify all significant changes in protein expression between biological samples when analysed by 2-DE, the system precision or `error', and how this correlates to protein abundance, must be known. Only then can the system be considered robust and investigators accurately and confidently report all observable statistically significant changes in protein expression. We introduce an expression variability test to identify protein spots whose expression correlates with increased antibody production. The results have highlighted a small number of candidate proteins for further investigation.

  8. Triton X-114 cloud point extraction to subfractionate blood plasma proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune

    2015-09-15

    A simple and reproducible procedure for enrichment of a plasma protein subfraction suitable for two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) was developed, using a Triton X-114-based cloud point extraction (CPE). Appropriate conditions for such a CPE procedure were found by SDS-PAGE to be a plasma protein concentration of about 10mg/ml in 3% (w/v) Triton X-114. 2DE of proteins obtained by CPE of 400 μl of human plasma revealed about 200 spots constituting a spot pattern very different from the pattern of total plasma. The CPE procedure only had a limited contribution to the technical variation. Identification of about 60 spots, representing only 22 proteins, revealed that several proteins in the obtained subfraction were present in more isoforms or modifications. Among these were apolipoproteins (A-1, D, E, L1, and M), haptoglobin-related protein, phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase, serum amyloid A, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1, which are proteins of a hydrophobic nature, as in plasma they relate to lipoprotein particles. Thus, Triton X-114-based CPE is a simple plasma prefractionation tool, attractive for detailed 2DE studies of hydrophobic plasma proteins and their isoforms or modifications.

  9. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  10. A proteomic approach to identifying proteins differentially expressed in conidia and mycelium of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum.

    PubMed

    Barros, Bruno H R; da Silva, Sérgio H; dos ReisMarques, Everaldo Dos Reis; Rosa, José C; Yatsuda, Ana Patrícia; Roberts, Donald W; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2010-07-01

    Metarhizium spp. is an important worldwide group of entomopathogenic fungi used as an interesting alternative to chemical insecticides in programs of agricultural pest and disease vector control. Metarhizium conidia are important in fungal propagation and also are responsible for host infection. Despite their importance, several aspects of conidial biology, including their proteome, are still unknown. We have established conidial and mycelial proteome reference maps for Metarhizium acridum using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In all, 1130±102 and 1200±97 protein spots were detected in ungerminated conidia and fast-growing mycelia, respectively. Comparison of the two protein-expression profiles reveled that only 35% of the protein spots were common to both developmental stages. Out of 94 2-DE protein spots (65 from conidia, 25 from mycelia and two common to both) analyzed using mass spectrometry, seven proteins from conidia, 15 from mycelia and one common to both stages were identified. The identified protein spots exclusive to conidia contained sequences similar to known fungal stress-protector proteins (such as heat shock proteins (HSP) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase) plus the fungal allergen Alt a 7, actin and the enzyme cobalamin-independent methionine synthase. The identified protein spots exclusive to mycelia included proteins involved in several cell housekeeping biological processes. Three proteins (HSP 90, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and allergen Alt a 7) were present in spots in conidial and mycelial gels, but they differed in their locations on the two gels.

  11. An effective protein extraction method for two-dimensional electrophoresis in the anticancer herb Andrographis paniculata Nees.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Puad, Mohd Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure protein. In plants, protein extraction and purification present a great challenge due to accumulation of a large amount of interfering substances, including polysaccharides, polyphenols, and secondary metabolites. Therefore, it is necessary to modify the extraction protocols. A study was conducted to compare four protein extraction and precipitation methods for proteomic analysis. The results showed significant differences in protein content among the four methods. The chloroform-trichloroacetic acid-acetone method using 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer provided the best results in terms of protein content, pellets, spot resolution, and intensity of unique spots detected. An overall of 83 qualitative or quantitative significant differential spots were found among the four methods. Based on the 2-DE gel map, the method is expected to benefit the development of high-level proteomic and biochemical studies of Andrographis paniculata, which may also be applied to other recalcitrant medicinal plant tissues.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of protein extraction protocols for apple and strawberry fruit suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qifa; Song, Jun; Doncaster, Kristen; Rowland, Elden; Byers, David M

    2007-03-07

    A modified phenol-based protocol and a phenol-free protocol that involves hot SDS extraction followed by TCA precipitation in acetone were qualitatively and quantitatively compared and evaluated on apple peel and strawberry fruit. The phenol protocol resulted in significantly higher protein yields of 2.35 +/- 0.1 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 mg/g of FW from apple and strawberry fruit, respectively, compared to the SDS protocol, which produced 0.74 +/- 0.1 and 0.27 +/- 0.02 mg/g of FW, respectively. 2-DE analysis of apple protein extracts revealed 1422 protein spots associated with the phenol protocol and 849 spots associated with the SDS protocol. Of these, 761 were present only in phenol gels, whereas 23 were exclusive to SDS samples. For strawberry, SDS extraction produced poor-quality spots with a high degree of streaking, indicating possible contamination. The application of a cleanup procedure resulted in a purified protein extract with high-quality spots. 2-DE analysis of strawberry protein extracts revealed 1368 spots for the phenol protocol and 956 spots for the SDS protocol accompanied by the cleanup procedure. Of these, 599 spots were present only in phenol gels, whereas 109 were present only in SDS samples. Spots from each fruit tissue and extraction procedure were selected, and a total of 26 were identified by LC-MS/MS. Overall, this study demonstrates the complexity of protein extraction of fruit tissues and suggests that a phenol-based protein extraction protocol should be used as a standard procedure for recalcitrant fruit tissues, whereas a SDS protocol with or without a cleanup procedure may be used as an alternative protocol.

  13. Identification of proteins of human colorectal carcinoma cell line SW480 by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying-Tao; Geng, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Le; Lai, Bao-Chang; Si, Lv-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To conduct the proteomic analysis of human colorectal carcinoma cell line, SW480 by using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption /ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). METHODS: The total proteins of human colorectal carcinoma cell line, SW480 were separated with 2-DE by using immobilized pH gradient strips and visualized by staining with silver nitrate. The gel images were acquired by scanner and 2-DE analysis software, Image Master 2D Elite. Nineteen distinct protein spots were excised from gel randomly and digested in gel by TPCK-trypsin. Mass analysis of the tryptic digest peptides mixture was performed by using MALDI-TOF MS. Peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) obtained by the MALDI-TOF analysis were used to search NCBI, SWISS-PROT and MSDB databases by using Mascot software. RESULTS: PMF maps of all spots were obtained by MALDI-TOF MS and thirteen proteins were preliminarily identified. CONCLUSION: The methods of analysis and identification of protein spots of tumor cells in 2-DE gel with silver staining by MALDI-TOF MS derived PMF have been established. Protein expression profile of SW480 has been obtained. It is demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and cell culture is a useful approach to comprehend the process of colon carcinogenesis. PMID:16094709

  14. Analysis of Soluble Proteins in Natural Cordyceps sinensis from Different Producing Areas by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis and Two-dimensional Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Hong; Zuo, Hua-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Feng-Qin; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Qian, Zheng-Ming; Li, Wen-Jia; Xia, Zhi-Ning; Yang, Feng-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background: As one of the bioactive components in Cordyceps sinensis (CS), proteins were rarely used as index components to study the correlation between the protein components and producing areas of natural CS. Objective: Protein components of 26 natural CS samples produced in Qinghai, Tibet, and Sichuan provinces were analyzed and compared to investigate the relationship among 26 different producing areas. Materials and Methods: Proteins from 26 different producing areas were extracted by Tris-HCl buffer with Triton X-100, and separated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Results: The SDS-PAGE results indicated that the number of protein bands and optical density curves of proteins in 26 CS samples was a bit different. However, the 2-DE results showed that the numbers and abundance of protein spots in protein profiles of 26 samples were obviously different and showed certain association with producing areas. Conclusions: Based on the expression values of matched protein spots, 26 batches of CS samples can be divided into two main categories (Tibet and Qinghai) by hierarchical cluster analysis. SUMMARY The number of protein bands and optical density curves of proteins in 26 Cordyceps sinensis samples were a bit different on the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profilesNumbers and abundance of protein spots in protein profiles of 26 samples were obvious different on two-dimensional electrophoresis mapsTwenty-six different producing areas of natural Cordyceps sinensis samples were divided into two main categories (Tibet and Qinghai) by Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the values of matched protein spots. Abbreviations Used: SDS-PAGE: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-DE: Two-dimensional electrophoresis, Cordyceps sinensis: CS, TCMs: Traditional Chinese medicines PMID:28250651

  15. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  16. Immunoproteomic Analysis of the Excretory-Secretory Proteins from Spirometra mansoni Sparganum

    PubMed Central

    HU, Dan Dan; CUI, Jing; WANG, Li; LIU, Li Na; WEI, Tong; WANG, Zhong Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Sparganosis is caused by the invasion of Spirometra sparganum into various tissues/organs. Subcutaneous sparganosis can be diagnosed by biopsy, while visceral/cerebral sparganosis is not easy to be diagnosed. The diagnosis depends largely on the detection of specific anti-sparganum antibodies. The specificity of the ELISA could be increased by using S. mansoni sparganum excretory–secretory (ES) antigens, but it also had the cross-reactions with sera of patients with cysticercosis or paragonimiasis. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens in S. mansoni sparganum ES proteins. Methods The sparganum ES proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blot probed with early sera from infected mice at 14 days post-infection. The immunoreactive protein spots were characterized by MALDI-TOF/ TOF-MS. Results A total of approximately 149 proteins spots were detected with isoelectric point (pI) varying from 3 to 7.5 and molecular weight from 20 to 115 kDa and seven protein spots with molecular weight of 23-31 kDa were recognized by the infection sera. Three of seven spots were successfully identified and characterized as the same S. mansoni protein (cysteine protease), and the proteins of other 4 spots were not included in the databases. Conclusion The cysteine protease from S. mansoni ES proteins recognized by early infection sera might be the early diagnostic antigens for sparganosis. PMID:24454434

  17. An immunoproteomic approach for characterization of the outer membrane proteins of Salmonella Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngjae; Sun, Jisun; Han, Jang Hyuck; Jang, Joo Hyun; Kang, Zheng Wu; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) is an important pathogen that causes fowl typhoid in chickens. In order to investigate SG outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as potential vaccine candidate proteins, we established a proteomic map and database of antigenic SG-OMPs. A total of 174 spots were detected by 2DE. Twenty-two antigen-reactive spots were identified as nine specific proteins using PMF. OmpA was the most abundant protein among all of the identified OMPs, and it exhibited seven protein species. We conducted Western blot analysis for the SG-OMPs in order to determine which proteins were cross-reactive to the serovars Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and SG. Our results indicated that OmpA was considered to be an antigenic cross-reactive protein among the three serovars. This study sheds new light on our understanding of cross-protection among Salmonella serovars.

  18. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  19. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  20. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  1. Scientists Spot 'Teetotaler' Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162265.html Scientists Spot 'Teetotaler' Gene Discovery might one day lead to drugs to ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they've identified a gene variant that dampens the desire to drink alcohol. ...

  2. Identification of new proteins in follicular fluid from mature human follicles by direct sample rehydration method of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chul; Lee, Sang-Wha; Lee, Kyo Won; Lee, Sook-Whan; Cha, Kwang-Yul; Kim, Kye Hyun; Lee, Suman

    2005-06-01

    Human follicular fluid (HFF) includes various biologically active proteins which can affect follicle growth and oocyte fertilization. Thus far, these proteins from mature follicles in human follicular fluid have been poorly characterized. Here, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to identify new proteins in HFF. Mature follicular fluids were obtained from five females after oocyte collection during in vitro fertilization (IVF). We directly rehydrated HFF samples, obtained high-resolution 2-DE maps, and processed them for 2-DE and MALDI-MS. One hundred eighty spots were detected and 10 of these spots were identified. By the 2-DE database, six of them had been reported, as proteins already existing in HFF. Hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), Unnamed protein product 1 (UPP1), Unnamed protein product 2 (UPP2), and apolipoprotein A-IV precursor were newly detected. HSL and apolipoprotein A-IV participate in lipid metabolism. UPP1 has a homology with selenocysteine lyase. We found by RT-PCR that these genes are expressed from human primary granulosa cells. The proteins identified here may emerge as potential candidates for specific functions during folliculogenesis, hormone secretion regulation, or oocyte maturation. Further functional analysis of these proteins is necessitated to determine their biological implications.

  3. Protein profile analysis of salt-responsive proteins in leaves and roots in two cultivars of creeping bentgrass differing in salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenping; Sibicky, Tim; Huang, Bingru

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of stress-responsive proteins is critical for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance. The objectives of this study were to establish a proteomic map for a perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (A. stolonifera L.), and to identify differentially expressed, salt-responsive proteins in two cultivars differing in salinity tolerance. Plants of two cultivars ('Penncross' and 'Penn-A4') were irrigated daily with water (control) or NaCl solution to induce salinity stress in a growth chamber. Salinity stress was obtained by adding NaCl solution of 2, 4, 6, and 8 dS m(-1) in the soil daily for 2-day intervals at each concentration, and then by watering soil with 10 dS m(-1) solution daily for 28 days. For proteomic map, using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), approximately 420 and 300 protein spots were detected in leaves and roots, respectively. A total of 148 leaf protein spots and 40 root protein spots were excised from the 2-DE gels and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. In total, 106 leaf protein spots and 24 root protein spots were successfully identified. Leaves had more salt-responsive proteins than roots in both cultivars. The superior salt tolerance in 'Penn-A4', indicated by shoot extension rate, relative water content, and cell membrane stability during the 28-day salinity stress could be mainly associated with its higher level of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in roots and UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, methionine synthase, and glucan exohydrolase in leaves, as well as increased accumulation of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in leaves. Our results suggest that salinity tolerance in creeping bentgrass could be in part controlled by an alteration of ion transport through vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in roots, maintenance of the functionality and integrity of thylakoid membranes, sustained polyamine biosynthesis, and by the activation of cell wall loosening proteins and antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  4. Protein profile of Lupinus texensis phloem sap exudates: searching for Fe- and Zn-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Andaluz, Sofía; Matros, Andrea; Calvete, Juan José; Kehr, Julia; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive overview of the phloem sap protein profile of Lupinus texensis, with a special focus on proteins binding Fe and Zn. L. texensis was chosen as model plant given the simplicity to obtain exudates from sieve elements. Protein profiling by 2DE revealed 249 spots, and 54 of them were unambiguously identified by MALDI-MS and ESI-MS/MS. The largest number of identified protein species belongs to protein modification/turnover and general metabolism (19-21%), followed by redox homeostasis (9%) and defense and cell structural components (7%). This protein profile is similar to that reported in other plant species, suggesting that the phloem sap proteome is quite conserved. Staining of 2DE gels for Fe-containing proteins and affinity chromatography experiments revealed the presence of two low molecular weight Fe-binding proteins in phloem sap: a metallothionein-like protein type 2B identified in the Fe-affinity chromatography, and a second protein identified with both Fe staining methods. This protein species had a molecular weight of 13.5 kDa, a pI of 5.6 and 51% homology to a phloem-specific protein from Medicago truncatula. Zinc affinity chromatography revealed four Zn-binding proteins in phloem sap, one belonging to the dehydrin family and three Zn finger proteins.

  5. Protein expression profile in the striatum of rats with methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Takeshi; McGregor, Iain S; Matsumoto, Izuru

    2007-04-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (MAP) results in an increased behavioral response to the drug during subsequent exposure. This phenomenon is called behavioral sensitization. Sensitization is an enduring phenomenon, and suggests chronic alterations in neuronal plasticity. MAP-induced sensitization has been proposed and widely investigated as an animal model of MAP psychosis and schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying MAP-induced sensitization. 2-DE-based proteomics allows us to examine global changes in protein expression in complex biological systems and to propose hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying various pathological conditions. In the present study, we examined protein expression profiles in the striatum of MAP-sensitized rats using 2-DE-based proteomics. Repeated administration of MAP (4.0 mg/kg, once a day, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) for 10 days significantly augmented the locomotor response to an MAP challenge injection (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 11. This enhanced activity was maintained even after a week of drug abstinence. 2-DE analysis revealed 42 protein spots were differentially regulated in the striatum of MAP-sensitized rats compared to control. Thirty-one protein spots were identified using MALDI-TOF, including synapsin II, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DRP2). These proteins can be related to underlying mechanisms of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization, indicating cytoskeletal modification, and altered synaptic function.

  6. Cloning of profilin (FcPFN) from the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis, a highly expressed protein in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp.

    PubMed

    Kong, H J; Hong, G-E; Cho, H K; Nam, B-H; Kim, Y-O; Kim, W-J; Lee, S-J; Kim, K-K

    2009-01-01

    We isolated and characterized the profilin (FcPFN) cDNA from hemocytes of Fenneropenaeus chinensis, a unique shrimp species from the Yellow Sea. The FcPFN cDNA consists of 830 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 125 amino acids, having a predicted isoelectric point of 5.06. The deduced amino acid sequence of FcPFN shows 36% and 90% amino acid sequence identity to the profilin genes of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon, respectively. The FcPFN mRNA was highly expressed in hemocytes and hepatopancreas and moderately in muscle of normal shrimp. The higher expression of FcPFN mRNA is observed in shrimp infected with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), which is a major concern in all shrimp-growing regions of the world. These results suggest a potential role for FcPFN in viral host defense mechanisms.

  7. Two novel pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting organelle number and protein synthesis. Is the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene an etiologic hot spot?

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, C T; Ciacci, F; Bonilla, E; Jansen, C; Hirano, M; Rao, N; Lovelace, R E; Rowland, L P; Schon, E A; DiMauro, S

    1993-01-01

    We identified two patients with pathogenic single nucleotide changes in two different mitochondrial tRNA genes: the first mutation in the tRNA(Asn) gene, and the ninth known mutation in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. The mutation in tRNA(Asn) was associated with isolated ophthalmoplegia, whereas the mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) caused a neurological syndrome resembling MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers) plus optic neuropathy, retinopathy, and diabetes. Both mutations were heteroplasmic, with higher percentages of mutant mtDNA in affected tissues, and undetectable levels in maternal relatives. Analysis of single muscle fibers indicated that morphological and biochemical alterations appeared only when the proportions of mutant mtDNA exceeded 90% of the total cellular mtDNA pool. The high incidence of mutations in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene suggests that this region is an "etiologic hot spot" in mitochondrial disease. Images PMID:8254046

  8. Differential expression profile of membrane proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain exposed to methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Yu; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide, which has been related to a broad spectrum of toxic effects on environmental organisms. The present study investigated the changes in the protein profile of enriched membrane fraction from zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain exposed to three concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/L) of MP. 2-DE revealed that the abundance of 21 protein spots was significantly changed by MP stress. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and database search, 16 protein spots were identified as membrane proteins, among which 8 were down-regulated, while 8 were up-regulated. These proteins are mainly involved in oxidative stress response, signal transduction, metabolism, protein synthesis and degradation, neuroplasticity and regeneration as well as synaptic transmission. These results may aid our understanding of the mechanism of MP-induced neurotoxicity and provide the possibility of the establishment of candidate biomarkers of MP.

  9. Protein identification from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of Klebsiella pneumoniae by combined use of mass spectrometry data and raw genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Jibin; Nimtz, Manfred; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Zeng, An-Ping

    2003-01-01

    Separation of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with identification of proteins through peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is the widely used technique for proteomic analysis. This approach relies, however, on the presence of the proteins studied in public-accessible protein databases or the availability of annotated genome sequences of an organism. In this work, we investigated the reliability of using raw genome sequences for identifying proteins by PMF without the need of additional information such as amino acid sequences. The method is demonstrated for proteomic analysis of Klebsiella pneumoniae grown anaerobically on glycerol. For 197 spots excised from 2-DE gels and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis 164 spots were clearly identified as 122 individual proteins. 95% of the 164 spots can be successfully identified merely by using peptide mass fingerprints and a strain-specific protein database (ProtKpn) constructed from the raw genome sequences of K. pneumoniae. Cross-species protein searching in the public databases mainly resulted in the identification of 57% of the 66 high expressed protein spots in comparison to 97% by using the ProtKpn database. 10 dha regulon related proteins that are essential for the initial enzymatic steps of anaerobic glycerol metabolism were successfully identified using the ProtKpn database, whereas none of them could be identified by cross-species searching. In conclusion, the use of strain-specific protein database constructed from raw genome sequences makes it possible to reliably identify most of the proteins from 2-DE analysis simply through peptide mass fingerprinting. PMID:14653859

  10. Characterization of Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum isolated from spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and plains zebras (Equus burchelli), and identification of a M-like protein (SrM) encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Speck, Stephanie; Höner, Oliver P; Wachter, Bettina; Fickel, Jörns

    2008-04-01

    Thirteen strains of Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum from free-ranging spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and plains zebras (Equus burchelli) in Tanzania were characterized by biochemical and molecular-biological methods. Although the colony appearance of the S.e. ruminatorum wildlife strains differed from that of the S.e. ruminatorum type strain CECT 5772(T), all biochemical reactions of the wildlife strains were similar to those of the type strain. In addition, all wildlife strains produced hyaluronidase and were capable of hydrolysing arginine, three strains (23%) synthesized acetoin, but only eight strains (62%) produced acid from ribose. rep-PCR indicated that different clones of S.e. ruminatorum were distributed among the hyena and zebra populations in the study area. Identical rep-PCR patterns in hyena and zebra strains suggest that a direct transmission of S.e. ruminatorum between these species may occur. The presence of a M-like protein (SrM) gene was demonstrated in all S.e. ruminatorum strains including the type strain. Sequencing of the M-like protein gene revealed a hypervariable region within the deduced amino acid sequence. Most of the strains clustered with previously described strains based on the hypervariable region of the S.e. zooepidemicus SzP protein. Sequencing also demonstrated that identical SrM protein sequences were shared among S.e. ruminatorum strains from different host species.

  11. Efficient method of protein extraction from Theobroma cacao L. roots for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses.

    PubMed

    Bertolde, F Z; Almeida, A-A F; Silva, F A C; Oliveira, T M; Pirovani, C P

    2014-07-04

    Theobroma cacao is a woody and recalcitrant plant with a very high level of interfering compounds. Standard protocols for protein extraction were proposed for various types of samples, but the presence of interfering compounds in many samples prevented the isolation of proteins suitable for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). An efficient method to extract root proteins for 2-DE was established to overcome these problems. The main features of this protocol are: i) precipitation with trichloroacetic acid/acetone overnight to prepare the acetone dry powder (ADP), ii) several additional steps of sonication in the ADP preparation and extractions with dense sodium dodecyl sulfate and phenol, and iii) adding two stages of phenol extractions. Proteins were extracted from roots using this new protocol (Method B) and a protocol described in the literature for T. cacao leaves and meristems (Method A). Using these methods, we obtained a protein yield of about 0.7 and 2.5 mg per 1.0 g lyophilized root, and a total of 60 and 400 spots could be separated, respectively. Through Method B, it was possible to isolate high-quality protein and a high yield of roots from T. cacao for high-quality 2-DE gels. To demonstrate the quality of the extracted proteins from roots of T. cacao using Method B, several protein spots were cut from the 2-DE gels, analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry, and identified. Method B was further tested on Citrus roots, with a protein yield of about 2.7 mg per 1.0 g lyophilized root and 800 detected spots.

  12. Proteomic evaluation of sheep serum proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The applications of proteomic strategies to ovine medicine remain limited. The definition of serum proteome may be a good tool to identify useful protein biomarkers for recognising sub-clinical conditions and overt disease in sheep. Findings from bovine species are often directly translated for use in ovine medicine. In order to characterize normal protein patterns and improve knowledge of molecular species-specific characteristics, we generated a two-dimensional reference map of sheep serum. The possible application of this approach was tested by analysing serum protein patterns in ewes with mild broncho-pulmonary disease, which is very common in sheep and in the peripartum period which is a stressful time, with a high incidence of infectious and parasitic diseases. Results This study generated the first reference 2-DE maps of sheep serum. Overall, 250 protein spots were analyzed, and 138 identified. Compared with healthy sheep, serum protein profiles of animals with rhino-tracheo-bronchitis showed a significant decrease in protein spots identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1 and a significant increase in spots identified as haptoglobin, endopin 1b and alpha1B glycoprotein. In the peripartum period, haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, apolipoprotein A1 levels rose, while transthyretin content dropped. Conclusions This study describes applications of proteomics in putative biomarker discovery for early diagnosis as well as for monitoring the physiological and metabolic situations critical for ovine welfare. PMID:22630135

  13. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  14. The Cucumber leaf spot virus p25 auxiliary replicase protein binds and modifies the endoplasmic reticulum via N-terminal transmembrane domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, Kankana; Theilmann, Jane; Reade, Ron; Sanfacon, Helene; Rochon, D’Ann

    2014-11-15

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) is a member of the Aureusvirus genus, family Tombusviridae. The auxiliary replicase of Tombusvirids has been found to localize to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes or mitochondria; however, localization of the auxiliary replicase of aureusviruses has not been determined. We have found that the auxiliary replicase of CLSV (p25) fused to GFP colocalizes with ER and that three predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) at the N-terminus of p25 are sufficient for targeting, although the second and third TMDs play the most prominent roles. Confocal analysis of CLSV infected 16C plants shows that the ER becomes modified including the formation of punctae at connections between ER tubules and in association with the nucleus. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the cytoplasm contains numerous vesicles which are also found between the perinuclear ER and nuclear membrane. It is proposed that these vesicles correspond to modified ER used as sites for CLSV replication. - Highlights: • The CLSV p25 auxiliary replicase targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). • Targeting of CLSV p25 is associated with ER restructuring. • Restructuring of the ER occurs during CLSV infection. • CLSV p25 contains 3 predicted transmembrane domains 2 of which are required for ER targeting. • Vesicles derived from the ER may be sites of CLSV replication.

  15. Rolling Spot Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Garret E.; Fonteyne, Steve L.

    1990-01-01

    Wheeled tool speeds tack-welding operations. Spotwelds foil to parts in preparation for brazing. Includes electrode wheel rolling across foil. Welding current in electrode pulsed as electrode moves along, making series of uniformly-spaced low-current spot welds.

  16. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  17. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  18. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  19. TV spots' impact.

    PubMed

    El-bakly, S

    1994-09-01

    The Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Center of the State Information Service was established in 1979 for the purpose of providing information to the people on the population issue. The Ministry of Information has accorded the State Information Service free TV and radio air time for family planning dramas and spots. In the early years information campaigns were organized to make people aware of the population problem by slogans, songs, and cartoons. Around 1984 misconceptions about family planning and contraceptives were attacked through a number of TV and radio spots. A few years later 21 spots on specific contraceptive methods were broadcast which were aired for three years over 3000 times. They were extremely successful. The impact of these TV spots was one of the major reasons why the contraceptive prevalence rate increased from 30% in 1984 to 38% in 1988 and 47% in 1992. Spots were also broadcast about the social implications of large families. The TV soap opera "And The Nile Flows On", with the family planning message interwoven into it, was very well received by the target audience. A program entitled "Wedding of the Month" features couples who know family planning well. The most successful radio program is a 15-20 minute long quiz show for residents of the villages where the Select Villages Project is being implemented. The State Information Service has 60 local information centers in the 26 governorates of Egypt that make plans for the family planning campaign. In 1992 the Minya Initiative, a family planning project was implemented in the Minya Governorate. As a result, the contraceptive prevalence rate rose from 22% to 30% over 18 months. A new project, the Select Village Project, was developed in 1993 that replicates the Minya Initiative on the village level in other governorates. This new project that was implemented in sixteen governorates.

  20. Integrating sustainable hunting in biodiversity protection in Central Africa: hot spots, weak spots, and strong spots.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting.

