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Sample records for 2-dimensional premixed flames

  1. Premixed conical flame stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikunova, A. I.; Son, E. E.; Saveliev, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    In the current work, stabilization of premixed laminar and lean turbulent flames for wide range of flow rates and equivalence ratios was performed. Methane-air mixture was ignited after passing through premixed chamber with beads and grids, and conical nozzle (Bunsen-type burner). On the edge of the nozzle a stabilized body-ring was mounted. Ring geometry was varied to get the widest stable flame parameters. This work was performed as part of the project on experimental investigation of premixed flames under microgravity conditions.

  2. Premixed turbulent flame calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Tahry, S.; Rutland, C. J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Rogers, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of turbulent premixed flames in a variety of applications has led to a substantial amount of effort towards improving the understanding of these flames. Although these efforts have increased the understanding, many questions still remain. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) in solving these questions is examined.

  3. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  4. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noever, D.A. )

    1991-07-15

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks---metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  5. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks-metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  6. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks-metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of 2-dimensional H2O concentration and temperature distribution in premixed methane/air flame using TDLAS-based tomography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Wu, Qi; Huang, Qunxing; Zhang, Haidan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    An innovative tomographic method using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) is presented in this paper for detecting two-dimensional distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a premixed flame. The collimated laser beam emitted from a low cost diode laser module was delicately split into 24 sub-beams passing through the flame from different angles and the acquired laser absorption signals were used to retrieve flame temperature and H2O concentration simultaneously. The efficiency of the proposed reconstruction system and the effect of measurement noise were numerically evaluated. The temperature and H2O concentration in flat methane/air premixed flames under three different equivalence ratios were experimentally measured and reconstruction results were compared with model calculations. Numerical assessments indicate that the TDLAS tomographic system is capable for temperature and H2O concentration profiles detecting even the noise strength reaches 3% of absorption signal. Experimental results under different combustion conditions are well demonstrated along the vertical direction and the distribution profiles are in good agreement with model calculation. The proposed method exhibits great potential for 2-D or 3-D combustion diagnostics including non-uniform flames.

  8. Turbulent flame propagation in partially premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouve, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flame propagation is essential in many practical devices. In the past, fundamental and modeling studies of propagating flames have generally focused on turbulent flame propagation in mixtures of homogeneous composition, i.e. a mixture where the fuel-oxidizer mass ratio, or equivalence ratio, is uniform. This situation corresponds to the ideal case of perfect premixing between fuel and oxidizer. In practical situations, however, deviations from this ideal case occur frequently. In stratified reciprocating engines, fuel injection and large-scale flow motions are fine-tuned to create a mean gradient of equivalence ratio in the combustion chamber which provides additional control on combustion performance. In aircraft engines, combustion occurs with fuel and secondary air injected at various locations resulting in a nonuniform equivalence ratio. In both examples, mean values of the equivalence ratio can exhibit strong spatial and temporal variations. These variations in mixture composition are particularly significant in engines that use direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. In this case, the liquid fuel does not always completely vaporize and mix before combustion occurs, resulting in persistent rich and lean pockets into which the turbulent flame propagates. From a practical point of view, there are several basic and important issues regarding partially premixed combustion that need to be resolved. Two such issues are how reactant composition inhomogeneities affect the laminar and turbulent flame speeds, and how the burnt gas temperature varies as a function of these inhomogeneities. Knowledge of the flame speed is critical in optimizing combustion performance, and the minimization of pollutant emissions relies heavily on the temperature in the burnt gases. Another application of partially premixed combustion is found in the field of active control of turbulent combustion. One possible technique of active control consists of pulsating

  9. Flame structure and chemiluminescence in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana-Otero, Jose; Mahmoudi, Siamak

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative use of chemiluminescence requires the knowledge of the relationship between the concentration of excited species with flame properties such as the equivalency ratio, the burning rate or the heat release rate. With the aim of rigorously finding from first principles these relations we have analyzed, numerically and analytically, the distribution of the excited species OH* and CH* in steady hydrogen and methane planar premixed flames. Their mass fractions turn out to be extremely small; thus, a kinetic mechanism describing their dynamics in the flame can be obtained by simply adding the kinetic mechanism describing the excitation and de-excitation to the mechanism of the base flame. Due also to their small concentrations, the excited species are in steady state, facilitating a simple analytical description. The analyses show that OH*, both in hydrogen and methane flames, can be found broadly distributed downstream the preheat region, in a three-layer structure that is analytically described. The distribution of CH* is much simpler, being always in equilibrium with CH, whose concentration is in turn proportional to that of CH4. As a result, CH* is confined to the methane consumption layer in lean flames, but broadly distributed in rich flames.

  10. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Ashurst, W.T.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  11. Turbulent transport in premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Cant, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations of planar, premixed turbulent flames with heat release were used to study turbulent transport. Reynolds stress and Reynolds flux budgets were obtained and used to guide the investigation of important physical effects. Essentially all pressure terms in the transport equations were found to be significant. In the Reynolds flux equations, these terms are the major source of counter-gradient transport. Viscous and molecular terms were also found to be significant, with both dilatational and solenoidal terms contributing to the Reynolds stress dissipation. The BML theory of premixed turbulent combustion was critically examined in detail. The BML bimodal pdf was found to agree well with the DNS data. All BML decompositions, through the third moments, show very good agreement with the DNS results. Several BML models for conditional terms were checked using the DNS data and were found to require more extensive development.

  12. Lewis Number Effects on Partially Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruetsch, G. R.; Ferziger, J.

    1996-01-01

    Combustion is generally categorized as either premixed, where flames propagate into homogeneous mixtures of reactants, or as nonpremixed, where initially separated reactants diffuse into the reaction zones. Although these approaches are applicable to many combustion devices, there are cases not in either of these two limiting regimes. Under such circumstances, one must consider partially premixed combustion. In partially premixed combustion, mechanisms from both premixed and nonpremixed regimes coexist and, as a result, some interesting phenomena arise. One such phenomenon is flame stabilization in laminar mixing layers by triple flames.

  13. Flame propagation under partially-premixed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruetsch, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    This study concentrates on developing a better understanding of triple flames. We relax the assumption of zero heat release, address the issue of stabilization, and, in order to investigate the role that heat release plays in flame propagation in partially premixed combustion, we return to a simple flow field and investigate the behavior of flames in a laminar environment. We solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a two-dimensional domain. At the boundaries, we use an inflow boundary condition on the left and nearly-perfect reflective boundary conditions, required to avoid pressure drift, at the outflow and sides. After the flow and flame are initialized, the mixture fraction is varied at the inlet from its uniform stoichiometric value to a tanh profile varying from zero to one. As the mixture fraction gradient reaches the flame surface only the centerline is exposed to the stoichionetric mixture fraction and locally maintains the planar flame speed and reaction rate. Above this point the mixture is fuel rich, and below fuel lean. As a result, these regions of non-unity equivalence ratio burn less, the reaction rate drops, and the local flame speed is reduced. The excess fuel and oxidizer then combine behind the premixed flame along the stoichiometric surface and burn in a trailing diffusion flame. Thus the 'triple' flame refers to the fuel-rich premixed flame, the fuel-lean premixed flame, and the trailing diffusion flame. Due to heat release, the normal velocity across the flame is increased, whereas the tangential component remains unchanged. Far-field flame speed, local flame speed, and their differences are shown as a function of the local mixing thickness. It was also determined that the lateral position of the flame affects stabilization, and the distribution of the reaction rate along the premixed wings of triple flames affects flame propagation.

  14. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  15. Premixed turbulent flame propagation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Jagoda, J.; Sujith, R.

    1995-01-01

    To reduce pollutant formation there is, at present, an increased interest in employing premixed fuel/air mixture in combustion devices. It is well known that greater control over local temperature can be achieved with premixed flames and with lean premixed mixtures, significant reduction of pollutants such as NO(x) can be achieved. However, an issue that is still unresolved is the predictability of the flame propagation speed in turbulent premixed mixtures, especially in lean mixtures. Although substantial progress has been made in recent years, there is still no direct verification that flame speeds in turbulent premixed flows are highly predictable in complex flow fields found in realistic combustors. One of the problems associated with experimental verification is the difficulty in obtaining access to all scales of motion in typical high Reynolds number flows, since, such flows contain scales of motion that range from the size of the device to the smallest Kolmogorov scale. The overall objective of this study is to characterize the behavior of turbulent premixed flames at reasonable high Reynolds number, Re(sub L). Of particular interest here is the thin flame limit where the laminar flame thickness is much smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Thin flames occur in many practical combustion devices and will be numerically studied using a recently developed new formulation that is briefly described.

  16. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  17. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  18. Premixed flame stabilization on a bluff body

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.; Talbot, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of fluid mechanics on combustion, the density and velocity fields of a turbulent premixed flame stabilized on a bluff-body flameholder observed by using Rayleigh scattering for single point measurements of density and laser Doppler velocimetry for velocity data. The stabilization region near the flameholder is the focus of this work. There are several motivations for a study of this nature. First, this configuration, in which a premixed flame is stabilized in the free shear layer of a separated wake behind a bluff body has implications for both mixing layer and basic flame anchoring questions, making this a fundamental problem. Second, since most premixed flames require some form of stabilization for laboratory study, understanding the interaction of the stabilization region and the propagating premixed flame is essential for the interpretation of any resultant data. Third, flame stabilization is of ongoing concern for ramjets, turbojet afterburners and other practical combustion systems. Finally, global models of flame stabilization are based on assumptions, such as the presence of stable recirculating vortices and high turbulence in the recirculation zone, which require verification.

  19. The behavior of partially premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chun Wai

    In this investigation, we have characterized the structure of two-dimensional partially-premixed slot burner flames through the measurement of the heat release topography, and the temperature and velocity distribution. The measurements were used to infer the flame stretch and the response of the local propagation speed of the inner rich premixed reaction zone in these flames to stretch rate variations due to hydrodynamic and curvature effects. The inner premixed reaction zone of the PPFs exhibits a highly curved portion near its tip and planar topography along its lower portion. An "effective flame speed" was characterized for two flames beyond the rich flammability limit that can only burn in a partially-premixed mode due to the synergy between the inner premixed and outer nonpremixed reaction zones. The reaction zone speed in the curved region increases significantly during the transition from a planar to curved topology due to curvature effects. The Markstein relation must be suitably modified to account for the curvature of the reaction zones for flame with negative curvature. Negative curvature increases the local value of the flame speed above the unstretched flame speed Su o while positive curvature decreases it below that value. Although curvature effects are included in the definition of stretch, they are not fully accounted for by the Su(kappa) Markstein linear relation. This implies that the curvature has an influence on Su through kappa and another more explicit effect. The propagation of triple flames in premixed and nonpremixed jet modes was investigated. The response of flame speed at the triple point to stretch has a turning behavior due to the variation of the radius of curvature while the flame is propagating downward. In normal gravity, the buoyant gases accelerate the flow in a direction opposite to the gravity vector, causing air entrainment, which enhances the mixing of the reactants with ambient laboratory air and consequently, influences the

  20. Dynamics and structure of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilger, R. W.; Swaminathan, N.; Ruetsch, G. R.; Smith, N. S. A.

    1995-01-01

    In earlier work (Mantel & Bilger, 1994) the structure of the turbulent premixed flame was investigated using statistics based on conditional averaging with the reaction progress variable as the conditioning variable. The DNS data base of Trouve and Poinsot (1994) was used in this investigation. Attention was focused on the conditional dissipation and conditional axial velocity in the flame with a view to modeling these quantities for use in the conditional moment closure (CMC) approach to analysis of kinetics in premixed flames (Bilger, 1993). Two remarkable findings were made: there was almost no acceleration of the axial velocity in the flame front itself; and the conditional scalar dissipation remained as high, or higher, than that found in laminar premixed flames. The first finding was surprising since in laminar flames all the fluid acceleration occurs through the flame front, and this could be expected also for turbulent premixed flames at the flamelet limit. The finding gave hope of inventing a new approach to the dynamics of turbulent premixed flames through use of rapid distortion theory or an unsteady Bernoulli equation. This could lead to a new second order closure for turbulent premixed flames. The second finding was contrary to our measurements with laser diagnostics in lean hydrocarbon flames where it is found that conditional scalar dissipation drops dramatically below that for laminar flamelets when the turbulence intensity becomes high. Such behavior was not explainable with a one-step kinetic model, even at non-unity Lewis number. It could be due to depletion of H2 from the reaction zone by preferential diffusion. The capacity of the flame to generate radicals is critically dependent on the levels of H2 present (Bilger, et al., 1991). It seemed that a DNS computation with a multistep reduced mechanism would be worthwhile if a way could be found to make this feasible. Truly innovative approaches to complex problems often come only when there is the

  1. Internal structure of a premixed turbulent flame

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, S.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    A pulsed laser and a multielement detector have been used to make instantaneous Rayleigh profiles along a line through a turbulent flame front thus eliminating the effects of flame front motion. The flame front in a premixed turbulent flame moves randomly about a mean position, giving rise to the visually observed flame brush or time-averaged flame thickness which is larger than the instantaneous thickness of the reaction zone. The physical characteristics and statistical properties of such turbulent flames reported previously were deduced from the time histories of Rayleigh scattered laser light at one or two points within the reaction zone. The study was conducted on a premixed propane-air flame stabilized on a rod at the exit plane of a square burner. Turbulence-producing screens below the burner exit controlled turbulent length scales while intensity was controlled with inlet mixture velocity. Turbulence properties of the cold reactants were determined by hot-wire anemometry. Mean and fluctuating velocity in the unburnt and burnt gases were measured using laser Doppler velocimetry. At the low level of turbulence studied, the instantaneous flame front thickness was found to be only slightly greater than the laminar flame thickness, and the magnitude of the density fluctuations only slightly greater than the cold flow turbulence intensity. Mean and rms values of density and velocity; density and velocity probability density functions; spatial density correlations; and comparison of data with the Bray-Moss-Libby model are presented.

  2. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, O. C.; Abid, M.; Porres, J.; Liu, J. B.; Ronney, P. D.; Struk, P. M.; Weiland, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    Several topics relating to premixed flame behavior at reduced gravity have been studied. These topics include: (1) flame balls; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) experimental simulation of buoyancy effects in premixed flames using aqueous autocatalytic reactions; and (4) premixed flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells. Because of space limitations, only topic (1) is discussed here, emphasizing results from experiments on the recent STS-107 Space Shuttle mission, along with numerical modeling efforts.

  3. Confined superadiabatic premixed flame-flow interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.

    1995-12-31

    Laminar premixed unity-Lewis number flames are studied numerically, to examine flow-flame interaction in a two-dimensional closed domain. Two opposed planar flame fronts are perturbed sinusoidally and allowed to develop by consuming premixed reactants. Combustion heat release leads to global pressure and temperature rise in the domain, due to confinement. A superadiabatic condition, with products temperature rising with distance behind the flame front, is observed due to stagnation pressure rise. Variations in tangential strain rate behind the perturbed flame fronts, due to flame curvature and heat release, result in a modified local superadiabatic temperature gradient in the products. These variations in temperature gradients are shown to determine the net local confinement-heating rate in the products, leading to corresponding deviations in products temperature, and the local reaction rate along the flame front. These observations, which are not consistent with one-dimensional superadiabatic stagnation flame behavior, are a direct result of the unrestrained unsteady nature of two-dimensional flame-flow interaction.

  4. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  5. Gravity Effects Observed In Partially Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Gauguly, Ranjan; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) contain a rich premixed fuel air mixture in a pocket or stream, and, for complete combustion to occur, they require the transport of oxidizer from an appropriately oxidizer-rich (or fuel-lean) mixture that is present in another pocket or stream. Partial oxidation reactions occur in fuel-rich portions of the mixture and any remaining unburned fuel and/or intermediate species are consumed in the oxidizer-rich portions. Partial premixing, therefore, represents that condition when the equivalence ratio (phi) in one portion of the flowfield is greater than unity, and in another section its value is less than unity. In general, for combustion to occur efficiently, the global equivalence ratio is in the range fuel-lean to stoichiometric. These flames can be established by design by placing a fuel-rich mixture in contact with a fuel-lean mixture, but they also occur otherwise in many practical systems, which include nonpremixed lifted flames, turbulent nonpremixed combustion, spray flames, and unwanted fires. Other practical applications of PPFs are reported elsewhere. Although extensive experimental studies have been conducted on premixed and nonpremixed flames under microgravity, there is a absence of previous experimental work on burner stabilized PPFs in this regard. Previous numerical studies by our group employing a detailed numerical model showed gravity effects to be significant on the PPF structure. We report on the results of microgravity experiments conducted on two-dimensional (established on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner) and axisymmetric flames (on a coannular burner) that were investigated in a self-contained multipurpose rig. Thermocouple and radiometer data were also used to characterize the thermal transport in the flame.

  6. Network structure of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Belur Vishwanath, Rahul; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Sujith, R. I.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a generalized description of the complex topology of turbulent premixed flames stabilized in a model gas turbine combustor is obtained using network analysis. Networks are created using the visibility algorithm applied to points on the flame edge obtained from Hydroxyl radical (OH)—Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence images of turbulent premixed flames. The network structure thus obtained showed the emergence of a few massively connected nodes which were found to represent the folded regions of the flame front. These nodes, which are called the hubs of the network, are vital for determining the overall structure of the flame front. Degree distribution of the formulated networks is used to characterize the flame-turbulence interaction inherent in the system. Turbulent flame front networks were found to be rigid enough to be unaffected by random perturbations but highly vulnerable towards coordinated removal of hubs or folds. These findings could serve as the first network-analytic approach to characterize turbulence-flame interaction dynamics with the use of a flourishing network theory, which enhances ongoing works based on vortex dynamics, hydrodynamic stability, and thermo-acoustic instability.

  7. Network structure of turbulent premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasmeet; Belur Vishwanath, Rahul; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Sujith, R I

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a generalized description of the complex topology of turbulent premixed flames stabilized in a model gas turbine combustor is obtained using network analysis. Networks are created using the visibility algorithm applied to points on the flame edge obtained from Hydroxyl radical (OH)-Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence images of turbulent premixed flames. The network structure thus obtained showed the emergence of a few massively connected nodes which were found to represent the folded regions of the flame front. These nodes, which are called the hubs of the network, are vital for determining the overall structure of the flame front. Degree distribution of the formulated networks is used to characterize the flame-turbulence interaction inherent in the system. Turbulent flame front networks were found to be rigid enough to be unaffected by random perturbations but highly vulnerable towards coordinated removal of hubs or folds. These findings could serve as the first network-analytic approach to characterize turbulence-flame interaction dynamics with the use of a flourishing network theory, which enhances ongoing works based on vortex dynamics, hydrodynamic stability, and thermo-acoustic instability.

  8. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  9. Nongradient diffusion in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental results demonstrating the interaction between force fields and density inhomogeneities as they arise in premixed turbulent flames are discussed. In such flames, the density fluctuates between two levels, the high density in reactants rho sub r and the low density in products rho sub p, with the ratio rho sub r/rho sub p on the order of five to ten in flows of applied interest. The force fields in such flames arise from the mean pressure drop across the flame or from the Reynolds shear stresses in tangential flames with constrained streamlines. The consequence of the interaction is nongradient turbulent transport, countergradient in the direction normal to the flame and nongradient in the tangential direction. The theoretical basis for these results, the presently available experimental support therefore and the implications for other variable density turbulent flows are discussed.

  10. The premixed flame in uniform straining flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of the premixed flame in uniform straining flow are investigated by the technique of activation-energy asymptotics. An inverse method is used, which avoids some of the restrictions of previous analyses. It is shown that this method recovers known results for adiabatic flames. New results for flames with heat loss are obtained, and it is shown that, in the presence of finite heat loss, straining can extinguish flames. A stability analysis shows that straining can suppress the cellular instability of flames with Lewis number less than unity. Strain can produce instability of flames with Lewis number greater than unity. A comparison shows quite good agreement between theoretical deductions and experimental observations of Ishizuka, Miyasaka & Law (1981).

  11. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  12. Transient response of premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Vagelopoulos, Christina M.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2006-08-15

    The response of premixed methane-air flames to transient strain and local variations in equivalence ratio is studied during isolated interactions between a line-vortex pair and a V-flame. The temporal evolution of OH and CH is measured with planar laser-induced fluorescence for N{sub 2}-diluted flames with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.2. One-dimensional laminar flame calculations are used to simulate the flame response to unsteady strain and variations in reactant composition. When the reactant composition of the vortex pair and the V-flame are identical, the measurements and predictions show that the peak mole fractions of OH and CH decay monotonically in lean, stoichiometric, and rich flames. We also investigate the effects of a vortex pair with a leaner composition than the V-flame. In a stoichiometric flame, the leaner vortex enhances the decay of both OH and CH. In a rich flame, we observe an abrupt increase in OH-LIF signal and a disappearance of CH-LIF signal that are consistent with a previous experimental investigation. Our results indicate that the previously observed OH burst and CH breakage were caused by a difference in the equivalence ratios of the vortex pair and the main reactant flow. A numerical study shows that N{sub 2} dilution enhances the response of premixed flames to unsteady strain and variations in stoichiometry. Reaction-path and sensitivity analyses indicate that the peak OH and CH mole fractions exhibit significant sensitivity to the main branching reaction, H+O{sub 2} {r_reversible}OH+O. The sensitivity of OH and CH to this and other reactions is enhanced by N{sub 2} dilution. As a result, N{sub 2}-diluted flames provide a good test case for studying the reliability of chemical kinetic and transport models. (author)

  13. Flame surface density and burning rate in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.

    1995-10-01

    The flame surface density has been measured in hydrocarbon/air stagnation point and v-shaped premixed turbulent flames. A method is proposed to determine the flame surface density from the data obtained by laser sheet tomography. The average flame length and flame zone area as a function of the progress variable are calculated from a map of progress variable and a set of flame edges obtained from the tomographs. From these results a surface density estimate in two dimensions is determined. By this technique it is possible to avoid the difficulties which arise when using an algebraic model based on the measurement of the flame front geometry and a scalar length scale. From these results the burning rate can be obtained which compares well with estimates calculated using the fractal technique. The present method, however, is not constrained by a minimum window size as is the case for the fractal determinations.

  14. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    The work of the Principal Investigator (PI) has encompassed four topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity, as discussed in the following sections. These topics include: (1) radiation effects on premixed gas flames; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) flame propagation and extinction is cylindrical tubes; and (4) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions.

  15. The structure of particle cloud premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Berlad, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles in an oxidizing gas mixture is analyzed. This analysis is motivated by experiments conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center on the structure of flames propagating in combustible mixtures of lycopodium particles and air. Several interesting modes of flame propagation were observed in these experiments depending on the number density and the initial size of the fuel particle. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi sub u, is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model, it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. The activation energy of the chemical reaction is presumed to be large. The activation energy characterizing the kinetics of vaporization is also presumed to be large. The equations governing the structure of the flame were integrated numerically. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi sub u is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Acoustic radiation from weakly wrinkled premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lieuwen, Tim; Mohan, Sripathi; Rajaram, Rajesh; Preetham,

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of acoustic radiation from weakly wrinkled (i.e., u'/S{sub L}<1) premixed flames. Specifically, it determines the transfer function relating the spectrum of the acoustic pressure oscillations, P'({omega}), to that of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the approach flow, U'({omega}). In the weakly wrinkled limit, this transfer function is local in frequency space; i.e., velocity fluctuations at a frequency {omega} distort the flame and generate sound at the same frequency. This transfer function primarily depends upon the flame Strouhal number St (based on mean flow velocity and flame length) and the correlation length, {lambda}, of the flow fluctuations. For cases where the ratio of the correlation length and duct radius {lambda}/a>>1, the acoustic pressure and turbulent velocity power spectra are related by P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}U'({omega}) and P'({omega})-U'({omega}) for St<<1 and St>>1, respectively. For cases where {lambda}/a<<1, the transfer functions take the form P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}({lambda}/a){sup 2}U'({omega}) and P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}({lambda}/a){sup 2}({psi}-{delta}ln({lambda}/a))U'({omega}) for St<<1 and St>>1, respectively, where (PS) and {delta} are constants. The latter result demonstrates that this transfer function does not exhibit a simple power law relationship in the high frequency region of the spectra. The simultaneous dependence of this pressure-velocity transfer function upon the Strouhal number and correlation length suggests a mechanism for the experimentally observed maximum in acoustic spectra and provides some insight into the controversy in the literature over how this peak should scale with the flame Strouhal number.

  17. The structure of particle cloud premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a numerical and asymptotic description of the structure of planar laminar flames, propagating in a medium containing a uniform cloud of fuel-particles premixed with air. Attention is restricted here to systems where the fuel-particles first vaporize to form a known gaseous fuel, which is then oxidized in the gas-phase. This program is supported for the period September 14, 1991 to September 13, 1992. Some results of the study is shown in Ref. 1. The work summarized in Ref. 1 was initiated prior to September 14, 1991 and was completed on February 1992. Research performed in addition to that described in Ref. 1 in collaboration with Professor A. Linan, is summarized here.

  18. Studies of premixed laminar and turbulent flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    A two and one-half year experimental and theoretical research program on the properties of laminar and turbulent premixed gas flames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  19. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  20. Active Control for Statistically Stationary Turbulent PremixedFlame Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Grcar, J.F.; Lijewski, M.J.

    2005-08-30

    The speed of propagation of a premixed turbulent flame correlates with the intensity of the turbulence encountered by the flame. One consequence of this property is that premixed flames in both laboratory experiments and practical combustors require some type of stabilization mechanism to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. Furthermore, the stabilization introduces additional fluid mechanical complexity into the overall combustion process that can complicate the analysis of fundamental flame properties. To circumvent these difficulties we introduce a feedback control algorithm that allows us to computationally stabilize a turbulent premixed flame in a simple geometric configuration. For the simulations, we specify turbulent inflow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm on methane flames at various equivalence ratios in two dimensions. The simulation data are used to study the local variation in the speed of propagation due to flame surface curvature.

  1. Combustion Dynamics of Plasma-Enhanced Premixed and Nonpremixed Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    flame. The anchor of the nonpremixed flame can be seen at the base of the plasma plume. Both the size and luminosity of the plume increase as a...K higher than that in nonpremixed flames for the same fuel flow rates. For premixed flames, the visible flame luminosity and plasma volume increase...vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 2545–2551, Dec. 2006. [10] W. Kim, M. Godfrey Mungal, and M. A. Cappelli, “The role of in situ reforming in plasma enhanced ultra

  2. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Greenberg, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The study of field effects of buoyancy on premixed turbulent flames is directed towards the advancement of turbulent combustion theory and the development of cleaner combustion technologies. Turbulent combustion is considered the most important unsolved problem in combustion science and laboratory studies of turbulence flame processes are vital to theoretical development. Although buoyancy is dominant in laboratory flames, most combustion models are not yet capable to consider buoyancy effects. This inconsistency has impeded the validation of theories and numerical simulations with experiments. Conversely, the understanding of buoyancy effects is far too limited to help develop buoyant flame models. Our research is also relevant to combustion technology because lean premixed combustion is a proven method to reduce the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In industrial lean premixed combustion systems, their operating conditions make them susceptible to buoyancy thus affecting heat distribution, emissions, stability, flashback and blowoff. But little knowledge is available to guide combustion engineers as to how to avoid or overcome these problems. Our hypothesis is that through its influence on the mean pressure field, buoyancy has direct and indirect effects on local flame/turbulence interactions. Although buoyancy acts on the hot products in the farfield the effect is also felt in the nearfield region upstream of the flame. These changes also influence the generation and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy inside the flame brush and throughout the flowfield. Moreover, the plume of an open flame is unstable and the periodic fluctuations make additional contributions to flame front dynamics in the farfield. Therefore, processes such as flame wrinkling, flow acceleration due to heat release and flame- generated vorticity are all affected. Other global flame properties (e.g. flame stabilization limits and flame speed) may all be coupled to buoyancy. This

  3. Premixing quality and flame stability: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Heywood, J. B.; Tabaczynski, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Models for predicting flame ignition and blowout in a combustor primary zone are presented. A correlation for the blowoff velocity of premixed turbulent flames is developed using the basic quantities of turbulent flow, and the laminar flame speed. A statistical model employing a Monte Carlo calculation procedure is developed to account for nonuniformities in a combustor primary zone. An overall kinetic rate equation is used to describe the fuel oxidation process. The model is used to predict the lean ignition and blow out limits of premixed turbulent flames; the effects of mixture nonuniformity on the lean ignition limit are explored using an assumed distribution of fuel-air ratios. Data on the effects of variations in inlet temperature, reference velocity and mixture uniformity on the lean ignition and blowout limits of gaseous propane-air flames are presented.

  4. Interaction of a vortex and a premixed flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, Joel H.; Rutland, Christopher J.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of a vortex structure and a premixed flame is studied. The presence of pressure gradients in the vortex and density gradients in the flame result in a complicated interaction. This interaction has been examined when the flame and vortex are fully coupled and in two special cases where they are decoupled: a frozen flame case and a frozen vortex case. In the frozen flame case the main effect of the flame on the vortex is through the barocline torque term. This has been modeled for high Damkoehler numbers. In the frozen vortex case the main effect, at moderate Damkoehler numbers, is to convect the flame around the vortex. At low Damkoehler numbers, depending on the length scales, pockets of unburned gas can form or the flame structure can be significantly changed. The two frozen cases provide a basis for understanding the full interaction.

  5. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  6. Excitation of thermoacoustic oscillations by small premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, C.M.; Chang, Z.; Williams, P.D.

    2010-06-15

    Experiments have been carried out in which very small lean premixed flames closely representative of those formed by modern multiport domestic gas burners have been subjected to controlled acoustic perturbation. PLIF from CH has been used to visualise the flame response and the heat-release-rate fluctuations have been evaluated directly from the flame images. It is shown that small laminar flames can amplify the effects of acoustic velocity fluctuations by mechanisms that do not involve resonant heat loss to the burner and that the fluctuations in flame-front area are not adequately characterised by a Strouhal number alone. The measured transfer function is compared with the predictions of various analytical formulations and a new model of the flame oscillation is proposed which applies specifically to situations in which the design of the burner renders the flame base immobile. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of premixed H2-air cellular tubular flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carl Alan; Wendell Pitz, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The detailed flame structure of laminar premixed cellular flames in the tubular domain is simulated in 2D using a fully-implicit primitive variable finite difference formulation that includes multicomponent transport and detailed chemical kinetics. Numerical results for H2/air flames are presented and compared against spatially resolved experimental measurements of temperature and chemical species including atomic H and OH. The experimental results compare well for flame structure and cell number, despite the numerical model under-predicting the peak temperature by 200 K. Numerical experiments were performed to assess the ability for cellular tubular flames to impact experimental and numerical investigations of practical flames. The cellular flame structure is found to provide a highly sensitive geometry that is useful for validating diffusive transport modelling approximations. This capability is exemplified through the development of a simple and accurate approximation for thermal diffusion (i.e. the Soret effect) that is suitable for practical combustion codes.

  8. Characteristics of Non-Premixed Turbulent Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Yuan, Z. G.; Stocker, D. P.; Bahadori, M. Y.

    2001-01-01

    This project is concerned with the characteristics of turbulent hydrocarbon (primarily propane) gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity. A microgravity environment provides the opportunity to study the structure of turbulent diffusion flames under momentum-dominated conditions (large Froude number) at moderate Reynolds number which is a combination not achievable in normal gravity. This paper summarizes progress made since the last workshop. Primarily, the features of flame radiation from microgravity turbulent jet diffusion flames in a reduced gravity environment are described. Tests were conducted for non-premixed, nitrogen diluted propane flames burning in quiescent air in the NASA Glenn 5.18 Second Zero Gravity Facility. Measured flame radiation from wedge-shaped, axial slices of the flame are compared for microgravity and normal gravity flames. Results from numerical computations of the flame using a k-e model for the turbulence are also presented to show the effects of flame radiation on the thermal field. Flame radiation is an important quantity that is impacted by buoyancy as has been shown in previous studies by the authors and also by Urban et al. It was found that jet diffusion flames burning under microgravity conditions have significantly higher radiative loss (about five to seven times higher) compared to their normal gravity counterparts because of larger flame size in microgravity and larger convective heat loss fraction from the flame in normal gravity. These studies, however, were confined to laminar flames. For the case of turbulent flames, the flame radiation is a function of time and both the time-averaged and time-dependent components are of interest. In this paper, attention is focused primarily on the time-averaged level of the radiation but the turbulent structure of the flame is also assessed from considerations of the radiation power spectra.

  9. Accelerative propagation and explosion triggering by expanding turbulent premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Law, Chung K

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics and morphology of outwardly propagating, accelerating turbulent premixed flames and the effect of flame acceleration on explosion triggering are analyzed. Guided by recent theoretical results and substantiated by experiments, we find that an expanding flame front in an externally forced, near-isotropic turbulent environment exhibits accelerative propagation given by a well-defined power law based on the average global flame radius. In this context the limits of the power-law exponent and the effective turbulence intensity experienced by the flame are derived. The power-law exponent is found to be substantially larger than that for the hydrodynamically unstable cellular laminar flames, hence facilitating the possibility of detonation triggering in turbulent environments. For large length scales, hydrodynamic instability is expected to provide additional acceleration, thus further favoring the attainment of detonation triggering.

