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Sample records for 2-dimensional electron gas

  1. Role of surface defects on the formation of the 2-dimensional electron gas at polar interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artacho, Emilio; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between two insulators, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, has fuelled a great research activity on this and similar systems in the last years. The electronic reconstruction model, typically invoked to explain the formation of the 2DEG, while being intuitive and successful on predicting fundamental aspects of this phenomenon like the critical thickness of LaAlO3, fails to explain many other experimental observations. Oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, are known to dramatically affect the physical behaviour of this system, but their role at the atomic level is far from well understood. Here we perform ab initio simulations in order to assess whether the formation of oxygen vacancies at the surface of the polar material can account for various recent experimental results that defy the current theoretical understanding of these interfaces. We simulate SrTiO3/LaAlO3 slabs with various concentrations of surface oxygen vacancies and analyze the role of the defects on the formation of the metallic interface, their electrostatic coupling with the 2DEG and the interplay with the different instabilities of the materials involved. Financial support from Spanish MINECO under grant FIS2012-37549-C05-01. Computational resources provided by the Red Espñola de Supercomputación and DIPC.

  2. Origin of fine oscillations in the photoluminescence spectrum of 2-dimensional electron gas formed in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Porwal, S.; Jain, Anubha; Oak, S. M.; Sharma, T. K.

    2015-10-01

    An unambiguous identification of the fine oscillations observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures is carried out. In literature, such oscillations have been erroneously identified as the sub-levels of 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Here, the origin of these oscillations is probed by performing the angle dependent PL and reflectivity measurements under identical conditions. Contrary to the reports available in literature, we find that the fine oscillations are not related to 2DEG sub-levels. The optical characteristics of these oscillations are mainly governed by an interference phenomenon. In particular, peculiar temperature dependent redshift and excitation intensity dependent blueshift, which have been interpreted as the characteristics of 2DEG sub-levels in HEMT structures by other researchers, are understood by invoking the wavelength and temperature dependence of the refractive index of GaN within the framework of interference phenomenon. The results of other researchers are also consistently explained by considering the fine oscillatory features as the interference oscillations.

  3. Origin of fine oscillations in the photoluminescence spectrum of 2-dimensional electron gas formed in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Dipankar Porwal, S.; Oak, S. M.; Sharma, T. K.; Jain, Anubha

    2015-10-28

    An unambiguous identification of the fine oscillations observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures is carried out. In literature, such oscillations have been erroneously identified as the sub-levels of 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Here, the origin of these oscillations is probed by performing the angle dependent PL and reflectivity measurements under identical conditions. Contrary to the reports available in literature, we find that the fine oscillations are not related to 2DEG sub-levels. The optical characteristics of these oscillations are mainly governed by an interference phenomenon. In particular, peculiar temperature dependent redshift and excitation intensity dependent blueshift, which have been interpreted as the characteristics of 2DEG sub-levels in HEMT structures by other researchers, are understood by invoking the wavelength and temperature dependence of the refractive index of GaN within the framework of interference phenomenon. The results of other researchers are also consistently explained by considering the fine oscillatory features as the interference oscillations.

  4. 2 dimensional electron gas in chemically stable SrSnO3/KTaO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyukwoo; Park, Chulkwon; Char, Kookrin; Materials and Devices Physics Lab. Team

    2013-03-01

    Recent 2DEGs are mostly formed at the interface of LaAlO3/SrTiO3(LAO/STO) system, which is explained by the polar catastrophe mechanism. Because of large propensity of oxygen vacancy formation in SrTiO3, there remains a possibility that the origin of 2DEG of LAO/STO system may stem from extra charge of oxygen vacancy of SrTiO3, not from the polar layer of LaAlO3. In this presentation, we report the realization of 2DEG at the interface of SrSnO3/KTaO3(SSO/KTO), which is chemically stable due to extremely stable oxygen stoichiometry. This SrSnO3/KTaO3 heterosturcture was epitaxially grown by puled laser deposition and the interface was found atomically matched by transmission electron microscope and reciprocal space mapping. We measured the magnetic property of SSO/KTO heterostructure and acquired a large ferromagnetic signal, which is unchanged in the temperature range of 4 ~300 K by SQUID magnetometer measurement. As SrSnO3 and KTaO3 are non-magnetic materials, this ferromagnetic signal may result from 2DEG at the interface of SSO/KTO. We hope our results can shed lights on the exact mechanism of 2DEGs that are formed at oxide interfaces.

  5. Impedance-based interpretations in 2-dimensional electron gas conduction formed in the LaAlO3/SrxCa1-xTiO3/SrTiO3 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Rok; Moon, Seon Young; Park, Da-Hee; Kim, Shin-Ik; Kim, Seong-Keun; Kang, Chong-Yun; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Choi, Jung-Hae; Kim, Jin-Sang; Choi, Eunsoo; Hwang, Jin-Ha

    2016-06-01

    Frequency-dependent impedance spectroscopy was applied to the 2-dimensioanl conduction transport in the LaAlO3/SrxCa1-xTiO3/SrTiO3 system. The 2-dimensional conduction modifies the electrical/dielectric responses of the LaAlO3/SrxCa1-xTiO3/SrTiO3 depending on the magnitude of the interfacial 2-dimensional resistance. The high conduction of the 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) layer can be described using a metallic resistor in series with two parallel RC circuits. However, the high resistance of the 2-dimensional layer drives the composite system from a finite low resistor in parallel with the surrounding dielectrics composed of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 materials to a dielectric capacitor. This change in the resistance of the 2-dimensional layers modifies the overall impedance enabled by the presence of the interfacial layer due to SrxCa1-xTiO3, which alters the charge transport of the 2-dimensional layer from metallic to semiconducting conduction. A noticeable change is observed in the capacitance Bode plots, indicating highly amplified dielectric constants compared with the pristine SrTiO3 substrates and SrxCa1-xTiO3 with a greater Ca content.

  6. Fully Automated Portable Comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Zhou, Menglian; Zhu, Hongbo; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-10-06

    We developed a fully automated portable 2-dimensional (2-D) gas chromatography (GC x GC) device, which had a dimension of 60 cm × 50 cm × 10 cm and weight less than 5 kg. The device incorporated a micropreconcentrator/injector, commercial columns, micro-Deans switches, microthermal injectors, microphotoionization detectors, data acquisition cards, and power supplies, as well as computer control and user interface. It employed multiple channels (4 channels) in the second dimension ((2)D) to increase the (2)D separation time (up to 32 s) and hence (2)D peak capacity. In addition, a nondestructive flow-through vapor detector was installed at the end of the (1)D column to monitor the eluent from (1)D and assist in reconstructing (1)D elution peaks. With the information obtained jointly from the (1)D and (2)D detectors, (1)D elution peaks could be reconstructed with significantly improved (1)D resolution. In this Article, we first discuss the details of the system operating principle and the algorithm to reconstruct (1)D elution peaks, followed by the description and characterization of each component. Finally, 2-D separation of 50 analytes, including alkane (C6-C12), alkene, alcohol, aldehyde, ketone, cycloalkane, and aromatic hydrocarbon, in 14 min is demonstrated, showing the peak capacity of 430-530 and the peak capacity production of 40-80/min.

  7. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO{sub 3} embedded in GdTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Fadley, C. S.; Cho, S.; Rault, J. E.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M.-C.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Stemmer, S.; Balents, L.; Schneider, C. M.

    2015-12-07

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO{sub 3} (GTO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}, with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggested is the critical thickness for 2DEG formation. We have studied these with Ti-resonant angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission and find that the spectral feature in the spectra associated with the 2DEG is present in the 1.5 unit cell sample, but not in the 1.0 unit cell sample. We also observe through core-level spectra additional states in Ti and Sr, with the strength of a low-binding-energy state for Sr being associated with the appearance of the 2DEG, and we suggest it to have an origin in final-state core-hole screening.

  8. The work function of a 2-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groshev, Atanas; Scho¨n, Gerd

    1994-02-01

    A single-parameter model for flat-band heterojunctions is discussed. It is 2DEG-analog of the well studied jellium model of metal surfaces. We use effective potential with an image tail, which arises due to the screening by the free carriers in the 2DEG. The work function Φ 2 DEG of the 2DEG, is calculated (for GaAs Φ 2DEG≈1.5-2meV.

  9. Uniform quantized electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Lomba, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    In this work we study the correlation energy of the quantized electron gas of uniform density at temperature T  =  0. To do so we utilize methods from classical statistical mechanics. The basis for this is the Feynman path integral for the partition function of quantized systems. With this representation the quantum mechanical problem can be interpreted as, and is equivalent to, a classical polymer problem in four dimensions where the fourth dimension is imaginary time. Thus methods, results, and properties obtained in the statistical mechanics of classical fluids can be utilized. From this viewpoint we recover the well known RPA (random phase approximation). Then to improve it we modify the RPA by requiring the corresponding correlation function to be such that electrons with equal spins can not be on the same position. Numerical evaluations are compared with well known results of a standard parameterization of Monte Carlo correlation energies.

  10. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas.

  11. Intra- and Intersubject Whole Blood/Plasma Cannabinoid Ratios Determined by 2-Dimensional, Electron Impact GC-MS with Cryofocusing

    PubMed Central

    Schwilke, Eugene W.; Karschner, Erin L.; Lowe, Ross H.; Gordon, Ann M.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Herning, Ronald I.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Whole-blood concentrations of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC(THCCOOH)are approximately half of those in plasma due to high plasma protein binding and poor cannabinoid distribution into erythrocytes. Whole blood is frequently the only specimen available in forensic investigations; controlled cannabinoid administration studies provide scientific data for interpretation of cannabinoid tests but usually report plasma concentrations. Whole-blood/plasma cannabinoid ratios from simultaneously collected authentic specimens are rarely reported. METHODS We collected whole blood for 7 days from 32 individuals residing on a closed research unit. Part of the whole blood was processed to obtain plasma, and the whole blood and plasma were stored at −20°C until analysis by validated 2-dimensional GC-MS methods. RESULTS We measured whole-blood/plasma cannabinoid ratios in 187 specimen pairs. Median (interquartile range) whole-blood/plasma ratios were 0.39 (0.28–0.48) for THC (n = 75), 0.56 (0.43–0.73) for 11-OH-THC (n = 17), and 0.37 (0.24–0.56) for THCCOOH (n = 187). Intrasubject variability was determined for the first time: 18.1%–56.6% CV (THC) and 10.8%–38.2% CV (THCCOOH). The mean whole-blood/plasma THC ratio was significantly lower than the THCCOOH ratio (P = 0.0001; 4 participants’ mean THCCOOH ratios were >0.8). CONCLUSION Intra- and intersubject whole-blood/plasma THC and THCCOOH ratios will aid interpretation of whole-blood cannabinoid data. PMID:19264857

  12. Factors affecting variations in the detailed fatty acid profile of Mediterranean buffalo milk determined by 2-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pegolo, S; Stocco, G; Mele, M; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-04-01

    Buffalo milk is the world's second most widely produced milk, and increasing attention is being paid to its composition, particularly the fatty acid profile. The objectives of the present study were (1) to characterize the fatty acid composition of Mediterranean buffalo milk, and (2) to investigate potential sources of variation in the buffalo milk fatty acid profile. We determined the profile of 69 fatty acid traits in 272 individual samples of Mediterranean buffalo milk using gas chromatography. In total, 51 individual fatty acids were identified: 24 saturated fatty acids, 13 monounsaturated fatty acids, and 14 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The major individual fatty acids in buffalo milk were in the order 16:0, 18:1 cis-9, 14:0, and 18:0. Saturated fatty acids were the predominant fraction in buffalo milk fat (70.49%); monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were at 25.95 and 3.54%, respectively. Adopting a classification based on carbon-chain length, we found that medium-chain fatty acids (11-16 carbons) represented the greater part (53.7%) of the fatty acid fraction of buffalo milk, whereas long-chain fatty acids (17-24 carbons) and short-chain fatty acids (4-10 carbons) accounted for 32.73 and 9.72%, respectively. The n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were 0.46 and 1.77%, respectively. The main conjugated linoleic acid, rumenic acid, represented 0.45% of total milk fatty acids. Herd/test date and stage of lactation were confirmed as important sources of variation in the fatty acid profile of buffalo milk. The percentages of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids in buffalo milk increased in early lactation (+0.6 and +3.5%, respectively), whereas long-chain fatty acids decreased (-4.2%). The only exception to this pattern was butyric acid, which linearly decreased from the beginning of lactation, confirmation that its synthesis is independent of malonyl-CoA. These results seem to suggest that in early lactation the mobilization of energy reserves may have less

  13. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  14. An Electronically Timed Gas Viscometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramwell, Fitzgerald B.; Bramwell, Fitzgerald

    1982-01-01

    Describes modification of a gas viscometer to produce a low cost instrument with high precision and safe design. Three tungsten electrodes are mounted in the viscometer using graded glass seals and a ball trap is inserted between mercury reservoir and all external stopcocks. Also describes modifications in experimental procedures. (Author/JN)

  15. Femtosecond gas phase electron diffraction with MeV electrons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Wang, Xijie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-12-16

    We present results on ultrafast gas electron diffraction (UGED) experiments with femtosecond resolution using the MeV electron gun at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. UGED is a promising method to investigate molecular dynamics in the gas phase because electron pulses can probe the structure with a high spatial resolution. Until recently, however, it was not possible for UGED to reach the relevant timescale for the motion of the nuclei during a molecular reaction. Using MeV electron pulses has allowed us to overcome the main challenges in reaching femtosecond resolution, namely delivering short electron pulses on a gas target, overcoming the effect of velocity mismatch between pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, and maintaining a low timing jitter. At electron kinetic energies above 3 MeV, the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses becomes negligible. The relativistic electrons are also less susceptible to temporal broadening due to the Coulomb force. One of the challenges of diffraction with relativistic electrons is that the small de Broglie wavelength results in very small diffraction angles. In this paper we describe the new setup and its characterization, including capturing static diffraction patterns of molecules in the gas phase, finding time-zero with sub-picosecond accuracy and first time-resolved diffraction experiments. The new device can achieve a temporal resolution of 100 fs root-mean-square, and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. The collimation of the beam is sufficient to measure the diffraction pattern, and the transverse coherence is on the order of 2 nm. Currently, the temporal resolution is limited both by the pulse duration of the electron pulse on target and by the timing jitter, while the spatial resolution is limited by the average electron beam current and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection system. We also discuss plans for improving both the temporal resolution and the spatial resolution.

  16. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  17. Electronic visualization of gas bearing behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. C.; Klassen, H. A.; Wong, R. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Visualization technique produces a visual simulation of gas bearing operation by electronically combining the outputs from the clearance probes used to monitor bearing component motion. Computerized recordings of the probes output are processed, displayed on an oscilloscope screen and recorded with a high-speed motion picture camera.

  18. Electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    An electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detector (EGGSRAD) useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems is described. The radiation detector employs doping of the semiconductor and variation of the semiconductor detector material to form a two-dimensional electron gas, and to allow transistor action within the detector. This radiation detector provides superior energy resolution and radiation detection sensitivity over the conventional semiconductor radiation detector and the "electron-only" semiconductor radiation detectors which utilize a grid electrode near the anode. In a first embodiment, the EGGSRAD incorporates delta-doped layers adjacent the anode which produce an internal free electron grid well to which an external grid electrode can be attached. In a second embodiment, a quantum well is formed between two of the delta-doped layers, and the quantum well forms the internal free electron gas grid to which an external grid electrode can be attached. Two other embodiments which are similar to the first and second embodiment involve a graded bandgap formed by changing the composition of the semiconductor material near the first and last of the delta-doped layers to increase or decrease the conduction band energy adjacent to the delta-doped layers.

  19. Quantitative electron and gas cloud experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Sharp, W. M.; Baca, David; Bieniosek, F. M.; Leister, C.; Seidl, P. A.; Vay, J.-L.

    2007-07-01

    Electrons can accumulate in and degrade the quality of positively charged beams. This is a well-known problem in proton storage rings. Heavy-ion rings are more frequently limited by gas pressure-rise effects. Both effects may limit how closely the beam radius can approach the beam-tube radius in a heavy-ion linac. We study beams of 1 MeV K + with currents of up to 180 mA in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), and compare our work with simulations. The theory and simulation results are discussed in a companion papers. We have developed the first diagnostics that quantitatively measure the accumulation of electrons in a beam [M. Kireeff Covo, A. Molvik, A. Friedman, J.-L. Vay, P. Seidl, G. Logan, D. Baca, J.L. Vujic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 054801; M. Kireeff Covo, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, 2007, in press, doi:10.1016/j.nima.2007.02.045.]. This will enable the particle balance to be measured for each source of electrons in a linac: ionization of gas, emission from walls surrounding the beam, and emission from an end wall coupled with electron drifts upstream through quadrupole magnets, and electron-trapping efficiencies can be determined. Experiments where the heavy-ion beam is transported with solenoid magnetic fields, rather than with quadrupole magnetic or electrostatic fields, are being initiated. We discuss plans for experiments using electrode sets (in the middle and at the ends of magnets) to either expel or to trap electrons within the magnets. We observe oscillations of the electron density and position in the last quadrupole magnet when we flood the beam with electrons from an end wall. These oscillations, near 6 MHz, are observed to grow from the center of the magnet while drifting upstream against the beam, in good agreement with simulations.

  20. Gas Electron Multiplier Tracking Telescopes for OLYMPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Joshua; Campbell, Miles

    2011-10-01

    The OLYMPUS collaboration is conducting an experiment to measure two-photon contributions to elastic electron scattering. The experiment is taking place at the DORIS storage ring at DESY, Hamburg, Germany using the upgraded BLAST detector from the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) telescopes are used to detect scattered leptons at a forward angle to monitor the luminosity. The GEM detectors have been commissioned at the test facility at DESY and were installed along with the main detector in the DORIS storage ring. With the testbeam the performance characteristics such as gain, efficiency, multiplicity, and resolution of the GEMs were studied.

  1. A Tunable Terahertz Detector based on Self-Assembled Plasmonic Structure on a GaAs 2-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, Anandrao Shesherao

    The presented work in this report is about Real time Estimation of wind and analyzing current wind correction algorithm in commercial off the shelf Autopilot board. The open source ArduPilot Mega 2.5 (APM 2.5) board manufactured by 3D Robotics is used. Currently there is lot of development being done in the field of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAVs), various aerial platforms and corresponding; autonomous systems for them. This technology has advanced to such a stage that UAVs can be used for specific designed missions and deployed with reliability. But in some areas like missions requiring high maneuverability with greater efficiency is still under research area. This would help in increasing reliability and augmenting range of UAVs significantly. One of the problems addressed through this thesis work is, current autopilot systems have algorithm that handles wind by attitude correction with appropriate Crab angle. But the real time wind vector (direction) and its calculated velocity is based on geometrical and algebraic transformation between ground speed and air speed vectors. This method of wind estimation and prediction, many a times leads to inaccuracy in attitude correction. The same has been proved in the following report with simulation and actual field testing. In later part, new ways to tackle while flying windy conditions have been proposed.

  2. Theory of the classical electron gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guernsey, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    In a previous paper Cohen and Murphy (1969) used the Meeron resummation (1958) of the Mayer diagrams (1950) to calculate the pair correlation for the classical electron gas in thermal equilibrium. They found that successive terms in the expression for the pair correlation were more and more singular for small interparticle spacing, actually dominating the Debye-Hueckel result for sufficiently small distances. This led to apparent divergence in the higher order contributions to the internal energy. The present paper shows that the apparent anomalies in the Cohen-Murphy results can be removed without further resummation by a more careful treatment of the region of small interparticle spacing. It is shown that there is really no anomalous behavior at short range in any order and all integrals in the expression for the internal energy converge.

  3. Heat diffusion in the disordered electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiete, G.; Finkel'stein, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    We study the thermal conductivity of the disordered two-dimensional electron gas. To this end, we analyze the heat density-heat density correlation function concentrating on the scattering processes induced by the Coulomb interaction in the subtemperature energy range. These scattering processes are at the origin of logarithmic corrections violating the Wiedemann-Franz law. Special care is devoted to the definition of the heat density in the presence of the long-range Coulomb interaction. To clarify the structure of the correlation function, we present details of a perturbative calculation. While the conservation of energy strongly constrains the general form of the heat density-heat density correlation function, the balance of various terms turns out to be rather different from that for the correlation functions of other conserved quantities such as the density-density or spin density-spin density correlation function.

  4. Gain of a single gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is a gaseous detector used in particle detection and is known for its high rate capability. Ever since its invention in 1997, GEM was applied in many areas and recently has been proposed to be installed in the CMS high η regions for upgrade at LHC, CERN. A complete understanding of the working and gain behaviour does not exist. GEM gain is influenced by charging up and this has been variedly interpreted in literature lacking consensus. I have attempted in this work through simulations and measurements to achieve a better understanding of single GEM gain and how it is affected by various factors. Specific experimental methods which evolved with subsequent measurements were employed to systematically study the charging up effect. Information from simulations was applied to characterize measurements thereby enabling the development of a model for charging up. Conductivity mechanism of the dielectric used in GEM was analyzed and the resistivity measured. Gain free of charging up effects was measured and this is appropriate for comparison with simulations.

  5. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  6. Two dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicka, Karolina

    2011-12-01

    Extraordinary phenomena can occur at the interface between two oxide materials. A spectacular example is a formation of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface. In this dissertation the properties of the 2DEG are investigated from first principles. The spatial extent of the 2DEG formed at the SrTiO3/LaAlO 3 n-type interface is studied. It is shown that the confinement of the 2DEG is controlled by metal induced gap states formed in the band gap of SrTiO 3. The confinement width is then determined by the attenuation length of the metal induced gap states into SrTiO3 which is governed by the lowest decay rate evanescent states of bulk SrTiO3 which in turn can be found from the complex band structure of bulk SrTiO3. Magnetic properties of the 2DEG formed at the n-type interface of the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices are investigated. It is found that for a thin SrTiO3 film the interface is ferromagnetic but for a thicker SrTiO3 film the magnetic moment decreases and eventually disappears. This is a result of delocalization of the 2DEG that spreads over thicker SrTiO3 film which leads to violation of the Stoner criterion. Further, it is shown that inclusion of the Hubbard U interaction enhances the Stoner parameter and stabilizes the magnetism. The effect of the 2DEG and the polar interfaces for the thin film ferroelectricity is investigated using both first principles and model calculations. Using a TiO2-terminated BaTiO3 film with LaO monolayers at the two interfaces it is shown that the intrinsic electric field produced by the polar interface forces ionic displacements in BaTiO3 to produce the electric polarization directed into the interior of the BaTiO 3 layer. This creates a ferroelectric dead layer near the interfaces that is non-switchable and thus detrimental to ferroelectricity. It is found that the effect is stronger for a larger effective ionic charge at the interface and longer screening length due to a stronger intrinsic electric

  7. A high density two-dimensional electron gas in an oxide heterostructure on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, E. N.; Kornblum, L.; Kumah, D. P.; Zou, K.; Walker, F. J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Ngai, J. H.; Ahn, C. H.

    2014-11-01

    We present the growth and characterization of layered heterostructures comprised of LaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} epitaxially grown on Si (001). Magnetotransport measurements show that the sheet carrier densities of the heterostructures scale with the number of LaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces, consistent with the presence of an interfacial 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at each interface. Sheet carrier densities of 8.9 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} per interface are observed. Integration of such high density oxide 2DEGs on silicon provides a bridge between the exceptional properties and functionalities of oxide 2DEGs and microelectronic technologies.

  8. Importance of electronic state of two-dimensional electron gas for electron injection process in nano-electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraguchi, M.; Endoh, T.; Takada, Y.; Sakurai, Y.; Nomura, S.; Shiraishi, K.; Ikeda, M.; Makihara, K.; Miyazaki, S.; Shigeta, Y.

    2010-09-01

    We report the unexpected temperature dependence of electron tunneling from the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) to the Si-dot in a Si-dots floating gate metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor. We indicate that this temperature dependence of the electron tunneling cannot be explained by the conventional one-dimensional tunneling model, and show that it is necessary for a new model which includes the geometrical factor of the system. To extract a mechanism of the electron injection process from the 2DEG to the nano-structure, we have employed the numerical simulation, which includes both the geometrical condition of the system and the experimental setup. We suggest in our new tunneling model that the main contribution to the electron tunneling is induced by the wave-packet-like state of the electron below the Si-dots. We successfully show that the temperature dependence of the electron injection voltage in the Si-dots floating gate MOS capacitor fits our model. This indicates that the spatial distribution of electron density in the two-dimensional electron gas would play a crucial role in the electron tunneling.

  9. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  10. The use of 2-dimensional gas chromatography to investigate the effect of rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid, breed, and lactation stage on the fatty acid profile of sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Pellattiero, E; Cecchinato, A; Tagliapietra, F; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 2-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to obtain a detailed fatty acid (FA) profile of sheep milk and to evaluate the effects of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (rpCLA) supply, breed, days in milk (DIM), sampling period, and number of lambs suckling on the FA profile. Twenty-four ewes, from 3 autochthonous breeds of the Veneto Alps (Brogna, Foza, and Lamon), were housed in 6 pens (2 pens/breed), according to DIM (38 ± 23 d) and body weight (61 ± 13 kg). The ewes and their offspring of 3 pens (1 pen/breed) were fed ad libitum a total mixed ration (control), and the other animals received the same diet supplemented with 12 g/d per ewe, plus 4 g/d for each lamb older than 30 d, of an rpCLA mixture. The study lasted 63 d. Two composite milk samples for each ewe were prepared during the first and second months of the trial. The pooled milk samples were analyzed in duplicate for FA profile by 2-dimensional gas chromatography, which allowed us to obtain a detailed FA profile of sheep milk, with 170 different FA detected, including many that were present in small concentrations. The milk relative proportions of individual FA, groups of FA, or FA indices were analyzed by PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC), considering diet, breed, DIM, and sampling period as sources of variation. The random effect of animal was used to test diet, breed, and DIM, whereas the effects of period were tested on the residual. Breed had a small influence on milk FA profile, mainly on branched- and odd-chain FA. Within breed, animal repeatability for the relative proportions of milk FA was notable for almost all monounsaturated FA and for saturated FA with 14 to 19 carbon atoms, except C16:0, and less so for polyunsaturated FA. The inclusion of rpCLA (CLA cis-9,trans-11 and CLA trans-10,cis-12) increased the presence of the same CLA isomers in the milk as well as that of CLA trans-9,trans-11, and decreased the proportions of de novo

  11. New "wet type" electron beam flue gas treatment pilot plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Erdal; Ünal, Suat; Doğan, Alişan; Letournel, Eric; Pellizzari, Fabien

    2016-02-01

    We describe a new pilot plant for flue gas cleaning by a high energy electron beam. The special feature of this pilot plant is a uniquely designed reactor called VGS® (VIVIRAD Gas Scrubber, patent pending), that allows oxidation/reduction treating flue gas in a single step. The VGS® process combines a scrubber and an advanced oxidation/reduction process with the objective of optimizing efficiency and treatment costs of flue gas purification by electron accelerators. Promising treatment efficiency was achieved for SOx and NOx removal in early tests (99.2% and 80.9% respectively). The effects of various operational parameters on treatment performance and by-product content were investigated during this study.

  12. An electronic nose for quantitative determination of gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Grzegorz; Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    The practical application of human nose for fragrance recognition is severely limited by the fact that our sense of smell is subjective and gets tired easily. Consequently, there is considerable need for an instrument that can be a substitution of the human sense of smell. Electronic nose devices from the mid 1980s are used in growing number of applications. They comprise an array of several electrochemical gas sensors with partial specificity and a pattern recognition algorithms. Most of such systems, however, is only used for qualitative measurements. In this article usage of such system in quantitative determination of gas concentration is demonstrated. Electronic nose consist of a sensor array with eight commercially available Taguchi type gas sensor. Performance of three different pattern recognition algorithms is compared, namely artificial neural network, partial least squares regression and support vector machine regression. The electronic nose is used for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide concentration determination.

  13. Electronic fuel injection for gas engine/compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wertheimer, H.P.

    1998-12-31

    Conventional gas engine/compressors use cam operated fuel injectors. Fuel delivery to the engine is controlled by throttling the pressure to the fuel gas manifold that feeds the injectors. A mechanical or electronic governor regulates the position of the throttle. Power cylinder balance is adjusted with manual valves in the fuel feed pipes to each injector. This paper describes a recently introduced electronic fuel gas injection (EFGI{trademark}) system that modulates fuel delivery by controlling the open duration of the injectors. Balancing is achieved by electronically apportioning the pulses to the individual injectors. The camshaft, pushrods, rocker arms, cam followers, and balance valves, as well as the separate governor and throttle are not needed when EFGI is applied to two stroke engines. The system`s most striking feature is its ability to rebalance an engine in minutes. Emission reductions stem from balanced power cylinders, and optimized injection timing, which enhances fuel air mixing.

  14. Photogalvanic current in electron gas over a liquid helium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.

    2014-02-01

    We study the stationary surface photocurrent in 2D electron gas near the helium surface. Electron gas is assumed to be attracted to the helium surface due to the image attracting force and an external stationary electric field. The alternating electric field has both vertical and in-plane components. The photogalvanic effect originates from the periodic transitions of electrons between quantum subbands in the vertical direction caused by a normal component of the alternating electric field accompanied by synchronous in-plane acceleration/deceleration due to the electric field in-plane component. The effect needs vertical asymmetry of the system. The problem is considered taking into account a friction caused by the electron-ripplon interaction. The photocurrent resonantly depends on the field frequency. The resonance occurs at field frequencies close to the distance between well subbands. The resonance is symmetric or antisymmetric depending on the kind (linear or circular) of polarization.

  15. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  16. Two-dimensional electron gas magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, J.; Partin, D. L.; Morelli, D. T.; Fuller, B. K.; Thrush, C. M.

    1990-07-01

    We describe the use of accumulation layers of electron charge in applications as magnetoresistive devices. We consider two such systems: an InGaAs/InP heterostructure in which we identify a two-dimensional electron gas from the observation of the quantum Hall effect, and InAs films, in which a strong surface accumulation of charge is inferred from depth profiling studies of the galvanomagnetic coefficients. Magnetoresistive devices fabricated from these materials exhibit outstanding field sensitivity and temperature stability due to the existence of electrons of relatively high density and mobility in the accumulation regions. We also model the magnetosensitivity of our devices.

  17. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  18. Manifestations of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklja, Maija M.; Sharia, Onise; Tsyshevsky, Roman

    2017-03-01

    The existence of two-dimensional electron gas in molecular materials has not been reported or discussed. Intriguing properties of two-dimensional electron gas observed on interfaces of polar and nonpolar oxides spurred oxide electronics and advanced nanotechnology. Here we discover how an electrostatic instability occurs on polar surfaces of molecular crystals and explore its manifestations, chemical degradation of surfaces, charge separation, electrical conductivity, optical band-gap closure and surface metallization. A thin layer of polar surface of a dielectric molecular crystal becomes metallic due to interactions of polar molecules. Our findings are illustrated with two polymorphs of cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine crystals, the polar δ-phase and nonpolar β-phase. Our theory offers an explanation to a relative stability of the β-phase versus the explosive reactivity of δ-phase and to the experimentally observed difference in conductivity of these crystals. We predict that the electrostatic instability takes place on all polar molecular materials.

  19. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    Using the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, dissociative attachment coefficients [beta] for reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4], HRh(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] and carbonyl hydride complexes HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 5] have been determined under thermal conditions over the approximate temperature range 300[approximately]550 K. The superacids react relatively slowly (<1/20 of [beta][sub max]) with free electrons in a thermal plasma, and the values of [beta] obtained this far do not show a correlation between acidity and [beta]. The pioneer researchers in this field had speculated that any superacid would be a rapid attacher of electrons; it was found that this speculation is not true in general. The product distribution of electron attachment reaction to HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] was found to be independent of temperature even though the [beta][HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4

  20. Substitutionally doped phosphorene: electronic properties and gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvansinpan, Nawat; Hussain, Fayyaz; Zhang, Gang; Hsin Chiu, Cheng; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorene, a new elemental two-dimensional material, has attracted increasing attention owing to its intriguing electronic properties. In particular, pristine phospohorene, due to its ultrahigh surface-volume ratio and high chemical activity, has been shown to be promising for gas sensing (Abbas et al 2015 ACS Nano 9 5618). To further enhance its sensing ability, we perform first-principles calculations based on density functional theory to study substitutionally doped phosphorene with 17 different atoms, focusing on structures, energetics, electronic properties and gas sensing. Our calculations reveal that anionic X (X = O, C and S) dopants have a large binding energy and highly dispersive electronic states, signifying the formation of covalent X-P bonds and thus strong structural stability. Alkali atom (Li and Na) doping is found to donate most of the electrons in the outer s-orbital by forming ionic bonds with P, and the band gap decreases by pushing down the conduction band, suggesting that the optical and electronic properties of the doped phosphorene can be tailored. For doping with VIIIB-group (Fe, Co and Ni) elements, a strong affinity is predicted and the binding energy and charge transfer are correlated strongly with their electronegativity. By examining NO molecule adsorption, we find that these metal doped phosphorenes (MDPs) in general exhibit a significantly enhanced chemical activity compared with pristine phosphorene. Our study suggests that substitutionally doped phosphorene shows many intriguing electronic and optic properties different from pristine phosphorene and MDPs are promising in chemical applications involving molecular adsorption and desorption processes, such as materials growth, catalysis, gas sensing and storage.

  1. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  2. Superconductivity of the magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.

    2008-10-15

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is developed for the magnetized electron gas on a cylindrical surface. The Gibbs free energy is calculated for the superconducting system. A gap equation is derived that determines the critical temperature as a function of the quantum-cylinder dimensions and the Aharonov-Bohm parameter. It is shown that the gap not only exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, but also oscillates with varying curvature of the cylindrical surface.

  3. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palenskis, V.

    2014-04-15

    Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  4. Electron attachment to ? and ? in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Spanel, Patrik

    1996-11-01

    The fullerene molecule 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 is known to attach several electrons in the solid phase, but only recently has it been recognized that it can also attach electrons in the gas phase. The first electron - molecular beam results showed that 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 molecules non-dissociatively attached a single electron over the unusually wide electron energy range from near thermal to about 10 eV, but these studies were not able to provide either the magnitude of the cross sections or describe the low-energy attachment behaviour. But using our flowing afterglow - Langmuir probe (FALP) apparatus we have been able to determine the absolute attachment rate coefficients for both 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 over the electron temperature range 300 - 4500 K. These FALP experiments have shown that attachment to 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 at low electron energies (<1 eV) proceeds predominantly by p-wave electron capture, and that a centrifugal barrier of 0.26 eV is evident which was corroborated by subsequent theory. A similar situation is observed for attachment to 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 except that for this fullerene molecule there is evidence that at very low electron energies (< 0.05 eV) inefficient s-wave capture may also occur. These FALP data further indicate that at energies above about 0.3 eV extraordinarily efficient electron attachment occurs to both 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5, and when the mean thermal cross sections derived from these FALP data are used to normalize the crossed electron - molecular beam data at the common low energies accessible in both experiments, it is clear that electron attachment to these fullerene molecules is very efficient over a wide electron energy range from about 0.3 - 10 eV above which electron thermionic emission occurs from the hot 0953-4075/29/21/030/img12 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img13 nascent negative ions.

  5. Design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer with a thick gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Puddu, Silvia; Waker, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer (EMS) including a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) is presented. The THGEM was designed to easily be incorporated in an existing EMS to investigate the ability to detect tritium in air using a micropattern gas detector. The THGEM and a collection plate (anode) were installed and the appropriate circuitry was designed and connected to supply the required voltages to the THGEM-EMS. An alpha source (241Am) was used to generate electron-ion pairs within the gas-filled sensitive volume of the EMS. The electrons were used to investigate the THGEM-EMS response as a function of applied voltage to the THGEM and anode. The relative gas-gain and system resolution of the THGEM-EMS were measured at various applied voltage settings. It was observed a potential difference across the THGEM of +420 V and potential difference across the induction region of +150 V for this EMS setup resulted in the minimum voltage requirements to operate with a stable gain and system resolution. Furthermore, as expected, the gain is strongly affected not only by the potential difference across the THGEM, but also by the applied voltage to the anode and resulting potential difference between the THGEM and anode.

  6. Mean free path of a suddenly created fast electron moving in a degenerate electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, I.; Echenique, P. M.

    2012-03-01

    A lower bound on the mean free path (l) of a swift electron moving in a degenerate electron gas is calculated by implementing a standard theoretical framework for the collision rate, 1/τ, with a scattering amplitude characterized by the matrix element of a hole-screened interaction potential taken between plane-wave states. The instantaneous hole around a system's electron is considered at the Hartree-Fock level for the ground-state wave function of the degenerate electron gas. The real transitions in the many-body system are considered by following Galitskii's treatment on an almost perfect Fermi gas of neutral atomic constituents. The analytical results show minima both in τ and l, and they appear at (E/EF)≃4.6 and (E/EF)≃2.5, respectively, where E is the kinetic energy of the fast electron and EF is the Fermi energy of the host. Comparison with mean free path data obtained recently for Cu is made and a reasonable agreement is found.

  7. Transport properties in semiconductor-gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; (Yücel) Kurt, H.; Albarzanji, A. O.; Alekperov, S. D.; Salamov, B. G.

    2009-09-01

    Nonlinear electrical transport of semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detector in semiconductor-gas discharge IR image converter (SGDIC) are studied experimentally for a wide range of the gas pressures ( p = 28-55 Torr), interelectrode distances ( d = 445-525 μm) and inner electrode diameters ( D = 12-22 mm) of photocathode. The destabilization of homogeneous state observed in a planar dc-driven structure is due to nonlinear transport properties of GaAs photocathode. Experimental investigation of electrical instability in SGDIC structure was analyzed using hysteresis, N-shaped negative differential conductivity (NDC) current voltage characteristics (CVC) and dynamic behavior of current in a wide range of feeding voltage ( U = 590-1000 V) under different IR light intensities incident on cathode material. It is established that hysteresis are related to electron capture and emission from EL2 deep center on the detector substrate. We have experimentally investigated domain velocity and electron mobility based on well-understood transferred electron effect (TEE) for abovementioned nonlinear electrical characteristics of SI GaAs. The experimental findings are in good agreement with estimated results reported by other independent authors.

  8. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  9. Electron-beam synthesis of fuel in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Holodkova, E. M.; Ershov, B. G.

    2012-09-01

    Electron-beam synthesis of liquid fuel from gaseous alkanes was upgraded for formation of conventional and alternative fuel from biomass or pyrolysis oil. Bio-feedstock conversion algorithm includes two consecutive stages: (1) initial macromolecules' transformation to low-molecular-weight intermediates; (2) transformation of these intermediates to stable fuel in gaseous alkanes' atmosphere. Radicals originated from alkanes participate in alkylation/hydrogenation of biomass intermediates. Chemical fixation of gaseous alkanes is amplified in the presence of biomass derivatives due to suppression of gas regeneration reactions, higher molar mass of reagents and lower volatility of radiolytic intermediates.

  10. Dirac Fermions in a Nanopatterned Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol-Hwan

    2013-03-01

    If a lateral periodic potential with triangular (or honeycomb) lattice symmetry is applied to a conventional two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), the charge carriers behave like massless Dirac ferions. A very interesting and useful point of these newly-generated massless Dirac fermions is that, unlike the case of graphene, their properties can be tuned through the external periodic potential. In this presentation, I will review the electronic properties of those newly-generated massless Dirac fermions in an artificial 2DEG superlattice system and will discuss how the elecctronic structure of those massless Dirac fermions changes depending on the external periodic potential. This work was partly supported by Research Settlement Fund for the new faculty of SNU.

  11. Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-05-26

    The advent of bottom-up atomic manipulation heralded a new horizon for attainable information density, as it allowed a bit of information to be represented by a single atom. The discrete spacing between atoms in condensed matter has thus set a rigid limit on the maximum possible information density. While modern technologies are still far from this scale, all theoretical downscaling of devices terminates at this spatial limit. Here, however, we break this barrier with electronic quantum encoding scaled to subatomic densities. We use atomic manipulation to first construct open nanostructures - 'molecular holograms' - which in turn concentrate information into a medium free of lattice constraints: the quantum states of a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The information embedded in the holograms is transcoded at even smaller length scales into an atomically uniform area of a copper surface, where it is densely projected into both two spatial degrees of freedom and a third holographic dimension mapped to energy. In analogy to optical volume holography, this requires precise amplitude and phase engineering of electron wavefunctions to assemble pages of information volumetrically. This data is read out by mapping the energy-resolved electron density of states with a scanning tunnelling microscope. As the projection and readout are both extremely near-field, and because we use native quantum states rather than an external beam, we are not limited by lensing or collimation and can create electronically projected objects with features as small as {approx}0.3 nm. These techniques reach unprecedented densities exceeding 20 bits/nm{sup 2} and place tens of bits into a single fermionic state.

  12. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  13. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in xenon gas

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo model for studying the local degradation of electrons in the energy range 9–10 000 eV in xenon gas. Analytically fitted form of electron impact cross sections for elastic and various inelastic processes are fed as input data to the model. The two-dimensional numerical yield spectrum (NYS), which gives information on the number of energy loss events occurring in a particular energy interval, is obtained as the output of the model. The NYS is fitted analytically, thus obtaining the analytical yield spectrum (AYS). The AYS can be used to calculate electron fluxes, which can be further employed for the calculation of volume production rates. Using the yield spectrum, mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of inelastic processes are calculated. The value for mean energy per ion pair for Xe is 22 eV at 10 keV. Ionization dominates for incident energies greater than 50 eV and is found to have an efficiency of approximately 65% at 10 keV. The efficiency for the excitation process is approximately 30% at 10 keV. PMID:27118913

  14. Gas-phase Electronic Spectra of Coronene and Corannulene Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, Corey A.; Maier, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase electronic spectra of the coronene ({{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+) and corannulene ({{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+) cations complexed with helium have been recorded in a quadrupole ion trap at 5 K by photodissociation. The electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+ with two helium atoms was also measured to estimate the perturbation. This method is sufficient for an astronomical comparison because the shift due to the weakly bound helium is on the order of 0.2 Å. {{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+{--}{He} has the origin band of the {{{A}}}2{{{E}}}1g≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u transition at 9438.3 Å and that to a much higher state {{{D}}}3≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u at 4570 Å. The corannulene cation is subject to a Jahn–Teller distortion in the electronic ground state, leading to the {3}2{{A}}\\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime and {3}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime transitions with origin band maxima when complexed with helium at 5996.1 and 5882.6 Å. These absorptions lie in a region where there is a congestion of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). However, the recorded features have no match with astronomical observations, removing coronene and corannulene cations and probably other aromatic hydrocarbons of this size as possible carriers of the DIBs.

  15. Memory effect in semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; Kurt, H.; Salamov, B. G. Yücel

    2008-11-01

    The memory effect in the planar semiconductor gas discharge system at different pressures (15-760 Torr) and interelectrode distances (60-445 µm) was experimentally studied. The study was performed on the basis of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) measurements with a time lag of several hours of afterglow periods. The influence of the active space charge remaining from the previous discharge on the breakdown voltage (UB) has been analysed using the CVC method for different conductivities of semiconductor GaAs photocathode. CVC showed that even a measurement taken 96 h after the first breakdown was influenced by accumulated active particles deposited from the previous discharge. Such phenomena based on metastable atoms surviving from the previous discharge and recombined on the cathode to create initial electrons in the avalanche mechanism are shown to be fully consistent with CVC data for both pre-breakdown and post-breakdown regions. However, in the post-breakdown region pronounced negative differential conductivity was observed. Such nonlinear electrical property of GaAs is attributed to the existence of deep electronic defect called EL2 in the semiconductor cathode material. On the other hand, the CVC data for subsequent dates present a correlation of memory effect and hysteresis behaviour. The explanation for such a relation is based on the influence of long lived active charges on the electronic transport mechanism of semiconductor material.

  16. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  17. A Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, C. C.; McMahan, M.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Johnson, M.

    2008-10-01

    We have built a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector for detection of fast neutrons at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The detector consists of a 0.0625 inch thick polypropylene neutron converter, three GEM foils and a grid of 16 readout pads on a printed circuit board. In this talk, we present images of the GEM detector, the results of tests with ^60Co, AmBe sources and our neutron beam, and a comparison between the proposed fast neutron GEM detector and a fast neutron ^238U fission chamber we purchased. One of the advantages of the GEM detector over the fission chamber is the fact that it provides the x-y position information of the neutrons.

  18. Development of a thick gas electron multiplier for microdosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, G. M.; Chin, K.; Prestwich, W. V.; Waker, A. J.; Byun, S. H.

    2011-05-01

    A new tissue-equivalent proportional counter based on a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) was developed and tested for microdosimetry. A systematic test was conducted at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the overall performance of the prototype detector. A mixed neutron-gamma-ray radiation field was generated using the 7Li(p,n) reaction. The detector was operated at low voltage initially to test the stability and then the relative multiplication gain was measured as a function of the operating high voltage. A drift potential of 100 V and a THGEM bias of 727 V generated a multiplication gain sufficient for the detection of both neutron and gamma-ray radiation. A consistent microdosimetric pattern was observed between the THGEM detector and standard TEPC for microdosimetry.

  19. A ballistic two-dimensional-electron-gas Andreev interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Amado, M. Fornieri, A.; Sorba, L.; Giazotto, F.; Biasiol, G.

    2014-06-16

    We report the realization and investigation of a ballistic Andreev interferometer based on an InAs two dimensional electron gas coupled to a superconducting Nb loop. We observe strong magnetic modulations in the voltage drop across the device due to quasiparticle interference within the weak-link. The interferometer exhibits flux noise down to ∼80 μΦ{sub 0}/√(Hz) and a robust behavior in temperature with voltage oscillations surviving up to ∼7 K. Besides this remarkable performance, the device represents a crucial first step for the realization of a fully-tunable ballistic superconducting magnetometer and embodies a potential advanced platform for the investigation of Majorana bound states, non-local entanglement of Cooper pairs, as well as the manipulation and control of spin triplet correlations.

  20. Development of Resistive Electrode Gas Electron Multiplier (RE-GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tamagawa, T.; Iwahashi, T.; Asami, F.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hayato, A.; Hamagaki, H.; Gunji, T.; Akimoto, R.; Nukariya, A.; Hayashi, S.; Ueno, K.; Ochi, A.; Oliveria, R.

    2012-01-01

    We successfully produced Resistive-Electrode Gas Electron Multiplier (RE-GEM) which has resistive electrodes instead of the metal ones which are employed for the standard GEM foils. RE-GEM has a resistive electrode of 25 micron-thick and an insulator layer of 100 micron-thick. The hole structure of RE-GEM is a single conical with the wider and narrower hole diameters of 80 micron and 60 micron, respectively. A hole pitch of RE-GEM is 140 micron. We obtained the maximum gain of about 600 and the typical energy resolution of about 20% (FWHM) at an applied voltage between the resistive electrodes of 620 V, using a collimated 8 keV X-rays from a generator in a gas mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO2 by volume at the atmospheric pressure. We measured the effective gain as a function of the electric field of the drift region and obtained the maximum gain at an drift field of 0.5 kV/cm.

  1. Ultraintense laser-produced fast-electron propagation in gas jets.

    PubMed

    Batani, D; Baton, S D; Manclossi, M; Santos, J J; Amiranoff, F; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Antonicci, A; Rousseaux, C; Le Gloahec, M Rabec; Hall, T; Malka, V; Cowan, T E; King, J; Freeman, R R; Key, M; Stephens, R

    2005-02-11

    We study the propagation of fast electrons in a gas at different densities. A large relativistic electron current is produced by focusing a short-pulse ultrahigh-intensity laser on a metallic target. It then propagates in a gas jet placed behind the foil. Shadowgraphy in the gas shows an electron cloud moving at sub-relativistic average velocities. The experiment shows (i) the essential role of the density of background material for allowing propagation of fast electrons, (ii) the importance of the ionization phase which produces free electrons available for the return current, and (iii) the effect of electrostatic fields on fast-electron propagation.

  2. Ferroelectric control of two dimensional electron gas in oxide heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Tra Vu; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chun; Wu, Chung-Lin; Lin, Jiunn Yuan; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2012-02-01

    Oxide heterointerfaces are emerging as one of the most exciting materials systems in condensed-matter science. One remarkable example is the LaAlO3 /SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface, a model system in which a highly mobile electron gas forms between two band insulators. Our study to manipulate the conductivity at this interface by using ferroeletricity of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3. Our transport data strongly suggests that down polarization direction depletes the conducting interface of LAO/STO. After switching the polarization direction (up), it becomes accumulation. In addition, our experiments show there is obvious the band structure changed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and combining with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The transport properties are measured to build up the connection between macroscopic properties and local electronic structures that have been applied to study this structure. Controlling the conductivity of this oxide interface suggests that this technique may not only extend more generally to other oxide systems but also open much potential to ferroelectric field effect transistors.

  3. The Diamagnetic Phase Transition of Dense Electron Gas: Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The “magnetic interaction” between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in “low-field” magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall (DW) motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magnetized electron gas are consistent with observations of magnetar emission, and especially the threshold critical dynamics of driven DW can partially overcome the difficulties of “low-field” magnetar bursts and the heating mechanism of transient, or “outbursting” magnetar.