  1. Investigating citrullinated proteins in tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of arginine into citrulline, termed citrullination, has important consequences for the structure and function of proteins. Studies have found PADI4, an enzyme performing citrullination, to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumours and have shown that PADI4 participates in the process of tumorigenesis. However, as citrullinated proteins have not been systematically investigated in tumours, the present study aimed to identify novel citrullinated proteins in tumours by 2-D western blotting (2-D WB). Methods Two identical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels were prepared using extracts from ECA, H292, HeLa, HEPG2, Lovo, MCF-7, PANC-1, SGC, and SKOV3 tumour cell lines. The expression profiles on a 2-DE gel were trans-blotted to PVDF membranes, and the blots were then probed with an anti-citrulline antibody. By comparing the 2-DE profile with the parallel 2-D WB profile at a global level, protein spots with immuno-signals were collected from the second 2-DE gel and identified using mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation was used to verify the expression and citrullination of the targeted proteins in tumour cell lines. Results 2-D WB and mass spectrometry identified citrullinated α-enolase (ENO1), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), keratin 8 (KRT8), tubulin beta (TUBB), T cell receptor chain and vimentin in these cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses verified the expression and citrullination of ENO1, HSP60, KRT8, and TUBB in the total protein lysates of the tumour cell lines. Conclusions The citrullination of these proteins suggests a new mechanism in the tumorigenic process. PMID:24099319

  2. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Erhui; An, Sufang; Gong, Fangping; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs), mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin), exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa) and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  3. Differences between fertilized and unfertilized chicken egg white proteins revealed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ning; Liu, Wen; Ma, Meihu; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yuqi

    2013-03-01

    The egg white protein alterations during the early phase of chicken embryonic development were recently reported by our laboratory. Nevertheless, the original albumen differences between fresh unfertilized and fertilized chicken eggs have not been investigated. By using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS/MS) method, 1 ovalbumin protein spot as well as 6 ovalbumin-related protein Y spots were identified showing more than 10-fold differences (P < 0.01) in abundance between fresh unfertilized and fertilized chicken egg whites. Six of these protein spots represented higher intensity in fertilized eggs through 2-DE analysis. It was thus concluded that ovalbumin protein family, especially ovalbumin-related protein Y, may play an important role in embryonic development, which still needs to be validated. This finding will provide insight into embryogenesis to improve our understanding of the functions of ovalbumin family proteins in regulating or supporting embryonic development.

  4. Poisson Spot with Magnetic Levitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  5. Maize (Zea mays L.) seedling leaf nuclear proteome and differentially expressed proteins between a hybrid and its parental lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Chen, Yanhong; Li, Chuan; Wang, Tianya; Wang, Rui; Wang, Bo; Hu, Sha; Du, Xiaofen; Xing, Hongyan; Song, Xiao; Yao, Yingyin; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the underlying molecular basis of leaf development in maize, a reference map of nuclear proteins in basal region of seedling leaf was established using a combination of 2DE and MALDI-TOF-MS. In total, 441 reproducible protein spots in nuclear proteome of maize leaf basal region were detected with silver staining in a pH range of 3-10, among which 203 spots corresponding to 163 different proteins were identified. As expected, proteins implicated in RNA and protein-associated functions were overrepresented in nuclear proteome. Remarkably, a high percentage (10%) of proteins was identified to be involved in cell division and growth. In addition, comparative nuclear proteomic analysis in leaf basal region of highly heterotic hybrid Mo17/B73 and its parental lines was also performed and 52 of 445 (11.69%) detected protein spots were differentially expressed between the hybrid and its parental lines, among which 16 protein spots displayed nonadditively expressed pattern. These results indicated that hybridization between two parental lines can cause changes in the expression of a variety of nuclear proteins, which may be responsible for the observed leaf size heterosis.

  6. The interaction of two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, with Cry protein production and predation by Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) in Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Tian, Jun-Ce; Shi, Wang-Peng; Dong, Xue-Hui; Romeis, Jörg; Naranjo, Steven E; Hellmich, Richard L; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-02-01

    Crops producing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), are an important tool for managing lepidopteran pests on cotton and maize. However, the effects of these Bt crops on non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that provide biological control services, are required to be addressed in an environmental risk assessment. Amblyseius andersoni (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a cosmopolitan predator of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), a significant pest of cotton and maize. Tri-trophic studies were conducted to assess the potential effects of Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize on life history parameters (survival rate, development time, fecundity and egg hatching rate) of A. andersoni. We confirmed that these Bt crops have no effects on the biology of T. urticae and, in turn, that there were no differences in any of the life history parameters of A. andersoni when it fed on T. urticae feeding on Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab or non-Bt cotton and Cry1F or non-Bt maize. Use of a susceptible insect assay demonstrated that T. urticae contained biologically active Cry proteins. Cry proteins concentrations declined greatly as they moved from plants to herbivores to predators and protein concentration did not appear to be related to mite density. Free-choice experiments revealed that A. andersoni had no preference for Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton or Cry1F maize-reared T. urticae compared with those reared on non-Bt cotton or maize. Collectively these results provide strong evidence that these crops can complement other integrated pest management tactics including biological control.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  9. Novel prediction method of beer foam stability using protein Z, barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and yeast thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Takoi, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Takafumi; Kihara, Makoto; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kazutoshi; Sato, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    2008-09-24

    Foam stability is an important quality trait of beer. Our previous results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) analyses of beer proteins implied a relationship between barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and beer foam stability as judged by the NIBEM-T analyzer. To develop a novel prediction method of beer foam stability under different conditions of barley cultivar and malt modification, multiple linear regression analysis was applied. The spot intensities of major beer proteins on 2DE gel were quantified and used as explanatory variables. The foam stabilities of 25 beer samples each brewed from malt with different malt modification in one of the three cultivars (cultivars A, B, and C) were explained by the spot intensities of BDAI-1 at the 5% significance level ( r = 0.421). Furthermore, two other major protein spots (b0 and b5) were observed on the 2DE gels of Japanese commercial beer samples with different foam stability. Then, multiple regression for foam stability was calculated using these three spot intensities as explanatory variables. As a result, 72.1% of the beer foam stability in 25 beer samples was explained by a novel multiple regression equation calculated using spot b0 and BDAI-1 as positive explanatory variables and spot b5 as a negative variable. To verify the validity of the multiple regression equation and the explanatory variables, the beer foam stability in practical beer samples was analyzed. As a result, 81.5% of the beer foam stability in 10 Japanese commercial beer samples was also explained by using spot b0 and BDAI-1 as positive explanatory variables and spot b5 as a negative variable. Mass spectrometry analyses followed by database searches revealed that protein spots b0 and b5 were identified as protein Z originated from barley and thioredoxin originated from yeast, respectively. These results confirm that BDAI-1 and protein Z are foam-positive factors and identify yeast thioredoxin as a possible novel foam

  10. HotRegion: a database of predicted hot spot clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cukuroglu, Engin; Keskin, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Hot spots are energetically important residues at protein interfaces and they are not randomly distributed across the interface but rather clustered. These clustered hot spots form hot regions. Hot regions are important for the stability of protein complexes, as well as providing specificity to binding sites. We propose a database called HotRegion, which provides the hot region information of the interfaces by using predicted hot spot residues, and structural properties of these interface residues such as pair potentials of interface residues, accessible surface area (ASA) and relative ASA values of interface residues of both monomer and complex forms of proteins. Also, the 3D visualization of the interface and interactions among hot spot residues are provided. HotRegion is accessible at http://prism.ccbb.ku.edu.tr/hotregion. PMID:22080558

  11. Characterization of vegetative storage protein (VSP) and low molecular proteins induced by water deficit in stolon of white clover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Lee, Dong-Gi; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2014-01-03

    In stolon of white clover (Trifolium repens L.), the 17.3 kDa protein has been newly identified as a vegetative storage protein (VSP) which has preponderant roles in N accumulation and mobilization to sustain growth when capacity of N uptake is strongly reduced. To characterize the water deficit effect on this protein, the kinetic pattern of soluble protein, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and proteomic analysis was studied in the stolon of white clover during 28 days of water-deficit. Water deficit led to decrease protein concentration. SDS-PAGE revealed that two major proteins of 17.3 and 16 kDa were accumulated to high level in response to water stress. These proteins cross-reacted positively with antibodies raised against the 17.3 kDa VSP, a protein which shared biochemical features with stress proteins implied in dehydration tolerance. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gel and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis, it was demonstrated that 19.5 and 17.3 kDa protein spots were up-regulated by water stress, and both spots were identical to nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), respectively. These results suggest that low molecular proteins induced by water-deficit in the stolon of white clover act as an alternative N reserves or play significant roles in plant protection against water-deficit stress.

  12. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  13. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  14. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  15. Dark Spots and Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As winter turns to spring at the south polar ice cap of Mars, the rising sun reveals dark spots and fans emerging from the cold polar night. Using visual images (left) and temperature data (right) from the Thermal Emission Imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, scientists have built a new model for the origin of the dark markings. Scientists propose the markings come from dark sand and dust strewn by high-speed jets of carbon-dioxide gas. These erupt from under a layer of carbon-dioxide ice that forms each Martian winter.

  16. Evaluation of Three Protein-Extraction Methods for Proteome Analysis of Maize Leaf Midrib, a Compound Tissue Rich in Sclerenchyma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wu, Xiaolin; Ku, Lixia; Chen, Yanhui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Leaf morphology is closely related to the growth and development of maize (Zea mays L.) plants and final kernel production. As an important part of the maize leaf, the midrib holds leaf blades in the aerial position for maximum sunlight capture. Leaf midribs of adult plants contain substantial sclerenchyma cells with heavily thickened and lignified secondary walls and have a high amount of phenolics, making protein extraction and proteome analysis difficult in leaf midrib tissue. In the present study, three protein-extraction methods that are commonly used in plant proteomics, i.e., phenol extraction, TCA/acetone extraction, and TCA/acetone/phenol extraction, were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated based on 2DE maps and MS/MS analysis using the midribs of the 10th newly expanded leaves of maize plants. Microscopy revealed the existence of substantial amounts of sclerenchyma underneath maize midrib epidermises (particularly abaxial epidermises). The spot-number order obtained via 2DE mapping was as follows: phenol extraction (655) > TCA/acetone extraction (589) > TCA/acetone/phenol extraction (545). MS/MS analysis identified a total of 17 spots that exhibited 2-fold changes in abundance among the three methods (using phenol extraction as a control). Sixteen of the proteins identified were hydrophilic, with GRAVY values ranging from -0.026 to -0.487. For all three methods, we were able to obtain high-quality protein samples and good 2DE maps for the maize leaf midrib. However, phenol extraction produced a better 2DE map with greater resolution between spots, and TCA/acetone extraction produced higher protein yields. Thus, this paper includes a discussion regarding the possible reasons for differential protein extraction among the three methods. This study provides useful information that can be used to select suitable protein extraction methods for the proteome analysis of recalcitrant plant tissues that are rich in sclerenchyma cells. PMID:27379139

  17. Evaluation of Three Protein-Extraction Methods for Proteome Analysis of Maize Leaf Midrib, a Compound Tissue Rich in Sclerenchyma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wu, Xiaolin; Ku, Lixia; Chen, Yanhui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Leaf morphology is closely related to the growth and development of maize (Zea mays L.) plants and final kernel production. As an important part of the maize leaf, the midrib holds leaf blades in the aerial position for maximum sunlight capture. Leaf midribs of adult plants contain substantial sclerenchyma cells with heavily thickened and lignified secondary walls and have a high amount of phenolics, making protein extraction and proteome analysis difficult in leaf midrib tissue. In the present study, three protein-extraction methods that are commonly used in plant proteomics, i.e., phenol extraction, TCA/acetone extraction, and TCA/acetone/phenol extraction, were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated based on 2DE maps and MS/MS analysis using the midribs of the 10th newly expanded leaves of maize plants. Microscopy revealed the existence of substantial amounts of sclerenchyma underneath maize midrib epidermises (particularly abaxial epidermises). The spot-number order obtained via 2DE mapping was as follows: phenol extraction (655) > TCA/acetone extraction (589) > TCA/acetone/phenol extraction (545). MS/MS analysis identified a total of 17 spots that exhibited 2-fold changes in abundance among the three methods (using phenol extraction as a control). Sixteen of the proteins identified were hydrophilic, with GRAVY values ranging from -0.026 to -0.487. For all three methods, we were able to obtain high-quality protein samples and good 2DE maps for the maize leaf midrib. However, phenol extraction produced a better 2DE map with greater resolution between spots, and TCA/acetone extraction produced higher protein yields. Thus, this paper includes a discussion regarding the possible reasons for differential protein extraction among the three methods. This study provides useful information that can be used to select suitable protein extraction methods for the proteome analysis of recalcitrant plant tissues that are rich in sclerenchyma cells.

  18. Proteomic analysis reveals differentially expressed proteins in the rat frontal cortex after methamphetamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Faure, J J; Hattingh, S M; Stein, D J; Daniels, W M

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an addictive psycho-stimulant and the illicit use of the drug is escalating. In the present study, we examined protein expression profiles in the rat frontal cortex exposed to a total of eight MA injections (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) using 2-DE based proteomics. We investigated protein changes occurring in both the cytosolic fraction and the membrane fraction. 2-DE analysis resulted in 62 cytosolic and 44 membrane protein spots that were differentially regulated in the frontal cortex of rats exposed to MA when compared to control animals. Of these spots, 47 cytosolic and 42 membrane proteins were identified respectively, using ESI-Quad-TOF, which included ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1), beta-synuclein, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), gamma-enolase, dihydropyrimidase-related protein 2 (DRP 2), complexin 2 and synapsin II. These proteins are associated with protein degradation, redox regulation, energy metabolism, cellular growth, cytoskeletal modifications and synaptic function. Proteomic research may be useful in exploring the complex underlying molecular mechanisms of MA dependence.

  19. Proteomic analysis of salinity-stressed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed differential suppression and induction of a large number of important housekeeping proteins.

    PubMed

    Yokthongwattana, Chotika; Mahong, Bancha; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Phaonaklop, Narumon; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Yokthongwattana, Kittisak

    2012-03-01

    Salinity stress is one of the most common abiotic stresses that hamper plant productivity worldwide. Successful plant adaptations to salt stress require substantial changes in cellular protein expression. In this work, we present a 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of a model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, subjected to 300 mM NaCl for 2 h. Results showed that, in addition to the protein spots that showed partial up- or down-regulation patterns, a number of proteins were exclusively present in the proteome of the control cells, but were absent from the salinity-stressed samples. Conversely, a large number of proteins exclusively appeared in the proteome of the salinity-stressed samples. Of those exclusive proteins, we could successfully identify, via LC-MS/MS, 18 spots uniquely present in the control cells and 99 spots specific to NaCl-treated cells. Interestingly, among the salt-exclusive protein spots, we identified several important housekeeping proteins like molecular chaperones and proteins of the translation machinery, suggesting that they may originate from post-translational modifications rather than from de novo biosynthesis. The possible role and the salt-specific modification of these proteins by salinity stress are discussed.

  20. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  1. Turbulent spots in hypervelocity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent spot propagation process in boundary layer flows of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and air/carbon dioxide mixtures in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is investigated. Experiments are performed in a hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel with a 5-degree half-angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with flush-mounted fast-response coaxial thermocouples. Time-resolved and spatially demarcated heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent bursts within the mean flow, and convection rates at approximately 91, 74, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, peak, and trailing edge of the spots. A simple model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from observed transition onset to completion distance. Spot generation rates in air and nitrogen are estimated to be approximately twice the spot generation rates in air/carbon dioxide mixtures.

  2. Jovian Dark Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A recently discovered black spot in Jupiter's clouds is darker than any feature ever before observed on the giant planet. The spot may be the result of a downward spiraling wind that blows away high clouds and reveals deeper, very dark cloud layers. These three panels depict the same area of Jupiter's atmosphere. A map of Jovian temperatures near 250 millibar pressure (top) panel is derived from the photopolarimeter-radiometer instrument on NASA's Galileo Jupiter orbiter. This map is compared with maps derived from images of the same area in visible light (middle panel)and thermal radiation sensitive to cloud-top temperatures (bottom panel).

    The single downward-pointing arrow in the top panel indicates the location of a warm area that corresponds to the position of a so-called 'black spot'(shown in the middle panel), a feature that is about a year old. Features this dark are rare on Jupiter. The bottom panel, sensitive to temperatures at Jupiter's cloud tops, shows this feature as a bright object, meaning that upper-level cold clouds are missing - allowing us to see deeper into Jupiter's warmer interior. The dark visible appearance of the feature than most likely represents the color of very deep clouds. The warm temperatures and cloud-free conditions imply that this feature is a region where dry upper-atmospheric gas is being forced to converge, is warmed up and then forced to descend, clearing out clouds. It is the opposite of wet, upwelling gas in areas such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot or white ovals. On the other hand, it is unlike the dry and relatively cloudless feature into which the Galileo probe descended in 1995, because that region had the same temperatures as its surroundings and did not appear nearly as dark as this new spot.

    The temperatures sampled by the photopolarimeter radiometer are near the top of Jupiter's troposphere, where wind motions control the atmosphere. The top row of arrows shows the location of temperature waves in a warm region

  3. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates.

  4. Vitamin D Binding Protein Isoforms and Apolipoprotein E in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Prognostic Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Katarzyna; Minari, Nicoletta; Falvo, Sara; Marnetto, Fabiana; Caldano, Marzia; Reviglione, Raffaella; Berchialla, Paola; Capobianco, Marco A.; Malentacchi, Maria; Corpillo, Davide; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a heterogeneous and unpredictable course. To date there are no prognostic biomarkers even if they would be extremely useful for early patient intervention with personalized therapies. In this context, the analysis of inter-individual differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome may lead to the discovery of biological markers that are able to distinguish the various clinical forms at diagnosis. Methods To this aim, a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) study was carried out on individual CSF samples from 24 untreated women who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected MS. The patients were clinically monitored for 5 years and then classified according to the degree of disease aggressiveness and the disease-modifying therapies prescribed during follow up. Results The hierarchical cluster analysis of 2-DE dataset revealed three protein spots which were identified by means of mass spectrometry as Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and two isoforms of vitamin D binding protein (DBP). These three protein spots enabled us to subdivide the patients into subgroups correlated with clinical classification (MS aggressive forms identification: 80%). In particular, we observed an opposite trend of values for the two protein spots corresponding to different DBP isoforms suggesting a role of a post-translational modification rather than the total protein content in patient categorization. Conclusions These findings proved to be very interesting and innovative and may be developed as new candidate prognostic biomarkers of MS aggressiveness, if confirmed. PMID:26046356

  5. Resolving stellar surface spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T.; Rice, J. B.; Savanov, I. S.

    Doppler imaging of stellar surfaces is a novel technique with similarities to medical brain tomography (instead of a fixed brain and a rotating scanner, astronomers have a fixed spectrograph and a rotating brain, star of course). The number of free (internal) parameters is of the order of the number of surface grid points and only constrained by the number of input data points. This obviously ill-posed situation requires modern inversion algorithms with penalty functions of the form of maximum entropy or Tikhonov etc.. We present a brief status review of our Doppler imaging codes at AIP that span from temperature and spot-filling-factor mapping to full Stokes-based magnetic field mapping.

  6. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  7. An iterative calibration method with prediction of post-translational modifications for the construction of a two-dimensional electrophoresis database of mouse mammary gland proteins.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Sevil; Scheler, Christian; Focks, Nicole; Leenders, Frauke; Theuring, Franz; Salnikow, Johann; Jungblut, Peter R

    2002-10-01

    Protein databases serve as general reference resources providing an orientation on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) patterns of interest. The intention behind constructing a 2-DE database of the water soluble proteins from wild-type mouse mammary gland tissue was to create a reference before going on to investigate cancer-associated protein variations. This database shall be deemed to be a model system for mouse tissue, which is open for transgenic or knockout experiments. Proteins were separated and characterized in terms of their molecular weight (M(r)) and isoelectric point (pI) by high resolution 2-DE. The proteins were identified using prevalent proteomics methods. One method was peptide mass fingerprinting by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry. Another method was N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation. By N-terminal sequencing M(r) and pI values were specified more accurately and so the calibration of the master gel was obtained more systematically and exactly. This permits the prediction of possible post-translational modifications of some proteins. The mouse mammary gland 2-DE protein database created presently contains 66 identified protein spots, which are clickable on the gel pattern. This relational database is accessible on the WWW under the URL: http://www.mpiib-berlin.mpg.de/2D-PAGE.

  8. Protein/RNA coextraction and small two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for proteomic/gene expression analysis of renal cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Giovanna; Carta, Franco; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Mandili, Giorgia; Crobu, Salvatore; Ceruti, Carlo; Fontana, Dario; Destefanis, Paolo; Turrini, Francesco

    2006-02-01

    A small amount of bioptic tissue ( approximately 5-10mg of fresh tissue) usually does not contain enough material to extract protein and RNA separately, to obtain preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and to identify a large number of separated proteins by MS. We tested a method, on small renal cancer specimens, for the coextraction of protein and RNA coupled with 2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) or quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) analysis. We coextracted 0.28+/-0.05mg of proteins and 2.5+/-0.33microg of RNA for each 10mg of renal carcinoma tissue. Small and large 2-DE gels were compared: they showed a similar number of spots, and it was possible to match each other; using small format gels, one-fifth of the protein amount was required to identify, by Q-TOF analysis, the same number of proteins identifiable in large-format gel using MALDI-TOF analysis. Quality of RNA coextracted with the proteins was tested by real-time PCR on a set of housekeeping genes. They were quantified with high amplification efficiency and specificity. In conclusion, using 5 to 10mg of fresh tissue, it was possible to perform comprehensive parallel proteomic and genomic analysis by high-resolution, small-format 2-DE gels, allowing approximately 300 proteins identification and 1000 genes expression analysis.

  9. 2D-PAGE protein analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum based on three different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Norshaha, Safida Anira; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algae bloom or red tide seems to be considered as threat to ecosystem, especially to human consumption because of the production of neurotoxin by dinoflagellates species such as Alexandrium minutum which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning. The aim of this study is to determine the most suitable method for protein extraction of A. minutum followed by determination of differential protein expression of A. minutum on three different temperatures (15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C). After the optimization, the protein extract was subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to compare the intensity and distribution of the protein spots. Based on quantitative and qualitative protein assessment, use of Trizol reagent is the most suitable method to extract protein from A. minutum. 2-DE analysis of the samples results in different distribution and intensity of the protein spots were compared between 15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C.

  10. Identification and comparative proteomic study of quail and duck egg white protein using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, S; Qiu, N; Liu, Y; Zhao, H; Gao, D; Song, R; Ma, M

    2016-05-01

    A proteomic study of egg white proteins from 2 major poultry species, namely quail (Coturnix coturnix) and duck (Anas platyrhynchos), was performed with comparison to those of chicken (Gallus gallus) through 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis. By using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS/MS), 29 protein spots representing 10 different kinds of proteins as well as 17 protein spots designating 9 proteins were successfully identified in quail and duck egg white, respectively. This report suggested a closer relationship between quail and chicken egg white proteome patterns, whereas the duck egg white protein distribution on the 2-DE map was more distinct. In duck egg white, some well-known major proteins, such as ovomucoid, clusterin, extracellular fatty acid-binding protein precursor (ex-FABP), and prostaglandin D2 synthase (PG D2 synthase), were not detected, while two major protein spots identified as "deleted in malignant brain tumors 1" protein (DMBT1) and vitellogenin-2 were found specific to duck in the corresponding range on the 2-DE gel map. These interspecies diversities may be associated with the egg white protein functions in cell defense or regulating/supporting the embryonic development to adapt to the inhabiting environment or reproduction demand during long-term evolution. The findings of this work will give insight into the advantages involved in the application on egg white proteins from various egg sources, which may present novel beneficial properties in the food industry or related to human health.

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  12. Automated Segmentation and Classification of High Throughput Yeast Assay Spots

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad; Parrish, Jodi R.; Finley, Russell L.

    2009-01-01

    Several technologies for characterizing genes and proteins from humans and other organisms use yeast growth or color development as read outs. The yeast two-hybrid assay, for example, detects protein-protein interactions by measuring the growth of yeast on a specific solid medium, or the ability of the yeast to change color when grown on a medium containing a chromogenic substrate. Current systems for analyzing the results of these types of assays rely on subjective and inefficient scoring of growth or color by human experts. Here an image analysis system is described for scoring yeast growth and color development in high throughput biological assays. The goal is to locate the spots and score them in color images of two types of plates named “X-Gal” and “growth assay” plates, with uniformly placed spots (cell areas) on each plate (both plates in one image). The scoring system relies on color for the X-Gal spots, and texture properties for the growth assay spots. A maximum likelihood projection-based segmentation is developed to automatically locate spots of yeast on each plate. Then color histogram and wavelet texture features are extracted for scoring using an optimal linear transformation. Finally an artificial neural network is used to score the X-Gal and growth assay spots using the extracted features. The performance of the system is evaluated using spots of 60 images. After training the networks using training and validation sets, the system was assessed on the test set. The overall accuracies of 95.4% and 88.2% are achieved respectively for scoring the X-Gal and growth assay spots. PMID:17948730

  13. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  14. Comparison of antigenic proteins from Lactococcus garvieae KG- and KG+ strains that are recognized by olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gee-Wook; Nho, Seong-Won; Park, Seong-Bin; Jang, Ho-Bin; Cha, In-Seok; Ha, Mi-Ae; Kim, Young-Rim; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Joh, Seong-Joon; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2009-10-20

    Lactococcus garvieae is an important etiological agent of lactococcosis in various fish species including olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). In this study, proteomic and immunoproteomic analyses were employed to compare the antigenic profiles of strains KG9408, MS93003, and NSS9310 strains of L. garvieae. Proteomic analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed differences in five protein spots among the different L. garvieae strains. In immunoproteomic analysis, there was a significant difference in the 2-DE immunoblot profiles of the L. garvieae strains using sera collected from fish surviving infection with either L. garvieae strains KG9408 or NSS9310. These sera reacted with 8 and 7 unique antigenic protein spots, respectively. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and DNA-directed RNA polymerase were among the specific antigens recognized by the anti-NSS9310 serum. In addition, the anti-NSS9310 and anti-KG9408 olive flounder sera reacted with 25 common antigenic protein spots of all the L. garvieae strains, which included elongation factor (EF)-Tu, arginine deiminase (AD), inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPD), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphomannomutase (PMM), L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH), 6-phosphofructokinase and UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (UDP-galactose). Based on the present results, the 8 antigens recognized by the anti-KG9408 serum and the 25 common antigens recognized by both sera may serve as potential markers for developing an effective vaccine against this bacterium.

  15. Identification of differentially expressed proteins of gamma-ray irradiated rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zhang; Yongping, Su; Fengchao, Wang; Guoping, Ai; Yongjiang, Wei

    2005-02-01

    To identify proteins involved in the processes of cellular and molecular response to radiation damage repair in intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteome of irradiated IEC-6 cells with that of normal cells. A series of methods were used, including two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (Z-DE), PDQuest software analysis of 2-DE gels, peptide mass fingerprinting based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and Swiss-Prot database searching, to separate and identify differentially expressed proteins. Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to validate the differentially expressed proteins. Image analysis revealed that averages of 608 +/- 39 and 595 +/- 31 protein spots were detected in normal and irradiated IEC-6 cells, respectively. Sixteen differential protein spots were isolated from gels, and measured with MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 14 spots yielded good spectra, and 11 spots matched with known proteins after database searching. These proteins were mainly involved in anti-oxidation, metabolism, and protein post-translational processes. Western blotting confirmed that stress-70 protein was down-regulated by gamma-irradiation. Up-regulation of ERP29 was confirmed by RT-PCR, indicating that it is involved in ionizing radiation. The clues provided by the comparative proteome strategy utilized here will shed light on molecular mechanisms of radiation damage repair in intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Saturn's Hot Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the sharpest image of Saturn's temperature emissions taken from the ground; it is a mosaic of 35 individual exposures made at the W.M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii on Feb. 4, 2004.