  10. Dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flames in mesoscale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mantzaras, John; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2008-10-15

    Direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and transport is used to study the stabilization and dynamics of lean ({phi}=0.5) premixed hydrogen/air atmospheric pressure flames in mesoscale planar channels. Channel heights of h=2, 4, and 7 mm, and inflow velocities in the range 0.3{<=}U{sub IN}{<=}1100cm/ s are investigated. Six different burning modes are identified: mild combustion, ignition/extinction, closed steady symmetric flames, open steady symmetric flames, oscillating and, finally, asymmetric flames. Chaotic behavior of cellular flame structures is observed for certain values of U{sub IN}. Stability maps delineating the regions of the different flame types are finally constructed. (author)

  11. Combustion mechanism of ultralean rotating counterflow twin premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemichi, Akane; Nishioka, Makihito

    2015-01-01

    In our previous numerical studies [Nishioka Makihito, Zhenyu Shen, and Akane Uemichi. "Ultra-lean combustion through the backflow of burned gas in rotating counterflow twin premixed flames." Combustion and Flame 158.11 (2011): 2188-2198. Uemichi Akane, and Makihito Nishioka. "Numerical study on ultra-lean rotating counterflow twin premixed flame of hydrogen-air." Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 34.1 (2013): 1135-1142]. we found that methane- and hydrogen-air rotating counterflow twin flames (RCTF) can achieve ultralean combustion when backward flow of burned gas occurs due to the centrifugal force created by rotation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of ultralean combustion in these flames by the detailed numerical analyses of the convective and diffusive transport of the main species. We found that, under ultralean conditions, the diffusive transport of fuel exceeds its backward convective transport in the flame zone, which is located on the burned-gas side of the stagnation point. In contrast, the relative magnitudes of diffusive and convective transport for oxygen are reversed compared to those for the fuel. The resulting flows for fuel and oxygen lead to what we call a 'net flux imbalance'. This net flux imbalance increases the flame temperature and concentrations of active radicals. For hydrogen-air RCTF, a very large diffusivity of hydrogen enhances the net flux imbalance, significantly increasing the flame temperature. This behaviour is intrinsic to a very lean premixed flame in which the reaction zone is located in the backflow of its own burned gas.

  12. Measurements and large eddy simulation of propagating premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Masri, A.R.; Cadwallader, B.J.; Ibrahim, S.S.

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of unsteady turbulent premixed flames igniting in an initially stagnant mixture and propagating past solid obstacles. The objective here is to study the outstanding issue of flow-flame interactions in transient premixed combustion environments. Particular emphasis is placed on the burning rate and the structure of the flame front. The experimental configuration consists of a chamber with a square cross-section filled with a combustible mixture of propane-air ignited from rest. An array of baffle plates as well as geometrical obstructions of varying shapes and blockage ratios, are placed in the path of the flame as it propagates from the ignition source to the vented end of the enclosure. A range of flame propagation conditions are studied experimentally. Measurements are presented for pressure-time traces, high-speed images of the flame front, mean velocities obtained from particle imaging velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence images of the hydroxyl radical OH. Three-dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) are also made for a case where a square obstacle and an array of baffle plates are placed in the chamber. The dynamic Germano model and a simple flamelet combustion model are used at the sub-grid scale. The effects of grid size and sub-grid filter width are also discussed. Calculations and measurements are found to be in good agreement with respect to flame structure and peak overpressure. Turbulence levels increase significantly at the leading edge of the flame as it propagates past the array of baffle plates and the obstacle. With reference to the regime diagrams for turbulent premixed combustion, it is noted that the flame continues to lie in the zones of thin reactions or corrugated flamelets regardless of the stage of propagation along the chamber. (author)

  13. The nonlinear behaviour of a ducted premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinath, Karthik; Waugh, Iain; Hemchandra, Santosh; Juniper, Matthew

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear thermoacoustic oscillations are one of the most challenging problems in premixed gas turbine engine combustors. We investigate the nonlinear thermoacoustic behaviour of a ducted premixed flame using two approaches:(i) a matrix-free continuation analysis in the time domain; and (ii) a quasi-linear flame describing function (FDF) approach in the frequency domain. Continuation methods find limit cycles numerically in the time domain and track them as the operating condition of the system changes, with no additional assumptions other than those used to form the governing equations. The FDF characterizes the flame's response to harmonic velocity fluctuations over a range of forcing frequencies and forcing amplitudes. Limit cycles can then be found using an integral criterion derived from the acoustic momentum and energy equations. The gain and phase of the FDF, combined with the limit cycles and floquet modes obtained from the continuation analysis reveal physical information about the flame-acoustic interaction. We use these approaches on a model of a ducted premixed flame, to show how the bifurcation surfaces of this thermoacoustic system can be calculated over a large parameter space, as well as how the physical mechanisms causing these bifurcations may be identified. Supported by EPSRC and Rolls Royce.

  14. Spectral Kinetic Energy Transfer Through a Premixed Flame Brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, Colin A. Z.; Poludnenko, Alexei Y.; Hamlington, Peter E.

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence-flame interactions are of fundamental importance for understanding and modeling premixed turbulent reacting flows. These interactions can result in nonlinear feedback leading to large changes in both the turbulence and flame. Recent computational studies have indicated, however, that not all scales of turbulent motion are affected equally. Small-scale motions appear to be suppressed while larger-scale motions are unaffected or even enhanced. In order to determine the scale-dependence of turbulence-flame interactions, direct numerical simulations of statistically planar, premixed flames have been performed and analyzed. Two-dimensional kinetic energy spectra, conditioned on the planar-averaged fuel mass-fraction, are measured through the flame brush and compared to both compressible and incompressible non-reacting flow spectra. Changes in the spectra with respect to fuel mass-fraction are then connected to the dynamics of the kinetic energy spectrum transport equation. Particular focus is placed on understanding triadic velocity, pressure, and dilatation interactions, including the characterization of backscatter due to heat release and compressibility. Finally, the implications of these results for modeling practical premixed combustion problems are outlined.

  15. Partially Premixed Flame (PPF) Research for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Incipient fires typically occur after the partial premixing of fuel and oxidizer. The mixing of product species into the fuel/oxidizer mixture influences flame stabilization and fire spread. Therefore, it is important to characterize the impact of different levels of fuel/oxidizer/product mixing on flame stabilization, liftoff and extinguishment under different gravity conditions. With regard to fire protection, the agent concentration required to achieve flame suppression is an important consideration. The initial stage of an unwanted fire in a microgravity environment will depend on the level of partial premixing and the local conditions such as air currents generated by the fire itself and any forced ventilation (that influence agent and product mixing into the fire). The motivation of our investigation is to characterize these impacts in a systematic and fundamental manner.

  16. Streamline segment statistics of premixed flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Wang, Lipo; Klein, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The interaction of flame and surrounding fluid motion is of central importance in the fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion. It is demonstrated here that this interaction can be represented using streamline segment analysis, which was previously applied in nonreactive turbulence. The present work focuses on the effects of the global Lewis number (Le) on streamline segment statistics in premixed flames in the thin-reaction-zones regime. A direct numerical simulation database of freely propagating thin-reaction-zones regime flames with Le ranging from 0.34 to 1.2 is used to demonstrate that Le has significant influences on the characteristic features of the streamline segment, such as the curve length, the difference in the velocity magnitude at two extremal points, and their correlations with the local flame curvature. The strengthenings of the dilatation rate, flame normal acceleration, and flame-generated turbulence with decreasing Le are principally responsible for these observed effects. An expression for the probability density function (pdf) of the streamline segment length, originally developed for nonreacting turbulent flows, captures the qualitative behavior for turbulent premixed flames in the thin-reaction-zones regime for a wide range of Le values. The joint pdfs between the streamline length and the difference in the velocity magnitude at two extremal points for both unweighted and density-weighted velocity vectors are analyzed and compared. Detailed explanations are provided for the observed differences in the topological behaviors of the streamline segment in response to the global Le.

  17. Extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel

    SciTech Connect

    Alliche, Mounir; Haldenwang, Pierre; Chikh, Salah

    2010-06-15

    A local refinement method is used to numerically predict the propagation and extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel considering a thermodiffusive model. A local refinement method is employed because of the numerous length scales that characterize this phenomenon. The time integration is self adaptive and the solution is based on a multigrid method using a zonal mesh refinement in the flame reaction zone. The objective is to determine the conditions of extinction which are characterized by the flame structure and its properties. We are interested in the following properties: the curvature of the flame, its maximum temperature, its speed of propagation and the distance separating the flame from the wall. We analyze the influence of heat losses at the wall through the thermal conductivity of the wall and the nature of the fuel characterized by the Lewis number of the mixture. This investigation allows us to identify three propagation regimes according to heat losses at the wall and to the channel radius. The results show that there is an intermediate value of the radius for which the flame can bend and propagate provided that its curvature does not exceed a certain limit value. Indeed, small values of the radius will choke the flame and extinguish it. The extinction occurs if the flame curvature becomes too small. Furthermore, this study allows us to predict the limiting values of the heat loss coefficient at extinction as well as the critical value of the channel radius above which the premixed flame may propagate without extinction. A dead zone of length 2-4 times the flame thickness appears between the flame and the wall for a Lewis number (Le) between 0.8 and 2. For small values of Le, local extinctions are observed. (author)

  18. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  19. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulopoulos, N.; Kerl, J.; Sponfeldner, T.; Beyrau, F.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area.

  20. Vorticity isotropy in high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt, Brock; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The isotropy of the smallest turbulent scales is investigated in premixed turbulent combustion by analyzing the vorticity vector in a series of high Karlovitz number premixed flame direct numerical simulations. It is found that increasing the Karlovitz number and the ratio of the integral length scale to the flame thickness both reduce the level of anisotropy. By analyzing the vorticity transport equation, it is determined that the vortex stretching term is primarily responsible for the development of any anisotropy. The local dynamics of the vortex stretching term and vorticity resemble that of homogeneous isotropic turbulence to a greater extent at higher Karlovitz numbers. This results in small scale isotropy at sufficiently high Karlovitz numbers and supports a fundamental similarity of the behavior of the smallest turbulent scales throughout the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. At lower Karlovitz numbers, the vortex stretching term and the vorticity alignment in the strain-rate tensor eigenframe are altered by the flame. The integral length scale has minimal impact on these local dynamics but promotes the effects of the flame to be equal in all directions. The resulting isotropy in vorticity does not reflect a fundamental similarity between the smallest turbulent scales in the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  1. Premixed Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, J. F.; Sichel, M.; Sinibaldi, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    A unique experiment makes it now possible to obtain detailed images in microgravity showing how an individual vortex causes the wrinkling, stretching, area increase, and eventual extinction of a premixed flame. The repeatable, controllable flame-vortex interaction represents the fundamental building block of turbulent combustion concepts. New information is provided that is central to turbulent flame models, including measurements of all components of flame stretch, strain, and vorticity. Simultaneous measurements of all components of these quantities are not possible in fully turbulent flames but are possible in the present axisymmetric, repeatable experiment. Advanced PIV diagnostics have been used at one-g and have been developed for microgravity. Numerical simulations of the interaction are being performed at NRL. It is found that microgravity conditions greatly augment the flame wrinkling process. Flame area and the amplitude of wrinkles at zero-g are typically twice that observed at one-g. It is inferred that turbulent flames in microgravity could have larger surface area and thus propagate significantly faster than those in one-g, which is a potential safety hazard. A new mechanism is identified by PIV images that shows how buoyancy retards flame wrinkling at one-g; buoyancy produces new vorticity (due to baroclinic torques) that oppose the wrinkling and the stretch imposed by the original vortex. Microgravity conditions remove this stabilizing mechanism and the amplitude of flame wrinkling typically is found to double. Microgravity also increases the flame speed by a factor of 1.8 to 2.2. Both methane and propane-air flames were studied at the NASA Lewis drop tower. Results indicate that it is important to add buoyancy to models of turbulent flames to simulate the correct flame wrinkling, stretch and burning velocity.

  2. Flame temperature and location measurements of sooting premixed Bunsen flames by rainbow schlieren deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2005-06-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) provides a simple and nonintrusive way of determining the temperature field of axisymmetric flames. This technique is specially suited for the detection of large temperature gradients, such as those near the flame location. We explore the feasibility and accuracy of using RSD to obtain the flame location and thermal structure of premixed Bunsen flames for varying fuel types, equivalence ratios, and soot loadings. Uncertainty analysis is also carried out to provide various ways to reduce RSD experimental error. The RSD technique is demonstrated to give useful data even for moderately and heavily sooting flames.

  3. Response mechanisms of attached premixed flames subjected to harmonic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreekrishna

    The persistent thrust for a cleaner, greener environment has prompted air pollution regulations to be enforced with increased stringency by environmental protection bodies all over the world. This has prompted gas turbine manufacturers to move from nonpremixed combustion to lean, premixed combustion. These lean premixed combustors operate quite fuel-lean compared to the stochiometric, in order to minimize CO and NOx productions, and are very susceptible to oscillations in any of the upstream flow variables. These oscillations cause the heat release rate of the flame to oscillate, which can engage one or more acoustic modes of the combustor or gas turbine components, and under certain conditions, lead to limit cycle oscillations. This phenomenon, called thermoacoustic instabilities, is characterized by very high pressure oscillations and increased heat fluxes at system walls, and can cause significant problems in the routine operability of these combustors, not to mention the occasional hardware damages that could occur, all of which cumulatively cost several millions of dollars. In a bid towards understanding this flow-flame interaction, this research works studies the heat release response of premixed flames to oscillations in reactant equivalence ratio, reactant velocity and pressure, under conditions where the flame preheat zone is convectively compact to these disturbances, using the G-equation. The heat release response is quantified by means of the flame transfer function and together with combustor acoustics, forms a critical component of the analytical models that can predict combustor dynamics. To this end, low excitation amplitude (linear) and high excitation amplitude (nonlinear) responses of the flame are studied in this work. The linear heat release response of lean, premixed flames are seen to be dominated by responses to velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations at low frequencies, and to pressure fluctuations at high frequencies which are in the

  4. Measurements of turbulent premixed flame dynamics using cinema stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2008-06-01

    A new experimental method is described that provides high-speed movies of turbulent premixed flame wrinkling dynamics and the associated vorticity fields. This method employs cinema stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and has been applied to a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. Three-component velocity fields were measured with high temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.9 ms and 140 μm, respectively. The flame-front location was determined using a new multi-step method based on particle image gradients, which is described. Comparisons are made between flame fronts found with this method and simultaneous CH-PLIF images. These show that the flame contour determined corresponds well to the true location of maximum gas density gradient. Time histories of typical eddy-flame interactions are reported and several important phenomena identified. Outwardly rotating eddy pairs wrinkle the flame and are attenuated at they pass through the flamelet. Significant flame-generated vorticity is produced downstream of the wrinkled tip. Similar wrinkles are caused by larger groups of outwardly rotating eddies. Inwardly rotating pairs cause significant convex wrinkles that grow as the flame propagates. These wrinkles encounter other eddies that alter their behavior. The effects of the hydrodynamic and diffusive instabilities are observed and found to be significant contributors to the formation and propagation of wrinkles.

  5. The propagation of premixed flames in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe; Metzener, Philippe

    1997-04-01

    A nonlinear evolution equation that describes the propagation of a premixed flame in a closed tube has been derived from the general conservation equations. What distinguishes it from other similar equations is a memory term whose origin is in the vorticity production at the flame front. The two important parameters in this equation are the tube's aspect ratio and the Markstein parameter. A linear stability analysis indicates that when the Markstein parameter [alpha] is above a critical value [alpha]c the planar flame is the stable equilibrium solution. For [alpha] below [alpha]c the planar flame is no longer stable and there is a band of growing modes. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear equation confirm this conclusion. Starting with random initial conditions the results indicate that, after a short transient, a at flame develops when [alpha]>[alpha]c and it remains flat until it reaches the end of the tube. When [alpha]<[alpha]c, on the other hand, stable curved flames may develop down the tube. Depending on the initial conditions the flame assumes either a cellular structure, characterized by a finite number of cells convex towards the unburned gas, or a tulip shape characterized by a sharp indentation at the centre of the tube pointing toward the burned gases. In particular, if the initial conditions are chosen so as to simulate the elongated finger-like flame that evolves from an ignition source, a tulip flame evolves downstream. In accord with experimental observations the tulip shape forms only after the flame has travelled a certain distance down the tube, it does not form in short tubes and its formation depends on the mixture composition. While the initial deformation of the flame front is a direct result of the hydrodynamic instability, the actual formation of the tulip flame results from the vortical motion created in the burned gas which is a consequence of the vorticity produced at the flame front.

  6. Jet flow and premixed jet flame control by plasma swirler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Jiang, Xi; Zhao, Yujun; Liu, Cunxi; Chen, Qi; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-01

    A swirler based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is designed and its effectiveness in both jet flow and premixed jet flame control is demonstrated. In contrast to traditional spanwise-oriented actuators, plasma actuators are placed along the axial direction of the injector to induce a circumferential velocity to the main flow and create a swirl flow without any insertion or moving part. In the DBD plasma swirl injector, the discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. Flame visualization is obtained by cameras while velocity profiles are obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the new design.

  7. Mass discrimination effects in MBMS study of rich premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Vovelle, C.; Doute, C.; Delfau, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    Sampling by formation of a molecular beam in mixtures containing both light and heavy species can be affected by mass discrimination effects. This situation is faced in rich premixed flames where H{sub 2} and H atoms are present in high concentration in mixture with heavier combustion products. This paper describes the results of a specific study carried out to derive a procedure that takes into account these effects and improves the accuracy of H{sub 2} and H measurements in flames. A three stage Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) apparatus especially designed for the experimental determination of the structure of low pressure premixed flames has been used to study the effect of temperature (T) and mean molar mass (M) on the signals measured for species in mixtures of known composition. Variations of T and M where aimed at reproducing the evolution observed in flames when the sampling probe is moved from unburned, (low T, high M) to burned gases (high T, low M). However, as temperature variations were limited to the range 300-800K, the pressure was also varied from 13 down to 0.8 kPa to create sample density conditions equivalent to those prevailing in post flame gases. Most measurements have been performed with H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/Ar/CO{sub 2} mixtures while variations of the mean molar mass were achieved with binary H{sub 2}/Ar mixtures.

  8. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  9. Periodic and Chaotic Modes in Premixed Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hamdi, Mohamed Abbes

    1991-06-01

    In this thesis, we report the discoveries of many periodic and chaotic modes of laminar premixed flames on porous plug burners. This report is the first confirmation of predictions of a number of recent theoretical studies on the dynamics of premixed flames. The experimental innovations and techniques presented in section 3.6 are at the heart of the discoveries of these dynamical modes. In our experiments, a flame front is stabilized on a porous plug burner enclosed within a pyrex chamber. By varying the total flow rate, the stoichiometry of the combustible mixture, and the chamber pressure, we discovered many periodic and chaotic modes. We show that different fuels and/or oxidizers as well as the symmetries of the system can affect the dynamics of the flame front. Experimental evidence is presented that shows that laminar premixed flames exhibit low-dimensional, deterministic chaos. The largest Liapunov exponent and the pointwise dimension calculations are used to confirm that chaos exists in certain regions of parameter space. We also describe a power spectrum technique that can be used to identify deterministic dynamics in real time. With the help of a spectrum analyzer, an experimentalist can map the dynamics (simple and complex) of the system under investigation in a relatively short time. As far as we know, this is the first time that nonlinear dynamics techniques are used to analyze experimental data from combustion. All the nonperiodic modes that we have discovered exhibit low-dimensional deterministic chaos and we believe that this result is a general one for propagating fronts. The implication of our work is that such nonperiodic states can be described by a tractable set of ordinary differential equations.

  10. High frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narra, Venkateswarlu

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of high frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames. The objective of this work was to characterize the scattered incoherent acoustic field and determine its parametric dependence on frequency, flame brush thickness, incident and measurement angles, mean velocity and flame speed. The experimental facility consists of a slot burner with a flat flame sheet that is approximately 15 cm wide and 12 cm tall. The baseline cold flow characteristics and flame sheet statistics were extensively characterized. Studies were performed over a wide range of frequencies (1-24 kHz) in order to characterize the role of the incident acoustic wave length. The spectrum of the scattered acoustic field showed distinct incoherent spectral sidebands on either side of the driving frequency. The scattered incoherent field was characterized in terms of the incoherent field strength and spectral bandwidth and related to the theoretical predictions. The role of the flame front wrinkling scale, i.e., flame brush thickness, was also studied. Flame brush thickness was varied independent of the mean velocity and flame speed by using a variable turbulence generator. Results are reported for five flame brush thickness cases, ranging from 1.2 mm to 5.2 mm. Some dependence of scattered field characteristics on flame brush thickness was observed, but the magnitude of the effect was much smaller than expected from theoretical considerations. The spatial dependence of the scattered field was investigated by measuring the scattered field at four measurement angles and exciting the flame at four incident angles. Theory predicts that these variations influence the spatial scale of the acoustic wave normal to the flame, a result confirmed by the measurements. Measurements were performed for multiple combinations of mean velocities and flame speeds. The scattered field was observed to depend strongly on the flame speed. Further analysis

  11. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-09-15

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between

  12. Premixed burner experiments: Geometry, mixing, and flame structure issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.; Gupta, M.

    1995-10-01

    This research program is exploring techniques for improved fuel-air mixing, with the aim of achieving combustor operations up to stoichiometric conditions with minimal NO x and maximum efficiency. The experimental studies involve the use of a double-concentric natural gas burner that is operable in either premixed or non-premixed modes, and the system allows systematic variation of equivalence ratio, swirl strength shear length region and flow momentum in each annulus. Flame structures formed with various combinations of swirl strengths, flow throughput and equivalence ratios in premixed mode show the significant impact of swirl flow distribution on flame structure emanating from the mixedness. This impact on flame structure is expected to have a pronounced effect on the heat release rate and the emission of NO{sub x}. Thus, swirler design and configuration remains a key factor in the quest for completely optimized combustion. Parallel numerical studies of the flow and combustion phenomena were carried out, using the RSM and thek-{epsilon} turbulence models. These results have not only indicated the strengths and limitations of CFD in performance and pollutants emission predictions, but have provided guidelines on the size and strength of the recirculation produced and the spatio-temporal structure of the combustion flowfield. The first stage of parametric studies on geometry and operational parameters at Morgan State University have culminated in the completion of a one-dimensional flow code that is integrated with a solid, virtual model of the existing premixed burner. This coupling will provide the unique opportunity to study the impact of geometry on the flowfield and vice-versa, with particular emphasis on concurrent design optimization.

  13. Flame Oscillations In Non-Premixed Systems Diffusion Flames and Edge-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    Diffusive-thermal instabilities are well known features of premixed and diffusion flames. In one of its form the instability appears as spontaneous oscillations. In premixed systems oscillations are predicted to occur when the effective Lewis number, defined as the ratio of the thermal diffusivity of the mixture to the mass diffusivity of the deficient component, is sufficiently larger than one. Oscillations would therefore occur in mixtures that are deficient in the less mobile reactant, namely in lean hydrocarbon-air or rich hydrogen-air mixtures. The theoretical predictions summarized above are in general agreement with experimental results; see for example [5] where a jet configuration was used and experiments were conducted for various inert-diluted propane and methane flames burning in inert-diluted oxygen. Nitrogen, argon and SF6 were used as inert in order to produce conditions of substantially different Lewis numbers and mixture strength. In accord with the predicted trend, it was found that oscillations arise at near extinction conditions, that for oscillations to occur it suffices that one of the two Lewis numbers be sufficiently large, and that oscillations are more likely to be observed when is relatively large.

  14. The ``turbulent flame speed'' of wrinkled premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe; Creta, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    The determination of the turbulent flame speed is a central problem in combustion theory. Early studies by Damköhler and Shelkin resorted to geometrical and scaling arguments to deduce expressions for the turbulent flame speed and its dependence on turbulence intensity. A more rigorous approach was undertaken by Clavin and Williams who, based on a multi-scale asymptotic approach valid for weakly wrinkled flames, derived an expression that apart from a numerical factor recaptures the early result by Damköhler and Shelkin. The common denominator of the phenomenological and the more rigorous propositions is an increase in turbulent flame speed due solely to an increase in flame surface area. Various suggestions based on physical and/or experimental arguments have been also proposed, incorporating other functional parameters into the flame speed relation. The objective of this work is to extend the asymptotic results to a fully nonlinear regime that permits to systematically extract scaling laws for the turbulent flame speed that depend on turbulence intensity and scale, mixture composition and thermal expansion, flow conditions including effects of curvature and strain, and flame instabilities. To this end, we use a hybrid Navier-Stokes/front-capturing methodology, which consistently with the asymptotic model, treats the flame as a surface of density discontinuity separating burned and unburned gases. The present results are limited to positive Markstein length, corresponding to lean hydrocarbon-air or rich hydrogen-air mixtures, and to wrinkled flames of vanishingly small thickness, smaller that the smallest fluid scales. For simplicity we have considered here two-dimensional turbulence, which although lacks some features of real three-dimensional turbulence, is not detrimental when using the hydrodynamic model under consideration, because the turbulent flame retains its laminar structure and its interaction with turbulence is primarily advective/kinematic in

  15. Premixed flame response to unsteady strain-rate and curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.; Wyckoff, P.S.

    1996-05-01

    The interaction of a premixed stoichiometric methane-air flame with a counter-rotating vortex-pair is studied using a skeletal C{sub 1} chemical description of the reaction process. The focus is on the modification to flame structure and dynamics due to unsteady strain-rate and curvature. The detailed description of flame structure and dynamics in response to unsteady flow is necessary to establish relevant extinction criteria in unsteady multi-dimensional flow, which, based on recent experimental evidence, may be significantly different from those of steady one-dimensional counterflow stagnation flames. Present results suggest that the increasing unsteady tangential strain-rate causes modification of flame structure that leads to reduced reaction rates of key chain-branching reactions which are active on the products side of the flame. This causes a reduction in the concentrations of active radicals, such as H, OH, and O, which are necessary for the breakdown of hydrocarbons on the reactants side of the flame.

  16. A ring stabilizer for lean premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.R.; Kostiuk, L.W.; Cheng, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    In previous experiments on conical flame behavior in microgravity, which were conducted in drop-towers and in airplanes, the use of a pilot flame was not an option. To permit combustion of stable lean premixed conical flames without a pilot, a ring stabilizer was developed. Although similar types of bluff-body stabilization have been used in the past, the ring stabilizer is somewhat unique. It is designed to fit inside the burner exit port and has demonstrated to be highly effective in stabilizing flames over a very wide range of conditions (including ultra-lean flames at high flow-rates) without adversely affecting flame emissions. Unlike a simple rod stabilizer or a stagnation flame system, the benefit of having the stabilizer conform to the burner port is that there is very little leakage of the unburned fuel. The purpose of this brief communication is to offer this simple and highly useful device to the combustion research community. Presented are highlights of a parametric study that measured the stabilization limits and pollutant emissions of several different rings, and demonstrated their potential for use in practical systems.

  17. Direct simulations of premixed turbulent flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1993-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet regime is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For nonunity Lewis numbers, Le is not equal to 1, the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence with constant density, single-step Arrhenius kinetics chemistry. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. At the local level, curvature effects dominated changes to the flame structure while strain effects were insignificant. A strong Lewis-number-dependent correlation was found between surface curvature and the local flame speed. The correlation was positive for Le less than 1 and negative for Le greater than 1. At the global level, strain-related effects were more significant than curvature effects. The turbulent flame speed changed significantly with Lewis number, increasing as Le decreased. This was found to be due to strain effects that have a nonzero mean over the flame surface, rather than to curvature effects that have a nearly zero mean. The mean product temperature was also found to vary with Lewis number, being higher for Le greater than 1 and lower for Le less than 1.

  18. Finite amplitude wave interaction with premixed laminar flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Mohamad; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-11-01

    The physics underlying combustion instability is an active area of research because of its detrimental impact in many combustion devices, such as turbines, jet engines, and liquid rocket engines. Pressure waves, ranging from acoustic waves to strong shocks, are potential sources of these disturbances. Literature on flame-disturbance interactions are primarily focused on either acoustics or strong shock wave interactions, with little information about the wide spectrum of behaviors that may exist between these two extremes. For example, the interaction between a flame and a finite amplitude compression wave is not well characterized. This phenomenon is difficult to study numerically due to the wide range of scales that need to be captured, requiring powerful and efficient numerical techniques. In this work, the interaction of a perturbed laminar premixed flame with a finite amplitude compression wave is investigated using the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM). This method optimally solves the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations while capturing the essential scales. The results show that depending on the amplitude and duration of a finite amplitude disturbance, the interaction between these waves and premixed flames can produce a broad range of responses.

  19. Temperature response of turbulent premixed flames to inlet velocity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoola, B.; Hartung, G.; Armitage, C. A.; Hult, J.; Cant, R. S.; Kaminski, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Flame-turbulence interactions are at the heart of modern combustion research as they have a major influence on efficiency, stability of operation and pollutant emissions. The problem remains a formidable challenge, and predictive modelling and the implementation of active control measures both rely on further fundamental measurements. Model burners with simple geometry offer an opportunity for the isolation and detailed study of phenomena that take place in real-world combustors, in an environment conducive to the application of advanced laser diagnostic tools. Lean premixed combustion conditions are currently of greatest interest since these are able to provide low NO x and improved increased fuel economy, which in turn leads to lower CO2 emissions. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the response of a bluff-body-stabilised flame to periodic inlet fluctuations under lean premixed turbulent conditions. Inlet velocity fluctuations were imposed acoustically using loudspeakers. Spatially resolved heat release rate imaging measurements, using simultaneous planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH and CH2O, have been performed to explore the periodic heat release rate response to various acoustic forcing amplitudes and frequencies. For the first time we use this method to evaluate flame transfer functions and we compare these results with chemiluminescence measurements. Qualitative thermometry based on two-line OH PLIF was also used to compare the periodic temperature distribution around the flame with the periodic fluctuation of local heat release rate during acoustic forcing cycles.

  20. Preflame zone structure and main features of fuel conversion in atmospheric pressure premixed laminar hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ksandopulo, G.I.

    1995-08-25

    This report describes the structure study of the premixed hydrocarbon-oxidizer Bunsen flames burning at the atmospheric pressure and also the ones with some inhibitors added. Studies were performed on hexane, propane, methane, acetylene, and hexene flames.

  1. Premixed flame propagation in combustible particle cloud mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Yang, B.

    1993-01-01

    The structures of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles, in an oxidizing gas mixtures is analyzed. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process, can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  2. Premixed-Gas Flame Propagation in Hele-Shaw Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharif, J.; Abid, M.; Ronney, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that buoyancy and thermal expansion affect the propagation ra and shapes of premixed gas flames. The understanding of such effects is complicated by the large density ratio between the reactants and products, which induces a baroclinic production of vorticity due to misalignment of density and pressure gradients at the front, which in turn leads to a complicated multi-dimensional flame/flow interaction. The Hele-Shaw cell, i.e., the region between closely-spaced flat parallel plates, is probably the simplest system in which multi-dimensional convection is presents consequently, the behavior of fluids in this system has been studied extensively (Homsy, 1987). Probably the most important characteristic of Hele-Shaw flows is that when the Reynolds number based on gap width is sufficiently small, the Navier-Stokes equations averaged over the gap reduce to a linear relation, namely a Laplace equation for pressure (Darcy's law). In this work, flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells is studied to obtain a better understanding of buoyancy and thermal expansion effects on premixed flames. This work is also relevant to the study of unburned hydrocarbon emissions produced by internal combustion engines since these emissions are largely a result of the partial burning or complete flame quenching in the narrow, annular gap called the "crevice volume" between the piston and cylinder walls (Heywood, 1988). A better understanding of how flames propagate in these volumes through experiments using Hele-Shaw cells could lead to identification of means to reduce these emissions.

  3. A high-pressure premixed flat-flame burner for chemical process studies. [of pollutant formation in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A premixed flat-flame burner was designed and tested with methane-air mixtures at pressures from 1.1 to 20 atm and equivalence ratios from 0.7 to 1.1. Reactant velocity in the burner mixing chamber was used to characterize the range of stable flames at each pressure-equivalence-ratio condition. Color photographs of the flames were used to determine flame zone thickness and flame height. The results show that this burner can be used for chemical process studies in premixed high pressure methane-air flames up to 20 atm.

  4. Flame-Generated Vorticity Production in Premixed Flame-Vortex Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we use detailed time-dependent, multi-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the relative importance of the processes leading to FGV in flame-vortex interactions in normal gravity and microgravity and to determine if the production of vorticity in flames in gravity is the same as that in zero gravity except for the contribution of the gravity term. The numerical simulations will be performed using the computational model developed at NRL, FLAME3D. FLAME3D is a parallel, multi-dimensional (either two- or three-dimensional) flame model based on FLIC2D, which has been used extensively to study the structure and stability of premixed hydrogen and methane flames.

  5. Velocity and Reactive Scalar Dissipation Spectra in Turbulent Premixed Flames

    DOE PAGES

    Kolla, Hemanth; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Chen, Jacqueline H.; ...