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  5. Breaking of spherical symmetry in electronic structure, free and immersed atoms in an electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsett, Skye Forrest

    Total electronic energies are calculated numerically for free and singly-ionized He, Li, C, and Ne atoms using density functional theory. Immersion energies are calculated for a single C impurity atom embedded or absorbed into a charge-neutral system composed of a free-electron gas with uniform positive background, also called 'jellium'. Nonspherical effects resulting from the breaking of angular momentum symmetry are taken into account. Previous work has been limited to spherical approximations to these effects. Spin-polarization effects are incorporated through the local spin-density approximation. Solving the resulting coupled equations allows for a direct calculation of the total energy and the dielectric response of the charge cloud to an applied electric field. For a free carbon atom, we show that the ground state configuration predicted by the local spin density approximation violates Hund's 2nd rule. For free He, C, and Ne atoms in the presence of an applied electric field, we show that the polarizabilities calculated directly are in good agreement with previous results of perturbation theory and with experiment. For a carbon impurity system, phase shifts of the free-electron states are examined. Friedel oscillations and the Friedel sum rule are used for physical verification of the solutions. In the limit of low background density, we show that the impurity atom is affected by the presence of the electron gas and does not necessarily approach the free atom solution. Particularly, we show that the orbital magnetic quantum number is quenched for a neutral C impurity atom, even at very low background densities, which is again in violation of Hund's 2nd rule. For a neutral carbon impurity system, we show that the immersion energy changes from negative to postive value as the orbital magnetic quantum number is varied from 0 -- 1.

  6. Dimmable Electronic Ballast for a Gas Discharge Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raducanu, Marius; Hennings, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is the most efficient photocatalyst for organic oxidative degradation. TiO2 is effective not only in aqueous solution, but also in nonaqueous solvents and in the gas phase. It is photostable, biologically and chemically inert, and non-toxic. Low-energy UV light (approximately 375 nm, UV-A) can be used to photoactivate TiO2. TiO2 photocatalysis has been used to mineralize most types of organic compounds. Also, TiO2 photocatalysis has been effectively used in sterilization. This effectiveness has been demonstrated by its aggressive destruction of microorganisms, and aggressive oxidation effects of toxins. It also has been used for the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and ammonia to nitrogen. Despite having many attractive features, advanced photocatalytic oxidation processes have not been effectively used for air cleaning. One of the limitations of the traditional photocatalytic systems is the ballast that powers (lights) the bulbs. Almost all commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) ballasts are not dimmable and do not contain safety features. COTS ballasts light the UV lamp as bright as the bulb can be lit, and this results in shorter bulb lifetime and maximal power consumption. COTS magnetic ballasts are bulky, heavy, and inefficient. Several iterations of dimmable electronic ballasts have been developed. Some manifestations have safety features such as broken-bulb or over-temperature warnings, replace-bulb alert, logbulb operational hours, etc. Several electronic ballast boards capable of independently lighting and controlling (dimming) four fluorescent (UV light) bulbs were designed, fabricated, and tested. Because of the variation in the market bulb parameters, the ballast boards were designed with a very broad range output. The ballast boards can measure and control the current (power) for each channel.

  7. Measurement Of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongtae; Baldelomar, Edwin; Park, Kwangjune; Sosebee, Mark; White, Andy; Yu, Jaehoon

    2011-06-01

    The High Energy Physics group of the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing gas electron multiplier detectors to use them as sensitive gap detectors in digital hadron calorimeters for the International Linear Collider, a future high energy particle accelerator. For this purpose, we constructed numerous GEM detectors that employ double GEM layers. In this study, two kinds of prototype GEM detectors were tested; one with 28×28 cm2 active area double GEM structure with a 3 mm drift gap, a 1 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap and the other with two 3×3 cm2 GEM foils in the amplifier stage with a 5 mm drift gap, a 2 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap. The detectors' characteristics from exposure to high-energy charged particles and other radiations were measured using cosmic rays and 55Fe radioactive source. From the 55Fe tests, we observed two well separated characteristic X-ray emission peaks and confirmed the detectors' functionality. We also measured chamber gains to be over 6000 at a high voltage of 395 V across each GEM electrode. The responses to cosmic rays show the spectra that fit well to Landau distributions as expected from minimum ionizing particles.

  8. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  9. The Instability of Terahertz Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Gated and Ungated Quantum Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping

    2016-04-01

    The instability of terahertz (THz) plasma waves in two-dimensional (2D) quantum electron gas in a nanometer field effect transistor (FET) with asymmetrical boundary conditions has been investigated. We analyze THz plasma waves of two parts of the 2D quantum electron gas: gated and ungated regions. The results show that the radiation frequency and the increment (radiation power) in 2D ungated quantum electron gas are much higher than that in 2D gated quantum electron gas. The quantum effects always enhance the radiation power and enlarge the region of instability in both cases. This allows us to conclude that 2D quantum electron gas in the transistor channel is important for the emission and detection process and both gated and ungated parts take part in that process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10975114)

  10. Infrared light emission from nano hot electron gas created in atomic point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, T.; Klein, H. R.; Iazykov, M.; Dumas, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Gold atomic point contacts are prototype systems to evidence ballistic electron transport. The typical dimension of the nanojunction being smaller than the electron-phonon interaction length, even at room temperature, electrons transfer their excess energy to the lattice only far from the contact. At the contact however, favored by huge current densities, electron-electron interactions result in a nano hot electron gas acting as a source of photons. Using a home built Mechanically Controlled Break Junction, it is reported here, for the first time, that this nano hot electron gas also radiates in the infrared range (0.2 eV to 1.2 eV). Moreover, following the description introduced by Tomchuk et al. (Sov. Phys.-Solid State, 8 (1966) 2510), we show that this radiation is compatible with a black-body-like spectrum emitted from an electron gas at temperatures of several thousands of kelvins.

  11. Evaporation of 2-Dimensional Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Fethi M.

    2011-04-01

    Violation of unitarity in black hole evaporation has been puzzling physicist since the seminal work of Hawking in the seventies. Although there are hopes for a resolution of the problem in a full theory of quantum gravity, it has eluded us so far. Even less ambitious efforts considering only quantum corrections beyond the external field approximation have proven hard to attack in 4 dimensions. All these obstacles directed researchers to investigate the black hole evaporation problem in simpler 2-dimensional models. In this talk, we will present results on a new investigation of one of these models, the 2-dimensional Callan-Giddings-Harvey-Strominger (CGHS) model. Using a combination of analytical and high precision numerical tools, we are able to resolve CGHS black hole evaporation within the mean field approximation all the way to the point where the black hole area vanishes. Our results confirm some of the assumptions of the standard paradigm, and strongly suggest the recovery of unitarity within the full quantum theory. On the other hand, there are several surprising new results, in particular remarkable universal behavior in the evaporation of initially macroscopic black holes. This suggests that information about the collapsing matter that formed the black hole can not be recovered from the evaporation radiation. Though this separation of the questions of information loss and unitarity is peculiar to the 2-dimensional model, insights into the higher dimensional case can still be garnered.

  12. Gas dynamic theory of flight of fast electron flux in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.

    The one-dimensional flight of a fast electron flux in plasma is investigated taking into account generation and absorption of plasma waves. The transition from the kinetic description to the gas dynamics is made. The closed set of gas dynamic equations for electrons and plasmons is derived and an automodel solution is obtained in the case of instantaneous injection. This solution represents the beam-plasma formation on natural oscillations in the system electrons+plasmons is considered.

  13. Exchange interaction and oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.; Al'pern, A. V.; Sal'nikov, N. V.

    2006-10-15

    The exchange energy of the electron gas on a cylindrical surface in a constant magnetic field has been calculated. Analytical formulas describing the contribution of the exchange interaction into oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder have been obtained. It is shown that the magnetic response of the system exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases.

  14. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D.; Bruckner, B.; Moro, M. V.; Gruber, S.; Goebl, D.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.; Steinberger, R.; Duchoslav, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2017-03-01

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  15. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  16. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept.

    PubMed

    Roth, D; Bruckner, B; Moro, M V; Gruber, S; Goebl, D; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M; Steinberger, R; Duchoslav, J; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P

    2017-03-10

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  17. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Iion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F; Prost, L; Seidl, P; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-03-25

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 degrees from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86 degrees, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88 degrees. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub 0} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub 0} = 10{sub 4}. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to {approx}220 degrees had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  18. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Ion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F M; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-07-19

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub sigma} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub sigma} = 104. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to 230 had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  19. Solar wind heating beyond 1 AU. [interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas effect on protons and electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of an interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas on solar wind proton, electron and alpha-particle temperatures beyond 1 AU is considered. It is shown that the proton temperature (and probably also the alpha-particle temperature) reaches a minimum between 2 AU and 4 AU, depending on values chosen for solar wind and interstellar gas parameters. Heating of the electron gas depends primarily on the thermal coupling of the protons and electrons. For strong coupling, the electron temperature reaches a minimum between 4 AU and 8 AU, but for weak coupling (Coulomb collisions only), the electron temperature continues to decrease throughout the inner solar system. A spacecraft travelling to Jupiter should be able to observe the heating effect of the solar wind-interplanetary hydrogen interaction, and from such observations it may be possible of infer some properties of the interstellar neutral gas.

  20. An incompressible state of a photo-excited electron gas

    PubMed Central

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Watanabe, Masamitsu; Nasyedkin, Kostyantyn; Kono, Kimitoshi; Konstantinov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrons in a magnetic field can form new states of matter characterized by topological properties and strong electronic correlations as displayed in the integer and fractional quantum Hall states. In these states, the electron liquid displays several spectacular characteristics, which manifest themselves in transport experiments with the quantization of the Hall resistance and a vanishing longitudinal conductivity or in thermodynamic equilibrium when the electron fluid becomes incompressible. Several experiments have reported that dissipationless transport can be achieved even at weak, non-quantizing magnetic fields when the electrons absorb photons at specific energies related to their cyclotron frequency. Here we perform compressibility measurements on electrons on liquid helium demonstrating the formation of an incompressible electronic state under these resonant excitation conditions. This new state provides a striking example of irradiation-induced self-organization in a quantum system. PMID:26007282

  1. Stimulation of high-frequency breakdown of gas in Uragan-3M torsatron by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, I. K.; Tarasov, M. I.; Sitnikov, D. A.; Pashnev, V. K.; Lytova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments on confinement and heating of plasma in the Uragan-3M torsatron, the method of high-frequency breakdown of the working gas is used. In these experiments, in conditions of a relatively stable magnetic field, the rf power supplied to the setup chamber has a frequency close to the ion-cyclotron frequency. Such a method of gas breakdown is not always sufficiently reliable. In our experiments, preliminary ionization of the working gas by the run-away electron beam is used for stabilizing the breakdown. This work contains the results of experiments on enhancement of the runaway electron beam and on the interaction of the runaway electron beam in the Uragan-3M torsatron with the HF electromagnetic pump field. This enables us to formulate a number of recommendations for using spontaneously formed beams of accelerated particles for stimulating the rf breakdown. Our results confirm the possibility of gas breakdown by runaway electrons.

  2. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  3. Hot-Electron Gallium Nitride Two Dimensional Electron Gas Nano-bolometers For Advanced THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Rahul

    Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in semiconductor heterostructures was identified as a promising medium for hot-electron bolometers (HEB) in the early 90s. Up until now all research based on 2DEG HEBs is done using high mobility AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. These systems have demonstrated very good performance, but only in the sub terahertz (THz) range. However, above ˜0.5 THz the performance of AlGaAs/GaAs detectors drastically deteriorates. It is currently understood, that detectors fabricated from standard AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures do not allow for reasonable coupling to THz radiation while maintaining high conversion efficiency. In this work we have developed 2DEG HEBs based on disordered Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductor, that operate at frequencies beyond 1THz at room temperature. We observe strong free carrier absorption at THz frequencies in our disordered 2DEG film due to Drude absorption. We show the design and fabrication procedures of novel micro-bolometers having ultra-low heat capacities. In this work the mechanism of 2DEG response to THz radiation is clearly identified as bolometric effect through our direct detection measurements. With optimal doping and detector geometry, impedances of 10--100 O have been achieved, which allow integration of these devices with standard THz antennas. We also demonstrate performance of the antennas used in this work in effectively coupling THz radiation to the micro-bolometers through polarization dependence and far field measurements. Finally heterodyne mixing due to hot electrons in the 2DEG micro-bolometer has been performed at sub terahertz frequencies and a mixing bandwidth greater than 3GHz has been achieved. This indicates that the characteristic cooling time in our detectors is fast, less than 50ps. Due to the ultra-low heat capacity; these detectors can be used in a heterodyne system with a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as a local oscillator (LO) which typically provides output powers in the micro

  4. Electronic Nose Functionality for Breath Gas Analysis during Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Michael E.; Hummel, Thomas; Fetter, Viktor; Helwig, Andreas; Lenic, Joachim; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkow, Dimitrij; Chouker, Alexander; Schelling, Gustav

    2017-02-01

    The presence of humans in space represents a constant threat for their health and safety. Environmental factors such as living in a closed confinement, as well as exposure to microgravity and radiation, are associated with significant changes in bone metabolism, muscular atrophy, and altered immune response, which has impacts on human performance and possibly results in severe illness. Thus, maintaining and monitoring of crew health status has the highest priority to ensure whole mission success. With manned deep space missions to moon or mars appearing at the horizon where short-term repatriation back to earth is impossible the availability of appropriate diagnostic platforms for crew health status is urgently needed. In response to this need, the present experiment evaluated the functionality and practicability of a metal oxide based sensor system (eNose) together with a newly developed breath gas collecting device under the condition of altering acceleration. Parabolic flights were performed with an Airbus A300 ZeroG at Bordeaux, France. Ambient air and exhaled breath of five healthy volunteers was analyzed during steady state flight and parabolic flight maneuvres. All volunteers completed the study, the breath gas collecting device valves worked appropriately, and breathing through the collecting device was easy and did not induce discomfort. During breath gas measurements, significant changes in metal oxide sensors, mainly sensitive to aromatic and sulphur containing compounds, were observed with alternating conditions of acceleration. Similarly, metal oxide sensors showed significant changes in all sensors during ambient air measurements. The eNose as well as the newly developed breath gas collecting device, showed appropriate functionality and practicability during alternating conditions of acceleration which is a prerequisite for the intended use of the eNose aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for breath gas analysis and crew health status

  5. Gas Optics Applicable to Free Electron Laser Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-23

    near-field of the wiggler . This requires uiconventional optics because of the flux densities involved. A solution to this problem is the use of gas...optics, which show great tolerance to very high power densities, in place of solid optics near the wiggler . Gas optics can be thought of as weak lenses...ratio (tilt and focus corrected) measurement was about 0.7 at a flow Red of about 1000. It is suspected that the Strehl ratio is actually higher due to

  6. Electron impact ionization of the gas-phase sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Irina; Markush, Pavlo; Zavilopulo, Anatoly; Shpenik, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Ionization and dissociative ionization of the sorbitol molecule by electron impact have been studied using two different experimental methods. In the mass range of m/ z = 10-190, the mass spectra of sorbitol were recorded at the ionizing electron energies of 70 and 30 eV. The ion yield curves for the fragment ions have been analyzed and the appearance energies of these ions have been determined. The relative total ionization cross section of the sorbitol molecule was measured using monoenergetic electron beam. Possible fragmentation pathways for the sorbitol molecule were proposed.

  7. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  8. Effects of donor-acceptor electronic interactions on the rates of gas-phase metallocene electron-exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, D.K.; Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S.; Weaver, M.J. )

    1991-05-30

    Rate constants for electron self-exchange, k{sub ex}, of five cobaltocenium-cobaltocene and ferrocenium-ferrocene couples in the gas phase have been measured by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in order to explore the possible effects of donor-acceptor electronic coupling on gas-phase redox reactivity. The systems studied, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} (Cp = cyclopentadienyl), the decamethyl derivative Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, carboxymethyl(cobaltocenium-cobaltocene) (Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0}), and hydroxymethyl(ferrocenium-ferrocene) (HMFc{sup +/0}), were selected in view of the substantial variations in electronic coupling inferred on the basis of their solvent-dependent reactivities and theoretical grounds. The sequence of k{sub ex} values determined in the gas phase, Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0} {approx} Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0} > Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} > HMFc{sup +/0} > Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, is roughly similar to that observed in solution, although the magnitude (up to 5-fold) of the k{sub ex} variations is smaller in the former case. The likely origins of these differences in gas-phase reactivity are discussed in light of the known variations in the electronic coupling matrix element H{sub 12}, inner-shell reorganization energy {Delta}E*, and gas-phase ion-molecule interaction energy {Delta}E{sub w} extracted from solution-phase rates, structural data, and theoretical calculations. It is concluded that the observed variations in gas-phase k{sub ex} values, especially for Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} versus Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, arise predominantly from the presence of weaker donor-acceptor orbital overlap for the ferrocene couples, yielding inefficient electron tunneling for a substantial fraction of the gas-phase ion-molecule encounters. The anticipated differences as well as similarities of such nonadiabatic effects for gas-phase and solution electron-transfer processes are briefly outlined.

  9. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  10. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  11. Peoples Gas System turns to electronic data management

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, R.T.

    1997-02-01

    Peoples Gas System, Inc. (PGS) is the largest natural gas distributor in Florida with 12 divisions that service most of the state`s major metropolitan areas. The company is a consolidation of various gas utilities with maps and records dating back to the early 1900s. As a result, these records are in various paper formats, map scales and condition. Distribution maps are drawn on large format medium: linen cloth, mylar or vellum. These maps are routinely copied and reduced to a size that is suitable for field use. Service records have been recorded on numerous types of paper that are stored in different file cabinets according to the card size. As these records are researched on a daily basis, the condition of the permanent records steadily deteriorate and are commonly misfiled. A major concern is the loss of records due to a natural disaster. Hurricanes, which are a constant threat in Florida, could physically affect many of PGS`s division offices. The distribution maps have been archived on microfilm on a continuing basis, but other irreplaceable records have not. Disaster recovery of the maps from the archives would be very time consuming and expensive.

  12. Fabrication and test of digital output interface devices for gas turbine electronic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newirth, D. M.; Koenig, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop an innovative digital output interface device, a digital effector with optical feedback of the fuel metering valve position, for future electronic controls for gas turbine engines. A digital effector (on-off solenoids driven directly by on-off signals from a digital electronic controller) with optical position feedback was fabricated, coupled with the fuel metering valve, and tested under simulated engine operating conditions. The testing indicated that a digital effector with optical position feedback is a suitable candidate, with proper development for future digital electronic gas turbine controls. The testing also identified several problem areas which would have to be overcome in a final production configuration.

  13. Two-stage gas amplifier for ultrahigh resolution low vacuum scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, B. L.; Toth, M.; Schroemges, R. P. M.; Scholtz, J. J.; van Veen, G.; Knowles, W. R.

    2006-03-01

    We describe a magnetic field assisted, two-stage secondary electron gas amplification process for low vacuum scanning electron microscopy. The field of an ultrahigh resolution magnetic immersion objective lens and the electric field of an annular electrode configuration partition the amplification volume into two regions in which the electric and magnetic fields are parallel and crossed, respectively. The fields confine secondary electrons to axial and radial oscillations within the detector volume, until all of the kinetic energy imparted by an anode is dissipated through inelastic collisions with gas molecules. The electron confinement yields high gas amplification efficiency at short working distances and low gas pressures, facilitating high resolution imaging at low electron beam energies. Charging of insulating specimens is stabilized by positive ions produced in the gas ionization cascade. Furthermore, the signal to background level and bandwidth of this detector are superior to those of earlier generations of environmental secondary electron detectors. The combination of low vacuum, short working distance, and low beam energy is attractive to the semiconductor metrology industry, in particular, for critical dimension measurements on photolithographic masks.

  14. Two-stage gas amplifier for ultrahigh resolution low vacuum scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, B.L.; Toth, M.; Schroemges, R.P.M.; Scholtz, J.J.; Veen, G. van; Knowles, W.R.

    2006-03-15

    We describe a magnetic field assisted, two-stage secondary electron gas amplification process for low vacuum scanning electron microscopy. The field of an ultrahigh resolution magnetic immersion objective lens and the electric field of an annular electrode configuration partition the amplification volume into two regions in which the electric and magnetic fields are parallel and crossed, respectively. The fields confine secondary electrons to axial and radial oscillations within the detector volume, until all of the kinetic energy imparted by an anode is dissipated through inelastic collisions with gas molecules. The electron confinement yields high gas amplification efficiency at short working distances and low gas pressures, facilitating high resolution imaging at low electron beam energies. Charging of insulating specimens is stabilized by positive ions produced in the gas ionization cascade. Furthermore, the signal to background level and bandwidth of this detector are superior to those of earlier generations of environmental secondary electron detectors. The combination of low vacuum, short working distance, and low beam energy is attractive to the semiconductor metrology industry, in particular, for critical dimension measurements on photolithographic masks.

  15. Electronic Excitation in Air and Carbon Dioxide Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    processes in nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma of chemical compositions (air and carbon dioxide mixtures) frequently occurring in different aerospace...presents the problem of data processing automation. This problem is considered on the example of prediction of oscillator strengths of atomic species...elementary processes including into RC models .................................... 8 3.1 Ionization at collision of atoms and molecules with electrons

  16. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in methane gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Mukundan, Vrinda

    2015-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for degradation of 1-10,000 eV electrons in an atmosphere of methane. The electron impact cross sections for CH4 are compiled and analytical representations of these cross sections are used as input to the model."Yield spectra", which provides information about the number of inelastic events that have taken place in each energy bin, is used to calculate the yield (or population) of various inelastic processes. The numerical yield spectra, obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations, is represented analytically, thus generating the Analytical Yield Spectra (AYS). AYS is employed to obtain the mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of various inelastic processes. Mean energy per ion pair for neutral CH4 is found to be 26 (27.8) eV at 10 (0.1) keV. Efficiency calculation showed that ionization is the dominant process at energies > 50 eV, for which more than 50% of the incident electron energy is used. Above 25 eV, dissociation has an efficiency of ∼ 27 %. Below 10 eV, vibrational excitation dominates. Contribution of emission is around 1.2% at 10 keV. Efficiency of attachment process is ∼ 0.1 % at 8 eV and efficiency falls down to negligibly small values at energies greater than 15 eV. The efficiencies can be used to calculate volume production rate in planetary atmospheres by folding with electron production rate and integrating over energy.

  17. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Yuanping; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-06-01

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capacity for gaseous atoms and molecules in agreement with the experiments.A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by

  18. Microwave Reflection Spectroscopy of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruiyuan; Du, Lingjie; Du, Rui-Rui; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    Cyclotron resonance (CR) is a standard method to determine the carrier effective mass in two-dimensional electron systems, typically by measuring/analyzing the absorption or transmission signal. Here we report a microwave spectrometer utilizing the reflection signal. In our experiment setup based on a top-loading helium3 cryostat and a superconducting solenoid, the microwave (up to 40GHz) is sent down via a coax cable to the sample surface, and the reflection signal is then collected by the same cable and fed upward to a directional coupler, and being detected. We demonstrate the applicability of the spectrometer by measuring the CR of high-mobility electrons or holes in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. The construction of spectrometer, preliminary data, and brief discussions will be presented. The work at Rice was supported by Welch Foundation Grant C-1682.

  19. On the Electron Gas Heat Capacity in Undergraduate Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbun, Javier

    2013-03-01

    In undergraduate solid state physics the electronic energy, Uel, is calculated through the Fermi distribution function while the energy is weighted with the density of states. The electronic heat capacity is the derivative of the electronic energy with respect to temperature. Through this process, it is possible to obtain a low temperature approximation for the heat capacity, Cel that's proportional to the temperature. It is of interest to do a numerical calculation of Uel from which the numerical Cel is extracted. However, the result obtained, while agreeing with the low temperature approximation, has a slope that's substantially different. The disagreement appears large as the temperature is increased from zero K. Here we show that the reason has to do with the constancy of the Fermi level. By including the self consistent behavior of the chemical potential, the deviation from zero Kelvin is much improved and the result seems to make better sense. The lesson learned is significant enough to be of great pedagogical importance as regards the heat capacity calculation and the behavior of the chemical potential with temperature.

  20. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Yuanping; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-07-14

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ∼10(6) m s(-1). Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capacity for gaseous atoms and molecules in agreement with the experiments.

  1. Electron acceleration by laser fields in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. R.

    1991-09-01

    The strong fields lasers can produce allow high energy acceleration of charged particles. As the phase velocity of the fields cannot be matched in vacuum to the particle velocity, cumulative interaction over arbitrarily long straight trajectories is impossible. However, over limited regions a large energy gain as well as considerable focusing action can be achieved with suitably shaped laser beams. Away from boundaries, all laser fields consist of superpositions of plane wave components. We describe the properties of several practical configurations, beginning with a single plane wave. Only straight particle trajectories are considered in this analysis and it is assumed the energy is large enough so their speed is nearly constant and very close to that of light. The particles considered are electrons. The physical limitation of the interaction region may be obtained by reflecting surfaces which generate no evanescent waves, with the electron beam crossing the boundaries through holes small enough not to disturb the fields. The laser power density over these reflectors could impose a practical limit to field intensity in the interaction region. An alternative way to limit the interaction range is by bending magnets to deflect the electrons; but the energy radiated must then be taken into consideration. In the rest of this paper, no further discussion is given of interaction region boundaries, although they must be present in every case. This paper contains a quantitative analysis of the acceleration and focusing properties of a particular laser configuration, and discusses means of extending the useful interaction range by phase compensation surfaces.

  2. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons.

  3. Electron Attachment to POCl3: Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Rate Constants and Branching Ratios as a Function of Gas Pressure and Temperature, Electron Temperature, and Electron Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    the pulse along the flow tube axis variation in the total rate constant with temperature.2 In con- with the Langmuir probe . In the electron-He+-Ar...calculations 5 reported in Ref. 4 and should cylindrical Langmuir probe . The plasma velocity is measured be reliable within ±0.1 eV. Electron attachment...increasing temperature decreased diffusion. the amount of parent ion substantially in flowing - afterglow In the present work, POCI3 gas was added

  4. Thermal electron attachment to chlorinated alkenes in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnorowski, K.; Wnorowska, J.; Michalczuk, B.; Jówko, A.; Barszczewska, W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the rate coefficients and the activation energies of the electron capture processes with various chlorinated alkenes. The electron attachment processes in the mixtures of chlorinated alkenes with carbon dioxide have been investigated using a Pulsed Townsend technique. This study has been performed in the temperature range (298-378) K. The obtained rate coefficients more or less depended on temperature in accordance to Arrhenius equation. The activation energies (Ea's) were determined from the fit to the experimental data points with function ln(k) = ln(A) - Ea/kBT. The rate coefficients at 298 K were equal to 1.0 × 10-10 cm3 s-1, 2.2 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, 1.6 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, 4.4 × 10-8 cm3 s-1, 2.9 × 10-12 cm3 s-1 and 7.3 × 10-12 cm3 s-1 and activation energies were: 0.27 eV, 0.26 eV, 0.25 eV, 0.21 eV, 0.55 eV and 0.42 eV, for trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, 2-chloropropene, 3-chloropropene respectively.

  5. Induced superconductivity in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in gallium arsenide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhong; Kazakov, Aleksandr; Manfra, Michael J; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken W; Rokhinson, Leonid P

    2015-06-11

    Search for Majorana fermions renewed interest in semiconductor-superconductor interfaces, while a quest for higher-order non-Abelian excitations demands formation of superconducting contacts to materials with fractionalized excitations, such as a two-dimensional electron gas in a fractional quantum Hall regime. Here we report induced superconductivity in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in gallium arsenide heterostructures and development of highly transparent semiconductor-superconductor ohmic contacts. Supercurrent with characteristic temperature dependence of a ballistic junction has been observed across 0.6 μm, a regime previously achieved only in point contacts but essential to the formation of well separated non-Abelian states. High critical fields (>16 T) in NbN contacts enables investigation of an interplay between superconductivity and strongly correlated states in a two-dimensional electron gas at high magnetic fields.

  6. Induced superconductivity in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in gallium arsenide heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhong; Kazakov, Aleksandr; Manfra, Michael J.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.; Rokhinson, Leonid P.

    2015-01-01

    Search for Majorana fermions renewed interest in semiconductor–superconductor interfaces, while a quest for higher-order non-Abelian excitations demands formation of superconducting contacts to materials with fractionalized excitations, such as a two-dimensional electron gas in a fractional quantum Hall regime. Here we report induced superconductivity in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in gallium arsenide heterostructures and development of highly transparent semiconductor–superconductor ohmic contacts. Supercurrent with characteristic temperature dependence of a ballistic junction has been observed across 0.6 μm, a regime previously achieved only in point contacts but essential to the formation of well separated non-Abelian states. High critical fields (>16 T) in NbN contacts enables investigation of an interplay between superconductivity and strongly correlated states in a two-dimensional electron gas at high magnetic fields. PMID:26067452

  7. Electron density measurements in a photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited laser gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, V. A.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Capjack, C. E.; Nikumb, S. K.

    1986-11-01

    Measurements of the electron density within a photo-initiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) laser gas discharge are presented. Ion current measurements were made using a single Langmuir electrostatic probe positioned within the laser discharge volume. Calculations of the electron density were made utilizing a thick-sheath analysis. The results indicate that the electron density increases by two orders of magnitude as the pulser power level is increased. In addition, the electron density was observed to decrease markedly as the dc discharge current was increased.

  8. Simulation of the formation of a runaway electron beam in an overvolted gas gap breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Shklyaev, V. A.; Ryzhov, V. V.; Belomyttsev, S. Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The paper reports on numerical simulation to inquire into the breakdown of a gas-filled diode in a highly inhomogeneous electric field. It is shown that early in the breakdown a runaway electron beam (RAEB) is formed in the diode and this strongly affects the rate of breakdown development. The energy gained by RAEB electrons corresponds to the electron energy gained under the same conditions in vacuum. The properties of the emission surface of the cathode determine the instant at which the beam is formed during subnanosecond voltage pulse rise time and hence the beam current and the energy spectrum of runaway electrons.

  9. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  10. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  11. Transit time of electrons and gas gain effects in P-10 and Ar+CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Waker, Anthony J.

    2014-11-01

    An Electron Mobility Spectrometer (EMS) has been designed to measure the transit time and electron attachment effects in proportional counter fill gases. The aim of the EMS is to observe how electron parameters including the drift velocity, pulse formation time, multiplication gain and electron attachment depend on the gas composition and operating parameters of the EMS. The operating parameters of interest for the EMS include the applied high voltage and gas pressure. Current research interests include the measurement of the time between the generation of the electron-ion pairs and arrival of the electrons at the wire anode in P-10 and Ar+CO2 gases. Additionally, the study of the multiplication properties of the detector as a function of pulse formation time in the two gases and as a function of applied electric field will be presented. The overall objective of this work is to investigate if the gas-gain of a proportional counter can be optimized by minimizing electron attachment with oxygen to improve the measurement of tritium in air.

  12. Simulating strongly correlated electrons with a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John E.

    2013-05-28

    The quantum many-body physics of strongly-correlated fermions is studied in a degenerate, strongly- interacting atomic Fermi gas, first realized by our group with DOE support in 2002. This system, which exhibits strong spin pairing, is now widely studied and provides an important paradigm for testing predictions based on state-of-the-art many-body theory in fields ranging from nuclear matter to high temperature superfluidity and superconductivity. As the system is strongly interacting, both the superfluid and the normal fluid are nontrivial and of great interest. A central part of our program on Fermi gases is the connection between the study of thermodynamics, supported by DOE and the study of hydrodynamic transport, supported by NSF. This connection is especially interesting in view of a recent conjecture from the string theory community on the concept of nearly perfect normal fluids, which exhibit a minimum ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly-interacting, scale-invariant systems.

  13. Use of nonlocal helium microplasma for gas impurities detection by the collisional electron spectroscopy method

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly A.; Stefanova, Margarita S.; Pramatarov, Petko M.

    2015-10-15

    The collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, which lays the ground for a new field for analytical detection of gas impurities at high pressures, has been verified. The CES method enables the identification of gas impurities in the collisional mode of electron movement, where the advantages of nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are fulfilled. Important features of dc negative glow microplasma and probe method for plasma diagnostics are applied. A new microplasma gas analyzer design is proposed. Admixtures of 0.2% Ar, 0.6% Kr, 0.1% N{sub 2}, and 0.05% CO{sub 2} are used as examples of atomic and molecular impurities to prove the possibility for detecting and identifying their presence in high pressure He plasma (50–250 Torr). The identification of the particles under analysis is made from the measurements of the high energy part of the EEDF, where maxima appear, resulting from the characteristic electrons released in Penning reactions of He metastable atoms with impurity particles. Considerable progress in the development of a novel miniature gas analyzer for chemical sensing in gas phase environments has been made.

  14. Time reversal and charge echo in an electron gas.

    PubMed

    Creswick, Richard J

    2004-09-03

    Apart from subtle violations of CP symmetry by the weak interactions, the basic laws of physics are time-reversal invariant. Nevertheless, in the macroscopic world, time has a very definite direction, or arrow. Given that the dynamics of a closed system are time-reversal invariant, the arrow of time is introduced through boundary or initial conditions. In this Letter it is argued that if the Hamiltonian for a system, H, has the property THT(-1)=-H for a unitary transformation T, then the system can, in principle, be made to evolve backward in time. The prototype of this sort of behavior is the spin echo. Calculations for a single-band tight-binding model suggest that it may be possible to observe the electronic counterpart, or charge echo.

  15. Heterodyne Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takashi; Bucciantini, Leda

    2016-10-01

    We study the hitherto unaddressed phenomenon of the quantum Hall effect with a magnetic and electric field oscillating in time with resonant frequencies. This phenomenon highlights an example of a heterodyne device with the magnetic field acting as a driving force, and it is analyzed in detail in its classical and quantum versions using Floquet theory. A bulk current flowing perpendicularly to the applied electric field is found, with a frequency shifted by integer multiples of the driving frequency. When the ratio of the cyclotron and driving frequency takes special values, the electron's classical trajectory forms a loop and the effective mass diverges, while in the quantum case we find an analog of the Landau quantization. A possible realization using metamaterial plasmonics is discussed.

  16. Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Akatay, M. Cem; Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov; Baumann, Philipp; Stach, Eric A. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov

    2014-03-15

    A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

  17. Analysis of the Molecules Structure and Vertical Electron Affinity of Organic Gas Impact on Electric Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juntao; Xiao, Dengming; Zhao, Xiaoling; Deng, Yunkun

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to find an efficient selection method to pre-analyze the gas electric strength from the perspective of molecule structure and the properties for finding the alternative gases to sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). As the properties of gas are determined by the gas molecule structure, the research on the relationship between the gas molecule structure and the electric strength can contribute to the gas pre-screening and new gas development. In this paper, we calculated the vertical electron affinity, molecule orbits distribution and orbits energy of gas molecules by the means of density functional theory (DFT) for the typical structures of organic gases and compared their electric strengths. By this method, we find part of the key properties of the molecule which are related to the electric strength, including the vertical electron affinity, the lowest unoccupied molecule orbit (LUMO) energy, molecule orbits distribution and negative-ion system energy. We also listed some molecule groups such as unsaturated carbons double bonds (C=C) and carbonitrile bonds (C≡N) which have high electric strength theoretically by this method. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177101 and 51337006)

  18. Ground state of a hydrogen ion molecule immersed in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, J.; Gutierrez, F. A.; Matamala, A. R.; Denton, C. D.; Vargas, P.; Valdes, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we have calculated the ground state energy of the hydrogen molecule, H2+, immersed in the highly inhomogeneous electron gas around a metallic surface within the local density approximation. The molecule is perturbed by the electron density of a crystalline surface of Au <1 0 0> with the internuclear axis parallel to the surface. The surface spatial electron density is calculated through a linearized band structure method (LMTO-DFT). The ground state of the molecule-ion was calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a fixed-ion while the screening effects of the inhomogeneous electron gas are depicted by a Thomas-Fermi like electrostatic potential. We found that within our model the molecular ion dissociates at the critical distance of 2.35 a.u. from the first atomic layer of the solid.

  19. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle A. Morrison; Stephen F. Paul; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-08-11

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion.

  20. Electron Production, Electron Attachment, and Charge Recombination Process in High Pressure Gas Discharges.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-10

    mixtures of H2 0-Ar, C3F8 -N2 and C3F8 -CH4 increase with increasing E/N. These characteristics are useful for the application of opening switchef. The...published in the Journal of Applied Physics. 4. Electron Attachment Coefficients of CqFA The electron attachment coefficients of C3F8 in buffer gases of...Ar, N2, and CH 4 were measured as a function of E/N. The 5 electron attachment rate constants of C3F8 in N2 and CR 4 increase with E/N, which are

  1. An electron beam polarimeter based on scattering from a windowless, polarized hydrogen gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, Jan; Milner, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Here we present the idea to develop a precision polarimeter for low energy, intense polarized electron beams using a windowless polarized hydrogen gas cell fed by an atomic beam source. This technique would use proven technology used successfully in both the electron scattering experiments: HERMES with 27 GeV electron and positron beams at DESY, and BLAST with 850 MeV electron beams at MIT-Bates. At 100 MeV beam energy, both spin-dependent Mo/ller and elastic electron-proton scattering processes have a high cross section and sizable spin asymmetries. The concept is described and estimates for realistic rates for elastic electron-proton scattering and Mo/ller scattering are presented. A number of important issues which affect the ultimate systematic uncertainty are identified.

  2. An electron beam polarimeter based on scattering from a windowless, polarized hydrogen gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Bernauer, Jan; Milner, Richard

    2013-11-07

    Here we present the idea to develop a precision polarimeter for low energy, intense polarized electron beams using a windowless polarized hydrogen gas cell fed by an atomic beam source. This technique would use proven technology used successfully in both the electron scattering experiments: HERMES with 27 GeV electron and positron beams at DESY, and BLAST with 850 MeV electron beams at MIT-Bates. At 100 MeV beam energy, both spin-dependent Mo/ller and elastic electron-proton scattering processes have a high cross section and sizable spin asymmetries. The concept is described and estimates for realistic rates for elastic electron-proton scattering and Mo/ller scattering are presented. A number of important issues which affect the ultimate systematic uncertainty are identified.

  3. Method for resurrecting negative electron affinity photocathodes after exposure to an oxidizing gas

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A; Bierman, John C

    2012-10-30

    A method by which negative electron affinity photocathodes (201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be made to recover their quantum yield following exposure to an oxidizing gas has been discovered. Conventional recovery methods employ the use of cesium as a positive acting agent (104). In the improved recovery method, an electron beam (205), sufficiently energetic to generate a secondary electron cloud (207), is applied to the photocathode in need of recovery. The energetic beam, through the high secondary electron yield of the negative electron affinity surface (203), creates sufficient numbers of low energy electrons which act on the reduced-yield surface so as to negate the effects of absorbed oxidizing atoms thereby recovering the quantum yield to a pre-decay value.

  4. Electromagnetic Aharonov-Bohm effect in a two-dimensional electron gas ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, W. G.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; de Franceschi, S.; Fujisawa, T.; Elzerman, J. M.; Huizeling, E. W.; Tarucha, S.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    We define a mesoscopic ring in a two-dimensional electron gas interrupted by two tunnel barriers, enabling us to apply a well-defined potential difference between the two halves of the ring. The electron interference in the ring is modified using a perpendicular magnetic field and a bias voltage. We observe clear Aharonov-Bohm oscillations up to the quantum Hall regime as a function of both parameters. The electron travel time between the barriers is found to increase with the applied magnetic field. Introducing a scattering model, we develop a method to measure the nonequilibrium electron dephasing time, which becomes very short at high voltages and magnetic fields. The relevance of electron-electron interactions is discussed.

  5. The determination of cyclohexylamine in aqueous solutions of sodium cyclamate by electron-capture gas chromatography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, M. D.; Pereira, W. E.; Duffield, A. M.

    1971-01-01

    A sensitive primary amine assay, capable of detecting 10 to the minus 11th g and utilizing the determination of the amine N-2,4-dinitrophenyl derivative by electron-capture gas chromatography is described. The method is exemplified by the determination of cyclohexylamine in sodium cyclamate.

  6. Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

    1965-01-01

    Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

  7. Analysis and design of digital output interface devices for gas turbine electronic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newirth, D. M.; Koenig, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A trade study was performed on twenty-one digital output interface schemes for gas turbine electronic controls to select the most promising scheme based on criteria of reliability, performance, cost, and sampling requirements. The most promising scheme, a digital effector with optical feedback of the fuel metering valve position, was designed.

  8. Investigation of Sterilization Effect by various Gas Plasmas and Electron Microscopic Observation of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yota; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Oshita, Takaya; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization method. It is considered that factor of plasma sterilization are mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the sterilization mechanism hasn't been investigated in detail because conventional plasma sources have a limitation in usable gas species and lack variety of ROS. So we developed multi-gas plasma jet which can generate various gas plasmas. In this study, investigation of sterilization effect by various gas plasmas and electron microscopic observation of bacteria were performed. Oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon and air were used as plasma gas. To investigate gas-species dependence of sterilization effect, S.aureus was treated. As a result, nitrogen plasma and carbon dioxide plasma were effective for sterilization. To investigate sterilization mechanism, the surface of S.aureus was observed by scanning electron microscope. As a result, dimples were observed on the surface after irradiation of nitrogen plasma, but no change observed in the case of carbon dioxide plasma. These results suggest that bactericidal mechanism of nitrogen and carbon dioxide plasma should be different. In the presentation, Measurement result of ROS will be reported.

  9. Noise characteristics of the gas ionization cascade used in low vacuum scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley L.; Knowles, W. Ralph; Toth, Milos

    2009-07-01

    The noise characteristics of gas cascade amplified electron signals in low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) are described and analyzed. We derive expressions for each component contributing to the total noise culminating in a predictive, quantitative model that can be used for optimization of LVSEM operating parameters. Signal and noise behavior is characterized experimentally and used to validate the model. Under most operating conditions, the noise is dominated by the excess noise generated in the gas amplification cascade. At high gains, the excess noise increases proportionally with gain such that the signal-to-noise ratio is constant. The effects of several instrument operating parameters, including working distance, gas pressure, beam current, and detector bias, are condensed and presented in the form of a master curve.

  10. Layer-by-Layer Evolution of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Near an Oxide Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Young Jun; Moreschini, Luca; Bostwick, Aaron; Gaines, Geoffrey A.; Kim, Yong Su; Walter, Andrew L.; Freelon, Byron; Tebano, Antonello; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2013-09-01

    We report the momentum-resolved measurement of a two-dimensional electron gas at the LaTiO3/SrTiO3 interface by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Thanks to an advanced sample preparation technique, the orbital character of the conduction electrons and the electronic correlations can be accessed quantitatively as each unit cell layer is added. We find that all of these quantities change dramatically with distance from the interface. These findings open the way to analogous studies on other heterostructures, which are traditionally a forbidden field for ARPES.

  11. Heating and cooling of a two-dimensional electron gas by terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    The absorption of terahertz radiation by free charge carriers in n-type semiconductor quantum wells accompanied by the interaction of electrons with acoustic and optical phonons is studied. It is shown that intrasubband optical transitions can cause both heating and cooling of the electron gas. The cooling of charge carriers occurs in a certain temperature and radiation frequency region where light is most efficiently absorbed due to intrasubband transitions with emission of optical phonons. In GaAs quantum wells, the optical cooling of electrons occurs most efficiently at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while cooling is possible even at room temperature in GaN heterostructures.

  12. Generation of electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration in pure neon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Mirzaie, Mohammad; Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Ge, Xulei; Liu, Feng; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie; Tao, Mengze; Chen, Liming

    2014-08-15

    We report on the generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams by the laser wakefield acceleration of 17–50 TW, 30 fs laser pulses in pure neon gas jet. The generated beams have energies in the range 40–120 MeV and up to ∼430 pC of charge. At a relatively high density, we observed multiple electron beamlets which has been interpreted by simulations to be the result of breakup of the laser pulse into multiple filaments in the plasma. Each filament drives its own wakefield and generates its own electron beamlet.

  13. Collective Tunneling Model between Two-Dimensional Electron Gas to Si-Nano Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraguchi, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Takada, Y.; Nomura, S.; Shiraishi, K.; Makihara, K.; Ikeda, M.; Miyazaki, S.; Shigeta, Y.; Endoh, T.

    2011-12-01

    We study the temperature dependence of electron injection voltage in Si-Nano-Dot (Si-NDs) Floating Gate MOS capacitor by using the collective tunneling model, which models the tunneling between two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and the Si-NDs. We clarify the temperature dependence by numerical calculation, which emulate the experiment in this system, and we obtained a new insight into the origin of the temperature dependence. We have revealed that the collective tunneling model can reproduce the temperature dependence of electron tunneling.

  14. Nonlinear effects in the energy loss of a slow dipole in a free-electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze beyond linear-response theory the energy loss of a slow dipole moving inside a free-electron gas. The energy loss is obtained from a nonlinear treatment of the scattering of electrons at the dipole-induced potential. This potential and the total electronic density are calculated with density-functional theory. We focus on the interference effects, i.e., the difference between the energy loss of a dipole and that of the isolated charges forming it. Comparison of our results to those obtained in linear-response theory shows that a nonlinear treatment of the screening is required to accurately describe the energy loss of slow dipoles.

  15. Time domain capacitance spectroscopy of tunneling electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoori, R. C.; Chan, H. B.

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a technique capable of measuring the tunneling current into both localized and conducting states in a 2D electron system (2DES). The method yields I-V characteristics for tunneling with no distortions arising from low 2D in-plane conductivity. We have used the technique to determine the pseudogap energy spectrum for electron tunneling into and out of a 2D system and, further, we have demonstrated that such tunneling measurements reveal spin relaxation times within the 2DEG. Pseudogap: In a 2DEG in perpendicular magnetic field, a pseudogap develops in the tunneling density of states at the Fermi energy. We resolve a linear energy dependence of this pseudogap at low excitations. The slopes of this linear gap are strongly field dependent. No existing theory predicts the observed behavior. Spin relaxation: We explore the characteristics of equilibrium tunneling of electrons from a 3D electrode into a high mobility 2DES. For most 2D Landau level filling factors, we find that electrons tunnel with a single, well-defined tunneling rate. However, for spin-polarized quantum Hall states ( ν=1, 3 and 1/3) tunneling occurs at two distinct rates that differ by up to two orders of magnitude. The dependence of the two rates on temperature and tunnel barrier thickness suggests that slow in-plane spin relaxation creates a bottleneck for tunneling of electrons.

  16. Spectrum of fast electrons in a dense gas in the presence of a nonuniform pulsed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, A. N.; Yakovlenko, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    The problems of gas preionization in discharges related to laser physics are considered. The propagation of fast electrons injected from the cathode in the presence of a nonuniform nonstationary field and the motion of multiplying electrons at the edge of the avalanche in the presence of a nonuniform nonstationary field are simulated. The effect of the voltage pulse steepness and the field nonuniformity on the mean propagation velocity of fast electrons and their energy distribution is demonstrated. At certain combinations of the voltage pulse rise time and amplitude and at a certain time interval, the center of gravity of the electron cloud can move in the opposite direction relative to the direction of force acting upon electrons. It is also demonstrated that the number of hard particles (and, hence, the hard component of the x-ray bremsstrahlung) increases with both an increase in the voltage amplitude and a decrease in the pulse rise time. For nonoptimal conditions of the picosecond voltage pulse, an assumption is formulated: an electron beam in gas is formed due to the electrons at the edge of the avalanche rather than the background multiplication wave approaching the anode.

  17. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  18. Hierarchical graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite films for high-performance flexible electronic gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunlong; Wang, Ting; Chen, Fanhong; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhongzhen; Wan, Pengbo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-06-09

    A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully interconnected and deposited onto flexible PET substrates to form hierarchical nanocomposite (PPANI/rGO-FPANI) network films. The assembled flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor exhibits high sensing performance towards NH3 gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 100 ppm, reliable transparency (90.3% at 550 nm) for the PPANI/rGO-FPANI film (6 h sample), fast response/recovery time (36 s/18 s), and robust flexibility without an obvious performance decrease after 1000 bending/extending cycles. The excellent sensing performance could probably be ascribed to the synergetic effects and the relatively high surface area (47.896 m(2) g(-1)) of the PPANI/rGO-FPANI network films, the efficient artificial neural network sensing channels, and the effectively exposed active surfaces. It is expected to hold great promise for developing flexible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive electronic sensors with real-time analysis to be potentially integrated into wearable flexible electronics.

  19. Simulation of protons energy relaxation in electron gas by molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, Andrey; Bronin, Sergey; Maiorov, Sergey; Manykin, Eduard; Zelener, Boris B.; Zelener, Boris V.

    2016-09-01

    Our work is concerned with simulation of heavy charged particles energy relaxation in electron gas. The research was stimulated by antihydrogen experiments that are held in conditions far from conditions of well studied nuclear fusion or gas discharge experiments. We used numerical simulation as a tool to test existing theoretical approaches to classical Coulomb system kinetics. By means of molecular dynamics method we calculated dynamics of energy relaxation of protons in ultracold electron gas. We considered non neutral plasma when number of electrons is much greater than the number of protons. We have shown that boundary conditions have significant influence on simulation results. Two types of boundary conditions were considered -- periodic boundary conditions and reflecting walls. The influence of number of particles in the simulation cell was studied. The problem of Coulomb potential modification on small distances was also considered. Simulations were performed for electron densities 108 cm-3, initial temperatures for electrons is equal 10 K and for protons 100 K. The work was supported by Russian Science Foundation grant RNF 14-19-01492.

  20. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  1. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Results for the Degenerate Electron Gas at Finite Temperature.