    The images to create this mosaic were taken with infrared radiation. The mosaic was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of the image is right at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected. The tropospheric temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    Ring particles are not at a uniform temperature everywhere in their orbit around Saturn. The ring particles are orbiting clockwise in this image. Particles are coldest just after having cooled down in Saturn's shadow (lower left). As they orbit Saturn, the particles increase in temperature up to a maximum (lower right) just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

    A small section of the ring image is missing because of incomplete mosaic coverage during the observing sequence.

  17. Single spots, unipolar magnetic regions, and pairs of spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    2014-06-01

    McIntosh (1981) noted that sunspot pairs appear preferentially near the boundary of unipolar magnetic (UM) regions of opposite polarity. A large number of solar magnetograms from the Mount Wilson Observatory and the Kitt Peak Observatory during fairly quiet periods are examined to confirm his finding. In this study, it is also found collaterally that positive single spots appear in a positive UM region and vice versa. It is suggested thus that a pair of spots of opposite polarity is formed because two single spots develop in the vicinity of the boundary (the neutral line) of two UM regions of opposite polarity for polarity arrangement appropriate to the Hale law, namely, the Hale boundary. For these reasons, it is suggested that single spots and UM regions have significant meaning in solar magnetism.

  18. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait.

  19. Zeptosens' protein microarrays: a novel high performance microarray platform for low abundance protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Michael; Schick, Eginhard; Bopp, Martin A; Schneider, Michael J; Oroszlan, Peter; Ehrat, Markus

    2002-04-01

    Protein microarrays are considered an enabling technology, which will significantly expand the scope of current protein expression and protein interaction analysis. Current technologies, such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry, allowing the identification of biologically relevant proteins, have a high resolving power, but also considerable limitations. As was demonstrated by Gygi et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2000,97, 9390-9395), most spots in 2-DE, observed from whole cell extracts, are from high abundance proteins, whereas low abundance proteins, such as signaling molecules or kinases, are only poorly represented. Protein microarrays are expected to significantly expedite the discovery of new markers and targets of pharmaceutical interest, and to have the potential for high-throughput applications. Key factors to reach this goal are: high read-out sensitivity for quantification also of low abundance proteins, functional analysis of proteins, short assay analysis times, ease of handling and the ability to integrate a variety of different targets and new assays. Zeptosens has developed a revolutionary new bioanalytical system based on the proprietary planar waveguide technology which allows us to perform multiplexed, quantitative biomolecular interaction analysis with highest sensitivity in a microarray format upon utilizing the specific advantages of the evanescent field fluorescence detection. The analytical system, comprising an ultrasensitive fluorescence reader and microarray chips with integrated microfluidics, enables the user to generate a multitude of high fidelity data in applications such as protein expression profiling or investigating protein-protein interactions. In this paper, the important factors for developing high performance protein microarray systems, especially for targeting low abundant messengers of relevant biological information, will be discussed and the performance of the system will

  20. Differentially expressed proteins in the interaction of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri with leaf extract of the host plant.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A; Rosato, Y B

    2001-09-01

    The present study reports the expression of proteins of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri in response to different growth conditions. The bacterium was cultured in the basal medium MM1 and in the presence of leaf extracts from a susceptible host plant (sweet orange) as well as a resistant (ponkan) and a nonhost plant (passion fruit). The protein profiles were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Twelve differential spots (induced, up- and down-regulated and repressed) were observed in the protein profiles of the bacterium cultivated in citrus extract (susceptible host) when compared to that of MM1. The 2-DE profile of the bacterium cultured in the complex medium nutrient yeast glycerol was also obtained and the comparison with that of MM1 revealed 36 differential spots. Five proteins from the different treatments were successfully N-terminally sequenced and the putative functions were assigned by homology searches in databases. Two constitutively expressed proteins, B4 and B5, were identified as pseudouridine synthase and elongation factor P, respectively. The large subunit of ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and a sulfate binding protein were found as specifically up-regulated in the presence of citrus extracts. Finally, the heat shock protein G was found exclusively in the complex medium and repressed in all other media.

  1. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  2. Center Spot: Shoe Box Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jan

    1976-01-01

    This is the second "Center Spot" devoted to Jan Hoffman's "Shoe Box Science," a program that organizes manipulative materials so that children can identify, describe, order, construct, name and distinguish on their own.

  3. Spot14/Spot14R expression may be involved in MSC adipogenic differentiation in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QIFEI; YANG, JUNLIN; LIN, XIANG; HUANG, ZIFANG; XIE, CHAOFAN; FAN, HENGWEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different expression levels of thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP; Spot14)/S14 related, Mig12 (S14R) during bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) adipogenesis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. MSCs were retrospectively isolated from AIS patients and controls, and adipogenic differentiation was induced. Total RNA was extracted for Affymetrix 3′-IVT expression profiling microarrays and compared with the results from healthy controls. The results were confirmed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation and the protein expression levels of Spot14 and its paralogous gene S14R by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 300 significantly altered mRNAs were detected (111 upregulated and 189 downregulated) and confirmed by RT-qPCR. The mRNA expression levels of seven genes, including Spot14, were altered by >2-fold in AIS patients. Spot14/S14R was selected for further investigation. The results of the western blotting demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression levels of Spot14/S14R were significantly higher in AIS patients than the controls (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Spot14 was expressed in 85% (17/20 cases) in adipose tissue samples from AIS patients and 23.1% (3/13 cases) of adipose tissue samples from controls. The positive ratio of Spot14 in adipose tissue samples from AIS was significantly higher than the controls (P<0.001). The results of the present study indicated that Spot14/S14R were differently expressed in MSC adipogenesis in AIS patients, and they may be important in the abnormal adipogenic differentiation in AIS. PMID:27082501

  4. Two dimensional protein patterns of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from non-smokers, smokers, and subjects exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, M.; Ekström, T.; Sörensen, J.; Tagesson, C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid contains a large number of proteins which comprise a potential resource for studying respiratory effects due to occupational and environmental exposures. A study was undertaken to compare protein patterns of BAL fluid from non-smokers, smokers, and subjects exposed to asbestos. METHODS: BAL fluid samples were analysed with two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The separated proteins were detected, quantified, and pattern-matched between different individuals with a computerised imaging system designed for evaluations of 2-DE patterns. RESULTS: About 200 different protein spots were detected in each sample of BAL fluid. As is the case with blood plasma, the BAL fluid samples contained large amounts of albumin, transferrin, and immunoglobulins. Higher levels of basic proteins were found in smokers than in non-smokers, while subjects exposed to asbestos had increased amounts of several high molecular weight proteins as well as basic proteins. Lower levels of albumin and higher levels of immunoglobulins were found in smokers than in non-smokers, while higher levels of transferrin were found in asbestos exposed subjects than in unexposed subjects. Moreover, in the group exposed to asbestos differences were found between patients with pleuritis and patients with pleural plaque, and one protein spot was found only in two patients with progressive pleural disease. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that both smokers and asbestos exposed subjects have significant changes in their airway protein expression compared with non-smokers and unexposed subjects. It is inferred that analysis of protein patterns in the BAL fluid with 2-DE may be used to detect and characterise, at a molecular level, respiratory effects due to occupational and environmental exposures. Images PMID:8977605

  5. Extraction and proteome analysis of starch granule-associated proteins in mature wheat kernel (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Bancel, Emmanuelle; Rogniaux, Hélène; Debiton, Clément; Chambon, Christophe; Branlard, Gérard

    2010-06-04

    Starch consists of the two glucose polymers, amylose and amylopectin, and is deposited as semicrystalline granules inside plastids. The starch granule proteome is particularly challenging to study due to the amount of interfering compounds (sugars, storage proteins), the very low starch granule-associated protein content and also the dynamic range of abundant proteins. Here we present the protocol for extraction and 2-DE of wheat starch granule-associated proteins whose most important steps are: (i) washing and sonication to remove interfering compounds (storage proteins) from the surface of the granules, (ii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations to monitor purification and granules swelling, (iii) appropriate protein extraction and solubilization to obtain enough proteins for Coomassie blue staining and proteomic analysis. Our objective was to minimize the amount of contamination by storage proteins and to preserve the structure of the starch and of starch-associated proteins and to maximize the number of polypeptides that can be resolved. For quantitative proteomic analysis of proteins associated with wheat starch granules, we developed a two-step protein extraction protocol including TCA/acetone precipitation and phenol extraction. With this protocol, proteins were extracted from wheat starch granules and solubilized and satisfactory blue-stained 2-DE protein maps were obtained. The majority of the spots associated with starch granules were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS and functionally classified into carbohydrate metabolism and stress defense.

  6. Multiplex staining of 2-DE gels for an initial phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds and early grown seedlings from a non-orthodox specie: Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Rodríguez, M. Cristina; Abril, Nieves; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds (0 and 24 h after seed imbibition) and early grown seedlings (216 h after seed imbibition) from a non-orthodox sp. Quercus ilex, a multiplex (SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q DPS) staining of high-resolution 2-DE gels was used. By using this protocol it was possible to detect changes in protein-abundance and/or phosphorylation status. This simple approach could be a good complementary alternative to the enrichment protocols used in the search for phosphoprotein candidates. While 482 spots were visualized with SYPRO-Ruby, 222 were with Pro-Q DPS. Statistically significant differences in spot intensity were observed among samples, these corresponding to 85 SYPRO-Ruby-, 20 Pro-Q-DPS-, and 35 SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q-DPS-stained spots. Fifty-five phosphoprotein candidates showing qualitative or quantitative differences between samples were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF MS analysis, with 20 of them being identified. Identified proteins belonged to five different functional categories, namely: carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, defense, protein folding, and oxidation-reduction processes. With the exception of a putative cyclase, the other 19 proteins had at least one orthologous phosphoprotein in Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, N. tabacum, and Glycine max. Out of the 20 identified, seven showed differences in intensity in Pro-Q-DPS but not in SYPRO-Ruby-stained gels, including enzymes of the glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. This bears out that theory the regulation of these enzymes occurs at the post-translational level by phosphorylation with no changes at the transcriptional or translational level. This is different from the mechanism reported in orthodox seeds, in which concomitant changes in abundance and phosphorylation status have been observed for these enzymes. PMID:26322061

  7. Combining subproteome enrichment and Rubisco depletion enables identification of low abundance proteins differentially regulated during plant defense.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Ivy; Naumann, Kai; Roth, Udo; Wolf, Noreen; Mackey, David; Dangl, Jeffery L; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis conditionally expressing the bacterial avrRpm1 type III effector under the control of a dexamethasone-responsive promoter were used for proteomics studies. This model system permits study of an individual effector without interference from additional bacterial components. Coupling of different prefractionation approaches to high resolution 2-DE facilitated the discovery of low abundance proteins - enabling the identification of proteins that have escaped detection in similar experiments. A total of 34 differentially regulated protein spots were identified. Four of these (a remorin, a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), an RNA-binding protein, and a C2-domain-containing protein) are potentially early signaling components in the interaction between AvrRpm1 and the cognate disease resistance gene product, resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1). For the remorin and RNA-binding protein, involvement of PTM and post-transcriptional regulation are implicated, respectively.

  8. THE OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGEN TOXOPLASMA GONDII DEPLOYS A DIVERSE LEGION OF INVASION AND SURVIVAL PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing W.; Kafsack, Björn F. C.; Cole, Robert N.; Beckett, Phil; Shen, Rong F.; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2006-01-01

    Host cell invasion is an essential step during infection by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan that causes the severe opportunistic disease toxoplasmosis in humans. Recent evidence strongly suggests that proteins discharged from Toxoplasma apical secretory organelles (micronemes, dense granules, and rhoptries) play key roles in host cell invasion and survival during infection. However, to date, only a limited number of secretory proteins have been discovered and the full spectrum of effector molecules involved in parasite invasion and survival remains unknown. To address these issues, we analyzed a large cohort of freely released Toxoplasma secretory proteins using two complementary methodologies, 2-DE/MS and LC/ESI-MS-MS (MudPIT, shotgun proteomics). Visualization of Toxoplasma secretory products by 2-DE revealed ∼100 spots, most of which were successfully identified by protein microsequencing or MALDI-MS analysis. Many proteins were present in multiple species suggesting they are subjected to substantial posttranslational modification. Shotgun proteomic analysis of the secretory fraction revealed several additional products including novel putative adhesive proteins, proteases, and hypothetical secretory proteins similar to products expressed by other related parasites including Plasmodium, the etiologic agent of malaria. A subset of novel proteins were re-expressed as fusions to yellow fluorescent protein and this initial screen revealed shared and distinct localizations within secretory compartments of T. gondii tachyzoites. The findings provide a uniquely broad view of Toxoplasma secretory proteins that participate in parasite survival and pathogenesis during infection. PMID:16002397

  9. Intermittency Models and Spot Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental work at the University of Oxford Osney Lab has demonstrated characteristics of the late-stage transition process by the use of thin-film heat transfer gauges. The development of turbulent spots has been observed in a range of environments, including flat plates, turbine blade cascade tests and wake-passing experiments. These results were taken at Mach/Reynolds numbers and gas-to-wall temperature ratios representative of gas turbines. Analyses of the spot characteristics are consistent with measurements taken in low speed experiments, and support the Schubauer and Klebanoff type of turbulent spots. The addition of simulated wakes from upstream stages has been observed to be primarily superpositional for these tests.

  10. Poisson's spot and Gouy phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Paz, I. G.; Soldati, Rodolfo; Cabral, L. A.; de Oliveira, J. G. G.; Sampaio, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Recently there have been experimental results on Poisson spot matter-wave interferometry followed by theoretical models describing the relative importance of the wave and particle behaviors for the phenomenon. We propose an analytical theoretical model for Poisson's spot with matter waves based on the Babinet principle, in which we use the results for free propagation and single-slit diffraction. We take into account effects of loss of coherence and finite detection area using the propagator for a quantum particle interacting with an environment. We observe that the matter-wave Gouy phase plays a role in the existence of the central peak and thus corroborates the predominantly wavelike character of the Poisson's spot. Our model shows remarkable agreement with the experimental data for deuterium (D2) molecules.

  11. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  12. Red wine proteins: two dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Mainente, Federica; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Lorenzini, Marilinda; Cecconi, Daniela; Vincenzi, Simone; Rizzi, Corrado; Simonato, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize protein extraction from red wine (cv. Cabernet) in order to obtain a separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) compatible with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins were denatured by sodium dodecyl-sulphate (SDS) and precipitated as potassium salts. The potassium-DS (KDS) protein complexes obtained were treated with different solutions in order to remove the detergent. Proteins were solubilized with different buffers and separated by different electrophoretic approaches [native, urea, acid urea PAGEs and isoelectric focusing (IEF)] as the first-dimension (1-DE). The best 2D separation was achieved by using 10% saccharose in the DS removal step, and 6-cyclohexylhexyl β-d-maltoside detergent in the solubilisation buffer combined with the IEF approach. Several well focalized protein spots were obtained and analyzed through mass-spectrometry.

  13. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  15. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Dynes, Joseph L; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and 'skimming plane' imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes.

  16. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kyle L.; Dynes, Joseph L.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and ‘skimming plane’ imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes. PMID:26308212

  17. Proteomic Identification of Target Proteins of Thiodigalactoside in White Adipose Tissue from Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-06-25

    Previously, galectin-1 (GAL1) was found to be up-regulated in obesity-prone subjects, suggesting that use of a GAL1 inhibitor could be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of obesity. We evaluated thiodigalactoside (TDG) as a potent inhibitor of GAL1 and identified target proteins of TDG by performing comparative proteome analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from control and TDG-treated rats fed a high fat diet (HFD) using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI-TOF-MS. Thirty-two spots from a total of 356 matched spots showed differential expression between control and TDG-treated rats, as identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. These proteins were categorized into groups such as carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, signal transduction, cytoskeletal, and mitochondrial proteins based on functional analysis using Protein Annotation Through Evolutionary Relationship (PANTHER) and Database for Annotation, Visualization, Integrated Discovery (DAVID) classification. One of the most striking findings of this study was significant changes in Carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3), Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1), annexin A2 (ANXA2) and lactate dehydrogenase A chain (LDHA) protein levels between WAT from control and TDG-treated groups. In addition, we confirmed increased expression of thermogenic proteins as well as reduced expression of lipogenic proteins in response to TDG treatment. These results suggest that TDG may effectively prevent obesity, and TDG-responsive proteins can be used as novel target proteins for obesity treatment.

  18. Comparison of Different Protein Extraction Methods for Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ganoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Saidi, Noor Baity; Usuldin, Siti Rokhiyah Ahmad; Hussin, Siti Nahdatul Isnaini Said; Yusoff, Noornabeela Md; Idris, Abu Seman

    2016-04-01

    Ganoderma species are a group of fungi that have the ability to degrade lignin polymers and cause severe diseases such as stem and root rot and can infect economically important plants and perennial crops such as oil palm, especially in tropical countries such as Malaysia. Unfortunately, very little is known about the complex interplay between oil palm and Ganoderma in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Proteomic technologies are simple yet powerful tools in comparing protein profile and have been widely used to study plant-fungus interaction. A critical step to perform a good proteome research is to establish a method that gives the best quality and a wide coverage of total proteins. Despite the availability of various protein extraction protocols from pathogenic fungi in the literature, no single extraction method was found suitable for all types of pathogenic fungi. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for 2-DE gel analysis of Ganoderma spp., three previously reported protein extraction protocols were compared: trichloroacetic acid, sucrose and phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol. The third method was found to give the most reproducible gels and highest protein concentration. Using the later method, a total of 10 protein spots (5 from each species) were successfully identified. Hence, the results from this study propose phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol as the most effective protein extraction method for 2-DE proteomic studies of Ganoderma spp.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of Litopenaeus vannamei gills after vaccination with two WSSV structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Lin, Shi-Wei; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chang, Chin-I; Hseu, Jinn-Rong; Tsai, Jyh-Ming

    2016-02-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most devastating viral pathogens of cultured shrimp worldwide. Recently published papers show the ability of WSSV structural protein VP28 to vaccinate shrimp and raise protection against the virus. This study attempted to identify the joining proteins of the aforementioned shrimp quasi-immune response by proteomic analysis. The other envelope protein, VP36B, was used as the non-protective subunit vaccine control. Shrimp were intramuscularly injected with rVPs or PBS on day 1 and day 4 and then on day 7 their gill tissues were sampled. The two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) patterns of gill proteins between vaccinated and PBS groups were compared and 20 differentially expressed proteins identified by mass spectrometry, some of which were validated in gill and hemocyte tissues using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Many of identified proteins and their expression levels also linked with the shrimp response during WSSV infection. The list of up-regulated protein spots found exclusively in rVP28-vaccinated shrimp include calreticulin and heat shock protein 70 with chaperone properties, ubiquitin, and others. The two serine proteases, chymotrypsin and trypsin, were significantly increased in shrimp of both vaccinated groups compared to PBS controls. The information presented here should be useful for gaining insight into invertebrate immunity.

  20. Proteomic characterization of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica-a protein resource for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Aplysia californica (AC) is a widely used model for testing learning and memory. Although ESTs have been generated, proteomics studies on AC proteins are limited. Studies at the protein level, however, are mandatory, not only due to the fact that studies at the nucleic acid level are not allowing conclusions about PTMs. A gel-based proteomics method was therefore applied to carry out protein profiling in abdominal ganglia from AC. Abdominal ganglia were extirpated, proteins extracted and run on 2DE with subsequent in-gel digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and partially by subtilisin. Peptides were identified using a nano-LC-ESI-LTQ-FT-mass spectrometer. MS/MS data were analyzed by searching the NCBI nonredundant public AC EST database and the NCBI nonredundant public AC protein database. A total of 477 different proteins represented by 363 protein spots were detected and were assigned to different protein pathways as for instance signaling (receptors, protein kinases, and phosphatases), metabolism, protein synthesis, handling and degradation, cytoskeleton and structural, oxido-redox, heat shock and chaperone, hypothetical, predicted and unnamed proteins. The generation of a protein map of soluble proteins shows the existence of so far hypothetical and predicted proteins and is allowing and challenging further work at the protein level, in particular in the field of neuroscience.

  1. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.4 Spot audit. (a) In addition to regularly scheduled site audits, certified production sites will be subject to spot audits. (1) Random...

  2. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.4 Spot audit. (a) In addition to regularly scheduled site audits, certified production sites will be subject to spot audits. (1) Random...

  3. Comparison of antibody array substrates and the use of glycerol to normalize spot morphology.

    PubMed

    Olle, Eric W; Messamore, James; Deogracias, Michael P; McClintock, Shannon D; Anderson, Timothy D; Johnson, Kent J

    2005-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are a high-throughput proteomic technology used to examine the expression of multiple proteins in complex solutions. Antibody microarrays can be manufactured on a variety of commercially available activated glass or coated slides. The goal of this study was to compare Hydrogeltrade mark, nitrocellulose, aldehyde-silane and epoxy-silane slides to determine the amount of antibody bound. The optimal substrate was defined as one that bound the greatest amount of antibody with minimal background. Our studies found that epoxy-silane enhanced surface (ES) slides gave the greatest degree of binding along with a minimal background. However, larger antibody microarrays showed variability in spot size, high intra-spot coefficient of variation and drying artifacts. Increasing the amount of glycerol in the spotting buffer caused a dose-dependent improvement in overall spot morphology. Glycerol was tested on 128 different antibodies and showed decreased: mean spot diameter, intra-spot coefficient of variation and drying artifacts. These studies revealed that the optimal slide substrate was epoxy-silane ES microarray slides. Furthermore, glycerol could normalize spot size, decrease intra-spot coefficient of variability, decrease drying artifacts and increase antibody-spotting density.

  4. Rigorous assessment and integration of the sequence and structure based features to predict hot spots

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systematic mutagenesis studies have shown that only a few interface residues termed hot spots contribute significantly to the binding free energy of protein-protein interactions. Therefore, hot spots prediction becomes increasingly important for well understanding the essence of proteins interactions and helping narrow down the search space for drug design. Currently many computational methods have been developed by proposing different features. However comparative assessment of these features and furthermore effective and accurate methods are still in pressing need. Results In this study, we first comprehensively collect the features to discriminate hot spots and non-hot spots and analyze their distributions. We find that hot spots have lower relASA and larger relative change in ASA, suggesting hot spots tend to be protected from bulk solvent. In addition, hot spots have more contacts including hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, and atomic contacts, which favor complexes formation. Interestingly, we find that conservation score and sequence entropy are not significantly different between hot spots and non-hot spots in Ab+ dataset (all complexes). While in Ab- dataset (antigen-antibody complexes are excluded), there are significant differences in two features between hot pots and non-hot spots. Secondly, we explore the predictive ability for each feature and the combinations of features by support vector machines (SVMs). The results indicate that sequence-based feature outperforms other combinations of features with reasonable accuracy, with a precision of 0.69, a recall of 0.68, an F1 score of 0.68, and an AUC of 0.68 on independent test set. Compared with other machine learning methods and two energy-based approaches, our approach achieves the best performance. Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to predict hot spots of two protein complexes. Conclusion Experimental results show that support vector machine classifiers are quite

  5. Identification of human myocardial proteins separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using an effective sample preparation for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Thiede, B; Müller, E C; Scheler, C; Wittmann-Liebold, B; Jungblut, P

    1996-10-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting is a powerful tool for the identification of proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The identification of in-gel digested proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting was significantly improve in comparison to blot-digests by using a peptide-collecting device. This device allows the effective purification and concentration of enzymatic digests of low-intensity spots without expensive equipment and is described in detail. Sensitivity in the fmol range was demonstrated by unequivocal identification of bovine serum albumin after sodium dodecyl sulfate--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore the high performance liquid chromatography pattern of in-gel digests indicated a 2- to 3-fold higher yield of the separated peptides. Therefore, a higher amount of the peptides was available to perform N-terminal sequencing. The identification of 16 proteins from a high-resolution 2-DE gel map of human myocardium tissue has been achieved by means of this technique. Three of these proteins were associated with changes in spot intensity with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  7. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  8. Justifications shape ethical blind spots.

    PubMed

    Pittarello, Andrea; Leib, Margarita; Gordon-Hecker, Tom; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    To some extent, unethical behavior results from people's limited attention to ethical considerations, which results in an ethical blind spot. Here, we focus on the role of ambiguity in shaping people's ethical blind spots, which in turn lead to their ethical failures. We suggest that in ambiguous settings, individuals' attention shifts toward tempting information, which determines the magnitude of their lies. Employing a novel ambiguous-dice paradigm, we asked participants to report the outcome of the die roll appearing closest to the location of a previously presented fixation cross on a computer screen; this outcome would determine their pay. We varied the value of the die second closest to the fixation cross to be either higher (i.e., tempting) or lower (i.e., not tempting) than the die closest to the fixation cross. Results of two experiments revealed that in ambiguous settings, people's incorrect responses were self-serving. Tracking participants' eye movements demonstrated that people's ethical blind spots are shaped by increased attention toward tempting information.

  9. Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark; Celestian, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computer program written by senior-level Mechanical Engineering students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville which is capable of optimizing user-defined delivery systems for carrying payloads into orbit. The custom propulsion system is designed by the user through the input of configuration, payload, and orbital parameters. The primary advantages of the software, called Systematic Propulsion Optimization Tools (SPOT), are a user-friendly interface and a modular FORTRAN 77 code designed for ease of modification. The optimization of variables in an orbital delivery system is of critical concern in the propulsion environment. The mass of the overall system must be minimized within the maximum stress, force, and pressure constraints. SPOT utilizes the Design Optimization Tools (DOT) program for the optimization techniques. The SPOT program is divided into a main program and five modules: aerodynamic losses, orbital parameters, liquid engines, solid engines, and nozzles. The program is designed to be upgraded easily and expanded to meet specific user needs. A user's manual and a programmer's manual are currently being developed to facilitate implementation and modification.

  10. Isolation and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Roop-ngam, Piyachat; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first large-scale characterizations of oxalate-binding kidney proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recently developed oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads were applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 38 forms of 26 unique oxalate-binding kidney proteins were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 25/26 (96%) of identified proteins had 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' domain. -- Abstract: Oxalate-binding proteins are thought to serve as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, only few oxalate-binding proteins have been identified from previous studies. Our present study, therefore, aimed for large-scale identification of oxalate-binding proteins in porcine kidney using an oxalate-affinity column containing oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads for purification followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to resolve the recovered proteins. Comparing with those obtained from the controlled column containing uncoupled EAH-Sepharose 4B (to subtract the background of non-specific bindings), a total of 38 protein spots were defined as oxalate-binding proteins. These protein spots were successfully identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and/or tandem MS (MS/MS) as 26 unique proteins, including several nuclear proteins, mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress regulatory proteins, metabolic enzymes and others. Identification of oxalate-binding domain using the PRATT tool revealed 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' as a functional domain responsible for oxalate-binding in 25 of 26 (96%) unique identified proteins. We report herein, for the first time, large-scale identification and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney. The presence of positively charged arginine residue in the middle of this functional domain suggested its significance for binding to the negatively charged oxalate. These data will enhance future stone research, particularly on stone

  11. Downstream Development of a Laminar Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Naoki; Matsumoto, Akira

    It was well-known that a disturbance, introduced artificially into a supercritical laminar boundary layer along a flat plate, is still laminar in the initial stage of its downstream development. Thus, we named it a "laminar spot" because it resembles a turbulent spot though its velocity perturbation remains laminar. From velocity measurements using a rake-type 16-channel hot-wire probe, we found that in the first stage of the downstream development of a laminar spot, its maximum width was at 0.2δ (what is called the critical layer) and one-half of its lateral growth angle was about 5°, which is almost one-half that of a turbulent spot. We call this region a "laminar spot region". In the present study, we measured in detail the velocity field of a laminar spot using a new hot-wire probe in the laminar spot region. The results showed that a laminar spot consists of some hairpin vortices and some induced U-shaped vortices under the hairpin vortices. Because of the interaction of the velocities induced by the respective vortex legs, the legs of the U-shaped vortices were located at the outermost part of the spot. Moreover, the new vortex legs extended spanwise at about 4° as the spot traveled downstream. Consequently, we concluded that the laminar spot grew spanwise in accordance with the span of these vortex legs.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of early salt stress responsive proteins in roots and leaves of rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Chang, Tao-Shan; Hsu, Yu-Kai; Wang, Arthur Z; Yen, Hung-Chen; Wu, Yung-Pei; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2014-08-01

    Growth and productivity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) are severely affected by salinity. Understanding the mechanisms that protect rice and other important cereal crops from salt stress will help in the development of salt-stress-tolerant strains. In this study, rice seedlings of the same genetic species with various salt tolerances were studied. We first used 2DE to resolve the expressed proteome in rice roots and leaves and then used nanospray liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differentially expressed proteins in rice seedlings after salt treatment. The 2DE assays revealed that there were 104 differentially expressed protein spots in rice roots and 59 in leaves. Then, we identified 83 proteins in rice roots and 61 proteins in rice leaves by MS analysis. Functional classification analysis revealed that the differentially expressed proteins from roots could be classified into 18 functional categories while those from leaves could be classified into 11 functional categories. The proteins from rice seedlings that most significantly contributed to a protective effect against increased salinity were cysteine synthase, adenosine triphosphate synthase, quercetin 3-O-methyltransferase 1, and lipoxygenase 2. Further analysis demonstrated that the primary mechanisms underlying the ability of rice seedlings to tolerate salt stress were glycolysis, purine metabolism, and photosynthesis. Thus, we suggest that differentially expressed proteins may serve as marker group for the salt tolerance of rice.