    2016-06-09

    Dissipation spectra of velocity and reactive scalars—temperature and fuel mass fraction—in turbulent premixed flames are studied using direct numerical simulation data of a temporally evolving lean hydrogen-air premixed planar jet (PTJ) flame and a statistically stationary planar lean methane-air (SP) flame. Furthermore, the equivalence ratio in both cases was 0.7, the pressure 1 atm while the unburned temperature was 700 K for the hydrogen-air PTJ case and 300 K for methane-air SP case, that resulted in data sets with a density ratio of 3 and 5, respectively. The turbulent Reynolds numbers for the cases ranged from 200 to 428.4, themore » Damköhler number from 3.1 to 29.1, and the Karlovitz number from 0.1 to 4.5. The dissipation spectra collapse when normalized by the respective Favre-averaged dissipation rates. But, the normalized dissipation spectra in all the cases deviate noticeably from those predicted by classical scaling laws for constant-density turbulent flows and bear a clear influence of the chemical reactions on the dissipative range of the energy cascade.« less

  6. Velocity and Reactive Scalar Dissipation Spectra in Turbulent Premixed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, Hemanth; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Swaminathan, N.

    2016-06-09

    Dissipation spectra of velocity and reactive scalars—temperature and fuel mass fraction—in turbulent premixed flames are studied using direct numerical simulation data of a temporally evolving lean hydrogen-air premixed planar jet (PTJ) flame and a statistically stationary planar lean methane-air (SP) flame. Furthermore, the equivalence ratio in both cases was 0.7, the pressure 1 atm while the unburned temperature was 700 K for the hydrogen-air PTJ case and 300 K for methane-air SP case, that resulted in data sets with a density ratio of 3 and 5, respectively. The turbulent Reynolds numbers for the cases ranged from 200 to 428.4, the Damköhler number from 3.1 to 29.1, and the Karlovitz number from 0.1 to 4.5. The dissipation spectra collapse when normalized by the respective Favre-averaged dissipation rates. But, the normalized dissipation spectra in all the cases deviate noticeably from those predicted by classical scaling laws for constant-density turbulent flows and bear a clear influence of the chemical reactions on the dissipative range of the energy cascade.

  7. Lean premixed flames for low NO{sub x} combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, P.; Tseng, L.; Bryyjak, J.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objectives of the research at Purdue are to: obtain a reduced mechanism description of high pressure NO formation chemistry using experiments and calculations for laminar lean premixed methane air flames, develop a statistical model of turbulence NO chemistry interactions using a Bunsen type jet flame, and utilize the high pressure chemistry and turbulence models in a commercial design code, then evaluate its predictions using data from an analog gas turbine combustor. Work to date has resulted in the following achievements: spatially resolved measurements of NO in high-pressure high-temperature flat flames, plus evaluation of the influence of flame radiation on the measured temperature profile; measurements of temperature and velocity PDFs for a turbulent methane/air flame were obtained for the first time, under operating conditions which allow their study in the distributed regimes, and the increase in EINO{sub x} with equivalence ratio predicted using a chemical kinetics model; and simulation of non-reacting combustor flow fields from ambient to elevated pressure and temperature conditions and comparison of those results with experimental velocity profiles.

  8. Numerical simulation of premixed flame propagation in a closed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Ishii, Katsuya; Kuwahara, Kunio

    1996-08-01

    Premixed flame propagation of methane-air mixture in a closed tube is estimated through a direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations coupled with chemical reaction. In order to deal with a combusting flow, an extended version of the MAC method, which can be applied to a compressible flow with strong density variation, is employed as a numerical method. The chemical reaction is assumed to be an irreversible single step reaction between methane and oxygen. The chemical species are CH 4, O 2, N 2, CO 2, and H 2O. In this simulation, we reproduce a formation of a tulip flame in a closed tube during the flame propagation. Furthermore we estimate not only a two-dimensional shape but also a three-dimensional structure of the flame and flame-induced vortices, which cannot be observed in the experiments. The agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data is satisfactory, and we compare the phenomenon near the side wall with the one in the corner of the tube.

  9. Fundamental mechanisms in premixed flame propagation via vortex-flame interactions: Numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, Thierry

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to assess numerically the ability of single-step and two-step chemical models to describe the main features encountered during the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame. In the two-step mechanism, the reaction kinetics are represented by a first chain branching reaction A + X yields 2X and a second chain termination reaction X + X yields P. This paper presents the fundamental mechanisms occurring during vortex-flame interactions and the relative impact of the major parameters encountered in turbulent premixed flames and suspected of playing a role in quenching mechanism: (1) Influence of stretch is investigated by analyzing the contribution of curvature and tangential strain on the local structure of the flame. The effect of Lewis number on the flame response to a strained field is analyzed. (2) Radiative heat losses which are suspected to be partially or totally responsible for quenching are also investigated. (3) The effect of the diffusion of the radicals is studied using a two-step mechanism in which an intermediate species is present. The parameters of the two-step mechanism are entirely determined from physical arguments. (4) Precise quantitative comparisons between the DNS and the experimental results of Samaniego et al are performed. These comparisons concern the evolution of the minimum heat release rate found along the flame front during the interaction and the distribution of the heat release rate along the flame front.

  10. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiswall, James T.

    Improvements in deriving energy from hydrocarbon fuels will have a large impact on our efforts to transition to sustainable and renewable energy resources. The hypothesis for this work is that catalysis can extend the useful operating conditions for hydrocarbon oxidation and combustion, improve device efficiencies, and reduce pollutants. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames are examined experimentally, using a stagnation-flow reactor to identify the important physical and chemical mechanisms over a range of flow catalyst, and temperature conditions. The propane oxidation studies consider five catalyst materials: platinum, palladium, SnO2, 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt (by mass), and quartz. The volume fractions of CO2, O2, C 3H8, CO, NO and the electric power required to control the catalyst temperature quantify the activity of each catalyst for the equivalence ratios of φ = 0.67, 1.00, and 1.50, and over the catalyst temperature range 23-800°C. Quartz is used as a baseline and confirmed to be non-reactive at all conditions. 100% SnO2 has minimal reactivity. Platinum, palladium, and 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt show similar trends and have the highest catalytic activity at φ = 1.50. Palladium and 90% SnO 2 -- 10% Pt show an increasing catalyst-activation temperature (Tsa) for decreasing φ, and platinum shows an approximately constant catalyst-activation temperature for decreasing φ (Tsa = 310°C). Of these the 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt catalyst shows the lowest Tsa, occurring for the φ = 1.5 mixture (Tsa = 250°C). The studies of premixed propane-air flames consider platinum and quartz stagnation surfaces for fuel-mixture velocities from 0.6-1.6 m/s. Five flame structures are observed: cool core envelope, cone, envelope, disk and ring flames. The lean-extinction limit, disk-to-ring flame transition φ, and the disk-flame to stagnation-plane distance are reported. Platinum inhibits the ring flame structure. The lean-extinction limit and disk-flame to stagnation

  11. Formation and role of cool flames in plasma-assisted premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Mungal, M. G.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    The structure of a plasma-assisted laminar premixed flame is studied numerically. The initial radical yield generated by a nonequilibrium discharge serves as the boundary condition for a one-dimensional flame code predicting the formation of a cool flame which pilots the premixed methane/air combustion. The ignition of the surrounding unactivated methane-air mixture by this cool flame is modeled as an opposed diffusion flame. Our findings indicate that the nonequilibrium discharge is an in situ reformer of the fuel for the production of the cool flame, producing primarily H2 and CO, thus, facilitating the burning of the lean methane-air mixture.

  12. Radiation Effects on the Thermodiffusive Instability of Premixed Flames on a Cylindrical Porous Flame Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Minglong; Yang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    A linear analysis method was used to investigate the mechanics of radiation heat loss and mass transfer in the porous wall of premixed annular flames and their effect on thermodiffusive instability. The dispersion relation between the disturbance wave growth rate and wavenumber was calculated numerically. Results showed that radiation heat loss elevated the annular flame slightly away from the porous wall. In the annular flame with small Lewis numbers, radiation heat loss changed the thermodiffusive instability from a pulsating to a cellular state, while for the large Lewis numbers, only the pulsating instability was represented. Increasing radiation heat loss and the radius of the porous wall enhanced the instability of the annular flames. Heat losses decreased with the continued increase in thickness of the porous wall and the decrease in porosity. Annular flames with long-wave mode along the angular direction were more unstable than the shortwave mode.

  13. Time-dependent Computational Studies of Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Oran, Elaine S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program. The primary focus of this research is on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. Recently more advanced wall boundary conditions such as isothermal and no-slip have been added to the model. This enables the simulation of flames propagating in more practical systems than before. We have used the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of heat losses and buoyancy forces on the structure and stability of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the interaction between the various processes leading to flame instabilities and extinguishment, and to study the dynamics of cell formation and splitting. Our studies have been able to bring out the differences between upward- and downward-propagating flames and predict the zero-gravity behavior of these flames. The simulations have also highlighted the dominant role of wall heat losses in the case of downward-propagating flames. The simulations have been able to qualitatively predict the

  14. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  15. Multiple mapping conditioning for flames with partial premixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenburg, A.; Cleary, M.J.

    2008-10-15

    Fully closed multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) is used to model partially premixed flames in homogeneous, isotropic decaying turbulence where the partial premixing is caused by local extinction and reignition phenomena. Two reference variables that represent mixing and reaction progress, such as mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, are used to emulate turbulent scalar fluctuations. Local extinction is achieved by a priori coupling between scalar dissipation and temperature fluctuations via a correlation function that is based on the conditionally averaged sensible enthalpy at stoichiometric composition. The proposed model provides closures for the joint PDF of mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, for the conditional variance equation of a reactive scalar, and for the doubly conditioned dissipation terms. Model results are compared with DNS in three flame cases with varying levels of local extinction, up to global extinction. The joint PDF predicted by MMC is in fair agreement with DNS. It constitutes, however, a clear improvement over conventional models using preassumed distribution functions for the PDFs. The doubly conditioned dissipation terms are modeled well and the results for all major chemical species are in good agreement with DNS. Predictions for intermediate species are also satisfactory. (author)

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in non-premixed reacting flames.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2015-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at a perturbed interface between fluids of different densities when a light fluid pushes a heavier fluid. The mixing driven by RTI affects several physical phenomena, such as Inertial Confinement Fusion, Supernovae detonation, centrifugal combustors and liquid rocket engines. The RTI in such flows is often coupled with chemical/nuclear reactions that may form complex density stratifications in the form of flames or ablative layers. We investigate such a non-premixed fuel-air interface subject to a constant acceleration and developing under the influence of chemical reactions using high-resolution, Navier-Stokes simulations. The H2 fuel is diluted with N2 to vary the density difference across the interface in thermal equilibrium (at 1000K). The intervening layer between fuel and air is subject to exothermic combustion reactions to form a flame. Following combustion, initially unstable fuel-air interfaces at an Atwood number (At) <0.5, transform into stable (fuel-flame) and unstable (flame-air) interfaces. We report on interfaces (At = 0.2 and 0.6) with single wavelength, sinusoidal perturbations and a broadband spectrum of multimode perturbations.

  17. On flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases

    SciTech Connect

    Eisazadeh-Far, Kian; Metghalchi, Hameed; Parsinejad, Farzan; Keck, James C.

    2010-12-15

    Flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been carried out at constant pressure and temperature in a constant volume vessel located in a high speed shadowgraph system. The formation and propagation of the hot plasma kernel has been simulated for inert gas mixtures using a thermodynamic model. The effects of various parameters including the discharge energy, radiation losses, initial temperature and initial volume of the plasma have been studied in detail. The experiments have been extended to flame kernel formation and propagation of methane/air mixtures. The effect of energy terms including spark energy, chemical energy and energy losses on flame kernel formation and propagation have been investigated. The inputs for this model are the initial conditions of the mixture and experimental data for flame radii. It is concluded that these are the most important parameters effecting plasma kernel growth. The results of laminar burning speeds have been compared with previously published results and are in good agreement. (author)

  18. Direct numerical simulations of a high Karlovitz number laboratory premixed jet flame – an analysis of flame stretch and flame thickening [Direct numerical simulations of a high Ka laboratory premixed jet flame - an analysis of flame stretch and flame thickening

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; ...

    2017-02-23

    This article reports an analysis of the first detailed chemistry direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a high Karlovitz number laboratory premixed flame. The DNS results are first compared with those from laser-based diagnostics with good agreement. The subsequent analysis focuses on a detailed investigation of the flame area, its local thickness and their rates of change in isosurface following reference frames, quantities that are intimately connected. The net flame stretch is demonstrated to be a small residual of large competing terms: the positive tangential strain term and the negative curvature stretch term. The latter is found to be driven bymore » flame speed–curvature correlations and dominated in net by low probability highly curved regions. Flame thickening is demonstrated to be substantial on average, while local regions of flame thinning are also observed. The rate of change of the flame thickness (as measured by the scalar gradient magnitude) is demonstrated, analogously to flame stretch, to be a competition between straining tending to increase gradients and flame speed variations in the normal direction tending to decrease them. The flame stretch and flame thickness analyses are connected by the observation that high positive tangential strain rate regions generally correspond with low curvature regions; these regions tend to be positively stretched in net and are relatively thinner compared with other regions. Finally, high curvature magnitude regions (both positive and negative) generally correspond with lower tangential strain; these regions are in net negatively stretched and thickened substantially.« less

  19. Spatially resolved heat release rate measurements in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.; Frank, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Heat release rate is a fundamental property of great importance for the theoretical and experimental elucidation of unsteady flame behaviors such as combustion noise, combustion instabilities, and pulsed combustion. Investigations of such thermoacoustic interactions require a reliable indicator of heat release rate capable of resolving spatial structures in turbulent flames. Traditionally, heat release rate has been estimated via OH or CH radical chemiluminescence; however, chemiluminescence suffers from being a line-of-sight technique with limited capability for resolving small-scale structures. In this paper, we report spatially resolved two-dimensional measurements of a quantity closely related to heat release rate. The diagnostic technique uses simultaneous OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the pixel-by-pixel product of the OH and CH{sub 2}O PLIF signals has previously been shown to correlate well with local heat release rates. Results from this diagnostic technique, which we refer to as heat release rate imaging (HR imaging), are compared with traditional OH chemiluminescence measurements in several flames. Studies were performed in lean premixed ethylene flames stabilized between opposed jets and with a bluff body. Correlations between bulk strain rates and local heat release rates were obtained and the effects of curvature on heat release rate were investigated. The results show that the heat release rate tends to increase with increasing negative curvature for the flames investigated for which Lewis numbers are greater than unity. This correlation becomes more pronounced as the flame gets closer to global extinction.

  20. Partially-Premixed Flames in Internal Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Pitz; Michael C. Drake; Todd D. Fansler; Volker Sick

    2003-11-05

    This was a joint university-industry research program funded by the Partnerships for the Academic-Industrial Research Program (PAIR). The research examined partially premixed flames in laboratory and internal combustion engine environments at Vanderbilt University, University of Michigan, and General Motors Research and Development. At Vanderbilt University, stretched and curved ''tubular'' premixed flames were measured in a unique optically accessible burner with laser-induced spontaneous Raman scattering. Comparisons of optically measured temperature and species concentration profiles to detailed transport, complex chemistry simulations showed good correspondence at low-stretch conditions in the tubular flame. However, there were significant discrepancies at high-stretch conditions near flame extinction. The tubular flame predictions were found to be very sensitive to the specific hydrogen-air chemical kinetic mechanism and four different mechanisms were compared. In addition, the thermo-diffusive properties of the deficient reactant, H2, strongly affected the tubular flame structure. The poor prediction near extinction is most likely due to deficiencies in the chemical kinetic mechanisms near extinction. At the University of Michigan, an optical direct-injected engine was built up for laser-induced fluorescence imaging experiments on mixing and combustion under stratified charge combustion conditions with the assistance of General Motors. Laser attenuation effects were characterized both experimentally and numerically to improve laser imaging during the initial phase of the gasoline-air mixture development. Toluene was added to the isooctane fuel to image the fuel-air equivalence ratio in an optically accessible direct-injected gasoline engine. Temperature effects on the toluene imaging of fuel-air equivalence ratio were characterized. For the first time, oxygen imaging was accomplished in an internal combustion engine by combination of two fluorescence trackers

  1. Measurements and modeling of nitric oxide formation in counterflow, premixed, methane/oxygen/nitrogen flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Duane Douglas

    1999-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N 2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH 4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  2. Spatially resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in laminar premixed methane-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhaohua; Dong, Meirong; Li, Shishi; Lu, Jidong

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was evaluated for the analysis of the structure of laminar premixed methane-air flames. Firstly, breakdown threshold pulse energy and plasma energy in different areas of the flame were measured simultaneously, and an approximate linear relation between them was detected. Secondly, a new approach was proposed to qualitatively characterize the flame temperature distributions based on the plasma energy distributions. Finally, combination of the spatial analysis of the spectrum intensity, plasma energy and equivalence ratio, the laminar premixed flames structure was investigated deeply, including the distribution of the flame temperature, the width and distribution of different flame region (e.g. premixed combustion regions, high temperature regions.),as well as the location of the flame front.

  3. Assessment of turbulence-chemistry interaction models in the computation of turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, M. T.; Pozorski, J.

    2016-10-01

    The present work reports on the assessment of different turbulence-chemistry interaction closures for the modelling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. Two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations have been carried out based on three different laboratory flames. The methane fueled, piloted jet flame Sandia D, the simple jet syngas flame and the so-called Delft Jet-in-Hot Coflow flame are studied. All the flames can be characterised as non-premixed but differ by some features which are taken into account through appropriate modelling approach.

  4. Influence of premixed combustion flame stabilizer geometry on flame stability and emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dabbagh, N.A.; Andrews, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    Premixed combustion systems for gas turbines offer the possibility of low-pollution, high-combustion efficiency and good temperature distribution. They form a basis by which other well-mixed combustion systems may be assessed. The ultimate objective of this work is the development of nonpremixed rapid mixing combustion systems. Different geometries of baffle flame stabilizers are tested to study the influence of recirculation zone size and number of recirculation zones on flame stability, combustion efficiency and NO/sub x/. The results show that the flame stabilizer geometry has a major influence on combustion efficiency and flame stability but a lesser influence on NO/sub x/. Optimum equivalence ratios are identified for good combustion efficiency and low NO/sub x/ at simulated low and high-power engine conditions. 33 refs.

  5. The Behavior of Methane-Air Partially Premixed Flames Under Normal- and Zero-G Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Choi, Chun Wai; Hegde, Uday

    2001-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) represent a class of hybrid flames containing multiple reaction zones. These flames are established when less than stoichiometric quantity of oxidizer is molecularly mixed with the fuel stream before entering the reaction zone where additional oxidizer is available for complete combustion. This mode of combustion can be used to exploit the advantages of both nonpremixed and premixed flames regarding operational safety, lower pollutant emissions and flame stabilization. A double flame containing a fuel-rich premixed reaction zone, which is anchored by a nonpremixed reaction zone, is one example of a partially premixed flame. A triple flame is also a PPF that contains three reaction zones, namely, a fuel-rich premixed zone, a fuel-lean premixed zone, and a nonpremixed reaction zone. Herein we focus on two aspects of our investigation, one involving the development of optical diagnostics that can be used on a microgravity rig, which has been recently fabricated, and the other on the numerically predicted differences between normal- and zero-gravity PPFs. Both the measurements and simulations examine the detailed structure of methane-air PPFs stabilized on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner.

  6. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W.; King, Galen B.

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate

  7. Soot Formation in Purely-Curved Premixed Flames and Laminar Flame Speeds of Soot-Forming Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Thomas; Wang, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The research addressed here is a collaborative project between University of Delaware and Case Western Reserve University. There are two basic and related scientific objectives. First, we wish to demonstrate the suitability of spherical/cylindrical, laminar, premixed flames in the fundamental study of the chemical and physical processes of soot formation. Our reasoning is that the flame standoff distance in spherical/cylindrical flames under microgravity can be substantially larger than that in a flat burner-stabilized flame. Therefore the spherical/cylindrical flame is expected to give better spatial resolution to probe the soot inception and growth chemistry than flat flames. Second, we wish to examine the feasibility of determining the laminar flame speed of soot forming flames. Our basic assumption is that under the adiabatic condition (in the absence of conductive heat loss), the amount and dynamics of soot formed in the flame is unique for a given fuel/air mixture. The laminar flame speed can be rigorously defined as long as the radiative heat loss can be determined. This laminar flame speed characterizes the flame soot formation and dynamics in addition to the heat release rate. The research involves two integral parts: experiments of spherical and cylindrical sooting flames in microgravity (CWRU), and the computational counterpart (UD) that aims to simulate sooting laminar flames, and the sooting limits of near adiabatic flames. The computations work is described in this report, followed by a summary of the accomplishments achieved to date. Details of the microgra+ experiments will be discussed in a separate, final report prepared by the co-PI, Professor C-J. Sung of CWRU. Here only a brief discussion of these experiments will be given.

  8. PREMIXED FLAME PROPAGATION AND MORPHOLOGY IN A CONSTANT VOLUME COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, A; Wichman, IS

    2014-06-04

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of premixed flame propagation in a constant volume rectangular channel with an aspect ratio of six (6) that serves as a combustion chamber. Ignition is followed by an accelerating cusped finger-shaped flame-front. A deceleration of the flame is followed by the formation of a "tulip"-shaped flame-front. Eventually, the flame is extinguished when it collides with the cold wall on the opposite channel end. Numerical computations are performed to understand the influence of pressure waves, instabilities, and flow field effects causing changes to the flame structure and morphology. The transient 2D numerical simulation results are compared with transient 3D experimental results. Issues discussed are the appearance of oscillatory motions along the flame front and the influences of gravity on flame structure. An explanation is provided for the formation of the "tulip" shape of the premixed flame front.

  9. RANS/PDF and LES/FDF for prediction of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Server Levent

    Probability density function (PDF) and filtered density function (FDF) methodologies are developed and implemented, respectively, for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed flames. RANS predictions are made of a lean premixed bluff-body flame via the joint velocity-scalar-frequency PDF model. LES of a premixed Bunsen-burner flame is conducted via the scalar FDF methodology. Both simulations employ finite rate kinetics via a reduced methane chemistry mechanism to account for combustion. Prediction results are compared with experimental data, and are shown to capture some of the intricate physics of turbulent premixed combustion. Keywords. large eddy simulation, filtered density function, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, probability density function, turbulent reacting flows, lean premixed combustion.

  10. The dynamics of turbulent premixed flames: Mechanisms and models for turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam M.

    The use of turbulent premixed combustion in engines has been garnering renewed interest due to its potential to reduce NOx emissions. However there are many aspects of turbulence-flame interaction that must be better understood before such flames can be accurately modeled. The focus of this dissertation is to develop an improved understanding for the manner in which turbulence interacts with a premixed flame in the 'thin flamelet regime'. To do so, two new diagnostics were developed and employed in a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. These diagnostics, Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry and Orthogonal-Plane Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry, provided temporally resolved velocity and flame surface measurements in two- and three-dimensions with rates of up to 3 kHz and spatial resolutions as low as 280 mum. Using these measurements, the mechanisms with which turbulence generates flame surface area were studied. It was found that the previous concept that flame stretch is characterized by counter-rotating vortex pairs does not accurately describe real turbulence-flame interactions. Analysis of the experimental data showed that the straining of the flame surface is determined by coherent structures of fluid dynamic strain rate, while the wrinkling is caused by vortical structures. Furthermore, it was shown that the canonical vortex pair configuration is not an accurate reflection of the real interaction geometry. Hence, models developed based on this geometry are unlikely to be accurate. Previous models for the strain rate, curvature stretch rate, and turbulent burning velocity were evaluated. It was found that the previous models did not accurately predict the measured data for a variety of reasons: the assumed interaction geometries did not encompass enough possibilities to describe the possible effects of real turbulence, the turbulence was not properly characterized, and the transport of flame surface area was not always considered. New models

  11. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Spherical Flows and Geometry of Premixed Flames near the Stagnation Point of Axisymmetric Viscous Counterflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.

    1999-01-01

    Counterflow premixed flames play a significant role in the modeling of laminar flames. This is in part motivated by the fact that stretched premixed flames simulate local flamelet dynamics within turbulent premixed flames. In the present study, the modified form of the Navier-Stokes equation for reactive fields introduced earlier is employed to investigate the hydrodynamics of spherical flows embedded within counterflows. The geometry of premixed flames near the stagnation point is also determined. The predictions are in favorable agreement with the experimental observations and prior numerical studies.

  13. On the Structure and Stabilization Mechanisms of Planar and Cylindrical Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, James A.; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    1993-01-01

    The configurational simplicity of the stationary one-dimensional flames renders them intrinsically attractive for fundamental flame structure studies. The possibility and fidelity of studies of such flames on earth, however, have been severely restricted by the unidirectional nature of the gravity vector. To demonstrate these complications, let us first consider the premixed flame. Here a stationary, one-dimensional flame can be established by using the flat-flame burner. We next consider nonpremixed flames. First it may be noted that in an unbounded gravity-free environment, the only stationary one-dimensional flame is the spherical flame. Indeed, this is a major motivation for the study of microgravity droplet combustion, in which the gas-phase processes can be approximated to be quasi-steady because of the significant disparity between the gas and liquid densities for subcritical combustion. In view of the above considerations, an experimental and theoretical program on cylindrical and spherical premixed and nonpremixed flames in microgravity has been initiated. For premixed flames, we are interested in: (1) assessing the heat loss versus flow divergence as the dominant stabilization mechanism; (2) determining the laminar flame speed by using this configuration; and (3) understanding the development of flamefront instability and the effects of the flame curvature on the burning intensity.

  14. A model of particle nucleation in premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, Andrea; Sirignano, Mariano; Kent, John

    2010-11-15

    A detailed model of particle inception is proposed to delve into the physical structure and chemistry of combustion-formed particles. A sectional method is used, from a previously developed kinetic mechanism of particle formation with a double discretization of the particle phase in terms of C and H atom number. The present model also distinguishes between different particle structures based on their state of aggregation; single high molecular mass molecules, cluster of molecules and aggregates of clusters. The model predicts the mass of particles, hydrogen content and internal structure. It represents a first approach in following the chemical evolution and internal structure of the particles formed in flames, coupled with the main pyrolysis and oxidation of the fuel. The model is tested in atmospheric premixed flat flames of ethylene and the effect of fuel equivalence ratio on particle morphology is analyzed. Molecular weight growth of aromatic compounds and the inception of particles are predicted. The morphology of the particles and the number of molecules in the clusters at particle inception are also indicated. (author)

  15. The flame anchoring mechanism and associated flow structure in bluff-body stabilized lean premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Dan; Shanbhogue, Santosh; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We present numerical analysis of a lean premixed flame anchoring on a heat conducting bluff-body. Different mixtures of CH4/H2/air are analyzed in order to systematically vary the burning velocity, adiabatic flame temperature and extinction strain rate. The study was motivated by our experimental measurements in a step combustor which showed that both the recirculation zone length and stability map under acoustically coupled conditions for different fuels and thermodynamic conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate. The model fully resolves unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and without artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. The model includes a low Mach number operator-split projection algorithm, coupled with a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and an immersed boundary method for the solid body. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with the flame extinction strain rate, consistent with the experimental evidence. It is found that in the vicinity of the bluff body the flame is highly stretched and its leading edge location is controlled by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain. Moreover, the flame surface location relative to the shear layer influences the vorticity thus impacting the velocity field and the recirculation zone. The study sheds light on the experimentally observed collapse of the combustor dynamics using the reactants extinction strain rate.

  16. A theoretical and experimental study of preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions of laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Chae

    Recent work shows that preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions of laminar premixed flames are sufficiently robust to affect the stability of practical strongly-turbulent flames. In addition, past measurements of laminar burning velocities should be re-assessed because there generally was no attempt to control flame stretch. Finally, the sensitivity of laminar premixed flames to stretch (represented by the Markstein number) should be studied to better understand and model the properties of laminar premixed flames. Motivated by these considerations, an experimental and computational study of preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions for laminar premixed flames, for both alkane/alcohol-fuel-vapor-fueled flames (as practical fuels) and hydrogen-fueled flames (considering diluent-variation effects) was carried out during the present investigation. Considering outwardly-propagating spherical laminar premixed flames, laminar burning velocities of fuel-vapor/oxygen/nitrogen flames and hydrogen/oxygen/diluent (nitrogen, argon or helium) flames were measured for various values of stretch, fuel-equivalence ratios (0.6--4.5) and pressures (0.3--3 atm). The measurements were reduced to find fundamental unstretched laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers. The measurements were also used to evaluate corresponding numerical simulations of the experimentally-observed flames, based on contemporary detailed H2/O2 reaction mechanisms. Both measured and predicted ratios of unstretched to stretched laminar burning velocities varied linearly with flame stretch (represented by the Karlovitz number), yielding a constant Markstein number for a particular reactant mixture. The present flames were very sensitive to flame stretch (i.e., they had large Markstein numbers with significant ratios of unstretched to stretched laminar burning velocities) for levels of flame stretch well below quenching conditions. Increasing flame temperatures tended to reduce flame sensitivity to

  17. Turbulence-flame interactions in DNS of a laboratory high Karlovitz premixed turbulent jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a laboratory premixed turbulent jet flame was performed to study turbulence-flame interactions. The turbulent flame features moderate Reynolds number and high Karlovitz number (Ka). The orientations of the flame normal vector n, the vorticity vector ω and the principal strain rate eigenvectors ei are examined. The in-plane and out-of-plane angles are introduced to quantify the vector orientations, which also measure the flame geometry and the vortical structures. A general observation is that the distributions of these angles are more isotropic downstream as the flame and the flow become more developed. The out-of-plane angle of the flame normal vector, β, is a key parameter in developing the correction of 2D measurements to estimate the corresponding 3D quantities. The DNS results show that the correction factor is unity at the inlet and approaches its theoretical value of an isotropic distribution downstream. The alignment characteristics of n, ω and ei, which reflect the interactions of turbulence and flame, are also studied. Similar to a passive scalar gradient in non-reacting flows, the flame normal has a tendency to align with the most compressive strain rate, e3, in the flame, indicating that turbulence contributes to the production of scalar gradient. The vorticity dynamics are examined via the vortex stretching term, which was found to be the predominant source of vorticity generation balanced by dissipation, in the enstrophy transport equation. It is found that although the vorticity preferentially aligns with the intermediate strain rate, e2, the contribution of the most extensive strain rate, e1, to vortex stretching is comparable with that of the intermediate strain rate, e2. This is because the eigenvalue of the most extensive strain rate, λ1, is always large and positive. It is confirmed that the vorticity vector is preferentially positioned along the flame tangential plane, contributing

  18. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  19. Quantification of transient stretch effects on kernel-vortex interactions in premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, S.K.; Danby, S.J.; Roberts, W.L.; Drake, M.C.; Fansler, T.D.

    2008-07-15

    Relative flame speeds of time-dependent highly curved premixed methane-air flames (spark-ignited flame kernels) interacting with a laminar vortex have been quantified using high-speed chemiluminescence imaging, particle image velocimetry, and piezoelectric pressure measurements. The goals of this study are to improve fundamental understanding of transient stretch effects on highly curved premixed flames, to provide practical insight into the turbulent growth of spark-ignited flame kernels in internal combustion (IC) engines burning light hydrocarbon fuels, and to provide data for IC engine ignition and combustion model development. Lean and rich CH{sub 4}-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} flames were tested ({phi}=0.64, 0.90, and 1.13, with nitrogen dilution to equalize the flame speeds (S{sub b}) in the absence of vortex interaction). Transient stretch rates were varied using three different vortex strengths, and the size of the flame kernel at the start of the vortex interaction controlled by time delay between ignition and vortex generation. Vortex interactions with small ({proportional_to}5 mm radius) flame kernels were found to increase burning rates for lean ({phi}=0.64) flame kernels substantially. Burning rates for rich ({phi}=1.13) flames were decreased, with total flame kernel extinction occurring in extreme cases. These small flame kernel-vortex interactions are dominated by transient stretch effects and thermodiffusive stability, in agreement with premixed flame theory. However, vortex interactions with larger methane-air flame kernels ({proportional_to}30 mm radius) led to slight flame speed enhancements for both lean and rich flame kernels, with the flame-vortex process dominated by increased flamefront area generated by vortex-induced flame wrinkling. (author)

  20. Analysis of Turbulent Scales of Motion in Premixed Flames Using Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, Peter; Whitman, Samuel; Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Recently, multiscale turbulence-flame interactions in premixed reacting flows have been examined using both physical space and spectral approaches. However, there remains relatively little understanding of how turbulent scales of motion vary through the internal structure of the flame itself (i.e., through premixed flamelets). Such an analysis is made difficult by the inhomogeneity, small scale, and spatial locality of many premixed flames, particularly at high Damköhler and low Karlovitz numbers. Conditional structure functions provide a possible solution to this analysis challenge, and in this talk we present results from the calculation of structure functions using data from highly-resolved direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent premixed flames. The high resolution of the DNS allows structure functions to be calculated normally and tangentially to the local flame surface, revealing the specific effects of the flame on turbulent scales of motion near the scale of the local flame width. Moreover, the conditional nature of the analysis allows the effects of different flame regions (e.g., the preheat and reaction zones) on turbulence to be isolated. The implications of these results for the theory and modeling of turbulent flame physics are outlined.