    PubMed

    Schoof, T; Groth, S; Vorberger, J; Bonitz, M

    2015-09-25

    The uniform electron gas at finite temperature is of key relevance for many applications in dense plasmas, warm dense matter, laser excited solids, and much more. Accurate thermodynamic data for the uniform electron gas are an essential ingredient for many-body theories, in particular, density-functional theory. Recently, first-principles restricted path integral Monte Carlo results became available, which, however, had to be restricted to moderate degeneracy, i.e., low to moderate densities with r_{s}=r[over ¯]/a_{B}≳1. Here we present novel first-principles configuration path integral Monte Carlo results for electrons for r_{s}≤4. We also present quantum statistical data within the e^{4} approximation that are in good agreement with the simulations at small to moderate r_{s}.

  2. Electronic transport properties of BN sheet on adsorption of ammonia (NH3) gas.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Bhat, Chetan; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet

    2015-03-01

    We report the detection of ammonia gas through electronic and transport properties analysis of boron nitride sheet. The density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio approach has been used to calculate the electronic and transport properties of BN sheet in presence of ammonia gas. Analysis confirms that the band gap of the sheet increases due to presence of ammonia. Out of different positions, the bridge site is the most favorable position for adsorption of ammonia and the mechanism of interaction falls between weak electrostatic interaction and chemisorption. On relaxation, change in the bond angles of the ammonia molecule in various configurations has been reported with the distance between NH3 and the sheet. An increase in the transmission of electrons has been observed on increasing the bias voltage and I-V relationship. This confirms that, the current increases on applying the bias when ammonia is introduced while a very small current flows for pure BN sheet.

  3. Spin relaxations in 2D electron gas determined by the memory in the carrier dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Eugene; Glazov, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    The effects of long memory, in carrier dynamics in a magnetic field, on spin polarization evolution in 2D electron gas are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. As examples we consider (i) systems with random Rashba-type SO coupling and (ii) quantum wells with rigid short-range scatterers (antidotes) and regular Dresselhaus SO coupling. In both cases the spin dynamics is strongly non-Markovian. In the system with the random SO coupling the time dependence of the spin polarization shows Gaussian rather than exponential behavior with the cusps corresponding to the electron revolutions. The relaxation speeds up with the increase of the magnetic field. In the system with antidotes scattering, the spin polarization shows a long-tail behavior with the relaxation rate determined by inelastic electron-phonon and electron-electron collisions and demonstrates unusual field dependence.

  4. Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-12-10

    We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

  5. Raman scattering in a two-dimensional electron gas: Boltzmann equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, E. G.

    1999-06-01

    The inelastic light scattering in a two-dimensional electron gas is studied theoretically using the Boltzmann equation techniques. Electron-hole excitations produce the Raman spectrum essentially different from the one predicted for the 3D case. In the clean limit it has the form of a strong nonsymmetric resonance due to the square-root singularity at the electron-hole frequency ω=vk, while in the opposite dirty limit the usual Lorentzian shape of the cross section is reestablished. The effects of electromagnetic field are considered self-consistently, and the contribution from collective plasmon modes is found. It is shown that unlike 3D metals where plasmon excitations are unobservable (because of very large required transferred frequencies), the two-dimensional electron system gives rise to a low-frequency (ω~k1/2) plasmon peak. A measurement of the width of this peak can provide data on the magnitude of the electron-scattering rate.

  6. Tailoring the Two Dimensional Electron Gas at Polar ABO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces for Oxide Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changjian; Liu, Zhiqi; Lü, Weiming; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Annadi, Anil; Huang, Zhen; Zeng, Shengwei; Ariando; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-01-01

    The 2D electron gas at the polar/non-polar oxide interface has become an important platform for several novel oxide electronic devices. In this paper, the transport properties of a wide range of polar perovskite oxide ABO3/SrTiO3 (STO) interfaces, where ABO3 includes LaAlO3, PrAlO3, NdAlO3, NdGaO3 and LaGaO3 in both crystalline and amorphous forms, were investigated. A robust 4 unit cell (uc) critical thickness for metal insulator transition was observed for crystalline polar layer/STO interface while the critical thickness for amorphous ones was strongly dependent on the B site atom and its oxygen affinity. For the crystalline interfaces, a sharp transition to the metallic state (i.e. polarization catastrophe induced 2D electron gas only) occurs at a growth temperature of 515 °C which corresponds to a critical relative crystallinity of ~70 ± 10% of the LaAlO3 overlayer. This temperature is generally lower than the metal silicide formation temperature and thus offers a route to integrate oxide heterojunction based devices on silicon. PMID:26307382

  7. Tailoring the Two Dimensional Electron Gas at Polar ABO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces for Oxide Electronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjian; Liu, Zhiqi; Lü, Weiming; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Annadi, Anil; Huang, Zhen; Zeng, Shengwei; Ariando; Venkatesan, T

    2015-08-26

    The 2D electron gas at the polar/non-polar oxide interface has become an important platform for several novel oxide electronic devices. In this paper, the transport properties of a wide range of polar perovskite oxide ABO3/SrTiO3 (STO) interfaces, where ABO3 includes LaAlO3, PrAlO3, NdAlO3, NdGaO3 and LaGaO3 in both crystalline and amorphous forms, were investigated. A robust 4 unit cell (uc) critical thickness for metal insulator transition was observed for crystalline polar layer/STO interface while the critical thickness for amorphous ones was strongly dependent on the B site atom and its oxygen affinity. For the crystalline interfaces, a sharp transition to the metallic state (i.e. polarization catastrophe induced 2D electron gas only) occurs at a growth temperature of 515 °C which corresponds to a critical relative crystallinity of ~70 ± 10% of the LaAlO3 overlayer. This temperature is generally lower than the metal silicide formation temperature and thus offers a route to integrate oxide heterojunction based devices on silicon.

  8. Tailoring the Two Dimensional Electron Gas at Polar ABO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces for Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changjian; Liu, Zhiqi; Lü, Weiming; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Annadi, Anil; Huang, Zhen; Zeng, Shengwei; Ariando; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-08-01

    The 2D electron gas at the polar/non-polar oxide interface has become an important platform for several novel oxide electronic devices. In this paper, the transport properties of a wide range of polar perovskite oxide ABO3/SrTiO3 (STO) interfaces, where ABO3 includes LaAlO3, PrAlO3, NdAlO3, NdGaO3 and LaGaO3 in both crystalline and amorphous forms, were investigated. A robust 4 unit cell (uc) critical thickness for metal insulator transition was observed for crystalline polar layer/STO interface while the critical thickness for amorphous ones was strongly dependent on the B site atom and its oxygen affinity. For the crystalline interfaces, a sharp transition to the metallic state (i.e. polarization catastrophe induced 2D electron gas only) occurs at a growth temperature of 515 °C which corresponds to a critical relative crystallinity of ~70 ± 10% of the LaAlO3 overlayer. This temperature is generally lower than the metal silicide formation temperature and thus offers a route to integrate oxide heterojunction based devices on silicon.

  9. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal functionals for exchange-correlation energy of the inhomogeneous electron gas are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response function of the uniform electron gas. The WDA is constructed so that it is exact in the opposite limit of one-electron systems, and it was conjectured that the WDA is also accurate in the uniform gas limit. To test this conjecture, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of the WDA. We then compare the results with the Monte Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local-field correction, and identify the weak points of conventional WDA in the homogeneous limit. We suggest how the WDA can be modified to improve the response function. The resulting approximation is a good one in both opposite limits. Future testing should show whether it will also be better than conventional WDA and ADA for practical nonlocal density-functional calculations.

  10. Gas bremsstrahlung studies for medium energy electron storage rings using FLUKA Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahani, Prasanta Kumar; Haridas, G.; Sinha, Anil K.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-02-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated due to the interaction of the stored electron beam with residual gas molecules of the vacuum chamber in a storage ring. As the opening angle of the bremsstrahlung is very small, the scoring area used in Monte Carlo simulation plays a dominant role in evaluating the absorbed dose. In the present work gas bremsstrahlung angular distribution and absorbed dose for the energies ranging from 1 to 5 GeV electron storage rings are studied using the Monte Carlo code, FLUKA. From the study, an empirical formula for gas bremsstrahlung dose estimation was deduced. The results were compared with the data obtained from reported experimental values. The results obtained from simulations are found to be in very good agreement with the reported experimental data. The results obtained are applied in estimating the gas bremsstrahlung dose for 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation source, Indus-2 at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, India. The paper discusses the details of the simulation and the results obtained.

  11. Requirements for very high power electron beam systems for utility stack gas treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K.; Frutiger, W. A.; Hiley, J.; Nablo, S. V.

    Energetic electrons in gas cause the formation of very reactive free radicals, ions, and excited-state molecules. These can react either with each other, or with oxygen and water in the system, or with some intentionally added chemical component and, thereby, produce removable compounds. Fuel economies and an increasing global interest in improving the environment, have resulted in a resurgence of interest in using very high power electron beam systems to reduce stack gas pollutants (SO 2, NO x, etc.), a process examined at low power levels in the last decade at JAERI. Increasing industrial demands for large width (greater than 2 meters), high dose rate (1 megarad at 1500 meters/minute) electron processors has led to significant advances in high power systems over the past several years. Selfshielded systems capable of up to 1000 mA at 300 kV are now in commercial use. The total electron beam requirements for fossil fuel fired power plants with generating capacities below 500 MWe can be met by a reasonable number of these state-of-the-art 300 kilowatt modules. Electron beam modules with power levels approaching 1 megawatt may ultimately be necessary to provide economy of scale for generating capacities higher than this, unless significant breakthroughs are made in enhancing the formation of stable removable compounds. This paper presents some of the results from the 300 kV, 180 kW electron beam pilot installation in Karlsruhe, West Germany ∗ along with a description of the state-of-the-art 300 kW electron processors. The requirements for very high power electron beam systems approaching 1 MW are discussed and some ideas for optimizing total electron beam system costs through the enhanced formation of stable removable compounds described.

  12. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal exchange-correlation density functionals are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). The ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response of the uniform electron gas. WDA is constructed so that it is exact for one-electron systems, and was shown to yield good results for solids, too. While the WDA has correct one-electron behavior, it is important to access the accuracy of the method in the opposite limit of the nearly homogeneous electron gas. To do so, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of WDA. We compare our results with Monte-Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local field correction, and identify the weak points of the conventional WDA in this limit. The WDA can be modified to improve the response function in the short wavelength regime. The exchange-correlation local field correction includes a term derived from the correlation part of the kinetic energy, which does not decay at qarrow ∞. This can be reproduced by adding a delta-function part to the WDA weight function. The resulting approximation is good in both limits, and may be useful for practical density functional calculations. (More at this URL.)

  13. Electron-beam generation in a wide-aperture open gas discharge: A comparative study for different inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2010-08-30

    In the present study, electron-beam generation by open discharges was examined. The study was performed at gas pressures up to 20 Torr, and covered all inert gases. At voltages up to 8 kV, electron-beam currents up to 1600 A with current density {approx}130 A/cm{sup 2} and a beam generation efficiency in excess of 93% were obtained. The production of electrons from cold cathode was concluded to be of photoemissive nature, enabling the production of high-intensity electron beams in any noble gas or in a mixture of a noble gas with molecular gases irrespective of cathode material.

  14. Electron attachment to oxygen, water, and methanol, in various drift chamber gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huk, M.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Wagner, A.

    1988-04-01

    Attachment of electrons to oxygen, water, and methanol molecules has been studied in various gas mixtures based on argon, methane and isobutane, a class of gases often used to operate large drift chambers. The measurements were performed using a drift chamber in which the conditions prevailing in large experiments could be closely reproduced. Attachment coefficients were extracted as a function of the gas composition and pressure, the drift field, and the concentration of the molecules under investigation. The observed effects are compared to other measurements, and are discussed within the frame of physical models.

  15. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  16. On the equation of state for an electron gas in an intense magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Tsiang, E.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper we derive the equation of state for a relativistic electron gas imbedded in a static homogeneous magnetic field of arbitrary strength. The derivation is based on the evaluation of the energy-momentum tensor and the use of Dirac's equation for such a problem. Contrary to a derivation presented several years ago, the present derivation is completely gauge-invariant. We also show how to recover, in an exact manner, the perfect gas law for the case of weak magnetic fields.

  17. Prospects for applications of electron beams in processing of gas and oil hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Pershukov, V. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2015-12-15

    Waste-free processing of oil and oil gases can be based on electron-beam technologies. Their major advantage is an opportunity of controlled manufacturing of a wide range of products with a higher utility value at moderate temperatures and pressures. The work considers certain key aspects of electron beam technologies applied for the chain cracking of heavy crude oil, for the synthesis of premium gasoline from oil gases, and also for the hydrogenation, alkylation, and isomerization of unsaturated oil products. Electronbeam processing of oil can be embodied via compact mobile modules which are applicable for direct usage at distant oil and gas fields. More cost-effective and reliable electron accelerators should be developed to realize the potential of electron-beam technologies.

  18. Runaway electron beams in the gas discharge for UV nitrogen laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamschikov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    The review of the methods for obtaining the runaway electron beams in the gas discharge is performed. The new method is offered, using which the beam is first formed in a narrow gap ({approx}1 mm) between the cathode and the grid and then it is accelerated by the field of the plasma column of the anomalous self-sustained discharge in the main gap (10-20 mm long). The electron beams with an energy of about 10 keV and current density of 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at a molecular nitrogen pressure of up to 100 Torr have been obtained experimentally. The results of research of the UV nitrogen laser with an excitation via runaway electron beam and radiation of energy of {approx}1 mJ are given. The UV nitrogen laser generation with the energy of {approx}1 mJ has been obtained by the runaway electron beams.

  19. Relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction from molecules in the gas phase (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S.; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a powerful technique that can be used to resolve structural changes of gas molecules during a photochemical reaction. However, the temporal resolution in pump-probe experiments has been limited to the few-ps level by the space-charge effect that broadens the electron pulse duration and by velocity mismatch between the pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, making only long-lived intermediate states accessible. Taking advantage of relativistic effects, Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electrons can be used to suppress both the space-charge effect and the velocity mismatch, and hence to achieve a temporal resolution that is fast enough to follow coherent nuclear motion in the target molecules. In this presentation, we show the first MeV UED experiments on gas phase targets. These experiments not only demonstrate that femtosecond temporal resolution is achieved, but also show that the spatial resolution is not compromised. This unprecedented combination of spatiotemporal resolution is sufficient to image coherent nuclear motions, and opens the door to a new class of experiments where the structural changes can be followed simultaneously in both space and time.

  20. Filling in the Roadmap for Self-Consistent Electron Cloud and Gas Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Seidl, P A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Stoltz, P H; Veitzer, S; Verboncoeur, J

    2005-10-11

    Electron clouds and gas pressure rise limit the performance of many major accelerators. A multi-laboratory effort to understand the underlying physics via the combined application of experiment, theory, and simulation is underway. We present here the status of the simulation capability development, based on a merge of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP and the electron cloud code POSINST, with additional functionalities. The development of the new capability follows a ''roadmap'' describing the different functional modules, and their inter-relationships, that are ultimately needed to reach self-consistency. Newly developed functionalities include a novel particle mover bridging the time scales between electron and ion motion, a module to generate neutrals desorbed by beam ion impacts at the wall, and a module to track impact ionization of the gas by beam ions or electrons. Example applications of the new capability to the modeling of electron effects in the High Current Experiment (HCX) are given.

  1. 1D simulation of runaway electrons generation in pulsed high-pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Semeniuk, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of theoretical modelling of runaway electron generation in the high-pressure nanosecond pulsed gas discharge are presented. A novel hybrid model of gas discharge has been successfully built. Hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches are used simultaneously to describe the dynamics of different components of low-temperature discharge plasma. To consider motion of ions and low-energy (plasma) electrons the corresponding equations of continuity with drift-diffusion approximation are used. To describe high-energy (runaway) electrons the Boltzmann kinetic equation is included. As a result of the simulation we obtained spatial and temporal distributions of charged particles and electric field in a pulsed discharge. Furthermore, the energy spectra calculated runaway electrons in different cross-sections, particularly, the discharge gap in the anode plane. It is shown that the average energy of fast electrons (in eV) in the anode plane is usually slightly higher than the instantaneous value of the applied voltage to the gap (in V).

  2. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  3. Giant Andreev reflection in a two-dimensional electron gas coupled to superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wees, Bart J.

    1998-03-01

    I will review recent experiments on ballistic transport in a two- dimensional electron gas coupled to superconductors (Work done in collaboration with A.F. Morpurgo, S.G. den Hartog, and T.M. Klapwijk). This system has made it possible to study various aspects of coherent Andreev reflection, such as the modification of the conductance of a quantum point contact due to retroreflected holes, and the formation of Andreev bound states between two superconductors. In particular I will discuss the phenomenon of giant Andreev reflection, where, despite of the presence of disorder, electrons injected through a quantum point contact can be Andreev reflected with probability one.

  4. Surface plasmon dispersion relation for the plane-bounded electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsh, O. K.; Agarwal, B. K.

    1987-01-01

    Expressions for the dispersion relation of surface plasmon oscillations for the plane-bounded electron gas are derived using the hydrodynamical model. The results for the high and low electron densities agree with the standard results of Kunz, Ritchie and Arakawa. The hydrodynamic interface surface plasmons are discussed. The dispersion relation derived for the volume plasmon oscillations resembles that of Bohm and Pines. The effect of the perturbation set by long-range forces and the effect of short-range interactions are studied. A new critical wave vector Kc is found at which the oscillations are inhibited. The values of Kc are obtained for the various orders of perturbation.

  5. Zener tunneling between landau orbits in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, C L; Zhang, J; Du, R R; Simmons, J A; Reno, J L

    2002-08-12

    Magnetotransport in a laterally confined two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) can exhibit modified scattering channels owing to a tilted Hall potential. Transitions of electrons between Landau levels with shifted guiding centers can be accomplished through a Zener tunneling mechanism, and make a significant contribution to the magnetoresistance. A remarkable oscillation effect in weak field magnetoresistance has been observed in high-mobility 2DEGs in GaAs -Al Ga 0.3As (0.7) heterostructures, and can be well explained by the Zener mechanism.

  6. Quadrupole deformation of electron shells in the lattice dynamics of compressed rare-gas crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    The lattice dynamics of rare-gas crystals has been constructed taking into account the deformation of electron shells of the atoms of the dipole and quadrupole types, depending on the displacement of the nuclei. The obtained equations of lattice vibrations have been investigated in the long-wavelength approximation. The role played by the three-body interaction and the deformation of the electron shells in the violation of the Cauchy relation has been discussed. The calculated Birch elastic moduli for Xe and deviations from the Cauchy relation are in good agreement with the available experimental data over a wide range of pressures.

  7. Hierarchical graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite films for high-performance flexible electronic gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunlong; Wang, Ting; Chen, Fanhong; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhongzhen; Wan, Pengbo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully interconnected and deposited onto flexible PET substrates to form hierarchical nanocomposite (PPANI/rGO-FPANI) network films. The assembled flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor exhibits high sensing performance towards NH3 gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 100 ppm, reliable transparency (90.3% at 550 nm) for the PPANI/rGO-FPANI film (6 h sample), fast response/recovery time (36 s/18 s), and robust flexibility without an obvious performance decrease after 1000 bending/extending cycles. The excellent sensing performance could probably be ascribed to the synergetic effects and the relatively high surface area (47.896 m2 g-1) of the PPANI/rGO-FPANI network films, the efficient artificial neural network sensing channels, and the effectively exposed active surfaces. It is expected to hold great promise for developing flexible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive electronic sensors with real-time analysis to be potentially integrated into wearable flexible electronics.A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully

  8. Stable Laser-Driven Electron Beams from a Steady-State-Flow Gas Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, J.; Popp, A.; Karsch, S.; Major, Zs.; Marx, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hoerlein, R.; Gruener, F.; Habs, D.; Krausz, F.; Rowlands-Rees, T. P.; Hooker, S. M.

    2009-01-22

    Quasi-monoenergetic, laser-driven electron beams of up to {approx}200 MeV in energy have been generated from steady-state-flow gas cells [1]. These beams are emitted within a low-divergence cone of 2.1{+-}0.5 mrad FWHM and feature unparalleled shot-to-shot stability in energy (2.5% rms), pointing direction (1.4 mrad rms) and charge (16% rms) owing to a highly reproducible plasma-density profile within the laser-plasma-interaction volume. Laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in gas cells of this type constitutes a simple and reliable source of relativistic electrons with well defined properties, which should allow for applications such as the production of extreme-ultraviolet undulator radiation in the near future.

  9. Anisotropic Heisenberg form of RKKY interaction in the one-dimensional spin-polarized electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the indirect exchange interaction between two localized magnetic moments, known as Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction, in a one-dimensional (1D) spin-polarized electron gas. We find explicit expressions for each term of this interaction, study their oscillatory behaviors as a function of the distance between two magnetic moments, R, and compare them with the known results for RKKY interaction in the case of 1D standard electron gas. We show this interaction can be written in an anisotropic Heisenberg form, E(R) = λ2χ xx(S1xS2x + S1yS2y) + λ2χ zzS1zS2z, coming from broken time-reversal symmetry of the host material.

  10. The nanoscale implications of a molecular gas beam during electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Fowlkes, Jason; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Utke, Ivo; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2014-02-26

    The gas flux direction in focused electron beam induced processes can strongly destabilize the morphology on the nanometer scale. We demonstrate how pattern parameters such as position relative to the gas nozzle, axial rotation, scanning direction, and patterning sequence result in different growth modes for identical structures. This is mainly caused by nanoscale geometric shadowing, particularly when shadowing distances are comparable to surface diffusion lengths of (CH3)3-Pt-CpCH3 adsorbates. Furthermore, two different adsorbate replenishment mechanisms exist and are governed by either surface diffusion or directional gas flux adsorption. The experimental study is complemented by calculations and dynamic growth simulations which successfully emulate the observed morphology instabilities and support the proposed growth model.

  11. Gas counter for low temperature Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Jean, Malick; Jouen, Samuel; Vaudolon, Charly; Hannoyer, Béatrice

    2012-05-01

    The operation of a gas counter, designed for Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy measurement at low temperature, has been investigated. The experimental setup is described and tested with two pure gases, He and Ne, and two mixtures, He-5%CH4 and He-5%N2. The impacts on the counter performances of the applied voltage, the gas composition and pressure as well as the gas renewing are investigated between 41 K and 300 K. This investigation is made using 119Sn Mössbauer source and metallic tin absorber. The appropriate operating conditions of the present counter have been established for temperatures down to 41 K for both pure gases, and 61 and 85 K for He-5%N2 and He-5%CH4 respectively.

  12. Genetic algorithm for the pair distribution function of the electron gas.

    PubMed

    Vericat, Fernando; Stoico, César O; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Renzi, Danilo G

    2011-12-01

    The pair distribution function of the electron gas is calculated using a parameterized generalization of hypernetted chain approximation with the parameters being obtained by optimizing the system energy with a genetic algorithm. The functions so obtained are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed by other authors in its variational and di_usion versions showing a very good agreement especially with the di_usion Monte Carlo results.

  13. Equation of state of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2016-12-01

    We study the problem of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy. The specific heat at constant volume and particle number CV and the specific heat at constant pressure and particle number CP are calculated. The question of equation of state is also studied. Non degenerate and degenerate limits are considered. We generalize the formulas obtained in the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic regimes.

  14. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOEpatents

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  15. Study of the one dimensional electron gas arrays confined by steps in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Guipeng; Wei, Hongyuan; Jiao, Chunmei; Yang, Shaoyan; Wang, Lianshan; Zhu, Qinsheng

    2014-05-01

    One dimensional electron gas (1DEG) arrays in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have been studied. The steps at the interface would lead to the lateral barriers and limit the electron movement perpendicular to such steps. Through a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson approach, the electron energy levels and wave functions were calculated. It was found that when the total electron density was increased, the lateral barriers were lowered due to the screening effects by the electrons, and the electron gas became more two-dimension like. The calculated 1DEG densities were compared to the experimental values and good agreements were found. Moreover, we found that a higher doping density is more beneficial to form 1-D like electron gas arrays.

  16. Study of the one dimensional electron gas arrays confined by steps in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huijie E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Guipeng; Wei, Hongyuan; Jiao, Chunmei; Yang, Shaoyan E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Lianshan; Zhu, Qinsheng

    2014-05-21

    One dimensional electron gas (1DEG) arrays in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have been studied. The steps at the interface would lead to the lateral barriers and limit the electron movement perpendicular to such steps. Through a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson approach, the electron energy levels and wave functions were calculated. It was found that when the total electron density was increased, the lateral barriers were lowered due to the screening effects by the electrons, and the electron gas became more two-dimension like. The calculated 1DEG densities were compared to the experimental values and good agreements were found. Moreover, we found that a higher doping density is more beneficial to form 1-D like electron gas arrays.

  17. Double ionization effect in electron accelerations by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of laser-induced double-ionization of a helium gas (with inhomogeneous density profile) on vacuum electron acceleration. For enough laser intensity, helium gas can be found doubly ionized and it strengthens the divergence of the pulse. The double ionization of helium gas can defocus the laser pulse significantly, and electrons are accelerated by the front of the laser pulse in vacuum and then decelerated by the defocused trail part of the laser pulse. It is observed that the electrons experience a very low laser-intensity at the trailing part of the laser pulse. Hence, there is not much electron deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse. We found that the inhomogeneity of the neutral gas reduced the rate of tunnel ionization causing less defocusing of the laser pulse and thus the electron energy gain is reduced.

  18. Computational studies of suppression of microwave gas breakdown by crossed dc magnetic field using electron fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengcheng; Guo, Lixin; Shu, Panpan

    2016-08-01

    The gas breakdown induced by a square microwave pulse with a crossed dc magnetic field is investigated using the electron fluid model, in which the accurate electron energy distribution functions are adopted. Simulation results show that at low gas pressures the dc magnetic field of a few tenths of a tesla can prolong the breakdown formation time by reducing the mean electron energy. With the gas pressure increasing, the higher dc magnetic field is required to suppress the microwave breakdown. The electric field along the microwave propagation direction generated due to the motion of electrons obviously increases with the dc magnetic field, but it is much less than the incident electric field. The breakdown predictions of the electron fluid model agree very well with the particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision simulations as well as the scaling law for the microwave gas breakdown.

  19. Study of spatial resolution of coordinate detectors based on Gas Electron Multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Maltsev, T. V.; Shekhtman, L. I.

    2017-02-01

    Spatial resolution of GEM-based tracking detectors is determined in the simulation and measured in the experiments. The simulation includes GEANT4 implemented transport of high energy electrons with careful accounting of atomic relaxation processes including emission of fluorescent photons and Auger electrons and custom post-processing with accounting of diffusion, gas amplification fluctuations, distribution of signals on readout electrodes, electronics noise and particular algorithm of final coordinate calculation (center of gravity). The simulation demonstrates that the minimum of spatial resolution of about 10 μm can be achieved with a gas mixture of Ar -CO2 (75-25 %) at a strips pitch from 250 μm to 300 μm. At a larger pitch the resolution quickly degrades reaching 80-100 μm at a pitch of 460-500 μm. Spatial resolution of low-material triple-GEM detectors for the DEUTERON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring is measured at the extracted beam facility of the VEPP-4 M collider. One-coordinate resolution of the DEUTERON detector is measured with electron beam of 500 MeV, 1 GeV and 3.5 GeV energies. The determined value of spatial resolution varies in the range from approximately 35 μm to 50 μm for orthogonal tracks in the experiments.

  20. Extraordinary waves in two dimensional electron gas with separate spin evolution and Coulomb exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2017-02-01

    The hydrodynamics analysis of waves in a two-dimensional degenerate electron gas with a separate spin evolution is presented. The transverse electric field is included along with the longitudinal electric field. The Coulomb exchange interaction is included in the analysis. In contrast with the three-dimensional plasma-like media, the contribution of the transverse electric field is rather small, but it decreases the frequency of the extraordinary wave at small wave vectors. We show the decrease in the frequency of both the extraordinary (Langmuir) wave and the spin-electron acoustic wave due to the exchange interaction. Moreover, spin-electron acoustic waves have negative dispersion at the relatively large spin-polarization. The corresponding dispersion dependencies are presented and analyzed.

  1. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, N.; Santhana Raman, P.; Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Kan, J. A. van; Khursheed, A.

    2016-02-15

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  2. LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces: A new two-dimensional electron gas system

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, K.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Kisslinger, Kim; ...

    2015-03-01

    We report a new 2D electron gas (2DEG) system at the interface between a Mott insulator, LaTiO₃, and a band insulator, KTaO₃. For LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces, we observe metallic conduction from 2 K to 300 K. One serious technological limitation of SrTiO₃-based conducting oxide interfaces for electronics applications is the relatively low carrier mobility (0.5-10 cm²/V s) of SrTiO₃ at room temperature. By using KTaO₃, we achieve mobilities in LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces as high as 21 cm²/V s at room temperature, over a factor of 3 higher than observed in doped bulk SrTiO₃. By density functional theory, we attribute the higher mobilitymore » in KTaO₃ 2DEGs to the smaller effective mass for electrons in KTaO₃.« less

  3. LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces: A new two-dimensional electron gas system

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, K.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Kisslinger, Kim; Shen, Xuan; Su, Dong; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    We report a new 2D electron gas (2DEG) system at the interface between a Mott insulator, LaTiO₃, and a band insulator, KTaO₃. For LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces, we observe metallic conduction from 2 K to 300 K. One serious technological limitation of SrTiO₃-based conducting oxide interfaces for electronics applications is the relatively low carrier mobility (0.5-10 cm²/V s) of SrTiO₃ at room temperature. By using KTaO₃, we achieve mobilities in LaTiO₃/KTaO₃ interfaces as high as 21 cm²/V s at room temperature, over a factor of 3 higher than observed in doped bulk SrTiO₃. By density functional theory, we attribute the higher mobility in KTaO₃ 2DEGs to the smaller effective mass for electrons in KTaO₃.

  4. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Xu, X; Pang, R; Raman, P Santhana; Khursheed, A; van Kan, J A

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  5. Dynamical correlation effects on structure factor of spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Gurvinder; Moudgil, R. K.; Kumar, Krishan; Garg, Vinayak

    2015-06-24

    We report a theoretical study on static density structure factor S(q) of a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas over a wide range of electron number density r{sub s}. The electron correlations are treated within the dynamical version of the self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander, the so-called qSTLS approach. The calculated S(q) exhibits almost perfect agreement with the quantum Monte Carlo simulation data at r{sub s}=1. However, the extent of agreement somewhat diminishes with increasing r{sub s}, particularly for q around 2k{sub F}. Seen in conjunction with the success of qSTLS theory in dealing with correlations in the unpolarized phase, our study suggests that the otherwise celebrated qSTLS theory is not that good in treating the like-spin correlations.

  6. Suprathermal Electrons Generated by the Two-Plasmon-Decay Instability in Gas-Filled Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S P; Seka, W; Stoeckl, C; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Meyerhofer, D D; McCrory, R L; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H; Strozzi, D J; Meeker, D; Williams, E A; Jones, O S; Callahan, D A; Rosen, M D; Landen, O L; Sorce, C; MacGowan, B J; Kruer, W L

    2008-06-03

    For the first time a burst of suprathermal electrons is observed from the exploding laser-entrance-hole window of gas-filled hohlraums driven with 13.5 kJ of 351-nm laser light. The two-plasmon-decay instability appears to produce up to 20 J of hot electrons with T{sub hot} {approx} 75 keV at early times and has a sharp laser-intensity threshold between 0.3 and 0.5 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed threshold can be exploited to mitigate preheat by window hot electrons in ignition hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility and achieve high-density, high-pressure conditions in indirect drive implosions.

  7. Screening of the Coulomb field in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A.

    2009-05-15

    The quantum theory is constructed for screening of the Coulomb field of a point charge in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder. The asymptotics of the screened potential are calculated for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases. It is demonstrated that, in the degenerate case, apart from the known quasi-classical monotonic part, the result contains the quantum oscillating part, which corresponds to Friedel oscillations. The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the screened Coulomb interaction of electrons on a cylindrical surface are described analytically. It is shown that the Friedel oscillations can be represented as a superposition of oscillations with different frequencies which are determined by the macroscopic properties of the nanotube.

  8. Two-dimensional electron gas in GaAs/SrHfO3 heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianli; Yuan, Mengqi; Tang, Gang; Li, Huichao; Zhang, Junting; Guo, Sandong

    2016-06-01

    The III-V/perovskite-oxide system can potentially create new material properties and new device applications by combining the rich properties of perovskite-oxides together with the superior optical and electronic properties of III-Vs. The structural and electronic properties of the surface and interface are studied using first-principles calculations for the GaAs/SrHfO3 heterostructure. We investigate the specific adsorption sites and the atomic structure at the initial growth stage of GaAs on the SrHfO3 (001) substrate. Ga and As adsorption atoms preferentially adsorb at the top sites of oxygen atoms under different coverage. The energetically favorable interfaces are presented among the atomic arrangements of the GaAs/SrHfO3 interfaces. Our calculations predict the existing of the two-dimensional electron gas in the GaAs/SrHfO3 heterostructure.

  9. Simplified theory of the acoustic surface plasmons at the two-dimentional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jong-Kwan; Kim, Yon-Il; Kim, Kwang-Hyon; Kang, Chol-Jin; Ri, Myong Chol; Kim, Song-Hyok

    2016-01-01

    In the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), the system can be polarized by metal ions on the 2D surface, resulting in screening of Coulomb interaction between electrons. We calculate the 2D screened Coulomb interaction in Thomas-Fermi approximation and find that both electron-hole (e-h) and collective excitations occurring in the 2DEG can be described with the use of effective dielectric function, in the random-phase approximation (RPA). In this paper we show that the mode proportional to in-plane momentum, called acoustic surface plasmon (ASP), can appear in long-wavelength limit. We calculate ASP dispersion and determine the critical wave number and frequency for the ASP decay into e-h pair, and the velocity of ASP. Our result agrees qualitatively with previous ones in tendency.

  10. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  11. Ab initio study of He-He interactions in homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Niu, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Ying

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the immersion energy of a single He and the He-He interactions in homogeneous electron gas using ab initio calculations. It is found that He dislikes electrons and He-He interact via the He induced Friedel oscillations of electron densities. A critical electron density at which the global binding energy extremum shifts from the first minimum to the second one is identified. We also discover that the He-He global binding energy minimum of ∼-0.09 eV is reached at an optimal electron density of 0.04 e/Å3, corresponding to an optimal He-He separation of ∼1.7 Å. Further, the He atoms are found to gain a trivial amount of 2s and 2p states from the free electrons, inducing a hybridization between the He s- and p-states. The present results can qualitatively interpret the well-known He self-trapping behavior in metals.

  12. The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas in an electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haining; Du, Jiulin

    2014-11-15

    The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas of the plasma in an electromagnetic field is studied. We exactly obtained an expression of the q-parameter based on Boltzmann kinetic theories for plasmas, where Coulombian interactions and Lorentz forces play dominant roles. We show that the q-parameter different from unity is related by an equation to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the gas. The effect of the magnetic field on the q-parameter depends on the overall bulk velocity. Thus the q-parameter for the electron gas in an electromagnetic field represents the nonequilibrium nature or nonisothermal configurations of the plasma with electromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • An expression of the q-parameter is obtained for nonequilibrium plasma with electromagnetic interactions. • The q-parameter is related to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the plasma. • The q-parameter represents the nonequilibrium nature of the complex plasma with electromagnetic interactions.

  13. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-09

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  14. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  15. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  16. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  17. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-02-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  18. Development of gas pulsing system for electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sugiura, A.

    2008-02-01

    A gas-pulsing system for an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with all permanent magnets (Kei2 source) at NIRS has been developed and tested. The system consists of a small vessel (30ml) to reserve CH4 gas and two fast solenoid valves that are installed at both sides of the vessel. They are connected to each other and to the Kei2 source by using a stainless-steel pipe (4mm inner diameter), where the length of the pipe from the valve to the source is 60cm and the conductance is 1.2l /s. From the results of the test, almost 300eμA for a pulsed C4+12 beam was obtained at a Faraday cup in an extraction-beam channel with a pressure range of 4000Pa in the vessel. At this time, the valve has an open time of 10ms and the delay time between the valve open time and the application of microwave power is 100ms. In experiments, the conversion efficiency for input CH4 molecules to the quantity of extracted C4+12 ions in one beam pulse was found to be around 3% and the ratio of the total amount of the gas requirement was only 10% compared with the case of continuous gas provided in 3.3s of repetition in HIMAC.

  19. Fermionic path-integral Monte Carlo results for the uniform electron gas at finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Filinov, V S; Fortov, V E; Bonitz, M; Moldabekov, Zh

    2015-03-01

    The uniform electron gas (UEG) at finite temperature has recently attracted substantial interest due to the experimental progress in the field of warm dense matter. To explain the experimental data, accurate theoretical models for high-density plasmas are needed that depend crucially on the quality of the thermodynamic properties of the quantum degenerate nonideal electrons and of the treatment of their interaction with the positive background. Recent fixed-node path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) data are believed to be the most accurate for the UEG at finite temperature, but they become questionable at high degeneracy when the Brueckner parameter rs=a/aB--the ratio of the mean interparticle distance to the Bohr radius--approaches 1. The validity range of these simulations and their predictive capabilities for the UEG are presently unknown. This is due to the unknown quality of the used fixed nodes and of the finite-size scaling from N=33 simulated particles (per spin projection) to the macroscopic limit. To analyze these questions, we present alternative direct fermionic path integral Monte Carlo (DPIMC) simulations that are independent from RPIMC. Our simulations take into account quantum effects not only in the electron system but also in their interaction with the uniform positive background. Also, we use substantially larger particle numbers (up to three times more) and perform an extrapolation to the macroscopic limit. We observe very good agreement with RPIMC, for the polarized electron gas, up to moderate densities around rs=4, and larger deviations for the unpolarized case, for low temperatures. For higher densities (high electron degeneracy), rs≲1.5, both RPIMC and DPIMC are problematic due to the increased fermion sign problem.

  20. Validity of power functionals for a homogeneous electron gas in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaja, A.; Eich, F. G.; Baldsiefen, T.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-03-01

    Physically valid and numerically efficient approximations for the exchange and correlation energy are critical for reduced-density-matrix-functional theory to become a widely used method in electronic structure calculations. Here we examine the physical limits of power functionals of the form f (n ,n') =(nn')α for the scaling function in the exchange-correlation energy. To this end we obtain numerically the minimizing momentum distributions for the three- and two-dimensional homogeneous electron gas, respectively. In particular, we examine the limiting values for the power α to yield physically sound solutions that satisfy the Lieb-Oxford lower bound for the exchange-correlation energy and exclude pinned states with the condition n (k )<1 for all wave vectors k . The results refine the constraints previously obtained from trial momentum distributions. We also compute the values for α that yield the exact correlation energy and its kinetic part for both the three- and two-dimensional electron gas. In both systems, narrow regimes of validity and accuracy are found at α ≳0.6 and at rs≳10 for the density parameter, corresponding to relatively low densities.

  1. Quenching Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Electron Gas by a Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael; Rudin, Sergey; Greg Rupper Collaboration; Andrey Muraviev Collaboration

    Plasmonic detectors of terahertz (THz) radiation using the plasma wave excitation in 2D electron gas are capable of detecting ultra short THz pulses. To study the plasma wave propagation and decay, we used femtosecond laser pulses to quench the plasma waves excited by a short THz pulse. The femtosecond laser pulse generates a large concentration of the electron-hole pairs effectively shorting the 2D electron gas channel and dramatically increasing the channel conductance. Immediately after the application of the femtosecond laser pulse, the equivalent circuit of the device reduces to the source and drain contact resistances connected by a short. The total response charge is equal to the integral of the current induced by the THz pulse from the moment of the THz pulse application to the moment of the femtosecond laser pulse application. This current is determined by the plasma wave rectification. Registering the charge as a function of the time delay between the THz and laser pulses allowed us to follow the plasmonic wave decay. We observed the decaying oscillations in a sample with a partially gated channel. The decay depends on the gate bias and reflects the interplay between the gated and ungated plasmons in the device channel. Army Research Office.

  2. Emergence of an excitonic collective mode in the dilute electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami

    2016-12-01

    By comparing two expressions for the polarization function Π (q ,i ω ) given in terms of two different local-field factors, G+(q ,i ω ) and Gs(q ,i ω ) , we have derived the kinetic-energy-fluctuation (or sixth-power) sum rule for the momentum distribution function n (p ) in the three-dimensional electron gas. With use of this sum rule, together with the total-number (or second-power) and the kinetic-energy (or fourth-power) sum rules, we have obtained n (p ) in the low-density electron gas at negative compressibility (namely, rs>5.25 with rs being the conventional density parameter) up to rs≈22 by improving on the interpolation scheme due to Gori-Giorge and Ziesche proposed in 2002. The obtained results for n (p ) combined with the improved form for Gs(q ,ω +i 0+) are employed to calculate the dynamical structure factor S (q ,ω ) to reveal that a giant peak, even bigger than the plasmon peak, originating from an excitonic collective mode made of electron-hole pair excitations, emerges in the low-ω region at |q | near 2 pF (pF: the Fermi wave number). Connected with this mode, we have discovered a singular point in the retarded dielectric function at ω =0 and |q | ≈2 pF .

  3. Investigation of the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method using homogeneous electron gas models.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, James J; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali

    2012-06-28

    Using the homogeneous electron gas (HEG) as a model, we investigate the sources of error in the "initiator" adaptation to full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (i-FCIQMC), with a view to accelerating convergence. In particular, we find that the fixed-shift phase, where the walker number is allowed to grow slowly, can be used to effectively assess stochastic and initiator error. Using this approach we provide simple explanations for the internal parameters of an i-FCIQMC simulation. We exploit the consistent basis sets and adjustable correlation strength of the HEG to analyze properties of the algorithm, and present finite basis benchmark energies for N = 14 over a range of densities 0.5 ≤ r(s) ≤ 5.0 a.u. A single-point extrapolation scheme is introduced to produce complete basis energies for 14, 38, and 54 electrons. It is empirically found that, in the weakly correlated regime, the computational cost scales linearly with the plane wave basis set size, which is justifiable on physical grounds. We expect the fixed-shift strategy to reduce the computational cost of many i-FCIQMC calculations of weakly correlated systems. In addition, we provide benchmarks for the electron gas, to be used by other quantum chemical methods in exploring periodic solid state systems.

  4. Finite two-dimensional electron gas in a patterned semiconductor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion; Livingston, Victoria; Thomas, Elsa; Saganti, Seth

    On various occasions, fabrication of a two-dimensional semiconductor quantum dot leads to a small system of electrons confined in a domain that is not circular and may have a pronounced square (or rectangular) shape. In this work we consider a square-shaped semiconductor quantum dot configuration and treat the system of electrons as a finite two-dimensional electron gas. Within this framework, we adopt a Hartree-Fock approach and study the properties of a small two-dimensional system of electrons confined in a finite square region. We calculate the energy for various finite systems of fully spin-polarized (spinless) electrons interacting with a Coulomb potential. The results give a fairly accurate picture of how the energy of the finite system evolves towards the bulk value as the size of the system increases. The calculations for a square domain are challenging since expressions depend in each component of particle's position and not the radial distance from the center of the square-shaped semiconductor quantum dot. Therefore, we also consider a possible circularly symmetric approximation to the problem. We assess the quality of this approximation and discuss instances where its use is not only desirable, but also accurate. This research was supported in part by U.S. Army Research Office (ARO) Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0139 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. DMR-1410350.

  5. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  6. X-ray diagnostic for current density profiling relativistic electron beams in vacuum and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; Koppel, L.; Smith, J.

    1986-02-15

    An x-ray imaging technique has been studied for the purpose of observing the current density profile in a high-current relativistic electron beam (50 MeV, 10 kA). Calculations and measurements of energy spectra and intensities are in good agreement. Results indicate sufficient photon yield for pinhole imaging when the beam deposits a small part of its energy in high-Z gas or a thin high-Z foil. Characteristic L and K x-ray emission is not found not be a reliable technique due to strong L and K shell fluorescence in the presence of intense bremsstrahlung radiation. It is also found that at pressures on the order of one atmosphere, the density of energy deposition in a gas cell is too small to generate sufficient photon yield for time-resolved measurements.

  7. Surface photocurrent in an electron gas over liquid He subjected to a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    The photogalvanic effect is studied in electron gas over the liquid He surface with the presence of quantizing magnetic field. The gas is affected by the weak alternating microwave electric field tilted towards the surface normal. Both linear and circular photogalvanic effects are studied. The current occurs via indirect phototransition with the participation of ripplons emission or absorption. The photogalvanic tensor has strong resonances at the microwave frequency ω approaching to the frequencies of transitions between size-quantized subbands. The resonances are symmetric or antisymmetric, depending on a tensor component. Other resonances appear at ω ≈ nω c , where n being integer and ω c is the cyclotron frequency. It is found that the latter resonances split to two peaks connected with emission or absorption of ripplons. The calculated photogalvanic coefficients are in accord with the experimental observed values.

  8. Infrared Line Emission from Molecular Gas Heated by X-Rays and Energetic Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    "I propose to carry out a detailed study using infrared observations (and in some cases, optical and ultraviolet observations) of dense interstellar gas exposed to intense fluxes of X-rays and/or energetic electrons. This is undoubtedly the dominant source of line emission for clouds exposed to X-rays from active galactic nuclei, supernova shocks, or embedded X-ray sources (e.g., X-ray binaries), or to high-temperature or relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters, near powerful radio sources, or supernova remnants. Detailed physical and chemical models of such clouds will be used to analyze infrared observations of the Great Annihilator X-ray source in the Galactic Center, cD galaxies in massive cooling flows, and the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies which will be obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), UV and optical observations of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based near-infrared observations of Seyfert nuclei. Results from this work will also be of great relevance to observations obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS). In the first year of funding of this proposal, my chief collaborators (D.J. Hollenbach and A.G.G.M. Tielens, both of NASA Ames Research Center) and I concentrated on completing our models of the physical conditions in, and the resulting line emission from, dense gas irradiated by X-rays. As noted in the original proposal, some important physical processes were not yet thoroughly incorporated into our models at the time of submission. We completed our modeling of the physical conditions and line emission for essentially the entire range of parameter space (five orders of magnitude in X-ray flux to gas density ratio) occupied by typical dense interstellar clouds in which the gas is mostly neutral and X-rays are important for the ionization, chemistry, and thermal balance.

  9. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  10. Symmetric reflection line resonator and its quality factor modulation by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Miao-Lei; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2014-02-24

    We have designed and fabricated a half-wavelength reflection line resonator that consists of a pair of coupled microstrip lines on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. By changing the top gate voltage on a small square with a two-dimensional electron gas under the resonator, the quality factor was tuned over a large range from 2700 to below 600. Apart from being of fundamental interest, this gate modulation technique has the potential for use in on-chip resonator applications.

  11. Electron-Impact Excitation Cross Sections for Modeling Non-Equilibrium Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Munafo, Alessandro; Wray, Alan; Carbon, Duane F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a database for modeling hypersonic entry in a partially ionized gas under non-equilibrium, the electron-impact excitation cross sections of atoms have been calculated using perturbation theory. The energy levels covered in the calculation are retrieved from the level list in the HyperRad code. The downstream flow-field is determined by solving a set of continuity equations for each component. The individual structure of each energy level is included. These equations are then complemented by the Euler system of equations. Finally, the radiation field is modeled by solving the radiative transfer equation.

  12. New edge magnetoplasmon for a two-dimensional electron gas in a ring geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proetto, C. R.

    1992-09-01

    The dynamical response of a classical two-dimensional electron gas confined in a ring geometry under a perpendicular magnetic field is analyzed. Within the hydrodynamical approach and in the strong magnetic field limit, a new set of antidot edge magnetoplasmons is obtained, corresponding to density oscillations circulating along the inner boundary of the ring and whose frequency increases with magnetic field. The associated self-induced distribution of densities and currents are presented, together with an analysis of the size dependence of these perimeter waves.

  13. Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance of Neutral Donors Interacting with a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Morton, J. J. L.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.

    2011-04-20

    We have measured the electrically detected magnetic resonance of donor-doped silicon field-effect transistors in resonant X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavities. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) resonance signal increases by two orders of magnitude from X- to W-band, while the donor resonance signals are enhanced by over one order of magnitude. Bolometric effects and spin-dependent scattering are inconsistent with the observations. We propose that polarization transfer from the donor to the 2DEG is the main mechanism giving rise to the spin resonance signals.

  14. A complete theory for the magnetism of an ideal gas of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan; Sen, Swati

    2013-05-15

    We have explored Pauli paramagnetism, Landau diamagnetism, and de Haas-van Alphen effect in a single framework, and unified these three effects for all temperatures as well as for all strengths of magnetic field. Our result goes beyond Pauli-Landau result on the magnetism of the 3-D ideal gas of electrons, and is able to describe crossover of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillation to the saturation of magnetization. We also have obtained a novel asymptotic series expansion for the low temperature properties of the system.

  15. Zero-order crystallization in the Bethe-Fermi homework and electron gas problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiaggio, M. C.; De Llano, M.; Plastino, A.; Szybisz, L.; Ramírez, S.

    1980-04-01

    Single-determinantal states consisting of localized, non-overlapping single-particle orbitals are used in comparison with those made up of plane wave ones to show that neutron matter prefers a "crystalline" configuration beyond a density of around 0.07 fm -3 for the ν0 homework potential. The total energy is not too high above the best Jastrow-correlated calculations. No such effect is found for the ν1 homework potential. The analogous question for the electron gas is also studied.