  13. A novel multi-scale Hessian based spot enhancement filter for two dimensional gel electrophoresis images.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi, Sina; Miran Baygi, Mohammad Hossein; Azarian, Bahareh; Gooya, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) is a useful method for studying proteins in a wide variety of applications including identifying post-translation modification (PTM), biomarker discovery, and protein purification. Computerized segmentation and detection of the proteins are the two main processes that are carried out on the scanned image of the gel. Due to the complexities of 2DGE images and the presence of artifacts, the segmentation and detection of protein spots in these images are non-trivial, and involve supervised and time consuming processes. This paper introduces a new spot filter for enhancing, and separating the closely overlapping spots of protein in 2DGE images based on the multi-scale eigenvalue analysis of the image Hessian. Using a Gaussian spot model, we have derived closed form equations to compute the eigen components of the image Hessian of two overlapping spots in a multi-scale fashion. Based on this analysis, we have proposed a novel filter that suppresses the overlapping area and results in a better spot separation. The performance of the proposed filter has been evaluated on the synthetic and real 2DGE images. The comparison with three conventional techniques and a commercial software package reveals the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed filter.

  14. ESA uncovers Geminga's `hot spot'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    16 July 2004 Astronomers using ESA’s X-ray observatory XMM-Newton have detected a small, bright ‘hot spot’ on the surface of the neutron star called Geminga, 500 light-years away. The hot spot is the size of a football field and is caused by the same mechanism producing Geminga’s X-ray tails. This discovery identifies the missing link between the X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Geminga. hi-res Size hi-res: 1284 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot This figure shows the effects of charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere of Geminga. Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of particles kicked out by Geminga’s strong magnetic field, trail the neutron star as it moves about in space. Panel (b) shows how electrically charged particles interact with Geminga’s magnetic field. For example, if electrons (blue) are kicked out by the star, positrons (in red) hit the star’s magnetic poles like in an ‘own goal’. Panel (c) illustrates the size of Geminga’s magnetic field (blue) compared to that of the star itself at the centre (purple). The magnetic field is tilted with respect to Geminga’s rotation axis (red). Panel (d) shows the magnetic poles of Geminga, where charged particles hit the surface of the star, creating a two-million degrees hot spot, a region much hotter than the surroundings. As the star spins on its rotation axis, the hot spot comes into view and then disappears, causing the periodic colour change seen by XMM-Newton. An animated version of the entire sequence can be found at: Click here for animated GIF [low resolution, animated GIF, 5536 KB] Click here for AVI [high resolution, AVI with DIVX compression, 19128 KB] hi-res Size hi-res: 371 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot, panel (a) Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of

  15. Proteomic analysis of a segregant population reveals candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andréa Miyasaka; Urra, Claudio; Moraga, Carol; Jego, Marcela; Flores, Alejandra; Meisel, Lee; González, Mauricio; Infante, Rodrigo; Defilippi, Bruno G; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Orellana, Ariel

    2016-01-10

    Peaches are stored at low temperatures to delay ripening and increase postharvest life. However some varieties are susceptible to chilling injury,which leads to fruit mealiness, browning and flesh bleeding. In order to identify potentialmarkers associated with chilling injury,we performed proteomic analyses on a segregating population with contrasting susceptibility to chilling-induced mealiness. Chilling-induced mealiness was assessed by measuring juiciness in fruits that have been stored in cold and then allowed to ripen. Fruitmesocarp and leaf proteome from contrasting segregants were analyzed using 2-DE gels. Comparison of protein abundance between segregants revealed 133 spots from fruit mesocarp and 36 from leaf. Thirty four fruit mesocarp proteins were identified from these spots. Most of these proteins were related to ethylene synthesis, ABA response and stress response. Leaf protein analyses identified 22 proteins, most of which related to energy metabolism. Some of the genes that code for these proteins have been previously correlated with chilling injury through transcript analyses and co-segregation with mealiness QTLs. The results from this study, further deciphers the molecular mechanisms associated with chilling response in peach fruit, and identifies candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach which may be used as putative markers for this trait.

  16. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in Gossypium thurberi inoculated with cotton Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fu'an; Fang, Weiping; Xie, Deyi; Zhao, Yuanming; Tang, Zhongjie; Li, Wu; Nie, Lihong; Lv, Shuping

    2012-04-01

    Thurber's cotton (Gossypium thurberi) is the wild relative of cultivated cotton. It is highly resistant to cotton Verticillium wilt, a disease that significantly affects cotton yield and quality. To reveal the mechanism of disease resistance in G. thurberi and to clone resistance-related genes, we used two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins in Thurber's cotton after inoculation with Verticillium dahliae. A total of 57 different protein spots were upregulated, including 52 known proteins representing 11% of the total protein spots. These proteins are involved in resistance to stress and disease, transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, protein processing and degradation, photosynthesis, production capacity, basic metabolism, and other processes. In addition, five disease resistance proteins showed intense upregulation, indicating that resistance genes (R genes) may play a critical role in resistance to Verticillium wilt in Thurber's cotton. Our results suggest that disease and stress resistance are the combined effects of multiple co-expressed genes. This provides a basis for further, detailed investigation into the mechanisms underlying Verticillium wilt resistance of G. thurberi and for cloning essential genes into cotton cultivars to produce Verticillium wilt resistant plants.

  17. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  18. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of liver proteins: characterization of a drug-induced hepatomegaly in rats.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, S J; Maleeff, B F; Steiner, S; Anderson, N L; Schwartz, L W

    2000-06-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of liver proteins was applied to further characterize an unusual drug-induced increase in hepatocellular rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in Sprague-Dawley rats given a substituted pyrimidine derivative. Absolute liver weights of drug-treated rats (9.9 +/- 0.4 g) increased above vehicle-treated controls (7.2 +/- 0.2 g) by 37%. Light microscopy revealed diffuse granular basophilia of the hepatocellular cytoplasm, uncharacteristic of hepatocytes and suggested cells rich in ribosomes, which was confirmed by electron microscopy. Immunostaining for cell proliferation, viz., 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), indicated marked hepatocellular proliferative activity. 2-DE of solubilized liver using an ISO-DALT gel system indicated significant (p<0.001) quantitative changes in at least 17 liver proteins (12 increased, 5 decreased) compared to controls. The protein with the largest increase was homologous to acute-phase reactant, contrapsin-like protein inhibitor-6. Other markedly upregulated proteins were methionine adenosyltransferase, a catalyst in methionine/ATP metabolism and mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase, involved in cholesterol synthesis. The complementary strategies of 2-DE coupled either with database spot mapping or protein isolation and amino acid sequencing successfully identified a subset of proteins from xenobiotic-damaged rodent livers, the expression of which differed from controls. However, the current bioinformatics platform for rodent hepatic proteins and limited knowledge of specific protein functionality restricted application of this proteomics profile to further define a mechanistic basis for this unusual hepatotoxicity.

  19. Watermarking spot colors in packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Alastair; Filler, TomáÅ.¡; Falkenstern, Kristyn; Bai, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In January 2014, Digimarc announced Digimarc® Barcode for the packaging industry to improve the check-out efficiency and customer experience for retailers. Digimarc Barcode is a machine readable code that carries the same information as a traditional Universal Product Code (UPC) and is introduced by adding a robust digital watermark to the package design. It is imperceptible to the human eye but can be read by a modern barcode scanner at the Point of Sale (POS) station. Compared to a traditional linear barcode, Digimarc Barcode covers the whole package with minimal impact on the graphic design. This significantly improves the Items per Minute (IPM) metric, which retailers use to track the checkout efficiency since it closely relates to their profitability. Increasing IPM by a few percent could lead to potential savings of millions of dollars for retailers, giving them a strong incentive to add the Digimarc Barcode to their packages. Testing performed by Digimarc showed increases in IPM of at least 33% using the Digimarc Barcode, compared to using a traditional barcode. A method of watermarking print ready image data used in the commercial packaging industry is described. A significant proportion of packages are printed using spot colors, therefore spot colors needs to be supported by an embedder for Digimarc Barcode. Digimarc Barcode supports the PANTONE spot color system, which is commonly used in the packaging industry. The Digimarc Barcode embedder allows a user to insert the UPC code in an image while minimizing perceptibility to the Human Visual System (HVS). The Digimarc Barcode is inserted in the printing ink domain, using an Adobe Photoshop plug-in as the last step before printing. Since Photoshop is an industry standard widely used by pre-press shops in the packaging industry, a Digimarc Barcode can be easily inserted and proofed.

  20. Large-scale identification of proteins in human salivary proteome by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Xie, Yongming; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Li, Yang; Loo, Joseph A; Wong, David T

    2005-04-01

    Human saliva contains a large number of proteins and peptides (salivary proteome) that help maintain homeostasis in the oral cavity. Global analysis of human salivary proteome is important for understanding oral health and disease pathogenesis. In this study, large-scale identification of salivary proteins was demonstrated by using shotgun proteomics and two-dimensinal gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (2-DE-MS). For the shotgun approach, whole saliva proteins were prefractionated according to molecular weight. The smallest fraction, presumably containing salivary peptides, was directly separated by capillary liquid chromatography (LC). However, the large protein fractions were digested into peptides for subsequent LC separation. Separated peptides were analyzed by on-line electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using a quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer, and the obtained spectra were automatically processed to search human protein sequence database for protein identification. Additionally, 2-DE was used to map out the proteins in whole saliva. Protein spots 105 in number were excised and in-gel digested; and the resulting peptide fragments were measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry and sequenced by LC-MS/MS for protein identification. In total, we cataloged 309 proteins from human whole saliva by using these two proteomic approaches.

  1. Change in protein content during seed germination of a high altitude plant Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vivek; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2013-01-14

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle (=Sinopodophyllum hexandrum) is a high-altitude medicinal plant exploited for its etoposides which are potential anticancer compounds. An effective, conventional propagation method is by seed. However, seed germination is erratic, and seedling survival is low. A marginal increase in Podophyllum seed germination was attained with organic solvents. In the present study an attempt was made to decipher the physiological and biochemical barriers in terms of change in proteins during seed germination of Podophyllum. Comparative 2-DE analysis between un-germinated (dormant) and germinating seeds revealed nearly 113 differentially expressed proteins, whereas Peptide Mass Fingerprint (PMF) analysis of 97 protein spots revealed appearance of 27 proteins, up-accumulation of 11 proteins, down-accumulation of 19 proteins and disappearance of 40 proteins with germination. Identified 59 proteins in the homology search were involved in metabolism (carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism; 20 proteins), ABA/GA signaling (17 proteins) and stress (15 proteins) related proteins. Seven proteins were with unknown function. Two-DE, and MS/MS analysis in conjunction with semi-quantitative RT-PCR data of cell wall hydrolyzing genes, revealed that in Podophyllum the radicle protrusion occurs might be because of the up-accumulation of cell wall hydrolases i.e. β-1, 3-glucanase and XET which weakens the thick walled micropylar endosperm.

  2. Proteomic analysis of copper-binding proteins in excess copper-stressed rice roots by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yufeng; Zhang, Hongxiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Guiping; Zhuang, Kai; Cui, Jin; Shen, Zhenguo

    2014-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient required for plant growth and development. However, excess Cu can inactivate and disturb protein structure as a result of unavoidable binding to proteins. To understand better the mechanisms involved in Cu toxicity and tolerance in plants, we developed a new immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) method for the separation and isolation of Cu-binding proteins extracted from roots of rice seedling exposed to excess Cu. In our method, IDA-Sepharose or EDDS-Sepharose column (referred as pre-chromatography) and Cu-IDA-Sepharose column (referred as Cu-IMAC) were connected in tandem. Namely, protein samples were pre-chromatographed with IDA-Sepharose column to removal metal ions, then protein solution was flowed into Cu-IMAC column for enriching Cu-binding proteins in vitro. Compared with the control (Cu-IMAC without any pre-chromatography), IDA-Sepharose pre-chromatography method markedly increased yield of the Cu-IMAC-binding proteins, and number of protein spots and the abundance of 40 protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels. Thirteen protein spots randomly selected from 2-DE gel and 11 proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. These putative Cu-binding proteins included those involved in antioxidant defense, carbohydrate metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, protein folding and stabilization, protein transport and cell wall synthesis. Ten proteins contained one or more of nine putative metal-binding motifs reported by Smith et al. (J Proteome Res 3:834-840, 2004) and seven proteins contained one or two of top six motifs reported by Kung et al. (Proteomics 6:2746-2758, 2006). Results demonstrated that more proteins specifically bound with Cu-IMAC could be enriched through removal of metal ions from samples by IDA-Sepharose pre-chromatography. Further studies are needed on metal-binding characteristics of these proteins in vivo and the relationship between Cu ions and protein biological

  3. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  4. Still from Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is one of seven from the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft assembled as a brief movie of cloud movements on Jupiter. It was taken with a blue filter. The smallest features visible are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Based on data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft, scientists suspect that these small white features are lightning storms, where falling raindrops create an electrical charge. The lightning storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for these large-scale features. Imaging observations of the darkside of the planet in the weeks following Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter on Dec. 30, 2000 will search for lightning storms like these.

    This image was re-projected by cylindrical-map projection of an image taken in the first week of October 2000. It shows an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  5. Spot and Runway Departure Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a research prototype of a decision support tool for ATC tower controllers to assist in manging and controlling traffic on the surface of an airport. SARDA employs a scheduler to generate an optimal runway schedule and gate push-back - spot release sequence and schedule that improves efficiency of surface operations. The advisories for ATC tower controllers are displayed on an Electronic Flight Strip (EFS) system. The human-in-the-loop simulation of the SARDA tool was conducted for east operations of Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) to evaluate performance of the SARDA tool and human factors, such as situational awareness and workload. The results indicates noticeable taxi delay reduction and fuel savings by using the SARDA tool. Reduction in controller workload were also observed throughout the scenario runs. The future plan includes modeling and simulation of the ramp operations of the Charlotte International Airport, and develop a decision support tool for the ramp controllers.

  6. Instructor Debrief Training in SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne; Orasanu, Judith; Villeda, Eric; Conners, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One way to enhance the effectiveness of Special Purpose Operational Training' (SPOT) debriefing sessions may be for instructors to make explicit connections between the Crew Resource Management (CRM) concepts a carrier advocates and the behaviors displayed by the crew in question. A tool listing key behaviors from the scenario was devised, accompanied by an instructors' training session in which links were made between the behaviors and the underlying CRM processes they reflect. The aim of the tool is to assist instructors to focus the debriefing on the key SPOT/ CRM issues, in this case on planning. A second tool suggested ways to facilitate the discussion. Fourteen instructors at a major U.S. carrier took part in the training session and used the toolkit in their subsequent debriefs. Pre- and post-training debriefing samples from each instructor were compared to assess whether there were any changes in instructors' approaches to discussions in terms of the topics they covered and how they raised the points.

  7. Tetracycline treatment targeting Wolbachia affects expression of an array of proteins in Brugia malayi parasite.

    PubMed

    Dangi, Anil; Vedi, Satish; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Paithankar, Sameer; Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kar, Santosh Kumar; Dube, Anuradha; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2009-09-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular endosymbiont of Brugia malayi parasite whose presence is essential for the survival of the parasite. Treatment of B. malayi-infected jirds with tetracycline eliminates Wolbachia, which affects parasite survival and fitness. In the present study we have tried to identify parasite proteins that are affected when Wolbachia is targeted by tetracycline. For this Wolbachia depleted parasites (B. malayi) were obtained by tetracycline treatment of infected Mongolian jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) and their protein profile after 2-DE separation was compared with that of untreated parasites harboring Wolbachia. Approximately 100 protein spots could be visualized followed by CBB staining of 2-D gel and included for comparative analysis. Of these, 54 showed differential expressions, while two new protein spots emerged (of 90.3 and 64.4 kDa). These proteins were subjected to further analysis by MALDI-TOF for their identification using Brugia coding sequence database composed of both genomic and EST sequences. Our study unravels two crucial findings: (i) the parasite or Wolbachia proteins, which disappeared/down-regulated appear be essential for parasite survival and may be used as drug targets and (ii) tetracycline treatment interferes with the regulatory machinery vital for parasites cellular integrity and defense and thus could possibly be a molecular mechanism for the killing of filarial parasite. This is the first proteomic study substantiating the wolbachial genome integrity with its nematode host and providing functional genomic data of human lymphatic filarial parasite B. malayi.

  8. 2-D protein maps of rat gastrocnemius and soleus muscles: a tool for muscle plasticity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Cecilia; Viganò, Agnese; De Palma, Sara; Ripamonti, Marilena; Begum, Shajna; Cerretelli, Paolo; Wait, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Functional characterization of muscle fibers relies on ATPase activity and on differential measurements of metabolic proteins, including mitochondrial and glycolytic enzymes, glucose, lactate and lactic acid transporters, calcium cycling proteins and components of the contractile machinery. The recent introduction of microarray technology has enabled detailed gene expression studies under different physiological and pathological conditions, thus generating novel hypotheses on muscle function. However, microarray approaches are limited by the incomplete genome coverage of currently available chips, and by poor correlation between mRNA concentration and protein expression level. We have used 2-DE and MS to build a reference map of proteins from rat mixed gastrocnemius and soleus muscle, and to assess qualitative and quantitative differences in protein distribution between these two functionally dissimilar muscles. More than 800 spots on each gel were detected by silver staining, of which 167 were excised, digested in-gel with trypsin and analyzed by ESI-MS/MS. One hundred and twenty eight distinct gene products were identified, including metabolic, transport and contractile proteins. Forty one spots displayed differences in relative expression level between mixed gastrocnemius and soleus samples. These data not only enable differentiation of functionally distinct slow-twitch and fast-twitch fiber types, but also provide tools for investigating muscle plasticity in response to physiological and environmental conditions such as aging or hypoxia.

  9. Proteomic analysis of changes in the Kandelia candel chloroplast proteins reveals pathways associated with salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxia; Pan, Dezhuo; Li, Jian; Tan, Fanglin; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Liang, Wenyu; Chen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The plant chloroplast is one of the most sensitive organelles in response to salt stress. Chloroplast proteins extracted from seedling leaves were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 600 protein spots could be distinguished on each gel. Fifty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were detected, of which 46 could be identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). These proteins were found to be involved in multiple aspects of chloroplast metabolism pathways such as photosynthesis, ATP synthesis, detoxification and antioxidation processes, nitrogen assimilation and fixation, protein metabolism, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. The results indicated that K. candel could withstand up to 500 mM NaCl stress for a measured period of 3 days, by maintaining normal or high photosynthetic electron transfer efficiency and an only slightly stimulated Calvin cycle. Meanwhile, we found that ROS scavenging, nitrogen assimilation, protein degradation and chaperone function in chloroplasts were also of importance for salt tolerance of K. candel. The ultrastructural and physiological data agree with chloroplast proteome results. These findings allow further exploration of our knowledge on salt adaptation in woody halophytes and may contribute to the development of more salt-tolerant plants in the future.

  10. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  11. Spotted bass Micropterus punctulatus (Rafinesque 1819)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, Timothy N.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2015-01-01

    Three subspecies of Spotted Bass Micropterus punctulatus were historically recognized: the smaller Northern Spotted Bass M. p. punctulatus, the larger, longer-lived Alabama Spotted Bass M. p. henshalli, and the now invalidated Wichita Spotted Bass M. p. wichitae (Bailey and Hubbs 1940; Cofer 1995; Warren 2009; Rider and Maceina 2015, this volume). The subspecific status has been examined over the past decade as advanced genetic analyses have been developed (e.g., Kassler et al. 2002; Baker et al. 2008; Tringali et al. 2015, this volume). The American Fisheries Society has recently changed the designation of the Alabama Spotted Bass to a separate species, Alabama Bass M. henshalli (Page et al. 2013). The remainder of this paper will discuss the biology and conservation of only Spotted Bass. Both species have been observed to hybridize with other Micropterus spp. (Koppelman 1994; Pierce and Van Den Avyle 1997; Barwick et al. 2006).

  12. Evaluation and Comparison of Four Protein Extraction Protocols for Mono- and Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis in Mytilus Galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Marina; Chirollo, Claudia; Boccia, Federica; Smaldone, Giorgio; Marrone, Raffaele; Pepe, Tiziana

    2015-06-30

    In this study, four protein extraction protocols from Mytilus galloprovincialis were evaluated with the aim to identify the most practical, efficient and reproducible method. Four extraction protocols frequently used for mussels and organic matrices were selected and compared. The methods were based on the use of: i) TRIzol reagent; ii) Lysis buffer; iii) phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; iv) trichloroacetic acid-acetone. Protein concentration was measured by the Bradford method. Three specimens of mussels were studied and the analysis was conducted in triplicate for each of the four protocols. Results indicated that the four methods could extract significantly different protein profiles. The highest number of protein spots resolved in 2DE gels and the best reproducibility was obtained using trichloroacetic acid-acetone protocol. Results afforded the selection of a suitable extraction protocol to be used for ecotoxicoproteomics studies from mussels and for other proteomic studies conducted by particularly complex tissues such as Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  13. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  14. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  15. SU-E-T-510: Interplay Between Spots Sizes, Spot / Line Spacing and Motion in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, TK

    2015-06-15

    Purpose In proton beam configuration for spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT), one can define the spacing between spots and lines of scanning as a ratio of given spot size. If the spacing increases, the number of spots decreases which can potentially decrease scan time, and so can whole treatment time, and vice versa. However, if the spacing is too large, the uniformity of scanned field decreases. Also, the field uniformity can be affected by motion during SSPT beam delivery. In the present study, the interplay between spot/ line spacing and motion is investigated. Methods We used four Gaussian-shape spot sizes with 0.5cm, 1.0cm, 1.5cm, and 2.0cm FWHM, three spot/line spacing that creates uniform field profile which are 1/3*FWHM, σ/3*FWHM and 2/3*FWHM, and three random motion amplitudes within, +/−0.3mm, +/−0.5mm, and +/−1.0mm. We planned with 2Gy uniform single layer of 10×10cm2 and 20×20cm2 fields. Then, mean dose within 80% area of given field size, contrubuting MU per each spot assuming 1cGy/MU calibration for all spot sizes, number of spots and uniformity were calculated. Results The plans with spot/line spacing equal to or smaller than 2/3*FWHM without motion create ∼100% uniformity. However, it was found that the uniformity decreases with increased spacing, and it is more pronounced with smaller spot sizes, but is not affected by scanned field sizes. Conclusion It was found that the motion during proton beam delivery can alter the dose uniformity and the amount of alteration changes with spot size which changes with energy and spot/line spacing. Currently, robust evaluation in TPS (e.g. Eclipse system) performs range uncertainty evaluation using isocenter shift and CT calibration error. Based on presented study, it is recommended to add interplay effect evaluation to robust evaluation process. For future study, the additional interplay between the energy layers and motion is expected to present volumetric effect.

  16. Ambystoma maculatum (spotted salamander). Reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glorioso, Brad M.; Waddle, Hardin; Hefner, Jeromi

    2012-01-01

    The Spotted Salamander is a wide-ranging salamander of the eastern United States that typically breeds in winter or early spring in ephemeral pools in lowland forests. Ambystoma maculatum is known to deposit 2-4 egg masses per year, each containing 1-250 eggs. As part of ongoing research into the ecology and reproductive biology of Spotted Salamanders in the Kisatchie District of Kisatchie National Forest in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, USA, we have been counting the number of embryos per egg mass. We captured seven female A. maculatum in a small pool, six of which were still gravid. We took standard measurements, including SVL, and then implanted a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) into each adult female as was the protocol. About an hour after processing these animals we marked new A. maculatum egg masses found in the same small pool using PVC pin flags pushed carefully through the outer jelly. We did not have enough time to process them that evening, and it was not until a few days later that we photographed those masses. We discovered that one of the masses contained a PIT tag in the outer jelly that corresponded to one of the six gravid females that were marked that same evening. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PIT tags being the means, albeit coincidentally, by which a particular egg mass of Ambystoma maculatum has been assigned to a particular female. For our purposes, losing the PIT tag from the adult female is counter to the goals of our study of this population, and we will no longer be implanting PIT tags into gravid females.

  17. Strategic Improvements to TSA Spot Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Administration’s Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques (SPOT) program analyzes the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Office of Inspector...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iv ABSTRACT This study of Transportation Security Administration’s Screening Passengers by Observation Techniques ...area SME subject matter expert SPOT screening passengers by observation techniques TAC threat assessment capabilities TAD threat assessment

  18. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  19. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  20. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics and Epidemiology ...

  4. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Spotted seatrout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostecki, Paul T.

    1984-01-01

    The estuarine spotted seatrout, a primarily estuarine species, is one of the most important sport and commercial fishes in coastal Gulf of Mexico waters (Arnold et a1. 1976). Spotted seatrout rank second by weight in catches by U.S. saltwater sport fishermen (National Marine Fisheries Services 1981) .

  5. Plasma protein changes in horse after prolonged physical exercise: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Scoppetta, Fausto; Tartaglia, Micaela; Renzone, Giovanni; Avellini, Luca; Gaiti, Alberto; Scaloni, Andrea; Chiaradia, Elisabetta

    2012-07-19

    Physical exercise induces various stress responses and metabolic adaptations that have not yet been completely elucidated. Novel biomarkers are needed in sport veterinary medicine to monitor training levels and to detect subclinical conditions that can develop into exercise-related diseases. In this study, protein modifications in horse plasma induced by prolonged, aerobic physical exercise were investigated by using a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and combined mass spectrometry procedures. Thirty-eight protein spots, associated with expression products of 13 genes, showed significant quantitative changes; spots identified as membrane Cu amine oxidase, α-1 antitrypsin, α-1 antitrypsin-related protein, caeruloplasmin, α-2 macroglobulin and complement factor C4 were augmented in relative abundance after the race, while haptoglobin β chain, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin, retinol binding protein 4, fibrinogen γ chain, complement factor B and albumin fragments were reduced. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise affects plasma proteins involved in pathways related to inflammation, coagulation, immune modulation, oxidant/antioxidant activity and cellular and vascular damage, with consequent effects on whole horse metabolism.

  6. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  7. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  8. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  9. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  10. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  11. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  12. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  13. 7 CFR 28.415 - Low Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Low Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.415 Section 28... Spotted Color. Low Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Low Middling Color and Low Middling Spotted Color....

  14. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  15. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  16. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  17. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  18. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  19. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  20. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Middling Color and Middling Spotted Color....

  1. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  2. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  3. 7 CFR 28.411 - Good Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.411 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Good Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Good Middling Color and Good Middling Spotted Color....