  1. Extinction and near-extinction instability of non-premixed tubular flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shengteng; Pitz, Robert W.; Yu, Wang

    2009-01-15

    Tubular non-premixed flames are formed by an opposed tubular burner, a new tool to study the effects of curvature on extinction and flame instability of non-premixed flames. Extinction of the opposed tubular flames generated by burning diluted H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} or C{sub 3}H{sub 8} with air is investigated for both concave and convex curvature. To examine the effects of curvature on extinction, the critical fuel dilution ratios at extinction are measured at various stretch rates, initial mixture strengths and flame curvature for fuels diluted in N{sub 2}, He, Ar or CO{sub 2}. In addition, the onset conditions of the cellular instability are mapped as a function of stretch rates, initial mixture strengths, and flame curvature. For fuel mixtures with Lewis numbers much less than unity, such as H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, concave flame curvature towards the fuel suppresses cellular instabilities. (author)

  2. Correlation of flame speed with stretch in turbulent premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Im, H.G.

    1998-03-01

    Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional unsteady premixed methane/air flames are performed to determine the correlation of flame speed with stretch over a wide range of curvatures and strain rates generated by intense two-dimensional turbulence. Lean and stoichiometric premixtures are considered with a detailed C{sub 1}-mechanism for methane oxidation. The computed correlation shows the existence of two distinct stable branches. It further shows that exceedingly large negative values of stretch can be obtained solely through curvature effects which give rise to an overall nonlinear correlation of the flame speed with stretch. Over a narrower stretch range, {minus}1 {le} Ka {le} 1, which includes 90% of the sample, the correlation is approximately linear, and hence, the asymptotic theory for stretch is practically applicable. Overall, one-third of the sample has negative stretch. In this linear range, the Markstein number associated with the positive branch is determined and is consistent with values obtained from comparable steady counterflow computations. In addition to this conventional positive branch, a negative branch is identified. This negative branch occurs when a flame cusp, with a center of curvature in the burnt gases, is subjected to intense compressive strain, resulting in a negative displacement speed. Negative flame speeds are also encountered for extensive tangential strain rates exceeding a Karlovitz number of unity, a value consistent with steady counterflow computations.

  3. Surface properties of turbulent premixed propane/air flames at various Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.W.; North, G.L.; Santavicca, D.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Surface properties of turbulent premixed flames including the wrinkled flame perimeter, fraction of the flame pocket perimeter, flame curvature, and orientation distributions have been measured for propane-air flames at Lewis numbers ranging from 0.98 to 1.86 and u[prime]/S[sub L] = 1.42-5.71. The wrinkled flame perimeter is found to be greater for the thermodiffusively unstable Lewis number (Le < 1) by up to 30% in comparison to the most stable condition (Le = 1.86) tested, while the fraction of the flame pocket perimeter shows a similar tendency to be greater for Le < 1. The flame curvature probability density functions are nearly symmetric with respect to the zero mean at all Lewis numbers throughout the range of u[prime]/S[sub L] tested, and show a much stronger dependence on the turbulence condition than on the Lewis number. Similarly, the flame orientation distributions show a trend from anisotropy toward a more uniform distribution with increasing u[prime]/S[sub L] at a similar rate for all Lewis numbers. Thus, for turbulent premixed propane/air flames for a practical range of Lewis number from 0.98 to 1.86, the effect of Lewis number is primarily to affect the flame structures and thereby flame surface areas and flame pocket areas, while the flame curvature and orientation statistics are essentially determined by the turbulence properties.

  4. Lean premixed flames for low NO{sub x} combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, P.; Tseng, L.; Bryjak, J.

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines are being used throughout the world to generate electricity. Due to increasing fuel costs and environmental concerns, gas turbines must meet stringent performance requirements, demonstrating high thermal efficiencies and low pollutant emissions. In order for U.S. manufactured gas turbines to stay competitive, their NO{sub x} levels must be below 10 ppm and their thermal efficiencies should approach 60%. Current technology is being stretched to achieve these goals. The twin goals of high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions require extending the operating range of current gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires operation at higher pressures and temperatures. Lower NO{sub x} emissions requires lower flame temperatures. Lower flame temperatures can be achieved through partially to fully pre-mixed combustion. However, increased performance and lower emissions result in a set of competing goals. In order to achieve a successful compromise between high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions, advanced design tools must be developed. One key design tool is a computationally efficient, high pressure, turbulent flow, combustion model capable of predicting pollutant formation in an actual gas turbine. Its development is the goal of this program. Achieving this goal requires completion of three tasks. The first task is to develop a reduced chemical kinetics model describing N{sub O}x formation in natural gas-air systems. The second task is to develop a computationally efficient model that describes turbulence-chemistry interactions. The third task is to incorporate the reduced chemical kinetics and turbulence-chemistry interaction models into a commercially available flow solver and compare its predictions with experimental data obtained under carefully controlled conditions so that the accuracy of model predictions can be evaluated.

  5. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation Through Non-Uniform Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Ross, Howard D.; Marchese, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed gases occurs in several common combustion situations. As summarized in a previous conference paper, non-uniform premixed gas combustion has received scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames. It is the goal of this research to further our knowledge of layered combustion, in which a fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread, in particular by focusing on the role that gravity plays. Gravity can affect flame propagation in at least three ways: through a hydrostatic pressure gradient, by altering the initial distribution of fuel vapor, and through buoyantly induced flows once ignition has occurred. An understanding of the phenomena involved is important to fire safety, especially aboard spacecraft since no microgravity data exist. The data obtained will also be useful to verify theoretical models of this problem, which are easier to implement if buoyancy is neglected.

  6. Recent Advances in Understanding of Thermal Expansion Effects in Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelnikov, Vladimir A.; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-01-01

    When a premixed flame propagates in a turbulent flow, not only does turbulence affect the burning rate (e.g., by wrinkling the flame and increasing its surface area), but also the heat release in the flame perturbs the pressure field, and these pressure perturbations affect the turbulent flow and scalar transport. For instance, the latter effects manifest themselves in the so-called countergradient turbulent scalar flux, which has been documented in various flames and has challenged the combustion community for approximately 35 years. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made in investigating (a) the influence of thermal expansion in a premixed flame on the turbulent flow and turbulent scalar transport within the flame brush, as well as (b) the feedback influence of countergradient scalar transport on the turbulent burning rate. The present article reviews recent developments in this field and outlines issues to be solved in future research.

  7. An investigation of diamond film deposition in a premixed oxyacetylene flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.; Paul, P. H.

    1989-09-01

    Polycrystalline diamond film synthesis has been demonstrated using a wide variety of enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. The method of choice depends on the end application of the deposited film or coating. Diamond film has been deposited in a single-nozzle pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flame. Results of runs of varying duration suggest that diamond is deposited via the transport of hydrocarbon fragments produced at the secondary flame front. Planar laser induced photodissociation fluorescence suggests that this region is rich in C2H species. Emission studies also suggest that the post primary flame zone presents a source of C2 radicals which may account for the observed graphite and diamond-like carbon deposited on the substrate exposed to this region of the flame. The results on the pre-mixed flame suggest that it would be possible and more convenient to attempt large area deposition using a multi-nozzle diffusion flame.

  8. Development and Validation of a Thickened Flame Modeling Approach for Large Eddy Simulation of Premixed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Strakey, Peter A.; Eggenspieler, Gilles

    2010-04-07

    The development of a dynamic thickened flame (TF) turbulence-chemistry interaction model is presented based on a novel approach to determine the subfilter flame wrinkling efficiency. The burner is based on an enclosed scaled-down version of the low swirl injector developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A perfectly premixed lean methane-air flame was studied, as well as the cold-flow characteristics of the combustor.

  9. How ''flat'' is the rich premixed flame produced by your McKenna burner?

    SciTech Connect

    Migliorini, F.; De Iuliis, S.; Cignoli, F.; Zizak, G.

    2008-05-15

    McKenna burners are widely used in the combustion community for producing ''flat'' premixed flames. These flames are considered as standards for the development and calibration of optical techniques. Rich premixed flames produced by McKenna burners are frequently investigated in order to understand soot formation processes both by optical and by sampling techniques. Measurements are normally performed along the axis of the flames, with a uniform distribution of temperature and species concentration assumed in the radial direction. In this work it is shown that the soot radial profiles of rich premixed ethylene-air flames produced by a McKenna burner with a stainless steel porous plug may be far from being ''flat.'' Soot is mainly distributed in an annular region and nonsoot fluorescing species are present in the core of the flames. This surprising result was verified under several working conditions. Furthermore, flames cannot be considered axial-symmetric but present a skewed soot distribution. Another McKenna burner with a bronze porous disk was used to produce flames of the same equivalence ratio and flows. These flames show a completely different soot radial profile, closer to the claimed flat distribution. These results cast doubts about the conclusions drawn in several studies on soot formation performed with a stainless steel McKenna burner. (author)

  10. Field Effects of Buoyancy on a Premixed Turbulent Flame Studied by Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    Typical laboratory flames for the scientific investigation of flame/turbulence interactions are prone to buoyancy effects. Buoyancy acts on these open flame systems and provides upstream feedbacks that control the global flame properties as well as local turbulence/flame interactions. Consequently the flame structures, stabilization limits, and turbulent reaction rates are directly or indirectly coupled with buoyancy. The objective of this study is to characterize the differences between premixed turbulent flames pointing upwards (1g), pointing downwards (-1g), and in microgravity (mg). The configuration is an inverted conical flame stabilized by a small cone-shaped bluff body that we call CLEAN Flames (Cone-Stabilized Lean Flames). We use two laser diagnostics to capture the velocity and scalar fields. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measures the mean and root mean square velocities and planar imaging by the flame fronts method outlines the flame wrinkle topology. The results were obtained under typical conditions of small domestic heating systems such as water heaters, ovens, and furnaces. Significant differences between the 1g and -1g flames point to the need for including buoyancy contributions in theoretical and numerical calculations. In Earth gravity, there is a complex coupling of buoyancy with the turbulent flow and heat release in the flame. An investigation of buoyancy-free flames in microgravity will provide the key to discern gravity contributions. Data obtained in microgravity flames will provide the benchmark for interpreting and analyzing 1g and -1g flame results.

  11. Numerical study of transient evolution of lifted jet flames: partially premixed flame propagation and influence of physical dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Ruan, Shaohong; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a spark-ignited turbulent methane/air jet flame evolving from ignition to stabilisation are conducted for different jet velocities. A partially premixed combustion model is used involving a correlated joint probability density function and both premixed and non-premixed combustion mode contributions. The 3D simulation results for the temporal evolution of the flame's leading edge are compared with previous two-dimensional (2D) results and experimental data. The comparison shows that the final stabilised flame lift-off height is well predicted by both 2D and 3D computations. However, the transient evolution of the flame's leading edge computed from 3D simulation agrees reasonably well with experiment, whereas evident discrepancies were found in the previous 2D study. This difference suggests that the third physical dimension plays an important role during the flame transient evolution process. The flame brush's leading edge displacement speed resulting from reaction, normal and tangential diffusion processes are studied at different typical stages after ignition in order to understand the effect of the third physical dimension further. Substantial differences are found for the reaction and normal diffusion components between 2D and 3D simulations especially in the initial propagation stage. The evolution of reaction progress variable scalar gradients and its interaction with the flow and mixing field in the 3D physical space have an important effect on the flame's leading edge propagation.

  12. Subfilter Scale Combustion Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence- chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The mod- elling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  13. Subfilter scale combustion modelling for large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence-chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The modelling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  14. Effects of Buoyancy on Laminar and Turbulent Premixed V-Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.; Bedat, Benoit

    1997-01-01

    Turbulent combustion occurs naturally in almost all combustion systems and involves complex dynamic coupling of chemical and fluid mechanical processes. It is considered as one of the most challenging combustion research problems today. Though buoyancy has little effect on power generating systems operating under high pressures (e.g., IC engines and turbines), flames in atmospheric burners and the operation of small to medium furnaces and boilers are profoundly affected by buoyancy. Changes in burner orientation impacts on their blow-off, flash-back and extinction limits, and their range of operation, burning rate, heat transfer, and emissions. Theoretically, buoyancy is often neglected in turbulent combustion models. Yet the modeling results are routinely compared with experiments of open laboratory flames that are obviously affected by buoyancy. This inconsistency is an obstacle to reconciling experiments and theories. Consequently, a fundamental understanding of the coupling between turbulent flames and buoyancy is significant to both turbulent combustion science and applications. The overall effect of buoyancy relates to the dynamic interaction between the flame and its surrounding, i.e., the so-called elliptical problem. The overall flame shape, its flowfield, stability, and mean and local burning rates are dictated by both upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In steady propagating premixed flames, buoyancy affects the products region downstream of the flame zone. These effects are manifested upstream through the mean and fluctuating pressure fields to influence flame stretch and flame wrinkling. Intuitively, the effects buoyancy should diminish with increasing flow momentum. This is the justification for excluding buoyancy in turbulent combustion models that treats high Reynolds number flows. The objectives of our experimental research program is to elucidate flame-buoyancy coupling processes in laminar and turbulent premixed flames, and to

  15. Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

  16. On the Interaction of a Premixed Flame with an Acoustic Disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to analyze the effect of acoustic disturbances on a premixed flame and determine their role in the onset of combustion instabilities. Computations for the one-dimensional, unsteady combustion of a lean premixed methane-air mixture are performed. An acoustic excitation is introduced in the chamber and interacts with the flame front. Our results indicate that as the amplitude of the acoustic excitation is increased, the flame front position fluctuates rapidly. This phenomenon is even more intense when the frequency of the acoustic disturbance matches the fundamental frequency of the chamber. Our results suggest that the interactions between the flame and the acoustic excitation may result in flame extinguishment. In addition various passive control devices are tested and we found that the Helmholtz resonator with rounded inlet corners is the most efficient.

  17. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  18. 3D DNS of Turbulent Premixed Flame with over 50 Species and 300 Elementary Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Masayasu; Yenerdag, Basmil; Naka, Yoshitsugu; Nada, Yuzuru; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of methane-air premixed planar flame propagating in homogenous isotropic turbulence is conducted to investigate local flame structure in thin reaction zones. Detailed kinetic mechanism, GRI-Mech 3.0 which includes 53 species and 325 elementary reactions, is used to represent methane-air reaction, and temperature dependences of transport and thermal properties are considered. For a better understanding of the local flame structure in thin reaction zones regime, distributions of mass fractions of major species, heat release rate, temperature and turbulent structures are investigated. Characteristic flame structures, such as radical fingering and multi-layered-like flame structures, are observed. The most expected maximum heat release rate in flame elements is lower than that of laminar flame with same mixture. To clarify mechanism of the decrease in local heat release rate, effects of strain rates tangential to flame front on local heat release rate are investigated.

  19. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  20. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  1. Visualization of the heat release zone of highly turbulent premixed jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Liang; Tan, Jianguo; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-10-01

    Visualization of the heat release zone (HRZ) of highly turbulent flames is significantly important to understand the interaction between turbulence and chemical reactions, which is the foundation to design and optimize engines. Simultaneous measurements of OH and CH2O using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were performed to characterize the HRZ. A well-designed piloted premixed jet burner was employed to generate four turbulent premixed CH4/air jet flames, with different jet Reynolds numbers (Rejet) ranging from 4900 to 39200. The HRZ was visualized by both the gradient of OH and the pixel-by-pixel product of OH and CH2O. It is shown that turbulence has an increasing effect on the spatial structure of the flame front with an increasing height above the jet exit for the premixed jet flames, which results in the broadening of the HRZ and the increase of the wrinkling. The HRZ remains thin as the Rejet increases, whereas the preheat zone is significantly broadened and thickened. This indicates that the smallest turbulent eddies can only be able to enter the flame front rather than the HRZ in the present flame conditions. The flame quenching is observed with Rejet = 39200, which may be due to the strong entrainment of the cold air from outside of the burned gas region.

  2. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional DNS of turbulent premixed flames in a constant volume vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Naoya; Tsunemi, Akihiko; Shimura, Masayasu; Shim, Youngsam; Tanahashi, Mamoru; Miyauchi, Toshio

    2010-11-01

    Clarification of flame behaviors in a vessel is of great importance for high efficiency of combustors, especially in SI engines. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent hydrogen-air premixed flames in a constant volume rectangular vessel at relatively high Reynolds number has been conducted by considering detailed kinetic mechanism. At first, flame ignites and propagates from the ignition kernel. When the flame approaches a wall, the flame displacement speed normal to the wall decreases gradually. After the flame impingement on the wall, the flame propagates along the wall and the flame displacement speed parallel to the wall becomes higher than that of freely propagating flames. The flame is also strongly affected by internal pressure rise in the vessel. Since the pressure increase makes flame thickness thin, heat release rate of each flame element is augmented. The local pressure rise due to dilatation also enhances turbulence and finer scale vortices appear, which makes flame surface more complicated and results in increase of the flame surface area.

  4. Flame thickness and conditional scalar dissipation rate in a premixed temporal turbulent reacting jet

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kolla, Hemanth; Dave, Himanshu L.; ...

    2017-07-07

    The flame structure corresponding to lean hydrogen–air premixed flames in intense sheared turbulence in the thin reaction zone regime is quantified from flame thickness and conditional scalar dissipation rate statistics, obtained from recent direct numerical simulation data of premixed temporally-evolving turbulent slot jet flames. It is found that, on average, these sheared turbulent flames are thinner than their corresponding planar laminar flames. Extensive analysis is performed to identify the reason for this counter-intuitive thinning effect. The factors controlling the flame thickness are analyzed through two different routes i.e., the kinematic route, and the transport and chemical kinetics route. The kinematicmore » route is examined by comparing the statistics of the normal strain rate due to fluid motion with the statistics of the normal strain rate due to varying flame displacement speed or self-propagation. It is found that while the fluid normal straining is positive and tends to separate iso-scalar surfaces, the dominating normal strain rate due to self-propagation is negative and tends to bring the iso-scalar surfaces closer resulting in overall thinning of the flame. The transport and chemical kinetics route is examined by studying the non-unity Lewis number effect on the premixed flames. The effects from the kinematic route are found to couple with the transport and chemical kinetics route. In addition, the intermittency of the conditional scalar dissipation rate is also examined. It is found to exhibit a unique non-monotonicity of the exponent of the stretched exponential function, conventionally used to describe probability density function tails of such variables. As a result, the non-monotonicity is attributed to the detailed chemical structure of hydrogen-air flames in which heat release occurs close to the unburnt reactants at near free-stream temperatures.« less

  5. The evolution equation for the flame surface density in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, Arnaud

    1993-01-01

    The mean reaction rate in flamelet models for turbulent premixed combustion depends on two basic quantities: a mean chemical rate, called the flamelet speed, and the flame surface density. Our previous work had been primarily focused on the problem of the structure and topology of turbulent premixed flames, and it was then determined that the flamelet speed, when space-averaged, is only weakly sensitive to the turbulent flow field. Consequently, the flame surface density is the key quantity that conveys most of the effects of the turbulence on the rate of energy release. In flamelet models, this quantity is obtained via a modeled transport equation called the Sigma-equation. Past theoretical work has produced a rigorous approach that leads to an exact but unclosed formulation for the turbulent Sigma-equation. In the exact Sigma-equation, it appears that the dynamical properties of the flame surface density are determined by a single parameter, namely the turbulent flame stretch. Unfortunately, the turbulent flame stretch as well as the flame surface density is not available from experiments, and, in the absence of experimental data, little is known on the validity of the closure assumptions used in current flamelet models. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is the alternative approach to get basic information on these fundamental quantities. In the present work, three-dimensional DNS of premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow is used to estimate the different terms appearing in the Sigma-equation. A new methodology is proposed to provide the source and sink terms for the flame surface density, resolved both temporally and spatially throughout the turbulent flame brush. Using this methodology, our objective is to extract the turbulent flame stretch from the DNS data base and then perform extensive comparisons with flamelet models. Thanks to the detailed information produced by the DNS-based analysis, it is expected that this type of comparison will not only

  6. Tabulated Chemistry Simulations of Thermodiffusive Instabilities in Lean Premixed Hydrogen/Air Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlup, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Determining how unstable laminar flames transition from an initial perturbed planar flame to a cellular structure is an important step in understanding turbulent flame propagation and their physical mechanisms. While Direct Numerical Simulations of the turbulent reacting-flow equations complete with detailed chemical models would be ideal, the computational expense for such large scale simulations is prohibitive. To this end, tabulated chemistry models are used in this work to capture the important physical mechanisms of unsteady laminar flames. Two dimensional numerical simulations of lean hydrogen/air premixed flames are performed for a variety of domain sizes and grid resolutions. A one dimensional hydrogen/air flame serves as the initial profile, which is perturbed using a sinusoidal disturbance in the transverse direction. Additionally, detailed chemistry simulations are performed as a comparison metric for the tabulated chemistry results. Finally, the tabulated chemistry results are compared to experimental data of spherically expanding flames.

  7. Stratification effects on laminar premixed-flame response to mixture perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Tiernan; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    While complete mixing on the molecular level is desirable for ensuring that combustion processes are limited by chemical kinetics rather than mass transport, it is often the case that practical devices operate with some degree of unmixedness. As such, phenomena such as ignition or flame propagation will inevitably occur in regions that exhibit mixture or thermal non-uniformity. Here we present unsteady simulations of laminar premixed flames in the low-Mach limit subject to mixture perturbations of varying wavelength and amplitude, and qualify their effect on the flame behavior. When flames experience variations in mixture the transport processes in the flame zone vary with time and the flame behavior can depend on the burned gas history. Also, the possibility of extending flames beyond their flammability limits so as to maximize the overall mass of fuel burned is explored by exploiting these unsteady effects.

  8. Effects of Buoyancy on the Flowfields of Lean Premixed Turbulent V-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D. T.; Greenberg, P.

    1999-01-01

    Open laboratory turbulent flames used for investigating fundamental flame turbulence interactions are greatly affected by buoyancy. Though much of our current knowledge is based on observations made in open flames, buoyancy effects are usually not considered in data interpretation, numerical analysis or theories. This inconsistency remains an obstacle to merging experimental observations and theoretical predictions. To better understanding the effects of buoyancy, our research focuses on steady lean premixed flames propagating in fully developed turbulence. We hypothesize that the most significant role of buoyancy forces on these flames is to influence their flowfields through a coupling with the mean and the fluctuating pressure fields. This coupling relates to the elliptical problem that emphasizes the importance of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions in determining all aspects of flame propagation. Therefore, buoyancy has the same significance as other parameters such as flow configuration, and flame geometry.

  9. Effects of Buoyancy on the Flowfields of Lean Premixed Turbulent V-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D. T.; Greenberg, P.

    1999-01-01

    Open laboratory turbulent flames used for investigating fundamental flame turbulence interactions are greatly affected by buoyancy. Though much of our current knowledge is based on observations made in open flames, buoyancy effects are usually not considered in data interpretation, numerical analysis or theories. This inconsistency remains an obstacle to merging experimental observations and theoretical predictions. To better understanding the effects of buoyancy, our research focuses on steady lean premixed flames propagating in fully developed turbulence. We hypothesize that the most significant role of buoyancy forces on these flames is to influence their flowfields through a coupling with the mean and the fluctuating pressure fields. This coupling relates to the elliptical problem that emphasizes the importance of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions in determining all aspects of flame propagation. Therefore, buoyancy has the same significance as other parameters such as flow configuration, and flame geometry.

  10. Study of Turbulent Premixed Flame Propagation using a Laminar Flamelet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The laminar flamelet concept in turbulent reacting flows is considered applicable to many practical combustion systems (Linan & Williams 1993). For turbulent premixed combustion, the laminar flamelet regime is valid when turbulent Karlovitz number is less than unity, which is equivalent to stating that the characteristic thickness of the flame is less than that of a Kolmogorov eddy; this is known as the Klimov-Williams criterion (Williams 1985). In such a case, the flame maintains its laminar structure, and the effect of turbulent flow is merely to wrinkle and strain the flame front. The propagating wrinkled premixed flame can then be described as an infinitesimally thin surface dividing the unburnt fresh mixture and the burnt product.

  11. Effects of operating pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in a partially premixed swirl combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Gyung-Min; Kim, Duck-Jool

    2011-01-15

    The influence of varying combustor pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame were investigated. In order to investigate combustion characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame, the combustor pressure was controlled in the range of -30 to 30 kPa for each equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.8-1.2). The r.m.s. of the pressure fluctuations increased with decreasing combustor pressure for the lean condition. The combustor pressure had a sizeable influence on combustion oscillation, whose dominant frequency varied with the combustor pressure. Combustion instabilities could be controlled by increasing the turbulent intensity of the unburned mixture under the lean condition. An unstable flame was caused by incomplete combustion; hence, EICO greatly increased. Furthermore, EINO{sub x} simply reduced with decreasing combustor pressure at a rate of 0.035 g/10 kPa. The possibility of combustion control on the combusting mode and exhaust gas emission was demonstrated. (author)

  12. Mechanisms of combustion limits in premixed gas flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    A three-year experimental and theoretical research program on the mechanisms of combustion limits of premixed gasflames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  13. Nanosecond Plasma Enhanced H2/O2/N2 Premixed Flat Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    hole, which defines the spatial resolution of the measurements in the direction normal to laser propagation, and passes into the vacuum chamber...combustion, nanosecond plasma discharge, burner stabilized premixed flame, plasma fluid modeling, Laser Induced Fluorescence, Thermometry. Paper length...is studied at low pressure (25 torr), using a novel plasma-flame facility, non-intrusive laser diagnostics, and high- fidelity numerical simulations

  14. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation Through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Marchese, Anthony; Hovermann, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized recently and in previous Microgravity Workshop papers, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our recent findings on gravitational effects on layered combustion along a floor, in which the fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. In an effort to understand the mechanism by which the flames spread faster in microgravity (and much faster, in laboratory coordinates, than the laminar burning velocity for uniform mixtures), we have begun making pressure measurements across the spreading flame front that are described here. Earlier researchers, testing in 1g, claimed that hydrostatic pressure differences could account for the rapid spread rates. Additionally, we present the development of a new apparatus to study flame spread in free (i.e., far from walls), non-homogeneous fuel layers formed in a flow tunnel behind an airfoil that has been tested in normal gravity.

  15. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Ross, Howard D.; Marchese, Anthony; Perry, David; Kulis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized previously, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our progress on furthering the knowledge of layered combustion, in which a fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. We present experimental and numerical results for flame spread through propanol-air layers formed near the flash point temperature (25 C) or near the stoichiometric temperature (33 C). Both the model and experimental results show that the removal of gravity results in a faster spreading flame, by as much as 80% depending on conditions. This is exactly the opposite effect as that predicted by an earlier model reported. We also found that having a gallery lid results in faster flame spread, an effect more pronounced at normal gravity, demonstrating the importance of enclosure geometry. Also reported here is the beginning of our spectroscopic measurements of fuel vapor.

  16. The role of in situ reforming in plasma enhanced ultra lean premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wookyung; Godfrey Mungal, M.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes a mechanism for the stabilization of ultra lean premixed methane/air flames by pulsed nonequilibrium plasma enhancement. It is shown that the pulsed discharge plasma produces a cool ({proportional_to}500-600 K) stream of relatively stable intermediate species including hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), which play a central role in enhancing flame stability. This stream is readily visualized by ultraviolet emission from electronically excited hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The rotational and vibrational temperature of this ''preflame'' are determined from its emission spectrum. Qualitative imaging of the overall flame structure is obtained by planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH. Preflame nitric oxide (NO) concentrations are determined by gas sampling chromatography. A simple numerical model of this plasma enhanced premixed flame is proposed that includes the generation of the preflame through plasma activation, and predicts the formation of a dual flame structure that arises when the preflame serves to pilot the combustion of the surrounding non-activated premixed flow. The calculation represents the plasma through its ability to produce an initial radical yield, which serves as a boundary condition for conventional flame simulations. The simulations also capture the presence of the preflame and the dual flame structure, and predict preflame levels of NO comparable to those measured. A subsequent pseudo-sensitivity analysis of the preflame shows that flame stability is most sensitive to the concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO in the preflame. As a consequence of the role of H{sub 2} and CO in enhancing the flame stability, the blowout limit extensions of methane/air and hydrogen/air mixtures in the absence/presence of a discharge are investigated experimentally. For methane/air mixtures, the blowout limit of the current burner is extended by {proportional_to}10% in the presence of a discharge while comparable studies carried

  17. A simulation of a bluff-body stabilized turbulent premixed flame using LES-PDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Pope, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A turbulent premixed flame stabilized by a triangular cylinder as a flame-holder is simulated. The computational condition matches the Volvo experiments (Sjunnesson et al. 1992). Propane is premixed at a fuel lean condition of ϕ = 0 . 65 . For this reactive simulation, LES-PDF formulation is used, similar to Yang et al. (2012). The evolution of Lagrangian particles is simulated by solving stochastic differential equations modeling transport of the composition PDF. Mixing is modeled by the modified IEM model (Viswanathan et al. 2011). Chemical reactions are calculated by ISAT and for the good load balancing, PURAN distribution of ISAT tables is applied (Hiremath et al. 2012). To calculate resolved density, the two-way coupling (Popov & Pope 2013) is applied, solving a transport equation of resolved specific volume to reduce statistical noise. A baseline calculation shows a good agreement with the experimental measurements in turbulence statistics, temperature, and minor species mass fractions. Chemical reaction does not significantly contribute to the overall computational cost, in contrast to non-premixed flame simulations (Hiremath et al. 2013), presumably due to the restricted manifold of the purely premixed flame in the composition space.

  18. Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hai; Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2010-10-01

    This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation model

  19. On stability of premixed flames in stagnation - Point flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivashinsky, G. I.; Law, C. K.; Joulin, G.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative description of flame stabilization in stagnation-point flow is proposed. Asymptotic and stability analyses are made for a flame model where the density of the gas is assumed to be constant and the reaction zone is assumed to be narrow and concentrated over the flame front. It is shown that, if blowing is sufficiently strong, the corrugations disappear and a plane flame results. The phenomena cannot be fully described by means of classical linear stability analysis.

  20. Effect of vorticity flip-over on the premixed flame structure: Experimental observation of type-I inflection flames.

    PubMed

    El-Rabii, Hazem; Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-12-01

    Premixed flames propagating in horizontal tubes are observed to take on a convex shape towards the fresh mixture, which is commonly explained as a buoyancy effect. A recent rigorous analysis has shown, on the contrary, that this process is driven by the balance of vorticity generated by a curved flame front with the baroclinic vorticity, and predicted existence of a regime in which the leading edge of the flame front is concave. We report experimental realization of this regime. Our experiments on ethane and n-butane mixtures with air show that flames with an inflection point on the front are regularly produced in lean mixtures, provided that a sufficiently weak ignition is used. The observed flame shape perfectly agrees with that theoretically predicted.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Card, J.M.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1995-07-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. A global one- step mechanism is used to describe the chemical kinetics, and molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. The flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and a 25:1 increase in kinematic viscosity across the flame. Reignition followed by partially-premixed burning is observed in the present results. Local curvature effects are found to be important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame, and hence, the location of the peak reaction rate relative to the stoichiometric surface. The results presented in this study demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating global-step kinetics for the oxidation of methane into direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to study the flame structure.

  2. Effects of Buoyancy on the Flowfields of Lean Premixed Turbulent V-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Greenberg, P.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Open laboratory turbulent flames used for investigating fundament flame turbulence interactions are greatly affected by buoyancy. Though much of our current knowledge is based on observations made in these open flames, the effects of buoyancy are usually not included in data interpretation, numerical analysis or theories. This inconsistency remains an obstacle to merging experimental observations and theoretical predictions. To better understanding the effects of buoyancy, our research focuses on steady lean premixed flames propagating in fully developed turbulence. We hypothesize that the most significant role of buoyancy forces on these flames is to influence their flowfields through a coupling with mean and fluctuating pressure fields. Changes in flow pattern alter the mean aerodynamic stretch and in turn affect turbulence fluctuation intensities both upstream and downstream of the flame zone. Consequently, flame stabilization, reaction rates, and turbulent flame processes are all affected. This coupling relates to the elliptical problem that emphasizes the importance of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions in determining all aspects of flame propagation. Therefore, buoyancy has the same significance as other parameters such as flow configuration, flame geometry, means of flame stabilization, flame shape, enclosure size, mixture conditions, and flow conditions.

  3. Effects of buoyancy on the flowfields of lean premixed turbulentv-flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D.T.; Greenberg, P.

    2001-03-01

    Open laboratory turbulent flames used for investigating fundament flame turbulence interactions are greatly affected by buoyancy. Though much of our current knowledge is based on observations made in these open flames, the effects of buoyancy are usually not included in data interpretation, numerical analysis or theories. This inconsistency remains an obstacle to merging experimental observations and theoretical predictions. To better understanding the effects of buoyancy, our research focuses on steady lean premixed flames propagating in fully developed turbulence. We hypothesize that the most significant role of buoyancy forces on these flames is to influence their flowfields through a coupling with mean and fluctuating pressure fields. Changes in flow pattern alter the mean aerodynamic stretch and in turn affect turbulence fluctuation intensities both upstream and downstream of the flame zone. Consequently, flame stabilization, reaction rates, and turbulent flame processes are all affected. This coupling relates to the elliptical problem that emphasizes the importance of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions in determining all aspects of flame propagation. Therefore, buoyancy has the same significance as other parameters such as flow configuration, flame geometry, means of flame stabilization, flame shape, enclosure size, mixture conditions, and flow conditions.