  16. Determination of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, J.F.; Bopp, R.J.; Carmichael, R.H.; Farid, K.Z.; Lemberger, L.

    1982-10-01

    This gas-chromatographic method for assay of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in human plasma involves extraction of the drugs and use of a /sup 63/Ni electron-capture detector. The linear range of detection is 25 to 800 micrograms/L for each drug. Overall precision (CV) in the concentration range of 10 to 100 micrograms/L for both drugs was approximately 10%. Accuracy (relative error) in the same concentration range was approximately +10%. None of the commonly prescribed antidepressants or tranquilizers that we tested interfere with the assay.

  17. Quantitative detection of trace explosive vapors by programmed temperature desorption gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L

    2014-07-25

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples.

  18. Electron gas quality at various (110)-GaAs interfaces as benchmark for cleaved edge overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, S.; Reichl, C.; Berl, M.; Alt, L.; Maier, A.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    We study molecular beam epitaxial growth on the unusual (110) surface of GaAs substrates as prerequisite for cleaved edge overgrown structures. We present the first systematic comparison of the quality of two dimensional electron systems on simultaneously overgrown (110) GaAs monitor wafers with ex situ as well as in situ cleaved (110) facets. Our study confirms that characterization of the monitor wafer is a valid benchmark for the magnetotransport characteristics of structures grown on cleaved facets. We show that deviating results can be traced back to (110) substrates of lower quality. We also demonstrate that the roughness of the in situ cleaved facets is decisive for the quality of the induced electron gas.

  19. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with many-body states of a two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Stephan; Wuester, Wolf; Haupt, Florian; Faelt, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Imamoglu, Ataç

    2014-10-17

    Light-matter interaction has played a central role in understanding as well as engineering new states of matter. Reversible coupling of excitons and photons enabled groundbreaking results in condensation and superfluidity of nonequilibrium quasiparticles with a photonic component. We investigated such cavity-polaritons in the presence of a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas, exhibiting strongly correlated phases. When the cavity was on resonance with the Fermi level, we observed previously unknown many-body physics associated with a dynamical hole-scattering potential. In finite magnetic fields, polaritons show distinct signatures of integer and fractional quantum Hall ground states. Our results lay the groundwork for probing nonequilibrium dynamics of quantum Hall states and exploiting the electron density dependence of polariton splitting so as to obtain ultrastrong optical nonlinearities.

  20. Terahertz Radiation Heterodyne Detector Using Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in a GaN Heterostructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Crawford, Timothy J.; Sergeev, Andrei V.; Mitin, Vladimir V.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution submillimeter/terahertz spectroscopy is important for studying atmospheric and interstellar molecular gaseous species. It typically uses heterodyne receivers where an unknown (weak) signal is mixed with a strong signal from the local oscillator (LO) operating at a slightly different frequency. The non-linear mixer devices for this frequency range are unique and are not off-the-shelf commercial products. Three types of THz mixers are commonly used: Schottky diode, superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB), and superconductor-insulation-superconductor (SIS) junction. A HEB mixer based on the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the interface of two slightly dissimilar semiconductors was developed. This mixer can operate at temperatures between 100 and 300 K, and thus can be used with just passive radiative cooling available even on small spacecraft.

  1. Spin-susceptibility of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas: effect of weak disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetano, Senatore; Palo Stefania, De; Michela, Botti; Saverio, Moroni

    2004-03-01

    Recent measurements[1] on a 2DEG in a GaAs HIGHFET yield a spin susceptibility that is as much as 30% lower than the most accurate theoretical prediction[2] for a one-valley, strictly 2D, clean electron gas. We therefore consider the effect of a model random disorder, in the weak regime, employing the response function formalism. We find that the weak disorder yields an enhancement (depression) of the magnetic response of interacting (noninteracting) electrons in 2D. The implications of such a result are briefly discussed. [1] J.Zhu, H. L. Stormer, L. N. Pfeiffer,K. W. Baldwin, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 056805 (2003) [2]C. Attaccalite, S. Moroni, P. Gori-Giorgi, and G. B. Bachelet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 256601 (2002

  2. Charge-changing collisions of argon ions on argon gas. One-electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, J.; Bliman, S.; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Van Houtte, D.

    1980-12-01

    Single-electron-capture cross sections have been measured for argon ions with initial charges 2< or =q< or =12 incident on an argon-gas target. The cross sections show little dependence on the incident ion energy in the range 1q--10q keV. A remarkable oscillating feature is seen for cross sections sigma/sub q/,q-1 when q> or =7. Particularly, sigma/sub 8,7/ is smaller than sigma/sub 7,6/ and sigma/sub 9,8/, the Ar/sup 8 +/ electronic structure being Ne-like. Variation of the cross section is shown as function of the initial charge at constant energy.

  3. Nature of sonoluminescence: noble gas radiation excited by hot electrons in cold water

    PubMed

    Garcia; Levanyuk; Osipov

    2000-08-01

    It was proposed before that single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) may be caused by strong electric fields occurring in water near the surface of collapsing gas bubbles because of the flexoelectric effect involving polarization resulting from a gradient of pressure. Here we show that these fields can indeed provoke dynamic electric breakdown in a micron-size region near the bubble and consider the scenario of the SBSL. The scenario is (i) at the last stage of incomplete collapse of the bubble, the gradient of pressure in water near the bubble surface has such a value and a sign that the electric field arising from the flexoelectric effect exceeds the threshold field of the dynamic electrical breakdown of water and is directed to the bubble center; (ii) mobile electrons are generated because of thermal ionization of water molecules near the bubble surface; (iii) these electrons are accelerated in "cold" water by the strong electric fields; (iv) these hot electrons transfer noble gas atoms dissolved in water to high-energy excited states and optical transitions between these states produce SBSL UV flashes in the transparency window of water; (v) the breakdown can be repeated several times and the power and duration of the UV flash are determined by the multiplicity of the breakdowns. The SBSL spectrum is found to resemble a black-body spectrum where temperature is given by the effective temperature of the hot electrons. The pulse energy and some other characteristics of the SBSL are found to be in agreement with the experimental data when realistic estimates are made.

  4. Devices using ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas in delta doped gallium arsenide high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungmu

    In this thesis, devices using the ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistor(HEMT) structure is fabricated and their dc and ac properties are characterized. This study gives insight on operation and applications of modern submicron devices with ever reduced gate length comparable to electron mean free path. The ballistic transport is achieved using both temporal and spatial limits in this thesis. In temporal limit, when frequency is higher than the scattering frequency (1/(2pitau)), ballistic transport can be achieved. At room temperature, generally the scattering frequency is around 500 GHz but at cryogenic temperature (≤4K) with high mobility GaAs HEMT structure, the frequency is much lower than 2 GHz. On this temporal ballistic transport regime, effect of contact impedance and different dc mobility on device operation is characterized with the ungated 2DEG of HEMT structure. In this ballistic regime, impedance and responsivity of plasma wave detector are investigated using the gated 2DEG of HEMT at different ac boundary conditions. Plasma wave is generated at asymmetric ac boundary conditions of HEMTs, where source is short to ground and drain is open while rf power is applied to gate. The wave velocity can be tuned by gate bias voltage and induced drain to source voltage(Vds ) shows the resonant peak at odd number of fundamental frequency. Quantitative power coupling to plasma wave detector leads to experimental characterization of resonant response of plasma wave detector as a function of frequency. Because plasma wave resonance is not limited by transit time, the physics learned in this study can be directly converted to room temperature terahertz detection by simply reducing gate length(Lgate) to submicron for the terahertz application such as non destructive test, bio medical analysis, homeland security, defense and space. In same HEMT structure, the dc and rf characterization on device is also

  5. Linewidths of collective excitations of the inhomogeneous electron gas: Application to two-dimensional quantum strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Vignale, G.

    1998-09-01

    It is well known that high-frequency collective excitations in electronic systems are not Landau damped, i.e., they cannot decay effectively into single particle-hole pairs. The leading damping mechanism in this regime is instead provided by dynamical exchange and correlation effects, such as multipair production. These effects are not captured by the widely used adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA), which accounts for Landau damping only. In the recently developed time-dependent current density-functional formalism [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4878 (1997)], exchange and correlation enter as viscoelastic stresses in the electron fluid, causing an additional damping that is not contained in the ALDA. We use this theory to derive an explicit formula for the linewidth of collective electronic excitations that are not Landau damped. The formula is then applied to calculate the linewidth of collective modes in two-dimensional (2D) quantum strips. In comparison with the corresponding modes in the homogeneous 2D electron gas, we find an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the linewidth due to the nonuniformity of the system.

  6. Electrochemical Potential Measurements of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Gallium-Arsenide - - Arsenide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiran, Amir Massoud

    The electrochemical potential (ECP) oscillations of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures (GaAs-HET) in high magnetic fields and at low temperatures has been measured by a 'floating-gate' technique. We have carried out these measurements using a very high impedence circuit (~10 ^{13}Omega) at temperatures between 1.2 and 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 15 Tesla on conventional GaAs-HETs by monitoring the voltage difference between the contacts to the 2DEG and a metal 'gate' evaporated on top of the samples. We have also used novel GaAs-HET samples with a substrate contact to the 2DEG through a thin (~50 nm) tunneling barrier thereby eliminating the problems associated with circulating eddy currents induced in the 2DEG layer by the changing magnetic field. These quantitative measurements of the ECP oscillations have allowed us to extract the 2DEG thermodynamic density of states (DOS) in quantizing magnetic fields. Our experimental findings bring out a dynamic picture of the DOS where nonlinear screening of the long-range scatterers (e.g. ionized impurities) causes a filling factor dependent 'breathing' of the Landau levels and the electron-electron interactions result in an oscillatory enhancement of the g-factor of electrons in GaAs.

  7. Pulse length of ultracold electron bunches extracted from a laser cooled gas

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, J. G. H.; Frankort, T. L. I.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Luiten, O. J.

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of the pulse length of ultracold electron bunches generated by near-threshold two-photon photoionization of a laser-cooled gas. The pulse length has been measured using a resonant 3 GHz deflecting cavity in TM110 mode. We have measured the pulse length in three ionization regimes. The first is direct two-photon photoionization using only a 480 nm femtosecond laser pulse, which results in short (∼15 ps) but hot (∼104 K) electron bunches. The second regime is just-above-threshold femtosecond photoionization employing the combination of a continuous-wave 780 nm excitation laser and a tunable 480 nm femtosecond ionization laser which results in both ultracold (∼10 K) and ultrafast (∼25 ps) electron bunches. These pulses typically contain ∼103 electrons and have a root-mean-square normalized transverse beam emittance of 1.5 ± 0.1 nm rad. The measured pulse lengths are limited by the energy spread associated with the longitudinal size of the ionization volume, as expected. The third regime is just-below-threshold ionization which produces Rydberg states which slowly ionize on microsecond time scales.

  8. Controlling the two-dimensional electron gas at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotti, Anderson

    2014-03-01

    Heterostructures of complex oxides have attracted great interest since the demonstration of a high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 (STO/LAO) interface. Still, the density of the 2DEG is only one tenth of what was expected from simple electron counting, i.e., 1/2 electron per unit-cell area. Since then, the origin and amount of the charge, the electrical properties of the 2DEG, the role of native defects, and the abrupt variation of the electron density with the thickness of the LAO top layer have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies. More recently, a 2DEG with the full density of 1/2 electron per unit cell area has been observed at the interface between the band insulator STO and the Mott insulator GdTiO3 (GTO), shedding additional light on the origin of the 2DEG, and raising important questions on the differences between the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures. Here we will discuss the similarities of the 2DEG at the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures from the perspective of first-principles simulations. We will address the differences in band alignments in the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures, and how the 2DEG is affected by the surface of the LAO top layer in the STO/LAO, but apparently not in the STO/GTO case. Finally, we will also discuss how heterostructures can be used to drastically alter the electronic structure of STO, transforming it from a band insulator into a Mott insulator. This work was performed in collaboration with Lars Bjaalie, Luke Gordon, Burak Himmetoglu, and Chris G. Van de Walle, and supported by ARO and NSF.

  9. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie,Shaocheng; Qi, Tang

    2015-06-15

    The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set merges together key surface measurements at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate data application. Data from the original site locations can be found in the ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set.

  10. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  11. Electronic and Interfacial Properties of PD/6H-SiC Schottky Diode Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Bansal, Gaurav; Petit, Jeremy B.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai

    1996-01-01

    Pd/SiC Schottky diodes detect hydrogen and hydrocarbons with high sensitivity. Variation of the diode temperature from 100 C to 200 C shows that the diode sensitivity to propylene is temperature dependent. Long-term heat treating at 425 C up to 140 hours is carried out to determine the effect of extended heat treating on the diode properties and gas sensitivity. The heat treating significantly affects the diode's capacitive characteristics, but the diode's current carrying characteristics are much more stable with a large response to hydrogen. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Spectrometry studies of the Pd surface after the heating show cluster formation and background regions with grain structure observed in both regions. The Pd and Si concentrations vary between grains. Auger Electron Spectroscopy depth profiles revealed that the heat treating promoted interdiffusion and reaction between the Pd and SiC dw broadened the interface region. This work shows that Pd/SiC Schottky diodes have significant potential as high temperature gas sensors, but stabilization of the structure is necessary to insure their repeatability in long-term, high temperature applications.

  12. Development of a multi-element microdosimetric detector based on a thick gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjomani, Z.; Hanu, A. R.; Prestwich, W. V.; Byun, S. H.

    2017-03-01

    A prototype multi-element gaseous microdosimetric detector was developed using the Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) technique. The detector aims at measuring neutron and gamma-ray dose rates for weak neutron-gamma radiation fields. The multi-element design was employed to increase the neutron detection efficiency. The prototype THGEM multi-element detector consists of three layers of tissue equivalent plastic hexagons and each layer houses a hexagonal array of seven cylindrical gas cavity elements with equal heights and diameters of 17 mm. The final detector structure incorporates 21 gaseous volumes. Owing to the absence of wire electrodes, the THGEM multi-element detector offers flexible and convenient fabrication. The detector responses to neutron and gamma-ray were investigated using the McMaster Tandetron 7Li(p,n) neutron source. The dosimetric performance of the detector is presented in contrast to the response of a commercial tissue equivalent proportional counter. Compared to the standard TEPC response, the detector gave a consistent microdosimetric response with an average discrepancy of 8 % in measured neutron absorbed dose. An improvement of a factor of 3.0 in neutron detection efficiency has been accomplished with only a small degradation in energy resolution. However, its low energy cut off is about 6 keV/μm, which is not sufficient to measure the gamma-ray dose. This problem will be addressed by increasing the electron multiplication gain using double THGEM layers.

  13. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-01

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  14. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-26

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  15. Reduction of VOCs in flue gas from coal combustion by electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Ostapczuk, A.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.; Kubica, K.

    2002-03-01

    Coal combustion is one of the biggest sources of VOCs, which are emitted with various concentrations, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known as the most dangerous, and among them, e.g. benzo(a)pyrene C 20H 12, benzo(g,h,I)perylene C 22H 12 or dibenzo(a,h)anthracene C 22H 14 are the most toxic according to EPA. Recent years have brought new regulations concerning PAH emission, and European countries have signed an international treaty, covering PAH emission. Tests at the pilot plant constructed at a coal-fired power station were performed with the purpose of estimating the influence of electron beam on VOCs present in flue gas, during SO 2 and NO x removal. The influence of electron beam on the global toxicity factor of flue gas has been analysed. In the presence of ammonia, the concentrations of some PAHs were lower than that without ammonia. The removal efficiencies have been ranged from 40% up to 98%.

  16. Gas adsorption, energetics and electronic properties of boron- and nitrogen-doped bilayer graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    We study stabilities and electronic properties of several environmental polluting or toxic gas molecules (CO, CO2, NO, and NO2) adsorbed on B and N atoms in bilayer graphene using first-principles electronic-structure calculations. We find that NO and NO2 molecules can be bound chemically on B-doped bilayer graphene with large adsorption energies, while CO and CO2 molecules are not adsorbed chemically on B-doped one. In the case of the N-doped graphene, all four gases do not bind with chemical bonds but adsorb rather physically with small adsorption energies at long distances between gases and graphene. The adsorptions of NO and NO2 molecules on B-doped bilayer graphene induce the acceptor states above the Fermi energy, and we also find that the charge transfer takes place when the NO and the NO2 molecules are adsorbed. Thereby, the B-doped bilayer graphene is expected to be useful for NO and NO2 gas sensor materials.

  17. Sound waves generated due to the absorption of a pulsed electron beam in gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Pushkarev, M. A.; Remnev, G. E.

    2002-03-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of acoustic vibrations (their frequency, amplitude, and attenuation coefficient) generated in a gas mixture as a result of the injection of a high-current pulsed electron beam into a closed reactor are presented. It is shown that the change in the phase composition of the initial mixture under the action of the electron beam leads to a change in the frequency of the sound waves and to an increase in the attenuation coefficient. By measuring the change in frequency, it is possible to evaluate with sufficient accuracy (about 2%) the degree of conversion of the initial products in the plasmochemical process. Relations describing the dependence of the sound energy attenuation coefficient on the size of the reactor and on the thermal and physical properties of the gases under study are derived. It is shown that a simple experimental setup measuring the parameters of acoustic waves can be used for monitoring the plasmochemical processes initiated by a pulsed excitation of a gas mixture.

  18. Development of Fabric-Based Chemical Gas Sensors for Use as Wearable Electronic Noses

    PubMed Central

    Seesaard, Thara; Lorwongtragool, Panida; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-01-01

    Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose). The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP)/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons. PMID:25602265

  19. Properties of the flight model gas electron multiplier for the GEMS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoko; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Tamagawa, Toru; Iwakiri, Wataru; Asami, Fumi; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Kaneko, Kenta; Enoto, Teruaki; Black, Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith

    2014-07-01

    We present the gain properties of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) foil in pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 190 Torr. The GEM is one of the micro pattern gas detectors and it is adopted as a key part of the X-ray polarimeter for the GEMS mission. The X-ray polarimeter is a time projection chamber operating in pure DME gas at 190 Torr. We describe experimental results of (1) the maximum gain the GEM can achieve without any discharges, (2) the linearity of the energy scale for the GEM operation, and (3) the two-dimensional gain variation of the active area. First, our experiment with 6.4 keV X-ray irradiation of the whole GEM area demonstrates that the maximum effective gain is 2 x 104 with the applied voltage of 580 V. Second, the measured energy scale is linear among three energies of 4.5, 6.4, and 8.0 keV. Third, the two-dimensional gain mapping test derives the standard deviation of the gain variability of 7% across the active area.

  20. Properties of the Flight Model Gas Electron Multiplier for the GEMS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, Yoko; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Tamagawa, Toru; Iwakiri, Wataru; Asami, Fumi; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Kaneko, Kenta; Enoto, Teruaki; Black, Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We present the gain properties of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) foil in pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 190 Torr. The GEM is one of the micro pattern gas detectors and it is adopted as a key part of the X-ray polarimeter for the GEMS mission. The X-ray polarimeter is a time projection chamber operating in pure DME gas at 190 Torr. We describe experimental results of (1) the maximum gain the GEM can achieve without any discharges, (2) the linearity of the energy scale for the GEM operation, and (3) the two-dimensional gain variation of the active area. First, our experiment with 6.4 keV X-ray irradiation of the whole GEM area demonstrates that the maximum effective gain is 2 x 10(exp 4) with the applied voltage of 580 V. Second, the measured energy scale is linear among three energies of 4.5, 6.4, and 8.0 keV. Third, the two-dimensional gain mapping test derives the standard deviation of the gain variability of 7% across the active area.

  1. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  2. Feasibility study of a gas electron multiplier detector as an X-Ray image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sukyoung; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Soonhyouk

    2015-07-01

    For its ease of manufacture, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an X-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of using a GEM detector as an X-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of an A225 charge sensitive preamp, an A206 discriminator, and a MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, argon gas was mixed with CO2 in a ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, a 3106D power supply was used. A CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an X-ray source, and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of the efficiency of the GEM detector to that of the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the relative efficiency. The relative detection efficiency of the GEM detector for Fe-55 by using total count method was 32%, and the relative detection efficiencies were 5, 43, 33, 37, 35, and 36%, respectively, for 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7- keV energy spectrum by using the energy spectrum method. In conclusion, we found that the detection efficiency of the two-layered GEM detector is insufficient for use as an X-ray image sensor, so we suggest a CsI-coated GEM foil to increase the efficiency, with resulting value being increased to 41%.

  3. On the mechanism of the runaway of electrons in a gas: the universal escape curves for He, Xe, N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlenko, Sergey I.; Tkachev, A. N.

    2004-05-01

    Basing on the simple form of the energy conservation law and taking into account a multiplication of electrons, we show that the Townsend mechanism of electron multiplication in a gas is valid at sufficiently large interelectrode distance even at so large values of an electric field strength, when it is possible to neglect ionization friction. Correspondingly, the runaway electron producing in a gas is determined not by the local criteria accepted presently, but by the ratio of interelectrode distance and the characteristic electron multiplication length. Basing on numerical simulations for nitrogen gas we show that the critical discharge voltage Ucr(pd), at which the runaway electrons begin prevail, is a function of the product of the interelectrode distance by the gas pressure pd. This function (escape curve of Ucr-pd dependence) separates the area of an effective multiplication of electrons and the area, in which electrons escape discharge gap not having time to be multiplied. The curve Ucr(pd) has the upper and lower branches. Using Ucr(pd) we obtain the analog of well-known Paschen curve, which describes additionally the absence of a self-sustained discharge at a high voltages sufficiently rapidly supplied across the electrodes. Escape curves for helium, xenon and nitrogen are presented.

  4. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luyi

    2013-05-17

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This dissertation presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly

  5. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  6. Non-linear Resistivity of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Maxim G.; Aleiner, Igor L.; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2007-03-01

    We develop a theory of nonlinear response to an electric field of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) placed in a classically strong magnetic field. The latter leads to a non-linear current-voltage characteristic at a relatively weak electric field. The origin of the non-linearity is two-fold: the formation of a non-equilibrium electron distribution function, and the geometrical resonance in the inter-Landau-levels transitions rates. We find the dependence of the current-voltage characteristics on the electron relaxation rates in the 2DEG. Our results can be applied for analysis of measurements at low [1] and high [2,3] current densities. [1] J. Zhang, S. Vitkalov, A. A. Bykov, A. K. Kalagin and A. K. Bakarov, cond-mat/0607741. [2] C. L. Yang, J. Zhang, R. R. Du, J. A. Simmons and J. L. Reno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 076801 (2002). [3] W. Zhang, H. -S. Chiang, M. A. Zudov, L. N. Pfeiffer and K. W. West, cond-mat/0608727.

  7. Fermi-edge superfluorescence from a quantum-degenerate electron-hole gas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; II, G. Timothy Noe; McGill, Stephen A.; Wang, Yongrui; Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey A.; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Nonequilibrium can be a source of order. This rather counterintuitive statement has been proven to be true through a variety of fluctuation-driven, self-organization behaviors exhibited by out-of-equilibrium, many-body systems in nature (physical, chemical, and biological), resulting in the spontaneous appearance of macroscopic coherence. Here, we report on the observation of spontaneous bursts of coherent radiation from a quantum-degenerate gas of nonequilibrium electron-hole pairs in semiconductor quantum wells. Unlike typical spontaneous emission from semiconductors, which occurs at the band edge, the observed emission occurs at the quasi-Fermi edge of the carrier distribution. As the carriers are consumed by recombination, the quasi-Fermi energy goes down toward the band edge, and we observe a continuously red-shifting streak. We interpret this emission as cooperative spontaneous recombination of electron-hole pairs, or superfluorescence (SF), which is enhanced by Coulomb interactions near the Fermi edge. This novel many-body enhancement allows the magnitude of the spontaneously developed macroscopic polarization to exceed the maximum value for ordinary SF, making electron-hole SF even more “super” than atomic SF. PMID:24257510

  8. Enhanced thermopower in ZnO two-dimensional electron gas

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Sunao; Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Iizuka, Takahiko; Ono, Shimpei; Miwa, Kazumoto; Tokura, Yoshinori; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Control of dimensionality has proven to be an effective way to manipulate the electronic properties of materials, thereby enabling exotic quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, quantum Hall effects, and valleytronic effects. Another example is thermoelectricity, which has been theoretically proposed to be favorably controllable by reducing the dimensionality. Here, we verify this proposal by performing a systematic study on a gate-tuned 2D electron gas (2DEG) system formed at the surface of ZnO. Combining state-of-the-art electric-double-layer transistor experiments and realistic tight-binding calculations, we show that, for a wide range of carrier densities, the 2DEG channel comprises a single subband, and its effective thickness can be reduced to ∼ 1 nm at sufficiently high gate biases. We also demonstrate that the thermoelectric performance of the 2DEG region is significantly higher than that of bulk ZnO. Our approach opens up a route to exploit the peculiar behavior of 2DEG electronic states and realize thermoelectric devices with advanced functionalities. PMID:27222585

  9. Modifications in Structural, Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Thin Films under different Gas Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Omveer; Dahiya, Raj P.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2015-09-01

    In the recent past, Titanium thin films can be grown over different substrates such as silicon, glass and quartz by using versatile deposition techniques DC, RF sputtering, electronic beam and thermal evaporation etc. The grown films are then exposed in different gas environments for individual application. It has been found that Titanium nitride exhibits good chemical stability, mechanical and electrical properties. To investigate these properties in titanium nitride thin films, we have developed a new approach hot cathode arc discharge plasma system. By using this technique, we can measure plasma and nitriding parameters independently. In the present work, we have investigated gases mixture (Nitrogen, Argon and Hydrogen) effect on the structural, mechanical, electrical and electronic properties in plasma system. We have used 100% N2, 50% N2 + 50% Ar and 50% N2 + 50% H2 gases ratio for plasma nitriding. Structural and electronic structure properties are measured from X-ray diffractions (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) respectively. The surface morphology of these films were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and the nano-indentation mode is used to find out the hardness of the samples. Government of India.

  10. Enhanced thermopower in ZnO two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Sunao; Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Iizuka, Takahiko; Ono, Shimpei; Miwa, Kazumoto; Tokura, Yoshinori; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-07

    Control of dimensionality has proven to be an effective way to manipulate the electronic properties of materials, thereby enabling exotic quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, quantum Hall effects, and valleytronic effects. Another example is thermoelectricity, which has been theoretically proposed to be favorably controllable by reducing the dimensionality. Here, we verify this proposal by performing a systematic study on a gate-tuned 2D electron gas (2DEG) system formed at the surface of ZnO. Combining state-of-the-art electric-double-layer transistor experiments and realistic tight-binding calculations, we show that, for a wide range of carrier densities, the 2DEG channel comprises a single subband, and its effective thickness can be reduced to [Formula: see text] 1 nm at sufficiently high gate biases. We also demonstrate that the thermoelectric performance of the 2DEG region is significantly higher than that of bulk ZnO. Our approach opens up a route to exploit the peculiar behavior of 2DEG electronic states and realize thermoelectric devices with advanced functionalities.

  11. Characteristics and Function of AN Electron Attachment Spectrometer: Pulse Formation Time and Gain Effects in P-10 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Waker, Anthony J.

    2014-02-01

    An Electron Attachment Spectrometer (EAS) has been designed to measure electron attachment in air and other gases. The aim of the EAS is to observe how parameters such as the electric field, reduced electric field and type of gas can influence electron attachment. The overall objective of this work is to investigate if the gas-gain of a proportional counter can be optimized by minimizing electron attachment with oxygen to improve the measurement of tritium-in-air. Current research interests include the measurement of the time between the generation of the electron-ion pairs and arrival of the electrons at the wire anode. Additionally, the study of the multiplication properties of the detector as a function of pulse formation time, P-10 gas flow rate and electric field will be presented. The EAS is a cylinder with a length of approximately 92 mm and diameter of 41 mm comprised of cylindrical hollow brass electrodes and Teflon spacers. A uniform electric field within the tube is applied and guides electrons and/or ions towards their respective electrodes. A proportional counter with a 50 μm diameter wire anode is used to detect the electrons and/or ions created by an 241Am source located at the opposite end.

  12. 4-dimensional spacetimes from 2-dimensional conformal null data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Ellis, George F. R.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we investigate whether the holographic principle proposed in string theory has a classical counterpart in general relativity theory. We show that there is a partial correspondence: at least in the case of vacuum Petrov type D spacetimes that admit a non-trivial Killing tensor, which encompass all the astrophysical black hole spacetimes, there exists a one-to-one correspondence between gravity in bulk and a 2-dimensional classical conformal scalar field on a null boundary.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation on Turbulent Flow and Plume Dispersion over A 2-Dimensional Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, H.; Nagai, H.

    2009-09-01

    The dispersion analysis of airborne contaminant including radioactive substances from industrial or nuclear facilities is the important issue for maintenance of air quality or safety assessment. Many studies on the plume dispersion behavior in the simulated atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat plain have been conducted mainly by wind tunnel experiments. However, many nuclear power plants are located at complex coastal terrains in Japan. In this case, topographical effects on the turbulent flow and plume dispersion should be investigated. Therefore, we perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) on turbulent flows and plume dispersions. As the first step of this study, we try it for a 2-dimensional hill flow and investigate the characteristics of mean and fluctuation concentrations. In order to produce a realistic turbulent boundary layer flow, we set up two computational domains. One is the driver region for generating the spatially-developing boundary layer flow and the other is the main computational region for plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill. Near the inlet of the driver region, roughness blocks for generating a thick turbulent boundary layer are placed. The inflow turbulence data obtained in the driver region are imposed at the inlet of the main computational domain at each time step. The sizes of driver and main computational regions are 46.25H×6.25H×25.0H and 37.5H×6.25H×25.0H (H: the height of a 2-dimensional hill) in x-, y- and z-directions, respectively. Here, x, y and z indicate streamwise, spanwise and vertical directions, respectively. The number of grid points of driver and main computational regions are 400×100×90 and 400×100×90 in x, y and z directions, respectively. A 2-dimensional hill model has 5.45H length and are placed at a distance of 10.4H downstream from the inlet of the main computational region. A release point of a tracer gas is located at a distance of 9.09H upstream from a 2-dimensional hill top and elevated with the

  14. The Use of Liquid Isopropyl Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma to Biologically Decontaminate Spacecraft Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, J. K.; Tudryn, Carissa D.; Choi, Sun J.; Eulogio, Sebastian E.; Roberts, Timothy J.; Tudryn, Carissa D.

    2006-01-01

    Legitimate concern exists regarding sending spacecraft and their associated hardware to solar system bodies where they could possibly contaminate the body's surface with terrestrial microorganisms. The NASA approved guidelines for sterilization as set forth in NPG 8020.12C, which is consistent with the biological contamination control objectives of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), recommends subjecting the spacecraft and its associated hardware to dry heat-a dry heat regimen that could potentially employ a temperature of 110(deg)C for up to 200 hours. Such a temperature exposure could prove detrimental to the spacecraft electronics. The stimulated growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in metallic interconnects and/or thermal degradation of organic materials composing much of the hardware could take place over a prolonged temperature regimen. Such detrimental phenomena would almost certainly compromise the integrity and reliability of the electronics. Investigation of sterilization procedures in the medical field suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H202) gas plasma (HPGP) technology can effectively function as an alternative to heat sterilization, especially for heat-sensitive items. Treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in liquid form prior to exposure of the hardware to HPGP should also prove beneficial. Although IPA is not a sterilant, it is frequently used as a disinfectant because of its bactericidal properties. The use of IPA in electronics cleaning is widely recognized and has been utilized for many years with no adverse affects reported. In addition, IPA is the principal ingredient of the test fluid used in ionic contamination testers to assess the amount of ionic contamination found on the surfaces of printed wiring assemblies. This paper will set forth experimental data confirming the feasibility of the IPA/H202 approach to reach acceptable microbial reduction (MR) levels of spacecraft electronic hardware. In addition, a proposed process flow in

  15. Solid-gas reactions of complex oxides inside an environmental high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Sayagués, M J; Krumeich, F; Hutchison, J L

    2001-07-01

    In a gas reaction cell (GRC), installed in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) (JEOL 4000EX), samples can be manipulated in an ambient atmosphere (p<50mbar). This experimental setup permits not only the observation of solid-gas reactions in situ at close to the atomic level but also the induction of structural modifications under the influence of a plasma, generated by the ionization of gas particles by an intense electron beam. Solid state reactions of non-stoichiometric niobium oxides and niobium tungsten oxides with different gases (O2, H2 and He) have been carried out inside this controlled environment transmission electron microscope (CETEM), and this has led to reaction products with novel structures which are not accessible by conventional solid state synthesis methods. Monoclinic and orthorhombic Nb(12)O(29) crystallize in block structures comprising [3x4] blocks. The oxidation of the monoclinic phase occurs via a three step mechanism: firstly, a lamellar defect of composition Nb(11)O(27) is formed. Empty rectangular channels in this defect provide the diffusion paths in the subsequent oxidation. In the second step, microdomains of the Nb(22)O(54) phase are generated as an intermediate state of the oxidation process. The structure of the final product Nb(10)O(25), which consists of [3x3] blocks and tetrahedral coordinated sites, is isostructural to PNb(9)O(25). Microdomains of this apparently metastable phase appear as a product of the Nb(22)O(54) oxidation. The oxidation reaction of Nb(12)O(29) was found to be a reversible process: the reduction of the oxidation product with H(2) results in the formation of the starting Nb(12)O(29) structure. On the other hand, the block structure of Nb(12)O(29) has been destroyed by a direct treatment of the sample with H(2) while NbO in a cubic rock salt structure is produced. This in situ technique has also been applied to niobium tungsten oxides which constitute the solid solution series Nb(8-n

  16. Exfoliation and Dispersion of 2-Dimensional Materials by Elevating Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sanghyuk; Kim, Jinseon; Kwon, Hyukjoon; Lee, Changgu; Graphene Engneering Lab Team

    It is known that graphene and other 2-dimensional materials are hard to dissolve in water without using chemicals or surfactants. Here, we present a facile method to exfoliate and disperse those materials in water by simply controlling temperature. Graphene, when sonicated in water at high temperature (60°C), was edge-functionalized due to the extremely high temperature and pressure locally induced by ultrasonic cavitation, and dissolved in water stably even for longer than 1 month. However, it was not dispersed at low temperature(30°C) because of less cavitation and reduced sonochemical reaction. Other 2-dimensional materials, such as h-BN, MoS2, and other layered metal chalcogenides, were also well dissolved in water as graphene, but even at low temperature. Their stable solution is from the electric double layer because their relatively high insulating property. Also elevated storage temperature (60°C) improved the long-term dispersion stability compared to lower storage temperature (20°C) Exfoliation and Dispersion of 2-Dimensional Materials by Elevating Temperature.

  17. Electronic Structure and Gas-Phase Behaviour of the Heaviest Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Jacob, T.; Borschevsky, A.

    2010-04-30

    Electronic structures and gas-phase adsorption behaviour of the heaviest elements 112, 113 and 114 and of their lighter homologs Hg, Tl and Pb is studied on the basis of ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic and four-component Density Functional Theory molecular and cluster calculations. The heaviest elements were shown to have low adsorption enthalpies on Teflon and should, therefore, be well transported through Teflon capillaries from the target chamber to the chemistry set up. Adsorption enthalpies of these elements on the Au(111) surface are predicted as -44.5 kJ/mol, -158.6 kJ/mol and -68.5 kJ/mol, respectively, giving the following sequence in the adsorption temperatures 113>114>112.

  18. Optical investigation of electrical spin injection into an inverted two-dimensional electron gas structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, M.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Ciorga, M.; Korn, T.; Loher, J.; Schuh, D.; Schüller, C.; Bougeard, D.; Weiss, D.; Back, C. H.

    2017-01-01

    We report on electrical spin injection from (Ga,Mn)As into a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas confined at an (Al,Ga)As/GaAs interface. Besides standard nonlocal electrical detection, we use a magneto-optical approach which provides cross-sectional images of the spin accumulation at the cleaved edge of the sample, yielding spin decay lengths on the order of 2 μ m . In some cases we find a nonmonotonic bias voltage dependence of the spin signal, which may be linked to ballistic tunneling effects during spin injection. We observe a clear Hanle depolarization using a technique which is free of dynamic nuclear polarization effects. Fitting the data with the standard drift-diffusion model of spin injection suggests averaged in-plane spin lifetimes on the order of 1 ns.

  19. N2O analysis in the atmosphere via electron capture-gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Krasnec, J.; Pierotti, D.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of commercially available pulse-modulated electron capture detector (ECD)-equipped gas chromatographs for direct measurement of ambient levels of N2O is assessed. Since the sensitivity of ECD to N2O is directly proportional to the detector operating temperature and detector standing current, it is necessary to use a 'hot' ECD (250-350 C). The method is shown to be very precise with a standard error not exceeding 1% for automated analysis of ambient air samples. The technology is available to permit highly accurate routine direct analysis of N2O in the troposphere and stratosphere. Both captured air samples or direct real-time measurement from research vessels or airborne platforms are possible.

  20. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  1. Industrial applications of electron beam flue gas treatment—From laboratory to the practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.

    2007-08-01

    The electron beam technology for flue gas treatment (EBFGT) has been developed in Japan in the early 1980s. Later on, this process was investigated in pilot scale in the USA, Germany, Japan, Poland, Bulgaria and China. The new engineering and process solutions have been developed during the past two decades. Finally industrial plants have been constructed in Poland and China. The high efficiency of SO x and NO x removal was achieved (up to 95% for SO x and up to 70% for NO x) and by-product is a high quality fertilizer. Since the power of accelerators applied in industrial installation is over 1 MW and requested operational availability of the plant is equal to 8500 h in year, it is a new challenge for radiation processing applications.

  2. Averaged electron collision cross sections for thermal mixtures of \\alpha -alanine conformers in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Milton M.; de Lima, Erik V. R.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical study of elastic electron collisions with 9 conformers of the gas-phase amino acid α-alanine (CH3CH(NH2)COOH) is performed. The eigenphase sums, resonance features, differential and integral cross sections are computed for each individual conformer. Resonance positions for the low-energy {π }* shape resonance are found to vary from 2.6 to 3.1 eV and the resonance widths from 0.3 to 0.5 eV. Averaged cross sections for thermal mixtures of the 9 conformers are presented. Both theoretical and experimental population ratios are considered. Thermally averaged cross sections obtained using the best theoretical estimates give reasonable agreement with the observed thermal cross sections. Excited conformers IIA and IIB make a large contribution to this average due to their large permanent dipole moments.

  3. Pesticide residue analysis of vegetables by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar; Martínez, Carmen M; Flores, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    A new and original analytical method was developed for the routine analysis of 28 multiclass pesticide residues in vegetables (green pepper, red pepper, and tomato). The extraction was performed with acetone, and the pesticides were partitioned into ethyl acetate-cyclohexane (1 + 1, v/v). Residue levels in vegetables were determined by gas chromatography (GC) with electron-capture detection. Residue identities were confirmed by GC coupled with mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. The average recoveries in pepper and tomato obtained for all analytes studied were 67.3 and 123.1%, respectively, with relative standard deviation between 1.8 and 7.0%. The detection limit for the pesticides studied varied from 0.1 to 2.6 microg/kg. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of these compounds in vegetables grown in experimental greenhouses.

  4. Control of spin dynamics in a two-dimensional electron gas by electromagnetic dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Morina, S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    We solved the Schrödinger problem for a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the presence of a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field). The found eigenfunctions and eigenenergies of the problem are used to describe the spin dynamics of the dressed 2DEG within the formalism of the density matrix response function. Solving the equations of spin dynamics, we show that the dressing field can switch the spin relaxation in the 2DEG between the cases corresponding to the known Elliott-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel' regimes. As a result, the spin properties of the 2DEG can be tuned by a high-frequency electromagnetic field. The present effect opens an unexplored way for controlling the spin with light and, therefore, forms the physical prerequisites for creating light-tuned spintronics devices.

  5. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses surface roughness examined by interferential shifting phase and scanning electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Merindano, M D; Canals, M; Saona, C; Costa, J

    1998-01-01

    The anterior surface roughness of seven factory new rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses has been studied by interferential shifting phase microscopy (ISPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Five lenses were fluorsilicone acrylate and two lenses were silicone acrylate. Their material Dk ranged from 14 to 210. ISPM is shown to be a reliable and non-destructive method to observe and measure the relief of the contact lens surface. Moreover, profile and contour data are easily stored for further quantitative studies. ISPM contour patterns of the studied lenses are qualitatively compared with those obtained by SEM for the same lenses. Results point out that ISPM gives similar accuracy but it is non-destructive and cheaper than SEM. Moreover, the quantitative study of surface roughness suggests that there is a relationship between surface roughness and Dk of the lens material: surface roughness increases with Dk and allows to distinguish between lenses with low, medium and high Dk.

  6. Spin-susceptibility of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas: effect of the finite layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Palo, Stefania; Gaetano, Senatore; Michela, Botti; Moroni, Saverio

    2004-03-01

    Recent measurements[1] on a 2DEG in a GaAs HIGHFET yield a spin susceptibility that is as much as 30most accurate theoretical prediction[2] for a one-valley, strictly 2D, clean electron gas (1V2DEG). We consider here the effect of the finite thickness of the 2DEG on the magnetic response, starting from the known energy and pair correlations of the 1V2DEG[2]. We find a substantial reduction of the discrepancies, with the theoretical prediction however still remaining above the experimental estimate. [1] J. Zhu, H. L. Stormer, L. N. Pfeiffer,K. W. Baldwin, and K.W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 056805 (2003) [2]C. Attaccalite, S. Moroni, P. Gori-Giorgi, and G. B. Bachelet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 256601 (2002)

  7. Landau level crossing in a spin-orbit coupled two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xing-Jun; Li, Ting-Xin; Zhang, Chi; Du, Rui-Rui

    2015-01-05

    We have studied experimentally the Landau level (LL) spectrum of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/InP quantum well structure by means of low-temperature magneto-transport coincidence measurement in vector magnetic fields. It is well known that LL crossing occurs in tilted magnetic fields due to a competition between cyclotron energy and Zeeman effect. Remarkably, here we observe an additional type of level-crossing resulting from a competition between Rashba and Zeeman splitting in a small magnetic field, consistent with the theoretical prediction for strongly spin-orbit coupled 2DEG.

  8. Room-Temperature Determination of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Concentration and Mobility in Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, S. E.; Mena, R. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for determination of room-temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration and mobility in heterostructures is presented. Using simultaneous fits of the longitudinal and transverse voltages as a function of applied magnetic field, we were able to separate the parameters associated with the 2DEG from those of the parallel layer. Comparison with the Shubnikov-de Haas data derived from measurements at liquid helium temperatures proves that the analysis of the room-temperature data provides an excellent estimate of the 2DEG concentration. In addition we were able to obtain for the first time the room-temperature mobility of the 2DEG, an important parameter to device application. Both results are significantly different from those derived from conventional Hall analysis.

  9. 10 cm x 10 cm Single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) X-ray Fluorescence Detector for Dilute Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, E. H.; Siddons, D. P.; Seifu, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have built and tested a 10 cm × 10 cm single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) X-ray detector to probe dilute amounts of Fe in a prepared sample. The detector uses Argon/Carbon Dioxide (75/25) gas mixture flowing at a slow rate through a leak proof Plexi-glass enclosure held together by O-rings and screws. The Fluorescence X-ray emitted by the element under test is directed through a Mylar window into the drift region of the detector where abundant gas is flowing. The ionized electrons are separated, drifted into the high electric field of the GEM, and multiplied by impact ionization. The amplified negatively charged electrons are collected and further amplified by a Keithley amplifier to probe the absorption edge of the element under test using X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The results show that the GEM detector provided good results with less noise as compared with a Silicon drift detector (SDD).

  10. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-12-01

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH4, Ar + 3.5% CO2 and Kr + 2.7% CO2 gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  11. Self-injection and acceleration of electrons during ionization of gas atoms by a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.

    2006-04-15

    Using a relativistic three-dimensional single-particle code, acceleration of electrons created during the ionization of nitrogen and oxygen gas atoms by a laser pulse has been studied. Barrier suppression ionization model has been used to calculate ionization time of the bound electrons. The energy gained by the electrons peaks for an optimum value of laser spot size. The electrons created near the tail do not gain sufficient energy for a long duration laser pulse. The electrons created at the tail of pulse escape before fully interacting with the trailing part of the pulse for a short duration laser pulse, which causes electrons to retain sufficient energy. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then energy of the electrons created at the tail of the pulse further increases.

  12. Influence of the microstructure on the charge transport in semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; Aktas, K.; Acar, S.; Salamov, B. G.

    2010-06-01

    Experimental results with nonlinear features and hysteresis characteristics in the pre-breakdown Townsend discharge regime is studied experimentally for a planar microstructure with a GaAs photocathode, an interelectrode gap thickness of 445 μm and gas pressure in the range 28-66 Torr. An investigation of the effect of the voltage amplitude on the dynamics of transient processes in the semiconductor gas discharge microstructure was made to explain the mechanism of the current decay. A linearly increasing voltage (i.e. 3 V s and 5 V s voltage rate) was applied to the system to study current instability. The nonlinear transport mechanism of carriers through the cross-section of the discharge gap i.e. the appearance of the spatio-temporal self-organization of a nonlinear dissipative system, non-equilibrium electron motion and autocatalytic effect of carrier accumulation in the gas layer attributed to decrease of current with the increase of applied voltage. It is established that the pre-breakdown current decreases anomalously with increase of the feeding voltage and illumination intensity on the photocathode. The current density change through the cross-section of the discharge gap, i.e. the appearance of the spatio-temporal self-organization of nonlinear dissipative systems, causes these observed effects. On the other hand, the oscillatory current with non-monotonic N-shaped and hysteresis peculiarities in post-breakdown region is known to be related to a nonlinear mechanism of carrier transport in the semiconductor material caused by EL2 defect centres.

  13. Determination of toxaphene enantiomers by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Bordajandi, Luisa R; Ramos, Lourdes; González, María José

    2006-09-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with micro electron-capture detection (GC x GC-microECD) has been evaluated for the enantioseparation of five chiral toxaphenes typically found in real-life samples (Parlar 26, 32, 40, 44 and 50). From the two enantioselective beta-cyclodextrin-based columns evaluated as first dimension column, BGB-176SE and BGB-172, the latter provided the best results and was further combined with three non-enantioselective columns in the second dimension: HT-8, BPX-50 and Supelcowax-10. The combination BGB-172 x BPX-50 was finally selected because it provided a complete separation among all enantiomers. A satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility of the retention times in both the first and the second dimension were observed for all target compounds (RSDs below 0.8%, n = 4). Linear responses in the tested range of 10-200 pg/microl and limits of detection in the range of 2-6 pg/microl were obtained. The repeatability and reproducibility at a concentration of 100 pg/microl, evaluated as the RSDs calculated for the enantiomeric fraction (EF), was better than 11% (n = 4) in all instances. The feasibility of the method developed for real-life analyses was illustrated by the determination of the enantiomeric ratios and concentration levels of the test compounds in four commercial fish oil samples. These results were compared to those obtained by heart-cut multidimensional gas chromatography using the same enantioselective column.

  14. Effects of electron interference on temperature dependent transport properties of two dimensional electron gas at MgZnO/ZnO interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit K. Misra, P.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-09-07

    We report the effects of electron interference on temperature dependent transport properties of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined at the interface in polycrystalline MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures grown by pulsed laser deposition on c-alumina substrates. On increasing Mg concentration in the MgZnO layer, the sheet electron concentration was found to increase and the sheet resistance was found to decrease. In addition, the electron concentration and mobility were almost temperature independent in the range from 4.2 to 300 K, indicating the formation of 2DEG at the interface. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements showed a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity at low temperatures together with negative magnetoresistance. These were found to be caused by electron interference effects, and the experimental data could be explained using the models of quantum corrections to conductivity.

  15. Long Term Multiplication Behavior Studies of the 30cmx 30cm prototype Gas electron Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Ying Wun Yvonne; Yu, Jaehoon; Park, Seongtae; White, Andy

    2014-03-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology is one of the next generation radiation detector technologies that utilized the ionization in gaseous medium and the electron avalanche to detect a magnified charge value from various radiation and charge particles. With its low building cost, low discharge rate and high resolution, GEM is currently being considered to be one of the candidate gap detectors for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in Japan. It is therefore of crucial for us to study the long term stability of amplification power of the detector. Using cosmic radiation as our radiation source, data has been taken continuously in the past 2 years by the high energy physics group in University of Texas at Arlington to characterize the stability of the 30cmx30cm detector. Effect of atmospheric pressure to the detector amplification is eliminated by a correction algorithm. Noise study has been done to eliminate excessive noise produced by the detector as well as its readout chip. Result shows that the detector gives us a stable 35fC average MPV for the cosmic MIPs with few fC of chamber noise and about 0.5 of chip noise. GEM should work well as a digital calorimeter for uses in the ILC project.

  16. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  17. Electronic Spectra of Protonated Fluoranthene in a Neon Matrix and Gas Phase at 10 K.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A; Rice, C A; Hardy, F-X; Fulara, J; Maier, J P

    2016-07-14

    Four electronic systems with origin bands at 759.5, 559.3, 476.3, and 385.5 nm are detected in a 6 K neon matrix following deposition of mass-selected protonated fluoranthene C16H11(+) produced from a reaction of neutral vapor and ethanol in a hot-cathode ion source. Two cationic isomers are identified as the carriers of these band systems. The 559.3, 476.3, and 385.5 nm absorptions are assigned to 4,3,2 (1)A' ← X (1)A' transitions of isomer E(+) (γ-) and the 2 (1)A' ← X (1)A' system at 759.5 nm is of isomer C(+) (α-) of protonated fluoranthene on the basis of theoretical predictions. The electronic spectrum of E(+) was also recorded in the gas phase using a resonant 1 + 1 two-photon excitation-dissociation technique in an ion trap at vibrational and rotational temperatures of 10 K. The 3,2 (1)A' ← X (1)A' transitions have origin band maxima at 558.28 ± 0.01 and 474.92 ± 0.01 nm. Both the 2 (1)A' and 3 (1)A' excited states have a distinct vibrational pattern with lifetimes on the order of 1 ps.