  4. 7 CFR 28.412 - Strict Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strict Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.412 Section 28... Light Spotted Color. Strict Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between Strict Middling Color and Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  5. 7 CFR 28.413 - Middling Light Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Light Spotted Color. 28.413 Section 28.413... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Light Spotted Cotton § 28.413 Middling Light Spotted Color. Middling Light Spotted Color is color which in spot or color, or both, is between...

  6. Neptune's small dark spot (D2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera. Banding surrounding the feature indicates unseen strong winds, while structures within the bright spot suggest both active upwelling of clouds and rotation about the center. A rotation rate has not yet been measured, but the V-shaped structure near the right edge of the bright area indicates that the spot rotates clockwise. Unlike the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, which rotates counterclockwise, if the D2 spot on Neptune rotates clockwise, the material will be descending in the dark oval region. The fact that infrared data will yield temperature information about the region above the clouds makes this observation especially valuable. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  8. Fatal Israeli spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Yagupsky, P; Wolach, B

    1993-11-01

    We describe three Israeli children with fatal spotted fever. Clinical disease was characterized by irreversible shock, encephalopathy, renal failure, bleeding tendency, and death within 24 hours of admission. None of the patients had a history of tick bite, and no tache noire was noted. One child presented without rash, and the other two did not have antibodies to spotted-fever-group rickettsiae. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Rickettsia conorii from the patients' blood and tissues in cell cultures or from susceptible laboratory animals inoculated with human specimens. The present cases demonstrate the existence of a severe form of Israeli spotted fever in this population that resembles Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Because Israeli spotted fever may follow a quick, unpredictable, rapidly fatal clinical course, specific antimicrobial therapy should be promptly administered whenever the diagnosis is suspected.

  9. TEVA-SPOT Toolkit 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jonathan; Riesen, Lee Ann; Hart, William

    2007-07-26

    The TEVA-SPOT Toolkit (SPOT) supports the design of contaminant warning systems (CWSs) that use real-time sensors to detect contaminants in municipal water distribution networks. Specifically, SPOT provides the capability to select the locations for installing sensors in order to maximize the utility and effectiveness of the CWS. SPOT models the sensor placement process as an optimization problem, and the user can specify a wide range of performance objectives for contaminant warning system design, including population health effects, time to detection, extent of contamination, volume consumed and number of failed detections. For example, a SPOT user can integrate expert knowledge during the design process by specigying required sensor placements or designating network locations as forbidden. Further, cost considerations can be integrated by limiting the design with user-specified installation costs at each location.

  10. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations. PMID:26938537

  11. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  12. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  13. New insight on crystal and spot development in hard and extra-hard cheeses: Association of spots with incomplete aggregation of curd granules.

    PubMed

    D'Incecco, P; Limbo, S; Faoro, F; Hogenboom, J; Rosi, V; Morandi, S; Pellegrino, L

    2016-08-01

    Chemical composition and structure of different types of macroparticles (specks, spots) and microparticles (microcrystals) present in hard and extra-hard cheeses were investigated. Light microscopy revealed that the small hard specks had the structure of crystalline tyrosine, as confirmed by amino acid analysis. Spots showed a complex structure, including several curd granules, cavities, and microcrystals, and were delimited by a dense protein layer. Spots contained less moisture and ash than the adjacent cheese area, and more protein, including significantly higher contents of valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Microcrystals were observed by light and electron microscopy and analyzed by confocal micro-Raman. Among others, calcium phosphate crystals appeared to consist of a central star-shaped structure immersed in a matrix of free fatty acids plus leucine and phenylalanine in free form or in small peptides. A hypothetical mechanism for the formation of these structures has been formulated.

  14. The evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots contributes to speciation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smagulova, Fatima; Brick, Kevin; Pu, Yongmei; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Petukhova, Galina V.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for the segregation of homologous chromosomes and is essential for fertility. In most mammals, the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are directed to a subset of genomic loci (hot spots) by sequence-specific binding of the PRDM9 protein. Rapid evolution of the DNA-binding specificity of PRDM9 and gradual erosion of PRDM9-binding sites by gene conversion will alter the recombination landscape over time. To better understand the evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots and its consequences, we mapped DSB hot spots in four major subspecies of Mus musculus with different Prdm9 alleles and in their F1 hybrids. We found that hot spot erosion governs the preferential usage of some Prdm9 alleles over others in hybrid mice and increases sequence diversity specifically at hot spots that become active in the hybrids. As crossovers are disfavored at such hot spots, we propose that sequence divergence generated by hot spot turnover may create an impediment for recombination in hybrids, potentially leading to reduced fertility and, eventually, speciation. PMID:26833728

  15. The evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots contributes to speciation in mice.

    PubMed

    Smagulova, Fatima; Brick, Kevin; Pu, Yongmei; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Petukhova, Galina V

    2016-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is required for the segregation of homologous chromosomes and is essential for fertility. In most mammals, the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are directed to a subset of genomic loci (hot spots) by sequence-specific binding of the PRDM9 protein. Rapid evolution of the DNA-binding specificity of PRDM9 and gradual erosion of PRDM9-binding sites by gene conversion will alter the recombination landscape over time. To better understand the evolutionary turnover of recombination hot spots and its consequences, we mapped DSB hot spots in four major subspecies of Mus musculus with different Prdm9 alleles and in their F1 hybrids. We found that hot spot erosion governs the preferential usage of some Prdm9 alleles over others in hybrid mice and increases sequence diversity specifically at hot spots that become active in the hybrids. As crossovers are disfavored at such hot spots, we propose that sequence divergence generated by hot spot turnover may create an impediment for recombination in hybrids, potentially leading to reduced fertility and, eventually, speciation.

  16. Proteomic analysis of salt-responsive proteins in the leaves of mangrove Kandelia candel during short-term stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxia; Liu, Xiao; Liang, Meng; Tan, Fanglin; Liang, Wenyu; Chen, Yiyong; Lin, Yongxiang; Huang, Li; Xing, Jianhong; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is a major abiotic stress that limits crop productivity in many regions of the world. A comparative proteomic approach to identify salt stress-responsive proteins and to understand the molecular mechanisms was carried out in the woody halophyte Kandelia candel. Four-leaf-old K. candel seedlings were exposed to 150 (control), 300, 450, and 600 mM NaCl for 3 days. Proteins extracted from the leaves of K. candel seedlings were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 900 protein spots were detected on each gel, and 53 differentially expressed protein spots were located with at least two-fold differences in abundance on 2-DE maps, of which 48 were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). The results showed that K. candel could withstand up to 450 mM NaCl stress by up-regulating proteins that are mainly involved in photosynthesis, respiration and energy metabolism, Na(+) compartmentalization, protein folding and assembly, and signal transduction. Physiological data, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion radicals (O2(-)) contents, as well as Na(+) content and K(+)/Na(+) ratios all correlated well with our proteomic results. This study provides new global insights into woody halophyte salt stress responses. Identification of differentially expressed proteins promotes better understanding of the molecular basis for salt stress reduction in K. candel.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Salt-Responsive Proteins in the Leaves of Mangrove Kandelia candel during Short-Term Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Meng; Tan, Fanglin; Liang, Wenyu; Chen, Yiyong; Lin, Yongxiang; Huang, Li; Xing, Jianhong; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is a major abiotic stress that limits crop productivity in many regions of the world. A comparative proteomic approach to identify salt stress-responsive proteins and to understand the molecular mechanisms was carried out in the woody halophyte Kandelia candel. Four-leaf-old K. candel seedlings were exposed to 150 (control), 300, 450, and 600 mM NaCl for 3 days. Proteins extracted from the leaves of K. candel seedlings were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 900 protein spots were detected on each gel, and 53 differentially expressed protein spots were located with at least two-fold differences in abundance on 2-DE maps, of which 48 were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). The results showed that K. candel could withstand up to 450 mM NaCl stress by up-regulating proteins that are mainly involved in photosynthesis, respiration and energy metabolism, Na+ compartmentalization, protein folding and assembly, and signal transduction. Physiological data, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion radicals (O2−) contents, as well as Na+ content and K+/Na+ ratios all correlated well with our proteomic results. This study provides new global insights into woody halophyte salt stress responses. Identification of differentially expressed proteins promotes better understanding of the molecular basis for salt stress reduction in K. candel. PMID:24416157

  18. Geo Spots and Vortex Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    ), when limited to particular regions, may have created in the past and perhaps still do to this day torsions in localized spots of the Earth's crust (Geo Spots), which over time have conditioned the distribution of tectonic stresses on the surface of the Earth at a regional scale.

  19. Malaysian cockle (Anadara granosa) allergy: Identification of IgE-binding proteins and effects of different cooking methods.

    PubMed

    Zailatul, H M Y; Rosmilah, M; Faizal, B; Noormalin, A; Shahnaz, M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different cooking methods on the allergenicity of cockle and to identify proteins most frequently bound by IgE antibodies using a proteomics approach. Raw, boiled, fried and roasted extracts of the cockle were prepared. The protein profiles of the extracts were obtained by separation using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). IgE-immunoblotting was then performed with the use of individual sera from patients with cockle allergy and the major IgE-binding proteins were analyzed by mass-spectrometry. SDS-PAGE of raw extract showed 13 protein bands. Smaller numbers of protein bands were detected in the boiled, fried and roasted extracts. The 2-DE gel profile of the raw extract further separated the protein bands to ~50 protein spots with molecular masses between 13 to 180 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) values ranging from 3 to 10. Immunoblotting of raw extract exhibited 11 IgE-binding proteins with two proteins of 36 and 40 kDa as the major IgE-binding proteins, while the boiled extract revealed 3 IgE-binding proteins. Fried and roasted extracts only showed a single IgE-binding protein at 36 kDa. 2-DE immunoblotting of raw extract demonstrated 5 to 20 IgE reactive spots. Mass spectrometry analysis led to identification of 2 important allergens, tropomyosin (36 kDa) and arginine kinase (40 kDa). Heated extracts showed a reduction in the number of IgE-reactive bands compared with raw extract, which suggest that thermal treatment can be used as a tool in attempting to reduce cockle allergenicity. The degree of allergenicity of cockle was demonstrated in the order raw > boiled > fried ≈ roasted. Two important allergens reacting with more than 50% of patients' sera identified using mass spectrometric approaches were tropomyosin and arginine kinase. Thus, allergens found in this study would help in component based diagnosis, management of

  20. A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the preparation of intra- and extracellular proteins of Clostridium acetobutylicum for proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katrin; Fiedler, Tomas; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for extraction and handling of intra- and extracellular protein fractions of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for reproducible high quality two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analyses. Standardized cells from a phosphate-limited chemostat were used to evaluate different protein preparation methods. For the preparation of the secretome, a dialysis/ultrafiltration procedure resulted in higher protein yields and proved to be more reliable compared to different precipitation methods using TCA, DOC-TCA, acetone, and PEG 6000. Sonication was found to be the most efficient method among different tested techniques of cell disruption for the analysis of the intracellular proteome. Furthermore, the effect of protease inhibitors and sample storage conditions were tested for both intra- and extracellular protein samples. Significant changes in the protein pattern were observed depending on the addition of protease inhibitors. 2-DE gels with a pH gradient from 4 to 7 prepared according to the developed SOP contained at least 736 intracellular and 324 extracellular protein spots.

  1. Towards a global analysis of porcine alveolar macrophages proteins through two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Ramírez-Boo, María; Garrido, Juan J; Jorrín, Jesús V; Moreno, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the primary phagocytes of the innate immune systems, constituting a link between innate and adaptive immunity. With the aim of studying the porcine AM biology and the dynamics of pig-pathogen cell interactions, we have obtained a reference 2-DE map of the porcine AM proteins. The proteins were separated by 2-DE using a 5-8 range pH gradient in isoelectric focusing and over 800 spots were detected. A set of proteins, covering the pI 5.2-7.4 and M(W) 19 to 106kDa ranges, was subjected to MS analysis and 106 proteins were assigned identification by PMF, this identification being confirmed by MS/MS. An important number of proteins is involved in immunological functions, signalling process, transport or apoptosis, confirming that macrophages are involved in a wide range of biological functions. This reference map provides a useful tool for identifying protein pattern changes as a result of inflammation, exposure to infectious agents or genetic diseases.

  2. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  3. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  4. Proteomic analysis of day-night variations in protein levels in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Sparre, Thomas; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter; Vorum, Henrik

    2007-06-01

    The pineal gland secretes the hormone melatonin. This secretion exhibits a circadian rhythm with a zenith during night and a nadir during day. We have performed proteome analysis of the superficial pineal gland in rats during daytime and nighttime. The proteins were extracted and subjected to 2-DE. Of 1747 protein spots revealed by electrophoresis, densitometric analysis showed the up-regulation of 25 proteins during nighttime and of 35 proteins during daytime. Thirty-seven of the proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The proteins up-regulated during the night are involved in the Krebs cycle, energy transduction, calcium binding, and intracellular transport. During the daytime, enzymes involved in glycolysis, electron transport, and also the Krebs cycle were up-regulated as well as proteins taking part in RNA binding and RNA processing. Our data show a prominent day-night variation of the protein levels in the rat pineal gland. Some proteins are up-regulated during the night concomitant with the melatonin secretion of the gland. Other proteins are up-regulated during the day indicating a pineal metabolism not related to the melatonin synthesis.

  5. HUBBLE FINDS NEW DARK SPOT ON NEPTUNE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new great dark spot, located in the northern hemisphere of the planet Neptune. Because the planet's northern hemisphere is now tilted away from Earth, the new feature appears near the limb of the planet. The spot is a near mirror-image to a similar southern hemisphere dark spot that was discovered in 1989 by the Voyager 2 probe. In 1994, Hubble showed that the southern dark spot had disappeared. Like its predecessor, the new spot has high altitude clouds along its edge, caused by gasses that have been pushed to higher altitudes where they cool to form methane ice crystal clouds. The dark spot may be a zone of clear gas that is a window to a cloud deck lower in the atmosphere. Planetary scientists don t know how long lived this new feature might be. Hubble's high resolution will allow astronomers to follow the spot's evolution and other unexpected changes in Neptune's dynamic atmosphere. The image was taken on November 2, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, when Neptune was 2.8 billion miles (4.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. Hubble can resolve features as small as 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) across in Neptune's cloud tops. Credit: H. Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and NASA

  6. Image Pretreatment Tools II: Normalization Techniques for 2-DE and 2-D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Quasso, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is usually applied to identify different protein expression profiles in biological samples (e.g., control vs. pathological, control vs. treated). Information about the effect to be investigated (a pathology, a drug, a ripening effect, etc.) is however generally confounded with experimental variability that is quite large in 2-DE and may arise from small variations in the sample preparation, reagents, sample loading, electrophoretic conditions, staining and image acquisition. Obtaining valid quantitative estimates of protein abundances in each map, before the differential analysis, is therefore fundamental to provide robust candidate biomarkers. Normalization procedures are applied to reduce experimental noise and make the images comparable, improving the accuracy of differential analysis. Certainly, they may deeply influence the final results, and to this respect they have to be applied with care. Here, the most widespread normalization procedures are described both for what regards the applications to 2-DE and 2D Difference Gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) maps.

  7. Retrospective determination of ceruloplasmin in newborn screening blood spots of patients with Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Charles A; Ferber, Matt J; Dawson, Brian D; Jacobson, Robert M; Mensink, Kara A; Lorey, Fred; Sherwin, John; Cunningham, George; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich; Hahn, Si Houn

    2006-01-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper transport, caused by the reduced or absent function of the Wilson disease gene ATP7B on chromosome 13. The disease is characterized by reduced incorporation of copper into the ceruloplasmin protein and reduced excretion of copper into the bile. Wilson disease is effectively treated if detected early. Our study goals were to determine the feasibility of a population screening for Wilson disease using dried blood spots and to characterize the base-line ceruloplasmin concentration in newborn blood spots of patients with Wilson disease. Ceruloplasmin was analyzed in dried blood spots obtained from 353 Mayo Clinic pediatric volunteers aged from 3 months to 18 years and from 1045 anonymous newborn screening specimens using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The original newborn screening blood spots were retrieved from two patients with Wilson disease along with age-matched controls for ceruloplasmin determination. The mean (+/-SD) concentration of ceruloplasmin in the pediatric blood spots was 40.0+/-14.4 mg/dL (range 13.1 to >60 mg/dL) and newborn blood spots was 47.2+/-15.5mg/dL (range 6.5 to >60 mg/dL). Ceruloplasmin in the newborn blood spots from two Wilson disease patients were 2.6 and 2.8 mg/dL, respectively. The newborns affected with Wilson disease had significantly lower ceruloplasmin levels in blood spots than unaffected newborns. These findings support that presymptomatic screening for Wilson disease using dried blood spots could be possible, even in the newborn period.

  8. Meiotic recombination cold spots in chromosomal cohesion sites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kugou, Kazuto; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Mura, Sachiko; Ikeda, Sho; Innan, Hideki; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Meiotic chromosome architecture called 'axis-loop structures' and histone modifications have been shown to regulate the Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger meiotic recombination. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses followed by deep sequencing, we compared the genome-wide distribution of the axis protein Rec8 (the kleisin subunit of meiotic cohesin) with that of oligomeric DNA covalently bound to Spo11, indicative of DSB sites. The frequency of DSB sites is overall constant between Rec8 binding sites. However, DSB cold spots are observed in regions spanning ±0.8 kb around Rec8 binding sites. The axis-associated cold spots are not due to the exclusion of Spo11 localization from the axis, because ChIP experiments showed that substantial Spo11 persists at Rec8 binding sites during DSB formation. Spo11 fused with Gal4 DNA binding domain (Gal4BD-Spo11) tethered in close proximity (≤0.8 kb) to Rec8 binding sites hardly forms meiotic DSBs, in contrast with other regions. In addition, H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) remarkably decreases at Rec8 binding sites. These results suggest that reduced histone H3K4me3 in combination with inactivation of Spo11 activity on the axis discourages DSB hot spot formation.

  9. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y; Ganie, Arshid H; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard.

  10. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y.; Ganie, Arshid H.; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard. PMID:27524987

  11. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Greco, Viviana; Ricchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Norma; Bassols, Anna; Urbani, Andrea; Roncada, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of a chronic enteritis of ruminants (bovine paratuberculosis (PTB)--Johne's disease) that is associated with enormous worldwide economic losses for the animal production. Diagnosis is based on observation of clinical signs, the detection of antibodies in milk or serum, or evaluation of bacterial culture from feces. The limit of these methods is that they are not able to detect the disease in the subclinical stage and are applicable only when the disease is already advanced. For this reason, the main purpose of this study is to use the MAP proteome to detect novel immunoreactive proteins that may be helpful for PTB diagnoses. 2DE and 2D immunoblotting of MAP proteins were performed using sera of control cattle and PTB-infected cattle in order to highlight the specific immunoreactive proteins. Among the assigned identifiers to immunoreactive spots it was found that most of them correspond to surface-located proteins while three of them have never been described before as antigens. The identification of these proteins improves scientific knowledge that could be useful for PTB diagnoses. The sequence of the identified protein can be used for the synthesis of immunoreactive peptides that could be screened for their immunoreaction against bovine sera infected with MAP. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange consortium with identifier PXD001159 and DOI 10.6019/PXD001159.

  12. Changes in total soluble proteins and Ca2+ upon cryopreservation of Prunus mume pollen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y L; Li, B L; Wang, H; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    Mei Flowers (Prunus mume) are traditional Chinese ornamental plants. Fifty-one Mei cultivars have been conserved in a pollen cryobank since 2003. We used two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of total soluble proteins and flow cytometric detection of Ca2+ fluorescence to probe changes in pollen grains before and after cryopreservation. Results indicated that: (1) electrophoresis maps of total soluble proteins before and after cryostorage of pollen from three cultivars were different, even though 70 percent of the protein spots among these three cultivars were matched after cryopreservation. We found some protein spots that changed in all three cultivars; their molecular weights and pI were between 12.6-72.8 kDa and 5.6-7.3, respectively; (2): the geometric mean of Ca2+ fluorescence intensity (GMFI) value of cryopreserved pollen was significantly higher compared with that of fresh pollen in cultivar 'Beijing Yudie'. GMFI increased during pollen germination in our studied cultivars, especially after 0.5 and 1.0 h of culturing. In addition, no positive correlation was found between pollen germination rate and GMFI in the present study.

  13. A Dark Spot on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's icy moon Europa focuses on a dark, smooth region whose center is the lowest area in this image. To the west (left), it is bounded by a cliff and terraces, which might have been formed by normal faulting. The slopes toward the east (right) leading into the dark spot are gentle.

    Near the center of the dark area, it appears the dark materials have covered some of the bright terrain and ridges. This suggests that when the dark material was deposited, it may have been a fluid or an icy slush.

    Only a few impact craters are visible, with some of them covered or flooded by dark material. Some appear in groups, which may indicate that they are secondary craters formed by debris excavated during a larger impact event. A potential source for these is the nearby crater Mannann`an.

    North is to the top of the picture which is centered at 1 degree south latitude and 225 degrees west longitude. The images in this mosaic have been re-projected to 50 meters (55 yards) per picture element. They were obtained by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on March 29, 1998, during Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter, at ranges as close as 1940 kilometers (1,200 miles) from Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  14. Finding your innovation sweet spot.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Jacob; Horowitz, Roni; Levav, Amnon; Mazursky, David

    2003-03-01

    Most new product ideas are either uninspired or impractical. So how can developers hit the innovation sweet spot--far enough from existing products to attract real interest but close enough that they are feasible to make and market? They can apply five innovation patterns that manipulate existing components of a product and its immediate environment to come up with something both ingenious and viable, say the authors. The subtraction pattern works by removing product components, particularly those that seem desirable or indispensable. Think of the legless high chair that attaches to the kitchen table. The multiplication pattern makes one or more copies of an existing component, then alters those copies in some important way. For example, the Gillette double-bladed razor features a second blade that cuts whiskers at a slightly different angle. By dividing an existing product into its component parts--the division pattern--you can see something that was an integrated whole in an entirely different light. Think of the modern home stereo--it has modular speakers, tuners, and CD and tape players, which allow users to customize their sound systems. The task unification pattern involves assigning a new task to an existing product element or environmental attribute, thereby unifying two tasks in a single component. An example is the defrosting filament in an automobile windshield that also serves as a radio antenna. Finally, the attribute dependency pattern alters or creates the dependent relationships between a product and its environment. For example, by creating a dependent relationship between lens color and external lighting conditions, eyeglass developers came up with a lens that changes color when exposed to sunlight.

  15. Specific Changes of Serum Proteins in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenwen; Wan, Xinhua; Liu, Bin; Rong, Xianfang; Zhu, Lei; Li, Pingping; Li, Jiang; Wang, Ling; Cui, Liying; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and validate protein change in the serum from PD patients. We used serum samples from 21 PD patients and 20 age-matched normal people as control to conduct a comparative proteomic study. We performed 2-DE and analyzed the differentially expressed protein spots by LC-MS/MS. In PD group 13 spots were shown to be differentially expressed compared to control group. They were identified as 6 proteins. Among these, 3 proteins were confirmed by Western blot analysis. It showed that the frequency of fibrinogen γ-chain (FGG) appeared 70% in PD, which could not be detected in control group. The protein of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITI-H4) was found to exist two forms in serum. The full size (120 kDa) of the protein was increased and the fragmented ITI-H4 (35 kDa) was decreased in PD group. The ratio of full size ITI-H4 to fragmented ITI-H4 in PD patients was 3.85±0.29-fold higher than in control group. Furthermore, fragmented Apo A-IV (∼26 kDa) was mainly detected in control group, while it was rare to be found in PD group. Above findings might be useful for diagnosis of PD. When the expressions of FGG and 120 kDa ITI-H4 are increase, as well as ∼26 kDa Apo A-IV disappear would provide strong evidence for PD. PMID:24769800

  16. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins in wheat roots exposed to phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Du, Jiangxue; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic and toxic to humans through ingestion of contaminated food crops. PAHs can enter crop roots through proton/PAH symporters; however, to date, the symporter remains unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the plasma membrane proteome of Triticum aestivum seedling roots in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and protein database search engines were employed to analyze and identify phenanthrene-responsive proteins. Over 192 protein spots are reproducibly detected in each gel, while 8 spots are differentially expressed under phenanthrene treatment. Phenanthrene induces five up-regulated proteins distinguished as 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase 2, enolase, heat shock protein 80-2, probable mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 37e (heat shock 70-kDa protein 1), and lactoylglutathione lyase. Three proteins identified as adenosine kinase 2, 4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-yl glucoside beta-D-glucosidase 1c, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 3 are down-regulated under exposure to phenanthrene. The up-regulated proteins are related to plant defense response, antioxidant system, and glycolysis. The down-regulated proteins involve the metabolism of high-energy compounds and plant growth. Magnesium, which is able to bind to enolase, can enhance the transport of phenanthrene into wheat roots. Therefore, it is concluded that phenanthrene can induce differential expression of proteins in relation to carbohydrate metabolism, self-defense, and plant growth on wheat root plasma membrane. This study not only provides novel insights into PAH uptake by plant roots and PAH stress responses, but is also a good starting point for further determination and analyses of their functions using genetic and other approaches.

  17. Predicting 'hot' and 'warm' spots for fragment binding.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Ludlow, R Frederick; Hall, Richard John; Murray, Christopher W; Mortenson, Paul Neil; Verdonk, Marcel L

    2017-04-04

    Computational fragment mapping methods aim to predict hotspots on protein surfaces where small fragments will bind. Such methods are popular for druggability assessment as well as structure-based design. However, to date researchers developing or using such tools have had no clear way of assessing the performance of these methods. Here, we introduce the first diverse, high quality validation set for computational fragment mapping. The set contains 52 diverse examples of fragment binding 'hot' and 'warm' spots from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Additionally, we describe PLImap, a novel protocol for fragment mapping based on the Protein-Ligand Interaction force field (PLIff). We evaluate PLImap against the new fragment mapping test set, and compare its performance to that of simple shape-based algorithms and fragment docking using GOLD. PLImap is made publicly available from https://bitbucket.org/AstexUK/pli.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Shrimp White Spot Bacilliform Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; He, Jun; Lin, Xionghui; Li, Qin; Pan, Deng; Zhang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xun

    2001-01-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of a marine invertebrate virus. White spot bacilliform virus (WSBV; or white spot syndrome virus) is a major shrimp pathogen with a high mortality rate and a wide host range. Its double-stranded circular DNA genome of 305,107 bp contains 181 open reading frames (ORFs). Nine homologous regions containing 47 repeated minifragments that include direct repeats, atypical inverted repeat sequences, and imperfect palindromes were identified. This is the largest animal virus that has been completely sequenced. Although WSBV is morphologically similar to insect baculovirus, the two viruses are not detectably related at the amino acid level. Rather, some WSBV genes are more homologous to eukaryotic genes than viral genes. In fact, sequence analysis indicates that WSBV differs from all known viruses, although a few genes display a weak homology to herpesvirus genes. Most of the ORFs encode proteins that bear no homology to any known proteins, either suggesting that WSBV represents a novel class of viruses or perhaps implying a significant evolutionary distance between marine and terrestrial viruses. The most unique feature of WSBV is the presence of an intact collagen gene, a gene encoding an extracellular matrix protein of animal cells that has never been found in any viruses. Determination of the genome of WSBV will facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of the WSBV virus and will also provide useful information concerning the evolution and divergence of marine and terrestrial animal viruses at the molecular level. PMID:11689662

  19. Self-Checks Help Spot Melanoma's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163682.html Self-Checks Help Spot Melanoma's Return Patient-detected symptoms were most common way ... Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Self-checks by melanoma skin cancer patients play an important role in ...

  20. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety for the Whole Family Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Hey! A Tick Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  1. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  2. Interferometric diagnostics for magnetic spots detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.