  4. Effect of equivalence ratio on premixed flame response to unsteady strain-rate and curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.; Wyckoff, P.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1998-03-01

    The interaction of a premixed stoichiometric methane-air flame with a two-dimensional counter-rotating vortex pair is studied under stoichiometric and rich conditions using a detailed C{sub 1}C{sub 2} chemical mechanism. The focus is on the effect of equivalence ratio on flame response to unsteady strain-rate and curvature. Flame structure and transient response are studied, both at curved cusps and on the vortex-pair centerline. The rich flame is found to exhibit faster response to flow disturbances. Results suggest this is due to the increased sensitivity of the flame to H concentration at rich conditions. Significant differences are observed in the unsteady behavior of some C{sub 2} species, where substantial transient accumulation is observed at stoichiometric conditions, but not at rich conditions. Transient response of flame observables, such as CH, OH, and HCO, is studied and compared to experimental data.

  5. Experimental study of the flowfield of a V-shaped premixed turbulent flame

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.K.; Ng, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The flowfield of a V-shaped, premixed ethylene/air flame in grid induced turbulence has been studied using Laser Doubler Velocimetry. The experimental conditions covered free-stream velocities of 5 and 7 m/s and equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.78. The two-dimensional velocity vectors obtained indicate that flow deflection in the free stream was significant and seemed to correlate with the flame angle. The influence of the flame holder wake on the flame was demonstrated. In the presence of the flame, an increase in the turbulence level in the free stream was found and was attributed to fluctuations in flow deflection induced by the fluctuating flame.

  6. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heatmore » release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  7. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heat release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  8. Impact of heat release on strain rate field in turbulent premixed Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of combustion on the strain rate field are investigated in turbulent premixed CH4/air Bunsen flames using simultaneous tomographic PIV and OH LIF measurements. Tomographic PIV provides three-dimensional velocity measurements, from which the complete strain rate tensor is determined. The OH LIF measurements are used to determine the position of the flame surface and the flame-normal orientation within the imaging plane. This combination of diagnostic techniques enables quantification of divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, which are otherwise biased using only planar measurements. Measurements are compared in three lean-to-stoichiometric flames that have different amounts of heat release and Damköhler numbers greater than unity. The effects of heat release on the principal strain rates and their alignment relative to the local flame normal are analyzed. The extensive strain rate preferentially aligns with the flame normal in the reaction zone, which has been indicated by previous studies. The strength of this alignment increases with increasing heat release and, as a result, the flame-normal strain rate becomes highly extensive. These effects are associated with the gas expansion normal to the flame surface, which is largest for the stoichiometric flame. In the preheat zone, the compressive strain rate has a tendency to align with the flame normal. Away from the flame front, the flame – strain rate alignment is arbitrary in both the reactants and products. The flame-tangential strain rate is on average positive across the flame front, and therefore the turbulent strain rate field contributes to the enhancement of scalar gradients as in passive scalar turbulence. As a result, increases in heat release result in larger positive values of the divergence as well as flame-normal and tangential strain rates, the tangential strain rate has a weaker dependence on heat release than the flame-normal strain rate and the

  9. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  10. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Cavity-Stabilized Ethylene/Air Premixed Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jacqueline; Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Rauch, Andreas; Chelliah, Harsha

    2016-11-01

    Cavity flame holders have been shown to be important for flame stabilization in scramjet combustors. In the present study the stabilization of a lean premixed ethylene/air flame in a rectangular cavity at thermo-chemical conditions relevant to scramjet combustors is simulated using a compressible reacting multi-block direct numerical simulation solver, S3D, incorporating a 22 species ethylene-air reduced chemical model. The fuel is premixed with air to an equivalence ratio of 0.4 and enters the computational domain at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.6. An auxiliary inert channel flow simulation is used to provide the turbulent velocity profile at the inlet for the reacting flow simulation. The detailed interaction between intense turbulence, nonequilibrium concentrations of radical species formed in the cavity and mixing with the premixed main stream under density variations due to heat release rate and compressibility effects is quantified. The mechanism for flame stabilization is quantified in terms of relevant non-dimensional parameters, and detailed analysis of the flame and turbulence structure will be presented. We acknowledge the sponsorship of the AFOSR-NSF Joint Effort on Turbulent Combustion Model Assumptions and the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  12. Laser-saturated fluorescence of nitric oxide and chemiluminescence measurements in premixed ethanol flames

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Carla S.T.; Barreta, Luiz G.; Sbampato, Maria E.; dos Santos, Alberto M.

    2010-11-15

    In this study, nitric oxide laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements were acquired from premixed ethanol flames at atmospheric pressure in a burner. NO-LSF experimental profiles for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames ({phi} = 1.34 and {phi} = 1.66) were determined through the excitation/detection scheme of the Q{sub 2}(26.5) rotational line in the A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi} (0,0) vibronic band and {gamma}(0,1) emission band. A calibration procedure by NO doping into the flame was applied to establish the NO concentration profiles in these flames. Chemiluminescent emission measurements in the (0, 0) vibronic emission bands of the OH{sup *} (A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi}) and CH{sup *}(A{sup 2}{delta} - X{sup 2}{pi}) radicals were also obtained with high spatial and spectral resolution for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames to correlate them with NO concentrations. Experimental chemiluminescence profiles and the ratios of the integrated areas under emission spectra (A{sub CH*}/A{sub CH*}(max.) and A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) were determined. The relationships between chemiluminescence and NO concentrations were established along the premixed ethanol flames. There was a strong connection between CH{sup *} radical chemiluminescence and NO formation and the prompt-NO was identified as the governing mechanism for NO production. The results suggest the optimum ratio of the chemiluminescence of two radicals (A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) for NO diagnostic purposes. (author)

  13. Simulations and experiments on the ignition probability in turbulent premixed bluff-body flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitte, Michael Philip; Bach, Ellen; Kariuki, James; Bauer, Hans-Jörg; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2016-05-01

    The ignition characteristics of a premixed bluff-body burner under lean conditions were investigated experimentally and numerically with a physical model focusing on ignition probability. Visualisation of the flame with a 5 kHz OH* chemiluminescence camera confirmed that successful ignitions were those associated with the movement of the kernel upstream, consistent with previous work on non-premixed systems. Performing many separate ignition trials at the same spark position and flow conditions resulted in a quantification of the ignition probability Pign, which was found to decrease with increasing distance downstream of the bluff body and a decrease in equivalence ratio. Flows corresponding to flames close to the blow-off limit could not be ignited, although such flames were stable if reached from a richer already ignited condition. A detailed comparison with the local Karlovitz number and the mean velocity showed that regions of high Pign are associated with low Ka and negative bulk velocity (i.e. towards the bluff body), although a direct correlation was not possible. A modelling effort that takes convection and localised flame quenching into account by tracking stochastic virtual flame particles, previously validated for non-premixed and spray ignition, was used to estimate the ignition probability. The applicability of this approach to premixed flows was first evaluated by investigating the model's flame propagation mechanism in a uniform turbulence field, which showed that the model reproduces the bending behaviour of the ST-versus-u‧ curve. Then ignition simulations of the bluff-body burner were carried out. The ignition probability map was computed and it was found that the model reproduces all main trends found in the experimental study.

  14. Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide Formation in Counterflow, Premixed CH4/O2/N2 Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Douglas; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    2000-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  15. Occurrence and characterization of carbon nanoparticles below the soot laden zone of a partially premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Bireswar; Datta, Amitava; Datta, Aparna; Saha, Abhijit

    2009-12-15

    An experimental study has been performed to detect the occurrence of nanosized carbon particulates below the soot laden zone of a co-flowing partially premixed flame. Samples have been extracted from different points across the flame and passed through DI water. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies have been performed with the collected water suspensions. The occurrence of carbon nanoparticles is evident across the inner flame front. In addition, evidence of naphthalene has also been found inside the inner rich premixed flame. The concentration of naphthalene decreases while that of the carbon nanoparticles increases as the inner flame front is reached. The stability of the nanoparticles in the sample has been ensured by observing that the change in fluorescence quantum yield from the sample over a long duration is small. The band gap energy has been evaluated using the absorption data to characterize the likely structures of the particles in the collected suspension. Two kinds of particles having different zones of band gap energy are found in the flame. Dynamic light scattering measurements show that the particle size grows with the increase in height in the lower part of the flame. While, at 3 and 6 mm elevations the particles are observed to be below 2.5 nm in diameter, the particles at 10 mm elevation are found in the size range of 2.5-5.5 nm. (author)

  16. Investigation of the nonlinear response of turbulent premixed flames to imposed inlet velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, C.A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S.; Balachandran, R.

    2006-08-15

    Acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body stabilized flames are investigated using turbulent combustion CFD. The calculations simulate aspects of the experimental investigation by Balachandran et al. [R. Balachandran, B. Ayoola, C. Kaminski, A. Dowling, E. Mastorakos, Combust. Flame 143 (2005) 37-55] and focus on the amplitude dependence of the flame response. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach is appropriate. The combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic representation of the flame surface density. The predictions are compared with flame surface density (FSD) and OH* chemiluminescence measurements. In the experiments the response of the flame has been quantified by means of a number of single-frequency, amplitude-dependent transfer functions. The predicted flame shape and position are in good agreement with the experiment. The dynamic response of the flame to inlet velocity forcing is also well captured by the calculations. At moderate frequencies nonlinear behavior of the transfer functions is observed as the forcing amplitude is increased. In the experiments this nonlinearity was attributed in part to the rollup of the reacting shear layer into vortices and in part to the collision of the inner and outer flame sheets. This transition to nonlinearity is also observed in the transfer functions obtained from the predictions. Furthermore, the vortex shedding and flame-sheet collapse may be seen in snapshots of the predicted flow field taken throughout the forcing cycle. The URANS methodology successfully predicts the behavior of the forced premixed turbulent flames and captures the effects of saturation in the transfer function of the response of the heat release to velocity fluctuations. (author)

  17. An experimental and numerical study of the inwardly-propagating premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarreta, Alfonso F.

    Flame stretch, described as the time rate of change of the flame surface area, can cause large changes in burning velocity of laminar premixed flames. Many experimental studies have been conducted to quantify the effects of flame stretch, but most only deal with the hydrodynamic strain component of stretch rate. In this thesis, a new experimental technique was used to study the inwardly-propagating premixed flame. This flame configuration is significant because it is subjected to the curvature component of stretch rate without the competing effects of hydrodynamic strain. Inwardly-propagating premixed flames were formed using a vortex to wrinkle a flame and create a pocket of reactants. Experiments using lean propane/air mixtures were run at both one-g and microgravity conditions to optimize the formation of large pockets of reactants. Numerical simulations of the inwardly-propagating flame (IPF) and outwardly-propagating flame (OPF) were performed for lean propane/air, methane/air and hydrogen/air mixtures. Complex chemistry as well as three different one-step reaction models were employed. Markstein numbers obtained from the experiments and computations were compared to OPF experimental data available in the literature. Researchers have used different definitions of flame location and burning velocity; the effects of these differences on the Markstein number were assessed. Experimental and numerical results indicate that the Markstein numbers obtained for the IPF are typically two to three times larger than those for the OPF. It was concluded that the observed difference in Markstein number was not caused by the IPF flame-flame interaction or the presence of intermediate species. Analysis of results obtained from the one-step reaction models identified the reasons for the difference between IPFs and OPFs: (A) the thermo-diffusive mechanism, (B) the pure curvature mechanism and (C) gas expansion. The consumption speed (Sc) was found to depend only on the thermo

  18. DNS of premixed turbulent V-flame: coupling spectral and finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauguel, Raphael; Vervisch, Luc; Domingo, Pascale

    2005-01-01

    To allow for a reliable examination of the interaction between velocity fluctuations, acoustics and combustion, a novel numerical procedure is discussed in which a spectral solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is directly associated to a high-order finite difference fully compressible DNS solver (sixth order PADE). Using this combination of high-order solvers with accurate boundary conditions, simulations have been performed where a turbulent premixed V-shape flame develops in grid turbulence. In the light of the DNS results, a sub-model for premixed turbulent combustion is analyzed. To cite this article: R. Hauguel et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  19. Local curvature measurements of a lean, partially premixed swirl-stabilised flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Alan E.; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, Alex M. K. P.

    2012-04-01

    A swirl-stabilised, lean, partially premixed combustor operating at atmospheric conditions has been used to investigate the local curvature distributions in lifted, stable and thermoacoustically oscillating CH4-air partially premixed flames for bulk cold-flow Reynolds numbers of 15,000 and 23,000. Single-shot OH planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to capture instantaneous images of these three different flame types. Use of binary thresholding to identify the reactant and product regions in the OH planar laser-induced fluorescence images, in order to extract accurate flame-front locations, is shown to be unsatisfactory for the examined flames. The Canny-Deriche edge detection filter has also been examined and is seen to still leave an unacceptable quantity of artificial flame-fronts. A novel approach has been developed for image analysis where a combination of a non-linear diffusion filter, Sobel gradient and threshold-based curve elimination routines have been used to extract traces of the flame-front to obtain local curvature distributions. A visual comparison of the effectiveness of flame-front identification is made between the novel approach, the threshold binarisation filter and the Canny-Deriche filter. The novel approach appears to most accurately identify the flame-fronts. Example histograms of the curvature for six flame conditions and of the total image area are presented and are found to have a broader range of local flame curvatures for increasing bulk Reynolds numbers. Significantly positive values of mean curvature and marginally positive values of skewness of the histogram have been measured for one lifted flame case, but this is generally accounted for by the effect of flame brush curvature. The mean local flame-front curvature reduces with increasing axial distance from the burner exit plane for all flame types. These changes are more pronounced in the lifted flames but are marginal for the thermoacoustically oscillating flames. It is

  20. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N.; Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Mantzaras, John

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  1. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  2. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Dimalanta, R.; Wernet, M. P.; Greenberg, P. S.

    2001-01-01

    Buoyancy affects the entire flowfield of steady turbulent flames and this aspect of flame buoyancy coupling is largely unexplored by experiments or by theory. Open flames and flames within large confinements are free to expand and interact with the surrounding environment. In addition to fluid and combustion conditions, their aerodynamic flowfields are determined by the flame brush orientation and geometry, wake of the stabilizer, enclosure size, and of course, the gravitational field. Because the flowfield consists mainly of cold reactants (mostly in the nearfield) and hot products (mostly in the farfield), buoyancy effects are manifested in the farfield region. In upward pointing flames, an obvious effect is a favorable axial pressure gradient that accelerates the products thereby increasing the axial aerodynamic stretch rate. Intrinsic to turbulent flows, changes in mean aerodynamic stretch also couple to the fluctuating pressure field. Consequently, buoyancy can influence the turbulence intensities upstream and downstream of the flame. Flame wrinkling process, and heat release rate are also directly affected. This backward coupling mechanism is the so-called elliptic problem. To resolve the field effects of buoyancy would require the solution of three-dimensional non-linear Navier Stokes equations with full specification of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions.

  3. The evolution equation for the flame surface density in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.; Poinsot, T.

    1992-01-01

    One central ingredient in flamelet models for turbulent premixed combustion is the flame surface density. This quantity conveys most of the effects of the turbulence on the rate of energy release and is obtained via a modeled transport equation, called the Sigma-equation. Past theoretical work has produced a rigorous approach that leads to an exact, but unclosed, formulation for the turbulent Sigma-equation. In this exact Sigma-equation, it appears that the dynamical properties of the flame surface density are determined by a single parameter, namely the turbulent flame stretch. Unfortunately, the flame surface density and the turbulent flame stretch are not available from experiments and, in the absence of experimental data, little is known on the validity of the closure assumptions used in current flamelet models. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is the obvious, complementary approach to get basic information on these fundamental quantities. Three-dimensional DNS of premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow is used to estimate the different terms appearing in the Sigma-equation. A new methodology is proposed to provide the source and sink terms for the flame surface density, resolved both temporally and spatially throughout the turbulent flame brush. Using this methodology, the effects of the Lewis number on the rate of production of flame surface area are described in great detail and meaningful comparisons with flamelet models can be performed. The analysis reveals in particular the tendency of the models to overpredict flame surface dissipation as well as their inability to reproduce variations due to thermo-diffusive phenomena. Thanks to the detailed information produced by a DNS-based analysis, this type of comparison not only underscores the shortcomings of current models but also suggests ways to improve them.

  4. The effect of temperature on soot properties in premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Alfe, M.; Apicella, B.; Tregrossi, A.; Ciajolo, A.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2010-10-15

    The effect of flame temperature on soot properties was studied in premixed methane/oxygen flames burning at a constant mixture composition (C/O = 0.60, {phi} = 2.4) and different cold-gas flow velocities (4 and 5 cm s{sup -1}). Temperature and concentration profiles of stable gases and condensed phases combustion products were measured along the flame axis. It was found that the high flame temperature conditions cause a larger decomposition of methane into hydrogen and C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, thereby reducing the formation of benzene and condensed phases including condensed species and soot. Soot properties were studied by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and H/C elemental analysis. A description of soot nanostructural organization was also performed by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Different properties and nanostructures were found to develop in the soot, depending on the temperature and on soot aging associated. Soot dehydrogenation occurred to a larger extent in the high flame temperature conditions. As soot dehydrogenates the mass absorption coefficients of soot exhibited an increasing trend along the flame axis. However, mature soot retained a relatively high H/C ratio and low absorption coefficients with respect to other less hydrogenated fuels even in high temperature conditions. This indicates that the aromatization/dehydrogenation of soot in premixed flames is more dependent on the fuel characteristics rather than on the flame temperature. Generally, it was assessed that mature soot produced from diverse hydrocarbon fuels with similar flame temperatures and flame types possess a different chemical composition and structure. To this regard the H/C atomic ratio and mass absorption coefficients appeared to be signatures of soot properties and structural evolution. (author)

  5. Prediction of electron and ion concentrations in low-pressure premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancian, J.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Colket, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2013-04-01

    Flame stabilisation and extinction in a number of different flows can be affected by application of electric fields. Electrons and ions are present in flames, and because of charge separation, weak electric fields can also be generated even when there is no externally applied electric field. In this work, a numerical model incorporating ambipolar diffusion and plasma kinetics has been developed to predict gas temperature, species, and ion and electron concentrations in laminar premixed flames without applied electric fields. This goal has been achieved by combining the existing CHEMKIN-based PREMIX code with a recently developed methodology for the solution of electron temperature and transport properties that uses a plasma kinetics model and a Boltzmann equation solver. A chemical reaction set has been compiled from seven sources and includes chemiionisation, ion-molecule, and dissociative-recombination reactions. The numerical results from the modified PREMIX code (such as peak number densities of positive ions) display good agreement with previously published experimental data for fuel-rich, non-sooting, low-pressure acetylene and ethylene flames without applied electric fields.

  6. Experimental study on a comparison of typical premixed combustible gas-air flame propagation in a horizontal rectangular closed duct.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiqiang; Duan, Qiangling; Liew, K M; Peng, Zhongjing; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jinhua

    2017-04-05

    Research surrounding premixed flame propagation in ducts has a history of more than one hundred years. Most previous studies focus on the tulip flame formation and flame acceleration in pure gas fuel-air flame. However, the premixed natural gas-air flame may show different behaviors and pressure dynamics due to its unique composition. Natural gas, methane and acetylene are chosen here to conduct a comparison study on different flame behaviors and pressure dynamics, and to explore the influence of different compositions on premixed flame dynamics. The characteristics of flame front and pressure dynamics are recorded using high-speed schlieren photography and a pressure transducer, respectively. The results indicate that the compositions of the gas mixture greatly influence flame behaviors and pressure. Acetylene has the fastest flame tip speed and the highest pressure, while natural gas has a faster flame tip speed and higher pressure than methane. The Bychkov theory for predicting the flame skirt motion is verified, and the results indicate that the experimental data coincide well with theory in the case of equivalence ratios close to 1.00. Moreover, the Bychkov theory is able to predict flame skirt motion for acetylene, even outside of the best suitable expansion ratio range of 6

  7. EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDY OF PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES OF ETHANOL AND METHANE

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the chemistry of the combustion of ethanol, the structure of five low pressure laminar premixed flames has been investigated: a pure methane flame (φ=1), three pure ethanol flames (φ=0.7, 1.0, and 1.3), and an ethanol/methane mixture flames (φ=1). The flames have been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 64.3 cm/s at 333 K. The results consist of mole fraction profiles of 20 species measured as a function of the height above the burner by probe sampling followed by online gas chromatography analyses. A mechanism for the oxidation of ethanol was proposed. The reactions of ethanol and acetaldehyde were updated and include recent theoretical calculations while that of ethenol, dimethyl ether, acetone, and propanal were added in the mechanism. This mechanism was also tested against experimental results available in the literature for laminar burning velocities and laminar premixed flame where ethenol was detected. The main reaction pathways of consumption of ethanol are analyzed. The effect of the branching ratios of reaction C2H5OH+OH→Products+H2O is also discussed. PMID:23712124

  8. DNS and modeling of the interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T. J.; Haworth, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls is studied using a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver with simple chemistry. The effects of wall distance on the local and global flame structure are investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes during quenching are computed in laminar cases and are found to be comparable to experimental and analytical results. For turbulent cases, it is shown that quenching distances and maximum heat fluxes remain of the same order as for laminar flames. Based on simulation results, a 'law-of-the-wall' model is derived to describe the interaction between a turbulent premixed flame and a wall. This model is constructed to provide reasonable behavior of flame surface density near a wall under the assumption that flame-wall interaction takes place at scales smaller than the computational mesh. It can be implemented in conjunction with any of several recent flamelet models based on a modeled surface density equation, with no additional constraints on mesh size or time step.

  9. Direct spectral/hp element simulation of piloted jet non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastase, Cristian R.

    2004-11-01

    The spectral/hp element method is used for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of piloted non premixed methane jet flames. This method combines the accuracy of spectral methods with versatility of finite element methods, and allows accurate simulations of complex flows on structured and unstructured grids. Here, the methodology is extended for simulation of multi-species, reactive flows using the discontinuous Galerkin formulation. Parallel computation is performed via MPI standards coupled with a domain decomposition methodology. The overall computational scheme allows for an efficient partitioning of the flow configuration. Tests performed with up to 64 processors show quasi-linear parallel performance and scalability. The flame configurations are similar to the piloted jet non-premixed flame considered at the Combustion Research Facility at the Sandia National Laboratories. For a momentum dominated flame, the simulated results portray many of the features observed experimentally. This pertains to both the spatial and the compositional structures of the flow. For a buoyancy controlled flame (at elevated gravity levels), the results indicate an increase in both the turbulence levels and flow acceleration. Departure from equilibrium, including localized extinction is observed on a significant portion of this flame.

  10. Blowoff behavior of bluff body stabilized flames in vitiated and partially premixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Steven G.

    Turbulent flame holding and blowoff characteristics of bluff body stabilized flames were measured in an enclosed rectangular duct with a triangular flame holder in vitiated, premixed and unvitiated, asymmetrically stratified flows. Blowoff stability margins were characterized, with chemiluminescence measurements performed by high-speed imaging to capture flame dynamics during blow off. As the equivalence ratio was decreased, local extinction along the shear layer flames occurred with greater frequency and proximity to the wake stagnation zone. Decreased equivalence ratio resulted in extinction events at the trailing edge of the stagnation zone, where reactants were convected into the recirculation zone and burned. Eventually, increasing reactant dilution of the recirculation zone either increased the ignition time scale or the lowered the strain tolerance of the propagating flames in the flame anchoring region, resulting in lift-off or extinction, and the near field shear layer flames convected to the wake stagnation zone, where they continued to propagate. From there, the flames were convected upstream into the recirculation zone, where they were eventually quenched. Simultaneous PIV and OH PLIF measurements captured the flame edge location and aerodynamic behavior as blowoff was approached. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic stretch alone the flame front and flow field vorticity maps were extracted from the combined PIV/OH PLIF data. The distribution of flame stretch shifted to greater values as the equivalence ratio decreased. Asymmetric fuel distributions, measured with acetone LW, were found to increase the equivalence ratio at blow off from that found with uniformly-fueled flows. This was attributed to the greater wake instability and extinction of the lean-side flames. The asymmetrically fueled flames were more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities when the shedding frequency was near an acoustic eigenmode of the exhaust duct, due to the decreased

  11. Structure and propagation speeds of turbulent premixed flames; A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    El Tahry, S.H. ); Rutland, C.; Ferziger, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the work presented was to gain understanding of turbulent premixed flames, particularly the local flame speed and structure. Full numerical simulations were made for flames (with simple reactions and Lewis number unity) propagating in a constant density, isotropic turbulent flow; the Reynolds and Damkohler numbers were varied. The range of Damkohler numbers allowed investigation of both the unstrained and strained flame regimes. The latter included cases in which local flame extinction was observed. The results showed that the local structure of weakly strained flames, i.e., those at high Damkohler numbers, is similar to that of an unstrained, one-dimensional, steady, planar laminar flame. Moreover, the local propagation speed had a narrow probability density function peaked at the speed of the laminar flame. The results support the validity of flamelet modeling concepts which are used in current combustion models. However, at small values of the Damkohler number, the local flame structure is complex and flamelet models may not be appropriate.

  12. Pre-mixed flame simulations for non-unity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1990-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet region is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For non-unity Lewis numbers (Le), the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of the three dimensional, constant density, decaying isotropic turbulence with a single step, finite rate chemical reaction. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. The turbulent flame speed, S(sub T), increases as Le decreases. The correlation between S(sub T) and u prime found in previous Le = 1 simulations has a strong Lewis number dependency. The variance of the pdf of the flame curvature increases as Le decreases, indicating that the flames become more wrinkled. A strong correlation between local flame speed and curvature was found. For Le greater than 1, the flame speed increases in regions concave towards the products and decreases in convex regions. The opposite correlation was found for Le less than 1. The mean temperature of the products was also found to vary with Lewis number. For Le = 0.8, it is less than the adiabatic flame temperature and for Le = 1.2 it is greater.

  13. Pre-mixed flame simulations for non-unity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1990-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet region is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For non-unity Lewis numbers (Le), the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of the three dimensional, constant density, decaying isotropic turbulence with a single step, finite rate chemical reaction. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. The turbulent flame speed, S(sub T), increases as Le decreases. The correlation between S(sub T) and u prime found in previous Le = 1 simulations has a strong Lewis number dependency. The variance of the pdf of the flame curvature increases as Le decreases, indicating that the flames become more wrinkled. A strong correlation between local flame speed and curvature was found. For Le greater than 1, the flame speed increases in regions concave towards the products and decreases in convex regions. The opposite correlation was found for Le less than 1. The mean temperature of the products was also found to vary with Lewis number. For Le = 0.8, it is less than the adiabatic flame temperature and for Le = 1.2 it is greater.

  14. Numerical studies on the structure of two-dimensional H{sub 2}/air premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, V.R.; Roquemore, W.M.

    1995-07-01

    The burning characteristics of a premixed, H{sub 2}/air Bunsen-type flame are investigated using a time-dependent, axisymmetric numerical model with variable transport properties and a detailed-chemical-kinetics mechanism. The temperature, species concentration, and velocity fields are investigated under fuel-lean, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich conditions. The calculations show that under fuel-lean conditions the flame exhibits the ``tip-opening`` phenomenon, while under fuel-rich condition the tip of the flame burns intensely. These results are in agreement with the experimental findings of Mizomoto et al. who have suggested that the tip-opening phenomenon results from the nonunity Lewis number. To further investigate the impact of local Lewis number on the premixed-flame structure, numerical experiments are performed by modifying the local Lewis numbers of the individual species. Results for the fuel-lean condition confirm that the local Lewis number is responsible for the tip-opening phenomenon. Indeed, when the local Lewis number is set equal to 2, the burning pattern of the fuel-lean premixed flame resembles that of a fuel-rich flame with a closed tip. The spatial distributions of NO in the fuel-lean, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich flames are also examined. Under the fuel-lean and stoichiometric conditions, the NO is formed along the high-temperature cone of the flame, as expected. In the fuel-rich case, a dual flame structure is observed. The NO production occurs primarily in the secondary ``diffusion`` flame which is established at the interface of the excess fuel and ambient oxygen. Buoyancy-induced toroidal vortices are found to form in the vertically mounted premixed flames. However, the dynamic characteristics of a premixed flame, in contrast to those of a jet diffusion flame, are observed to be dependent on the inlet velocity profile of the fuel jet.

  15. An experimental investigation of thermoacoustic instabilities in a premixed swirl-stabilized flame

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, D.; Fueri, M.; Boulouchos, K.

    2007-10-15

    Modern gas turbines use lean premixed combustion to achieve the best compromise between pollutant emissions and efficiency. This type of combustion increases the flame receptivity to external perturbations, thereby promoting the onset of large-amplitude pressure oscillations called thermoacoustic instabilities (often referred to as combustion noise). To improve our understanding of stability properties in such complex systems, encountered in many industrial applications, the flame structure of an atmospheric swirl-stabilized burner of 30 to 75 kW was systematically investigated for various inlet temperatures and air-fuel ratios. This investigation revealed the existence of two stable flame types (one lean and one rich) separated by a region of unstable flames characterized by very distinct flame shapes, flame pressure drops, and dynamic pressure oscillations. The lean transition from stable to unstable flames has been associated with a critical flame temperature at the edge of two different flame-stabilizing mechanisms, while the rich transition from unstable to stable flames has been attributed to a critical ratio of hydrodynamic to combustion times in terms of Damkoehler number. In this noise island, the mechanism for instability is due to the nonmonotonic behavior of flame pressure drop as the air-fuel ratio is changed, the maximum pressure drop across the flame coinciding with the maximum dynamic pressure. Finally, the frequency analysis of the dynamic pressure revealed the coupling with the acoustic eigenmodes of the combustion chamber for the dominant mode and with the plenum for secondary ones the frequency of which did not change with flame temperature. (author)

  16. Consistent flamelet modeling of differential molecular diffusion for turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng

    2016-03-01

    Treating differential molecular diffusion correctly and accurately remains as a great challenge to the modeling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. The aim of this paper is to develop consistent modeling strategies for differential molecular diffusion in flamelet models. Two types of differential molecular diffusion models are introduced, linear differential diffusion models and nonlinear differential diffusion models. A multi-component turbulent mixing layer problem is analyzed in detail to gain insights into differential molecular diffusion and its characteristics, particularly the dependence of differential molecular diffusion on the Reynolds number and the Lewis number. These characteristics are then used to validate the differential molecular diffusion models. Finally, the new models are applied to the modeling of a series of laboratory-scale turbulent non-premixed jet flames with different Reynolds number (Sandia Flames B, C, and D) to further assess the models' performance.

  17. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE PAGES

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; ...

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore » the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  18. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.

  19. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma on Partially Premixed Flame Extinction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    dissociative attachment processes. The Boltzmann equation calculates the rate coefficients of the electron impact elementary reactions by averaging the...ion-ion neutralization processes, ion-molecule reactions, and electron attachment and detachment processes. Note that the present model does not solve...partially premixed methane flames was studied at 60 Torr by blending 2% CH4 into the oxidizer stream. The non-equilibrium discharge accelerated

  20. Low and High Temperature Combustion Chemistry of Butanol Isomers in Premixed Flames and Autoignition Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Yasunaga, K; Curran, H J; Tsujimura, T; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K

    2010-12-12

    Butanol is a fuel that has been proposed as a bio-derived alternative to conventional petroleum derived fuels. The structural isomer in traditional 'bio-butanol' fuel is n-butanol, but newer conversion technologies produce iso-butanol as a fuel. In order to better understand the combustion chemistry of bio-butanol, this study presents a comprehensive chemical kinetic model for all the four isomers of butanol (e.g., 1-, 2-, iso- and tert-butanol). The proposed model includes detailed high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. In this study, the primary experimental validation target for the model is premixed flat low-pressure flame species profiles obtained using molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The model is also validated against previously published data for premixed flame velocity and n-butanol rapid compression machine and shock tube ignition delay. The agreement with these data sets is reasonably good. The dominant reaction pathways at the various pressures and temperatures studied are elucidated. At low temperature conditions, we found that the reaction of alphahydroxybutyl with O{sub 2} was important in controlling the reactivity of the system, and for correctly predicting C{sub 4} aldehyde profiles in low pressure premixed flames. Enol-keto isomerization reactions assisted by HO{sub 2} were also found to be important in converting enols to aldehydes and ketones in the low pressure premixed flames. In the paper, we describe how the structural features of the four different butanol isomers lead to differences in the combustion properties of each isomer.

  1. Self-organized Spiral and Circular Waves in Premixed Gas Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pealman, Howard G.; Ronney, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive-thermal high Lewis number (Le) gas-phase oscillator has been observed in premixed flames using a lean mixture of butane and oxygen diluted with helium (Le approx. 3.0). This reactive-diffusive system exhibits both propagating radial pulsations and rotating spiral waves perhaps,analogous to those observed in other excitable media such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

  2. Self-organized spiral and circular waves in premixed gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard G.; Ronney, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive-thermal high Lewis number (Le) gas-phase oscillator has been observed in premixed flames using a lean mixture of butane and oxygen diluted with helium (Le approximately equals 3.0). This reactive-diffusive system exhibits both propagating radial pulsations and rotating spiral waves perhaps analogous to those observed in other excitable media such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

  3. On the structure, propagation, and stabilization of laminar premixed flames. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Chung K.