  18. Structure and conformations of isoprene by vibrational spectroscopy and gas electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traetteberg, M.; Paulen, G.; Cyvin, S. J.; Panchenko, Yu. N.; Mochalov, V. I.

    1984-04-01

    The structure of the isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) molecule has been studied by vibrational spectroscopy and gas electron diffraction techniques. A normal coordinate analysis was used to calculate the vibrational frequencies for the anti ( s-trans), gauche and syn ( s-cis) conformers of the molecule. Assignments of some frequencies of the anti form were revised. The experimental bands at 1255, 635, 555, 419 and 311 cm -1 are assigned as fundamentals of the gauche conformer with a high degree of confidence. Among the structural parameters determined by electron diffraction are the following bond distances (in Å): CC 1.340, CC 1.463, CC methyl 1.512, CH 1.076 and CmethylH 1.110. The abundance of the anti form was determined to be 95.3%, while the rest (4.7%) was interpreted as the gauche form with a dihedral angle of 73.5°.

  19. Coupling gas chromatography and electronic nose detection for detailed cigarette smoke aroma characterization.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Tienpont, Bart; Mitsui, Kazuhisa; Masugi, Eri; Yoshimura, Yuta; Nagata, Hisanori; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2014-10-24

    Aroma characterization of whole cigarette smoke samples using sensory panels or electronic nose (E-nose) devices is difficult due to the masking effect of major constituents and solvent used for the extraction step. On the other hand, GC in combination with olfactometry detection does not allow to study the delicate balance and synergetic effect of aroma solutes. To overcome these limitations a new instrumental set-up consisting of heart-cutting gas chromatography using a capillary flow technology based Deans switch and low thermal mass GC in combination with an electronic nose device is presented as an alternative to GC-olfactometry. This new hyphenated GC-E-nose configuration is used for the characterization of cigarette smoke aroma. The system allows the transfer, combination or omission of selected GC fractions before injection in the E-nose. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant factor analysis (DFA) allowed clear visualizing of the differences among cigarette brands and classifying them independently of their nicotine content. Omission and perceptual interaction tests could also be carried out using this configuration. The results are promising and suggest that the GC-E-nose hyphenation is a good approach to measure the contribution level of individual compounds to the whole cigarette smoke.

  20. Thermal Gas Phase Electron Attachment Reactions of Sulfuryl- and Thionyl-halides at 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doren, Jane M.; Thompson, Matthew S.; Monaco, Elizabeth M.; Wszolek, Matthew F.

    1999-10-01

    The reactions of the sulfuryl-halides SO_2Cl_2, SO_2ClF, and SO_2F_2, and thionyl-halides SOCl2 and SOF2 were studied in the gas phase under thermal conditions at 300K with a Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe with mass spectrometric detection. The chloride-containing species react efficiently with electrons while the fluoride analogues react relatively inefficiently. All of these species react with electrons through cleavage of the sulfur-halide bond. Non-dissociative attachment is also observed in the reaction with sulfuryl fluoride. In the reactions of both thionyl halides as well as that of sulfuryl chloride, the only observed product ion is the atomic halogen anion. In the reaction of sulfuryl fluoride, cleavage of the sulfur-fluorine bond leads to the formation of SO_2F^- + F. Both possible primary product anions are observed for the mixed sulfuryl halide (SO_2ClF), Cl^- and SO_2F^-. Efficient secondary ion-molecule reactions were also identified and their products were characterized.

  1. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale. PMID:27849054

  2. Low-Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of an Electron Beam Against Ceramic Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    An 8-kv electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" (UHT) burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1,427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 scc at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6-24 in. At both closer (2 in.) and farther (48 in.) standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high-voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  3. Density-Functional Study of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at the Perovskite Titanate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Ranjit; Popovic, Zoran; Thulasi, Sunita; Satpathy, Sashi

    2006-03-01

    Oxide superlattices and microstructures hold the promise for creating a new class of devices with unprecedented functionalities. Density-functional studies^1 of the recently fabricated, lattice-matched perovskite titanates^2 (SrTiO3)n/(LaTiO3)m reveal a classic wedge-shaped potential well for the monolayer structure, originating from the Coulomb potential of a charged La sheet. The potential in turn confines the electrons in the Airy-function-localized states. This resulting two-dimensional electron gas may be described in terms of the simplified jellium model^3 and it describes reasonably well the observed charge modulation of the Ti atoms near the interface. Concerning magnetism, it is suppressed for the monolayer LaTiO3 structure, while in structures with a thicker LaTiO3 part, bulk antiferromagnetism is recovered, with a narrow transition region separating the magnetic LaTiO3 and the non-magnetic SrTiO3. 1. Z. S. Popovic and S. Satpathy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 176805 (2005) 2. A. Ohtomo et al., Nature 419, 378 (2002) 3. S. Thulasi and S. Satpathy, Phys. Rev. B (2006)

  4. The reaction of CF2Cl2 with gas-phase hydrated electrons.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Jozef; van der Linde, Christian; Fárník, Michal; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-09-14

    The reaction of dichlorodifluoromethane (CF2Cl2) with hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-) (n = 30-86) in the gas phase was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. The hydrated electron reacts with CF2Cl2, forming (H2O)mCl(-) with a rate constant of (8.6 ± 2.2) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1), corresponding to an efficiency of 57 ± 15%. The reaction enthalpy was determined using nanocalorimetry, revealing a strongly exothermic reaction with ΔHr(CF2Cl2, 298 K) = -208 ± 41 kJ mol(-1). The combination of the measured reaction enthalpy with thermochemical data from the condensed phase yields a C-Cl bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) ΔHC-Cl(CF2Cl2, 298 K) = 355 ± 41 kJ mol(-1) that agrees within error limits with the predicted values from quantum chemical calculations and published BDEs.

  5. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in an ultracold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Sommer, Christian; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena such as the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences. Here we demonstrate an experimental approach towards this goal by utilizing an ultracold Rydberg gas generated with a broadband picosecond laser pulse. We follow the ultrafast evolution of its electronic coherence by time-domain Ramsey interferometry with attosecond precision. The observed electronic coherence shows an ultrafast oscillation with a period of 1 femtosecond, whose phase shift on the attosecond timescale is consistent with many-body correlations among Rydberg atoms beyond mean-field approximations. This coherent and ultrafast many-body dynamics is actively controlled by tuning the orbital size and population of the Rydberg state, as well as the mean atomic distance. Our approach will offer a versatile platform to observe and manipulate non-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems on the ultrafast timescale.

  6. Edge spin accumulation in a two-dimensional electron gas with two subbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, Alexander; Egues, J. Carlos

    We have studied the edge spin accumulation in 2D electron gas due to the intrinsic mechanism of spin-orbit interaction for the case of a two-subband structure. This study is strongly motivated by recent experiments which observed the spin accumulation near the edges of a high mobility 2D electron system in a bilayer symmetric GaAs structure in contrast to zero effect in a single-layer configuration. Our theoretical explanation is based on the Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction which arises as a result of the coupling between two subband states of opposite parities in a symmetric quantum well. Following the method developed in, we have calculated the edge spin density in a quasi-ballistic regime, and explained the experimental results, in particular, a large magnitude of the edge spin density. We showed that one can easily proceed from the regime of strong spin accumulation to the regime of weak one. It opens up a possibility to construct an interesting new spintronic device Supported by FAPESP (Brazil).

  7. Permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo approach to the uniform electron gas at finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Dornheim, Tobias; Schoof, Tim; Groth, Simon; Filinov, Alexey; Bonitz, Michael

    2015-11-28

    The uniform electron gas (UEG) at finite temperature is of high current interest due to its key relevance for many applications including dense plasmas and laser excited solids. In particular, density functional theory heavily relies on accurate thermodynamic data for the UEG. Until recently, the only existing first-principle results had been obtained for N = 33 electrons with restricted path integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC), for low to moderate density, rs=r¯/aB≳1. These data have been complemented by configuration path integral Monte Carlo (CPIMC) simulations for rs ≤ 1 that substantially deviate from RPIMC towards smaller rs and low temperature. In this work, we present results from an independent third method-the recently developed permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo (PB-PIMC) approach [T. Dornheim et al., New J. Phys. 17, 073017 (2015)] which we extend to the UEG. Interestingly, PB-PIMC allows us to perform simulations over the entire density range down to half the Fermi temperature (θ = kBT/EF = 0.5) and, therefore, to compare our results to both aforementioned methods. While we find excellent agreement with CPIMC, where results are available, we observe deviations from RPIMC that are beyond the statistical errors and increase with density.

  8. Interaction of fast charged projectiles with two-dimensional electron gas: Interaction and collisional-damping effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B.; Das, Amal K.

    2009-07-15

    The results of a theoretical investigation on the stopping power of ions moving in a two-dimensional degenerate electron gas are presented. The stopping power for an ion is calculated employing linear-response theory using the dielectric function approach. The collisions, which lead to a damping of plasmons and quasiparticles in the electron gas, is taken into account through a relaxation-time approximation in the linear-response function. The stopping power for an ion is calculated in both the low- and high-velocity limits. In order to highlight the effects of damping, we present a comparison of our analytical and numerical results, in the case of pointlike ions, obtained for a nonzero damping with those for a vanishing damping. It is shown that the equipartition sum rule first formulated by Lindhard and Winther for three-dimensional degenerate electron gas does not necessarily hold in two dimensions. We have generalized this rule introducing an effective dielectric function. In addition, some results for two-dimensional interacting electron gas have been obtained. In this case, the exchange-correlation interactions of electrons are considered via local-field corrected dielectric function.

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of CdSe Nanocrystals in the Gas Phase: A Direct Measure of the Evanescent Electron Wave Function of Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy of CdSe Nanocrystals in the Gas Phase: A Direct Measure of the Evanescent Electron Wave Function of Quantum Dots Wei Xiong...the fraction of evanescent electron wave function that extends outside of the quantum dot . This work shows that gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy ...function. KEYWORDS: Quantum dots , ultrafast, electronic structure, aerodynamic lens, gas phase photoelectron spectroscopy , velocity map imaging Quantum

  10. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O2 , N2 , Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (˜1 V ) compared to pure Kr plasma (˜0.01 V ), with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  11. Low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber and a search for a high-efficiency secondary-electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.; Sbarra, C.

    1994-11-01

    The test beam performance of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a thick CsI secondary-electron emitting surface as the source of primary ionization is presented. A study of the secondary-electron yield of CsI and KCl coated surfaces are discussed, as well as a promising new technique, CsI-treated CVD diamond films.

  12. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  13. The influence of the intensity of electric field on methane-air mixed gas discharge electron transport parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuang-yan; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Plasma enhanced ignition is an important way in the field of ignition auxiliary. It has got wide attention throughout the researchers both at home and abroad. The plasma is usually added in the form of discharge. It makes a big difference in the discharge form according to different discharge unit, different kinds of electric field and different kinds of discharge medium. Variety of methods could be used to characterize the parameters of the plasma. The electron transport parameter is an important variable during the process of the plasma discharge. The mathematical model was set up to calculate the electron transport parameters in different reduced electric intensity. The electrons meet the Boltzmann equations in plasma system. Reasonable methods were used to simplify the Boltzmann equations. The electron transport parameters of methane-air mixed gas at the same equivalent ratio and pressure in different reduced electric field were calculated. The calculation results show that the EEDF turns to the right with the increasing of reduced electric field. The average electron energy and average electron energy of the mixed gas increases linearly with the increasing of reduced electric field. The increasing of reduced electric field enhances the electronic/energy diffusion effect and the enhancing effect is more apparent when the reduced electric field is high. The increasing of reduced electric field restrains the electron diffusion and energy transference restrains from the trend of the change. The inhibition effect is weakening with the increasing of the reduced electric field.

  14. Investigation of ionization-induced electron injection in a wakefield driven by laser inside a gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, T. L.; Hansson, M.; Lee, P.; Desforges, F. G.; Maynard, G.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Aurand, B.; Persson, A.; Gallardo González, I.; Maitrallain, A.; Monot, P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; Cros, B.

    2016-02-01

    Ionization-induced electron injection was investigated experimentally by focusing a driving laser pulse with a maximum normalized potential of 1.2 at different positions along the plasma density profile inside a gas cell, filled with a gas mixture composed of 99 %H2+1 %N2 . Changing the laser focus position relative to the gas cell entrance controls the accelerated electron bunch properties, such as the spectrum width, maximum energy, and accelerated charge. Simulations performed using the 3D particle-in-cell code WARP with a realistic density profile give results that are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The interest of this regime for optimizing the bunch charge in a selected energy window is discussed.

  15. Electron spectroscopy of rare-gas clusters irradiated by x-ray free-electron laser pulses from SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, H.; Tachibana, T.; Motomura, K.; Xu, W. Q.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured electron energy spectra and asymmetry parameters of Ar clusters and Xe clusters illuminated by intense x-rays at 5 and 5.5 keV. A velocity map imaging spectrometer was developed for this purpose and employed at an x-ray free-electron laser facility, SACLA in Japan. The cluster size dependence and the peak fluence dependence of the electron spectra and asymmetry parameters are discussed.

  16. Gas-assisted annular microsprayer for sample preparation for time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen S.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, a microfluidic device has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using a microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, whilst not being so thin that it dries out before freezing, i.e. an optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6 and 9 μm, which fulfilled the droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size 58  ×  58 μm), and a data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 h period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieving using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection with the previous device has been shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliters of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction.

  17. Oscillation spectrum of an electron gas with a small density fraction of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Yu. N.

    2010-07-15

    The problem is solved of the stability of a nonneutral plasma that completely fills a waveguide and consists of magnetized cold electrons and a small density fraction of ions produced by ionization of the atoms of the background gas. The ions are described by an anisotropic distribution function that takes into account the characteristic features of their production in crossed electric and magnetic fields. By solving a set of Vlasov-Poisson equations analytically, a dispersion equation is obtained that is valid over the entire range of allowable electric and magnetic field strengths. The solutions to the dispersion equation for the m = +1 main azimuthal mode are found numerically. The plasma oscillation spectrum consists of the families of Trivelpiece-Gould modes at frequencies equal to the frequencies of oblique Langmuir oscillations Doppler shifted by the electron rotation and also of the families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes at frequencies close to the harmonics of the MIC frequency (the frequencies of radial ion oscillations in crossed fields). It is shown that, over a wide range of electric and magnetic field strengths, Trivelpiece-Gould modes have low frequencies and interact with MIC modes. Trivelpiece-Gould modes at frequencies close to the harmonics of the MIC frequency with nonnegative numbers are unstable. The lowest radial Trivelpiece-Gould mode at a frequency close to the zeroth harmonic of the MIC frequency has the fastest growth rate. MIC modes are unstable over a wide range of electric and magnetic field strengths and grow at far slower rates. For a low ion density, a simplified dispersion equation is derived perturbatively that accounts for the nonlocal ion contribution, but, at the same time, has the form of a local dispersion equation for a plasma with a transverse current and anisotropic ions. The solutions to the simplified dispersion equation are obtained analytically. The growth rates of the Trivelpiece-Gould modes and the behavior

  18. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  19. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the uniform electron gas without fixed nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, S.; Schoof, T.; Dornheim, T.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-02-01

    The uniform electron gas (UEG) at finite temperature is of key relevance for many applications in the warm dense matter regime, e.g., dense plasmas and laser excited solids. Also, the quality of density functional theory calculations crucially relies on the availability of accurate data for the exchange-correlation energy. Recently, results for N =33 spin-polarized electrons at high density, rs=r ¯/aB≲4 , and low temperature have been obtained with the configuration path integral Monte Carlo (CPIMC) method [T. Schoof et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 130402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.130402]. To achieve these results, the original CPIMC algorithm [T. Schoof et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 51, 687 (2011), 10.1002/ctpp.201100012] had to be further optimized to cope with the fermion sign problem (FSP). It is the purpose of this paper to give detailed information on the manifestation of the FSP in CPIMC simulations of the UEG and to demonstrate how it can be turned into a controllable convergence problem. In addition, we present new thermodynamic results for higher temperatures. Finally, to overcome the limitations of CPIMC towards strong coupling, we invoke an independent method—the recently developed permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo approach [T. Dornheim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 204101 (2015), 10.1063/1.4936145]. The combination of both approaches is able to yield ab initio data for the UEG over the entire density range, above a temperature of about one half of the Fermi temperature. Comparison with restricted path integral Monte Carlo data [E. W. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.146405] allows us to quantify the systematic error arising from the free particle nodes.

  20. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    DOE PAGES

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here we perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N = 1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy F xc of the macroscopic electron gas withmore » an unprecedented accuracy of | Δ V | / | V | , | Δ Fxc | / | F | xc ~ 10 $-$3. Finally, a comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of F xc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.« less

  1. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  2. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-07

    Here we perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N = 1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy F xc of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of | Δ V | / | V | , | Δ Fxc | / | F | xc ~ 10 $-$3. Finally, a comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of F xc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  3. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit.

    PubMed

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-07

    We perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N=1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy F_{xc} of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of |ΔV|/|V|,|ΔF_{xc}|/|F|_{xc}∼10^{-3}. A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of F_{xc} by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  4. Current-Induced Cooling Phenomenon in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Under a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Naomi; Endo, Akira; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hatano, Naomichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Shirasaki, Ryōen; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of temperature induced by a dc current in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field. We numerically calculate the distributions of the electrostatic potential ϕ and the temperature T in a 2DEG enclosed in a square area surrounded by insulated-adiabatic (top and bottom) and isopotential-isothermal (left and right) boundaries (with ϕ left< ϕ right and T left= T right), using a pair of nonlinear Poisson equations (for ϕ and T) that fully take into account thermoelectric and thermomagnetic phenomena, including the Hall, Nernst, Ettingshausen, and Righi-Leduc effects. We find that, in the vicinity of the left-bottom corner, the temperature becomes lower than the fixed boundary temperature, contrary to the naive expectation that the temperature is raised by the prevalent Joule heating effect. The cooling is attributed to the Ettingshausen effect at the bottom adiabatic boundary, which pumps up the heat away from the bottom boundary. In order to keep the adiabatic condition, downward temperature gradient, hence the cooled area, is developed near the boundary, with the resulting thermal diffusion compensating the upward heat current due to the Ettingshausen effect.

  5. Gas Electron Multiplier performance under high intensity X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, Danning

    2015-10-01

    Large size Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab) have been built at Detector Lab of University of Virginia(UVa). The Proton Polarimeter Back Tracker of the SBS consist of 40 GEM modules of size 60 ×50 cm2. We report R&D and quality test of the GEM detectors under high intensity X-ray radiation. Expected background rate in experiment is up to about 500 kHz/cm2. Such high background rate requires GEM detectors to have timing resolution of about a few nano seconds and operate stably with high rate activities going on within. X-ray with high rate up to 50 MHz/cm2 and energy up to 50 keV was used to test the performance of GEM detectors in detector lab at UVa. Issues caused by high intensity background and detailed R&D effort to adapt GEM detectors for use in the SBS are described.

  6. Ferroelectricity, Antiferroelectricity and Ultrathin 2D Electron/Hole Gas in Multifunctional Monolayer MXene.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Anand; Mishra, Avanish; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2017-04-04

    Presence of ferroelectric polarization in 2D materials is extremely rare due to the effect of the surface depolarizing field. Here, we use first-principles calculations to show the largest out-of-plane polarization observed in a monolayer in functionalized MXenes (Sc2CO2). The switching of polarization in this new class of ferroelectric materials occurs through an previously unknown intermediate antiferroelectric structure thus establishing three states for applications in low-dimensional non-volatile memory. We show that the armchair domain-interface acts as an 1D metallic nanowire separating two insulating domains. In the case of the van-der-Waals bilayer we observe, interestingly, the presence of an ultrathin 2D electron/hole gas (2DEG) on the top/bottom layers, respectively, due to the redistrubution of charge carriers. The 2DEG is non-degenerate due to spin-orbit-coupling, thus paving the way for spin-orbitronic devices. The coexistence of ferroelectricity, antiferroelectricity, 2DEG and spin-orbit splitting in this system suggests that such 2D polar materials possess high potential for device application in a multitude of fields ranging from nanoelectronics to photovoltaics.

  7. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  8. Tunable one-dimensional electron gas carrier densities at nanostructured oxide interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Zhang, Lipeng; Xu, Haixuan; Kent, P. R. C.; Ganesh, P.; Cooper, Valentino R.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of two-dimensional metallic states at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure interface is known to occur at a critical thickness of four LAO layers. This insulator to-metal transition can be explained through the “polar catastrophe” mechanism arising from the divergence of the electrostatic potential at the LAO surface. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring can be effective in reducing or eliminating this critical thickness. Employing a modified “polar catastrophe” model, we demonstrate that the nanowire heterostructure electrostatic potential diverges more rapidly as a function of layer thickness than in a regular heterostructure. Our first-principles calculations indicate that for nanowire heterostructures a robust one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) can be induced, consistent with recent experimental observations of 1D conductivity at LAO/STO steps. Similar to LAO/STO 2DEGs, we predict that the 1D charge density decays laterally within a few unit cells away from the nanowire; thus providing a mechanism for tuning the carrier dimensionality between 1D and 2D conductivity. Our work provides insight into the creation and manipulation of charge density at an oxide heterostructure interface and therefore may be beneficial for future nanoelectronic devices and for the engineering of novel quantum phases. PMID:27151049

  9. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic atoms doped into a semiconductor are the building blocks for bottom up spintronic and quantum logic devices. They also provide model systems for the investigation of fundamental effects. In order to correlate the dopant's atomic structure with its magnetism magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution are a prerequisite. Here, I show electrical excitation and read-out [ 1 ] of single magnetic dopant associated spins in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined to a semiconductor surface [ 2 ] using spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy [ 3 ] . I will review our real-space study of the quantum Hall transition in the 2DEG [ 2 ] and of the magnetic properties of the dopants [ 1 ] . Finally, I will demonstrate that the dopant serves as an atomic scale probe for local magnetometry of the 2DEG. This work was done in collaboration with A. A. Khajetoorians, B. Chillian, S. Schuwalow, F. Lechermann, K. Hashimoto, C. Sohrmann, T. Inaoka, F. Meier, Y. Hirayama, R. A. Römer, M. Morgenstern, and R. Wiesendanger. [ 1 ] A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Nature 467, 1084 (2010). [ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 256802 (2008). [ 3 ] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant ``FURORE'', by the DFG via SFB668 and GrK1286, and by the city of Hamburg via the cluster of excellence ``Nanospintronics''.

  10. Tunable one-dimensional electron gas carrier densities at nanostructured oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xu, Haixuan; Kent, Paul R. C.; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Cooper, Valentino R.; Zhuang, Houlong L.

    2016-05-06

    The emergence of two-dimensional metallic states at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure interface is known to occur at a critical thickness of four LAO over layers. This insulator-to-metal transition can be explained through the polar catastrophe mechanism arising from the divergence of the electrostatic potential at the LAO surface. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring can be effective in reducing or eliminating this critical thickness. Employing a modified polar catastrophe" model, we demonstrate that the nanowire heterostructure electrostatic potential diverges more rapidly as a function of layer thickness than in a regular heterostructure. Our first principles calculations indicate that for nanowire heterostructure geometries a one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) can be induced, consistent with recent experimental observations of 1D conductivity in LAO/STO steps. Similar to LAO/STO 2DEGs, we predict that the 1D charge density will decay laterally within a few unit cells away from the nanowire; thus providing a mechanism for tuning the carrier behavior between 1D and 2D conductivity. Furthermore, our work provides insight into the creation and manipulation of charge density at an oxide heterostructure interface and therefore may be beneficial for future nanoelectronic devices and for the engineering of novel quantum phases.

  11. Tunable one-dimensional electron gas carrier densities at nanostructured oxide interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xu, Haixuan; Kent, Paul R. C.; ...

    2016-05-06

    The emergence of two-dimensional metallic states at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure interface is known to occur at a critical thickness of four LAO over layers. This insulator-to-metal transition can be explained through the polar catastrophe mechanism arising from the divergence of the electrostatic potential at the LAO surface. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring can be effective in reducing or eliminating this critical thickness. Employing a modified polar catastrophe" model, we demonstrate that the nanowire heterostructure electrostatic potential diverges more rapidly as a function of layer thickness than in a regular heterostructure. Our first principles calculations indicate that for nanowire heterostructuremore » geometries a one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) can be induced, consistent with recent experimental observations of 1D conductivity in LAO/STO steps. Similar to LAO/STO 2DEGs, we predict that the 1D charge density will decay laterally within a few unit cells away from the nanowire; thus providing a mechanism for tuning the carrier behavior between 1D and 2D conductivity. Furthermore, our work provides insight into the creation and manipulation of charge density at an oxide heterostructure interface and therefore may be beneficial for future nanoelectronic devices and for the engineering of novel quantum phases.« less

  12. Large Gas Electron Multiplier Trackers for Super Bigbite Spectrometer at Jefferson lab Hall A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenboonruang, K.; Gnanvo, K.; Liyanage, N.; Nelyubin, V.; Sacher, S.; Cisbani, E.; Musico, P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2013-04-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) makes many exciting nuclear experiments possible. These experiments also require new high performance instrumentation. The Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) was proposed to perform a series of high precision nucleon form factor experiments at large momentum transfer. The SBS will be capable of operating at a very high luminosity and provide a large solid angle acceptance of 76 msr. SBS will be equipped with a double focal plane polarimeter. Thus, SBS will have three large trackers made of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers. The first, second, and third trackers will consist of six, four, and four tracking layers respectively. When completed in 2017, the SBS GEM trackers will form one of the largest sets of GEM chambers in the world. The GEM trackers allow the SBS to operate under high background rates over 500 kHz/cm^2, while providing an excellent spatial resolution of 70 μm. The first tracker will be constructed at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Italy, while the second and third trackers will be built at the University of Virginia. In 2012, the first UVa SBS GEM chamber prototype was successfully constructed and tested. The GEM chamber construction details and test results will be presented in this talk.

  13. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin-orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and {τ }{{s}}=16 {{ns}} at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices.

  14. Radiation modulation of circular photogalvanic effect in two-dimensional electron gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chongyun; Ma, Hui; Yu, Jinling; Liu, Yu; Chen, Yonghai

    2012-12-01

    We report on the observation of a modulation on the circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) imposed by an extra optical radiation in a GaAs-based two dimensional electron gas system. The wavelength of the radiation for exciting the CPGE is 1064 nm and the wavelength of the modulation is 532 nm. The experiment is carried out from 77 K up to room temperature. The 1064 nm induced CPGE modulated by the 532 nm radiation increases as the increasing temperature. We also vary the power of the modulation beam to investigate the intensity dependence of the modulation effect. The modulation exhibits a linear dependence at low intensity. As the intensity increasing, we observe a saturation at certain level of the intensity and a suppression of the modulation when the intensity is further increased. The investigation of photoconductivity reveals that the change of the photoexcited charge carrier density has little contribution to the radiation modulation effect. Therefore, the microscopic mechanism of the radiation modulation effect can be attributed to the modulation of spin-orbit interaction in the structure.

  15. Accurate Zero Parameter Correlation Energy Functional Obtained from the Homogeneous Electron Gas with an Energy Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. B.; Chen, Jiqiang; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    We have obtained an analytic approximation to E_c(r_g, ζ,G) where G is an energy gap separating the occupied and unoccupied states of a homogeneous electron gas for ζ=3D0 and ξ=3D1. When G=3D0, E_c(r_g, ζ) reduces to the usual LSD result. This functional is employed in calculating correlation energies for unpolarized atoms and ions for Z <= 18 by taking G[n]=3D1/8|nabla ln n|^2, which reduces to the ionization energy in the large r limit in an exact Kohn-Sham (KS) theory. The resulting functional is self-interaction-corrected employing a method which is invariant under a unitary transformation. We find that the application of this approach to the calculation of the Ec functional reduces the error in the LSD result by more than 95%. When the value of G is approximately corrected to include the effect of higher lying unoccupied localized states, the resulting values of Ec are within a few percent of the exact results.

  16. Methodology to model the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of electronic software distributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel R; Tang, Yinshan

    2012-01-17

    A new electronic software distribution (ESD) life cycle analysis (LCA) methodology and model structure were constructed to calculate energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In order to counteract the use of high level, top-down modeling efforts, and to increase result accuracy, a focus upon device details and data routes was taken. In order to compare ESD to a relevant physical distribution alternative, physical model boundaries and variables were described. The methodology was compiled from the analysis and operational data of a major online store which provides ESD and physical distribution options. The ESD method included the calculation of power consumption of data center server and networking devices. An in-depth method to calculate server efficiency and utilization was also included to account for virtualization and server efficiency features. Internet transfer power consumption was analyzed taking into account the number of data hops and networking devices used. The power consumed by online browsing and downloading was also factored into the model. The embedded CO(2)e of server and networking devices was proportioned to each ESD process. Three U.K.-based ESD scenarios were analyzed using the model which revealed potential CO(2)e savings of 83% when ESD was used over physical distribution. Results also highlighted the importance of server efficiency and utilization methods.

  17. The Two-dimensional Electron Gas at the Lanthanum Aluminate - Strontium Titanate Heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Tomas

    Since the discovery of the conducting two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface of insulating oxide materials LaAlO3 and SrTiO 3 in 2004, this system has shown a vast diversity of physical properties including superconductivity, ferromagnetism and field induced metal-insulator phase transitions. In this dissertation we discuss three advances by our collaboration that bolster applicability of this interfacial system. In an all thin-film LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system we identified two different conduction regimes, where the effect of oxygen partial pressure during growth directly affects the carrier density of the system. In the lower carrier density regime (˜ 1013 cm-2) we found a metallic to insulating temperature dependence and strong localization by disorder, whereas in the higher regime (> 1014 cm-2) we find metallic dependence with signs of weak localization. This is understood in the occupation of Ti 3d bands farther from the interface as carrier density is increased. Our work in the electronic properties of all-thin-film LaAlO 3/SrTiO3 pioneers the understanding and implementations of this 2DEG to harness the richness of this oxide interface and its integration to industry standard substrates. Furthermore, we showed the first conducting LaAlO3/SrTiO3 two-dimensional system grown by the physical vapor deposition technique: 90° off-axis sputtering. Films grown with this scalable technique have excellent crystalline quality and transport characteristics similar to those grown by (mostly research employed) pulsed laser deposition. Writing of circuits on the nanoscale using conducting-tip atomic force microscopy is demonstrated in sputtered LaAlO3 on SrTiO3, opening the doors to nanoelectronic application of this novel interfacial system. Moreover, we are among the first groups in the world to demonstrate conducting [111]-oriented LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures, a crystallographic orientation that proves to be challenging due to the large polar nature of

  18. A relaxation-accelerated propagator method for calculations of electron energy distribution function and electron transport parameters in gas under dc electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirotake

    2017-04-01

    A propagator method (PM), a numerical technique to solve the Boltzmann equation (BE) for the electron velocity or energy distribution function (EVDF/EEDF) of electron swarms in gases, was customized to obtain the equilibrium solution quickly. The PM calculates the number of electrons in cells defined in velocity space using an operator called the propagator or Green’s function. The propagator represents the intercellular transfer of electrons corresponding to the electron velocity change due to the acceleration by the electric field and the collisional events with gas molecules. The relaxation of the EVDF to its drift equilibrium solution proceeds with iterative propagator operations for the EVDF. Merits of the PM are that the series expansion of the EVDF as done in the BE analyses is not required and that time evolution of the electron swarm can be observed if necessary. On the other hand, in case only the equilibrium solution of the EVDF is wanted, the relaxation can be accelerated numerically. A demonstration achieved a shortening of the computational time by about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, this scheme was applied to calculations of a set of electron transport parameters required in fluid-model simulations, i.e. the effective ionization frequency, the centroid drift velocity and the longitudinal diffusion coefficient, using the zeroth-, first- and second-order moment equations derived from the BE. A detailed description on the PM calculation was presented.

  19. Analysis of phthalate esters in soils near an electronics manufacturing facility and from a non-industrialized area by gas purge microsyringe extraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Hu, Jia; Wang, Jinqi; Chen, Xuerong; Yao, Na; Tao, Jing; Zhou, Yi-Kai

    2015-03-01

    Here, a novel technique is described for the extraction and quantitative determination of six phthalate esters (PAEs) from soils by gas purge microsyringe extraction and gas chromatography. Recovery of PAEs ranged from 81.4% to 120.3%, and the relative standard deviation (n=6) ranged from 5.3% to 10.5%. Soil samples were collected from roadsides, farmlands, residential areas, and non-cultivated areas in a non-industrialized region, and from the same land-use types within 1 km of an electronics manufacturing facility (n=142). Total PAEs varied from 2.21 to 157.62 mg kg(-1) in non-industrialized areas and from 8.63 to 171.64 mg kg(-1) in the electronics manufacturing area. PAE concentrations in the non-industrialized area were highest in farmland, followed (in decreasing order) by roadsides, residential areas, and non-cultivated soil. In the electronics manufacturing area, PAE concentrations were highest in roadside soils, followed by residential areas, farmland, and non-cultivated soils. Concentrations of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) differed significantly (P<0.01) between the industrial and non-industrialized areas. Principal component analysis indicated that the strongest explanatory factor was related to DMP and DnBP in non-industrialized soils and to butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and DMP in soils near the electronics manufacturing facility. Congener-specific analysis confirmed that diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) was a predictive indication both in the non-industrialized area (r(2)=0.944, P<0.01) and the industrialized area (r(2)=0.860, P<0.01). The higher PAE contents in soils near the electronics manufacturing facility are of concern, considering the large quantities of electronic wastes generated with ongoing industrialization.

  20. Self-absorption Effects In Experimental Methods Used To Determine Electron Density And Gas Temperature In An Argon Microwave Plasma (SWP) Generated At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, I.; Munoz, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2008-10-22

    In this work a procedure was applied to verify that self-absorption does not affect the spectral lines used in the experimental determination of the electron density and the gas temperature in surface wave discharges at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, the values of electron density and gas temperature obtained are not perturbed by this phenomenon.

  1. Dependence of the Light Emission Characteristics on the Ne Gas Pressure in an Electron-beam-pumped Light Source Using a Field Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Kazufumi; Neo, Yoichiro; Okada, Morihiro; Kume, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ikedo, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi; Hashiguchi, Gen; Mimura, Hidenori

    The dependence of the light intensity on the gas pressure was investigated in an electron-beam-pumped-light source using a graphite nanoneedle field emitter, a Si electron-transparent film and a Ne gas. A spot-like light emission and a background light emission are observed in at a Ne gas pressure less than 0.4 atm, while the back ground light emission disappears and the light emission becomes a completely spot with increasing the gas pressure. These experimental results are explained by the Monte-Calro simulation of electron trajectories inside the gas cell. On the other hand, the light intensity almost saturates at a gas pressure of 0.4 atm and dose not increase with increasing the gas pressure. The Monte-Calro simulation suggests that the saturation of the light intensity is due to the increase of the excited Ne atoms losing their energy without light emission.

  2. Mixed valence as a necessary criteria for quasi-two dimensional electron gas in oxide hetero-interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijeta; Pulikkotil, J. J.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of quasi-two dimensional electron gas at the interface of polar-nonpolar oxide hetero-structure, such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3, is debated over electronic reconstruction and defects/disorder models. Common to these models is the partial valence transformation of substrate Ti ions from its equilibrium 4 + state to an itinerant 3 + state. Given that the Hf ions have a lower ionization potential than Ti due to the 4 f orbital screening, one would expect a hetero-interface conductivity in the polar-nonpolar LaAlO3/SrHfO3 system as well. However, our first principles calculations show the converse. Unlike the Ti3+ -Ti4+ valence transition which occur at a nominal energy cost, the barrier energy associated with its isoelectronic Hf3+ -Hf4+ counterpart is very high, hence suppressing the formation of quasi-two dimensional electron gas at LaAlO3/SrHfO3 hetero-interface. These calculations, therefore, emphasize on the propensity of mixed valence at the interface as a necessary condition for an oxide hetero-structure to exihibit quasi two-dimensional electron gas.

  3. Portable Electronic Nose System for Identification of Synthesized Gasoline Using Metal Oxide Gas Sensor and Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Wung; Park, Hong Bae; Lee, In Soo; Cho, Jung Hwan

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for use in the identification of synthesized gasoline, comprised of a single semiconductor type of gas sensor and pattern recognition neural networks. The designed e-nose system consists of a one-chip microcontroller, a pre-concentrator, and a gas sensor. Two different neural networks, a multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network and a fuzzy ARTMAP neural network were applied to discriminate synthesized gasoline from normal gasoline. The results of the classification showed 100% and 85% recognition rates for the training data set and testing data set, respectively.

  4. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Parks, P. B.; Eidietis, N. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Austin, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function f{sub ε} during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, f{sub ε} is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ∼ 0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  5. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-Da)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Parks, P. B.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Moyer, R. A.; Shiraki, D.; Austin, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rudakov, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function fεfε during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, fεfε is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ∼ 0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  6. The effect of sample matrix on electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature in the argon inductively coupled plasma examined by Thomson and Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanselman, D. S.; Sesi, N. N.; Huang, M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1994-05-01

    Spatially-resolved electron temperature ( Te), electron number density ( ne) and gas-kinetic temperature ( Tg) maps of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) have been obtained for two central-gas flow rates, four heights above the load coil (ALC) and in the presence and absence of interferants with a wide range of first ionization potentials. The radial profiles demonstrate how the directly measured fundamental parameters neTe and Tg can be significantly enhanced and/or depressed with added interferent, depending upon plasma operating conditions and observation region. In general, the magnitude of ne, and Te change is found to be an inverse function of interferent ionization potential; furthermore, ne enhancements in the central channel might be the result of electron redistribution from high to low electron density regions rather than from ionization of the matrix. The large measured increases in ne cannot be attributed solely to matrix ionization, especially when measurement uncertainties and the probable over-estimation in calculated ne, enhancements are taken into account. Changes in ne and Te have been correlated with axial Ca atom and ion emission profiles. A brief review of the mechanisms most likely involved in interelement matrix interferences is given within the context of the present study. This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text is accompanied by a disk for the Macintosh computer with data files stored in ASCII format. The main article discusses the scientific aspects of the subject and gives an interpretation of the results contained in the data files.

  7. Emergence of a Kondo singlet state with Kondo temperature well beyond 1000 K in a proton-embedded electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Maezono, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Kanako

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen in metals has attracted much attention for a long time from both basic scientific and technological points of view. Its electronic state has been investigated in terms of a proton embedded in the electron gas mostly by the local density approximation (LDA) to the density functional theory. At high electronic densities, it is well described by a bare proton H+ screened by metallic electrons (charge resonance), while at low densities two electrons are localized at the proton site to form a closed-shell negative ion H- protected from surrounding metallic electrons by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, no details are known about the transition from H+ to H- in the intermediate-density region. Here, by accurately determining the ground-state electron distribution n (r ) by the use of LDA and diffusion Monte Carlo simulations with the total electron number up to 170, we obtain a complete picture of the transition, in particular, a sharp transition from short-range H+ screening charge resonance to long-range Kondo-type spin-singlet resonance, the emergence of which is confirmed by the presence of an anomalous Friedel oscillation characteristic to the Kondo singlet state with the Kondo temperature TK well beyond 1000 K. This study not only reveals interesting competition between charge and spin resonances, enriching the century-old paradigm of metallic screening to a point charge, but also discovers a high-TK system long sought in relation to the development of exotic superconductivity in the quantum critical regime.

  8. Cross-Calibration of Secondary Electron Multiplier in Noble Gas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Alessandro; Hamilton, Doug; Deerberg, Michael; Wijbrans, Jan; Kuiper, Klaudia; Bouman, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    The latest generation of multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers has decisively improved the precision in isotopic ratio analysis [1, 2] and helped the scientific community to address new questions [3]. Measuring numerous isotopes simultaneously has two significant advantages: firstly, any fluctuations in signal intensity have no effect on the isotope ratio and secondly, the analysis time is reduced. This particular point becomes very important in static vacuum mass spectrometry where during the analysis, the signal intensity decays and at the same time the background increases. However, when multi-collector analysis is utilized, it is necessary to pay special attention to the cross calibration of the detectors. This is a key point in order to have accurate and reproducible isotopic ratios. In isotope ratio mass spectrometry, with regard to the type of detector (i.e. Faraday or Secondary Electron Multiplier, SEM), analytical technique (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS or IRMS) and isotope system of interest, several techniques are currently applied to cross-calibrate the detectors. Specifically, the gain of the Faraday cups is generally stable and only the associated amplifier must be calibrated. For example, on the Thermo Scientific instrument control systems, the 1011 and 1012 ohm amplifiers can easily be calibrated through a fully software controlled procedure by inputting a constant electric signal to each amplifier sequentially [4]. On the other hand, the yield of the SEMs can drift up to 0.2% / hour and other techniques such as peak hopping, standard-sample bracketing and multi-dynamic measurement must be used. Peak hopping allows the detectors to be calibrated by measuring an ion beam of constant intensity across the detectors whereas standard-sample bracketing corrects the drift of the detectors through the analysis of a reference standard of a known isotopic ratio. If at least one isotopic pair of the sample is known, multi-dynamic measurement can be used; in this

  9. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on the generation of electron beams in the gas-filled diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. H.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) on generation of an electron beam in the gas-filled diode is experimentally investigated. It is shown that, at voltage U = 25 kV across the diode and a low helium pressure (45 Torr), the transverse magnetic field influences the beam current amplitude behind a foil and its distribution over the foil cross section. At elevated pressures and under the conditions of ultrashort avalanche electron beam formation in helium, nitrogen, and air, the transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) has a minor effect on the amplitude and duration of the beam behind the foil. It is established that, when the voltage of the pulse generator reaches several hundreds of kilovolts, some runaway electrons (including the electrons from the discharge plasma near the cathode) are incident on the side walls of the diode.

  10. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas on Ultrathin Helium Films on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrust, N.; Güdde, J.; Höfer, U.; Kossler, S.; Feulner, P.

    2016-06-01

    Electrons in image-potential states on the surface of bulk helium represent a unique model system of a two-dimensional electron gas. Here, we investigate their properties in the extreme case of reduced film thickness: a monolayer of helium physisorbed on a single-crystalline (111)-oriented Cu surface. For this purpose we have utilized a customized setup for time-resolved two-photon photoemission at very low temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We demonstrate that the highly polarizable metal substrate increases the binding energy of the first (n =1 ) image-potential state by more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the surface of liquid helium. An electron in this state is still strongly decoupled from the metal surface due to the large negative electron affinity of helium and we find that even 1 monolayer of helium increases its lifetime by 1 order of magnitude compared to the bare Cu(111) surface.

  11. Quantitation of opioids in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2011-03-01

    Opioids are frequently encountered in Forensic Toxicology casework. A PubMed literature search was conducted to find a method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine whole blood specimens. A previously published method was identified, and an updated version was provided by the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. This procedure was used as a starting point for development and validation of a refined procedure to be used in the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Forensic Toxicology laboratory for routine analysis of antemortem forensic toxicology case samples. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining detection limits from 1 to 10 ng/mL and quantitation limits of 2.5 to 10 ng/mL using 1 mL of whole blood. Target compounds were chosen based on applicability to the method as well as availability and common use in the United States and include dihydrocodeine, codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone. Each analyte demonstrated two zero-order linear ranges (r(2) > 0.990) over the concentrations evaluated (from 2.5 to 500 ng/mL). The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 12%. Quantitative accuracy was within ± 27% at 2.5 ng/mL, ± 11% at 10 ng/mL, and ± 8% at 50 ng/mL. The validated method provides a more sensitive procedure for the quantitation of common opioids in blood using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  12. Quantitation of benzodiazepines in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently encountered in forensic toxicology. A literature search was conducted to find a simple method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GC-MS) to examine whole blood specimens for the most commonly encountered benzodiazepines in the United States. A recently published method was identified in the literature search and used as a starting point for development of a new procedure to be used for routine analysis of forensic toxicology case samples. The procedure was then developed and validated as a rapid and efficient method for the screening and quantitation of benzodiazepines in blood using liquid-liquid extraction and EI-GC-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining LODs from 5 to 50 ng/mL and LOQs of 50 ng/mL or less using 1 mL of sample. Target compounds were chosen based on availability and common use in the United States and include diazepam, desalkylflurazepam, nordiazepam, midazolam, oxazepam, temazepam, lorazepam, clonazepam, and alprazolam (relative elution order). The linear range (r2 > 0.990) was validated from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for all analytes. The CV of replicate analyses at both 50 and 200 ng/mL was less than 4%. Quantitative accuracy was within +/- 16% at 50 ng/mL and within +/- 7% at 200 ng/mL. The validated method provides an efficient procedure for the quantitation of a broad range of the most common benzodiazepines in blood at meaningful limits of detection and quantitation using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  13. Evaluation of electron capture gas chromatographic method for determination of methyl mercury in freezer-case seafoods.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, G H; Hight, S C; Capar, S G

    1984-01-01

    A method was recently adopted by AOAC for determination of methyl-bound mercury in canned and fresh-frozen seafood by electron capture gas chromatography. That method was applied to the analysis of commercially prepared freezer-case seafoods. None of the commercially added ingredients produced electron capture responses that interfered in the analysis for methyl mercury. Recoveries of 95.7-114% were obtained in fortification studies of methyl mercury at 0.2 and 1.0 ppm levels. The applicability of aqueous methyl mercuric chloride solution for fortification studies was demonstrated.

  14. Collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied electron gas with allowance for its spin polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Sasorov, P. V.; Fomin, I. V.

    2015-06-15

    The collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied spin-polarized gas of fermions (electrons) is derived. The collisions between these fermions and the collisions with much heavier particles (ions) forming a randomly located stationary background (gas) are taken into account. An important new circumstance is that the particle-particle scattering amplitude is not assumed to be small, which could be obtained, for example, in the first Born approximation. The derived collision integral can be used in the kinetic equation, including that for a relatively cold rarefied spin-polarized plasma with a characteristic electron energy below α{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}, where α is the fine-structure constant.

  15. The effects of gas mixing and plasma electrode position on the emittance of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2004-05-01

    Gas mixing is a commonly used method to improve the intensities and the charge state distribution of ion beams extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). At the same time, the emittance of the ion beam should be as small as possible. In this work we have studied the effect of the gas mixing method on the ion beam quality by measuring the emittance and brightness of different ion beams using helium, oxygen, and argon with several gas feeding ratios. All measurements were performed with the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. At the second stage of the experiments the emittance and the ion beam brightness were studied as a function of the plasma electrode position. The extraction system constructed for this experiment can be moved online.

  16. Excitonic splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer in the gas-phase benzoic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    The benzoic acid dimer, (BZA)2, is a paradigmatic symmetric hydrogen bonded dimer with two strong antiparallel hydrogen bonds. The excitonic S1/S2 state splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer within supersonically cooled (BZA)2 and its 13C-, d1 -, d2 -, and 13C/d1 - isotopomers have been investigated by mass-resolved two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. The (BZA)2-(h - h) and (BZA)2-(d - d) dimers are C2h symmetric, hence only the S2 ← S0 transition can be observed, the S1 ← S0 transition being strictly electric-dipole forbidden. A single 12C/13C or H/D isotopic substitution reduces the symmetry of the dimer to Cs, so that the isotopic heterodimers (BZA)2 - 13C, (BZA)2 -(h - d), (BZA)2 -(h13C-d), and (BZA)2 -(h - d13C) show both S1 ← S0 and S2 ← S0 bands. The S1/S2 exciton splitting inferred is Δexc = 0.94 ± 0.1 cm-1. This is the smallest splitting observed so far for any H-bonded gas-phase dimer. Additional isotope-dependent contributions to the splittings, Δiso, arise from the change of the zero-point vibrational energy upon electronic excitation and range from Δiso = 3.3 cm-1 upon 12C/13C substitution to 14.8 cm-1 for carboxy H/D substitution. The degree of excitonic localization/delocalization can be sensitively measured via the relative intensities of the S1 ← S0 and S2 ← S0 origin bands; near-complete localization is observed even for a single 12C/13C substitution. The S1/ S2 energy gap of (BZA)2 is Δ ^{exc}_{calc} = 11 cm-1 when calculated by the approximate second-order perturbation theory (CC2) method. Upon correction for vibronic quenching, this decreases to Δ ^{exc}_{vibron}=2.1 cm-1 [P. Ottiger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 174308 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4705119, in good agreement with the observed Δexc = 0.94 cm-1. The observed excitonic splittings can be converted to exciton hopping times τexc. For the (BZA)2-(h - h) homodimer τexc = 18 ps, which is nearly 40 times shorter than the double proton transfer time

  17. Excitonic splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer in the gas-phase benzoic acid dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-11-28

    The benzoic acid dimer, (BZA){sub 2}, is a paradigmatic symmetric hydrogen bonded dimer with two strong antiparallel hydrogen bonds. The excitonic S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} state splitting and coherent electronic energy transfer within supersonically cooled (BZA){sub 2} and its {sup 13}C-, d{sub 1}-, d{sub 2}-, and {sup 13}C/d{sub 1}- isotopomers have been investigated by mass-resolved two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. The (BZA){sub 2}-(h-h) and (BZA){sub 2}-(d-d) dimers are C{sub 2h} symmetric, hence only the S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} transition can be observed, the S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} transition being strictly electric-dipole forbidden. A single {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C or H/D isotopic substitution reduces the symmetry of the dimer to C{sub s}, so that the isotopic heterodimers (BZA){sub 2}-{sup 13}C, (BZA){sub 2}-(h-d), (BZA){sub 2}-(h{sup 13}C-d), and (BZA){sub 2}-(h-d{sup 13}C) show both S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} and S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} bands. The S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} exciton splitting inferred is {Delta}{sub exc}= 0.94 {+-} 0.1 cm{sup -1}. This is the smallest splitting observed so far for any H-bonded gas-phase dimer. Additional isotope-dependent contributions to the splittings, {Delta}{sub iso}, arise from the change of the zero-point vibrational energy upon electronic excitation and range from {Delta}{sub iso}= 3.3 cm{sup -1} upon {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C substitution to 14.8 cm{sup -1} for carboxy H/D substitution. The degree of excitonic localization/delocalization can be sensitively measured via the relative intensities of the S{sub 1} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} and S{sub 2} Leftwards-Arrow S{sub 0} origin bands; near-complete localization is observed even for a single {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C substitution. The S{sub 1}/ S{sub 2} energy gap of (BZA){sub 2} is {Delta}{sub calc}{sup exc}=11 cm{sup -1} when calculated by the approximate second-order perturbation theory (CC2) method. Upon correction for vibronic

  18. Investigation of Influence of Gas Ratio on the Electron Temperature in TiN Magnetron Sputtering Deposition System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada, Spain Investigation of Influence of Gas Ratio on the Electron Temperature in TiN Magnetron Sputtering ...Iran. In this work, a nanolayer of titanium nitride which produced by the magnetron sputtering system is synthesized. Moreover the effect of...Direct current (DC) sputtering has become a very popular technique to develop a wide variety of thin films including nitrides. Using this method

  19. Anomalous-circular photogalvanic effect in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. G.; Chen, Y. H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z. G.