    2014-09-01

    The signature of activity in general, and of stellar magnetic spots in particular, is present in every measurements, including interferometric ones. Indeed, stellar spots can be found on many stellar surfaces, their size and number varying according to their host's magnetic field and rotational velocity. To correctly determine stellar parameters, it is thus necessary to determine and extract stellar activity's signals. Interferometric observables are disturbed by activity, and this observing technique thus constitutes a good way of probing stellar surface. However, magnetic spots sometimes mimic other phenomenon, like a transiting exoplanet. In that case, the combination of several observing techniques, like photometry and interferometry, is mandatory to extract the planetary signal from the spot's one, and then characterize the exoplanet.

  3. How Many Spots Does a Cheetah Have?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Kristine M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes first grade students' mathematical investigation of the number of spots on a cheetah. The exploration of counting and estimation strategies that grew from the investigation gives evidence that mathematicians come in all ages. (ASK)

  4. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  5. Robust Identification of Binding Hot Spots Using Continuum Electrostatics: Application to Hen Egg-White Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Binding hot spots, protein regions with high binding affinity, can be identified by using X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy to screen libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such hot spots. FTMap, a direct computational analogue of the experimental screening approaches, uses 16 different probe molecules for global sampling of the surface of a target protein on a dense grid and evaluates the energy of interaction using an empirical energy function that includes a continuum electrostatic term. Energy evaluation is based on the fast Fourier transform correlation approach, which allows for the sampling of billions of probe positions. The grid sampling is followed by off-grid minimization that uses a more detailed energy expression with a continuum electrostatics term. FTMap identifies the hot spots as consensus clusters formed by overlapping clusters of several probes. The hot spots are ranked on the basis of the number of probe clusters, which predicts their binding propensity. We applied FTMap to nine structures of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), whose hot spots have been extensively studied by both experimental and computational methods. FTMap found the primary hot spot in site C of all nine structures, in spite of conformational differences. In addition, secondary hot spots in sites B and D that are known to be important for the binding of polysaccharide substrates were found. The predicted probe–protein interactions agree well with those seen in the complexes of HEWL with various ligands and also agree with an NMR-based study of HEWL in aqueous solutions of eight organic solvents. We argue that FTMap provides more complete information on the HEWL binding site than previous computational methods and yields fewer false-positive binding locations than the X-ray structures of HEWL from crystals soaked in organic solvents. PMID:22092261

  6. White-spot disease of salmon fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazuranich, J.J.; Nielson, W.E.

    1959-01-01

     White-spot disease, sometimes referred to as coagulated-yolk disease, has been associated with excessive mortalities occurring among the fry and early fingerling stages of the fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytacha) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Stations at Carson, Cook, Underwood, and Willard, Washington. This disease of eggs and fry should not be confused with the "white-spot" infection that is caused in fingerlings by members of the protozoan genus Ichthyophthirius.

  7. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S. G.

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  8. Increased oxidative-modifications of cytosolic proteins in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)-exposed rat liver.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Vijay V; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Yu, Li-Rong; Lee, Insong J; Eddington, Natalie D; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) causes acute liver damage in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize oxidative modification and inactivation of cytosolic proteins in MDMA-exposed rats. Markedly increased levels of oxidized and nitrated cytosolic proteins were detected 12 h after the second administration of two consecutive MDMA doses (10 mg/kg each). Comparative 2-DE analysis showed markedly increased levels of biotin-N-methylimide-labeled oxidized cytosolic proteins in MDMA-exposed rats compared to vehicle-treated rats. Proteins in the 22 gel spots of strong intensities were identified using MS/MS. The oxidatively modified proteins identified include anti-oxidant defensive enzymes, a calcium-binding protein, and proteins involved in metabolism of lipids, nitrogen, and carbohydrates (glycolysis). Cytosolic superoxide dismutase was oxidized and its activity significantly inhibited following MDMA exposure. Consistent with the oxidative inactivation of peroxiredoxin, MDMA activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase and p38 kinase. Since these protein kinases phosphorylate anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, their activation may promote apoptosis in MDMA-exposed tissues. Our results show for the first time that MDMA induces oxidative-modification of many cytosolic proteins accompanied with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, contributing to hepatic damage.

  9. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis.

  10. Exploring Proteins in Anopheles gambiae Male and Female Antennae through MALDI Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Francesca R.; Francese, Simona; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Felicioli, Antonio; Caputo, Beniamino; Simard, Frederic; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Coluzzi, Mario; della Torre, Alessandra; Turillazzi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    MALDI profiling and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) are novel techniques for direct analysis of peptides and small proteins in biological tissues. In this work we applied them to the study of Anopheles gambiae antennae, with the aim of analysing expression of soluble proteins involved in olfaction perireceptor events. MALDI spectra obtained by direct profiling on single antennae and by the analysis of extracts, showed similar profiles, although spectra obtained through profiling had a richer ion population and higher signal to noise ratio. Male and female antennae showed distinct protein profiles. MALDI imaging experiments were also performed and differences were observed in the localization of some proteins. Two proteins were identified through high resolution measurement and top-down MS/MS experiments. A 8 kDa protein only present in the male antennae matched with an unannotated sequence of the An. gambiae genome, while the presence of odorant binding protein 9 (OBP-9) was confirmed through experiments of 2-DE, followed by MS and MS/MS analysis of digested spots. This work shows that MALDI MS profiling is a technique suitable for the analysis of proteins of small and medium MW in insect appendices, and allows obtaining data for several specimens which can be investigated for differences between groups. Proteins of interest can be identified through other complementary MS approaches. PMID:18665262

  11. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes.

  12. Unblinding the dark matter blind spots

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tao; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang; ...

    2017-02-10

    The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the $Z$-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relicmore » DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. We find that (i) the spin-independent (SI) blind spots may be rescued by the spin-dependent (SD) direct detection in the future underground experiments, and possibly by the indirect DM detections from IceCube and SuperK neutrino experiments; (ii) the detection of gamma rays from Fermi-LAT may not reach the desirable sensitivity for searching for the DM blind-spot regions; (iii) the SUSY searches at the LHC will substantially extend the discovery region for the blind-spot parameters. As a result, the dark matter blind spots thus may be unblinded with the collective efforts in future DM searches.« less

  13. Nonbright-spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The use of amplitude variation with offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace (A) and the gradient trace (B) have been used extensively in bright spot AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with low acoustic impedance bright spot responses, they are not reliable indicators of nonbright-spot seismic anomalies. Analyzing nonbright-spot seismic data with common AVO attribute sections will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. The authors divide nonbright-spot AVO offset responses into two subcategories: those with phase reversals and those without. An AVO analysis procedure for these anomalies is presented through two examples. The procedure exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and this technique is adaptive to both subcategories of nonbright-spot AVO responses. This technique identifies the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir when compared to a conventionally processed, relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance contrast sands.

  14. Unblinding the dark matter blind spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang; Wu, Yongcheng

    2017-02-01

    The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the Z-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relic DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. We find that (i) the spin-independent (SI) blind spots may be rescued by the spin-dependent (SD) direct detection in the future underground experiments, and possibly by the indirect DM detections from IceCube and SuperK neutrino experiments; (ii) the detection of gamma rays from Fermi-LAT may not reach the desirable sensitivity for searching for the DM blind-spot regions; (iii) the SUSY searches at the LHC will substantially extend the discovery region for the blind-spot parameters. The dark matter blind spots thus may be unblinded with the collective efforts in future DM searches.

  15. Canopy hot-spot as crop identifier

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Simmer, C.; Powers, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    Illuminating any reflective rough or structured surface by a directional light source results in an angular reflectance distribution that shows a narrow peak in the direction of retro-reflection. This is called the Heiligenschein or hot-spot of vegetation canopies and is caused by mutual shading of leaves. The angular intensity distribution of the hot-spot, its brightness and slope, are therefore indicators of the plant's geometry. We propose the use of hot-spot characteristics as crop identifiers in satellite remote sensing because the canopy hot-spot carries information about plant stand architecture that is more distinctive for different plant species than, for instance, their spectral reflectance characteristics. A simple three-dimensional Monte Carlo/ray tracing model and an analytic two-dimensional model are developed to estimate the angular distribution of the hot-spot as a function of the size of the plant leaves. The results show that the brightness-distribution and slope of the hot-spot change distinctively for different leaf sizes indicating a much more peaked maximum for the smaller leaves.

  16. Modeling deflagration waves out of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives comes about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping through an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step, deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in the cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighboring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration waves may depend on both pressure and temperature. It depends on pressure for quasistatic loading near ambient temperature, and on temperature at high temperatures resulting from shock loading. From the simulation we obtain deflagration fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For 8 to 13 GPa shocks, the emanating fronts propagate as deflagration waves to consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels deflagration waves may interact with the sweeping shock to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds.

  17. Absence of aquaporin-4 in skeletal muscle alters proteins involved in bioenergetic pathways and calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2011-04-28

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers, whose expression is altered in several forms of muscular dystrophies. However, little is known concerning the physiological role of AQP4 in skeletal muscle and its functional and structural interaction with skeletal muscle proteome. Using AQP4-null mice, we analyzed the effect of the absence of AQP4 on the morphology and protein composition of sarcolemma as well as on the whole skeletal muscle proteome. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the absence of AQP4 did not perturb the expression and cellular localization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex proteins, aside from those belonging to the extracellular matrix, and no alteration was found in sarcolemma integrity by dye extravasation assay. With the use of a 2DE-approach (BN/SDS-PAGE), protein maps revealed that in quadriceps, out of 300 Coomassie-blue detected and matched spots, 19 proteins exhibited changed expression in AQP4(-/-) compared to WT mice. In particular, comparison of the protein profiles revealed 12 up- and 7 down-regulated protein spots in AQP4-/- muscle. Protein identification by MS revealed that the perturbed expression pattern belongs to proteins involved in energy metabolism (i.e. GAPDH, creatine kinase), as well as in Ca(2+) handling (i.e. parvalbumin, SERCA1). Western blot analysis, performed on some significantly changed proteins, validated the 2D results. Together these findings suggest AQP4 as a novel determinant in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism and better define the role of this water channel in skeletal muscle physiology.

  18. Absence of Aquaporin-4 in Skeletal Muscle Alters Proteins Involved in Bioenergetic Pathways and Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers, whose expression is altered in several forms of muscular dystrophies. However, little is known concerning the physiological role of AQP4 in skeletal muscle and its functional and structural interaction with skeletal muscle proteome. Using AQP4-null mice, we analyzed the effect of the absence of AQP4 on the morphology and protein composition of sarcolemma as well as on the whole skeletal muscle proteome. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the absence of AQP4 did not perturb the expression and cellular localization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex proteins, aside from those belonging to the extracellular matrix, and no alteration was found in sarcolemma integrity by dye extravasation assay. With the use of a 2DE-approach (BN/SDS-PAGE), protein maps revealed that in quadriceps, out of 300 Coomassie-blue detected and matched spots, 19 proteins exhibited changed expression in AQP4−/− compared to WT mice. In particular, comparison of the protein profiles revealed 12 up- and 7 down-regulated protein spots in AQP4−/− muscle. Protein identification by MS revealed that the perturbed expression pattern belongs to proteins involved in energy metabolism (i.e. GAPDH, creatine kinase), as well as in Ca2+ handling (i.e. parvalbumin, SERCA1). Western blot analysis, performed on some significantly changed proteins, validated the 2D results. Together these findings suggest AQP4 as a novel determinant in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism and better define the role of this water channel in skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:21552523

  19. 7 CFR 28.423 - Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Middling Spotted Color. 28.423 Section 28.423... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Spotted Cotton § 28.423 Middling Spotted Color. Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody...

  20. 7 CFR 28.423 - Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Middling Spotted Color. 28.423 Section 28.423... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Spotted Cotton § 28.423 Middling Spotted Color. Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody...

  1. 7 CFR 28.423 - Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Spotted Color. 28.423 Section 28.423... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Spotted Cotton § 28.423 Middling Spotted Color. Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody...

  2. 7 CFR 28.423 - Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Middling Spotted Color. 28.423 Section 28.423... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Spotted Cotton § 28.423 Middling Spotted Color. Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody...

  3. 7 CFR 28.423 - Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Middling Spotted Color. 28.423 Section 28.423... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Spotted Cotton § 28.423 Middling Spotted Color. Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a set of samples in the custody...

  4. SPOTTED STAR LIGHT CURVES WITH ENHANCED PRECISION

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.

    2012-09-15

    The nearly continuous timewise coverage of recent photometric surveys is free of the large gaps that compromise attempts to follow starspot growth and decay as well as motions, thereby giving incentive to improve computational precision for modeled spots. Due to the wide variety of star systems in the surveys, such improvement should apply to light/velocity curve models that accurately include all the main phenomena of close binaries and rotating single stars. The vector fractional area (VFA) algorithm that is introduced here represents surface elements by small sets of position vectors so as to allow accurate computation of circle-triangle overlap by spherical geometry. When computed by VFA, spots introduce essentially no noticeable scatter in light curves at the level of one part in 10,000. VFA has been put into the Wilson-Devinney light/velocity curve program and all logic and mathematics are given so as to facilitate entry into other such programs. Advantages of precise spot computation include improved statistics of spot motions and aging, reduced computation time (intrinsic precision relaxes needs for grid fineness), noise-free illustration of spot effects in figures, and help in guarding against false positives in exoplanet searches, where spots could approximately mimic transiting planets in unusual circumstances. A simple spot growth and decay template quantifies time profiles, and specifics of its utilization in differential corrections solutions are given. Computational strategies are discussed, the overall process is tested in simulations via solutions of synthetic light curve data, and essential simulation results are described. An efficient time smearing facility by Gaussian quadrature can deal with Kepler mission data that are in 30 minute time bins.

  5. Hubble Finds New Dark Spot on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new great dark spot, located in the northern hemisphere of the planet Neptune. Because the planet's northern hemisphere is now tilted away from Earth, the new feature appears near the limb of the planet.

    The spot is a near mirror-image to a similar southern hemisphere dark spot that was discovered in 1989 by the Voyager 2 probe. In 1994, Hubble showed that the southern dark spot had disappeared.

    Like its predecessor, the new spot has high altitude clouds along its edge, caused by gasses that have been pushed to higher altitudes where they cool to form methane ice crystal clouds. The dark spot may be a zone of clear gas that is a window to a cloud deck lower in the atmosphere.

    Planetary scientists don t know how long lived this new feature might be. Hubble's high resolution will allow astronomers to follow the spot's evolution and other unexpected changes in Neptune's dynamic atmosphere.

    The image was taken on November 2, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, when Neptune was 2.8 billion miles (4.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. Hubble can resolve features as small as 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) across in Neptune's cloud tops.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  6. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  7. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  8. Superoscillating electron wave functions with subdiffraction spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remez, Roei; Tsur, Yuval; Lu, Peng-Han; Tavabi, Amir H.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Arie, Ady

    2017-03-01

    Almost one and a half centuries ago, Abbe [Arch. Mikrosk. Anat. 9, 413 (1873), 10.1007/BF02956173] and shortly after Lord Rayleigh [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 8, 261 (1879), 10.1080/14786447908639684] showed that, when an optical lens is illuminated by a plane wave, a diffraction-limited spot with radius 0.61 λ /sinα is obtained, where λ is the wavelength and α is the semiangle of the beam's convergence cone. However, spots with much smaller features can be obtained at the focal plane when the lens is illuminated by an appropriately structured beam. Whereas this concept is known for light beams, here, we show how to realize it for a massive-particle wave function, namely, a free electron. We experimentally demonstrate an electron central spot of radius 106 pm, which is more than two times smaller than the diffraction limit of the experimental setup used. In addition, we demonstrate that this central spot can be structured by adding orbital angular momentum to it. The resulting superoscillating vortex beam has a smaller dark core with respect to a regular vortex beam. This family of electron beams having hot spots with arbitrarily small features and tailored structures could be useful for studying electron-matter interactions with subatomic resolution.

  9. Effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of Brassica napus phloem sap.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Albacete, Alfonso; Rios, Juan José; Kehr, Julia; Abadía, Anunciación; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana Flor

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of phloem sap exudates from Brassica napus using 2DE (IEF-SDS-PAGE). The experiment was repeated thrice and two technical replicates per treatment were done. Phloem sap purity was assessed by measuring sugar concentrations. Two hundred sixty-three spots were consistently detected and 15.6% (41) of them showed significant changes in relative abundance (22 decreasing and 19 increasing) as a result of Fe deficiency. Among them, 85% (35 spots), were unambiguously identified. Functional categories containing the largest number of protein species showing changes as a consequence of Fe deficiency were signaling and regulation (32%), and stress and redox homeostasis (17%). The Phloem sap showed a higher oxidative stress and significant changes in the hormonal profile as a result of Fe deficiency. Results indicate that Fe deficiency elicits major changes in signaling pathways involving Ca and hormones, which are generally associated with flowering and developmental processes, causes an alteration in ROS homeostasis processes, and induces decreases in the abundances of proteins involved in sieve element repair, suggesting that Fe-deficient plants may have an impaired capacity to heal sieve elements upon injury.

  10. Towards the Full Realization of 2DE Power

    PubMed Central

    Naryzhny, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Here, approaches that allow disclosure of the information hidden inside and outside of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) are described. Experimental identification methods, such as mass spectrometry of high resolution and sensitivity (MALDI-TOF MS and ESI LC-MS/MS) and immunodetection (Western and Far-Western) in combination with bioinformatics (collection of all information about proteoforms), move 2DE to the next level of power. The integration of these technologies will promote 2DE as a powerful methodology of proteomics technology. PMID:28248243

  11. Possible Case of Novel Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiosis in Traveler Returning to Japan from India

    PubMed Central

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Hiromi; Kawano, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Takeshi; Matsuda, Motohiro; Kubo, Kazuyoshi; Miyauchi, Shunichi; Umekita, Kunihiko; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Okayama, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman experienced fever, headache, rash, and altered vision after returning to Japan from India. Testing detected elevated antibody titers to spotted fever group rickettsia; PCR on blood yielded positive results for the rickettsial outer membrane protein A gene. We isolated a unique rickettsial agent and performed a full-genome analysis. PMID:27192498

  12. Detection of host-specific immunogenic proteins in the saliva of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mu, Alan Kang-Wai; Chan, Yunn Shy; Kang, Szu Szu; Azman, Siti Nuraishah; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Chai, Wen Lin; Chen, Yeng

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to develop a new and reliable saliva-based clinical diagnostic method for the early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This study used an immunoproteomic approach which allowed the detection of immunogenic host proteins in patients' samples using pooled human antibodies. In an attempt to investigate potential biomarkers of OSCC, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by immunoblotting of saliva from patients and controls were compared. The protein spots of interest were analyzed using 2-DE image analyzer and subsequently subjected to MALDI-TOF/TOF and then matched against NCBI database. The result showed that four protein clusters, namely Human Pancreatic Alpha-amylase (HPA), Human Salivary Amylase (sAA), keratin-10 (K-10), and Ga Module Complexed with Human Serum Albumin (GA-HSA), had exhibited immunoreactivity in western blot. The results are suggestive of the potential use of the differentially expressed saliva protein as tumor biomarkers for the detection of OSCC. However, further studies are recommended to validate this finding.

  13. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation) elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level. PMID:22621772

  14. Cartographic potential of SPOT image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R.

    1985-01-01

    In late 1985, the SPOT (Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre) satellite is to be launched by the Ariane rocket from French Guiana. This satellite will have two High Resolution Visible (HRV) line array sensor systems which are capable of providing monoscopic and stereoscopic coverage of the earth. Cartographic applications are related to the recording of stereo image data and the acquisition of 20-m data in a multispectral mode. One of the objectives of this study involves a comparison of the suitability of SPOT and TM image data for mapping urban land use/cover. Another objective is concerned with a preliminary assessment of the potential of SPOT image data for map revision when merged with conventional map sheets converted to raster formats.

  15. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and r.m.s. fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary-layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  16. Fatal Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Mafra, Cláudio Lísias; Calic, Simone Berger; Chamone, Chequer Buffe; Filho, Gracco Cesarino; Olano, Juan Pablo; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence and reemergence of a serious infectious disease are often associated with a high case-fatality rate because of misdiagnosis and inappropriate or delayed treatment. The current reemergence of spotted fever rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in Brazil has resulted in a high proportion of fatal cases. We describe two familial clusters of Brazilian spotted fever in the state of Minas Gerais, involving six children 9 months to 15 years of age; five died. Immunohistochemical investigation of tissues obtained at necropsy of a child in each location, Novo Cruzeiro and Coronel Fabriciano municipalities, established the diagnosis by demonstration of disseminated endothelial infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae. The diagnosis in the two fatal cases from Coronel Fabriciano and the surviving patient from Novo Cruzeiro was further supported by immunofluorescence serologic tests. PMID:14718082

  17. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Brazil].

    PubMed

    del Sá DelFiol, Fernando; Junqueira, Fábio Miranda; da Rocha, Maria Carolina Pereira; de Toledo, Maria Inês; Filho, Silvio Barberato

    2010-06-01

    Although the number of confirmed cases of spotted fever has been declining in Brazil since 2005, the mortality rate (20% to 30%) is still high in comparison to other countries. This high mortality rate is closely related to the difficulty in making the diagnosis and starting the correct treatment. Only two groups of antibiotics have proven clinical effectiveness against spotted fever: chloramphenicol and tetracyclines. Until recently, the use of tetracyclines was restricted to adults because of the associated bone and tooth changes in children. Recently, however, the American Academy of Pediatrics and various researchers have recommended the use of doxycycline in children. In more severe cases, chloramphenicol injections are often preferred in Brazil because of the lack of experience with injectable tetracycline. Since early diagnosis and the adequate drug treatment are key to a good prognosis, health care professionals must be better prepared to recognize and treat spotted fever.

  18. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plume Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a data base obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area, the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  19. Spots on AG Virginis - Paradigm or panacea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. A.; Rainger, P. P.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1990-12-01

    New photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binary AG Vir are presented. Medium-resolution spectroscopy has allowed the measurement of velocities for the secondary component for the first time. The V light curve shows many of the features seen in previous studies of this system. A full analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data has been made which suggests that the system is either in a marginal state of conatact or a deep-contact configuration depending on the type of spot model invoked. AG Vir constitutes an excellent example of the expected manifestations of spot activity on a light curve. It also demonstrates the ease with which the spot phenomenon can be invoked to explain the appearance of a light curve and to provide conflicting results. This study shows the necessity of a more thorough investigation of this system using Doppler-imaging techniques and simultaneous infrared and optical photometry.

  20. Proteomic Identification of Target Proteins of Thiodigalactoside in White Adipose Tissue from Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-01-01

    Previously, galectin-1 (GAL1) was found to be up-regulated in obesity-prone subjects, suggesting that use of a GAL1 inhibitor could be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of obesity. We evaluated thiodigalactoside (TDG) as a potent inhibitor of GAL1 and identified target proteins of TDG by performing comparative proteome analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from control and TDG-treated rats fed a high fat diet (HFD) using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI-TOF-MS. Thirty-two spots from a total of 356 matched spots showed differential expression between control and TDG-treated rats, as identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. These proteins were categorized into groups such as carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, signal transduction, cytoskeletal, and mitochondrial proteins based on functional analysis using Protein Annotation Through Evolutionary Relationship (PANTHER) and Database for Annotation, Visualization, Integrated Discovery (DAVID) classification. One of the most striking findings of this study was significant changes in Carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3), Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1), annexin A2 (ANXA2) and lactate dehydrogenase A chain (LDHA) protein levels between WAT from control and TDG-treated groups. In addition, we confirmed increased expression of thermogenic proteins as well as reduced expression of lipogenic proteins in response to TDG treatment. These results suggest that TDG may effectively prevent obesity, and TDG-responsive proteins can be used as novel target proteins for obesity treatment. PMID:26121299

  1. Development of hot spot fixer (HSF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Toshiya; Kyoh, Suigen; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Inazu, Takatoshi; Ikeuchi, Atsuhiko; Urakawa, Yukihiro; Inoue, Soichi; Morita, Etsuya; Klaver, Simon; Horiuchi, Takumi; Peeters, Johan; Kuramoto, Satoshi

    2006-03-01

    A new design for manufacturability (DfM) scheme with a lithography compliance check (LCC) and hot spot fixing (HSF) flow has been developed to guarantee design compliance for OPC and RET by combining lithography simulator, hot spot detector and layout modification tool. Hot spots highlighted by the LCC flow are removed by the HSF flow following modification rule consists of "Line-Sizing" (LS) and "Space-Sizing (SS)" that are resize value of line-width and space-width for the original pattern. In order to meet layout modification requirements at the pre- and post- tape out (T.O.) stages, the priorities individually set for the modification rules and the design rules, which provides flexibly to achieve the modification scheme desirable at each stage. For handling large data at a fast speed, Layout Analyzer (LA) and Layout Optimizer (LO) engines were combined with the HSF flow. LA is used to reconstruct the original hierarchy structure, clips off small parts of the layout that include hot spots from the original layout and sends those to LO in order to reduce the computational time and resource. LO optimizes the clipped off layout following the prioritized modification- and design-rules. The new DfM scheme was found to be quite effective for hot spot cleaning for 65nm node and beyond, since it was demonstrated that the HSF flow improved the lithography margin for the metal layer of 65nm node full-chip data by reducing number of hot spots to below 0.1% of original within about 12 hours, using 1CPU of commercially available workstation.

  2. Statistical Hot Spot Model for Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, III, A L

    2005-07-14

    The Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Statistical Hot Spot Model (NLTE SHS), a new model for explosive detonation, is described. In this model, the formation, ignition, propagation, and extinction of hot spots is explicitly modeled. The equation of state of the explosive mixture is treated with a non-local equilibrium thermodynamic assumption. A methodology for developing the parameters for the model is discussed, and applied to the detonation velocity diameter effect. Examination of these results indicates where future improvements to the model can be made.

  3. Statistical Hot Spot Model for Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols III, A L

    2004-05-10

    The Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Statistical Hot Spot Model (NLTE SHS), a new model for explosive detonation, is described. In this model, the formation, ignition, propagation, and extinction of hot spots is explicitly modeled. The equation of state of the explosive mixture is treated with a nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamic assumption. A methodology for developing the parameters for the model is discussed, and applied to the detonation velocity diameter effect. Examination of these results indicates where future improvements to the model can be made.

  4. The simple spot-welding apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Takeshi

    1998-07-01

    A simple spot-welding apparatus has been developed for the fabrication of stable electrodes used in the measurement of transport properties in condensed matter physics. The apparatus is especially suited for the use of brittle and small sized samples of rare-earth intermetallic compounds (REICs). The spot welding is made by a sharp pulse (150 A and several μs), generated by the precise time generation IC in a capacitor discharge circuit, to avoid breaking the sample. Stable electrodes of six 15 μ Au wires can be made on a REIC sample with length less than 1 mm.

  5. Identification of stringent response-related and potential serological proteins released from Bacillus anthracis overexpressing the RelA/SpoT homolog, Rsh Bant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Kye; Park, Moon Kyoo; Kim, Sang Hoon; Oh, Kwang Gun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Hong, Chong-Hae; Yoon, Jang W; Chai, Young Gyu

    2014-10-01

    RelA and SpoT synthesize ppGpp, a key effector molecule that facilitates the adaptation of bacteria to nutrient starvation and other stresses, known as the stringent response. To investigate the role of Rsh Bant , a putative RelA/SpoT homolog (encoded by BAS4302) in Bacillus anthracis, we examined the alteration of the secretome profiles after the overexpression of a functional His-Rsh Bant protein in the B. anthracis strain Sterne at the stationary growth phase. In the ppGpp-deficient E. coli mutant strain CF1693, overexpression of Rsh Bant restored a ppGpp-dependent growth defect on minimal glucose media. The secretome profiles obtained using a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis were altered by overexpression of Rsh Bant in B. anthracis. Among the 66 protein spots differentially expressed >1.5-fold, the 29 proteins were abundant for further identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Functional categorization of those proteins implicated their involvement in various biological activities. Taken together, our results imply that overexpression of a functional His-Rsh Bant can lead to the increased levels of intracellular ppGpp in B. anthracis, resulting in the significant changes in its secretome profiling. The stringent response-controlled proteins identified are likely useful as potential targets for serodiagnostic applications.