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the funded program was to qualitatively understand and quantitatively determine the structure and dynamics of laminar premixed flames. The investigation was conducted using laser-based experimentation, computational simulation with detailed chemistry and transport, and activation energy asymptotic analysis. Highlights of accomplishments were discussed in the annual reports submitted to the program monitor for this project. Details are reported in the thirty journal publications cited in the journal article list which is the major component of this final report.

  4. Self-organized Spiral and Circular Waves in Premixed Gas Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pealman, Howard G.; Ronney, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive-thermal high Lewis number (Le) gas-phase oscillator has been observed in premixed flames using a lean mixture of butane and oxygen diluted with helium (Le approx. 3.0). This reactive-diffusive system exhibits both propagating radial pulsations and rotating spiral waves perhaps,analogous to those observed in other excitable media such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

  5. Self-organized spiral and circular waves in premixed gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard G.; Ronney, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive-thermal high Lewis number (Le) gas-phase oscillator has been observed in premixed flames using a lean mixture of butane and oxygen diluted with helium (Le approximately equals 3.0). This reactive-diffusive system exhibits both propagating radial pulsations and rotating spiral waves perhaps analogous to those observed in other excitable media such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

  6. A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Ultra-lean, hydrogen-air mixtures are found to support another kind of laminar flame that is steady and stable beside flat flames and flame balls. Direct numerical simulations are performed of flames that develop into steadily and stably propagating cells. These cells were the original meaning of the word"flamelet'' when they were observed in lean flammability studies conducted early in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified and are contrasted with the properties of one-dimensional flame balls and flat flames. Although lean hydrogen-air flames are subject to thermo-diffusive effects, in this case the result is to stabilize the flame rather than to render it unstable. The flame cells may be useful as basic components of engineering models for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable.

  7. Interaction of turbulent premixed flames with combustion products: Role of stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.; Gomez, Alessandro

    2016-05-30

    Stabilization methods of turbulent flames often involve mixing of reactants with hot products of combustion. The stabilizing effect of combustion product enthalpy has been long recognized, but the role played by the chemical composition of the product gases is typically overlooked. We employ a counterflow system to pinpoint the effects of the combustion product stoichiometry on the structure of turbulent premixed flames under conditions of both stable burning and local extinction. To that end, a turbulent jet of lean-to-rich, CH4/O2/N2-premixed reactants at a turbulent Reynolds number of 1050 was opposed to a stream of hot products of combustion that were generated in a preburner. While the combustion product stream temperature was kept constant, its stoichiometry was varied independently from that of the reactant stream, leading to reactant-to-product stratification of relevance to practical combustion systems. The detailed structure of the turbulent flame front was analyzed in two series of experiments using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF): joint CH2O LIF and OH LIF measurements and joint CO LIF and OH LIF measurements. Results revealed that a decrease in local CH2O+OH and CO+OH reaction rates coincide with the depletion of OH radicals in the vicinity of the combustion product stream. These critical combustion reaction rates were more readily quenched in the presence of products of combustion from a stoichiometric flame, whereas they were favored by lean combustion products. As a result, stoichiometric combustion products contributed to a greater occurrence of local extinction. Furthermore, they limited the capacity of premixed reactants to ignite and of the turbulent premixed flames to stabilize. In contrast, lean and rich combustion products facilitated flame ignition and stability and reduced the rate of local extinction. The influence of the combustion product stream on the turbulent flame front was

  8. Interaction of turbulent premixed flames with combustion products: Role of stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.; Gomez, Alessandro

    2016-05-30

    Stabilization methods of turbulent flames often involve mixing of reactants with hot products of combustion. The stabilizing effect of combustion product enthalpy has been long recognized, but the role played by the chemical composition of the product gases is typically overlooked. We employ a counterflow system to pinpoint the effects of the combustion product stoichiometry on the structure of turbulent premixed flames under conditions of both stable burning and local extinction. To that end, a turbulent jet of lean-to-rich, CH4/O2/N2-premixed reactants at a turbulent Reynolds number of 1050 was opposed to a stream of hot products of combustion that were generated in a preburner. While the combustion product stream temperature was kept constant, its stoichiometry was varied independently from that of the reactant stream, leading to reactant-to-product stratification of relevance to practical combustion systems. The detailed structure of the turbulent flame front was analyzed in two series of experiments using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF): joint CH2O LIF and OH LIF measurements and joint CO LIF and OH LIF measurements. Results revealed that a decrease in local CH2O+OH and CO+OH reaction rates coincide with the depletion of OH radicals in the vicinity of the combustion product stream. These critical combustion reaction rates were more readily quenched in the presence of products of combustion from a stoichiometric flame, whereas they were favored by lean combustion products. As a result, stoichiometric combustion products contributed to a greater occurrence of local extinction. Furthermore, they limited the capacity of premixed reactants to ignite and of the turbulent premixed flames to stabilize. In contrast, lean and rich combustion products facilitated flame ignition and stability and reduced the rate of local extinction. The influence of the combustion product stream on the turbulent flame front was

  9. Interaction of turbulent premixed flames with combustion products: Role of stoichiometry

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno Rene Leon; Frank, Jonathan H.; Gomez, Alessandro

    2016-05-30

    Stabilization methods of turbulent flames often involve mixing of reactants with hot products of combustion. The stabilizing effect of combustion product enthalpy has been long recognized, but the role played by the chemical composition of the product gases is typically overlooked. We employ a counterflow system to pinpoint the effects of the combustion product stoichiometry on the structure of turbulent premixed flames under conditions of both stable burning and local extinction. To that end, a turbulent jet of lean-to-rich, CH4/O2/N2-premixed reactants at a turbulent Reynolds number of 1050 was opposed to a stream of hot products of combustion that weremore » generated in a preburner. While the combustion product stream temperature was kept constant, its stoichiometry was varied independently from that of the reactant stream, leading to reactant-to-product stratification of relevance to practical combustion systems. The detailed structure of the turbulent flame front was analyzed in two series of experiments using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF): joint CH2O LIF and OH LIF measurements and joint CO LIF and OH LIF measurements. Results revealed that a decrease in local CH2O+OH and CO+OH reaction rates coincide with the depletion of OH radicals in the vicinity of the combustion product stream. These critical combustion reaction rates were more readily quenched in the presence of products of combustion from a stoichiometric flame, whereas they were favored by lean combustion products. As a result, stoichiometric combustion products contributed to a greater occurrence of local extinction. Furthermore, they limited the capacity of premixed reactants to ignite and of the turbulent premixed flames to stabilize. In contrast, lean and rich combustion products facilitated flame ignition and stability and reduced the rate of local extinction. The influence of the combustion product stream on the turbulent flame front was limited to a zone of approximately two millimeters

  10. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixer Methane/Oxygen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot is a dominant feature of hydrocarbon/air flames, affecting their reaction mechanisms and structure. As a result, soot processes affect capabilities for computational combustion as well as predictions of flame radiation and pollution emissions. Motivated by these observations, the present investigation extended past work on soot growth in laminar premixed flames, seeking to evaluate model predictions of flame structure. Xu et al. report direct measurements of soot residence times, soot concentrations, soot structure, gas temperatures and gas compositions for premixed flames similar to those studied by Harris and Weiner and Ramer et al. respectively. It was found that predictions of major stable gas species concentrations based on mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt and Frenklach and coworkers, were in good agreement with the measurements. The results were also used to evaluate the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers and Colket and Hall. It was found that these mechanisms were effective using quite reasonable correlations for the steric factors appearing in the theories. The successful evaluation of the HACA mechanism of soot growth in Refs. 1 and 2 is encouraging but one aspect of this evaluation is a concern. In particular, H-atom concentrations play a crucial role in the HACA mechanism and it was necessary to estimate these concentrations because they were not measured directly. These estimates were made assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium between H, and H based on measured temperatures and H2 concentrations and the equilibrium constant data of Kee et al.. This approach was justified by the flame structure predictions; nevertheless, direct evaluation of equilibrium estimates of H-atom concentrations in the soot growth regions of laminar premixed flames is needed to provide more convincing proof of this behavior. Thus, the objective of the present investigation was to complete new measurements of the

  11. Premixed hydrocarbon stagnation flames : experiments and simulations to validate combustion chemical-kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benezech, Laurent Jean-Michel

    A methodology based on the comparison of flame simulations relying on reacting flow models with experiment is applied to C1-C3 stagnation flames. The work reported targets the assessment and validation of the modeled reactions and reaction rates relevant to (C1-C3)-flame propagation in several detailed combustion kinetic models. A concensus does not, as yet, exist on the modeling of the reasonably well-understood oxidation of C1-C2 flames, and a better knowledge of C3 hydrocarbon combustion chemistry is required before attempting to bridge the gap between the oxidation of C1-C2 hydrocarbons and the more complex chemistry of heavier hydrocarbons in a single kinetic model. Simultaneous measurements of velocity and CH-radical profiles were performed in atmospheric propane(C3H8)- and propylene(C3H6)-air laminar premixed stagnation flames stabilized in a jet-wall configuration. These nearly-flat flames can be modeled by one-dimensional simulations, providing a means to validate kinetic models. Experimental data for these C3 flames and similar experimental data for atmospheric methane(CH4)-, ethane(C2H6)-, and ethylene(C2H4)-air flames are compared to numerical simulations performed with a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model, a multi-component transport formulation including thermal diffusion, and different detailed-chemistry models, in order to assess the adequacy of the models employed. A novel continuation technique between kinetic models was developed and applied successfully to obtain solutions with the less-robust models. The 2005/12 and 2005/10 releases of the San Diego mechanism are found to have the best overall performance in C3H8 and C3H6 flames, and in CH4, C2H6, and C2H4 flames, respectively. Flame position provides a good surrogate for flame speed in stagnation-flow stabilized flames. The logarithmic sensitivities of the simulated flame locations to variations in the kinetic rates are calculated via the "brute-force" method for fifteen representative flames

  12. The production of premixed flame surface area in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, we use three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of premixed flames in turbulent shear flow to characterize the effect of a mean shear motion on flame surface production. The shear is uniform in the unburnt gas, and simulations are performed for different values of the mean shear rate, S. The data base is then used to estimate and compare the different terms appearing in the Sigma-equation as a function of S. The analysis gives in particular the relative weights f the turbulent flow and mean flow components, a(sub T) and A(sub T), of the flame surface production term. This comparison indicates whether the dominant effects of a mean flow velocity gradient on flame surface area are implicit and scale with the modified turbulent flow parameters, kappa and epsilon, or explicit and scale directly with the rate of deformation.

  13. A comparison of transport algorithms for premixed, laminar steady state flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, T. P.; Heimerl, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of different methods of approximating multispecies transport phenomena in models of premixed, laminar, steady state flames were studied. Five approximation methods that span a wide range of computational complexity were developed. Identical data for individual species properties were used for each method. Each approximation method is employed in the numerical solution of a set of five H2-02-N2 flames. For each flame the computed species and temperature profiles, as well as the computed flame speeds, are found to be very nearly independent of the approximation method used. This does not indicate that transport phenomena are unimportant, but rather that the selection of the input values for the individual species transport properties is more important than the selection of the method used to approximate the multispecies transport. Based on these results, a sixth approximation method was developed that is computationally efficient and provides results extremely close to the most sophisticated and precise method used.

  14. A comparison of transport algorithms for premixed, laminar steady state flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, T. P.; Heimerl, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of different methods of approximating multispecies transport phenomena in models of premixed, laminar, steady state flames were studied. Five approximation methods that span a wide range of computational complexity were developed. Identical data for individual species properties were used for each method. Each approximation method is employed in the numerical solution of a set of five H2-02-N2 flames. For each flame the computed species and temperature profiles, as well as the computed flame speeds, are found to be very nearly independent of the approximation method used. This does not indicate that transport phenomena are unimportant, but rather that the selection of the input values for the individual species transport properties is more important than the selection of the method used to approximate the multispecies transport. Based on these results, a sixth approximation method was developed that is computationally efficient and provides results extremely close to the most sophisticated and precise method used.

  15. A comparison of experimental results of soot production in laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Nattan R.; Soares, Diego; Nunes, Roger P.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Smith Schneider, Paulo; Vielmo, Horácio A.; van der Laan, Flávio Tadeu

    2015-05-01

    Soot emission has been the focus of numerous studies due to the numerous applications in industry, as well as the harmful effects caused to the environment. Thus, the purpose of this work is to analyze the soot formation in a flat flame burner using premixed compressed natural gas and air, where these quasi-adiabatic flames have one-dimensional characteristics. The measurements were performed applying the light extinction technique. The air/fuel equivalence ratiowas varied to assess the soot volume fractions for different flame configurations. Soot production along the flamewas also analyzed by measurements at different heights in relation to the burner surface. Results indicate that soot volume fraction increases with the equivalence ratio. The higher regions of the flamewere analyzed in order to map the soot distribution on these flames. The results are incorporated into the experimental database for measurement techniques calibration and for computational models validation of soot formation in methane premixed laminar flames, where the equivalence ratio ranging from 1.5 up to 8.

  16. Flame front tracking in turbulent lean premixed flames using stereo PIV and time-sequenced planar LIF of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, G.; Hult, J.; Balachandran, R.; Mackley, M. R.; Kaminski, C. F.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes the simultaneous application of time-sequenced laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH radicals and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for measurements of the flame front dynamics in lean and premixed LP turbulent flames. The studied flames could be acoustically driven, to simulate phenomena important in LP combustion technologies. In combination with novel image post processing techniques we show how the data obtained can be used to track the flame front contour in a plane defined by the illuminating laser sheets. We consider effects of chemistry and convective fluid motion on the dynamics of the observed displacements and analyse the influence of turbulence and acoustic forcing on the observed contour velocity, a quantity we term as s {/d 2D}. We show that this quantity is a valuable and sensitive indicator of flame turbulence interactions, as (a) it is measurable with existing experimental methodologies, and (b) because computational data, e.g. from large eddy simulations, can be post processed in an identical fashion. s {/d 2D} is related (to a two-dimensional projection) of the three-dimensional flame displacement speed s d , but artifacts due to out of plane convective motion of the flame surface and the uncertainty in the angle of the flame surface normal have to be carefully considered. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate such effects for several distributions of flame front angle distributions, and it is shown conclusively that s {/d 2D} is a sensitive indicator of a quantity related to s d in the flames we study. s {/d 2D} was shown to increase linearly both with turbulent intensity and with the amplitude of acousting forcing for the range of conditions studied.

  17. DNS of turbulent premixed slot flames with mixture inhomogeneity: a study of NOx formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Stefano; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-11-01

    A set of Direct Numerical Simulations of three-dimensional methane/air lean flames in a spatially developing turbulent slot burner are performed. The flames are in the thin-reaction zone regimes and the jet Reynolds number is 5600. This configuration is of interest since it displays turbulent production by mean shear as in real devices. The gas phase hydrodynamics are modeled with the reactive, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the low Mach number limit. Combustion is treated with finite-rate chemistry. The jet is characterized by a non-uniform equivalence ratio at the inlet and varying levels of incomplete premixing for the methane/air mixture are considered. The global equivalence ratio is 0.7 and temperature is 800 K. All simulations are performed at 4 atm. The instantaneous profiles of the mass fractions of methane and air at the inlet are sampled from a set of turbulent channel simulations that provide realistic, fully turbulent fields. The data are analyzed to study the influence of partial premixing on the flame structure. Particular focus is devoted to the assessment of heat release rate fluctuations and NOx formation. In particular, the effects of partial premixing on the production rates for the various pathways to NOx formation are investigated.

  18. Combustion dynamics linked to flame behaviour in a partially premixed swirled industrial burner

    SciTech Connect

    Biagioli, Fernando; Guethe, Felix; Schuermans, Bruno

    2008-07-15

    Previous work [Biagioli, F., Stabilization mechanism of turbulent premixed flames in strongly swirled flows, Combustion, Theory and Modelling 10 (3) (2006) 389-412; Guethe, F., Lachner, R., Schuermans, B., Biagioli, F., Geng, W., Inauen, A., Schenker, S., Bombach, R., Hubschmid, W., Flame imaging on the ALSTOM EV-burner: thermo acoustic pulsations and CFD-validation, in: AIAA Paper 2006-437 presented at the 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, January 9-12, 2006] has shown that turbulent dry low NO{sub x} (partially premixed) flames in high swirl conical burners may be subject to a large change of their anchoring location at the symmetry axis when a critical value of the bulk equivalence ratio is reached, i.e. they are bi-stable. This flame behavior is linked here to combustion pressure dynamics measured in an atmospheric test rig for a prototype version of the Alstom EnVironmental (EV) conical burner. The link is made via the solution of the problem of the 'travelling flameholder', which shows that the unsteady displacement of the flame anchoring location implies an unsteady variation of the flame surface area and therefore unsteady heat release. The relevance of this source of unsteady heat release - which is different from more usual ones due to variations in turbulent burning rate and in the sensible enthalpy jump across the flame - to the generation of combustion dynamics in strongly swirled flows is confirmed here by the strong positive correlation between the tendency of the flame to be displaced and the measured amplitude of pressure pulsations. (author)

  19. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  1. Markstein Numbers of Negatively-Stretched Premixed Flames: Microgravity Measurements and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Driscoll, James F.; Feikema, Douglas A.; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of flame stretch, composed of strain and curvature, plays a major role in the propagation of turbulent premixed flames. Although all forms of stretch (positive and negative) are present in turbulent conditions, little research has been focused on the stretch due to curvature. The present study quantifies the Markstein number (which characterizes the sensitivity of the flame propagation speed to the imposed stretch rate) for an inwardly-propagating flame (IPF). This flame is of interest because it is negatively stretched, and is subjected to curvature effects alone, without the competing effects of strain. In an extension of our previous work, microgravity experiments were run using a vortex-flame interaction to create a pocket of reactants surrounded by an IPF. Computations using the RUN-1DL code of Rogg were also performed in order to explain the measurements. It was found that the Markstein number of an inwardly-propagating flame, for both the microgravity experiment and the computations, is significantly larger than that of an outwardly-propagating flame. Further insight was gained by running the computations for the simplified (hypothetical) cases of one step chemistry, unity Lewis number, and negligible heat release. Results provide additional evidence that the Markstein numbers associated with strain and curvature have different values.

  2. Examination of the effect of differential molecular diffusion in DNS of turbulent non-premixed flames

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Chao; Lignell, David O.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; ...

    2017-02-09

    Here, the effect of differential molecular diffusion (DMD) in turbulent non-premixed flames is studied by examining two previously reported DNS of temporally evolving planar jet flames, one with CO/H2 as the fuel and the other with C2H4 as the fuel. The effect of DMD in the CO/H2 DNS flames in which H2 is part of fuel is found to behave similar to laminar flamelet, while in the C2H4 DNS flames in which H2 is not present in the fuel it is similar to laminar flamelet in early stages but becomes different from laminar flamelet later. The scaling of the effectmore » of DMD with respect to the Reynolds number Re is investigated in the CO/H2 DNS flames, and an evident power law scaling (~Re–a with a a positive constant) is observed. The scaling of the effect of DMD with respect to the Damkohler number Da is explored in both laminar counter-flow jet C2H4 diffusion flames and the C2H4 DNS flames. A power law scaling (~Daa with a a positive constant) is clearly demonstrated for C2H4 nonpremixed flames.« less

  3. Flow field and scalar measurements in a series of turbulent partially-premixed dimethyl ether/air jet flames

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno; Im, Seong -Kyun; Gamba, Mirko; ...

    2017-03-12

    Here, we present a series of benchmark flames consisting of six partially-premixed piloted dimethyl ether (DME)/air jet flames. These flames provide an opportunity to understand turbulence-flame interactions for oxygenated fuels and to develop predictive models for these interactions using a canonical burner geometry. The development of accurate models for DME/air flames would establish a foundation for studies of more complex oxygenated fuels. The flames are stabilized on a piloted jet burner similar to that of the partially-premixed methane/air jet flames that have been studied extensively within the context of the TNF Workshop. This series of six jet flames spans jetmore » exit Reynolds numbers, ReD, from 29,300 to 73,300 and stoichiometric mixture fractions, ξst, from 0.35 to 0.60. Flame conditions range from very low probability of localized extinction to a high probability of localized extinction and subsequent re-ignition. Measurements in the flames are compared at downstream locations from 5 to 25 diameters above the nozzle exit. Mean and fluctuating velocity components are measured using stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV). Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of OH and CH2O provides insights into the distribution of these intermediate species in partially-premixed DME/air flames. OH LIF imaging is also combined with SPIV to investigate the strain rate field across the reaction zone.« less

  4. LES of Triangular-stabilized Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames with an algebraic reaction closure: Quality and Error Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, B.; Franke, J.; Muppala, S. P. R.; Dinkelacker, F.

    In this LES study, an algebraic flame surface wrinkling model based on the progress variable gradient approach is validated for lean premixed turbulent propane/air flames measured on VOLVO test rig. These combustion results are analyzed for uncertainty in the solution using two quality assessment techniques.

  5. Detailed characterization of the dynamics of thermoacoustic pulsations in a lean premixed swirl flame

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.; Weigand, P.; Duan, X.R.; Giezendanner-Thoben, R.

    2007-07-15

    A nozzle configuration for technically premixed gas turbine flames was operated with CH{sub 4} and air at atmospheric pressure. The flames were confined by a combustion chamber with large quartz windows, allowing the application of optical and laser diagnostics. In a distinct range of operating conditions the flames exhibited strong self-excited thermoacoustic pulsations at a frequency around 290 Hz. A flame with P=25kW thermal power and an equivalence ratio of {phi}=0.7 was chosen as a target flame in order to analyze the dynamics and the feedback mechanism of the periodic instability in detail. The velocity field was measured by three-component laser Doppler velocimetry, the flame structures were measured by chemiluminescence imaging and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH, and the joint probability density functions of major species concentrations, mixture fraction, and temperature were measured by laser Raman scattering. All measuring techniques were applied in a phase-locked mode with respect to the phase angle of the periodic pulsation. In addition to the pulsating flame, a nonpulsating flame with increased fuel flow rate (P=30kW, {phi}=0.83) was studied for comparison. The measurements revealed significant differences between the structures of the pulsating and the nonpulsating (or ''quiet'') flame. Effects of finite-rate chemistry and unmixedness were observed in both flames but were more pronounced in the pulsating flame. The phase-locked measurements revealed large variations of all measured quantities during an oscillation cycle. This yielded a clear picture of the sequence of events and allowed the feedback mechanism of the instability to be identified and described quantitatively. The data set presents a very good basis for the verification of numerical combustion simulations because the boundary conditions of the experiment were well-defined and the most important quantities were measured with a high accuracy. (author)

  6. Straining and wrinkling processes during turbulence-premixed flame interaction measured using temporally-resolved diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.

    2009-12-15

    The dynamical processes of flame surface straining and wrinkling that occur as turbulence interacts with a premixed flame were measured using cinema-stereoscopic PIV (CS-PIV) and orthogonal-plane cinema-stereoscopic PIV (OPCS-PIV). These diagnostics provided temporally resolved measurements of turbulence-flame interaction at frame rates of up to 3 kHz and spatial resolutions as small as 280{mu} m. Previous descriptions of flame straining and wrinkling have typically been derived based on a canonical interaction between a pair of counter-rotating vortices and a planar flame surface. However, it was found that this configuration did not properly represent real turbulence-flame interaction. Interactions resembling the canonical configuration were observed in less than 10% of the recorded frames. Instead, straining and wrinkling were generally caused more geometrically complex turbulence, consisting of large groups of structures that could be multiply curved and intertwined. The effect of the interaction was highly dependent on the interaction geometry. Furthermore, even when the turbulence did exist in the canonical geometry, the straining and wrinkling of the flame surface were not well characterized by the vortical structures. A new mechanistic description of the turbulence-flame interaction was therefore identified and confirmed by the measurements. In this description, flame surface straining is caused by coherent structures of fluid-dynamic strain-rate (strain-rate structures). The role of vortical structures is to curve existing flame surface, creating wrinkles. By simultaneously considering both forms of turbulent structure, turbulence-flame interactions in both the canonical configuration and more complex geometries could be understood. (author)

  7. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism.

  8. Near field flow structure of isothermal swirling flows and reacting non-premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Olivani, Andrea; Solero, Giulio; Cozzi, Fabio; Coghe, Aldo

    2007-04-15

    Two confined lean non-premixed swirl-stabilized flame typologies were investigated in order to achieve detailed information on the thermal and aerodynamic field in the close vicinity of the burner throat and provide correlation with the exhaust emissions. Previous finding indicated the generation of a partially premixed flame with radial fuel injection and a purely diffusive flame with co-axial injection in a swirling co-flow. In the present work, the experimental study is reported which has been conducted on a straight exit laboratory burner with no quarl cone, fuelled by natural gas and air, and fired vertically upwards with the flame stabilized at the end of two concentric pipes with the annulus supplying swirled air and the central pipe delivering the fuel. Two fuel injection typologies, co-axial and radial (i.e., transverse), leading to different mixing mechanisms, have been characterized through different techniques: particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for a comprehensive analysis of the velocity field, still photography for the detection of flame front and main visible features, and thermocouples for the temperature distribution. Isothermal flow conditions have been included in the experimental investigation to provide a basic picture of the flow field and to comprehend the modifications induced by the combustion process. The results indicated that, although the global mixing process and the main flame structure are governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the two different fuel injection methodologies play an important role on mixture formation and flame stabilization in the primary mixing zone. Particularly, it has been found that, in case of axial injection, the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the backflow generated by the swirl can induce an intermittent fuel penetration in the recirculated hot products and the formation of a central sooting luminous plume, a phenomenon totally

  9. Laser ablation plasma-assisted stabilization of premixed methane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Peng, Jiangbo; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation plasma has been applied to assist stabilization of premixed methane/air flames with a flow speed up to 15.3 m/s. The ablation plasma was generated using the 50 Hz, 1064 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser onto a tantalum slab. With the ablation plasma, the stabilization equivalence ratio has been extended to the fuel-leaner end and the blow off limits have been enhanced by from 3.6- to 14.8-folds for flames which can stabilize without the plasma. The laser pulse energy required for flameholding was reduced to 10 mJ, a 64 % reduction compared with that of gas breakdown plasma, which will ease the demand for high-power lasers for high-frequency plasma generation. The temporal evolutions of the flame kernels following the ablation plasma were investigated using the OH* chemiluminescence imaging approach, and the flame propagation speed ( v f) was measured from the flame kernel evolutions. With the ablation plasma, the v f with flow speed of 4.7-9.0 m/s and equivalence ratio of 1.4 has been enhanced from 0.175 m/s of laminar premixed methane/air flame to 2.79-4.52 and 1.59-5.46 m/s, respectively, in the early and late time following the ablation plasma. The increase in the combustion radical concentrations by the ablation plasma was thought to be responsible for the v f enhancement and the resulted flame stabilization.

  10. A numerical and experimental investigation of premixed methane-air flame transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Habib N. Najm; Phillip H. Paul; Omar M. Knio; Andrew McIlroy

    2000-01-06

    The authors report the results of a numerical and experimental investigation of the response of premixed methane-air flames to transient strain-rate disturbances induced by a two-dimensional counter-rotating vortex-pair. The numerical and experimental time histories of flow and flame evolution are matched over a 10 ms interaction time. Measurements and computations of CH and OH peak data evolution are reported, and found to indicate mis-prediction of the flame time scales in the numerical model. Qualitative transient features of OH at rich conditions are not predicted in the computations. On the other hand, evolution of computed and measured normalized HCO fractions are in agreement. The computed CH{sub 3}O response exhibits a strong transient driven by changes to internal flame structure, namely temperature profile steepening, induced by the flow field. Steady state experimental PLIF CH{sub 3}O data is reported, but experimental transient CH{sub 3}O data is not available. The present analysis indicates that the flame responds at time scales that are quite distinct from ``propagation'' time scale derived from flame thickness and burning speed. Evidently, these propagation time scales are not adequate for characterizing the transient flame response.

  11. Numerical simulations of turbulent premixed H2/O2/N2 flames with complex chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, M.; Poinsot, T. J.; Haworth, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Premixed stoichiometric H2/O2/N2 flames propagating in two-dimensional turbulence were studied using direct numerical simulation (simulations in which all fluid and thermochemical scales are fully resolved) including realistic chemical kinetics and molecular transport. Results are compared with earlier zero-chemistry (flame sheet) and one-step chemistry simulations. Consistent with the simpler models, the turbulent flame with realistic chemistry aligns preferentially with extensive strain rates in the tangent plane and flame curvature probability density functions are close to symmetric with near-zero means. By contrast to simple-chemistry results with non-unity Lewis numbers (ratio of thermal to species diffusivity), local flame structure does not correlate with curvature but rather with tangential strain rate. Turbulent straining results in substantial thinning of the flame relative to the steady unstrained laminar case. Heat release and H2O2 contours remain thin and connected ('flamelet-like') while species including H-atom and OH are more diffuse. Peak OH concentration occurs well behind the peak heat-release zone. The feasibility of incorporating realistic chemistry into full turbulence simulations to address issues such as pollutant formation in hydrocarbon-air flames is suggested.

  12. An Experimental Study of the Structure of Turbulent Non-Premixed Jet Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, Isaac; Idicheria, Cherian; Clemens, Noel

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of transitional and turbulent non-premixed jet flames under microgravity conditions. The microgravity experiments are being conducted using a newly developed drop rig and the University of Texas 1.5 second drop tower. The rig itself measures 16”x33”x38” and contains a co-flowing round jet flame facility, flow control system, CCD camera, and data/image acquisition computer. These experiments are the first phase of a larger study being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center 2.2 second drop tower facility. The flames being studied include methane and propane round jet flames at jet exit Reynolds numbers as high as 10,000. The primary diagnostic technique employed is emission imaging of flame luminosity using a relatively high-speed (350 fps) CCD camera. The high-speed images are used to study flame height, flame tip dynamics and burnout characteristics. Results are compared to normal gravity experimental results obtained in the same apparatus.

  13. OH-Planar Fluorescence Measurements of Pressurized, Hydrogen Premixed Flames in the SimVal Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Strakey, P.A.; Woodruff, S.D.; Williams, T.C.; Schefer, R.W.

    2008-07-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in lean, premixed natural gas flames augmented with hydrogen are presented. The experiments were conducted in the Simulation Validation combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory at operating pressures from 1 to 8 atmospheres. The data, which were collected in a combustor with well-controlled boundary conditions, are intended to be used for validating computational fluid dynamics models under conditions directly relevant to land-based gas turbine engines. The images, which show significant effects of hydrogen on local flame quenching, are discussed in terms of a turbulent premixed combustion regime and nondimensional parameters such as Karlovitz number. Pressure was found to thin the OH region, but only had a secondary effect on overall flame shape compared with the effects of hydrogen addition, which was found to decrease local quenching and shorten the turbulent flame brush. A method to process the individual images based on local gradients of fluorescence intensity is proposed, and results are presented. Finally, the results of several large eddy simulations are presented and compared with the experimental data in an effort to understand the issues related to model validation, especially for simulations that do not include OH as an intermediate species.

  14. Filtered chemical source term modeling for LES of high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    Tabulated chemistry with the transport of a single progress variable is a popular technique for large eddy simulations of premixed turbulent flames. Since the reaction zone thickness is usually smaller than the LES grid size, modeling of the filtered progress variable reaction rate is required. Most models assume that the filtered progress variable reaction rate is a function of the filtered progress variable and its variance where the dependence can be obtained through the probability density function (PDF) of the progress variable. Among the most common approaches, the PDF can be presumed (usually as a β-PDF) or computed using spatially filtered one dimensional laminar flames (FLF). Models for the filtered source term are studied a priori using results from DNS of turbulent n-heptane/air premixed flames at varying Karlovitz numbers. Predictions from the optimal estimator and models based on laminar flames using a β-PDF or a FLF-PDF are compared to the exact filtered source term. For all filter widths and Karlovitz numbers, the optimal estimator yields small errors while β-PDF and FLF-PDF approaches present larger errors. Sources of differences are discussed.

  15. Effects of Lewis number on turbulent scalar transport and its modelling in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Cant, R.S.

    2009-07-15

    The behaviour of the turbulent scalar flux in premixed flames has been studied using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with emphasis on the effects of Lewis number in the context of Reynolds-averaged closure modelling. A database was obtained from DNS of three-dimensional freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames with simplified chemistry and a range of global Lewis numbers from 0.34 to 1.2. Under the same initial conditions of turbulence, flames with low Lewis numbers are found to exhibit counter-gradient transport, whereas flames with higher Lewis numbers tend to exhibit gradient transport. The Reynolds-averaged transport equation for the turbulent scalar flux is analysed in detail and the performance of existing models for the unclosed terms is assessed with respect to corresponding quantities extracted from DNS data. Based on this assessment, existing models which are able to address the effects of non-unity Lewis number on turbulent scalar flux transport are identified, and new or modified models are suggested wherever necessary. In this way, a complete set of closure models for the scalar flux transport equation is prescribed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. (author)

  16. Effects of position and frequency of obstacles on turbulent premixed propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.; Masri, A.R.; Yaroshchyk, P.; Ibrahim, S.S.