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas excited by near infrared light at room temperature. The anomalous CPGE observed under normal incidence indicates a swirling current which is realized by a radial spin current via the reciprocal spin-Hall effect. The anomalous CPGE exhibits a cubic cosine dependence on the incidence angle, which is discussed in line with the above interpretation.

  20. Anomalous-circular photogalvanic effect in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Tang, C G; Chen, Y H; Liu, Y; Wang, Z G

    2009-09-16

    We have studied the circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas excited by near infrared light at room temperature. The anomalous CPGE observed under normal incidence indicates a swirling current which is realized by a radial spin current via the reciprocal spin-Hall effect. The anomalous CPGE exhibits a cubic cosine dependence on the incidence angle, which is discussed in line with the above interpretation.

  1. Large Tunable Rashba Spin Splitting of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. D. C.; Hatch, R. C.; Bianchi, M.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Lupulescu, C.; Landolt, G.; Slomski, B.; Dil, J. H.; Guan, D.; Mi, J. L.; Rienks, E. D. L.; Fink, J.; Lindblad, A.; Svensson, S.; Bao, S.; Balakrishnan, G.; Iversen, B. B.; Osterwalder, J.; Eberhardt, W.; Baumberger, F.; Hofmann, Ph.

    2011-08-01

    We report a Rashba spin splitting of a two-dimensional electron gas in the topological insulator Bi2Se3 from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We further demonstrate its electrostatic control, and show that spin splittings can be achieved which are at least an order-of-magnitude larger than in other semiconductors. Together these results show promise for the miniaturization of spintronic devices to the nanoscale and their operation at room temperature.

  2. Transport studies of reentrant integer quantum Hall states forming in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nianpei

    The two dimensional electron gas subjected to a magnetic field has been a model system in contemporary condensed matter physics which generated many beautiful experiments as well as novel fundamental concepts. These novel concepts are of broad interests and have benefited other fields of research. For example, the observations of conventional odd-denominator fractional quantum Hall states have enriched many-body physics with important concepts such as fractional statistics and composite fermions. The subsequent discovery of the enigmatic even-denominator nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state has led to more interesting concepts such as non-Abelian statistics and pairing of composite fermions which can be intimately connected to the electron pairing in superconductivity. Moreover, the observations of stripe phases and reentrant integer quantum Hall states have stimulated research on exotic electron solids which have more intricate structures than the Wigner Crystal. In contrast to fractional quantum Hall states and stripes phases, the reentrant integer quantum Hall states are very little studied and their ground states are the least understood. There is a lack of basic information such as exact filling factors, temperature dependence and energy scales for the reentrant integer quantum Hall states. A critical experimental condition in acquiring this information is a stable ultra-low temperature environment. In the first part of this dissertation, I will discuss our unique setup of 3He immersion cell in a state-of-art dilution refrigerator which achieves the required stability of ultra-low temperature. With this experimental setup, we are able to observe for the first time very sharp magnetotransport features of reentrant integer quantum Hall states across many Landau levels for the first time. I will firstly present our results in the second Landau level. The temperature dependence measurements reveal a surprisingly sharp peak signature that is unique to the reentrant

  3. Variation in Gas and Volatile Compound Emissions from Human Urine as It Ages, Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Siavash; Sagar, Nidhi M.; Kyrou, Ioannis; Mozdiak, Ella; O’Connell, Nicola; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna D.; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.; Covington, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The medical profession is becoming ever more interested in the use of gas-phase biomarkers for disease identification and monitoring. This is due in part to its rapid analysis time and low test cost, which makes it attractive for many different clinical arenas. One technology that is showing promise for analyzing these gas-phase biomarkers is the electronic nose—an instrument designed to replicate the biological olfactory system. Of the possible biological media available to “sniff”, urine is becoming ever more important as it is easy to collect and to store for batch testing. However, this raises the question of sample storage shelf-life, even at −80 °C. Here we investigated the effect of storage time (years) on stability and reproducibility of total gas/vapour emissions from urine samples. Urine samples from 87 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were collected over a four-year period and stored at −80 °C. These samples were then analyzed using FAIMS (field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry—a type of electronic nose). It was discovered that gas emissions (concentration and diversity) reduced over time. However, there was less variation in the initial nine months of storage with greater uniformity and stability of concentrations together with tighter clustering of the total number of chemicals released. This suggests that nine months could be considered a general guide to a sample shelf-life. PMID:26821055

  4. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  5. Gas phase low energy electron induced decomposition of the focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) precursor trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum(IV) (MeCpPtMe3).

    PubMed

    Engmann, Sarah; Stano, Michal; Matejčík, Stefan; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2012-11-14

    Relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dissociative ionization (DI) of the FEBID precursor, trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum(iv), MeCpPtMe(3), are presented. The most pronounced DEA process is the loss of one methyl radical, while the loss of two or three methyl groups along with hydrogen is the main pathway in DI. Further fragments are formed in DEA and through DI by more complex rearrangement reactions but complete dissociation to bare Pt(-) in DEA or Pt(+) in DI is minor. The transient negative ion (TNI) formation in DEA is discussed and fragmentation mechanisms are proposed for individual processes. From the thermodynamics of the DEA processes we derive a lower limit for the electron affinity of the MeCpPtMe(2) radical (1.7 eV). Appearance energies (AE) of MeCpPtMe(3)(+) (7.7 eV) and Pt(+) (18.6 eV) formation through electron impact ionisation (EI) and through DI, respectively, are determined. Finally, the current DEA and DI results are compared and brought into context with earlier surface science studies on electron-induced decomposition of adsorbed MeCpPtMe(3) as well as gas phase and surface science studies on the FEBID precursors [Co(CO)(3)NO] and [Pt(PF(3))(4)]. These comparisons strongly indicate that DEA is an important process in the electron-induced decomposition of these molecules in FEBID.

  6. Microscopic analytical theory of a correlated, two-dimensional N-electron gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Quiroga, Luis

    1997-07-01

    We present a microscopic, analytical theory describing a confined N-electron gas in two dimensions subject to an external magnetic field. The number of electrons N and strength of the electron - electron interaction can be arbitrarily large, and all Landau levels are included implicitly. For any value of the magnetic field B, the correlated N-electron states are determined by the solution to a universal effective problem which resembles that of a fictitious particle moving in a multi-dimensional space, without a magnetic field, occupied by potential minima corresponding to the classical N-electron equilibrium configurations. Introducing the requirement of total wavefunction antisymmetry selects out the allowed minimum-energy N-electron states. It is shown that low-energy minima can exist at filling factors 0953-8984/9/27/018/img5 where p and n are any positive integers. These filling factors correspond to the experimentally observed fractional (FQHE) and integer (IQHE) quantum Hall effects. The energy gaps calculated analytically at 0953-8984/9/27/018/img6 are found to be consistent with experimental data as a function of magnetic field, over a range of samples.

  7. Emission of Thermally Activated Electrons from Rare Gas Clusters Irradiated with Intense VUV Light Pulses from a Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Laarmann, T.; Rusek, M.; Schulz, J.; Castro, A.R.B. de; Guertler, P.; Laasch, W.; Moeller, T.

    2005-08-05

    The ionization dynamics of Ar and Xe clusters irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Clusters comprising between 70 and 900 atoms were irradiated with femtosecond pulses at 95 nm wavelength ({approx}13 eV photon energy) and a peak intensity of {approx}4x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. A broad thermal distribution of emitted electrons from clusters with a maximum kinetic energy up to 30-40 eV is observed. The observation of relatively low-energy photoelectrons is in good agreement with calculations using a time-dependent Thomas-Fermi model and gives experimental evidence of an outer ionization process of the clusters, due to delayed thermoelectronic emission.

  8. Emission of thermally activated electrons from rare gas clusters irradiated with intense VUV light pulses from a free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Laarmann, T; Rusek, M; Wabnitz, H; Schulz, J; de Castro, A R B; Gürtler, P; Laasch, W; Möller, T

    2005-08-05

    The ionization dynamics of Ar and Xe clusters irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Clusters comprising between 70 and 900 atoms were irradiated with femtosecond pulses at 95 nm wavelength (approximately 13 eV photon energy) and a peak intensity of approximately 4 x 10(12) W/cm2. A broad thermal distribution of emitted electrons from clusters with a maximum kinetic energy up to 30-40 eV is observed. The observation of relatively low-energy photoelectrons is in good agreement with calculations using a time-dependent Thomas-Fermi model and gives experimental evidence of an outer ionization process of the clusters, due to delayed thermoelectronic emission.

  9. Molecular structure of trans-cinnamaldehyde as determined by gas electron diffraction aided by DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Toru; Matsumoto, Rui; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    The molecular structure of trans-cinnamaldehyde (( E)-3-phenyl-2-propenal) was determined by means of gas electron diffraction. The nozzle temperature was 165 °C. The results of B3LYP calculations with the 6-31G ∗∗ basis set were used as Supporting information. It was found that this molecule has two stable conformers, s- cis and s- trans, which differ in the orientation of the sbnd CH dbnd O group. Their abundances at 165 °C were determined to be 25 ± 19% and 75%, for the s- cis and s- trans, respectively. This conformational composition is consistent with the prediction by the theoretical calculations. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of the more abundant conformer, s- trans, of trans-cinnamaldehyde are as follows: < r(C sbnd C) ring> = 1.398(1) Å; r(C dbnd C) = 1.348 (←) Å; r(C 1sbnd C) = 1.470(8) Å; r(C sbnd C( dbnd O)) = 1.473(←) Å; r(C dbnd O) = 1.225(6) Å; < r(C sbnd H)> = 1.116(6) Å; ∠C 6sbnd C 1sbnd C 2 = 118.6(3)°; ∠C 1sbnd C 2sbnd C = 121.0(←)°; ∠C sbnd C 6sbnd C 1 = 121.4(←)°; ∠C 2sbnd C 1sbnd C( dbnd C) = 122.0(26)°; ∠C 1sbnd C dbnd C = 128.3(26)°; ∠C dbnd C sbnd CO = 115.3(27)°; ∠C sbnd C dbnd O = 126.6(19)°. The C 1, C 2 and C 6 atoms are on the ring with the C 1 attached to the sbnd CH dbnd CH sbnd CHO group, and the C 2 and C 6 are on the cis and trans sides to the C dbnd C bond, respectively. Angle brackets denote average values; parenthesized values are the estimated limits of error (3 σ) referring to the last significant digit; left arrows in the parentheses mean that the differences to the preceding parameters are fixed.

  10. Analysis of naphthenic acid mixtures as pentafluorobenzyl derivatives by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan Manuel; Vázquez-Martínez, Juan; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Trudeau, Vance L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the efficiency of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) for naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures derivatization, and the comparison in the optimal conditions to the most common NAs derivatization reagents, BF3/MeOH and N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Naphthenic acids are carboxylic acid mixtures of petrochemical origin. These compounds are important for the oil industry because of their corrosive properties, which can damage oil distillation infrastructure. Moreover, NAs are commercially used in a wide range of products such as paint and ink driers, wood and fabric preservatives, fuel additives, emulsifiers, and surfactants. Naphthenic acids have also been found in sediments after major oils spills in the United States and South Korea. Furthermore, the toxicity of the oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), product of the oil sands extraction activities in Canada's oil sands, has largely been attributed to NAs. One of the main challenges for the chromatographic analysis of these mixtures is the resolution of the components. The derivatization optimization was achieved using surface response analysis with molar ratio and time as factors for derivatization signal yield. After gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC/EIMS) analysis of a mixture of NA standards, it was found that the signal produced by PFB-derivatives was 2.3 and 1.4 times higher than the signal produced by methylated and MTBS-derivatives, respectively. The pentafluorobenzyl derivatives have a characteristic fragment ion at 181m/z that is diagnostic for the differentiation of carboxylic and non-carboxylic acid components within mixtures. In the analysis of a Sigma and a Merichem derivatized oil extract NA mixtures, it was found that some peaks lack the characteristic fragment ion; therefore they are not carboxylic acids. Open column chromatography was used to obtain a hexane and a methanol fraction of the Sigma and

  11. Polymethyl methacrylate glow under the influence of runaway electron beams generated in a gas diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of PMMA radiation under the impact of runaway electrons with subnanosecond duration are studied. The PMMA radiation spectra for a subnanosecond electron beam pulse duration are determined for the first time. The studies show that radiation of the band with a maximum at about 490 nm the intensity of which decreases toward the short-wave spectral region is recorded in the glow spectra. The glow intensity of this band varies proportionally to the number of electrons in the beam, which allows the possibility of using this radiation for determination of the number of high energy electrons in electron beams.

  12. Terahertz optical-Hall effect characterization of two-dimensional electron gas properties in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöche, S.; Shi, Junxia; Boosalis, A.; Kühne, P.; Herzinger, C. M.; Woollam, J. A.; Schaff, W. J.; Eastman, L. F.; Schubert, M.; Hofmann, T.

    2011-02-01

    The free-charge carrier mobility, sheet density, and effective mass of a two-dimensional electron gas are exemplarily determined in the spectral range from 640 GHz to 1 THz in a AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using the optical-Hall effect at room temperature. Complementary midinfrared spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements are performed for analysis of heterostructure constituents layer thickness, phonon mode, and free-charge carrier parameters. The electron effective mass is determined to be (0.22±0.04)m0. The high-frequency sheet density and carrier mobility parameters are in good agreement with results from dc electrical Hall effect measurements, indicative for frequency-independent carrier scattering mechanisms of the two-dimensional carrier distribution.

  13. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam; Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background.

  14. Artificial Gauge Field and Topological Phase in a Conventional Two-dimensional Electron Gas with Antidot Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Likun; Lou, Wenkai; Cheng, F.; Zou, Y. L.; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Born-Oppemheimer approximation, we divide the total electron Hamiltonian in a spin-orbit coupled system into the slow orbital motion and the fast interband transition processes. We find that the fast motion induces a gauge field on the slow orbital motion, perpendicular to the electron momentum, inducing a topological phase. From this general designing principle, we present a theory for generating artificial gauge field and topological phase in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas embedded in parabolically graded GaAs/InxGa1−xAs/GaAs quantum wells with antidot lattices. By tuning the etching depth and period of the antidot lattices, the band folding caused by the antidot potential leads to the formation of minibands and band inversions between neighboring subbands. The intersubband spin-orbit interaction opens considerably large nontrivial minigaps and leads to many pairs of helical edge states in these gaps. PMID:26471126

  15. Liquid-Gated High Mobility and Quantum Oscillation of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at an Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shengwei; Lü, Weiming; Huang, Zhen; Liu, Zhiqi; Han, Kun; Gopinadhan, Kalon; Li, Changjian; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Wenxiong; Ma, Haijiao Harsan; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Ariando

    2016-04-26

    Electric field effect in electronic double layer transistor (EDLT) configuration with ionic liquids as the dielectric materials is a powerful means of exploring various properties in different materials. Here, we demonstrate the modulation of electrical transport properties and extremely high mobility of two-dimensional electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface through ionic liquid-assisted electric field effect. With a change of the gate voltages, the depletion of charge carrier and the resultant enhancement of electron mobility up to 19 380 cm(2)/(V s) are realized, leading to quantum oscillations of the conductivity at the LAO/STO interface. The present results suggest that high-mobility oxide interfaces, which exhibit quantum phenomena, could be obtained by ionic liquid-assisted field effect.

  16. Tuning the conductivity threshold and carrier density of two-dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces through interface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H. J. Harsan E-mail: ariando@nus.edu.sg; Zeng, S. W.; Annadi, A.; Ariando E-mail: ariando@nus.edu.sg; Huang, Z.; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-08-15

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the perovskite oxides heterostructures is of great interest because of its potential applications in oxides electronics and nanoscale multifunctional devices. A canonical example is the 2DEG at the interface between a polar oxide LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) and non-polar SrTiO{sub 3} (STO). Here, the LAO polar oxide can be regarded as the modulating or doping layer and is expected to define the electronic properties of 2DEG at the LAO/STO interface. However, to practically implement the 2DEG in electronics and device design, desired properties such as tunable 2D carrier density are necessary. Here, we report the tuning of conductivity threshold, carrier density and electronic properties of 2DEG in LAO/STO heterostructures by insertion of a La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (LSTO) layer of varying thicknesses, and thus modulating the amount of polarization of the oxide over layers. Our experimental result shows an enhancement of carrier density up to a value of about five times higher than that observed at the LAO/STO interface. A complete thickness dependent metal-insulator phase diagram is obtained by varying the thickness of LAO and LSTO providing an estimate for the critical thickness needed for the metallic phase. The observations are discussed in terms of electronic reconstruction induced by polar oxides.

  17. Application of convection heat transfer in near-wall jets to electron-beam-pumped gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo

    Heating of the transmission foil separating the vacuum diodes from the laser gas in electron-beam-pumped gas lasers due to high-energy electron beam attenuation necessitates an external cooling scheme to prevent its failure under repetitively pulsed operating conditions. Attenuation of the electron beam (typically 500 kV, 100 kA and 100 ns pulse duration) produces a strong and pulsed volumetric heat source in the relatively thin stainless-steel foil (thickness of ˜25 mum) causing it to fail. An experimental and numerical investigation has been conducted to study the cooling effectiveness of near-wall high-speed jets for a single stainless-steel foil strip that simulates the actual foil geometry between two neighboring support ribs in the Electra KrF gas laser developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. The foil is placed inside a rectangular channel with continuous gas flow to simulate the circulating laser gas. The foil is electrically heated with the heating power input adjusted to achieve the same foil temperatures observed in Electra when no active cooling is applied. Detailed studies include two jet geometries (planar and circular) and two injection methods (tangential/parallel or obliquely impinging jets) for two hibachi foil structure designs (flat and scalloped). The planar jet of ˜1mm thickness flows parallel to the circulating laser gas across the entire foil span. The other configuration uses circular jets of small diameters (0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.6 mm) positioned in two staggered rows located on the foil's two vertical edges with a pitch of 1.25 cm over the entire height of the foil. For both configurations, experiments have been conducted at various jet velocities (or jet Reynolds numbers), impingement angles and jet-foil spacing with an aim to identify the optimal operating parameters for the actual hibachi foil cooling. Numerous investigations have been performed that covered a wide range of operating parameters. Local and average heat transfer

  18. Design of a 300-kV gas environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a cold field emission gun.

    PubMed

    Isakozawa, Shigeto; Nagaoki, Isao; Watabe, Akira; Nagakubo, Yasuhira; Saito, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Zhang, Xiao Feng; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Baba, Norio

    2016-08-01

    A new in situ environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) was developed based on a 300 kV TEM with a cold field emission gun (CFEG). Particular caution was taken in the ETEM design to assure uncompromised imaging and analytical performance of the TEM. Because of the improved pumping system between the gun and column, the vacuum of CFEG was largely improved and the probe current was sufficiently stabilized to operate without tip flashing for 2-3 h or longer. A high brightness of 2.5 × 10(9) A/cm(2) sr was measured at 300 kV, verifying the high quality of the CFEG electron beam. A specially designed gas injection-heating holder was used in the in situ TEM study at elevated temperatures with or without gas around the TEM specimen. Using this holder in a 10 Pa gas atmosphere and specimen temperatures up to 1000°C, high-resolution ETEM performance and analysis were achieved.

  19. Ni-catalysed WO3 nanostructures grown by electron beam rapid thermal annealing for NO2 gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Sundararaj, Anuraj; Therese, Helen Annal; Jeganathan, K.

    2015-07-01

    Ni-catalysed WO3 (Ni-WO3) nanowires and nanosheets were grown on Si (100) substrates using electron beam evaporation followed by electron beam-assisted rapid thermal annealing process. Gas-sensing measurements were performed for various concentrations of NO2 in dry air at a temperature range of 50-400 °C. Nanowires and nanosheets show optimum sensor response of 229 and 197 at operating temperatures of 200 and 250 °C, respectively, for 100 ppm of NO2 exposure. Nanowires demonstrated a rapid response time of 66 s, but a slow recovery time of 204 s owing to poor rate of desorption of the adsorbed NO2 gas molecules from the internal porous structure of nanowires. In contrast, the recovery time for nanosheet was 126 s due to higher desorption rate of the adhered NO2 molecules associated with low surface area and less porous structure of nanosheet. The gas-sensing mechanism of WO3 nanostructure is discussed briefly.

  20. Control of interspecies electron transfer flow during anaerobic digestion: dynamic diffusion reaction models for hydrogen gas transfer in microbial flocs.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, S S; Palsson, B O; Thiele, J H

    1989-02-05

    Dynamic reaction diffusion models were used to analyze the consequences of aggregation for syntrophic reactions in methanogenic ecosystems. Flocs from a whey digestor were used to measure all model parameters under the in situ conditions of a particular defined biological system. Fermentation simulations without adjustable parameters could precisely predict the kinetics of H(2) gas production of digestor flocs during syntrophic methanogenesis from ethanol. The results demonstrated a kinetic compartmentalization of H(2) metabolism inside the flocs. The interspecies electron transfer reaction was mildly diffusion controlled. The H(2) gas profiles across the flocs showed high H (2) concentrations inside the flocs at any time. Simulations of the syntrophic metabolism at low substrate concentrations such as in digestors or sediments showed that it is impossible to achieve high H(2) gas turnovers at simultaneously low steady-state H(2) concentrations. This showed a mechanistic contradiction in the concept of postulated low H(2) microenvironments for the anaerobic digestion process. The results of the computer experiments support the conclusion that syntrophic H(2) production may only be a side reaction of H(2) independent interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic ecosystems.

  1. Transport signatures of correlated disorder in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, T.; Jäggi, R.; Ribeiro, E.; Waldkirch, M. v.; Ensslin, K.; Ulloa, S. E.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Petroff, P. M.

    2003-03-01

    We report electronic transport measurements on two-dimensional electron gases in a Ga[Al]As heterostructure with an embedded layer of InAs self-assembled quantum dots. At high InAs dot densities, pronounced Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak magnetoresistance oscillations are observed, which indicate short-range ordering of the potential landscape formed by the charged dots and the strain fields. The presence of these oscillations coincides with the observation of a metal-insulator transition, and a maximum in the electron mobility as a function of the electron density. Within a model based on correlated disorder, we establish a relation between these effects.

  2. A Wireless Electronic Nose System Using a Fe2O3 Gas Sensing Array and Least Squares Support Vector Regression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Wang, Qi; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Hongquan; Cheng, Yingguo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a wireless electronic nose (WEN) system which can online detect the combustible gases methane and hydrogen (CH4/H2) and estimate their concentrations, either singly or in mixtures. The system is composed of two wireless sensor nodes—a slave node and a master node. The former comprises a Fe2O3 gas sensing array for the combustible gas detection, a digital signal processor (DSP) system for real-time sampling and processing the sensor array data and a wireless transceiver unit (WTU) by which the detection results can be transmitted to the master node connected with a computer. A type of Fe2O3 gas sensor insensitive to humidity is developed for resistance to environmental influences. A threshold-based least square support vector regression (LS-SVR)estimator is implemented on a DSP for classification and concentration measurements. Experimental results confirm that LS-SVR produces higher accuracy compared with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and a faster convergence rate than the standard support vector regression (SVR). The designed WEN system effectively achieves gas mixture analysis in a real-time process. PMID:22346587

  3. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. D.; Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Jue, J. F.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuel were performed on various U-Mo fuel samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7 wt%Mo body-centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 × 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ∼4.5 × 1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7 wt%Mo microstructure starts to undergo grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The sub-divided fuel grains are less than 500 nm in diameter with what appears to be micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products typically decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Miller; J. Gan; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.-F. Jue; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuel was performed on various samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face-centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7wt% Mo body centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 x 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ~4.5x1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7wt% Mo microstructure undergoes grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The fuel grains are primarily less than 500 nm in diameter with micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  5. Electronic and geometric structure of doped rare-gas clusters: surface, site and size effects studied with luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Pietrowski, R.; von Haeften, K.; Laarmann, T.; Möller, T.; Museur, L.; Kanaev, A. V.

    2006-05-01

    The electronic and geometric structure of rare gas clusters doped with rare-gas atoms Rg = Xe, Kr or Ar is investigated with fluorescence excitation spectroscopy in the VUV spectral range. Several absorption bands are observed in the region of the first electronic excitations of the impurity atoms, which are related to the lowest spin-orbit split atomic 3P1 and 1P1 states. Due to influence of surrounding atoms of the cluster, the atomic lines are shifted to the blue and broadened (“electronical cage effect”). From the known interaction potentials and the measured spectral shifts the coordination of the impurity atom in ArN, KrN, NeN and HeN could be studied in great detail. In the interior of KrN and ArN the Xe atoms are located in substitutional sites with 12 nearest neighbours and internuclear distances comparable to that of the host matrix. In NeN and HeN the cluster atoms (18 and 22, respectively) arrange themselves around the Xe impurity with a bondlength comparable to that of the heteronuclear dimer. The results confirm that He clusters are liquid while Ne clusters are solid for N≥ 300. Smaller Ne clusters exhibit a liquid like behaviour. When doping is strong, small Rgm-clusters (Rg = Xe, Kr, Ar, m≤10 2) are formed in the interior sites of the host cluster made of Ne or He. Specific electronically excited states, assigned to interface excitons are observed. Their absorption bands appear and shift towards lower energy when the cluster size m increases, according to the Frenkel exciton model. The characteristic bulk excitons appear in the spectra, only when the cluster radius exceeds the penetration depth of the interface exciton, which can be considerably larger than that in free Rgm clusters. This effect is sensitive to electron affinities of the guest and the host cluster.

  6. Electron random walk and collisional crossover in a gas in presence of electromagnetic waves and magnetostatic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Dey, Indranuj; Paul, Samit

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with random walk of electrons and collisional crossover in a gas evolving toward a plasma, in presence of electromagnetic (EM) waves and magnetostatic (B) fields, a fundamental subject of importance in areas requiring generation and confinement of wave assisted plasmas. In presence of EM waves and B fields, the number of collisions N suffered by an electron with neutral gas atoms while diffusing out of the volume during the walk is significantly modified when compared to the conventional field free square law diffusion; N =1.5(Λ /λ)2, where Λ is the characteristic diffusion length and λ is the mean free path. There is a distinct crossover and a time scale associated with the transition from the elastic to inelastic collisions dominated regime, which can accurately predict the breakdown time (τc) and the threshold electric field (EBD) for plasma initiation. The essential features of cyclotron resonance manifested as a sharp drop in τc, lowering of EBD and enhanced electron energy gain is well reproduced in the constrained random walk.

  7. Coupled Langmuir oscillations in 2-dimensional quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-03-15

    In this work, we present a hydrodynamic model to study the coupled quantum electron plasma oscillations (QEPO) for two dimensional (2D) degenerate plasmas, which incorporates all the essential quantum ingredients such as the statistical degeneracy pressure, electron-exchange, and electron quantum diffraction effect. Effects of diverse physical aspects like the electronic band-dispersion effect, the electron exchange-correlations and the quantum Bohm-potential as well as other important plasma parameters such as the coupling parameter (plasma separation) and the plasma electron number-densities on the linear response of the coupled system are investigated. By studying three different 2D plasma coupling types, namely, graphene-graphene, graphene-metalfilm, and metalfilm-metalfilm coupling configurations, it is remarked that the collective quantum effects can influence the coupled modes quite differently, depending on the type of the plasma configuration. It is also found that the slow and fast QEPO frequency modes respond very differently to the change in plasma parameters. Current findings can help in understanding of the coupled density oscillations in multilayer graphene, graphene-based heterojunctions, or nanofabricated integrated circuits.

  8. Long wavelength plasmon damping in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Böhm, Helga M.; Schinner, Andreas

    1993-07-01

    The damping of the long wavelength plasmon in a homogeneos electron layer is determined by two-electron-hole excitations. Analytical and numerical results for the corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function and the plasmon half width are presented for various densities and different manners of screening.

  9. Molecular structure of cotinine studied by gas electron diffraction combined with theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2007-09-01

    The molecular structure of cotinine (( S)-1-methyl-5-(3-pyridinyl)-2-pyrrolidinone), the major metabolite of nicotine, has been determined at about 182 °C by gas electron diffraction combined with MP2 and DFT calculations. The diffraction data are consistent with the existence of the (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers, where ax and eq indicate the configuration of the pyrrolidinone ring by means of the position (axial and equatorial) of the pyridine ring, and sc, sp and ap distinguish the isomers arising from the internal rotation around the bond connecting the two rings. The (CH 3)NCCC(N) dihedral angles, ϕ, of the (ax, sc) and (eq, sp) conformers were determined independently to be 158(12)° and 129(13)°, respectively, where the numbers in parentheses are three times the standard errors, 3 σ. According to the MP2 calculations, the corresponding dihedral angles for the (ax, ap) and (eq, ap) conformers were assumed to differ by 180° from their syn counterparts. The ratios x(ax, sc)/ x(ax, ap) and x(eq, sp)/ x(eq, ap) were taken from the theoretically estimated free energy differences, Δ G, where x is the abundance of the conformer. The resultant abundances of (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers are 34(6)%, 21% (d.p.), 28% (d.p.), and 17% (d.p.), respectively, where d.p. represents dependent parameters. The determined structural parameters ( rg (Å) and ∠ α (°)) of the most abundant conformer, (ax, sc), are as follows: r(N sbnd C) pyrrol = 1.463(5); r(N sbnd C methyl) = 1.457(←); r(N sbnd C( dbnd O)) = 1.384(12); r(C dbnd O) = 1.219(5); < r(C sbnd C) pyrrol> = 1.541(3); r(C pyrrolsbnd C pyrid) = 1.521(←); < r(C sbnd C) pyrid> = 1.396(2); < r(C sbnd N) pyrid> = 1.343(←); ∠(CNC) pyrrol = 113.9(11); ∠CCC pyrrol(-C pyrid) = 103.6(←); ∠NCO = 124.1(13); ∠NC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.1(12); ∠C pyrrolC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.3(←); ∠(CNC) pyrid = 117.1(2); <∠(NCC) pyrid> = 124.4(←); ∠C methylNC( dbnd O) =

  10. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. I Thick-target heating by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.; Emslie, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out of the gas dynamical response of the solar atmosphere to a flare energy input in the form of precipitating nonthermal electrons. Rather than discussing the origin of these electrons, the spectral and temporal characteristics of the injected flux are inferred through a thick-target model of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production. It is assumed that the electrons spiral about preexisting magnetic field lines, making it possible for a one-dimensional spatial treatment to be performed. It is also assumed that all electron energy losses are due to Coulomb collisions with ambient particles; that is, return-current ohmic effects and collective plasma processes are neglected. The results are contrasted with earlier work on conductive heating of the flare atmosphere. A local temperature peak is seen at a height of approximately 1500 km above the photosphere. This derives from a spatial maximum in the energy deposition rate from an electron beam. It is noted that such a feature is not present in conductively heated models. The associated localized region of high pressure drives material both upward and downward.

  11. Techniques for improving the performance of a simplified electronic fuel controller with incremental actuation for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantas, Antanios Ioannou

    1990-04-01

    Concepts are introduced which improve the performance of an inexpensive electronic fuel control unit for small gas turbine engines suitable for use in small aircraft and helicopters. A conventional hydromechanical fuel control unit is modified and adapted for digital electronic control. The conversion involves the replacement of the pneumatic computing and actuating mechanism with digital computation and incremental electronic actuation of a flow metering valve. A mathematical model of the unit is developed, implemented, and validated. The model is used for simulation and study of the system dynamics. Some new methods are applied in the design and development of a digital controller. An optimization scheme for tuning the controller is formulated and implemented experimentally. As a next step toward improvement of the simple electronic fuel controller, a concept of two electronic actuators, one operating the metering valve and the other a bypass valve, is introduced and investigated. Higher flexibility and faster transient response, as compared to the conventional system and the single actuator unit, are demonstrated. The possibility of a backup scheme in case of failure of one of two actuating mechanisms is also discussed.

  12. Combination of two Gas Electron Multipliers and a Micromegas as gain elements for a time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiola, S.; Ehlers, R. J.; Gu, S.; Harris, J. W.; Majka, R.; Mulligan, J. D.; Oliver, M.; Schambach, J.; Smirnov, N.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the properties of a novel combination of two Gas Electron Multipliers with a Micromegas for use as amplification devices in high-rate gaseous time projection chambers. The goal of this design is to minimize the buildup of space charge in the drift volume of such detectors in order to eliminate the standard gating grid and its resultant dead time, while preserving good tracking and particle identification performance. To characterize this micro-pattern gas detector configuration, we measured the positive ion back-flow and energy resolution at various element gains and electric fields, using a variety of gases, and additionally studied crosstalk effects and discharge rates. At a gain of 2000, this configuration achieves an ion back-flow below 0.4% and an energy resolution better than σ / E = 12 % for 55Fe X-rays.

  13. Determination of naloxone and naltrexone as perfluoroalkyl ester derivatives by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sams, R A; Malspeis, L

    1976-10-13

    An electron-capture gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of naloxone and naltrexone as the perfluoroalkyl esters. Each compound serves as internal standard for determination of the other. The method permits quantitation of 2-100 ng of either compound. Conditions for derivatization with heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA), pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA), and trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) have been investigated. When catalyzed with pyridine, derivatization with HFBA and PFPA at 70 degrees gives naloxone and naltrexone triesters. Evidence for triester formation was obtained from gas chromatography-methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectral analysis. It was found that both the HFB and PFP triesters are suitable for quantitation of the narcotic antagonists, the HFB derivatives having greater stability than the PFP derivatives. The TFA derivatives are substantially less stable.

  14. Wigner crystallization of a two-dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: Single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.

    2001-10-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two-dimensional Wigner crystal in a perpendicular magnetic field with one and two electrons per cell is investigated. In the case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and correlation effects), and the interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing and incomplete spin polarization are accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a, roughly speaking, complementary description of the bubble phase (in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble), which was proposed by Koulakov, Fogler, and Shklovskii on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows that in GaAs the paired phase is energetically more favorable than the single electron phase for, roughly speaking, filling factor f larger than 0.3 and density parameter rs smaller than 19 effective Bohr radii (for a more precise statement see Figs. 3 and 4). If we start within the paired phase and increase magnetic field or decrease density, the pairs first undergo some singlet-triplet transitions before they break.

  15. Wigner Crystalization of a two dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M. G.

    2001-03-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two dimensional Wigner crystal with one -- and two electrons per cell are investigated. In case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and the full Coulomb correlation effects). The interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing is accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a supplementary description of the bubble phase in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble, as proposed by Koulakov, Fogler and Shklovskii in Phys.Rev.Lett. 76, 499 (1996) on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows for which filling factors and densities which phase: single electrons versus singlet or triplet pairs on the Wigner crystal lattice sites, is energetically favored. Comparison with other approximations for the Wigner crystal and with the Laughlin liquid is made as well.

  16. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  17. Materials Science and Device Physics of 2-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui

    Materials and device innovations are the keys to future technology revolution. For MOSFET scaling in particular, semiconductors with ultra-thin thickness on insulator platform is currently of great interest, due to the potential of integrating excellent channel materials with the industrially mature Si processing. Meanwhile, ultra-thin thickness also induces strong quantum confinement which in turn affect most of the material properties of these 2-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors, providing unprecedented opportunities for emerging technologies. In this thesis, multiple novel 2-D material systems are explored. Chapter one introduces the present challenges faced by MOSFET scaling. Chapter two covers the integration of ultrathin III V membranes with Si. Free standing ultrathin III-V is studied to enable high performance III-V on Si MOSFETs with strain engineering and alloying. Chapter three studies the light absorption in 2-D membranes. Experimental results and theoretical analysis reveal that light absorption in the 2-D quantum membranes is quantized into a fundamental physical constant, where we call it the quantum unit of light absorption, irrelevant of most of the material dependent parameters. Chapter four starts to focus on another 2-D system, atomic thin layered chalcogenides. Single and few layered chalcogenides are first explored as channel materials, with focuses in engineering the contacts for high performance MOSFETs. Contact treatment by molecular doping methods reveals that many layered chalcogenides other than MoS2 exhibit good transport properties at single layer limit. Finally, Chapter five investigated 2-D van der Waals heterostructures built from different single layer chalcogenides. The investigation in a WSe2/MoS2 hetero-bilayer shows a large Stokes like shift between photoluminescence peak and lowest absorption peak, as well as strong photoluminescence intensity, consistent with spatially indirect transition in a type II band alignment in this

  18. Chemical alteration of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) TFE teflon induced by exposure to electrons and inert-gas ions.

    PubMed

    Everett, Michael L; Hoflund, Gar B

    2005-09-08

    In this study the chemical alterations of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (TFE Teflon) by approximately 1.0-keV electrons and 1.0-keV He and Ar ions have been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial F/C atom ratio of 1.99 decreases to a steady-state value of 1.48 after 48 h of electron exposure. Exposure to either He+ or Ar+ decreases the initial F/C atom ratio from approximately 2 to a steady-state value of 1.12. The high-resolution XPS C 1s data indicate that new chemical states of carbon form as the F is removed and that the relative amounts of these states depend on the F content of the near-surface region. These states are most likely due to C bonded only to one F atom, C bonded only to other C atoms and C that have lost a pair of electrons through emission of F-. Exposures of the electron-damaged and He+- or Ar+-damaged surfaces to research-grade O2 result in chemisorption of very small amounts of O indicating that large quantities of reactive sites are not formed during the chemical erosion. Further exposure to the electron or ion fluxes quickly removes this chemisorbed oxygen. Exposure of the He+-damaged surface to air at room temperature results in the chemisorption of a larger amount of O than the O2 exposure but no N is adsorbed. The chemical alterations due to electrons and ions are compared with those caused by hyperthermal (approximately 5 eV) atomic oxygen (AO) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. The largest amount of damage is caused by AO followed by VUV, inert-gas ions, and then electrons.

  19. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  20. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; ...

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  1. Determination of chloramphenicol residue in fish and shrimp tissues by gas chromatography with a microcell electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Suxia; Jiang, Haiyang; Sun, Zhiwen

    2005-01-01

    A gas chromatography method with microcell electron capture detection was developed for the determination of chloramphenicol residue in fish and shrimp muscle tissues. The tissue samples were extracted with ethyl acetate, defatted with hexane, and derivatized with Sylon BFT [N,O-bis (trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide-trimethylchlorosilane (99 + 1)]. The limit of detection was 0.04 ng/g and the limit of quantitation 0.1 ng/g. Average recoveries were 70.8-90.8% for fish and 69.9-86.3% for shrimp, respectively. The method was validated for the determination of practical samples.

  2. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2014-12-09

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  4. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of biomolecules in the gas phase. Melatonin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, John T.; Brand, Christian; Wollenhaupt, Miriam; Pratt, David W.; Leo Meerts, W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the A and B bands of melatonin have been analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. From a comparison of the ab initio calculated structures of energy selected conformers to the experimental rotational constants, the A band could be shown to be due to a gauche structure of the side chain, while the B band is an anti structure. Both bands show a complicated pattern due to a splitting from the threefold internal rotation of the methyl rotor in the N-acetyl group of the molecules. From a torsional analysis we additionally were able to determine the barriers of the methyl torsion in both electronic states of melatonin B and give an estimate for the change of the barrier upon electronic excitation in melatonin A. The electronic nature of the lowest excited singlet state could be determined to be 1Lb (as in the chromophore indole) from comparison to the results of ab initio calculations.

  5. Transport-Coefficient Dependence of Current-Induced Cooling Effect in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Naomi; Endo, Akira; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hatano, Naomichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Shirasaki, Ryōen; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    The dependence of the current-induced cooling effect on the electron mobility μ e is explored for a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field. We calculate the distributions of the electrochemical potentials and the temperatures under a magnetic field, fully taking account of thermoelectric and thermomagnetic phenomena. Whereas the electrochemical potential and the electric current remain qualitatively unchanged, the temperature distribution exhibits drastic mobility dependence. The lower-mobility system has cold and hot areas at opposite corners, which results from the heat current brought about by the Ettingshausen effect in the vicinity of the adiabatic boundaries. The cooling effect is intensified by an increase in μ e. Intriguingly, the cold and hot areas change places with each other as the mobility μ e is further increased. This is because the heating current on the adiabatic edges due to the Righi-Leduc effect exceeds that due to the Ettingshausen effect in the opposite direction.

  6. A new type of magnetoresistance oscillations: Interaction of a two-dimensional electron gas with leaky interface phonons

    SciTech Connect

    ZUDOV,M.A.; PONOMAREV,I.V.; EFROS,A.L.; DU,R.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-05-11

    The authors report a new type of oscillations in magnetoresistance observed in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in GaAs-AIGaAs heterostructures. Being periodic in 1/B these oscillations appear in weak magnetic field (B < 0.3 T) and only in a narrow temperature range (3 K < T < 7 K). Remarkably, these oscillations can be understood in terms of magneto-phonon resonance originating from the interaction of 2DEG and leaky interface-acoustic phonon modes. The existence of such modes on the GaAs:AIGaAs interface is demonstrated theoretically and their velocities are calculated. It is shown that the electron-phonon scattering matrix element exhibits a peak for the phonons carrying momentum q = 2k{sub F} (k{sub F} is the Fermi wave-vector of 2DEG).

  7. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose™ was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint™, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1.

  8. Molecular vibrations kof iron trifluoride and aluminum trifluoride from gas-phase electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargittai, Magdolna; Subbotina, Natalya Yu.; Gershikov, Alexander G.

    1991-04-01

    A vibrational analysis of the electron diffraction intensity data of iron trifluoride provides firm evidence for the planarity of this molecule. The optimized deformation frequencies of iron trifluoride, ν 2 110(17) and ν 4 158(17) cm -1, appear to be much lower than the available estimates. The optimized symmetric streching frequency for aluminium trifluoride is 683(54) cm -1 from the joint analysis of electron diffraction intensities and vibrational frequencies. Force constants are also obtained for both molecules.

  9. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Anisotropic two-dimensional electron gas at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (110) interface

    PubMed Central

    Annadi, A.; Zhang, Q.; Renshaw Wang, X.; Tuzla, N.; Gopinadhan, K.; Lü, W. M.; Roy Barman, A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Srivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Zhao, Y. L.; Zeng, S. W.; Dhar, S.; Olsson, E.; Gu, B.; Yunoki, S.; Maekawa, S.; Hilgenkamp, H.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando

    2013-01-01

    The observation of a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas between two insulating complex oxides, especially LaAlO3/SrTiO3, has enhanced the potential of oxides for electronics. The occurrence of this conductivity is believed to be driven by polarization discontinuity, leading to an electronic reconstruction. In this scenario, the crystal orientation has an important role and no conductivity would be expected, for example, for the interface between LaAlO3 and (110)-oriented SrTiO3, which should not have a polarization discontinuity. Here we report the observation of unexpected conductivity at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface prepared on (110)-oriented SrTiO3, with a LaAlO3-layer thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition. Density functional theory calculation reveals that electronic reconstruction, and thus conductivity, is still possible at this (110) interface by considering the energetically favourable (110) interface structure, that is, buckled TiO2/LaO, in which the polarization discontinuity is still present. The conductivity was further found to be strongly anisotropic along the different crystallographic directions with potential for anisotropic superconductivity and magnetism, leading to possible new physics and applications. PMID:23673623

  11. Broadband terahertz radiation from a biased two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongxin, Zheng; Jiandong, Sun; Yu, Zhou; Zhipeng, Zhang; Hua, Qin

    2015-10-01

    The broadband terahertz (THz) emission from drifting two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure at 6 K is reported. The devices are designed as THz plasmon emitters according to the Smith-Purcell effect and the ‘shallow water’ plasma instability mechanism in 2DEG. Plasmon excitation is excluded since no signature of electron-density dependent plasmon mode is observed. Instead, the observed THz emission is found to come from the heated lattice and/or the hot electrons. Simulated emission spectra of hot electrons taking into account the THz absorption in air and Fabry-Pérot interference agree well with the experiment. It is confirmed that a blackbody-like THz emission will inevitably be encountered in similar devices driven by a strong in-plane electric field. A conclusion is drawn that a more elaborate device design is required to achieve efficient plasmon excitation and THz emission. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. G2009CB929303), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61271157), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2014M551678), and the Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (No. 1301054B).

  12. The Low Pressure Gas Effects On The Potency Of An Electron Beam On Ceramic Fabric Materials For Space Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Fragomeni, James M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kilovolt electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 milliamps from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 seconds at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 inches. At both closer (2") and farther (48") standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  13. The Low Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of AN Electron Beam on Ceramic Fabric Materials for Space Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Arthur C.; Fragomeni, James M.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kV electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427°C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 s at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 in. At both closer (2 in) and farther (48 in) standoff distances, the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  14. Simple relationship between oxidation state and electron affinity in gas-phase metal-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Ray, Manisha; Yoder, Bruce L; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-12-19

    The photoelectron spectra of WO3H(-) and WO2F(-) are presented and analyzed in the context of a series of previous similar measurements on MO(y)(-) (M = Mo, W; y = 0-3), MO4H(-) and AlMOy(-) (y ≤ 4) complexes. The electronic structures of the WO3H and WO2F anion and neutral complexes were investigated using the B3LYP hybrid density functional method. The spectra of WO3H(-), WO2F(-), and previously measured AlWO3(-) photoelectron spectra show that the corresponding neutrals, in which the transition metal centers are all in a +5 oxidation state, have comparable electron affinities. In addition, the electron affinities fit the general trend of monotonically increasing electron affinity with oxidation state, in spite of the WO3H(-), WO2F(-), and AlWO3(-) having closed shell ground states, suggesting that the oxidation state of the metal atom has more influence than shell closing on the electron affinity of these transition metal-oxo complexes. Results of DFT calculations suggest that the neutrals are pyramidal and the anions are planar. However, the barriers for inversion on the neutral surface are low, and attempts to generate simple Franck-Condon simulations based on simple normal coordinate displacement, ignoring the effects of inversion, are inadequate.

  15. Printable polythiophene gas sensor array for low-cost electronic noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Josephine B.; Liu, Vincent; Subramanian, Vivek; Sivula, Kevin; Luscombe, Christine; Murphy, Amanda; Liu, Jinsong; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2006-07-01

    A route for generating arrays of printable polythiophene-based gas sensor materials suitable for low-cost manufacturing is demonstrated. Materials with complementary sensor responses are synthesized by incorporating functional groups into the molecule, either along the polymer backbone or as end-capping groups. Using these materials as printable sensor inks, a functional, integrated gas sensor array chip is fabricated using additive deposition techniques. The sensor array shows sensitivity to a range of volatile organic compounds down to concentrations of 10ppm. A three-terminal thin film transistor structure is used, allowing the extraction of multiple parameters that help to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for sensor response and the role of the functional groups in this response.

  16. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  17. Gas-phase acidities of tetrahedral oxyacids from ab initio electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Kubicki, J.D.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-04

    Density functional calculations have been performed on several protonation states of the oxyacids of Si, P, V, As, Cr, and S. Structures and vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values where these are available. A reasonably well-defined correlation between the calculated gas-phase acidities and the measured pK{sub a} in aqueous solution has been found. The pK{sub a}/gas-phase acidity slopes are consistent with those derived from previous molecular mechanics calculations on ferric hydrolysis and the first two acidity constants for orthosilicic acid. The successive deprotonation of other H{sub n}TO{sub 4} species, for a given tetrahedral anion T are roughly consistent with this slope, but not to the extent that there is a universal correlation among all species.