  6. Defining the blood plasma protein repertoire of seven day old dairy calves - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczak, W F; Ozgo, M; Lepczynski, A; Herosimczyk, A

    2011-06-01

    During the early postnatal period in calves various adaptational changes occur. These functional, morphological and also metabolic alteration are reflected by blood plasma protein changes as they are secreted and shed from many cells and tissues. Blood plasma protein pattern of an adult cattle differs in some respect when compared with neonatal calves. There exist a very few data concerning 2-D maps of neonatal calves blood plasma. The above prompted us to establish protein pattern of this biological fluid characteristic of healthy, 7 day old, Polish Black-and-White (Polish Friesian) breed calves. Blood plasma proteins of the isoelectric point ranging from 4.0 to 7.0 were analyzed by the aid of high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Subsequently, 79 excised protein spots corresponding to 23 different gene products were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF MS). Protein map obtained in the present study may be useful in assessing the changes in the calves blood plasma protein profiles occurring in response to different physiological and/or pathophysiological factors.

  7. Jorge Rivera congratulated for spotting misplaced pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jorge Rivera (with microphone) shares his thoughts after receiving congratulations for his observatory powers from NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (right). A NASA external tank mechanical engineer, Rivera is the one who spotted the misplaced lock pin on Shuttle Discovery Oct. 10, shortly before the intended launch of mission STS-92, causing a scrub for safety reasons.

  8. Jorge Rivera congratulated for spotting misplaced pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jorge Rivera (center) receives a plaque and congratulations for his observatory powers from Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach (right). A NASA external tank mechanical engineer, Rivera is the one who spotted the misplaced lock pin on Shuttle Discovery Oct. 10, shortly before the intended launch of mission STS-92, causing a scrub for safety reasons.

  9. The sweet spots in human communication.

    PubMed

    Salem, Philip

    2011-07-01

    In baseball, the sweet spot is a special place on a bat where the batter can hit the ball with the most power. It is the place where the performances of the batter and pitcher collide with maximum effect. It is the place where the dynamic tension between opponents leads to transformation. The dynamic tension in all living systems is between similarity and difference. Chaos and complexity scholars recognized this tension as amounts of information. When the amounts of information were high, but not too high, the system moved to the edge of chaos, to the complexity regime, to strange attractors, or to chaos, depending on the model. The sweet spot is that range of relative variety, just the proper mix of similarity and difference, leading to transformation. This essay contains a model of human communication as an emergent social process with its own sweet spots. The essay also includes a description of current literature highlighting tensions between similarity and difference, and there is an exploration of the potential to move from one basin of attraction to another. The primary constraints on finding communication sweet spots are paradigmatic - adopting a process orientation, discovering the proper parameters, bracketing sequences to define initial conditions, and understanding the strengths and weaknesses of various modeling techniques.

  10. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... results as a result of testing of certified swine from that site at the slaughter facility. (b) All...

  11. 9 CFR 149.4 - Spot audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spot audit. 149.4 Section 149.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... results as a result of testing of certified swine from that site at the slaughter facility. (b) All...

  12. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  13. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  14. THE SPACE PUBLIC OUTREACH TEAM (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Kathryn; National Radio Astronomy Observatory; Montana Space Grant Consortium; West Virginia Space Grant Consortium; NASA Independent Verification and Validation Center

    2014-01-01

    The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) has shown over 17 years of success in bringing astronomy and space science-themed presentations to approximately 10,000 students per year in Montana, and the program is now being piloted in West Virginia through a joint partnership between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium, and NASA Independent Verification and Validation Center. SPOT recruits and trains undergraduate presenters from all over the state to learn interactive slide shows that highlight the state’s on-going and world-class space science research. Presenters then travel to K-12 schools to deliver these presentations and provide teachers additional supplemental information for when the SPOT team leaves. As a large-scale, low-cost, and sustainable program being implemented in both Montana and West Virginia, SPOT has the potential to become a nation-wide effort that institutions in other states can model to increase their education and public outreach presence.

  15. Easy Demonstration of the Poisson Spot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many physics teachers have a set of slides of single, double and multiple slits to show their students the phenomena of interference and diffraction. Thomas Young's historic experiments with double slits were indeed a milestone in proving the wave nature of light. But another experiment, namely the Poisson spot, was also important historically and…

  16. Expert Blind Spot among Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Mitchell J.; Petrosino, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    This study (N = 48) examined the relationship between preservice secondary teachers' subject-matter expertise in mathematics and their judgments of students' algebra problem-solving difficulty. As predicted by the "expert blind spot" hypothesis, participants with more advanced mathematics education, regardless of their program affiliation or…

  17. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (<~0.03 Hz), may enhance the probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  18. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  19. The Power Company Hot-Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barresi, Joseph F.

    1984-03-01

    Just as your companies screen and monitor the market place to determine demand and the public's perception of product need, the power company is constantly faced with studying and forecasting the potential for load growth within it's franchised areas. This study and it's resultant forecast for growth has placed the power industry in a hot spot.

  20. Digital Sun Sensor Multi-Spot Operation

    PubMed Central

    Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The operation and test of a multi-spot digital sun sensor for precise sun-line determination is described. The image forming system consists of an opaque mask with multiple pinhole apertures producing multiple, simultaneous, spot-like images of the sun on the focal plane. The sun-line precision can be improved by averaging multiple simultaneous measures. Nevertheless, the sensor operation on a wide field of view requires acquiring and processing images in which the number of sun spots and the related intensity level are largely variable. To this end, a reliable and robust image acquisition procedure based on a variable shutter time has been considered as well as a calibration function exploiting also the knowledge of the sun-spot array size. Main focus of the present paper is the experimental validation of the wide field of view operation of the sensor by using a sensor prototype and a laboratory test facility. Results demonstrate that it is possible to keep high measurement precision also for large off-boresight angles. PMID:23443388

  1. Spotting Junk Science A Classroom Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Brian

    2006-12-01

    This presentation is on an exercise in teaching non-science students to spot junk science and to be better consumers of scientific information. It is based upon critical analysis of the website advocating the theory of the solid surface of the sun. I will present examples of student work and solicit comments on how to improve the exercise.

  2. Two New Hot Spots on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on Galileo obtained this image of half of Io's disk in darkness on September 19, 1997. This image, at 5 microns, shows several hot spots on Io, which are volcanic regions of enhanced thermal emission. The area shown is part of the leading hemisphere of Io.

    Two new hot spots are shown and indicated in the image (New, and Shamshu). Neither of these hot spots were seen by NIMS or the Solid State Imaging Experiment, (SSI) prior to this observation, becoming only recently active. Several other previously known hot spots are labelled in the image. Galileo was at a distance of 342,000 km from Io when this observation was made.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Kamakura, Orson; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Horta, Mauricio C; Pacheco, Richard C

    2009-03-01

    Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in dogs has been reported solely in the United States. We report 2 natural clinical cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs in Brazil. Each case was confirmed by seroconversion and molecular analysis and resolved after doxycycline therapy.

  4. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  5. Mutation hot spots in mammalian mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Nicolas; Enard, David; Radondy, Yoan; Bazin, Eric; Belkhir, Khalid

    2006-02-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNA is characterized by a remarkably high level of within-species homoplasy, that is, phylogenetic incongruence between sites of the molecule. Several investigators have invoked recombination to explain it, challenging the dogma of maternal, clonal mitochondrial inheritance in animals. Alternatively, a high level of homoplasy could be explained by the existence of mutation hot spots. By using an exhaustive mammalian data set, we test the hot spot hypothesis by comparing patterns of site-specific polymorphism and divergence in several groups of closely related species, including hominids. We detect significant co-occurrence of synonymous polymorphisms among closely related species in various mammalian groups, and a correlation between the site-specific levels of variability within humans (on one hand) and between Hominoidea species (on the other hand), indicating that mutation hot spots actually exist in mammalian mitochondrial coding regions. The whole data, however, cannot be explained by a simple mutation hot spots model. Rather, we show that the site-specific mutation rate quickly varies in time, so that the same sites are not hypermutable in distinct lineages. This study provides a plausible mutation model that potentially accounts for the peculiar distribution of mitochondrial sequence variation in mammals without the need for invoking recombination. It also gives hints about the proximal causes of mitochondrial site-specific hypermutability in humans.

  6. Measuring microfocal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A; Ewert, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification is especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application; and (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. The following equations are used for the focal spot size measurement: By similar triangles the following equations are presupposed: f/a = U/b and M = (a+b)/a. These equations can be combined to yield the well known expression: U = f(M - 1). Solving for f, f = U/(M-1). Therefore, the focal spot size, f, can be calculated by measuring the radiographic unsharpness and magnification of a known object. This is the basis for these tests. The European standard actually uses one-half of the unsharpness (which are then added together) from both sides of the object to avoid additional unsharpness contributions due to edge transmission unsharpness of the round test object (the outside of the object is measured). So the equation becomes f = (1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2})/(M-1). In practice 1/2 U is measured from the 50% to the 90% signal points on the transition profile from ''black'' to ''white,'' (positive image) or attenuated to unattenuated portion of the image. The 50% to 90% points are chosen as a best fit to an assumed Gaussian radiation distribution from the focal spot and to avoid edge transmission effects. 1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2} corresponds about to the full width at half height of a Gaussian focal spot. A highly absorbing material (Tungsten, Tungsten Alloy, or Platinum) is used for the object. Either wires or a sphere are used as the object to eliminate alignment issues. One

  7. The Little Red Spot: Closest View Yet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is a mosaic of three New Horizons images of Jupiter's Little Red Spot, taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 17:41 Universal Time on February 26 from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.1 million miles). The image scale is 17 kilometers (11 miles) per pixel, and the area covered measures 33,000 kilometers (20,000 miles) from top to bottom, two and one-half times the diameter of Earth.

    The Little Red Spot, a smaller cousin of the famous Great Red Spot, formed in the past decade from the merger of three smaller Jovian storms, and is now the second-largest storm on Jupiter. About a year ago its color, formerly white, changed to a reddish shade similar to the Great Red Spot, perhaps because it is now powerful enough to dredge up reddish material from deeper inside Jupiter. These are the most detailed images ever taken of the Little Red Spot since its formation, and will be combined with even sharper images taken by New Horizons 10 hours later to map circulation patterns around and within the storm.

    LORRI took the images as the Sun was about to set on the Little Red Spot. The LORRI camera was designed to look at Pluto, where sunlight is much fainter than it is at Jupiter, so the images would have been overexposed if LORRI had looked at the storm when it was illuminated by the noonday Sun. The dim evening illumination helped the LORRI camera obtain well-exposed images. The New Horizons team used predictions made by amateur astronomers in 2006, based on their observations of the motion of the Little Red Spot with backyard telescopes, to help them accurately point LORRI at the storm.

    These are among a handful of Jupiter system images already returned by New Horizons during its close approach to Jupiter. Most of the data being gathered by the spacecraft are stored onboard and will be downlinked to Earth during March and April 2007.

  8. UV-B Radiation Stress Causes Alterations in Whole Cell Protein Profile and Expression of Certain Genes in the Rice Phyllospheric Bacterium Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jay; Babele, Piyoosh K; Singh, Divya; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Among the different types of UV radiation, UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) has gained much attention mainly due to its increasing incidence on the Earth's surface leading to imbalances in natural ecosystems. This study deals with the effects of UV-B radiation on the proteome and gene expression in a rice phyllospheric bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae. Of the five bacteria isolated from rice leaves, E. cloacae showed the highest level of resistance to UV-B and total killing occurred after 8 h of continuous exposure to UV-B. Reactive oxygen species were induced by UV-B exposure and increased with increasing duration of exposure. Protein profiling by SDS-PAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed major changes in the number as well as expression of proteins. Analysis of 2-DE gel spots indicated up/down-regulation of several proteins under the stress of UV-B radiation. Thirteen differentially expressed proteins including two hypothetical proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and assigned to eight functional categories. Both the hypothetical proteins (gi 779821175 and gi 503938301) were over-expressed after UV-B irradiation; gi 503938301 was characterized as a member of FMN reductase superfamily whereas gi 779821175 seems to be a structural protein as it did not show any functional domain. That the expression of certain proteins under UV-B stress is indeed up-regulated was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis of selected gene including genes of hypothetical proteins (cp011650 and cp002886) showed over-expression under UV-B stress as compared to untreated control cultures. Although this study deals with a limited number of proteins, identification of differentially expressed proteins reported herein may prove useful in future studies especially for assessing their significance in the protection mechanism of bacteria against UV-B radiation stress.

  9. UV-B Radiation Stress Causes Alterations in Whole Cell Protein Profile and Expression of Certain Genes in the Rice Phyllospheric Bacterium Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jay; Babele, Piyoosh K.; Singh, Divya; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Among the different types of UV radiation, UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) has gained much attention mainly due to its increasing incidence on the Earth’s surface leading to imbalances in natural ecosystems. This study deals with the effects of UV-B radiation on the proteome and gene expression in a rice phyllospheric bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae. Of the five bacteria isolated from rice leaves, E. cloacae showed the highest level of resistance to UV-B and total killing occurred after 8 h of continuous exposure to UV-B. Reactive oxygen species were induced by UV-B exposure and increased with increasing duration of exposure. Protein profiling by SDS-PAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed major changes in the number as well as expression of proteins. Analysis of 2-DE gel spots indicated up/down-regulation of several proteins under the stress of UV-B radiation. Thirteen differentially expressed proteins including two hypothetical proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and assigned to eight functional categories. Both the hypothetical proteins (gi 779821175 and gi 503938301) were over-expressed after UV-B irradiation; gi 503938301 was characterized as a member of FMN reductase superfamily whereas gi 779821175 seems to be a structural protein as it did not show any functional domain. That the expression of certain proteins under UV-B stress is indeed up-regulated was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis of selected gene including genes of hypothetical proteins (cp011650 and cp002886) showed over-expression under UV-B stress as compared to untreated control cultures. Although this study deals with a limited number of proteins, identification of differentially expressed proteins reported herein may prove useful in future studies especially for assessing their significance in the protection mechanism of bacteria against UV-B radiation stress. PMID:27672388

  10. Hyperspectral analysis of columbia spotted frog habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shive, J.P.; Pilliod, D.S.; Peterson, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Wildlife managers increasingly are using remotely sensed imagery to improve habitat delineations and sampling strategies. Advances in remote sensing technology, such as hyperspectral imagery, provide more information than previously was available with multispectral sensors. We evaluated accuracy of high-resolution hyperspectral image classifications to identify wetlands and wetland habitat features important for Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) and compared the results to multispectral image classification and United States Geological Survey topographic maps. The study area spanned 3 lake basins in the Salmon River Mountains, Idaho, USA. Hyperspectral data were collected with an airborne sensor on 30 June 2002 and on 8 July 2006. A 12-year comprehensive ground survey of the study area for Columbia spotted frog reproduction served as validation for image classifications. Hyperspectral image classification accuracy of wetlands was high, with a producer's accuracy of 96 (44 wetlands) correctly classified with the 2002 data and 89 (41 wetlands) correctly classified with the 2006 data. We applied habitat-based rules to delineate breeding habitat from other wetlands, and successfully predicted 74 (14 wetlands) of known breeding wetlands for the Columbia spotted frog. Emergent sedge microhabitat classification showed promise for directly predicting Columbia spotted frog egg mass locations within a wetland by correctly identifying 72 (23 of 32) of known locations. Our study indicates hyperspectral imagery can be an effective tool for mapping spotted frog breeding habitat in the selected mountain basins. We conclude that this technique has potential for improving site selection for inventory and monitoring programs conducted across similar wetland habitat and can be a useful tool for delineating wildlife habitats. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  11. Revised Thorium Abundances for Lunar Red Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar red spots are features on the nearside of the Moon that are characterized by high albedo and by a strong absorption in the ultraviolet. These red spots include the Gruithuisen domes, the Mairan domes, Hansteen Alpha, the southern portion of Montes Riphaeus, Darney Chi and Tau, Helmet, and an area near the Lassell crater. It has been suggested that many of the red spots are extrusive, nonmare, volcanic features that could be composed of an evolved lithlogy enriched in thorium. In fact, Hawke et al. used morphological characteristics to show that Hansteen Alpha is a nonmare volcanic construct. However, because the apparent Th abundances (6 - 7 ppm) were lower than that expected for evolved rock types, Hawke et al. concluded that Hansteen Alpha was composed of an unknown rock type. Subsequent studies by Lawrence et al. used improved knowledge of the Th spatial distribution for small area features on the lunar surface to revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at the Hansteen Alpha red spot. As part of their study, Lawrence et al. used a forward modeling technique to show that the Th abundance at Hansteen Alpha is not 6 ppm, but is more likely closer to 25 ppm, a value consistent with evolved lithologies. This positive correlation between the morphology and composition of Hansteen Alpha provides support for the presence of evolved lithologies on the lunar surface. It is possible, however, that Hansteen Alpha represents an isolated occurrence of non-mare volcanism. That is why we have chosen to use the forward modeling technique of Lawrence et al. to investigate the Th abundances at other lunar red spots, starting with the Gruithuisen domes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  12. Comparative proteomics reveals differential induction of both biotic and abiotic stress response associated proteins in rice during Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anirudh; Bimolata, Waikhom; Kannan, Monica; Kirti, P B; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight disease in rice and brutally affects the yield up to 50 % of total production. Here, we report a comparative proteomics analysis of total foliar protein isolated from infected rice leaves of susceptible Pusa Basmati 1 (PB1) and resistant Oryza longistaminata genotypes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) approaches identified 29 protein spots encoding unique proteins from both the genotypes. Identified proteins belonged to a large number of biological and molecular functions related to biotic and abiotic stress proteins which are potentially involved during Xoo infection. Biotic and abiotic stress-related proteins were induced during Xoo infection, indicating the activation of common stress pathway during bacterial blight infection. Candidate genes conferring tolerance against bacterial blight, which include germin-like protein, putative r40c1, cyclin-dependent kinase C, Ent-isokaur-15-ene synthase and glutathione-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase 1 (GSH-DHAR1), were also induced, with germin-like proteins induced only in the resistant rice genotype O. longistaminata. Energy, metabolism and hypothetical proteins were common among both the genotypes. Further, host defence/stress-related proteins were mostly expressed in resistant genotype O. longistaminata, indicating possible co-evolution of the pathogen and the wild rice, O. longistaminata.

  13. Differences in serum protein 2D gel electrophoresis patterns of Przewalski's (Mongolian wild horse) and thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Barsuren, Enkhbolor; Namkhai, Bandi; Kong, Hong Sik

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in serum protein expression profiles of Przewalski's (Mongolian wild horse) and thoroughbred horses using proteome analysis. The serum proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and five different gene products were identified. Proteins represented by the five spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS)/MS technology. The identities of all proteins were deduced based on their similarity to proteins in the human plasma protein database. Three proteins (a haptoglobin-2 alpha glycoprotein and two haptoglobin-2beta glycoproteins with different accession numbers) were downregulated in Przewalski's horse sera compared to thoroughbred horse sera. Moreover, two proteins (tetraspanin-18 and pM5) were upregulated in Przewalski's horses compared to thoroughbred horses. Haptoglobin-2 alpha and haptoglobin-2beta may serve as candidate molecules in future studies of inflammation, coagulation, immune modulation and pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity with consequential effects on the entire metabolism of the horse.

  14. The PROTICdb database for 2-DE proteomics.

    PubMed

    Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Joets, Johann

    2007-01-01

    PROTICdb is a web-based database mainly designed to store and analyze plant proteome data obtained by 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The goals of PROTICdb are (1) to store, track, and query information related to proteomic experiments, i.e., from tissue sampling to protein identification and quantitative measurements; and (2) to integrate information from the user's own expertise and other sources into a knowledge base, used to support data interpretation (e.g., for the determination of allelic variants or products of posttranslational modifications). Data insertion into the relational database of PROTICdb is achieved either by uploading outputs from Mélanie, PDQuest, IM2d, ImageMaster(tm) 2D Platinum v5.0, Progenesis, Sequest, MS-Fit, and Mascot software, or by filling in web forms (experimental design and methods). 2D PAGE-annotated maps can be displayed, queried, and compared through the GelBrowser. Quantitative data can be easily exported in a tabulated format for statistical analyses with any third-party software. PROTICdb is based on the Oracle or the PostgreSQLDataBase Management System (DBMS) and is freely available upon request at http://cms.moulon.inra.fr/content/view/14/44/.

  15. Towards reproducible MRM based biomarker discovery using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Cooper, Jason D; Lago, Santiago G; Kenny, Diarmuid; Rustogi, Nitin; Stocki, Pawel; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-03-27

    There is an increasing interest in the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and multiple reaction monitoring in proteomics. Although several groups have explored the utility of DBS by focusing on protein detection, the reproducibility of the approach and whether it can be used for biomarker discovery in high throughput studies is yet to be determined. We assessed the reproducibility of multiplexed targeted protein measurements in DBS compared to serum. Eighty-two medium to high abundance proteins were monitored in a number of technical and biological replicates. Importantly, as part of the data analysis, several statistical quality control approaches were evaluated to detect inaccurate transitions. After implementing statistical quality control measures, the median CV on the original scale for all detected peptides in DBS was 13.2% and in Serum 8.8%. We also found a strong correlation (r = 0.72) between relative peptide abundance measured in DBS and serum. The combination of minimally invasive sample collection with a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique allows for targeted quantification of multiple proteins in a single MS run. This approach has the potential to fundamentally change clinical proteomics and personalized medicine by facilitating large-scale studies.

  16. Towards reproducible MRM based biomarker discovery using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Cooper, Jason D.; Lago, Santiago G.; Kenny, Diarmuid; Rustogi, Nitin; Stocki, Pawel; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and multiple reaction monitoring in proteomics. Although several groups have explored the utility of DBS by focusing on protein detection, the reproducibility of the approach and whether it can be used for biomarker discovery in high throughput studies is yet to be determined. We assessed the reproducibility of multiplexed targeted protein measurements in DBS compared to serum. Eighty-two medium to high abundance proteins were monitored in a number of technical and biological replicates. Importantly, as part of the data analysis, several statistical quality control approaches were evaluated to detect inaccurate transitions. After implementing statistical quality control measures, the median CV on the original scale for all detected peptides in DBS was 13.2% and in Serum 8.8%. We also found a strong correlation (r = 0.72) between relative peptide abundance measured in DBS and serum. The combination of minimally invasive sample collection with a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique allows for targeted quantification of multiple proteins in a single MS run. This approach has the potential to fundamentally change clinical proteomics and personalized medicine by facilitating large-scale studies. PMID:28345601

  17. Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164081.html Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies Finding suggests other ... HealthDay News) -- Two tests that screen for preterm birth risk rarely spot trouble in first-time pregnancies, ...

  18. SPOT: How good for geology? A comparison with LANDSAT MSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesoeren, A.

    1986-12-01

    Geological interpretation possibilities of SPOT MSS and LANDSAT MSS positive prints enlarged to the same scale were compared, using as a test area part of the Jebel Amour (Algeria). The SPOT imagery offers many advantages, filling the gap between remote sensing from space and aerial photography. The best results by visual interpretation are obtained in combining SPOT for the required details with LANDSAT for the synoptic veiw. Further improvements are expected from the use of SPOT stereo-pairs.

  19. Vibrational modes identify soft spots in a sheared disordered packing.

    PubMed

    Manning, M L; Liu, A J

    2011-09-02

    We analyze low-frequency vibrational modes in a two-dimensional, zero-temperature, quasistatically sheared model glass to identify a population of structural "soft spots" where particle rearrangements are initiated. The population of spots evolves slowly compared to the interval between particle rearrangements, and the soft spots are structurally different from the rest of the system. Our results suggest that disordered solids flow via localized rearrangements that tend to occur at soft spots, which are analogous to dislocations in crystalline solids.

  20. Turbulent Region Near Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color mosaics of the turbulent region west of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is on the planetary limb on the right hand side of each mosaic. The region west (left) of the Great Red Spot is characterized by large, turbulent structures that rapidly change in appearance. The turbulence results from the collision of a westward jet that is deflected northward by the Great Red Spot into a higher latitude eastward jet. The large eddies nearest to the Great Red Spot are bright, suggesting that convection and cloud formation are active there.

    The top mosaic combines the violet (410 nanometers) and near infrared continuum (756 nanometers) filter images to create a mosaic similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundance of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The lower mosaic uses the Galileo imaging camera's three near-infrared (invisible) wavelengths (756 nanometers, 727 nanometers, and 889 nanometers displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. Purple most likely represents a high haze overlying a clear deep atmosphere. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.

    The mosaic is centered at 16.5 degrees south planetocentric latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. The north-south dimension of the Great Red Spot is approximately 11,000 kilometers. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. North is at the top of the picture. The images used were taken on June 26, 1997 at a range of 1.2 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology

  1. Salinity-induced changes in protein expression in the halophytic plant Nitraria sphaerocarpa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Cheng, Tielong; Wang, Pengkai; Liu, Weidong; Xiao, Jiao; Yang, Yunqiang; Hu, Xiangyang; Jiang, Zeping; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2012-09-18

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress that inhibits plant growth and development. Plants have evolved complex adaptive mechanisms that respond to salinity stress. However, an understanding of how plants respond to salinity stress is far from being complete. In particular, how plants survive salinity stress via alterations to their intercellular metabolic networks and defense systems is largely unknown. To delineate the responses of Nitraria sphaerocarpa cell suspensions to salinity, changes in their protein expression patterns were characterized by a comparative proteomic approach. Cells that had been treated with 150 mM NaCl for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 days developed several stress-related phenotypes, including those affecting morphology and biochemical activities. Of ~1100 proteins detected in 2-DE gel patterns, 130 proteins showed differences in abundance with more than 1.5-fold when cells were stressed by salinity. All but one of these proteins was identified by MS and database searching. The 129 spots contained 111 different proteins, including those involved in signal transduction, cell rescue/defense, cytoskeleton and cell cycle, protein folding and assembly, which were the most significantly affected. Taken together, our results provide a foundation to understand the mechanism of salinity response.

  2. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Differential Expression of Cellular Proteins in Response to Avian H9N2 Virus Infection of A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanliu; Liang, Wei; Liu, Jiyuan; Meng, Dan; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Sixteen different spots between the groups (ratio > 2, p < 0.05) were identified with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins located in the downstream of the NF-κB and IFN transcription factor pathways were identified, e.g., ISG15. Actin and keratin were also identified, suggesting that the cytoskeleton may plays an important role in the AIV infection of mammalian cells. These findings could provide insights into the interaction between host and influenza viruses and might provide valuable information for clarifying the pathogenesis of viral infections as well. PMID:28018302

  4. Proteomic Analysis on the Alteration of Protein Expression in the Early-Stage Placental Villous Tissue of Electromagnetic Fields Associated With Cell Phone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiong; Jiang, Ying; Jin, Min

    2013-01-01

    Background: To explore the possible adverse effects and search for cell phone electromagnetic field (EMF)-responsive proteins in human early reproduction, a proteomics approach was employed to investigate the changes in protein expression profile induced by cell phone EMF in human chorionic tissues of early pregnancy in vivo. Methods: Volunteer women about 50 days pregnant were exposed to EMF at the average absorption rate of 1.6 to 8.8 W/kg for 1 hour with the irradiation device placed 10 cm away from the umbilicus at the midline of the abdomen. The changes in protein profile were examined using 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Results: Up to 15 spots have yielded significant change at least 2- to 2.5-folds up or down compared to sham-exposed group. Twelve proteins were identified— procollagen–proline, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta, chain D crystal structure of human vitamin D-binding protein, thioredoxin-like 3, capping protein, isocitrate dehydrogenase 3 alpha, calumenin, Catechol-O-methyltransferase protein, proteinase inhibitor 6 (PI-6; SerpinB6) protein, 3,2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase protein, chain B human erythrocyte 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate mutase, and nucleoprotein. Conclusion: Cell phone EMF might alter the protein profile of chorionic tissue of early pregnancy, during the most sensitive stage of the embryos. The exposure to EMF may cause adverse effects on cell proliferation and development of nervous system in early embryos. Furthermore, 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry is a promising approach to elucidate the effects and search for new biomarkers for environmental toxic effects. PMID:23420827

  5. 7 CFR 28.424 - Strict Low Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strict Low Middling Spotted Color. 28.424 Section 28.424 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Low Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  6. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  7. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  8. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  9. 7 CFR 28.424 - Strict Low Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Low Middling Spotted Color. 28.424 Section 28.424 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Low Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  10. 7 CFR 28.421 - Good Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good Middling Spotted Color. 28.421 Section 28.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Color. Good Middling Spotted Color is color which is better than Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  11. 7 CFR 28.424 - Strict Low Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strict Low Middling Spotted Color. 28.424 Section 28.424 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Low Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  12. 7 CFR 28.421 - Good Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good Middling Spotted Color. 28.421 Section 28.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Color. Good Middling Spotted Color is color which is better than Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  13. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  14. 7 CFR 28.421 - Good Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good Middling Spotted Color. 28.421 Section 28.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Color. Good Middling Spotted Color is color which is better than Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  15. 7 CFR 28.424 - Strict Low Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strict Low Middling Spotted Color. 28.424 Section 28.424 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Low Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  16. 7 CFR 28.424 - Strict Low Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strict Low Middling Spotted Color. 28.424 Section 28.424 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Low Middling Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  17. 7 CFR 28.421 - Good Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good Middling Spotted Color. 28.421 Section 28.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Color. Good Middling Spotted Color is color which is better than Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  18. 7 CFR 28.426 - Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color. 28.426 Section 28.426 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Spotted Color. Strict Good Ordinary Spotted Color is color which is within the range represented by a...