    2009-02-15

    This paper studies the effects of the number and location of solid obstacles on the rate of propagation of turbulent premixed flames. A vented explosion chamber is constructed where controlled premixed flames are ignited from rest to propagate past grids or baffles plates as well as other solid obstacles strategically positioned in the chamber. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to image OH which is used as an indicator of the reaction zone while pressure transducers are used to obtain pressure-time traces. Single grids or baffle plates located at different distances from the ignition source are tested. Two as well as three baffle plates are also investigated in varying configurations. It is found that while the peak overpressure increases with increasing number of grids or baffle plates, a limit is reached where the pressure starts to decrease. The location of the obstacles is found to have a significant effect on the overpressure and the flame structure. Higher overpressures are obtained when the baffle plates and obstacles are stacked closer together hence not allowing turbulence to decay. LIF images for OH show that the reaction zones become more contorted with increasing number of baffle plates in the flame path. (author)

  17. Radiation properties of soot from premixed flat flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, M.B.; Vervisch, P.; Coppalle, A.

    1987-04-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of the radiation from luminous flames burning propane and methane fuels were carried out in the wavelength range from 0.4 ..mu..m to 5 ..mu..m and monochromatic spectra of the radiation from the soot particle cloud were measured. A large discrepancy between experimental and predicted k/sub lambda/ from Mie theory is observed. Calculations from Mie theory were performed to clarify the effect of the shape, size, and complex refractive index of soot particles.

  18. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiesset, F; Maurice, G; Halter, F; Mazellier, N; Chauveau, C; Gökalp, I

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar

  19. Characterization of flame front surfaces in turbulent premixed methane/air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, G.J.; Guelder, Oe.L.; Snelling, D.R.; Deschamps, B.M.; Goekalp, I.

    1995-06-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of the application of fractal geometry concepts in determining the turbulent burning velocity in the wrinkled flame regime of turbulent premixed combustion was conducted. The fractal dimension and cutoff scales were determined for six different turbulent flames in the wrinkled flame regime, where the turbulence intensity, turbulent length scale, and equivalence ratio were varied. Unlike previous reports, it has proved possible to obtain the fractal dimension and inner and outer cutoffs from individual flame images. From this individual data, the pdf distributions of all three fractal parameters, along with the distribution of the predicted increase in surface area, may be determined. The analysis of over 300 flame images for each flame condition provided a sufficient sample size to accurately define the pdf distributions and their means. However, the predicted S{sub T}/S{sub L}, calculated using fractal parameters, was significantly below the measured values. For conical flames, a geometrical modification factor was employed to predict S{sub T}/S{sub L}, however, this did little to improve the predictions. There appeared to be no dependence of the predicted S{sub T}/S{sub L} on the approach flow turbulence. The cutoffs did not seem to vary significantly with any of the length scales in the approach flow turbulence, although the fractal dimension did appear to have a weak dependence on u{prime}/S{sub L} and Re{sub {lambda}}. The probable reasons that fractal geometry does not correctly predict S{sub T}/S{sub L} are that S{sub T}/S{sub L} = A{sub w}/A{sub 0} does not hold in wrinkled turbulent premixed flames, that the flame front surface cannot be described by a single scaling exponent, or that these are not wrinkled flames. S{sub T} = turbulent burning velocity, S{sub L} = laminar burning velocity, A{sub w} = wrinkled flame surface area, and A{sub 0} = flow cross section area.

  20. Effect of fuel type on equivalence ratio measurements using chemiluminescence in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, Mikaël; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    Local temporally-resolved measurements of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals were obtained in premixed counterflow flames operating with propane and prevaporised fuels (isooctane, ethanol and methanol), for different equivalence ratios and strain rates. The results quantified independently the effects of fuel type, strain rate and equivalence ratio on chemiluminescent emissions from flames. The ability of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals to indicate heat release rate depends strongly on fuel type. The intensity ratio OH ∗/CH ∗ has a monotonic decrease with equivalence ratio for all fuels and can be used to measure equivalence ratio of the reacting mixture. For propane and isooctane, the OH ∗/CH ∗ ratio remains independent of flame strain rate, whereas some dependence is observed for ethanol and methanol.

  1. Influence of temperature and hydroxyl concentration on incipient soot formation in premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, M. M.; King, G. B.; Laurendeau, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Critical equivalence ratios phi(c) have been measured as a function of temperature (1600-1880 K) for premixed flames at atmospheric pressure. The five fuels studied are methane, ethane, propane, ethylene, and acetylene. The flames were stabilized on a flat flame burner and the temperatures were measured using sodium D-line reversal. A linear relationship is found between In phi(c) and 1/T for each fuel. Based on a global kinetic model in which soot precursors are formed by fuel pyrolysis and oxidized by OH, a predictive correlation has been developed which shows the influence of temperature, OH concentration, and C/H ratio on sooting tendency. This correlation describes all of the measured phi(c) versus temperature data, suggesting that the overall mechanism of soot formation is similar among aliphatic fuels.

  2. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  3. Potential-flow models for channelled two-dimensional premixed flames around near-circular obstacles.

    PubMed

    Joulin, G; Denet, B; El-Rabii, H

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional thin premixed flames is addressed in the framework of mathematical models where the flow field on either side of the front is piecewise incompressible and vorticity free. Flames confined in channels with asymptotically straight impenetrable walls are considered. Besides a few free propagations along straight channels, attention is focused on flames propagating against high-speed flows and positioned near a round central obstacle or near two symmetric bumps protruding inward. Combining conformal maps and Green's functions, a regularized generalization of Frankel's integro-differential equation for the instantaneous front shape in each configuration is derived and solved numerically. This produces a variety of real looking phenomena: steady fronts (symmetric or not), noise-induced subwrinkles, flashback events, and breathing fronts in pulsating flows. Perspectives and open mathematical and physical problems are finally evoked.

  4. Influence of temperature and hydroxyl concentration on incipient soot formation in premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, M. M.; King, G. B.; Laurendeau, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Critical equivalence ratios phi(c) have been measured as a function of temperature (1600-1880 K) for premixed flames at atmospheric pressure. The five fuels studied are methane, ethane, propane, ethylene, and acetylene. The flames were stabilized on a flat flame burner and the temperatures were measured using sodium D-line reversal. A linear relationship is found between In phi(c) and 1/T for each fuel. Based on a global kinetic model in which soot precursors are formed by fuel pyrolysis and oxidized by OH, a predictive correlation has been developed which shows the influence of temperature, OH concentration, and C/H ratio on sooting tendency. This correlation describes all of the measured phi(c) versus temperature data, suggesting that the overall mechanism of soot formation is similar among aliphatic fuels.

  5. Quantifying real-gas effects on a laminar n-dodecane - air premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Abishek; Yellapantula, Shashank; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing demand for higher efficiencies in aircraft gas-turbine engines, there has been a progressive march towards high pressure-ratio cycles. Under these conditions, the aviation fuel, Jet A, is injected into the combustor at supercritical pressures. In this work, we study and quantify the effects of transcriticality on a 1D freely propagating laminar n-dodecane - air premixed flame. The impact of the constitutive state relations arising from the Ideal Gas equation of state(EOS) and Peng-Robinson EOS on flame structure and propagation is presented. The effects of real-gas models of transport properties, such as viscosity on laminar flame speed, are also presented.

  6. Flow field studies of a new series of turbulent premixed stratified flames

    SciTech Connect

    Seffrin, F.; Fuest, F.; Dreizler, A.; Geyer, D.

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a new burner design for lean premixed stratified combustion for experiments to validate models for numerical simulations. The burner demonstrates combustion phenomena relevant to technological applications, where flames are often turbulent, lean premixed, and stratified. The generic burner was designed for high Reynolds number flows and can stabilize a variety of different lean premixed flames. The burner's design and its versatile operational conditions are introduced. Shear, stratification, and fuel type are parametrically varied to provide a sound database of related flow configurations. Reacting and corresponding non-reacting configurations are examined. Experimental setups and the results of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are presented and discussed. LDV measurements provide radial profiles of mean axial velocity, mean radial velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy as well as integral time scales. High-speed PIV is introduced as a novel technique to determine integral time and length scales and provide 2D 2-component velocity fields and related quantities, such as vorticity. (author)

  7. Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Peer -Timo; Weber, Gunther H.; Pascucci, Valerio; Day, Marc; Bell, John B.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents topology-based methods to robustly extract, analyze, and track features defined as subsets of isosurfaces. First, we demonstrate how features identified by thresholding isosurfaces can be defined in terms of the Morse complex. Second, we present a specialized hierarchy that encodes the feature segmentation independent of the threshold while still providing a flexible multi-resolution representation. Third, for a given parameter selection we create detailed tracking graphs representing the complete evolution of all features in a combustion simulation over several hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information with interactive rendering of the segmented isosurfaces enabling an in-depth analysis of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally extinguished regions. The number, area, and evolution over time of these cells provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. Utilizing the hierarchy we can perform an extensive parameter study without re-processing the data for each set of parameters. The resulting statistics enable scientist to select appropriate parameters and provide insight into the sensitivity of the results wrt. to the choice of parameters. Our method allows for the first time to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected. In particular, our analysis shows that counter-intuitively stronger turbulence leads to larger cell structures, which burn more intensely than expected. This behavior suggests that flames could be stabilized under much leaner conditions than previously anticipated.

  8. Analyzing and tracking burning structures in lean premixed hydrogen flames.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Weber, Gunther H; Pascucci, Valerio; Day, Marc; Bell, John B

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents topology-based methods to robustly extract, analyze, and track features defined as subsets of isosurfaces. First, we demonstrate how features identified by thresholding isosurfaces can be defined in terms of the Morse complex. Second, we present a specialized hierarchy that encodes the feature segmentation independent of the threshold while still providing a flexible multiresolution representation. Third, for a given parameter selection, we create detailed tracking graphs representing the complete evolution of all features in a combustion simulation over several hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information with interactive rendering of the segmented isosurfaces enabling an in-depth analysis of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally extinguished regions. The number, area, and evolution over time of these cells provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. Utilizing the hierarchy, we can perform an extensive parameter study without reprocessing the data for each set of parameters. The resulting statistics enable scientists to select appropriate parameters and provide insight into the sensitivity of the results with respect to the choice of parameters. Our method allows for the first time to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected. In particular, our analysis shows that counterintuitively stronger turbulence leads to larger cell structures, which burn more intensely than expected. This behavior suggests that flames could be stabilized under much leaner conditions than previously anticipated.

  9. Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed V-Flames Part I: Laminar and Turblent Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.; Bedat, Benoit; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Laser schlieren and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques have been used to investigate laminar and turbulent v-flames in +g, -g, and micro g under flow conditions that span the regimes of momentum domination (Ri < 0. 1) and buoyancy domination (Ri > 0.1). Overall flame features shown by schlieren indicate that buoyancy dominates the entire flow field for conditions close to Ri = 1. With decreasing Ri, buoyancy effects are observed only in the far-field regions. Analyses of the mean flame angles demonstrate that laminar and turbulent flames do not have similar responses to buoyancy. Difference in the laminar +g and -g flame angles decrease with Ri (i.e., increasing Re) and converge to the microgravity flame angle at the momentum limit (Ri - 0). This is consistent with the notion that the effects of buoyancy diminish with increasing flow momentum. The +g and -g turbulent flame angles, however, do not converge at Ri = 0. As shown by OH-PLIF images, the inconsistency in +g and -g turbulent flame angles is associated with the differences in flame wrinkles. Turbulent flame wrinkles evolve more slowly in +g than in -g. The difference in flame wrinkle structures, however, cannot be explained in terms of buoyancy effects on flame instability mechanisms. It seems to be associated with the field effects of buoyancy that stretches the turbulent flame brushes in +g and compresses the flame brush in -g. Flame wrinkling offers a mechanism through which the flame responds to the field effects of buoyancy despite increasing flow momentum. These observations point to the need to include both upstream and downstream contributions in theoretical analysis of flame turbulence interactions.

  10. Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed V-Flames Part I: Laminar and Turblent Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.; Bedat, Benoit; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Laser schlieren and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques have been used to investigate laminar and turbulent v-flames in +g, -g, and micro g under flow conditions that span the regimes of momentum domination (Ri < 0. 1) and buoyancy domination (Ri > 0.1). Overall flame features shown by schlieren indicate that buoyancy dominates the entire flow field for conditions close to Ri = 1. With decreasing Ri, buoyancy effects are observed only in the far-field regions. Analyses of the mean flame angles demonstrate that laminar and turbulent flames do not have similar responses to buoyancy. Difference in the laminar +g and -g flame angles decrease with Ri (i.e., increasing Re) and converge to the microgravity flame angle at the momentum limit (Ri - 0). This is consistent with the notion that the effects of buoyancy diminish with increasing flow momentum. The +g and -g turbulent flame angles, however, do not converge at Ri = 0. As shown by OH-PLIF images, the inconsistency in +g and -g turbulent flame angles is associated with the differences in flame wrinkles. Turbulent flame wrinkles evolve more slowly in +g than in -g. The difference in flame wrinkle structures, however, cannot be explained in terms of buoyancy effects on flame instability mechanisms. It seems to be associated with the field effects of buoyancy that stretches the turbulent flame brushes in +g and compresses the flame brush in -g. Flame wrinkling offers a mechanism through which the flame responds to the field effects of buoyancy despite increasing flow momentum. These observations point to the need to include both upstream and downstream contributions in theoretical analysis of flame turbulence interactions.

  11. Stability of a premixed flame in stagnation-point flow against general disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas L.; Matalon, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Previously, the stability of a premixed flame in a stagnation flow was discussed for a restricted class of disturbances that are self-similar to the basic undisturbed flow; thus, flame fronts with corrugations only in the cross stream direction were considered. Here, we consider a more general class of three-dimensional flame front perturbations which also permits corrugations in the streamwise direction. It is shown that, because of the stretch experienced by the flame, the hydrodynamic instability is limited only to disturbances of short wavelength. If in addition diffusion effects have a stabilizing influence, as would be the case of mixtures with Lewis number greater than one, a stretched flame could be absolutely stable. Instabilities occur when the Lewis number is below some critical value less than one. Neutral stability boundaries are presented in terms of the Lewis number, the strain rate, and the appropriate wavenumbers. Beyond the stability threshold, the two-dimensional self-similar modes always grow first. However, if disturbances of long wavelength are excluded, it is possible for the three-dimensional modes to be the least stable one. Accordingly, the pattern that will be observed on the flame front, at the onset of instability, will consist of either ridges in the direction of stretch or the more common three-dimensional cellular structure.

  12. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  13. Interplay of Darrieus-Landau instability and weak turbulence in premixed flame propagation.

    PubMed

    Creta, Francesco; Lamioni, Rachele; Lapenna, Pasquale Eduardo; Troiani, Guido

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigate, both numerically and experimentally, the interplay between the intrinsic Darrieus-Landau (DL) or hydrodynamic instability of a premixed flame and the moderately turbulent flow field in which the flame propagates. The objective is threefold: to establish, unambiguously, through a suitably defined marker, the presence or absence of DL-induced effects on the turbulent flame, to quantify the DL effects on the flame propagation and morphology and, finally, to asses whether such effects are mitigated or suppressed as the turbulence intensity is increased. The numerical simulations are based on a deficient reactant model which lends itself to a wealth of results from asymptotic theory, such as the determination of stability limits. The skewness of the flame curvature probability density function is identified as an unambiguous morphological marker for the presence or absence of DL effects in a turbulent environment. In addition, the turbulent propagation speed is shown to exhibit a distinct dual behavior whereby it is noticeably enhanced in the presence of DL instability while it is unchanged otherwise. Furthermore, increasing the turbulence intensity is found to be mitigating with respect to DL-induced effects such as the mentioned dual behavior which disappears at higher intensities. Experimental propane and/or air Bunsen flames are also investigated, utilizing two distinct diameters, respectively, above and below the estimated DL cutoff wavelength. Curvature skewness is still clearly observed to act as a marker for DL instability while the turbulent propagation speed is concurrently enhanced in the presence of the instability.

  14. Soot volume fraction in a piloted turbulent jet non-premixed flame of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Qamar, N.H.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Chan, Q.N.; Nathan, G.J.; Roekaerts, D.

    2009-07-15

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) has been used to measure soot volume fraction in a well-characterised, piloted, turbulent non-premixed flame known as the ''Delft Flame III''. Simulated Dutch natural gas was used as the fuel to produce a flame closely matching those in which a wide range of previous investigations, both experimental and modelling, have been performed. The LII method was calibrated using a Santoro-style burner with ethylene as the fuel. Instantaneous and time-averaged data of the axial and radial soot volume fraction distributions of the flame are presented here along with the Probability Density Functions (PDFs) and intermittency. The PDFs were found to be well-characterised by a single exponential distribution function. The distribution of soot was found to be highly intermittent, with intermittency typically exceeding 97%, which increases measurement uncertainty. The instantaneous values of volume fraction are everywhere less than the values in strained laminar flames. This is consistent with the soot being found locally in strained flame sheets that are convected and distorted by the flow. (author)

  15. Quasi-steady stages in the process of premixed flame acceleration in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, D. M.; Bychkov, V.; Akkerman, V.; Eriksson, L.-E.; Law, C. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present paper addresses the phenomenon of spontaneous acceleration of a premixed flame front propagating in micro-channels, with subsequent deflagration-to-detonation transition. It has recently been shown experimentally [M. Wu, M. Burke, S. Son, and R. Yetter, Proc. Combust. Inst. 31, 2429 (2007)], 10.1016/j.proci.2006.08.098, computationally [D. Valiev, V. Bychkov, V. Akkerman, and L.-E. Eriksson, Phys. Rev. E 80, 036317 (2009)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.036317, and analytically [V. Bychkov, V. Akkerman, D. Valiev, and C. K. Law, Phys. Rev. E 81, 026309 (2010)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.026309 that the flame acceleration undergoes different stages, from an initial exponential regime to quasi-steady fast deflagration with saturated velocity. The present work focuses on the final saturation stages in the process of flame acceleration, when the flame propagates with supersonic velocity with respect to the channel walls. It is shown that an intermediate stage may occur during acceleration with quasi-steady velocity, noticeably below the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration speed. The intermediate stage is followed by additional flame acceleration and subsequent saturation to the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration regime. We elucidate the intermediate stage by the joint effect of gas pre-compression ahead of the flame front and the hydraulic resistance. The additional acceleration is related to viscous heating at the channel walls, being of key importance at the final stages. The possibility of explosion triggering is also demonstrated.

  16. Interplay of Darrieus-Landau instability and weak turbulence in premixed flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creta, Francesco; Lamioni, Rachele; Lapenna, Pasquale Eduardo; Troiani, Guido

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigate, both numerically and experimentally, the interplay between the intrinsic Darrieus-Landau (DL) or hydrodynamic instability of a premixed flame and the moderately turbulent flow field in which the flame propagates. The objective is threefold: to establish, unambiguously, through a suitably defined marker, the presence or absence of DL-induced effects on the turbulent flame, to quantify the DL effects on the flame propagation and morphology and, finally, to asses whether such effects are mitigated or suppressed as the turbulence intensity is increased. The numerical simulations are based on a deficient reactant model which lends itself to a wealth of results from asymptotic theory, such as the determination of stability limits. The skewness of the flame curvature probability density function is identified as an unambiguous morphological marker for the presence or absence of DL effects in a turbulent environment. In addition, the turbulent propagation speed is shown to exhibit a distinct dual behavior whereby it is noticeably enhanced in the presence of DL instability while it is unchanged otherwise. Furthermore, increasing the turbulence intensity is found to be mitigating with respect to DL-induced effects such as the mentioned dual behavior which disappears at higher intensities. Experimental propane and/or air Bunsen flames are also investigated, utilizing two distinct diameters, respectively, above and below the estimated DL cutoff wavelength. Curvature skewness is still clearly observed to act as a marker for DL instability while the turbulent propagation speed is concurrently enhanced in the presence of the instability.

  17. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  18. Response dynamics of bluff-body stabilized conical premixed turbulent flames with spatial mixture gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2009-03-15

    Response of bluff-body stabilized conical turbulent premixed flames was experimentally studied for a range of excitation frequencies (10-400 Hz), mean flow velocities (5, 10 and 15 m/s) and three different spatial mixture distributions (uniform, inner and outer enrichment). Upstream excitation was provided by a loudspeaker producing velocity oscillation amplitudes of about 8% of the mean flow velocity. Flame response was detected by a photomultiplier observing the CH{sup *} emission from the flame. The studied turbulent flames exhibited transfer function characteristics of a low-pass filter with a cutoff Strouhal number between 0.08 and 0.12. The amplification factors at low frequencies ranged from 2 to 20 and generally increased for mean flow velocities from 5 to 15 m/s. The highest levels of amplification were found for the outer mixture enrichment followed in decreasing order by uniform and inner mixture gradient cases. The high levels of flame response for the outer enrichment case were attributed to the enhanced flame-vortex interaction in outer jet shear layer. At high excitation levels (u{sup '}/U{sub m}{approx}0.3) for U{sub m}=5 m/ s where non-linear flame response is expected, the flame exhibited a reduced amplitude response in the frequency range between 40 and 100 Hz for the uniform and outer equivalence ratio gradient cases and no discernible effect for the inner equivalence ratio gradient. In all cases, transfer function phase was found to vary linearly with excitation frequency. Finally, a relationship between the amplitude characteristics of the bluff-body wake transfer function and flame blowoff equivalence ratio was presented. (author)

  19. Turbulent combustion of premixed flames in closed vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Checkel, M.D. . Mechanical Engineering); Thomas, A. . Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    An extensive series of experiments on spark-ignited explosion of propane-air mixtures in both turbulent and quiescent conditions in a cubic closed vessel is described. Turbulence was produced by a moving grid, and the development with time of pressure and of flame area (from light emission) recorded. The effects of grid-hole diameter, grid velocity, spark timing after passage of the grid, equivalence ratio, and initial pressure were investigated. Estimates of the rate of strain in the unburnt gases were derived from hot-wire anemometry. Results indicated that rate of strain was a major factor governing the rate of combustion. Theoretical simulations of explosions with a simple model were made, in which turbulence was characterized solely by the rate of strain, and in which the decay of turbulence during explosions and the effect of changes in pressure on both burning velocity and flow field were taken into account. The simulations were compared with experimental results, and reinforced the idea that turbulence has the dual effect of causing wrinkling of flames and, especially for weaker mixtures, reducing the burning velocity. An empirical relationship was found in which the logarithmic rate of wrinkling was proportional to the square root of the rate of strain. Some simple conclusions are drawn regarding practical application of the results.

  20. Effects of porous insert on flame dynamics in a lean premixed swirl-stabilized combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Marcus; Agrawal, Ajay; Allen, James; Kornegay, John

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated different methods of determining the effect a porous insert has on flame dynamics during lean premixed combustion. A metallic porous insert is used to mitigate instabilities in a swirl-stabilized combustor. Thermoacoustic instabilities are seen as negative consequences of lean premixed combustion and eliminating them is the motivation for our research. Three different diagnostics techniques with high-speed Photron SA5 cameras were used to monitor flame characteristics. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe vortical structures and recirculation zones within the combustor. Using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), we were able to observe changes in the reaction zones during instabilities. Finally, utilizing a color high-speed camera, visual images depicting a flame's oscillations during the instability were captured. Using these monitoring techniques, we are able to support the claims made in previous studies stating that the porous insert in the combustor significantly reduces the thermoacoustic instability. Funding for this research was provided by the NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 and NASA Grant NNX13AN14A.

  1. Large eddy simulation of soot formation in a turbulent non-premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Menon, Suresh

    2009-02-15

    A recently developed subgrid model for soot dynamics [H. El-Asrag, T. Lu, C.K. Law, S. Menon, Combust. Flame 150 (2007) 108-126] is used to study the soot formation in a non-premixed turbulent flame. The model allows coupling between reaction, diffusion and soot (including soot diffusion and thermophoretic forces) processes in the subgrid domain without requiring ad hoc filtering or model parameter adjustments. The combined model includes the entire process, from the initial phase, when the soot nucleus diameter is much smaller than the mean free path, to the final phase, after coagulation and aggregation, where it can be considered in the continuum regime. A relatively detailed but reduced kinetics for ethylene-air is used to simulate an experimentally studied non-premixed ethylene/air jet diffusion flame. Acetylene is used as a soot precursor species. The soot volume fraction order of magnitude, the location of its maxima, and the soot particle size distribution are all captured reasonably. Along the centerline, an initial region dominated by nucleation and surface growth is established followed by an oxidation region. The diffusion effect is found to be most important in the nucleation regime, while the thermophoretic forces become more influential downstream of the potential core in the oxidation zone. The particle size distribution shows a log-normal distribution in the nucleation region, and a more Gaussian like distribution further downstream. Limitations of the current approach and possible solution strategies are also discussed. (author)

  2. Effects of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsell, Guillaume; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    The need for a thorough understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible flows is driven by recent technological developments in propulsion as well as renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. In such flows, pressure fluctuations displaying a wide range of length and timescales are present. These fluctuations are expected to impact the combustion process to varying degrees, depending amongst other things on the amplitude of the pressure variations and the timescales of the chemical reactions taking place in the flame. In this context, numerical simulations of these flows can provide insight into the impact of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process. In the present work, we analyze data from simulations of statistically-flat premixed n-heptane/air flames at high Karlovitz numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved exactly (DNS) and results obtained with both detailed kinetic modeling and one-step chemistry are considered. The effects of pressure fluctuations on the fuel burning rate are investigated. The findings are compared with results obtained from simulations of one-dimensional premixed flames subjected to various pressure waves.

  3. Structure and dynamics of premixed flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal

    1993-01-01

    In this report we describe the research performed at the Naval Research Laboratory in support of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program over the past three years with emphasis on the work performed since February 1992, the beginning of the current project. The focus of our research has been on investigating fundamental combustion questions concerning the propagation and extinction of gas-phase flames in microgravity and earth-gravity environments. Our approach to resolving these fundamental questions has been to use detailed time-dependent, multidimensional numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments. The basic questions we have addressed, a general description of the numerical approach, and a summary of the results are described in this report. More detailed discussions are available in the papers published which are referenced herein.

  4. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  5. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  6. Combustion oscillation monitoring using flame ionization in a turbulent premixed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-04-01

    To achieve very low NOx emission levels, lean-premixed gas turbine combustors have been commercially implemented that operate near the fuel-lean flame extinction limit. Near the lean limit, however, flashback, lean blow off, and combustion dynamics have appeared as problems during operation. To help address these operational problems, a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine combustors is being developed. CCADS uses the electrical properties of the flame to detect key events and monitor critical operating parameters within the combustor. Previous development efforts have shown the capability of CCADS to monitor flashback and equivalence ratio. Recent work has focused on detecting and measuring combustion instabilities. A highly instrumented atmospheric combustor has been used to measure the pressure oscillations in the combustor, the OH emission, and the flame ion field at the premix injector outlet and along the walls of the combustor. This instrumentation allows examination of the downstream extent of the combustion field using both the OH emission and the corresponding electron and ion distribution near the walls of the combustor. In most cases, the strongest pressure oscillation dominates the frequency behavior of the OH emission and the flame ion signals. Using this highly instrumented combustor, tests were run over a matrix of equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 0.8, with an inlet reference velocity of 25 m/s 82 ft/ s . The acoustics of the fuel system for the combustor were tuned using an active-passive technique with an adjustable quarter-wave resonator. Although several statistics were investigated for correlation with the dynamic pressure in the combustor, the best correlation was found with the standard deviation of the guard current. The data show a monotonic relationship between the standard deviation of the guard current (the current through the flame at the premix injector outlet) and the standard deviation of the chamber

  7. LES of a bluff-body stabilized premixed flame using discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias; Stanford University Team

    2016-11-01

    This talk focuses on the development of a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for application to chemically reacting flows. To enable these simulations, several algorithmic aspects are addressed, including the time-integration of multi-step chemical reactions, the incorporation of detailed thermo-viscous transport properties, and the stabilization of high-order solution representation. This DG solver is applied in implicit LES of a turbulent bluff-body stabilized propane/air premixed flame. The simulation results for cold-flow and reacting conditions are reported and compared to experimental data.

  8. Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water

    SciTech Connect

    Sivasegaram, S.; Tsai, R.F.; Whitelaw, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    The antinodal rms pressure fluctuations of a ducted premixed flame has been reduced from 9 to 1.75 kPa by pulsed injection of water with heat removal of less than 3% of the total heat release of 150 kW. A corresponding benefit was the reduction in NO{sub x} emissions from 65 to 30 ppm. Several control strategies were considered and active control based on the oscillation of injection at the same phase as that of the oscillations was found to provide the best combination of attenuation and NO{sub x} reduction.

  9. Dynamics of flow-soot interaction in wrinkled non-premixed ethylene-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paul G.; Lecoustre, Vivien R.; Roy, Somesh; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Daniel C.; Lu, Tianfeng; Trouvé, Arnaud; Im, Hong G.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional simulation of a non-premixed ethylene-air flame was conducted by employing a detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism considering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an aerosol-dynamics-based soot model using a method of moments with interpolative closure, and a grey gas and soot radiation model using the discrete transfer method. Interaction of the sooting flame with a prescribed decaying random velocity field was investigated, with a primary interest in the effects of velocity fluctuations on the flame structure and the associated soot formation process for a fuel-strip configuration and a composition with mature soot growth. The temporally evolving simulation revealed a multi-layered soot formation process within the flame, at a level of detail not properly described by previous studies based on simplified soot models utilizing acetylene or naphthalene precursors for initial soot inception. The overall effect of the flame topology on the soot formation was found to be consistent with previous experimental studies, while a unique behaviour of localised strong oxidation was also noted. The imposed velocity fluctuations led to an increase of the scalar dissipation rate in the sooting zone, causing a net suppression in the soot production rate. Considering the complex structure of the soot formation layer, the effects of the imposed fluctuations vary depending on the individual soot reactions. For the conditions under study, the soot oxidation reaction was identified as the most sensitive to the fluctuations and was mainly responsible for the local suppression of the net soot production.

  10. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  11. Structure of Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60 - 2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  12. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60-2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  13. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60-2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  14. Structure of Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60 - 2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  15. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q.; Nathan, G.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  16. An experimental and kinetic investigation of premixed furan/oxygen/argon flames

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenyu; Yuan, Tao; Fournet, Rene; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Zhang, Kuiwen; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The detailed chemical structures of three low-pressure (35 Torr) premixed laminar furan/oxygen/argon flames with equivalence ratios of 1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 have been investigated by using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry. About 40 combustion species including hydrocarbons and oxygenated intermediates have been identified by measurements of photoionization efficiency spectra. Mole fraction profiles of the flame species including reactants, intermediates and products have been determined by scanning burner position with some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds. Flame temperatures have been measured by a Pt-6%Rh/Pt-30%Rh thermocouple. A new mechanism involving 206 species and 1368 reactions has been proposed whose predictions are in reasonable agreement with measured species profiles for the three investigated flames. Rate-of-production and sensitivity analyses have been performed to track the key reaction paths governing furan consumption for different equivalence ratios. Both experimental and modeling results indicate that few aromatics could be formed in these flames. Furthermore, the current model has been validated against previous pyrolysis results of the literature obtained behind shock waves and the agreement is reasonable as well. PMID:23814311

  17. Low pressure premixed CH4/air flames with forced periodic mixture fraction oscillations: experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ax, H.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.; König, K.; Maas, U.; Class, A.; Aigner, M.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental setup for the generation and investigation of periodic equivalence ratio oscillations in laminar premixed flames is presented. A special low-pressure burner was developed which generates stable flames in a wide pressure range down to 20 mbar and provides the possibility of rapid mixture fraction variations. The technical realization of the mixture fraction variations and the characteristics of the burner are described. 1D laser Raman scattering was applied to determine the temperature and concentration profiles of the major species through the flame front in correlation to the phase-angle of the periodic oscillation. OH* chemiluminescence was detected to qualitatively analyze the response of the flame to mixture fraction variations by changing shape and position. Exemplary results from a flame at p=69 mbar, forced at a frequency of 10 Hz, are shown and discussed. The experiments are part of a cooperative research project including the development of kinetic models and numerical simulation tools with the aim of a better understanding and prediction of periodic combustion instabilities in gas turbines. The focus of the current paper lies on the presentation of the experimental realization and the measuring techniques.

  18. Analysis of the electric currents in 1D premixed flames under applied voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Casey, Tiernan; Im, Hong G.; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Studying electric currents in flames has practical aspects such as the determination of the ionic structure of a flame, the analysis of the flame behavior under an electric field and the use of flame electric properties for combustion diagnostics. This study proposes a simplified model to compute the electric currents in lean-to-stoichiometric 1D premixed flames under applied voltages. The Navier-Stokes equations coupled with transport equations for neutral and charged species along with a Poisson equation for the electric potential are solved. The model reproduces qualitatively the voltage-current characteristic found experimentally. The sensitivity of the electric currents to the applied voltage, equivalence ratio, and pressure is studied and the key parameters affecting the saturation current are determined. Results show that the saturation current is controlled by the amount of charged species created by the chemi-ionization reaction. We found that the recombination rate of electrons with cations and transport coefficients of charged species are the most important parameters affecting the voltage at witch saturation occurs. Analytical formulas for the voltage-current characteristic and the potential of saturation are developed and used to explain the obtained results.