  18. Two-color vibrational, femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) of gas-phase nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Hans U; Roy, Sukesh; Schmidt, Jacob B; Wrzesinski, Paul J; Gord, James R

    2016-09-28

    A resonantly enhanced, two-color, femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) approach is demonstrated and used to explore the nature of the frequency- and time-dependent signals produced by gas-phase nitric oxide (NO). Through careful selection of the input pulse wavelengths, this fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) scheme allows rovibronic-state-resolved observation of time-dependent rovibrational wavepackets propagating on the vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surface of this diatomic species. Despite the use of broadband, ultrafast time-resolved input pulses, high spectral resolution of gas-phase rovibronic transitions is observed in the FREE-CARS signal, dictated by the electronic dephasing timescales of these states. Analysis and computational simulation of the time-dependent spectra observed as a function of pump-Stokes and Stokes-probe delays provide insight into the rotationally resolved wavepacket motion observed on the excited-state and vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surfaces of NO, respectively.

  19. Thermochemistry of the Reaction of SF6 with Gas-Phase Hydrated Electrons: A Benchmark for Nanocalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Akhgarnusch, Amou; Höckendorf, Robert F; Beyer, Martin K

    2015-10-01

    The reaction of sulfur hexafluoride with gas-phase hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-), n ≈ 60-130, is investigated at temperatures T = 140-300 K by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. SF6 reacts with a temperature-independent rate of 3.0 ± 1.0 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) via exclusive formation of the hydrated F(-) anion and the SF5(•) radical, which evaporates from the cluster. Nanocalorimetry yields a reaction enthalpy of ΔHR,298K = 234 ± 24 kJ mol(-1). Combined with literature thermochemical data from bulk aqueous solution, these result in an F5S-F bond dissociation enthalpy of ΔH298K = 455 ± 24 kJ mol(-1), in excellent agreement with all high-level quantum chemical calculations in the literature. A combination with gas-phase literature thermochemistry also yields an experimental value for the electron affinity of SF5(•), EA(SF5(•)) = 4.27 ± 0.25 eV.

  20. Two-color vibrational, femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) of gas-phase nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Wrzesinski, Paul J.; Gord, James R.

    2016-09-01

    A resonantly enhanced, two-color, femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) approach is demonstrated and used to explore the nature of the frequency- and time-dependent signals produced by gas-phase nitric oxide (NO). Through careful selection of the input pulse wavelengths, this fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) scheme allows rovibronic-state-resolved observation of time-dependent rovibrational wavepackets propagating on the vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surface of this diatomic species. Despite the use of broadband, ultrafast time-resolved input pulses, high spectral resolution of gas-phase rovibronic transitions is observed in the FREE-CARS signal, dictated by the electronic dephasing timescales of these states. Analysis and computational simulation of the time-dependent spectra observed as a function of pump-Stokes and Stokes-probe delays provide insight into the rotationally resolved wavepacket motion observed on the excited-state and vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surfaces of NO, respectively.

  1. FAIMS operation for realistic gas flow profile and asymmetric waveforms including electronic noise and ripple.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2005-09-01

    The use of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has rapidly grown with the advent of commercial FAIMS systems coupled to mass spectrometry. However, many fundamental aspects of FAIMS remain obscure, hindering its technological improvement and expansion of analytical utility. Recently, we developed a comprehensive numerical simulation approach to FAIMS that can handle any device geometry and operating conditions. The formalism was originally set up in one dimension for a uniform gas flow and limited to ideal asymmetric voltage waveforms. Here we extend the model to account for a realistic gas flow velocity distribution in the analytical gap, axial ion diffusion, and waveform imperfections (e.g., noise and ripple). The nonuniformity of the gas flow velocity profile has only a minor effect, slightly improving resolution. Waveform perturbations are significant even at very low levels, in some cases approximately 0.01% of the nominal voltage. These perturbations always improve resolution and decrease sensitivity, a trade-off controllable by variation of noise or ripple amplitude. This trade-off is physically inferior to that obtained by adjusting the gap width and/or asymmetric waveform frequency. However, the disadvantage is negligible when the perturbation period is much shorter than the residence time in FAIMS, and ripple adjustment appears to offer a practical method for modifying FAIMS resolution.

  2. Exploring salt bridge structures of gas-phase protein ions using multiple stages of electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J; Vachet, Richard W

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  3. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Wang, G. T.; Dimakis, E. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Moustakas, T. D.; Tsui, D. C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in a superlattice structure of 40 InN quantum wells consisting of one monolayer of InN embedded between 10 nm GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} (or 1.25 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} per InN quantum well, assuming all the quantum wells are connected by diffused indium contacts) and 420 cm{sup 2}/Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  4. Rotationally Resolved Electronic Spectroscopy of Biomolecules in the Gas Phase. Melatonin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, John T.; Pratt, David W.; Brand, Christian; Wollenhaupt, Miriam; Schmitt, Michael; Meerts, W. Leo

    2011-06-01

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the A and B bands of melatonin have been analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. From a comparison of the ab initio calculated structures of energy selected conformers to the experimental rotational constants, the A band could be shown to be due to a gauche structure of the side chain, while the B band is an anti structure. Both bands show a complicated pattern due to a splitting from the three-fold internal rotation of the methyl rotor in the N-acetyl group of the molecules. From a torsional analysis we additionally were able to determine the barriers of the methyl torsion in both electronic states. The electronic nature of the lowest excited singlet state could be determined to be 1LB (as in the chromophore indole) from comparison to the results of ab initio calculations.

  5. Anisotropic two-dimensional electron gas at SrTiO3(110)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Zhong, Zhicheng; Hao, Xianfeng; Gerhold, Stefan; Stöger, Bernhard; Schmid, Michael; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Varykhalov, Andrei; Franchini, Cesare; Held, Karsten; Diebold, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at oxide heterostructures are attracting considerable attention, as these might one day substitute conventional semiconductors at least for some functionalities. Here we present a minimal setup for such a 2DEG––the SrTiO3(110)-(4 × 1) surface, natively terminated with one monolayer of tetrahedrally coordinated titania. Oxygen vacancies induced by synchrotron radiation migrate underneath this overlayer; this leads to a confining potential and electron doping such that a 2DEG develops. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical results show that confinement along (110) is strikingly different from the (001) crystal orientation. In particular, the quantized subbands show a surprising “semiheavy” band, in contrast with the analog in the bulk, and a high electronic anisotropy. This anisotropy and even the effective mass of the (110) 2DEG is tunable by doping, offering a high flexibility to engineer the properties of this system. PMID:24591596

  6. The Effect of Gas Ion Bombardment on the Secondary Electron Yield of TiN, TiCN and TiZrV Coatings For Suppressing Collective Electron Effects in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; Kirby, R.E.; King, F.K.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2006-01-25

    In many accelerator storage rings running positively charged beams, ionization of residual gas and secondary electron emission (SEE) in the beam pipe will give rise to an electron cloud which can cause beam blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. A preventative measure that suppresses electron cloud formation is to ensure that the vacuum wall has a low secondary emission yield (SEY). The SEY of thin films of TiN, sputter deposited Non-Evaporable Getters and a novel TiCN alloy were measured under a variety of conditions, including the effect of re-contamination from residual gas.

  7. Discharge regimes in an intermediate-pressure gas with runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbychev, G.V.; Ptashnik, I.V.

    1985-09-01

    It is shown experimentally that there exist two transition discharge regimes that generate beams of runaway electrons. The first regime, previously unknown, prevails during sufficiently intense ultraviolet illumination and appears immediately after the breakdown of the gap. In this regime, the discharge current is determined solely by the photoelectron emission from the cathode caused by the external ultraviolet light and consists of current runaway electrons. The second regime is a hindered glow discharge; it either follows the photoelectron regime or, if the ultraviolet illumination is not sufficiently intense, arises directly during the breakdown. 6 references.

  8. On the generation and disruption of a picosecond runaway electron beam during the breakdown of an atmospheric-pressure gas gap

    SciTech Connect

    Barengolts, S. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Tsventoukh, M. M.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2012-03-26

    The generation and disruption of the picosecond runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure strongly overvolted gas gap is considered with emphasis on the runaway kinetics, the increase in emission current and plasma density, and beam instabilities. It has been shown that a few-nanosecond ten-kV prepulse gives rise to a streamer. Application of the main pulse ({approx}2 MV/ns) results in the runaway electron beam generation with the streamer electrons involved in the acceleration, and in increase of the electron emission from the cathode and the plasma density. At the high enough plasma density, fast beam instability disrupts the runaway electron beam.

  9. Thermal shift of the resonance between an electron gas and quantum dots: what is the origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, Fabian; Wieck, Andreas D.; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-12-01

    The operation of quantum dots (QDs) at highest possible temperatures is desirable for many applications. Capacitance-voltage spectroscopy (C(V)-spectroscopy) measurements are an established instrument to analyse the electronic structure and energy levels of self-assembled QDs. We perform C(V) in the dark and C(V) under the influence of non-resonant illumination, probing exciton states up to {X}4+ on InAs QDs embedded in a GaAs matrix for temperatures ranging from 2.5 to 120 K. While a small shift in the charging spectra resonance is observed for the two spin degenerate electron s-state charging voltages with increasing temperature, a huge shift is visible for the electron-hole excitonic states resonance voltages. The s2-peak moves to slightly higher, the s1-peak to slightly lower charging voltages. In contrast, the excitonic states are surprisingly charged at much lower voltages upon increasing temperature. We derive a rate-model allowing to attribute and value different contributions to these shifts. Resonant tunnelling, state degeneracy and hole generation rate in combination with the Fermi distribution function turn out to be of great importance for the observed effects. The differences in the shifting behaviour is connected to different equilibria schemes for the peaks--s-peaks arise when tunnelling-in- and out-rates become equal, while excitonic peaks occur, when electron tunnelling-in- and hole-generation rates are balanced.

  10. Ultrafast terahertz probes of transient conducting and insulating phases in an electron-hole gas.

    PubMed

    Kaindl, R A; Carnahan, M A; Hägele, D; Lövenich, R; Chemla, D S

    2003-06-12

    Many-body systems in nature exhibit complexity and self-organization arising from seemingly simple laws. For example, the long-range Coulomb interaction between electrical charges has a simple form, yet is responsible for a plethora of bound states in matter, ranging from the hydrogen atom to complex biochemical structures. Semiconductors form an ideal laboratory for studying many-body interactions of electronic quasiparticles among themselves and with lattice vibrations and light. Oppositely charged electron and hole quasiparticles can coexist in an ionized but correlated plasma, or form bound hydrogen-like pairs called excitons. The pathways between such states, however, remain elusive in near-visible optical experiments that detect a subset of excitons with vanishing centre-of-mass momenta. In contrast, transitions between internal exciton levels, which occur in the far-infrared at terahertz (1012 s(-1)) frequencies, are independent of this restriction, suggesting their use as a probe of electron-hole pair dynamics. Here we employ an ultrafast terahertz probe to investigate directly the dynamical interplay of optically-generated excitons and unbound electron-hole pairs in GaAs quantum wells. Our observations reveal an unexpected quasi-instantaneous excitonic enhancement, the formation of insulating excitons on a 100-ps timescale, and the conditions under which excitonic populations prevail.

  11. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results for energy states of two-dimensional electron gas in pseudomorphically strained InAs high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Yui; Tange, Takahiro; Hirayama, Naomi; Iida, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    The energy states of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in high-electron-mobility transistors with a pseudomorphically strained InAs channel (PHEMTs) were analyzed rigorously using a recently established theory that takes into account the nonparabolicity of the conduction band of the channel layer. The sheet density of the 2DEG in InxGa1-xAs-PHEMTs and the drain I-V characteristics of those devices were calculated theoretically and compared with the density and characteristics obtained experimentally. Not only the calculated threshold voltage (VTH) but also the calculated transconductance agreed fairly well with the corresponding values obtained experimentally. When the effects of the compositions of the InxGa1-xAs subchannel layer in the composite channel and the channel layer on energy states of 2DEG were investigated in order to establish a guiding principle for a design of the channel structure in PHEMTs, it was found that VTH is determined by the effective conduction-band offset energy ΔEC between the InAlAs barrier and the channel layers.

  12. Substituent effect on electron affinity, gas-phase basicity, and structure of monosubstituted propynyl radicals and their anions: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gab-Yong

    2009-11-15

    The substituent effect of electron-withdrawing groups on electron affinity and gas-phase basicity has been investigated for substituted propynl radicals and their corresponding anions. It is shown that when a hydrogen of the alpha-CH(3) group in the propynyl system is substituted by an electron-withdrawing substituent, electron affinity increases, whereas gas-phase basicity decreases. These results can be explained in terms of the natural atomic charge of the terminal acetylene carbon of the systems. The calculated electron affinities are 3.28 eV (*C=C-CH(2)F), 3.59 eV (*C[triple bond]C-CH(2)Cl) and 3.73 eV (*C[triple bond]C-CH(2)Br), and the gas-phase basicities of their anions are 359.5 kcal/mol ((-):C[triple bond]C-CH(2)F), 354.8 kcal/mol (:C[triple bond]C-CH(2)Cl) and 351.3 kcal/mol ((-):C[triple bond]C-CH(2)Br). It is concluded that the larger the magnitude of electron-withdrawing, the greater is the electron affinity of radical and the smaller is the gas-phase basicity of its anion.

  13. Short-time dynamics on several electronic states: formalism and computational study of I 2 in rare gas solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nun, M.; Levine, R. D.

    1995-12-01

    A computationally tractable approximation for both interstate and intrastate dynamics is derived and applied. The correlation between the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is explicitly allowed for in that there is an equation of motion for the nuclear dynamics on each electronic state. These equations for the intrastate dynamics are coupled due to the interstate interaction. The exact equations are derived from a quantum mechanical Hamiltonian and are then simplified by assuming that the coupling between the different electronic states is localized and that, in the absence of interstate coupling, the nuclear motion on each electronic state is classical-like. Equations for the populations and the phases of the different electronic states are also derived. Coupling of the nuclear modes to a classical solvent is included in the formalism and the main computational effort is in the mechanical description of the solvent. As a computational example, a simulation of a fast pump-fast probe for an iodine X → B (bound) transition, in rare gas solvents, is presented and discussed. Despite the long range of the B state potential of iodine, which enhances the effect of the solvent on the excited state dynamics, there is a finite delay before the coupling to the solvent is manifested. The delocalization of the optically prepared state markedly slows down as the density is lowered. At longer times there is considerable energy exchange with the solvent. As a result many molecules either gain enough energy to dissociate or are cooled down, depending on the temperature and density of the solvent. At the higher densities, many molecules which attempt to dissociate are caged.

  14. Stoichiometry dependent electron transport and gas sensing properties of indium oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gali, Pradeep; Sapkota, Gopal; Syllaios, A J; Littler, Chris; Philipose, U

    2013-06-07

    The effect of stoichiometry of single crystalline In2O3 nanowires on electrical transport and gas sensing was investigated. The nanowires were synthesized by vapor phase transport and had diameters ranging from 80 to 100 nm and lengths between 10 and 20 μm, with a growth direction of [001]. Transport measurements revealed n-type conduction, attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice. As-grown In2O3 nanowires were shown to have a carrier concentration of ≈5 × 10(17) cm(-3), while nanowires that were annealed in wet O2 showed a reduced carrier concentration of less than 10(16) cm(-3). Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on the as-grown nanowires and analysis of the thermally activated Arrhenius conduction for the temperature range of 77-350 K yielded an activation energy of 0.12 eV. This is explained on the basis of carrier exchange that occurs between the surface states and the bulk of the nanowire, resulting in a depleted surface layer of thickness of the order of the Debye length (LD), estimated to be about 3-4 nm for the as-grown nanowires and about 10 times higher for the more stoichiometric nanowires. Significant changes in the electrical conductance of individual In2O3 nanowires were also observed within several seconds of exposure to NH3 and O2 gas molecules at room temperature, thus demonstrating the potential use of In2O3 nanowires as efficient miniaturized chemical sensors. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the nanowire channel conductance, and a simple energy band diagram is used to explain the change in conductivity when gas molecules adsorbed on the nanowire surface influence its electrical properties. Less stoichiometric nanowires were found to be more sensitive to oxidizing gases while more stoichiometric nanowires showed significantly enhanced response to reducing gases.

  15. Random walk of electrons in a gas in the presence of polarized electromagnetic waves: Genesis of a wave induced discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Paul, Samit

    2009-10-01

    The average number of collisions N of seed electrons with neutral gas atoms during random walk in escaping from a given volume, in the presence of polarized electromagnetic waves, is found to vary as N =B(Λ /λ)2/[1+C(Λ /λ)]2, indicating a modification to the conventional field free square law N =A(Λ /λ)2, where Λ is the characteristic diffusion length and λ the mean free path. It is found that for the field free case A =1.5 if all the electrons originate at the center and is 1.25 if they are allowed to originate at any random point in the given volume. The B and C coefficients depend on the wave electric field and frequency. Predictions of true discharge initiation time τc can be made from the temporal evolution of seed electrons over a wide range of collision frequencies. For linearly polarized waves of 2.45 GHz and electric field in the range (0.6-1.0)×105 V/m, τc=5.5-1.6 ns for an unmagnetized microwave driven discharge at 1 Torr argon.

  16. Hysteresis phenomena of the two dimensional electron gas density in lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Ling; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Guo, Lei; Hu, Anqi; Xiang, Yong; Yu, Tongjun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Jia, Lifang; He, Zhi; Wang, Maojun; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo; Ge, Weikun

    2015-08-03

    High-temperature transport properties in high-mobility lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures have been investigated. An interesting hysteresis phenomenon of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density is observed in the temperature-dependent Hall measurements. After high-temperature thermal cycles treatment, the reduction of the 2DEG density is observed, which is more serious in thinner InAlN barrier samples. This reduction can then be recovered by light illumination. We attribute these behaviors to the shallow trap states with energy level above the Fermi level in the GaN buffer layer. The electrons in the 2DEG are thermal-excited when temperature is increased and then trapped by these shallow trap states in the buffer layer, resulting in the reduction and hysteresis phenomenon of their density. Three trap states are observed in the GaN buffer layer and C{sub Ga} may be one of the candidates responsible for the observed behaviors. Our results provide an alternative approach to assess the quality of InAlN/GaN heterostructures for applications in high-temperature electronic devices.

  17. Photogalvanic effects originating from the violation of the Einstein relation in a 2D electron gas in high Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    This talk will present a quantum kinetic theory [1] of the microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magnetooscillations emerging in a spatially nonuniform 2D electron system in the absence of external dc driving [2]. It will show that in an irradiated sample the Landau quantization leads to violation of the Einstein relation between the dc conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Then, in the presence of a built-in electric field in a sample, the microwave illumination causes photo-galvanic signals which oscillate as a function of magnetic field as observed in the experiment. The discussed effects should also play an essential role for the transport in the zero resistance states where the system breaks into current domains and peculiarities of the transport properties of the inhomogeneous system become of central importance.[1] I. A. Dmitriev, S. I. Dorozhkin, and A. D. Mirlin, ``Theory of microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magneto-oscillations in a spatially nonuniform two-dimensional electron gas '', Phys. Rev. B 80, 125418 (2009).[2] S. I. Dorozhkin, I. V. Pechenezhskiy, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, V. Umansky, K. von Klitzing, and J. H. Smet, ``Photocurrent and Photovoltage Oscillations in the Two-Dimensional Electron System: Enhancement and Suppression of Built-In Electric Fields'', Phys. Rev.Lett. 102, 036602 (2009).

  18. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  19. Molecular geometry of vanadium dichloride and vanadium trichloride: a gas-phase electron diffraction and computational study.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán; Vest, Brian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Hargittai, Magdolna

    2010-03-15

    The molecular geometries of VCl2 and VCl3 have been determined by computations and gas-phase electron diffraction (ED). The ED study is a reinvestigation of the previously published analysis for VCl2. The structure of the vanadium dichloride dimer has also been calculated. According to our joint ED and computational study, the evaporation of a solid sample of VCl2 resulted in about 66% vanadium trichloride and 34% vanadium dichloride in the vapor. Vanadium dichloride is unambiguously linear in its 4Sigma(g)+ ground electronic state. For VCl3, all computations yielded a Jahn-Teller-distorted ground-state structure of C(2v) symmetry. However, it lies merely less than 3 kJ/mol lower than the 3E'' state (D(3h) symmetry). Due to the dynamic nature of the Jahn-Teller effect in this case, rigorous distinction cannot be made between the planar models of either D(3h) symmetry or C(2v) symmetry for the equilibrium structure of VCl3. Furthermore, the presence of several low-lying excited electronic states of VCl3 is expected in the high-temperature vapor. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental and computational study of the VCl3 molecule.

  20. Teleportation with two-dimensional electron gas formed at the interface of a GaAs heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adepoju, Adenike Grace; Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Camacho-Nieto, Oscar; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2017-03-01

    Inspired by the scenario proposed by Bennett et al, a teleportation protocol of qubits formed in a two-dimensional electron gas formed at the interface of a GaAs heterostructure is presented. The teleportation is carried out using three GaAs quantum dots (say P{{P}\\prime} , Q{{Q}\\prime} , R{{R}\\prime} ) and three electrons. The electron spin on GaAs quantum dots P{{P}\\prime} is used to encode the unknown qubit. The GaAs quantum dot Q{{Q}\\prime} and R{{R}\\prime} combine to form an entangled state. Alice (the sender) performs a Bell measurement on pairs (P,Q ) and ({{P}\\prime},{{Q}\\prime} ). Depending on the outcome of the measurement, a suitable Hamiltonian for the quantum gate can be used by Bob (the receiver) to transform the information based on spin to charge-based information. This work offers relevant corrections to the misconception in Weng and Kais (2006 Chem. Phys. Lett. 421 338).

  1. Van Hove correlation functions in an interacting electron gas: Equation-of-motion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinner, Andreas; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    1992-10-01

    An extension of the classical van Hove correlation functions to a three-dimensional system of identical fermions is investigated, taking into account interaction effects. This is done within the framework of a Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander-like static local-field approximation, combined with second-order effects of plasmon damping. As a main result the relaxation of the Fermi hole around an instantaneously removed electron is presented.

  2. Surface Acoustic-Wave-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John P.; Kennett, Malcolm P.; Cooper, Nigel R.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-07-01

    We study the geometrical commensurability oscillations imposed on the resistivity of 2D electrons in a perpendicular magnetic field by a propagating surface acoustic wave (SAW). We show that, for ω<ωc, this effect contains an anisotropic dynamical classical contribution increasing the resistivity and a nonequilibrium quantum contribution isotropically decreasing the resistivity, and we predict zero-resistance states associated with geometrical commensurability at large SAW amplitude.

  3. Kondo spin screening cloud in two-dimensional electron gas with spin-orbit couplings.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2011-03-16

    A spin-1/2 Anderson impurity in a semiconductor quantum well with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings is studied by using a variational wavefunction method. The local magnetic moment is found to be quenched at low temperatures. The spin-spin correlations of the impurity and the conduction electron density show anisotropy in both spatial and spin spaces, which interpolates the Kondo spin screenings of a conventional metal and of a surface of three-dimensional topological insulators.

  4. Electron scattering from gas phase cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Quantum analysis of resonance dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Ralph; Lucchese, Robert R.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2013-05-01

    We present scattering calculations of electron collisions with the platinum-containing compound cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), commonly known as cisplatin, between 0.5 eV and 6 eV, and the corresponding isolated Pt atom from 0.1 eV to 10 eV. We find evidence of resonances in e--CDDP scattering, using an ab initio description of the target. We computed scattering matrix elements from equations incorporating exchange and polarization effects through the use of the static-exchange plus density functional correlation potential. Additionally, we made use of a purely local adiabatic model potential that allows Siegert eigenstates to be calculated, thereby allowing inspection of the possible resonant scattering wave functions. The total cross section for electron scattering from (5d10) 1S Pt displays a large magnitude, monotonic decay from the initial collision energies, with no apparent resonance scattering features in any scattering symmetry. By contrast, the e--CDDP scattering cross section shows a small feature near 3.8 eV, which results from a narrow, well localized resonance of b2 symmetry. These findings are then related to the possible electron-mediated mechanism of the action of CDDP on DNA replication as suggested by recent experiments.

  5. Interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order in two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tanmoy

    2012-06-05

    Decoupling spin and charge transports in solids is among the many prerequisites for realizing spin electronics, spin caloritronics, and spin-Hall effect. Beyond the conventional method of generating and manipulating spin current via magnetic knob, recent advances have expanded the possibility to optical and electrical method which are controllable both internally and externally. Yet, due to the inevitable presence of charge excitations and electrical polarizibility in these methods, the separation between spin and charge degrees of freedom of electrons remains a challenge. Here we propose and formulate an interaction induced staggered spin-orbit order as a new emergent phase of matter. We show that when some form of inherent spin-splitting via Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling renders two helical Fermi surfaces to become significantly nested, a Fermi surface instability arises. To lift this degeneracy, a spontaneous symmetry breaking spin-orbit density wave develops, causing a surprisingly large quasiparticle gapping with chiral electronic states, with no active charge excitations. Since the staggered spin-orbit order is associated with a condensation energy, quantified by the gap value, destroying such spin-orbit interaction costs sufficiently large perturbation field or temperature or de-phasing time. BiAg2 surface state is shown to be a representative system for realizing such novel spin-orbit interaction with tunable and large strength, and the spin-splitting is decoupled from charge excitations.

  6. Electron attachment to oxygen in nitrogen buffer gas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, Marek; Stano, Michal; Wnorowska, Jolanta; Barszczewska, Wiesława; Loffhagen, Detlef; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out experimental and theoretical studies of three body electron attachment (TBEA) to O2 in N2/O2 mixtures. We have applied three different experimental methods to determine the apparent rate constant k for TBEA to O2 for reduced electric fields E/ n from 0.5 Td up to 4.5 Td and O2 concentrations from 0.02% up to 3%. From the apparent rate constant k we have evaluated three body rate constant for electron attachment to O2 in pure O2 and in pure N2 . The comparison of present data with former studies shows that the former values of overestimated the efficiency of this reaction, while in case of we have found agreement with earlier studies. We have solved numerically the Boltzmann equation of the electrons and calculated the values of k, and using well established cross sections. Using the known collision cross section set for TBEA to O2, very good agreement between calculated and measured results for was found, while in the case of k and we had to introduce a scaling function, which describes the decrease of the efficiency of TBEA to O2 in presence of N2 and the dependence of the scaling function on E/ n was determined.

  7. Substrate induced changes in atomically thin 2-dimensional semiconductors: Fundamentals, engineering, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yinghui; Wang, Rongming; Liu, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Substrate has great influences on materials syntheses, properties, and applications. The influences are particularly crucial for atomically thin 2-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. Their thicknesses are less than 1 nm; however, the lateral sizes can reach up to several inches or more. Therefore, these materials must be placed onto a variety of substrates before subsequent post-processing techniques for final electronic or optoelectronic devices. Recent studies reveal that substrates have been employed as ways to modulate the optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties of 2D semiconductors. In this review, we summarize recent progress upon the effects of substrates on properties of 2D semiconductors, mostly focused on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, through viewpoints of both fundamental physics and device applications. First, we discuss various effects of substrates, including interface strain, charge transfer, dielectric screening, and optical interference. Second, we show the modulation of 2D semiconductors by substrate engineering, including novel substrates (patterned substrates, 2D-material substrates, etc.) and active substrates (phase transition materials, ferroelectric materials, flexible substrates, etc.). Last, we present prospectives and challenges in this research field. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of the substrate effects, and may inspire new ideas of novel 2D devices based on substrate engineering.

  8. Focal plane arrays for submillimeter waves using two-dimensional electron gas elements: A grant under the Innovative Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. Sigfrid; Lau, Kei-May

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a three-year research effort, aimed at developing new types of THz low noise receivers, based on bulk effect ('hot electron') nonlinearities in the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas (2DEG) Medium, and the inclusion of such receivers in focal plane arrays. 2DEG hot electron mixers have been demonstrated at 35 and 94 GHz with three orders of magnitude wider bandwidth than previous hot electron mixers, which use bulk InSb. The 2DEG mixers employ a new mode of operation, which was invented during this program. Only moderate cooling is required for this mode, to temperatures in the range 20-77 K. Based on the results of this research, it is now possible to design a hot electron mixer focal plane array for the THz range, which is anticipated to have a DSB receiver noise temperature of 500-1000K. In our work on this grant, we have found similar results the the Cronin group (resident at the University of Bath, UK). Neither group has so far demonstrated heterodyne detection in this mode, however. We discovered and explored some new effects in the magnetic field mode, and these are described in the report. In particular, detection of 94 GHz and 238 GHz, respectively, by a new effect, 'Shubnikov de Haas detection', was found to be considerably stronger in our materials than the cyclotron resonance detection. All experiments utilized devices with an active 2DEG region of size of the order of 10-40 micrometers long, and 20-200 micrometers wide, formed at the heterojunction between AlGaAs and GaAs. All device fabrication was performed in-house. The materials for the devices were also grown in-house, utilizing OMCVD (Organo Metallic Chemical Vapor Deposition). In the course of this grant, we developed new techniques for growing AlGaAs/GaAs with mobilities equalling the highest values published by any laboratory. We believe that the field of hot electron mixers and detectors will grow substantially in importance in the next few years, partly as a result of

  9. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  10. Diagnostics and two-dimensional simulation of low-frequency inductively coupled plasmas with neutral gas heating and electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, K. N.; Denysenko, I. B.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Xu, S.; Storer, R. G.

    2002-11-01

    This article presents the results on the diagnostics and numerical modeling of low-frequency (approx460 KHz) inductively coupled plasmas generated in a cylindrical metal chamber by an external flat spiral coil. Experimental data on the electron number densities and temperatures, electron energy distribution functions, and optical emission intensities of the abundant plasma species in low/intermediate pressure argon discharges are included. The spatial profiles of the plasma density, electron temperature, and excited argon species are computed, for different rf powers and working gas pressures, using the two-dimensional fluid approach. The model allows one to achieve a reasonable agreement between the computed and experimental data. The effect of the neutral gas temperature on the plasma parameters is also investigated. It is shown that neutral gas heating (at rf powers[greater-than-or-equal, slanted]0.55 kW) is one of the key factors that control the electron number density and temperature. The dependence of the average rf power loss, per electron-ion pair created, on the working gas pressure shows that the electron heat flux to the walls appears to be a critical factor in the total power loss in the discharge.

  11. Determination of pentachlorophenol residue in meat and fish by gas chromatography-electron capture detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    A novel analytical method, using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) and GC-mass spectrometry detection (MS), was developed for the qualitative and quantitative measurement of pentachlorophenol in meat and fish. The analyte was extracted by methanol-2% trichloroacetic acid (3/1, v/v) with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatized with acetic anhydride-pyridine (1/1, v/v) for GC-ECD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. The parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, cleanup, derivatization and analysis procedure were optimized. The averaged decision limits and detection capability of the method were in the ranges of 0.25-0.41 and 0.49-1.01 µg/kg in the muscle and liver of swine and bovine and in the muscle of carp and finless eel, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 0.5-2.0 µg/kg were found to be more than 71.1%, with relative standard deviation less than 14.7% in GC-ECD and GC-MS. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterization and quantification of residues of pentachlorophenol in animal and fish tissues.

  12. Stability of flavin semiquinones in the gas phase: the electron affinity, proton affinity, and hydrogen atom affinity of lumiflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlan; Papson, Kaitlin; Ochran, Richard; Ridge, Douglas P

    2013-11-07

    Examination of electron transfer and proton transfer reactions of lumiflavin and proton transfer reactions of the lumiflavin radical anion by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. From the equilibrium constant determined for electron transfer between 1,4-naphthoquinone and lumiflavin the electron affinity of lumiflavin is deduced to be 1.86 ± 0.1 eV. Measurements of the rate constants and efficiencies for proton transfer reactions indicate that the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion is between that of difluoroacetate (331.0 kcal/mol) and p-formyl-phenoxide (333.0 kcal/mol). Combining the electron affinity of lumiflavin with the proton affinity of the lumiflavin radical anion gives a lumiflavin hydrogen atom affinity of 59.7 ± 2.2 kcal/mol. The ΔG298 deduced from these results for adding an H atom to gas phase lumiflavin, 52.1 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with ΔG298 for adding an H atom to aqueous lumiflavin from electrochemical measurements in the literature, 51.0 kcal/mol, and that from M06-L density functional calculations in the literature, 51.2 kcal/mol, suggesting little, if any, solvent effect on the H atom addition. The proton affinity of lumiflavin deduced from the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer reaction between lumiflavin and 2-picoline is 227.3 ± 2.0 kcal mol(-1). Density functional theory calculations on isomers of protonated lumiflavin provide a basis for assigning the most probable site of protonation as position 1 on the isoalloxazine ring and for estimating the ionization potentials of lumiflavin neutral radicals.

  13. Electronic Spectra of TRIS(2,2'-BIPYRIDINE)-METAL Complex Ions in Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Smith, James E. T.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    Tris(bpy)-metal complexes (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and their derivatives are important systems in metal-organic chemistry. While tris(bpy)-ruthenium, Ru(bpy)32+, has been extensively studied, less attention has been paid to analogous complexes involving first row transition metals. Here we report the electronic spectra of a series of dicationic tris(bpy) chelates with different transition metals, measured by photodisscociation spectroscopy of cryogenically prepared ions. We focus our attention on the π-π* transitions in the UV region of the spectrum.

  14. Semiclassical Vlasov and fluid models for an electron gas with spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Jérôme; Morandi, Omar; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine

    2014-06-01

    We derive a four-component Vlasov equation for a system composed of spin-1/2 fermions (typically electrons). The orbital part of the motion is classical, whereas the spin degrees of freedom are treated in a completely quantum-mechanical way. The corresponding hydrodynamic equations are derived by taking velocity moments of the phase-space distribution function. This hydrodynamic model is closed using a maximum entropy principle in the case of three or four constraints on the fluid moments, both for Maxwell-Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  15. How well do static electronic dipole polarizabilities from gas-phase experiments compare with density functional and MP2 computations?

    SciTech Connect

    Thakkar, Ajit J. Wu, Taozhe

    2015-10-14

    Static electronic dipole polarizabilities for 135 molecules are calculated using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and six density functionals recently recommended for polarizabilities. Comparison is made with the best gas-phase experimental data. The lowest mean absolute percent deviations from the best experimental values for all 135 molecules are 3.03% and 3.08% for the LC-τHCTH and M11 functionals, respectively. Excluding the eight extreme outliers for which the experimental values are almost certainly in error, the mean absolute percent deviation for the remaining 127 molecules drops to 2.42% and 2.48% for the LC-τHCTH and M11 functionals, respectively. Detailed comparison enables us to identify 32 molecules for which the discrepancy between the calculated and experimental values warrants further investigation.

  16. Electron capture gas chromatography study of the acid and alcohol products of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Selin, M J; Alley, C C

    1976-02-01

    The metabolic products produced by several strains of Clostridium septicum obtained from patients and animals, along with strains of Clostridium chauvoei, were studied in chopped meat glucose medium by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (EC-GLC). The strains of C. septicum and C. chauvoei were shown to comprise five different metabolic groups. Both the EC-GLC study and the O and H antigenic study performed previously showed that strains of C. septicum comprise a heterogeneous group. One type of metabolic profile was found only in strains of C. chauvoei. The O antigen types and EC-GLC metabolic types of C. septicum correlated fairly well in isolates from cancer patients but not in stock culture and animal isolates.

  17. Fireball as the result of self-organization of an ensemble of diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles in molecular gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lopasov, V. P.

    2011-12-15

    The conditions for dissipative self-organization of a fireball (FB) is a molecular gas by means of a regular correction of an elastic collision of water and nitrogen molecules by the field of a coherent bi-harmonic light wave (BLW) are presented. The BWL field is generated due to conversion of energy of a linear lightning discharge into light energy. A FB consists of two components: an ensemble of optically active diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles and a standing wave of elliptical polarization (SWEP). It is shown that the FB lifetime depends on the energies accumulated by nanoparticles and the SWEP field and on the stability of self-oscillations of the energy between nanoparticles and SWEP.

  18. Semi-experimental equilibrium structure of pyrazinamide from gas-phase electron diffraction. How much experimental is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Denis S.; Vishnevskiy, Yury V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Grikina, Olga E.; Khaikin, Leonid S.

    2017-03-01

    A semi-experimental equilibrium structure of free molecules of pyrazinamide has been determined for the first time using gas electron diffraction method. The refinement was carried using regularization of geometry by calculated quantum chemical parameters. It is discussed to which extent is the final structure experimental. A numerical approach for estimation of the amount of experimental information in the refined parameters is suggested. The following values of selected internuclear distances were determined (values are in Å with 1σ in the parentheses): re(Cpyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.397(2), re(Npyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.332(3), re(Cpyrazine-Camide) = 1.493(1), re(Namide-Camide) = 1.335(2), re(Oamide-Camide) = 1.219(1). The given standard deviations represent pure experimental uncertainties without the influence of regularization.

  19. Determination of hexachloro-1,3-butadiene in spinach, eggs, fish, and milk by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yurawecz, M P; Dreifuss, P A; Kamps, L R

    1976-05-01

    Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD), a waste product formed in the manufacture of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, has been found in fish from the lower Mississippi River basin. The AOAC official method for organochlorine pesticide residues in fatty and nonfatty foods has been modified for the determination of HCBD residues in selected food commodities. Acetonitrile extracts of nonfatty foods, or the combined acetonitrile extracts obtained in acetonitrile-petroleum ether partitioning of fat isolated from fatty foods, are diluted with water and extracted with petroleum ether. The petroleum ether extracts are chromatographed on Florisil and HCBD is eluted with petroleum ether. The elute is analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with an electron capture detector. Average recoveries of HCBD from fortified samples of fatty and nonfatty foods were greater than 90% in the interlaboratory trials of the method.

  20. Acid-Base Electronic Properties in the Gas Phase: Permanent Electric Dipole Moments of a Photoacidic Substrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Morgan, Philip J.; Pratt, David W.

    2009-06-01

    The permanent electric dipole moments of two conformers of 2-naphthol (2HN) in their ground and electronically excited states have been experimentally determined by Stark-effect measurements in a molecular beam. When in solution, 2HN is a weak base in the S{_0} state and a strong acid in the S{_1} state. Using sequential solvation of the cis-2HN photoacid with the base ammonia, we have begun to approach condensed phase acid-base interactions with gas phase rotational resolution. Our study, void of bulk solvent perturbations, is of importance to the larger community currently describing aromatic biomolecule and "super" photoacid behavior via theoretical modeling and condensed phase solvatochromism. [2] A. Weller. Prog. React. Kinet. 5, 273 (1970). [3] D. F. Plusquellic, X. -Q. Tan, and D. W. Pratt. J. Chem. Phys. 96, 8026 (1992).

  1. Multitip scanning gate microscopy for ballistic transport studies in systems with a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, K.; Szafran, B.; Hackens, B.

    2015-05-01

    We consider conductance mapping of systems based on the two-dimensional electron gas with scanning gate microscopy using two or more tips of an atomic force microscope. The paper contains the results of numerical simulations for a model tip potential. In addition, a few procedures are proposed for the extraction and manipulation of ballistic transport properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the multitip techniques can be used to obtain a readout of the Fermi wavelength, to detect potential defects, to filter specific transverse modes, and to tune the system into resonant conditions under which a stable map of the local density of states can be extracted from conductance maps using a third tip.

  2. Determination of malathion, coumaphos, and fluvalinate residues in honey by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus or electron capture detectors.

    PubMed

    Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, U; Diamantidis, G C; Georgiou, V E; Thrasyvoulou, A T

    2000-01-01

    A rapid, reliable, and inexpensive extraction method was developed to determine acaricide residues in honey by gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus (NP) or electron capture (EC) detectors. Because of the high selectivity of the NP detector, no interfering peaks were present and no cleanup was necessary. A simple cleanup step is proposed for the GC-ECD analysis. Recoveries from spiked honey samples ranged from 79 to 94.4%, with coefficients of variation of 0.3-18.5%. The quantitation limit obtained was 0.015 mg/kg for malathion, 0.020 mg/kg for coumaphos, and 0.005 mg/kg for fluvalinate. The method was used to determine the disappearance of malathion and coumaphos residues from honey samples collected from beehives treated with these acaricides. The disappearance of both acaricides was rapid and followed a first-order model for the duration of the experiment.

  3. Electronic subtracter for trace-gas detection with InGaAsP diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiang; Cassidy, Daniel T.

    1995-12-01

    An electronic noise-cancellation scheme has been developed and tested for second-harmonic (2f) detection with short-external-cavity and distributed-feedback InGaAsP diode lasers and wavelength modulation. The 2f background signal and noise from, e.g., optical feedback, optical fringes, and power-supply pickup are effectively reduced by subtraction of a measure of the signal-beam photocurrent from a measure of the reference-beam photocurrent. The dynamic range required for the lock-in amplifier is also reduced because the signal owing to modulation of the laser output at the first harmonic is canceled. Reduction of the 2f background and dynamic range are important for atmospheric-pressure detection where a large wavelength modulation is necessary. The detector noise was minimized by the use of zero-biased detectors in the subtraction circuit. A beam-noise level (defined as 2 \\times the rms value) equivalent to a line-center absorption of 1.6 \\times 10-6 was achieved with an equivalent-noise bandwidth of 1.25 Hz for 2f detection at 10 kHz. The electronic circuit is easy to construct and low cost.

  4. Photoconductivity in AC-driven modulated two-dimensional electron gas in a perpendicular magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Torres, Manuel; Kunold, Alejandro

    2006-04-26

    In this work we study the microwave photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the presence of a magnetic field and a two-dimensional modulation (2D). The model includes the microwave and Landau contributions in a non-perturbative exact way; the periodic potential is treated perturbatively. The Landau-Floquet states provide a convenient base with respect to which the lattice potential becomes time dependent, inducing transitions between the Landau-Floquet levels. Based on this formalism, we provide a Kubo-like formula that takes into account the oscillatory Floquet structure of the problem. The total longitudinal conductivity and resistivity exhibit strong oscillations, determined by ϵ = ω/ω(c), with ω the radiation frequency and ω(c) the cyclotron frequency. The oscillations follow a pattern with minima centred at [Formula: see text], and maxima centred at [Formula: see text], where j = 1,2,3..., δ∼1/5 is a constant shift and l is the dominant multipole contribution. Negative resistance states (NRSs) develop as the electron mobility and the intensity of the microwave power are increased. These NRSs appear in a narrow window region of values of the lattice parameter (a), around a∼l(B), where l(B) is the magnetic length. It is proposed that these phenomena may be observed in artificially fabricated arrays of periodic scatterers at the interface of ultraclean GaAs /Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heterostructures.

  5. Modeling nuclear and electronic recoils in noble gas detectors with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jeremy; NEST Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon are used as targets in single and dual phased rare event detectors like those used in the search for dark matter. Such experiments require an understanding of the behavior of the target material in the presence of low-energy ionizing radiation. This understanding allows an exploration of detector effects such as threshold, energy and position reconstruction, and pulse shape discrimination. The Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST) package is a comprehensive code base that models the scintillation and ionization yields from liquid and gaseous xenon and argon in the energy regimes of interest to many types of experiments, like dark matter and neutrino detectors. NEST is built on multiple physics models, which are constrained by available data for both electronic and nuclear recoils. A substantial body of data exists in the literature, and we are reaching an era in which sub-keV yields can be explored experimentally. Here we present a new global analysis of all available nuclear recoil data, and the latest updates to the electronic recoil model, in light of recent low-energy measurements and an improved understanding of detector systematics.

  6. Updated compilations of electron scattering from ground-state, noble gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, S. F.

    2011-10-01

    An updated analysis of the cross sections for electron scattering from ground state atoms for noble gases in the energy range from thermalto 10 MeV is outlined. The work was driven by the necessity tounderstand the Penning transfers and light emission in detectors of high energy particles and dark matter. The published experimental data for electron scattering up to 2010 have been used in the analysis. Recent, theoretically improved cross sections have been used in the important threshold region for both the singlet and triplet states. Experimental or theoretical oscillator strengths and BEF scaling have been used above the resonance region for the singlet states. The number of excitation levels considered (typically about 40) is chosen so that the sum of the oscillator strengths for the considered levels is within a few percent of the theoretical sum rule. The resulting total cross sections are within a few percent of the measured values, and the calculated Fano factors are consistent with available data. These data are now available on the LXCat website. This work is part of the RD51 collaboration at CERN.

  7. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  8. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  9. Extraordinary attributes of 2-dimensional MoS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. N. R.; Maitra, Urmimala; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of the amazing properties of graphene has stimulated exploration of single- and few-layer structures of layered inorganic materials. Of all the inorganic 2D nanosheet structures, those of MoS2 have attracted great attention because of their novel properties such as the presence of a direct bandgap, good field-effect transistor characteristics, large spin-orbit splitting, intense photoluminescence, catalytic properties, magnetism, superconductivity, ferroelectricity and several other properties with potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, energy devices and spintronics. MoS2 nanosheets have been used in lithium batteries, supercapacitors and to generate hydrogen. Highlights of the impressive properties of MoS2 nanosheets, along with their structural and spectroscopic features are presented in this Letter. MoS2 typifies the family of metal dichalcogenides such as MoSe2 and WS2 and there is much to be done on nanosheets of these materials. Linus Pauling would have been pleased to see how molybdenite whose structure he studied in 1923 has become so important today.

  10. Electronic Effects of 11β Substituted 17β-Estradiol Derivatives and Instrumental Effects on the Relative Gas Phase Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Fournier, Françoise; Afonso, Carlos; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Jacquot, Yves; Pèpe, Claude; Leclercq, Guy; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2012-12-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the role of the proton donor characteristics of the phenol group of 17β-estradiol (E2) in its association with the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Since the substitutions at position C(11) have been reported to modulate this association, we hypothesized that such substitutions may modify the phenol acidity. Hence, phenol gas-phase acidity of nine C(11)-substituted E2-derivatives were evaluated using the extended Cooks' kinetic method, which is a method widely used to determine thermochemical properties by mass spectrometry. To enhance accuracy in data collection we recorded data from several instruments, including quadrupole ion trap, triple quadrupole, and hybrid QqTOF. Indeed, we report for the first time the use of the QqTOF instrument to provide a novel means to improve data accuracy by giving access to an intermediate effective temperature range. All experimental gas-phase acidity values were supported by theoretical calculations. Our results confirmed the ability of distant substituents at C(11) to modulate the phenol acidity through electrostatic interactions, electron withdrawing inductive effects, and mesomeric effects. However, no relationship was found between the phenol gas-phase acidity of investigated steroids and their binding affinity for ERα assessed in solution. Thus, our results highlight that the intrinsic properties of the hormone do not influence sufficiently the stabilization of the hormone/ERα complex. It is more likely that such stabilization would be more related to factors depending on the environment within the binding pocket such as hydrophobic, steric as well as direct intermolecular electrostatic effects between ERα residues and the substituted steroidal estrogens.

  11. Nanostructured SnO2 thick films for gas sensor application: analysis of structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovic, Goran; Aleksic, Obrad S.; Nikolic, Maria V.; Nicolics, Johann; Radosavljevic, Goran; Vasiljevic, Zorka Z.; Lukovic, Miloljub D.; Smetana, Walter

    2016-03-01

    This research is focused on structural and electrical characterisation of tin oxide (SnO2) applied as a thick film and investigation of its properties as gas sensitive material. Micron sized SnO2 powder was milled in an agate mill for six hours to fabricate SnO2 nanopowder, which was afterwards sieved by 325 mesh sieve and characterized by XRD and SEM. This powder was used as functional part in the production of thick film tin oxide paste containing a resin vehicle with 4 wt. % nanosize glass frits acting as permanent binder. The glass frits where additionally milled for twelve hours in the agate mills to nanosized powder and sieved by a 325 mesh sieve as well. The achieved thick film paste was screen printed on alumina and fired at 850oC peak temperature for 10 minutes in air. After the sintering process, thick film samples where characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reflectivity was measured on the same samples by UV-VIS spectrophotometer: the band gap was determined from the slope of reflectance. After that a matrix of different interdigitated electrode structure of PdAg paste was printed and sintered using the mentioned sintering conditions. The tin oxide thick film was printed over the interdigitated electrodes as a top layer and sintered again under the same conditions. The total electrical resistance was measured as a function of the electrode spacing and temperature. A negative temperature coefficient (NTC) was identified and measured in the range from room temperature (27°C) to 180°C in a climate chamber. Finally the samples were placed into a gas reactor with NOx and CO gas and the resistance was measured in the same temperature range (27°C-200°C).

  12. Hollow-fiber solvent bar microextraction with gas chromatography and electron capture detection determination of disinfection byproducts in water samples.

    PubMed

    Correa, Liliana; Fiscal, Jhon Alex; Ceballos, Sandra; de la Ossa, Alberto; Taborda, Gonzalo; Nerin, Cristina; Rosero-Moreano, Milton

    2015-09-10

    A liquid-phase microextraction method that uses a hollow-fiber solvent bar microextraction technique was developed by combining gas chromatography with electron capture detection for the analysis of four trihalomethanes (chloroform, dichlorobromomethane, chlorodibromomethane, and bromoform) in drinking water. In the microextraction process, 1-octanol was used as the solvent. The technique operates in a two-phase mode with a 5 min extraction time, a 700 rpm stirring speed, a 30°C extraction temperature, and NaCl concentration of 20%. After microextraction, one edge of the membrane was cut, and 1 μL of solvent was collected from the membrane using a 10 μL syringe. The solvent sample was directly injected into the gas chromatograph. The analytical characteristics of the developed method were as follows: detection limits, 0.017-0.037 ng mL(-1) ; linear working range, 10-900 ng mL(-1) ; recovery, 74 ± 9-91 ± 2; relative standard deviation, 5.7-10.3; and enrichment factor, 330-455. A simple, fast, economic, selective, and efficient method with big possibilities for automation was developed with a potential use to apply with other matrices and analytes.