  19. 7 CFR 28.421 - Good Middling Spotted Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good Middling Spotted Color. 28.421 Section 28.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Color. Good Middling Spotted Color is color which is better than Strict Middling Spotted Color....

  20. Spot-Welding Gun With Pivoting Twin-Collet Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Francis; Simpson, Gareth; Hoult, William S.

    1996-01-01

    Modified spot-welding gun includes pivoting twin-collet assembly that holds two spot-welding electrodes. Designed to weld highly conductive (30 percent gold) brazing-alloy foils to thin nickel alloy workpieces; also suitable for other spot-welding applications compatible with two-electrode configuration.

  1. Spot-Welding Gun Is Easy To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Nguyen, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrical-resistance spot-welding gun designed to produce more welds per unit time by decreasing technician's effort and fatigue. Vacuum cups on frame secure welding gun to workpiece while compressed air drives welding tip against workpiece to make spot resistance weld. When weld completed, vacuum in frame cups released so frame and gun moved to position of next spot weld.

  2. 7 CFR 27.93 - Bona fide spot markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bona fide spot markets. 27.93 Section 27.93... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Spot Markets § 27.93 Bona fide spot markets. The following markets have been determined, after investigation, and are...

  3. 7 CFR 27.93 - Bona fide spot markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bona fide spot markets. 27.93 Section 27.93... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Spot Markets § 27.93 Bona fide spot markets. The following markets have been determined, after investigation, and are...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1670 - Spot-film device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spot-film device. 892.1670 Section 892.1670 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1670 Spot-film device. (a) Identification. A spot-film... medical purposes to position a radiographic film cassette to obtain radiographs during fluoroscopy....

  5. 21 CFR 892.1670 - Spot-film device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spot-film device. 892.1670 Section 892.1670 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1670 Spot-film device. (a) Identification. A spot-film... medical purposes to position a radiographic film cassette to obtain radiographs during fluoroscopy....

  6. 21 CFR 892.1670 - Spot-film device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spot-film device. 892.1670 Section 892.1670 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1670 Spot-film device. (a) Identification. A spot-film... medical purposes to position a radiographic film cassette to obtain radiographs during fluoroscopy....

  7. 21 CFR 892.1670 - Spot-film device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spot-film device. 892.1670 Section 892.1670 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1670 Spot-film device. (a) Identification. A spot-film... medical purposes to position a radiographic film cassette to obtain radiographs during fluoroscopy....

  8. 21 CFR 892.1670 - Spot-film device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spot-film device. 892.1670 Section 892.1670 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1670 Spot-film device. (a) Identification. A spot-film... medical purposes to position a radiographic film cassette to obtain radiographs during fluoroscopy....

  9. On the Spreading Rate and Structure of a Turbulent Spot.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-19

    ensemble-averaged spot. The particle trajectories led CCD to conclude that there are two vortex structures associated with an ensembled averaged spot . One transverse...virtual origin for the spot . One may chose the intersec- tion of _Z and a for the virtual origin because these loci represent the ex- treme

  10. Expression profiling reveals Spot 42 small RNA as a key regulator in the central metabolism of Aliivibrio salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spot 42 was discovered in Escherichia coli nearly 40 years ago as an abundant, small and unstable RNA. Its biological role has remained obscure until recently, and is today implicated in having broader roles in the central and secondary metabolism. Spot 42 is encoded by the spf gene. The gene is ubiquitous in the Vibrionaceae family of gamma-proteobacteria. One member of this family, Aliivibrio salmonicida, causes cold-water vibriosis in farmed Atlantic salmon. Its genome encodes Spot 42 with 84% identity to E. coli Spot 42. Results We generated a A. salmonicida spf deletion mutant. We then used microarray and Northern blot analyses to monitor global effects on the transcriptome in order to provide insights into the biological roles of Spot 42 in this bacterium. In the presence of glucose, we found a surprisingly large number of ≥ 2X differentially expressed genes, and several major cellular processes were affected. A gene encoding a pirin-like protein showed an on/off expression pattern in the presence/absence of Spot 42, which suggests that Spot 42 plays a key regulatory role in the central metabolism by regulating the switch between fermentation and respiration. Interestingly, we discovered an sRNA named VSsrna24, which is encoded immediately downstream of spf. This new sRNA has an expression pattern opposite to that of Spot 42, and its expression is repressed by glucose. Conclusions We hypothesize that Spot 42 plays a key role in the central metabolism, in part by regulating the pyruvat dehydrogenase enzyme complex via pirin. PMID:22272603

  11. Positional cloning of ds1, the target leaf spot resistance gene against Bipolaris sorghicola in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Ando, Tsuyu; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Sazuka, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Target leaf spot is one of the major sorghum diseases in southern Japan and caused by a necrotrophic fungus, Bipolaris sorghicola. Sorghum resistance to target leaf spot is controlled by a single recessive gene (ds1). A high-density genetic map of the ds1 locus was constructed with simple sequence repeat markers using progeny from crosses between a sensitive variety, bmr-6, and a resistant one, SIL-05, which allowed the ds1 gene to be genetically located within a 26-kb region on the short arm of sorghum chromosome 5. The sorghum genome annotation database for BTx623, for which the whole genome sequence was recently published, indicated a candidate gene from the Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor Kinase family in this region. The candidate protein kinase gene was expressed in susceptible plants but was not expressed or was severely reduced in resistant plants. The expression patterns of ds1 gene and the phenotype of target leaf spot resistance were clearly correlated. Genomic sequences of this region in parental varieties showed a deletion in the promoter region of SIL-05 that could cause reduction of gene expression. We also found two ds1 alleles for resistant phenotypes with a stop codon in the coding region. The results shown here strongly suggest that the loss of function or suppression of the ds1 protein kinase gene leads to resistance to target leaf spot in sorghum.

  12. Spot foreign exchange market and time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, F.; Serva, M.

    2003-08-01

    We investigate high frequency price dynamics in foreign exchange market using data from Reuters information system (the dataset has been provided to us by Olsen and Associates). In our analysis we show that a naïve approach to the definition of price (for example using the spot mid price) may lead to wrong conclusions on price behavior as for example the presence of short term correlations for returns. For this purpose we introduce an algorithm which only uses the non arbitrage principle to estimate real prices from the spot ones. The new definition leads to returns which are not affected by spurious correlations. Furthermore, any apparent information (defined by using Shannon entropy) contained in the data disappears.

  13. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenological effective Lagrangian of weak scale supersymmetry with a certain set of natural assumptions. This framework is designed to avoid problems in low-energy phenomenology and cosmology of supersymmetric models. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation, whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 105 GeV ≲Mmess ≲1010 GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields Nmess are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  14. Sweet Spot Supersymmetry and Composite Messengers

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2007-10-30

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenologically and cosmologically perfect framework to realize a supersymmetric world at short distance. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 10{sup 5} GeV {approx}< M{sub mess} {approx}< 10{sup 10} GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields N{sub mess} are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  15. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  16. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

  17. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Masters, Edwin J; Olson, Gary S; Weiner, Scott J; Paddock, Christopher D

    2003-04-14

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible Rocky Mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. Early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.

  18. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  19. Strong transverse fields in delta-spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Wang, Haimin

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the strength and direction of transverse magnetic fields in six delta-spots are presented. The field direction is determined by the relative strength of the pi- and sigma-components at different polarizer orientations, and is, with one exception, parallel to the neutral line and as strong as the umbral field. Field strengths determined by line splitting are as high as 3980 G.

  20. Does alprostadil cream hit the spot?

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Alprostadil, a prostaglandin, has been marketed for many years as a urethral stick and an intracavernous injection for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.(1) It is now available in the form of a cream (Vitaros-Takeda). Adverts for the product declare: "Sex with no pills, pellets or needles. Spot on." In this article, we consider the evidence for alprostadil cream, and its place in the management of erectile dysfunction.

  1. Mongolian spots: How important are they?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-11-16

    Mongolian spots (MS) are congenital birthmarks seen most commonly over the lumbosacral area. They are bluish-green to black in color and oval to irregular in shape. They are most commonly found in individuals of African or Asian ethnic background. Although these lesions resolve by one to two years of age, widespread, extrasacral and dark colored MS sometimes persist into adulthood. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although traditionally believed to be benign in nature, they have now been shown to co-exist with inborn errors of metabolism, most commonly GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Hurler's disease), followed by mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's syndrome), mucolipidosis, Niemann-Pick disease and mannosidosis. They have also been seen to co-exist with various vascular or other pigmented birthmarks like café-au-lait macules. Co-existing Mongolian spots and vascular birthmarks like nevus flammeus, nevus anemicus or nevus spilus is termed as phakomatosis pigmentovascularis. This review focuses on the important associations of Mongolian spots and stresses upon the importance of screening babies with extensive MS.

  2. First- and second-order Poisson spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, William R.; Shirley, Eric L.; Migdall, Alan L.; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Hendrix, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Although Thomas Young is generally given credit for being the first to provide evidence against Newton's corpuscular theory of light, it was Augustin Fresnel who first stated the modern theory of diffraction. We review the history surrounding Fresnel's 1818 paper and the role of the Poisson spot in the associated controversy. We next discuss the boundary-diffraction-wave approach to calculating diffraction effects and show how it can reduce the complexity of calculating diffraction patterns. We briefly discuss a generalization of this approach that reduces the dimensionality of integrals needed to calculate the complete diffraction pattern of any order diffraction effect. We repeat earlier demonstrations of the conventional Poisson spot and discuss an experimental setup for demonstrating an analogous phenomenon that we call a "second-order Poisson spot." Several features of the diffraction pattern can be explained simply by considering the path lengths of singly and doubly bent paths and distinguishing between first- and second-order diffraction effects related to such paths, respectively.

  3. Hot spot conditions during cavitation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Y.T.; McNamara, W.B. III; Suslick, K.S.

    1999-06-23

    Liquids irradiated with high-intensity ultrasound undergo acoustic cavitation--the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. The energy stored during the growth of the bubble in the rarefaction phase of the acoustic field is released when the bubble violently collapses in the compression phase of the acoustic field, as acoustic noise, shock waves, chemical reactions, and the emission of light (sonoluminescence, SL). This violent collapse is predicted to generate a hot spot of thousands of Kelvin within the bubble, but, to date, there have been only a limited number of experimental measurements of the temperature of this hot spot. Although the SL of water has been studied for more than 50 years, the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants, synthetic applications of sonochemistry, etc.), the authors decided to apply previous spectroscopic analysis of SL of nonaqueous liquids to aqueous solutions doped with small amounts of hydrocarbons. The authors have collected and analyzed excited-state C{sub 2} NBSL (multi-bubble sonoluminescence, light emission from the clouds of cavitating bubbles) spectra from mixtures of organic liquids in water at 20 kHz and find an effective emission temperature of 4,300 {+-} 200 K.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  5. Proteomic identification of the related immune-enhancing proteins in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei stimulated with vitamin C and Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jie; Du, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yueling; Du, Hong; Guo, Lingling; Zhong, Mingqi; Cao, Jingsong; Wang, Xiuying

    2011-12-01

    Recently, strong interest has been focused on immunostimulants to reducing the diseases in shrimp aquaculture. However, information regarding to the related immune-enhancing proteins in shrimps is not available yet. In this study, vitamin C (Vc), Chinese herbs (CH), and the mixture of vitamin C and Chinese herbs (Mix) were tested for their enhancement on shrimp's immune activity. Compared with those in the control group, values of phenoloxidase (PO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and antibacterial (Ua) activity in the Mix-treated group were improved significantly 12 or 24 days after the treatment. The cumulative mortality was also lower in the Mix-treated group after infection with Vibrio parahemolyticus. Furthermore, comparative proteomic approach was used to assess the protein expression profile in shrimps. Approximately 220-290 and 300-400 protein spots were observed in the 2-DE gels. Among them, 29 and 28 altered proteins from hemocytes and hepatopancreas, respectively, were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis. The results revealed that the main altered proteins showed high homologies with Litopenaeus vannamei hemocyanin, hemolymph clottable protein, hemoglobin beta, cytosolic MnSOD, trypsin, cathepsin I(L) and zinc proteinase Mpc1. Together, these studies found Vc and CH were suitable immunostimulants to shrimp L. vannamei, and 7 altered proteins could be involved in the enhanced immune activities.

  6. A comparative method for protein extraction and 2-D gel electrophoresis from different tissues of Cajanus cajan

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jain, Neha; Kumar, Ram; Jain, Ajay; Singh, Nagendra K.; Rai, Vandna

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea is an important legume crop with high protein content. However, it is often subjected to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Proteomics is a state-of-the-art technique used to analyze the protein profiling of a tissue for deciphering the molecular entities that could be manipulated for developing crops resistant to these stresses. In this context, developing a comprehensive proteome profile from different vegetative and reproductive tissues has become mandatory. Although several protein extraction protocols from different tissues of diverse plant species have been reported, there is no report for pigeonpea. Here, we report tissue-specific protein extraction protocols representing vegetative (young leaves), and reproductive (flowers and seeds) organs and their subsequent analysis on 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The study explicitly demonstrated that the efficacy of a particular protein extraction protocol is dependent on the different tissues, such as leaves, flowers and seeds that differ in their structure and metabolic constituents. For instance, phenol-based protocol showed an efficacy toward higher protein yield, better spot resolution and a minimal streaking on 2-DE gel for both leaves and flowers. Protein extraction from seeds was best achieved by employing phosphate-TCA-acetone protocol. PMID:26300903

  7. A comparative method for protein extraction and 2-D gel electrophoresis from different tissues of Cajanus cajan.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Jain, Neha; Kumar, Ram; Jain, Ajay; Singh, Nagendra K; Rai, Vandna

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea is an important legume crop with high protein content. However, it is often subjected to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Proteomics is a state-of-the-art technique used to analyze the protein profiling of a tissue for deciphering the molecular entities that could be manipulated for developing crops resistant to these stresses. In this context, developing a comprehensive proteome profile from different vegetative and reproductive tissues has become mandatory. Although several protein extraction protocols from different tissues of diverse plant species have been reported, there is no report for pigeonpea. Here, we report tissue-specific protein extraction protocols representing vegetative (young leaves), and reproductive (flowers and seeds) organs and their subsequent analysis on 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The study explicitly demonstrated that the efficacy of a particular protein extraction protocol is dependent on the different tissues, such as leaves, flowers and seeds that differ in their structure and metabolic constituents. For instance, phenol-based protocol showed an efficacy toward higher protein yield, better spot resolution and a minimal streaking on 2-DE gel for both leaves and flowers. Protein extraction from seeds was best achieved by employing phosphate-TCA-acetone protocol.

  8. Characterizing hot spots throughout the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, N.; Lockington, D.; Jakeman, T.; Hunt, R.

    2012-04-01

    Few catchments in the world are left truly undisturbed. Rather, they are under anthropogenic stress for a variety of reasons ranging from climate forcing to meeting the basic water allocation needs of the population. Reduction in the number of inundation areas has significantly decreased the nutrient and organic matter retention capacity along the river corridor, with major consequences for the both the riverine and coastal ecosystems. Cumulative stress may build up to a "tipping point" which can cause a change or set of changes which could occur non-linearly. In order to mitigate the environmental stress on these ecosystems, management plans are created to balance the needs of the dependent populations and those of ecology. While these catchment-wide plans aim to improve the ecological function of aquatic areas over the large scale, this sledge-hammer approach ignores the inherent heterogeneity in the catchment. Societal (and policy) decisions involve more than abiotic quantification of water storage and flow. A more encompassing ecohydrological view facilitates a more rounded policy framework that has flexibility to accommodate multiple social drivers, and one that can accommodate an "ecosystem improvement" rather than single species improvement. Not every spot in the landscape is equally valuable for specific societal values. Areas of high activity may provide the resilience capacity necessary to prevent catastrophic changes. In times of ecological instability, ecosystem resilience is of paramount importance in maintaining essential ecosystem services. Hot spots of biogeochemical cycling will occur where unique situations arise, such as areas of surface and groundwater interaction, creating spots of localized, high activity. In order to understand the systems' potential to support various habitat niches in the large scale, the identification of specific hot spots or hot moments is necessary. A basal understanding of the concurrent biogeochemical cycles enables

  9. Identification of Proteins from Interstitium of Trapezius Muscle in Women with Chronic Myalgia Using Microdialysis in Combination with Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Patrik; Gerdle, Björn; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Larsson, Britt; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2012-01-01

    Background Microdialysis (MD) of the trapezius muscle has been an attractive technique to investigating small molecules and metabolites in chronic musculoskeletal pain in human. Large biomolecules such as proteins also cross the dialysis membrane of the catheters. In this study we have applied in vivo MD in combination with two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the extracellular fluid of the trapezius muscle. Materials and Methods Dialysate from women with chronic trapezius myalgia (TM; n = 37), women with chronic wide spread pain (CWP; n = 18) and healthy controls (CON; n = 22) was collected from the trapezius muscle using a catheter with a cut-off point of 100 kDa. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and visualized by silver staining. Detected proteins were identified by nano liquid chromatography in combination with tandem mass spectrometry. Results Ninety-seven protein spots were identified from the interstitial fluid of the trapezius muscle; 48 proteins in TM and 30 proteins in CWP had concentrations at least two-fold higher or lower than in CON. The identified proteins pertain to several functional classes, e.g., proteins involved in inflammatory responses. Several of the identified proteins are known to be involved in processes of pain such as: creatine kinase, nerve growth factor, carbonic anhydrase, myoglobin, fatty acid binding protein and actin aortic smooth muscle. Conclusions In this study, by using in vivo microdialysis in combination with proteomics a large number of proteins in muscle interstitium have been identified. Several of the identified proteins were at least two-fold higher or lower in chronic pain patients. The applied techniques open up for the possibility of investigating protein changes associated with nociceptive processes of chronic myalgia. PMID:23300707

  10. Star spot location estimation using Kalman filter for star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jian-kun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Tan, Ji-chun; Li, Xiu-jian

    2011-04-20

    Star pattern recognition and attitude determination accuracy is highly dependent on star spot location accuracy for the star tracker. A star spot location estimation approach with the Kalman filter for a star tracker has been proposed, which consists of three steps. In the proposed approach, the approximate locations of the star spots in successive frames are predicted first; then the measurement star spot locations are achieved by defining a series of small windows around each predictive star spot location. Finally, the star spot locations are updated by the designed Kalman filter. To confirm the proposed star spot location estimation approach, the simulations based on the orbit data of the CHAMP satellite and the real guide star catalog are performed. The simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can filter out noises from the measurements remarkably if the sampling frequency is sufficient.

  11. Stability of the Boundary Layer and the Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2007-01-01

    The similarity among turbulent spots observed in various transition experiments, and the rate in which they contaminate the surrounding laminar boundary layer is only cursory. The shape of the spot depends on the Reynolds number of the surrounding boundary layer and on the pressure gradient to which it and the surrounding laminar flow are exposed. The propagation speeds of the spot boundaries depend, in addition, on the location from which the spot originated and do not simply scale with the local free stream velocity. The understanding of the manner in which the turbulent manner in which the turbulent spot destabilizes the surrounding, vortical fluid is a key to the understanding of the transition process. We therefore turned to detailed observations near the spot boundaries in general and near the spanwise tip of the spot in particular.

  12. Proteomic characterization of oyster shell organic matrix proteins (OMP)

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Abhishek; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Tong, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Oysters are economically and ecologically important bivalves, with its calcareous shell and delicious meat. The shell composition is a blend of inorganic crystals and shell proteins that form an organic matrix which protects the soft inner tissue of the oyster. The objective of the study was to compare the composition of organic matrix proteins (OMP) of two phylogenetically related species: the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) and the Portuguese oyster (Crassostrea angulata) which differ in their shell hardness and mechanical properties. C. hongkongensis shells are comparatively stronger than C. angulata. Modern shotgun proteomics has been used to understand the nature of the OMP and the variations observed in the mechanical properties of these two species of oyster shells. After visualizing proteins on the one (1DE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) gels, the protein spots and their intensities were compared using PDQuest software and 14 proteins of C. hongkongensis were found to be significantly different (student׳s t-test; p<0.05) when compared to the C. angulata. Furthermore, shell OMP separated on 1DE gels were processed using Triple TOF5600 mass spectrometry and 42 proteins of C. hongkongensis and 37 of C. angulata identified. A Circos based comparative analysis of the shell proteins of both oyster species were prepared against the shell proteome of other shell forming gastropods and molluscs to study the evolutionary conservation of OMP and their function. This comparative proteomics expanded our understating of the molecular mechanism behind the shells having different hardness and mechanical properties. PMID:28246460

  13. Neuroproteomic profiling of human brain tissue using multidimensional separation techniques and selective enrichment of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Musunuri, Sravani; Shevchenko, Ganna; Bergquist, Jonas

    2012-12-01

    Hydrophobic membrane proteins (MPs) occupy a unique niche in the brain proteome research due to their important physiological roles. Therefore, the extraction, separation, and identification of MPs are of great interest in proteomic analysis. We applied various proteomic techniques to enrich, separate, and analyze the human brain proteome, including membrane proteome. Temperature-induced phase fractionation with the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was used to simultaneously extract, separate, and concentrate low abundant hydrophobic and high abundant hydrophilic proteins from human brain tissue. The extracted and delipidated proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Approximately 600 spots were detected in the gels. In-solution digestion was performed on 3 kDa spin filters. Tryptic peptides were separated using RP nano-LC and analyzed using two different high performance mass spectrometers, linear ion trap-Fourier transform and a linear ion trap-Orbitrap to reveal the low abundant MPs. In total, 837 and 780 unique proteins were identified by using linear ion trap-Fourier transform and linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, respectively. More than 29% of the identified proteins were classified as MPs with significant biological functions such as ion channels and transporters. Our study establishes a simple and rapid shotgun approach for the characterization of the brain proteome, and allows comprehensive analysis of brain membrane proteomes.

  14. Global cooling: cold acclimation and the expression of soluble proteins in carp skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McLean, Lynn; Young, Iain S; Doherty, Mary K; Robertson, Duncan H L; Cossins, Andrew R; Gracey, Andrew Y; Beynon, Robert J; Whitfield, Phillip D

    2007-08-01

    The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has a well-developed capacity to modify muscle properties in response to changes in temperature. Understanding the mechanisms underpinning this phenotypic response at the protein level may provide fundamental insights into the molecular basis of adaptive processes in skeletal muscle. In this study, common carp were subjected to a cooling regimen and soluble extracts of muscle homogenates were separated by 1-D SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS and de novo peptide sequencing using LC-MS/MS. The 2-D gel was populated with numerous protein spots that were fragments of all three muscle isoforms (M1, M2 and M3) of carp creatine kinase (CK). The accumulation of the CK fragments was enhanced when the carp were cooled to 10 degrees C. The protein changes observed in the skeletal muscle of carp subjected to cold acclimation were compared to changes described in a previous transcript analysis study. Genes encoding CK isoforms were downregulated and the genes encoding key proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were upregulated. These findings are consistent with a specific cold-induced enhancement of proteolysis of CK.

  15. Humoral immune response of the small-spotted catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Kathryn; Smith, Lauren E; Williams, Rebecca; Cao, Wei; Lee, Mike; Jensen, Allan; Dooley, Helen

    2013-05-01

    Cartilaginous fishes are the oldest group in which an adaptive immune system based on immunoglobulin-superfamily members is found. This manuscript compares humoral immune function in small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) with that described for spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias), another member of the Squalomorphi superorder, and nurse shark, the model for humoral immunity in elasmobranchs and a member of the Galeomorphi superorder. Although small-spotted catshark and nurse shark are separated by over 200 million years we found that immunoglobulin isoforms are well conserved between the two species. However, the plasma protein profile of small-spotted catshark was most similar to that of spiny dogfish, with low levels of pentameric IgM, and IgNAR present as a multimer in plasma rather than a monomer. We show that an antigen-specific monomeric IgM response, with a profile similar to that described previously for nurse sharks, can be raised in small-spotted catshark. Lacking polyclonal or monoclonal antibody reagents for detecting catshark IgNAR we investigated phage-display and recombinant Fc-fusion protein expression as alternative methods to look for an antigen-specific response for this isotype. However, we could find no evidence of an antigen-specific IgNAR in the animals tested using either of these techniques. Thus, unlike nurse sharks where antigen-specific monomeric IgM and IgNAR appear together, it seems there may be a temporal or complete 'uncoupling' of these isotypes during a humoral response in the small-spotted catshark.

  16. Prevalence of antibodies to spotted fever group rickettsiae along the eastern coast of the Adriatic sea.

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, S; Walker, D H; Weiss, K; Dzelalija, B; Morovic, M

    1993-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey in coastal Croatia detected antibodies reactive with Rickettsia conorii in 4.2% of sera by immunofluorescence assay and in 5.0% of sera by enzyme immunoassay. Western immunoblotting demonstrated antibodies to the 120-kDa surface protein in all 20 positive serum samples examined and to rickettsial lipopolysaccharide in 3 of these serum samples. Humans in this area are clearly being exposed to spotted fever rickettsiae. PMID:8370756

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring of everolimus using the dried blood spot method in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, J; de Beer, Y; Hoogtanders, K; Christiaans, M; de Jong, G J; Neef, C; Stolk, L

    2009-11-01

    An assay of everolimus based on finger prick sampling and consecutive application as a blood spot on sampling paper has been developed. We explored several methods [K. Hoogtanders, J. van der Heijden, M. Christiaans, P. Edelbroek, J. van Hooff, L. Stolk, J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 44 (2006) 658-664; A. Allanson, M. Cotton, J. Tettey, et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 44 (2007) 963-969] and developed a new method, namely the impregnation of sampling paper with a solution of plasma-protein, formic acid and ammonium acetate, in combination with the extraction of the blood spot by filter filtration. This kind of sample preparation provides new possibilities for blood spot sampling especially if analytes are adsorbed to the paper. The dried blood spot was analysed using the HPLC-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry method, with 32-desmethoxyrapamycin as the internal standard. The working range of our study was 2-30 microg/l. Within this range, intra-and inter-assay variability for precision and accuracy was <15%. Everolimus blood spot samples proved stable for 3 days at 60 degrees C and for 32 days at 4 degrees C. Everolimus concentrations of one stable out-patient were compared after both blood spot sampling and conventional venous sampling on various occasions. Results indicate that this new method is promising for therapeutic drug monitoring in stable renal transplant patients.