  13. Analysis of mixing conditions and multistage irradiation impact on NOx removal efficiency in the electron beam flue gas treatment process.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, Andrzej; Dobrowolski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    In the process of electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT), most energy is spent on NOx removal. The dose distribution in the reactor is not uniform and the flue gas flow pattern plays an important role in the process efficiency. It was found that proper construction of the reactor may increase the energy efficiency of the process. The impact of the number of irradiation stages and mixing conditions on NOx removal efficiency was investigated for an ideal case and a practical solution was presented and compared with previously known EBFGT reactor constructions. The research was performed by means of computational fluid dynamics methods in combination with empirical Wittig formula. Two versions of dose distribution were taken for calculations. The results of the research show that for an ideal case, application of multistage irradiation and interstage mixing may reduce the energy consumption in the process by up to 39%. On the other side, simulation of reactor construction modification for two-stage irradiation results in 25% energy consumption reduction. The results of presented case study may be applied for improving the existing reactors and proper design of future installations.

  14. Energetic, spatial, and momentum character of the electronic structure at a buried interface: The two-dimensional electron gas between two metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Gray, A. X.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Eiteneer, D.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Saw, A. Y.; Bostwick, A.; Moreschini, L.; Rotenberg, E.; Strocov, V. N.; Kobayashi, M.; Schmitt, T.; Stolte, W.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Borek, S.; Minar, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Plucinski, L.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Balents, L.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Stemmer, S.; Fadley, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    The interfaces between two condensed phases often exhibit emergent physical properties that can lead to new physics and novel device applications and are the subject of intense study in many disciplines. We here apply experimental and theoretical techniques to the characterization of one such interesting interface system: the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in multilayers consisting of SrTi O3 (STO) and GdTi O3 (GTO). This system has been the subject of multiple studies recently and shown to exhibit very high carrier charge densities and ferromagnetic effects, among other intriguing properties. We have studied a 2DEG-forming multilayer of the form [6unit cells (u .c .) STO /3 u .c .of GTO ] 20 using a unique array of photoemission techniques including soft and hard x-ray excitation, soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission, core-level spectroscopy, resonant excitation, and standing-wave effects, as well as theoretical calculations of the electronic structure at several levels and of the actual photoemission process. Standing-wave measurements below and above a strong resonance have been exploited as a powerful method for studying the 2DEG depth distribution. We have thus characterized the spatial and momentum properties of this 2DEG in detail, determining via depth-distribution measurements that it is spread throughout the 6 u.c. layer of STO and measuring the momentum dispersion of its states. The experimental results are supported in several ways by theory, leading to a much more complete picture of the nature of this 2DEG and suggesting that oxygen vacancies are not the origin of it. Similar multitechnique photoemission studies of such states at buried interfaces, combined with comparable theory, will be a very fruitful future approach for exploring and modifying the fascinating world of buried-interface physics and chemistry.

  15. Comparing embodied greenhouse gas emissions of modern computing and electronics products.

    PubMed

    Teehan, Paul; Kandlikar, Milind

    2013-05-07

    Information and communications technology (ICT) contributes substantially to global greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutant emissions, but it is time-consuming to estimate the environmental impacts caused by the production of ICT devices, and the literature lacks coverage for newer products. Using a process-sum life cycle assessment (LCA) approach, we estimate and compare the embodied GHG emissions of 11 ICT products, including large- and small-form-factor desktop and laptop personal computers, a thin client device, an LCD monitor, newer mobile devices (an Apple iPad, an iPod Touch, and an Amazon Kindle), a rack server, and a network switch. Full bills of materials are provided via hand disassembly and weighing and are mapped to processes in the ecoinvent v2.2 database to produce impact estimates. Results are analyzed to develop simplified impact estimation models using linear regressions based on product characteristics. A simple and robust linear relationship between mass and embodied emissions is identified; a more sophisticated linear model using display mass, battery mass, and circuit board mass as inputs is slightly more accurate. Embodied GHG emissions for newer products are 50-60% lower than corresponding older products with similar functionality, largely due to decreased material usage, especially reductions in integrated circuit content.

  16. Gas-phase electronic spectroscopy of the indene cation (C9H8+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, Nahid; Dryza, Viktoras; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic spectrum of the indene radical cation has been investigated through resonance-enhanced photodissociation of the weakly bound C9H8+-He and C9H8+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The D2 ← D0 band origin for indene+-He is observed at 17 379 ± 15 cm-1, while the D2 ← D0 and D4 ← D0 band origins for indene+-Ar appear at 17 353 ± 15 cm-1 and 28 254 ± 15 cm-1, respectively. The vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system is assigned by comparison with a simulated spectrum based on time-dependent density functional theory calculations, and is due mainly to progressions in ring deformation vibrational modes. Possible correspondences between the stronger visible transitions of the indene cation and diffuse interstellar bands observed towards the heavily reddened star HD 204827 are discussed.

  17. Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy in Glow Discharge: A New Dimension for Gas Chromatography Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheverev, V. A.; Khromov, N. A.; Kojiro, D. R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Admixtures to helium of 100 ppm and 5 ppm of nitrogen, and 100 ppm and 10 ppm of carbon monoxide were identified and measured in the helium discharge afterglow using an electrical probe placed into the plasma. For nitrogen and carbon monoxide gases, the measured electron energy spectra display distinct characteristic peaks (fingerprints). Location of the peaks on the energy scale is determined by the ionization energies of the analyte molecules. Nitrogen and carbon monoxide fingerprints were also observed in a binary mixture of these gases in helium, and the relative concentration analytes has been predicted. The technically simple and durable method is considered a good candidate for a number of analytical applications, and in particular, in GC and for analytical flight instrumentation.

  18. Quantum magnetotransport in 2D electron gas in InGaAs/InP heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podor, Balint; Savel'ev, I. G.; Kovacs, Gy.; Remenyi, G.; Gombos, G.; Kreshchuk, A. M.; Novikov, S. V.

    1997-08-01

    Quantum magnetotransport measurements were performed on liquid phase epitaxially grown In0.35Ga0.47As/InP heterostructures at 4.2 K temperature in magnetic fields up to 22 Tesla. Measurements in tilted magnetic field, in conjunction with the analysis of the derivatives with respect to the magnetic field of the magnetoresistance curves, allowed the resolution of spin-splitting of the Landau levels up to N equals 3. The spin-splitting energy ESPIN was deduced for the half-filled Landau levels 0ARDN, 1ARUP, 1ARDN, 2ARUP, and 2$ARDN. The magnetic field dependence of the spin-splitting energy was interpreted using a simple model based on the exchange interaction of the electrons in the spin-splitted Landau levels, incorporating the disorder induced broadening of the Landau levels.

  19. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2015-07-28

    Thin film electronic devices (or stacks integrated with a substrate) that include a permeation barrier formed of a thin layer of metal that provides a light transmitting and electrically conductive layer, wherein the electrical conductive layer is formed on a surface of the substrate or device layer such as a transparent conducting material layer with pin holes or defects caused by manufacturing and the thin layer of metal is deposited on the conductive layer and formed from a self-healing metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block is formed in or adjacent to the thin film of metal at or proximate to the pin holes to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes.

  20. Interaction-induced magnetoresistance in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2004-04-01

    We study the interaction-induced quantum correction δσαβ to the conductivity tensor of electrons in two dimensions for arbitrary Tτ (where T is the temperature and τ the transport scattering time), magnetic field, and type of disorder. A general theory is developed, allowing us to express δσαβ in terms of classical propagators (“ballistic diffusons”). The formalism is used to calculate the interaction contribution to the longitudinal and the Hall resistivities in a transverse magnetic field in the whole range of temperature from the diffusive ( Tτ≪1) to the ballistic ( Tτ≳1) regime, both in smooth disorder and in the presence of short-range scatterers.

  1. Photodissociation Electronic Spectra of Cold Protonated Quinoline and Isoquinoline in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Féraud, Géraldine; Domenianni, Luis; Marceca, Ernesto; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2017-03-27

    Photofragmentation electronic spectra of isolated single-isomeric N-protonated quinoline (quinolinium) and isoquinoline (isoquinolinium) ions have been measured at a temperature of ∼40 K using a mass-selective, 10 cm(-1) spectral resolution, photodissociation spectrometer. Additionally, ab initio adiabatic transition energies calculated using the RI-ADC(2) method have been employed to assist in the assignment of the spectra. Three electronic transitions having ππ* character were clearly evidenced for both protonated ions within the UV and deep-UV spectral ranges. The corresponding spectra at room temperature were previously reported by Hansen et al., together with TD-DFT calculations and a careful analysis of the possible fragmentation mechanisms. This information will be complemented in the present study by appending better resolved spectra, characteristic of cold ions, in which well-defined vibrational progressions associated with the S1 ← S0 and S3 ← S0 transitions exhibit clear 0-0 bands at hν0-0 = 27868 and 42230 cm(-1), for protonated quinoline, and at hν0-0 = 28043 and 41988 cm(-1), for protonated isoquinoline. Active vibrations in the spectra were assigned with the help of calculated normal modes, looking very similar to those of the structurally related protonated naphthalene. Finally, we have observed that the bandwidths associated with the deep-UV S3 ← S0 transition denote a lifetime for the S3 excited state in the subpicosecond time scale, in contrast with that of S1.

  2. Gas Phase Dissociative Electron Attachment to Formamide Derivatives NMF and DMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhou; Dawley, M. Michele; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Fragmentation of biomolecules, such as nucleobases, induced by low energy electrons can lead to the break of DNA strands. Dissociative electron attachment (DEA), which can occur due to low energy interactions, is initiated with the formation of transient negative ions which exhibit characteristic resonant profiles in the product ion yield. The consequent fragmentation process can either be as simple as a single bond cleavage or a relatively complex process involving multiple bond rearrangements. Measurements of resonant peaks in ion yields and identification of ion products provide information of the resonant energies of the parent molecules as well as the fragmentation pathways. N-methylformamide (NMF) and dimethylformamide (DMF) are both derivatives of formamide which is the simplest structure containing the peptide bond linkage. In this work we identified anion fragments and measured resonance profiles of produced anions due to DEA to NMF and DMF. The anionic species produced from the two molecules were compared as well as the resonant positions and ion yields. Based on this comparison, the DEA process to the two molecules bears similarities such as leading to breaking of peptide bonds (C-N), as well as discrepancies such as absence of OCN- in DEA to DMF. The selective property of H atom loss, which is reported in the DEA to formamide, is also justified in our experiment since no dehydrogenated DMF anion was detected. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  3. Simulation and Digitization of a Gas Electron Multiplier Detector Using Geant4 and an Object-Oriented Digitization Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Timothy; Liyanage, Nilanga; Xiong, Weizhi; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    Our research has focused on simulating the response of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector using computational methods. GEM detectors provide a cost effective solution for radiation detection in high rate environments. A detailed simulation of GEM detector response to radiation is essential for the successful adaption of these detectors to different applications. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo (GEMC), a wrapper around Geant4 which has been successfully used to simulate the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) at Jefferson Lab, we are developing a simulation of a GEM chamber similar to the detectors currently used in our lab. We are also refining an object-oriented digitization program, which translates energy deposition information from GEMC into electronic readout which resembles the readout from our physical detectors. We have run the simulation with beta particles produced by the simulated decay of a 90Sr source, as well as with a simulated bremsstrahlung spectrum. Comparing the simulation data with real GEM data taken under similar conditions is used to refine the simulation parameters. Comparisons between results from the simulations and results from detector tests will be presented.

  4. Analytic and numeric Green's functions for a two-dimensional electron gas in an orthogonal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cresti, Alessandro . E-mail: cresti@df.unipi.it; Grosso, Giuseppe . E-mail: grosso@df.unipi.it; Parravicini, Giuseppe Pastori . E-mail: pastori@fisicavolta.unipv.it

    2006-05-15

    We have derived closed analytic expressions for the Green's function of an electron in a two-dimensional electron gas threaded by a uniform perpendicular magnetic field, also in the presence of a uniform electric field and of a parabolic spatial confinement. A workable and powerful numerical procedure for the calculation of the Green's functions for a large infinitely extended quantum wire is considered exploiting a lattice model for the wire, the tight-binding representation for the corresponding matrix Green's function, and the Peierls phase factor in the Hamiltonian hopping matrix element to account for the magnetic field. The numerical evaluation of the Green's function has been performed by means of the decimation-renormalization method, and quite satisfactorily compared with the analytic results worked out in this paper. As an example of the versatility of the numerical and analytic tools here presented, the peculiar semilocal character of the magnetic Green's function is studied in detail because of its basic importance in determining magneto-transport properties in mesoscopic systems.

  5. High-Throughput Design of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Systems Based on Polar/Nonpolar Perovskite Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kesong; Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar; Cheng, Jianli

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the interface between two insulating oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (STO) is of fundamental and practical interest because of its novel interfacial conductivity and its promising applications in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. Here we show that a group of combinatorial descriptors that characterize the polar character, lattice mismatch, band gap, and the band alignment between the perovskite-oxide-based band insulators and the STO substrate, can be introduced to realize a high-throughput (HT) design of SrTiO3-based 2DEG systems from perovskite oxide quantum database. Equipped with these combinatorial descriptors, we have carried out a HT screening of all the polar perovskite compounds, uncovering 42 compounds of potential interests. Of these, Al-, Ga-, Sc-, and Ta-based compounds can form a 2DEG with STO, while In-based compounds exhibit a strain-induced strong polarization when deposited on STO substrate. In particular, the Ta-based compounds can form 2DEG with potentially high electron mobility at (TaO2)+/(SrO)0 interface. Our approach, by defining materials descriptors solely based on the bulk materials properties, and by relying on the perovskite-oriented quantum materials repository, opens new avenues for the discovery of perovskite-oxide-based functional interface materials in a HT fashion.

  6. Andreev reflection and bound state formation in a ballistic two-dimensional electron gas probed by a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Hiroshi; Todt, Clemens; Kumada, Norio; Harada, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Muraki, Koji

    2016-10-01

    We study coherent transport and bound state formation of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in a high-mobility I n0.75G a0.25As two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) coupled to a superconducting Nb electrode by means of a quantum point contact (QPC) as a tunable single-mode probe. Below the superconducting critical temperature of Nb, the QPC shows a single-channel conductance greater than the conductance quantum 2 e2/h at zero bias, which indicates the presence of Andreev-reflected quasiparticles, time-reversed states of the injected electron, returning back through the QPC. The marked sensitivity of the conductance enhancement to voltage bias and perpendicular magnetic field suggests a mechanism analogous to reflectionless tunneling—a hallmark of phase-coherent transport, with the boundary of the 2DEG cavity playing the role of scatterers. When the QPC transmission is reduced to the tunneling regime, the differential conductance vs bias voltage probes the single-particle density of states in the proximity area. Measured conductance spectra show a double peak within the superconducting gap of Nb, demonstrating the formation of Andreev bound states in the 2DEG. Both of these results, obtained in the open and closed geometries, underpin the coherent nature of quasiparticles, i.e., phase-coherent Andreev reflection at the InGaAs/Nb interface and coherent propagation in the ballistic 2DEG.

  7. High-Throughput Design of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Systems Based on Polar/Nonpolar Perovskite Oxide Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kesong; Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar; Cheng, Jianli

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the interface between two insulating oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (STO) is of fundamental and practical interest because of its novel interfacial conductivity and its promising applications in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. Here we show that a group of combinatorial descriptors that characterize the polar character, lattice mismatch, band gap, and the band alignment between the perovskite-oxide-based band insulators and the STO substrate, can be introduced to realize a high-throughput (HT) design of SrTiO3-based 2DEG systems from perovskite oxide quantum database. Equipped with these combinatorial descriptors, we have carried out a HT screening of all the polar perovskite compounds, uncovering 42 compounds of potential interests. Of these, Al-, Ga-, Sc-, and Ta-based compounds can form a 2DEG with STO, while In-based compounds exhibit a strain-induced strong polarization when deposited on STO substrate. In particular, the Ta-based compounds can form 2DEG with potentially high electron mobility at (TaO2)+/(SrO)0 interface. Our approach, by defining materials descriptors solely based on the bulk materials properties, and by relying on the perovskite-oriented quantum materials repository, opens new avenues for the discovery of perovskite-oxide-based functional interface materials in a HT fashion. PMID:27708415

  8. Enhanced electrodynamic tether currents due to electron emission from a neutral gas discharge: Results from the TSS-1R Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Bonifazi, C.; Bilén, S. G.; Raitt, W. J.; Burke, W. J.; Stone, N. H.; Lebreton, J. P.

    During the reflight of the first electrodynamic Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R) mission, the unplanned separation of the tether at the Orbiter end resulted in the highest tether current during the mission. In the moments just prior to the tether separation with 19.7 km of tether deployed and a generated electromotive force (EMF) of 3482 V, currents reaching approximately 0.97 A were shunted through the tether to the Orbiter electrical ground, which was in contact with the ionosphere primarily through its main engine surfaces. This current level was nearly twice as large as observed during any nominal operating period. As the failure point of the tether entered into the ambient plasma, the current increased to 1.1 A and maintained this level even after the break for approximately 75 s. The principal surprise in these results was that the broken end of the tether, with only a few short strands of copper wire, could support higher currents than the much larger Orbiter conducting surface areas. Analysis of possible current enhancement mechanisms revealed that only a gas-enhanced electrical discharge, providing an electron emission source, was plausible. Ground plasma chamber tests confirmed this analysis. The TSS-1R results thus represent the highest electron current emission from a neutral plasma source yet demonstrated in a space plasma. This is of interest for current collection processes in general and plasma contactor development in particular.

  9. Bcs-Bose Crossover Picture for a 2d Electron Gas with a Finite-Range Attractive Interfermion Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Miguel A.; Sevilla, Francisco J.; Fortes, Mauricio; de Llano, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    Cooper pair formation is studied in a 2D electron gas interacting pairwise through a finite-range, separable interfermion potential in wavevector space V_ kk^' =-(v_0/L^2)g_kg_k^' , where L^2 is the system area, v0 >= 0 the interaction strength, g_k≡ (1+k^2/k_0^2)-1/2 with k0 the inverse interaction range. The interaction strength v0 is eliminated [1] in favor of the (positive) binding energy B2 of an electron pair in vacuum under the same interfermion interaction. For finite range, i.e., 1/k_0>0, we report numerical calculations of the gap, the critical temperature and the chemical potential as functions of B2 and 1/k_0. For k_0= ∞ or zero-range (viz., a delta potential well) we recover at T=0 the well-known Miyake [2] results. Finally, the gap-to-Tc ratio is exhibited as a function of B2 and compared with other calculations as well as with empirical values for cuprate superconductors. [1] S.K. Adhikari, M. Casas, A. Puente, A. Rigo, M. Fortes, M.A. Solís, M. de Llano, A.A. Valladares and O. Rojo, Phys. Rev. B 62, 8671 (2000). [2] K. Miyake, Prog. Theor. Phys. 69, 1794 (1983). We thank UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT # IN102198 and CONACyT # 27828E for partial support.

  10. Aging characteristics of electron beam and gas tungsten arc fusion zones of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2090

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J. . Center for Advanced Materials); Morris, J.W. Jr. . Dept of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) fusion zones of 2090 indicates that in both the as-welded and aged conditions, the EB and GTA fusion zones lack the volume fraction and the homogeneity of strengthening precipitates found in the base metal. In the underaged and peak-aged conditions, the [delta][prime] phase is the primary strengthener, the volume fraction of T[sub 1] present being too low to be effective. The T[sub 1] precipitates are found either in the vicinity of other inclusions or at the dendrite boundaries. As the strength increases with postweld aging, the elongation decreased to 1%. The presence of the boundary phases and Cu- and Cl-containing inclusions at the boundaries leads to poor elongation. The joint efficiencies of the peak-aged EB and GTA weldments (EBWs and GTAWs, respectively) are 75 and 55% at 293 K and 75 and 50% at 77 K, respectively. Both EBWs and GTAWs have relatively low elongations.

  11. Spin-Orbit Interaction in High-κ Dielectric Gated Rashba-2D Electron Gas and Mesoscopic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yanhua; Yuan, Zhuoquan; Stone, Kristjan; Du, Rui-Rui; Xu, Min; Ye, Peide

    2008-03-01

    There is increasing current interest in the quantum interference effect in mesoscopic devices fabricated on a Rashba-2D electron gas (2DEG), where the spin-orbit interaction parameters can be tuned by a potential gate. We explore ring structures that use a gate consisting of thin (5nm-50nm) high-κ dielectric Al2O3 or HfO2 layer and nano-patterned metals. The 2DEG is provided by lattice-matched In0.52Al0.48As/In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As quantum wells that have a typical electron density n of 1.5x10^12/cm^2 and mobility μ>=2x10^4cm^2/Vs. The dielectric material was grown by atomic layer deposition. We will present the gate characteristics of Hall bars as well as magnetic transport data from gated mesoscopic rings. The work at Rice is funded by NSF DMR-0706634. Reference: M. Konig et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 076804 (2006); T. Bergsten et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 196803 (2006); B. Grbic et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 176803 (2007).

  12. Demonstration of Confined Electron Gas and Steep-Slope Behavior in Delta-Doped GaAs-AlGaAs Core-Shell Nanowire Transistors.

    PubMed

    Morkötter, S; Jeon, N; Rudolph, D; Loitsch, B; Spirkoska, D; Hoffmann, E; Döblinger, M; Matich, S; Finley, J J; Lauhon, L J; Abstreiter, G; Koblmüller, G

    2015-05-13

    Strong surface and impurity scattering in III-V semiconductor-based nanowires (NW) degrade the performance of electronic devices, requiring refined concepts for controlling charge carrier conductivity. Here, we demonstrate remote Si delta (δ)-doping of radial GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell NWs that unambiguously exhibit a strongly confined electron gas with enhanced low-temperature field-effect mobilities up to 5 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The spatial separation between the high-mobility free electron gas at the NW core-shell interface and the Si dopants in the shell is directly verified by atom probe tomographic (APT) analysis, band-profile calculations, and transport characterization in advanced field-effect transistor (FET) geometries, demonstrating powerful control over the free electron gas density and conductivity. Multigated NW-FETs allow us to spatially resolve channel width- and crystal phase-dependent variations in electron gas density and mobility along single NW-FETs. Notably, dc output and transfer characteristics of these n-type depletion mode NW-FETs reveal excellent drain current saturation and record low subthreshold slopes of 70 mV/dec at on/off ratios >10(4)-10(5) at room temperature.

  13. Electron and ion kinetics in three-dimensional confined microwave-induced microplasmas at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiali; Yu, Xinhai; Wang, Zhenyu; Tu, Shan-Tung; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the gas pressure (pg), microcavity height (t), Au vapor addition, and microwave frequency on the properties of three-dimensional confined microwave-induced microplasmas were discussed in light of simulation results of a glow microdischarge in a three-dimensional microcavity (diameter dh = 1000 μm) driven at constant voltage loading on the drive electrode (Vrf) of 180 V. The simulation was performed using the PIC/MCC method, whose results were experimentally verified. In all the cases we investigated in this study, the microplasmas were in the γ-mode. When pg increased, the maximum electron (ne) or ion density (nAr+) distributions turned narrow and close to the discharge gap due to the decrease in the mean free path of the secondary electron emission (SEE) electrons (λSEE-e). The peak ne and nAr+ were not a monotonic function of pg, resulting from the two conflicting effects of pg on ne and nAr+. The impact of ions on the electrode was enhanced when pg increased. This was determined after comparing the results of ion energy distribution function (IEDFs) at various pg. The effects of t on the peaks and distributions of ne and nAr+ were negligible in the range of t from 1.0 to 3.0 mm. The minimum t of 0.6 mm for a steady glow discharge was predicted for pg of 800 Pa and Vrf of 180 V. The Au vapor addition increased the peaks of ne and nAr+, due to the lower ionization voltage of Au atom. The acceleration of ions in the sheaths was intensified with the addition of Au vapor because of the increased potential difference in the sheath at the drive electrode.

  14. Fragmentation and exfoliation of 2-dimensional materials: a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroupis-Agalou, Konstantinos; Liscio, Andrea; Treossi, Emanuele; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Pugno, Nicola Maria; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    different statistical functions to model the asymmetric distribution of nanosheet sizes typically obtained. Being the resolution of AFM much larger than the average sheet size, analysis could be performed directly at the nanoscale and at the single sheet level. We find that the size distribution of the sheets at a given time follows a log-normal distribution, indicating that the exfoliation process has a ``typical'' scale length that changes with time and that exfoliation proceeds through the formation of a distribution of random cracks that follow Poisson statistics. The validity of this model implies that the size distribution does not depend on the different preparation methods used, but is a common feature in the exfoliation of this material and thus probably for other 2D materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Exfoliation methods, image analysis procedure, and comparison of sheet size on surfaces and in solution. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06919b

  15. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Kierspel, Thomas; Wiese, Joss; Mullins, Terry; ...

    2015-09-16

    Here, we demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the linac coherent light source. Chirped laser pulses, i.e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2, 5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment ofmore » $$\\langle {\\mathrm{cos}}^{2}{\\theta }_{2{\\rm{D}}}\\rangle =0.85$$ was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.« less

  16. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kierspel, Thomas; Wiese, Joss; Mullins, Terry; Robinson, Joseph; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Boll, Rebecca; Boutet, Sebastien; Bucksbaum, Philip; Chapman, Henry N.; Christensen, Lauge; Fry, Alan; Hunter, Mark; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Natan, Adi; Petrovic, Vladimir; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schnorr, Kirsten; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Stern, Stephan; Thogersen, Jan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Trippel, Sebastian; Kupper, Jochen

    2015-09-16

    Here, we demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the linac coherent light source. Chirped laser pulses, i.e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2, 5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment of $\\langle {\\mathrm{cos}}^{2}{\\theta }_{2{\\rm{D}}}\\rangle =0.85$ was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.

  17. Final Report - Composite Fermion Approach to Strongly Interacting Quasi Two Dimensional Electron Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, John

    2009-11-30

    Work related to this project introduced the idea of an effective monopole strength Q* that acted as the effective angular momentum of the lowest shell of composite Fermions (CF). This allowed us to predict the angular momentum of the lowest band of energy states for any value of the applied magnetic field simply by determining N{sub QP} the number of quasielectrons (QE) or quasiholes (QH) in a partially filled CF shell and adding angular momenta of the N{sub QP} Fermions excitations. The approach reported treated the filled CF level as a vacuum state which could support QE and QH excitations. Numerical diagonalization of small systems allowed us to determine the angular momenta, the energy, and the pair interaction energies of these elementary excitations. The spectra of low energy states could then be evaluated in a Fermi liquid-like picture, treating the much smaller number of quasiparticles and their interactions instead of the larger system of N electrons with Coulomb interactions.

  18. Low-energy electron irradiation of preheated and gas-exposed single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecton, P. A.; Beatty, J.; Verbeck, G.; Lakshantha, W.; Rout, B.; Perez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the conditions under which electron irradiation at 2 keV of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles produces an increase in the Raman D peak. We find that irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in situ at 600 °C for 1 h in ultrahigh vacuum before irradiation does not result in an increase in the D peak. Irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in vacuum and then exposed to air or gases results in an increase in the D peak, suggesting that adsorbates play a role in the increase in the D peak. Small diameter SWCNTs that are not preheated or preheated and then exposed to air show a significant increase in the D and G bands after irradiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows no chemical shifts in the C 1s peak of SWCNTs that have been irradiated versus SWCNTs that have not been irradiated, suggesting that chemisorption of adsorbates is not responsible for the increase in the D peak.

  19. The molecular structure and conformational composition of epichlorohydrin as determined by gas phase electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Quang

    1985-09-01

    The molecular structure of gaseous epichlorohydrin has been investigated using electron diffraction data obtained at 67°C. The conformational composition at this temperature is such that the molecules exist predominantly in a gauche-2 conformer (where the CCl bond is 160° away from the CO) bond). Refinements showed that 33% (σ = 4) of the molecule exist in the gauche-1 form. The important distances ( rg) and angle (∠α) with the associated uncertainties are r(CH) = 1.095(5) Å, r(CO) = 1.442(3) Å, r(CC) = 1.475(8) Å, r(CC M) = 1.523(7) Å, r(CCl) = 1.788(2) Å, ∠CCO = 114° (1), ∠CCC M = 119°(1), ∠ClCC = 108.9° (7), and Tau(ClCCO) = -150°(10) ( gauche-2) and Tau(ClCCO) = 78° (10) ( gauche-1).

  20. Magnetocapacitance oscillations and thermoelectric effect in a two-dimensional electron gas irradiated by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. D.; Gusev, G. M.; Raichev, O. E.; Momtaz, Z. S.; Bakarov, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    To study the influence of microwave irradiation on two-dimensional electrons, we apply a method based on capacitance measurements in GaAs quantum well samples where the gate covers a central part of the layer. We find that the capacitance oscillations at high magnetic fields, caused by the oscillations of thermodynamic density of states, are not essentially modified by microwaves. However, in the region of fields below 1 T, we observe another set of oscillations, with the period and the phase identical to those of microwave-induced resistance oscillations. The phenomenon of microwave-induced capacitance oscillations is explained in terms of violation of the Einstein relation between conductivity and the diffusion coefficient in the presence of microwaves, which leads to a dependence of the capacitor charging on the anomalous conductivity. We also observe microwave-induced oscillations in the capacitive response to periodic variations of external heating. These oscillations appear due to the thermoelectric effect and are in antiphase with microwave-induced resistance oscillations because of the Corbino-like geometry of our experimental setup.

  1. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-12-17

    A thin film stack (100, 200) is provided for use in electronic devices such as photovoltaic devices. The stack (100, 200) may be integrated with a substrate (110) such as a light transmitting/transmissive layer. A electrical conductor layer (120, 220) is formed on a surface of the substrate (110) or device layer such as a transparent conducting (TC) material layer (120,220) with pin holes or defects (224) caused by manufacturing. The stack (100) includes a thin film (130, 230) of metal that acts as a barrier for environmental contaminants (226, 228). The metal thin film (130,230) is deposited on the conductor layer (120, 220) and formed from a self-healing metal such as a metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block (236) is formed in or adjacent to the thin film (130, 230) of metal at or proximate to the pin holes (224) to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes (224).

  2. Probing an Electron Scattering Resonance using Rydberg Molecules within a Dense and Ultracold Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Liebisch, Tara Cubel; Nguyen, Huan; Lochead, Graham; Engel, Felix; Böttcher, Fabian; Westphal, Karl M.; Kleinbach, Kathrin S.; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-02-01

    We present spectroscopy of a single Rydberg atom excited within a Bose-Einstein condensate. We not only observe the density shift as discovered by Amaldi and Segrè in 1934, but a line shape that changes with the principal quantum number n . The line broadening depends precisely on the interaction potential energy curves of the Rydberg electron with the neutral atom perturbers. In particular, we show the relevance of the triplet p -wave shape resonance in the e--Rb (5 S ) scattering, which significantly modifies the interaction potential. With a peak density of 5.5 ×1014 cm-3 , and therefore an interparticle spacing of 1300 a0 within a Bose-Einstein condensate, the potential energy curves can be probed at these Rydberg ion-neutral atom separations. We present a simple microscopic model for the spectroscopic line shape by treating the atoms overlapped with the Rydberg orbit as zero-velocity, uncorrelated, pointlike particles, with binding energies associated with their ion-neutral separation, and good agreement is found.

  3. Qualitative analysis of Copaifera oleoresin using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and gas chromatography with classical and cold electron ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Uekane, Thais M; Rezende, Claudia M; Bizzo, Humberto R; Marriott, Philip J

    2016-12-16

    Improved separation of both sesquiterpenes and diterpenic acids in Copaifera multijuga Hayne oleoresin, is demonstrated by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (accTOFMS). GC×GC separation employs polar phases (including ionic liquid phases) as the first dimension ((1)D) column, combined with a lower polarity (2)D phase. Elution temperatures (Te) of diterpenic acids (in methyl ester form, DAME) increased as the (1)D McReynolds' polarity value of the column phase decreased. Since Te of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons decreased with increased polarity, the very polar SLB-IL111 (1)D phase leads to excessive peak broadening in the (2)D apolar phase due to increased second dimension retention ((2)tR). The combination of SLB-IL59 with a nonpolar column phase was selected, providing reasonable separation and low Te for sesquiterpenes and DAME, compared to other tested column sets, without excessive (2)tR. Identities of DAME were aided by both soft (30eV) electron ionisation (EI) accurate mass TOFMS analysis and supersonic molecular beam ionisation (cold EI) TOFMS, both which providing less fragmentation and increased relative abundance of molecular ions. The inter-relation between EI energies, emission current, signal-to-noise and mass error for the accurate mass measurement of DAME are reported. These approaches can be used as a basis for conducting of GC×GC with soft EI accurate mass measurement of terpenes, particularly for unknown phytochemicals.

  4. Comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electron ionization for determination of N-nitrosamines in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenwen; Li, Xiaoshui; Huang, Huanfang; Zhu, Xuetao; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yuan; Cen, Kuang; Zhao, Lunshan; Liu, Xiuli; Qi, Shihua

    2017-02-01

    N-nitrosamines are trace organic contaminants of environmental concern when present in groundwater and river water due to their potent carcinogenicity. Therefore, N-nitrosamine analysis is increasingly in demand. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), both with electron ionization (EI), were compared for analysis of nine N-nitrosamines extracted from environmental water matrices. A total of 20 fishpond water, river water, and groundwater samples from Sihui and Shunde, China were collected for a survey of N-nitrosamine concentrations in real water samples. Various solid-phase extraction (SPE) conditions and GC conditions were first examined for the pre-concentration and separation steps. The analysis of N-nitrosamines in environmental waters demonstrated that their quantification with GC-MS poses a challenge due to the occurrence of co-eluting interferences. Conversely, the use of GC-MS/MS increased selectivity because of the fragmentation generated from precursor ions in the 'multiple reaction monitoring' (MRM) mode, which is expected to extract target analytes from the environmental water matrix. Thus, the high performance of GC-MS/MS with EI was used to quantify nine N-nitrosamines in environmental waters with detection limits of 1.1-3.1 ng L(-1). N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) concentrations were in the range of N.D. to 258 ng L(-1). Furthermore, other N-nitrosamines, except N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitroso-di-n-propylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), were also detected. Our findings suggest that GC-MS/MS with EI would be widely applicable in identifying N-nitrosamines in environmental waters and can be used for routine monitoring of these chemicals.

  5. Commercial and cost effective production of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Crary, David

    2010-05-05

    The nuclear and high energy physics research community is constantly searching for new and improved tracking and radiation detectors. The introduction of micropattern detectors has opened new opportunities for improving the rate capabilities, as well as the spatial and time resolution of particle detectors in these applications. GEM detectors in particular have received enormous interest for use in detectors planned for a number of new and upgraded experiments at many different research facilities. These include both the STAR and PHENIX experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and at the future electron-positron Linear Collider. At the present time, CERN is not able to supply foils in sufficient quantities to accommodate the needs of these experiments. Compounding this problem, there is a strong interest in GEM foils for numerous other applications, such as in astrophysics, medical imaging and detectors for homeland security. It would therefore be of significant benefit to the research community to develop a commercial source of GEM foils for all of these applications. Tech-Etch is in a unique position to develop this technology for commercial use. Tech-Etch has not only experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products, but it also has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven, Yale and MIT) that can help develop and evaluate the performance of the GEM foils produced at Tech-Etch. Additionally, since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, as well as the flexibility to shift production methods, equipment, and chemistry to optimize the GEM foil manufacturing process without being constrained by existing work running on high volume continuous coil equipment.

  6. Commercial and Cost Effective Production of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Craig

    2009-03-31

    The nuclear and high energy physics research community is constantly searching for new and improved tracking and radiation detectors. The introduction of micropattern detectors has opened new opportunities for improving the rate capabilities, as well as the spatial and time resolution of particle detectors in these applications. GEM detectors in particular have received enormous interest for use in detectors planned for a number of new and upgraded experiments at many different research facilities. These include both the STAR and PHENIX experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and at the future electron-positron Linear Collider. At the present time, CERN is not able to supply foils in sufficient quantities to accommodate the needs of these experiments. Compounding this problem, there is a strong interest in GEM foils for numerous other applications, such as in astrophysics, medical imaging and detectors for homeland security. It would therefore be of significant benefit to the research community to develop a commercial source of GEM foils for all of these applications. Tech-Etch is in a unique position to develop this technology for commercial use. Tech-Etch has not only experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products, but it also has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven, Yale and MIT) that can help develop and evaluate the performance of the GEM foils produced at Tech-Etch. Additionally, since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, as well as the flexibility to shift production methods, equipment, and chemistry to optimize the GEM foil manufacturing process without being constrained by existing work running on high volume continuous coil equipment.

  7. An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns by Patrick Debroux...Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns Patrick Debroux and Berenice Verdin Survivability/Lethality Analysis... Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  8. Study of electronic structure and magnetism at the relaxed SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soham; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2013-03-01

    The SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface has been found experimentally to be metallic and magnetic, with bandstructure calculations linking both phenomena to polar catastrophe and surface oxygen vacancies. In this work, we use LDA+U to study the properties of this interface, allowing the ionic structure to be fully relaxed, and investigate the 2-dimensional nature of the electron gas formed at the junction. We present an effort to understand the role of electron-electron correlation on the interfacial collective phenomena, by constructing extended Hubbard-like models based on bandstructure calculation.

  9. To the limit of gas-phase electron diffraction: Molecular structure of magnesium octa(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)porphyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabanov, Yuriy A.; Zakharov, Alexander V.; Giricheva, Nina I.; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Koifman, Oscar I.; Girichev, Georgiy V.

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase molecular structure of the magnesium octa(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)porphyrazine (MgC72H32N8F24) has been studied by a synchronous gas-phase electron diffraction and mass spectrometric experiment at T = 667(10) K in combination with DFT calculations using B3LYP hybrid method and triple-ζ valence basis sets. The molecule has an equilibrium structure of D4 symmetry. The following values of selected internuclear distances have been determined: rh1, Å: r(Mg-N) = 1.979(5), r(N-C) = 1.363(3), r(Nmezo-C) = 1.334(4), r(Cpyr-CPh) = 1.469(3), r(CPh-CF3) = 1.510(5), r(C-F) = 1.349(3), r(Cα-Cβ) = 1.466(3), r(Cβ-Cβ) = 1.380(7). A slight (less than 1 to 2 degrees) twisting deformation of the macrocycle from planarity, caused by the presence of the eight bulky PhCF3 substituents, planes of which are turned by 132.6(9) degrees relative to the adjacent pyrrole rings, has been found. The deviation of phenyl ring planes from 90 degrees orientation is caused by stabilizing donor-acceptor interactions between π-natural orbitals of pyrrole and phenyl moieties. Substitution effects and coordination bonding in magnesium porphyrazine complexes, MgPz, MgPzPh8 and MgPz(CF3Ph)8, are discussed. Sensitivity of GED data to long range interatomic distances of large molecules has been shown.

  10. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and

  11. Structural determination of carvone, a component of spearmint, by means of gas electron diffraction augmented by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Toru; Kachi, Yukari; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2003-10-01

    The molecular structure and conformation of carvone, a compound with a minty odor, were investigated by means of gas electron diffraction supported by theoretical calculations. Electron diffraction patterns were recorded by heating the nozzle up to 128 °C to obtain enough scattering intensity. The infrared spectrum was also measured by using an absorption cell with a path length of 10 m. The obtained molecular scattering intensities were analyzed with the aid of theoretical calculations and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that carvone consists of a mixture of three conformers that have the isopropenyl group in the equatorial position and mutually differ in the torsional angle around the single bond connecting the ring and the isopropenyl group. It was also found that the puckering amplitude of the ring of carvone is close to those of menthol and isomenthol, a minty compound and its nonminty isomer. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of the most abundant conformer of carvone are as follows: < r(C-C)>=1.520(3) Å; < r(CC)>=1.360(5) Å; r(CO)=1.225(5) Å; < r(C-H)>=1.104(4)Å; <∠CC-C>=121.1(5)°; <∠C-C-C>=110.4(5)°; ∠C-CO-C=117.1(14)°; <∠C-C-H>=111.1(13)°. Angle brackets denote average values and parenthesized values are the estimated limits of error (3 σ) referring to the last significant digit.

  12. Simultaneous analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples by membrane-assisted solvent extraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xizhi; Tang, Zigang; Sun, Aili; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Jian; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Pan, Daodong

    2014-12-01

    A highly efficient and environment-friendly membrane-assisted solvent extraction system combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector was applied in the simultaneous determination of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Variables affecting extraction efficiency, including extraction solvent used, stirring rate, extraction time, and temperature, were optimized extensively. Under optimal extraction conditions, recoveries between 76.9% and 104.6% in seawater samples were achieved, and relative standard deviation values below 10% were obtained. The limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) and limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio=10) of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater ranged from 0.14ngL(-1) to 0.36ngL(-1) and 0.46ngL(-1) to 1.19ngL(-1), respectively. Matrix effects on extraction efficiency were evaluated by comparing with the results obtained using tap water. The extraction effect of developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction method was further demonstrated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry which can provide structural information of the analytes for more accurate identification, and results identical to those produced by gas chromatography-electron capture detector were obtained. These findings demonstrate the applicability of the developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction determination method for coupling to gas chromatography-electron capture detector or tandem mass spectrometry for determining polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples.

  13. Two-dimensional electron gas at the Ti-diffused BiFeO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunlin; Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang Liang, Xiaobin; Nakajima, Ken; Lv, Shuhui; Li, Yanxi; Viehland, Dwight; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-20

    Oxide heterostructures with the broken translational symmetry often trigger a two-dimensional quantum confinement and associated unique electronic properties that cannot be observed in bulk constituents. Particular interest is devoted to the formation of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at heterointerfaces between two insulators, which offers a fertile ground for fabricating advanced electronic devices. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomistic first-principles calculations to demonstrate that the (100) BiFeO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface takes on a metallic nature and a 2DEG is generated at this interface. Our findings also reveal that the electronic reconstruction due to the polar discontinuity and the variation in valence state of Ti arising from diffusion of Ti cations in SrTiO{sub 3} to Fe sites of BiFeO{sub 3} are critical to the formation of 2DEG at the heterointerface.

  14. Structure and conformational behavior of N-phenylpiperidine studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlykov, Sergey A.; Phien, Tran D.; Gao, Yan; Weber, Peter M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular structure and conformational behavior of N-phenylpiperidine (NPhP) were investigated by synchronous gas-phase electron diffraction/mass spectrometry (GED/MS) and quantum chemistry. Due to influence of steric repulsion and hyperconjugation, NPhP may exist in two conformers, equatorial and axial chair forms. Both experiment and theoretical calculations suggest a C1 symmetry of the conformers, with the plane perpendicular to the phenyl group turned by ca. 30-40° (equatorial) and 0-20° (axial) about the plane perpendicular to the piperidine ring symmetry plane. According to the QC calculations, NPhP may exist as two conformers, equatorial and axial, with a ratio of Eq:Ax = 92:8 (B3LYP), 87:13 (B3LYP-GD3), 84:16 (M06-2X), 83:17 (MP2/6-311G**) and 76:24% (MP2/cc-pVTZ). Except for the latter, these values are in good agreement with the experimental GED data of 90(10):10(10)%. A comparative analysis of similar compounds, phenylcyclohexane and 1-phenylheterocyclohexanes, was performed. Conformational properties depend on the CPhsbnd X bond distance and hyperconjugation between the phenyl ring and the lone pair on the heteroatom. The contribution of the axial form of 1-phenylcyclohexane derivatives increases in the series of the heteroatom X in the cyclohexane ring: C → N → Si → P.

  15. Production of Mg and Al Auger electrons by noble gas ion bombardment of Mg and Al surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Pepper, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    Relative production efficiencies of Mg and Al Auger electrons by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ion bombardment are reported as a function of ion energy for energies not exceeding 3 keV. The experimental apparatus employed consisted of a LEED-Auger system equipped with an ion gun and a four-grid retarding-potential analyzer. It is found that: (1) the shape of the ion-excited Auger signal was independent of the rare gas and quite symmetric; (2) the Al signal was about an order of magnitude smaller than the Mg signal for a given bombarding species and ion-gun voltage; (3) no signal was observed for He(+) bombardment under any of the experimental conditions; (4) signal strengths were independent of temperature and ion dose; (5) the Auger production efficiencies differed by no more than a factor of two among the different gases - except for He(+) - on a given metal; (6) all the signal strengths increased with increasing ion-gun voltage, with no maximum exhibited; and (7) the apparent threshold energy for the Al signal was higher than that for the Mg signal. The differences between the results for the two metals are attributed to the fact that the Al 2p orbital lies deeper in energy and closer to the nucleus than the corresponding Mg orbital.

  16. The molecular structure and conformation of trans-1,2,3-trichloropropene as determined by gas-phase electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Quang

    1989-09-01

    The gas-phase molecular structure of trans-1,2,3-trichloropropene has been studied by electron diffraction at a nozzle-tip temperature of 110°C. The data are consistent with the presence of only a conformation with a torsional angle of 110° (8), where 0° corresponds to the eclipsing of the CCl and CC bonds. The principal geometrical parameter values ( rg and ∠ α) obtained from least squares refinement are: r(CH) = 1.06(3) Å, r(CC) = 1.365(12) Å, r(CC) = 1.467(15) Å, r(C 1Cl) = 1.733(25) Å, r(C 2Cl) = 1.727(25) Å, r(C 3Cl) = 1.800(9) Å, ∠ CCC = 124(2)°, ∠ ClC 1C 2 = 124(2)°, ∠ ClC 2C 1 = 115.2(14)°, ∠ClC 3C 2 = 110.9(13)°, and τ (ClC 3C 2C 1) = 110(8)°.

  17. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  18. Exploring the Radical Nature of a Carbon Surface by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and a Calibrated Gas Flow

    PubMed Central

    Green, Uri; Shenberger, Yulia; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Cohen, Haim; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    While the first Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies regarding the effects of oxidation on the structure and stability of carbon radicals date back to the early 1980s the focus of these early papers primarily characterized the changes to the structures under extremely harsh conditions (pH or temperature)1-3. It is also known that paramagnetic molecular oxygen undergoes a Heisenberg spin exchange interaction with stable radicals that extremely broadens the EPR signal4-6. Recently, we reported interesting results where this interaction of molecular oxygen with a certain part of the existing stable radical structure can be reversibly affected simply by flowing a diamagnetic gas through the carbon samples at STP7. As flows of He, CO2, and N2 had a similar effect these interactions occur at the surface area of the macropore system. This manuscript highlights the experimental techniques, work-up, and analysis towards affecting the existing stable radical nature in the carbon structures. It is hoped that it will help towards further development and understanding of these interactions in the community at large. PMID:24796382

  19. The molecular structure of tris(dipivaloylmethanato) thulium: Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, Oleg A.; Belova, Natalya V.; Sliznev, Valery V.

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structure of tris-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-heptane-3,5-dione thulium, or Tm(thd)3, has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction monitored by mass spectrometry (GED/MS) and quantum chemical (DFT) calculations. Both the DFT(PBE0) calculations and the GED data collected at 400(8) K indicate that the molecules have D3 symmetry with a distorted antiprismatic TmO6 coordination geometry. According to GED refinements the twist angle θ, i.e. the angle of rotation of the upper O3 triangles relative to their position in regular prism is θ = 16.9(2.0)0. This value is close to both the equilibrium value obtained from the DFT calculations and to the thermal average value at the temperature of the GED experiment obtained by integration over the DFT potential energy surface. The bond distances (rh1) in the chelate ring are Tmsbnd O = 2.214(5) Å, Csbnd O = 1.278(4) Å, and Csbnd C = 1.404(3) Å. The DFT calculations yielded structure parameters in close agreement with those found experimentally. As an alternative to conventional Lewis model which was realized in NBO the topological analysis of ρ(r) in the frame of Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM) was performed.

  20. Laboratory Activity for the Determination of Nicotine in Electronic Cigarette Liquids using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Todd; Bida, Morgan R.; Robinson, Risa J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the prevalence and popularity of electronic cigarettes (ECs) has increased noticeably and a large market for their refillable nicotine solutions (e-liquids) has also rapidly increased. These e-liquids contain nicotine, an addictive and potentially dangerous stimulant, but often the actual nicotine content differs significantly from manufacturers’ labelling, due in part to lack of regulation for these products. A laboratory activity for undergraduate students was developed to directly test e-liquids for nicotine content using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a means for teaching the instrumentation to undergraduate students using an authentic, real-world example. The activity introduces and/or re-emphasizes the theory and operation of GC-MS, standard/sample preparation, calibration curves, internal standards, selected ion monitoring mode of MS operation, and method validation. The laboratory experiment is designed for students enrolled in Quantitative Analysis courses (like Analytical Chemistry or Instrumental Analysis), but portions are also suitable for lower level chemistry courses or even those designed for allied health professionals or non-chemistry majors. Given the current popularity of ECs, this activity can provide the chemistry curriculum with a timely, real-world, and contemporary application in which crucial course content is taught. Students can also benefit from the inherent discussion of ECs, regulations, and related social aspects of smoking and EC vaping – which can serve as a secondary learning outcome. PMID:26478904