  19. Measurements of fuel mixture fraction oscillations of a turbulent jet non-premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kanga, D.M.; Fernandez, V.; Culick, F.E.C.; Ratner, A.

    2009-01-15

    This work describes new type of combustion instability for which the 3-way coupling between mixing, flame heat release, and acoustics is modified by local buoyancy effects. Measurements of fuel mixture fraction are made for a non-premixed jet flame in a combustion chamber to assess the dynamics of mixing under imposed acoustic oscillations (22-55 Hz). Infrared laser absorption and phase resolved acetone-planar laser induced fluorescence are used to measure the fuel mixture fraction and then the degree of fuel/air mixing is calculated by determining the unmixedness. Results show acoustic excitation causes oscillations in the degree of fuel/air mixing at the driving frequency, which results in oscillatory flame behavior. This oscillatory flame behavior couples to the buoyancy and this in turn affects the mixing. Results also show that the mixing becomes less effective when the excitation frequency is increased or when the flame is present, compared to the non-reacting case. This work describes a key coupling mechanism that occurs when buoyancy is a significant factor in the flow field. (author)

  20. Premixed Atmosphere and Convection Influences on Flame Inhibition and Combustion (Pacific)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, Linton K.; Ronney, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    Flame spread over flat solid fuel beds is a useful paradigm for studying the behavior of more complex two-phase nonpremixed flames. For practical applications, two of the most important elements of flame spreading are the effects of (1) the ambient atmosphere (e.g. pressure and composition) and (2) the flow environment on the spread rate and extinction conditions. Concerning (1), studies of flame spread in vitiated air and non-standard atmospheres such as those found in undersea vessels and spacecraft are particularly important for the assessment of fire hazards in these environments as well as determination of the effectiveness of fire suppressants. Concerning (2), the flow environment may vary widely even when no forced flow is present because of buoyancy effects. Consequently, the goal of this work is to employ microgravity (micro g) experiments to extend previous studies of the effects of ambient atmosphere and the flow environment on flame spread through the use of microgravity (micro g) experiments. Because of the considerable differences between upward (concurrent-flow) and downward (opposed-flow) flame spread at 1g (Williams, 1976, Fernandez-Pello, 1984), in this work both upward and downward 1g spread are tested. Two types of changes to the oxidizing atmosphere are considered in this work. One is the addition of sub-flammability-limit concentrations of a gaseous fuel ('partially premixed' atmospheres). This is of interest because in fires in enclosures, combustion may occur under poorly ventilated conditions, so that oxygen is partially depleted from the air and is replaced by combustible gases such as fuel vapors, H2 or CO. Subsequent fire spread over the solid fuel could occur under conditions of varying oxygen and gaseous fuel content. The potential significance of flame spread under vitiated or partially premixed conditions has been noted previously (Beyler, 1984). The second change is the diluent type, which affects the radiative properties of the

  1. Identification and Chemistry of Phenylnitrene in Premixed Pyridine/Oxygen/Argon Flame with Tunable Synchrotron Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen-yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Jing; Li, Yu-yang; Zhang, Tai-chang; Zhu, Ai-guo; Qi, Fei

    2007-08-01

    The triplet state phenylnitrene (PhN) species generated from the low-pressure (4.0 kPa) premixed laminar pyridine/oxygen/argon flame was detected and identified using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry techniques. The ionization energies of PhN were determined experimentally by photoionization efficiency spectra and theoretically by calculations. The results indicate that PhN has a 3A2 ground state and its first and second adiabatic ionization energies are 8.04 and 9.15±0.05 eV, respectively. Furthermore, the formation and consumption pathways of PhN are proposed according to the species detected in the present work. PhN is the first nitrogen-containing diradical detected in combustion chemistry, and so it should be added to the kinetic model of pyridine flames.

  2. Wavelet multi-resolution analysis of energy transfer in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Bassenne, Maxime; Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter; Ihme, Matthias; Urzay, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames are examined using wavelet multi-resolution analyses (WMRA) as a diagnostics tool to evaluate the spatially localized inter-scale energy transfer in reacting flows. In non-reacting homogeneous-isotropic turbulence, the net energy transfer occurs from large to small scales on average, thus following the classical Kolmogorov energy cascade. However, in turbulent flames, our prior work suggests that thermal expansion leads to a small-scale pressure-work contribution that transfers energy in an inverse cascade on average, which has important consequences for LES modeling of reacting flows. The current study employs WMRA to investigate, simultaneously in physical and spectral spaces, the characteristics of this combustion-induced backscatter effect. The WMRA diagnostics provide spatial statistics of the spectra, scale-conditioned intermittency of velocity and vorticity, along with energy-transfer fluxes conditioned on the local progress variable.

  3. Studies in premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on premixed combustion: theory of turbulent flame propagation; pattern formation in premixed flames and related problems; and pattern formation in extended systems. (LSP)

  4. Flame front surface characteristics in turbulent premixed propane/air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Guelder, O.L.; Smallwood, G.J.; Wong, R.; Snelling, D.R.; Smith, R.; Deschamps, B.M.; Sautet, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of the flame front surfaces in turbulent premixed propane/air flames were investigated. Flame front images were obtained using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of OH and Mie scattering on two Bunsen-type burners of 11.2-mm and 22.4-mm diameters. Nondimensional turbulence intensity, u{prime}/S{sub L}, was varied from 0.9 to 15, and the Reynolds number, based on the integral length scale, varied from 40 to 467. Approximately 100 images were recorded for each experimental condition. Fractal parameters (fractal dimension, inner and outer cutoffs) and corresponding standard deviations were determined by analysis of the flame front images using the caliper technique. The fractal dimensions derived from OH and Mie scattering images are almost identical. However, inner and outer cutoffs from OH images are consistently higher than those obtained from Mie scattering. The self-similar region of the flame front wrinkling is about a decade for all flames studied. In the nondimensional turbulence intensity range from 1 to 15, it was found that the mean fractal dimension is about 2.2 and it does not show any dependence on turbulence intensity. This contradicts the findings of the previous studies that showed that the fractal dimension asymptotically reaches to 2.35--2.37 when the nondimensional turbulence intensity u{prime}/S{sub L} exceeds 3. It is shown that the reason for this discrepancy is the image analysis method used in the previous studies. Examples are given to show the inadequacy of the circle method used in previous studies for extraction of fractal parameters from flame front images. The fractal parameters obtained so far, in this and previous studies, are not capable of correctly predicting the turbulent burning velocity using the available fractal area closure model.

  5. Computational study of lean premixed turbulent flames using RANSPDF and LESPDF methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowinski, David H.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is performed on a series of four piloted, lean, premixed turbulent jet flames. These flames use the Sydney Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB), and with jet velocities of 50, 100, 150 and 200 m/s are denoted PM150, PM1100, PM1150 and PM1200, respectively. Calculations are performed using the RANSPDF and LESPDF methodologies, with different treatments of molecular diffusion, with detailed chemistry and flamelet-based chemistry modelling, and using different imposed boundary conditions. The sensitivities of the calculations to these different aspects of the modelling are compared and discussed. Comparisons are made to experimental data and to previously-performed calculations. It is found that, given suitable boundary conditions and treatment of molecular diffusion, excellent agreement between the calculations and experimental measurements of the mean and variance fields can be achieved for PM150 and PM1100. The application of a recently developed implementation of molecular diffusion results in a large improvement in the computed variance fields in the LESPDF calculations. The inclusion of differential diffusion in the LESPDF calculations provides insight on the behaviour in the near-field region of the jet, but its effects are found to be confined to this region and to the species CO, OH and H2. A major discrepancy observed in many previous calculations of these flames is an overprediction of reaction progress in PM1150 and PM1200, and this discrepancy is also observed in the LESPDF calculations; however, a parametric study of the LESPDF mixing model reveals that, with a sufficiently large mixing frequency, calculations of these two flames are capable of yielding improved reaction progress in good qualitative agreement with the mean and RMS scalar measurements up to an x/D of 30. Lastly, the merits of each computational methodology are discussed in light of their computational costs.

  6. A mixing timescale model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames

    DOE PAGES

    Kuron, Michael; Ren, Zhuyin; Hawkes, Evatt R.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) methods are an attractive modeling approach for turbulent flames as chemical reactions appear in closed form. However, molecular micro-mixing needs to be modeled and this modeling is considered a primary challenge for TPDF methods. In the present study, a new algebraic mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames is proposed, which is a key ingredient in commonly used molecular mixing models. The new model aims to properly account for the transition in reactive scalar mixing rate behavior from the limit of turbulence-dominated mixing to molecular mixing behavior in flamelets. An a priorimore » assessment of the new model is performed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a lean premixed hydrogen–air jet flame. The new model accurately captures the mixing timescale behavior in the DNS and is found to be a significant improvement over the commonly used constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing timescale ratio model. An a posteriori TPDF study is then performed using the same DNS data as a numerical test bed. The DNS provides the initial conditions and time-varying input quantities, including the mean velocity, turbulent diffusion coefficient, and modeled scalar mixing rate for the TPDF simulations, thus allowing an exclusive focus on the mixing model. Here, the new mixing timescale model is compared with the constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing timescale ratio coupled with the Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) mixing model, as well as a laminar flamelet closure. It is found that the laminar flamelet closure is unable to properly capture the mixing behavior in the thin reaction zones regime while the constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing timescale model under-predicts the flame speed. Furthermore, the EMST model coupled with the new mixing timescale model provides the best prediction of the flame structure and flame propagation among the models tested, as the dynamics of reactive

  7. Effects of CO addition on the characteristics of laminar premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-Y.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-P.; Ho, C.-T.; Cheng, T.S.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of CO addition on the characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/air opposed-jet flames are investigated experimentally and numerically. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of the flame front position, temperature, and velocity are performed in stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames with various CO contents in the fuel. Thermocouple is used for the determination of flame temperature, velocity measurement is made using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the flame front position is measured by direct photograph as well as with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) of OH imaging techniques. The laminar burning velocity is calculated using the PREMIX code of Chemkin collection 3.5. The flame structures of the premixed stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air opposed-jet flames are simulated using the OPPDIF package with GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanisms and detailed transport properties. The measured flame front position, temperature, and velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames are closely predicted by the numerical calculations. Detailed analysis of the calculated chemical kinetic structures reveals that as the CO content in the fuel is increased from 0% to 80%, CO oxidation (R99) increases significantly and contributes to a significant level of heat-release rate. It is also shown that the laminar burning velocity reaches a maximum value (57.5 cm/s) at the condition of 80% of CO in the fuel. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, the chemistry of CO consumption shifts to the dry oxidation kinetics when CO content is further increased over 80%. Comparison between the results of computed laminar burning velocity, flame temperature, CO consumption rate, and sensitivity analysis reveals that the effect of CO addition on the laminar burning velocity of the stoichiometric CH{sub 4}/CO/air flames is due mostly to the transition of the dominant chemical kinetic steps. (author)

  8. Chemical kinetic considerations for postflame synthesis of carbon nanotubes in premixed flames using a support catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, Prarthana; Gore, Jay

    2007-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a grid supported cobalt nanocatalyst were grown, by exposing it to combustion gases from ethylene/air rich premixed flames. Ten equivalence ratios ({phi}) were investigated, as follows: 1.37, 1.44, 1.47, 1.50, 1.55, 1.57, 1.62, 1.75, 1.82, and 1.91. MWCNT growth could be observed for the range of equivalence ratios between 1.45 and 1.75, with the best yield restricted to the range 1.5-1.6. A one-dimensional premixed flame code with a postflame heat loss model, including detailed chemistry, was used to estimate the gas phase chemical composition that favors MWCNT growth. The results of the calculations show that the mixture, including the water gas shift reaction, is not even in partial chemical equilibrium. Therefore, past discussions of compositional parameters that relate to optimum carbon nanotube (CNT) growth are revised to include chemical kinetic effects. Specifically, rapid departures of the water gas shift reaction from partial equilibrium and changes in mole fraction ratios of unburned C{sub 2} hydrocarbons to hydrogen correlate well with experimentally observed CNT yields. (author)

  9. Examination of ionic wind and cathode sheath effects in a E-field premixed flame with ion density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Stewart V. Xu, Kunning G.

    2016-04-15

    The effect of the ionic wind on a premixed methane-air flame under a DC electric field is studied via mapping of the ion density with Langmuir probes. Ion densities were observed to increase near the burner with increasing electrode voltage up to 6 kV. Past this electrode supply voltage, ion densities ceased increasing and began to decline in some locations within the premixed flame. The increased ion density is caused by an increase in ionic wind force and cathode sheath thickness. The plateau in density is due to the cathode sheath fully encompassing the flame front which is the ion source, thereby collecting all ions in the flame. The spatial density data support the ionic wind hypothesis and provide further explanation of its limits based on the plasma sheath.

  10. Comparison of direct numerical simulation of lean premixed methane-air flames with strained laminar flame calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.

    2004-08-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) with complex chemistry was used to study statistics of displacement and consumption speeds in turbulent lean premixed methane-air flames. The main focus of the study is an evaluation of the extent to which a turbulent flame in the thin reaction zones regime can be described by an ensemble of strained laminar flames. Conditional averages with respect to strain for displacement and consumption speeds are presented over a wide range of strain typically encountered in a turbulent flame, compared with previous studies that either made local pointwise comparisons or conditioned the data on small strain and curvature. The conditional averages for positive strains are compared with calculated data from two different canonical strained laminar configurations to determine which is the optimal representation of a laminar flame structure embedded in a turbulent flame: the reactant-to-product (R-to-P) configuration or the symmetric twin flame configuration. Displacement speed statistics are compared for the progress-variable isosurface of maximum reaction rate and an isosurface toward the fresh gases, which are relevant for both modeling and interpretation of experiment results. Displacement speeds in the inner reaction layer are found to agree very well with the laminar R-to-P calculations over a wide range of strain for higher Damkhler number conditions, well beyond the regime in which agreement was expected. For lower Damkhler numbers, a reduced response to strain is observed, consistent with previous studies and theoretical expectations. Compared with the inner layer, broader and shifted probability density functions (PDFs) of displacement speed were observed in the fresh gases, and the agreement with the R-to-P calculations deteriorated. Consumption speeds show a poorer agreement with strained laminar calculations, which is attributed to multidimensional effects and a more attenuated unsteady response to strain fluctuations; however, they

  11. Comparison of direct numerical simulation of lean premixed methane-air flames with strained laminar flame calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2006-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) with complex chemistry was used to study statistics of displacement and consumption speeds in turbulent lean premixed methane-air flames. The main focus of the study is an evaluation of the extent to which a turbulent flame in the thin reaction zones regime can be described by an ensemble of strained laminar flames. Conditional averages with respect to strain for displacement and consumption speeds are presented over a wide range of strain typically encountered in a turbulent flame, compared with previous studies that either made local pointwise comparisons or conditioned the data on small strain and curvature. The conditional averages for positive strains are compared with calculated data from two different canonical strained laminar configurations to determine which is the optimal representation of a laminar flame structure embedded in a turbulent flame: the reactant-to-product (R-to-P) configuration or the symmetric twin flame configuration. Displacement speed statistics are compared for the progress-variable isosurface of maximum reaction rate and an isosurface toward the fresh gases, which are relevant for both modeling and interpretation of experiment results. Displacement speeds in the inner reaction layer are found to agree very well with the laminar R-to-P calculations over a wide range of strain for higher Damkohler number conditions, well beyond the regime in which agreement was expected. For lower Damkohler numbers, a reduced response to strain is observed, consistent with previous studies and theoretical expectations. Compared with the inner layer, broader and shifted probability density functions (PDFs) of displacement speed were observed in the fresh gases, and the agreement with the R-to-P calculations deteriorated. Consumption speeds show a poorer agreement with strained laminar calculations, which is attributed to multidimensional effects and a more attenuated unsteady response to strain fluctuations; however

  12. Experimental quantification of transient stretch effects from vortices interacting with premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danby, Sean James

    The understanding of complex premixed combustion reactions is paramount to the development of new concepts and devices used to increase the overall usefulness and capabilities of current technology. The complex interactions which occur within any modern practical combustion device were studied by isolating a single turbulent scale of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. Methane-air flame equivalence ratios (φ = 0.64, 0.90, and 1.13) were chosen to observe the mild affects of thermo-diffusive stability on the methane-air flame. Nitrogen was used as a diluent to retard the flame speeds of the φ = 0.90, and 1.13 mixtures so that the undisturbed outwardly propagating spherical flame kernel propagation rates, drf/dt, were approximately equal. Five primary propane equivalence ratios were utilized for investigation: φ = 0.69, 0.87, 1.08, 1.32, and 1.49. The choice of equivalence ratio was strategically made so that the φ = 0.69/1.49 and φ = 0.87/1.32 mixtures have the same undiluted flame propagation rate, drf/dt. Therefore, in the undiluted case, there are three flame speeds (in laboratory coordinates, not to be confused with burning velocity) represented by these mixtures. Three vortices were selected to be used in this investigation. The vortex rotational velocities were measured to be 77 cm/s, 266 cm/s and 398 cm/s for the "weak", "medium" and "strong" vortices, respectively. Ignition of the flame occurred in two ways: (1) spark-ignition or (2) laser ignition using an Nd:YAG laser at its second harmonic (lambda = 532 nm) in order to quantify the effect of electrode interference. Accompanying high-speed chemiluminescence imaging measurements, instantaneous pressure measurements were obtained to give a more detailed understanding of the effect of vortex strength on the overall flame speed and heat release rate over an extended time scale and to explore the use of a simple measurement to describe turbulent mixing. Further local flame-vortex interface analysis was

  13. Impact of chemical kinetic model reduction on premixed turbulent flame characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillo, Aaron; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The use of detailed chemical kinetic models for direct numerical simulations (DNS) is prohibitively expensive. Current best practice for the development of reduced models is to match laminar burning parameters such as flame speed, thickness, and ignition delay time to predictions of the detailed chemical kinetic models. Prior studies using reduced models implicitly assumed that matching the homogeneous and laminar properties of the detailed model will result in similar behavior in a turbulent environment. However, this assumption has not been tested. Fillo et al. recently demonstrated experimentally that real jet fuels with similar chemistry and laminar burning parameters exhibit different turbulent flame speeds under the same flow conditions. This result raises questions about the validity of current best practices for the development of reduced chemical kinetic models for turbulent DNS. This study will investigate the validity of current best practices. Turbulent burning parameters, including flame speed, thickness, and stretch rate, will be compared for three skeletal mechanisms of the Princeton POSF 4658 mechanism, reduced using current best practice methods. DNS calculations of premixed, high-Karlovitz flames will be compared to determine if these methods are valid. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1314109-DGE.

  14. The effect of nitrogen on biogas flame propagation characteristic in premix combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Suprianto, Fandi D.; Hartanto, Tan Ivan; Purnomo, Kenny; Wijaya, Tubagus P.

    2016-03-01

    Biogas is one of alternative energy and categorized as renewable energy. The main sources of biogas come from animal waste, garbage, and household waste that are organic waste. Primarily, over 50% of this energy contains methane (CH4). The other substances or inhibitors are nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Previously, carbon dioxide effect on biogas combustion is already experimented. The result shows that carbon dioxide reduces the flame propagation speed of biogas combustion. Then, nitrogen as an inhibitor obviously also brings some effects to the biogas combustion, flame propagation speed, and flame characteristics. Spark ignited cylinder is used for the premixed biogas combustion research. An acrylic glass is used as the material of this transparent cylinder chamber. The cylinder is filled with methane (CH4), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen (N2) with particular percentage. In this experiment, the nitrogen composition are set to 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%. The result shows that the flame propagation speed is reduced in regard to the increased level of nitrogen. It can also be implied that nitrogen can decrease the biogas combustion rate.

  15. Optical measurements of soot in premixed flames. Ph.D. Thesis - California Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 to 632.8 nm and 457.9 to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames were fuel rich and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered bronze, water colored flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients and the scattering efficiencies. Temperature measurements in the flame were made using infrared radiometry and fine wire thermocouples. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios between 0.1 and 0.8.

  16. Optical measurements of soot in premixed flames. Ph.D. Thesis - California Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 to 632.8 nm and 457.9 to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames were fuel rich and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered bronze, water colored flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients and the scattering efficiencies. Temperature measurements in the flame were made using infrared radiometry and fine wire thermocouples. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios between 0.1 and 0.8.

  17. A comparative study of TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized in premixed and diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hsiao-Kang; Yang, Hsiung-An

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have been shown that synthesis of titania (TiO2) crystalline phase purity could be effectively controlled by the oxygen concentration through titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) via premixed flame from a Bunsen burner. In this study, a modified Hencken burner was used to synthesize smaller TiO2 nanoparticles via short diffusion flames. The frequency of collisions among particles would decrease and reduce TiO2 nanoparticle size in a short diffusion flame height. The crystalline structure of the synthesized nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements. The characteristic properties of TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized from a modified Hencken burner were compared with the results from a Bunsen burner and commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25). The results showed that the average particle size of 6.63 nm from BET method was produced by a modified Hencken burner which was smaller than the TiO2 in a Bunsen burner and commercial TiO2. Moreover, the rutile content of TiO2 nanoparticles increased as the particle collecting height increased. Also, the size of TiO2 nanoparticles was highly dependent on the TTIP loading and the collecting height in the flame.

  18. Flamelet/flow interaction in premixed turbulent flames: simultaneous measurements of gas velocity and flamelet position

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, P.C.; Gouldin, F.C.

    1996-12-01

    An experimental technique for obtaining simultaneous measurements of fluid velocity and flamelet position in premixed flames is described and applied in a turbulent V-flame. The flamelet position information is used to calculate conditional velocity statistics, conditional on both zone (reactants or products) as well as conditional on distance from the flamelet. The conditional zone statistics demonstrate that increases (or decreases) in turbulence across the flame are dependent on axial position and location within the flame brush. The product- zone conditional covariance, coupled with the measured conditional mean velocity profiles, indicate that turbulence generation by shear may be a significant contribution to product zone turbulence levels. Velocity statistics conditional on distance from the flamelet demonstrate a considerable interaction between the flamelet and velocity field. Man and rms velocities vary significantly with proximity to the flamelet, such that differences in velocities which which occur just across the flamelet surface. The change in rms velocities just across the flamelet is found to be anisotropic, with the largest increase (smallest decrease) occurring in the axial velocity component. Rms velocities conditional on flamelet position further support the hypothesis that increased product gas velocity fluctuations may have a significant component associated with turbulence generation by mean shear.

  19. Scalar mixing in LES/PDF of a high-Ka premixed turbulent jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiaping; Yang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    We report a large-eddy simulation (LES)/probability density function (PDF) study of a high-Ka premixed turbulent flame in the Lund University Piloted Jet (LUPJ) flame series, which has been investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments. The target flame, featuring broadened preheat and reaction zones, is categorized into the broken reaction zone regime. In the present study, three widely used mixing modes, namely the Interaction by Exchange with the Mean (IEM), Modified Curl (MC), and Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) models are applied to assess their performance through detailed a posteriori comparisons with DNS. A dynamic model for the time scale of scalar mixing is formulated to describe the turbulent mixing of scalars at small scales. Better quantitative agreement for the mean temperature and mean mass fractions of major and minor species are obtained with the MC and EMST models than with the IEM model. The multi-scalar mixing in composition space with the three models are analyzed to assess the modeling of the conditional molecular diffusion term. In addition, we demonstrate that the product of OH and CH2O concentrations can be a good surrogate of the local heat release rate in this flame. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11521091 and 91541204).

  20. Extractive probe/TDLAS measurements of acetylene in atmospheric-pressure fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    2005-11-01

    The profiles of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} mole fractions were measured in flat atmospheric-pressure rich-premixed methane/air flames using microprobe gas sampling followed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), and compared the results with predictions of one-dimensional flame calculations. Acetylene concentrations are also determined by spontaneous Raman scattering to quantify possible uncertainties due to chemical reactions on the probe surface or acceleration of the combustion products into the probe.

  1. Lagrangian coherent structures during combustion instability in a premixed-flame backward-step combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Ramgopal; Mathur, Manikandan; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper quantitatively examines the occurrence of large-scale coherent structures in the flow field during combustion instability in comparison with the flow-combustion-acoustic system when it is stable. For this purpose, the features in the recirculation zone of the confined flow past a backward-facing step are studied in terms of Lagrangian coherent structures. The experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 18600 and an equivalence ratio of 0.9 of the premixed fuel-air mixture for two combustor lengths, the long duct corresponding to instability and the short one to the stable case. Simultaneous measurements of the velocity field using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and the C H* chemiluminescence of the flame along with pressure time traces are obtained. The extracted ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields delineate dynamically distinct regions of the flow field. The presence of large-scale vortical structures and their modulation over different time instants are well captured by the FTLE ridges for the long combustor where high-amplitude acoustic oscillations are self-excited. In contrast, small-scale vortices signifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are observed in the short duct case. Saddle-type flow features are found to separate the distinct flow structures for both combustor lengths. The FTLE ridges are found to align with the flame boundaries in the upstream regions, whereas farther downstream, the alignment is weaker due to dilatation of the flow by the flame's heat release. Specifically, the FTLE ridges encompass the flame curl-up for both the combustor lengths, and thus act as the surrogate flame boundaries. The flame is found to propagate upstream from an earlier vortex roll-up to a newer one along the backward-time FTLE ridge connecting the two structures.

  2. Lagrangian coherent structures during combustion instability in a premixed-flame backward-step combustor.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Ramgopal; Mathur, Manikandan; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R

    2016-12-01

    This paper quantitatively examines the occurrence of large-scale coherent structures in the flow field during combustion instability in comparison with the flow-combustion-acoustic system when it is stable. For this purpose, the features in the recirculation zone of the confined flow past a backward-facing step are studied in terms of Lagrangian coherent structures. The experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 18600 and an equivalence ratio of 0.9 of the premixed fuel-air mixture for two combustor lengths, the long duct corresponding to instability and the short one to the stable case. Simultaneous measurements of the velocity field using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and the CH^{*} chemiluminescence of the flame along with pressure time traces are obtained. The extracted ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields delineate dynamically distinct regions of the flow field. The presence of large-scale vortical structures and their modulation over different time instants are well captured by the FTLE ridges for the long combustor where high-amplitude acoustic oscillations are self-excited. In contrast, small-scale vortices signifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are observed in the short duct case. Saddle-type flow features are found to separate the distinct flow structures for both combustor lengths. The FTLE ridges are found to align with the flame boundaries in the upstream regions, whereas farther downstream, the alignment is weaker due to dilatation of the flow by the flame's heat release. Specifically, the FTLE ridges encompass the flame curl-up for both the combustor lengths, and thus act as the surrogate flame boundaries. The flame is found to propagate upstream from an earlier vortex roll-up to a newer one along the backward-time FTLE ridge connecting the two structures.

  3. The coupling between flame surface dynamics and species mass conservation in premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.; Veynante, D.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1994-01-01

    Current flamelot models based on a description of the flame surface dynamics require the closure of two inter-related equations: a transport equation for the mean reaction progress variable, (tilde)c, and a transport equation for the flame surface density, Sigma. The coupling between these two equations is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) with emphasis on the correlation between the turbulent fluxes of (tilde)c, bar(pu''c''), and Sigma, (u'')(sub S)Sigma. Two different DNS databases are used in the present work: a database developed at CTR by A. Trouve and a database developed by C. J. Rutland using a different code. Both databases correspond to statistically one-dimensional premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow. The run parameters, however, are significantly different, and the two databases correspond to different combustion regimes. It is found that in all simulated flames, the correlation between bar(pu''c'') and (u'')(sub S)Sigma is always strong. The sign, however, of the turbulent flux of (tilde)c or Sigma with respect to the mean gradients, delta(tilde)c/delta(x) or delta(Sigma)/delta(x), is case-dependent. The CTR database is found to exhibit gradient turbulent transport of (tilde)c and Sigma, whereas the Rutland DNS features counter-gradient diffusion. The two databases are analyzed and compared using various tools (a local analysis of the flow field near the flame, a classical analysis of the conservation equation for (tilde)(u''c''), and a thin flame theoretical analysis). A mechanism is then proposed to explain the discrepancies between the two databases and a preliminary simple criterion is derived to predict the occurrence of gradient/counter-gradient turbulent diffusion.

  4. Probe measurements and numerical model predictions of evolving size distributions in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, A.; Sgro, L.A.; Lanzuolo, G.; D'Alessio, A.

    2009-09-15

    Particle size distributions (PSDs), measured with a dilution probe and a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and numerical predictions of these PSDs, based on a model that includes only coagulation or alternatively inception and coagulation, are compared to investigate particle growth processes and possible sampling artifacts in the post-flame region of a C/O = 0.65 premixed laminar ethylene-air flame. Inputs to the numerical model are the PSD measured early in the flame (the initial condition for the aerosol population) and the temperature profile measured along the flame's axial centerline. The measured PSDs are initially unimodal, with a modal mobility diameter of 2.2 nm, and become bimodal later in the post-flame region. The smaller mode is best predicted with a size-dependent coagulation model, which allows some fraction of the smallest particles to escape collisions without resulting in coalescence or coagulation through the size-dependent coagulation efficiency ({gamma}{sub SD}). Instead, when {gamma} = 1 and the coagulation rate is equal to the collision rate for all particles regardless of their size, the coagulation model significantly under predicts the number concentration of both modes and over predicts the size of the largest particles in the distribution compared to the measured size distributions at various heights above the burner. The coagulation ({gamma}{sub SD}) model alone is unable to reproduce well the larger particle mode (mode II). Combining persistent nucleation with size-dependent coagulation brings the predicted PSDs to within experimental error of the measurements, which seems to suggest that surface growth processes are relatively insignificant in these flames. Shifting measured PSDs a few mm closer to the burner surface, generally adopted to correct for probe perturbations, does not produce a better matching between the experimental and the numerical results. (author)

  5. Transition from pulled to pushed premixed turbulent flames due to countergradient transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelnikov, V. A.; Lipatnikov, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of countergradient transport on the speed of a statistically stationary, planar, 1D premixed flame that propagates in frozen turbulence is studied theoretically and numerically by considering the normalised magnitude NB of the countergradient flux to be an input parameter. Spectra of admissible flame speeds are analytically determined and explicit travelling wave solutions are found for two algebraic relations widely used to close the mean rate of product creation. A problem of selecting the physically relevant solution that is approached for sufficiently steep initial conditions is addressed. It is argued that, if NB is larger than an analytically determined critical number NcrB, then the type of the physically relevant solution is drastically changed. If NB < NcrB, the physically relevant solution is of pulled wave type, i.e. its speed is controlled by processes localised to the leading edge of the flame brush and can be determined within the framework of a linear analysis at the leading edge. If NB > NcrB, the physically relevant solution is of pushed wave type, i.e. its speed is controlled by processes in the entire flame brush. Analytical expressions for the speed of the physically relevant solution as a function of NB and the density ratio are obtained. For NB > NcrB, the mean flame brush thickness and the spatial profile of the Favre-averaged combustion progress variable are also determined analytically. These results are validated by numerical simulations. Both analytical expressions and numerical data indicate that (i) both turbulent flame speed and thickness are decreased when NB is increased and (ii) the direction of total scalar flux (i.e. the sum of countergradient and gradient contributions) is strongly affected not only by NB, but also by the shape of the dependence of the mean rate of product creation on the mean combustion progress variable.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON THE FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SOOT IN PREMIXED ETHANE FLAMES. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot has been investigated in atmospheric-pressure, laminar, ethane/oxygen/argon premixed flames as a function of mixture equivalence ratio. Mole fraction profiles of major products, trace aromatics, ...

  7. EFFECTS OF EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON SPECIES AND SOOT CONCENTRATIONS IN PREMIXED N-HEPTANE FLAMES. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micro-structure of laminar premixed, atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich flames of n-heptane/oxygen/argon has been studied at two equivalence ratios (C/O = 0.63 and C/O = 0.67). A heated quartz microprobe coupled to an online gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HP 5890 Serie...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON THE FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SOOT IN PREMIXED ETHANE FLAMES. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot has been investigated in atmospheric-pressure, laminar, ethane/oxygen/argon premixed flames as a function of mixture equivalence ratio. Mole fraction profiles of major products, trace aromatics, ...

  9. EFFECTS OF EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON SPECIES AND SOOT CONCENTRATIONS IN PREMIXED N-HEPTANE FLAMES. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micro-structure of laminar premixed, atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich flames of n-heptane/oxygen/argon has been studied at two equivalence ratios (C/O = 0.63 and C/O = 0.67). A heated quartz microprobe coupled to an online gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HP 5890 Serie...

  10. Correlation of Flame Speed with Stretch in Turbulent Premixed Methane/Air Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Im, Hong G.

    1997-11-01

    Flame speed correlation with stretch is obtained from direct numerical simulations of lean to stoichiometric methane/air flames over a broad range of Karlovitz numbers. The correlation is interpreted in terms of local tangential strain rate and curvature effects. DNS results show that there exist two distinct branches in the correlation curve depending on the sign of the displacement speed. For small Karlovitz numbers with positive displacement speed, the estimated Markstein length from the DNS results agrees well with that obtained from steady strained laminar flame calculations as well as with experimental studies. Larger values of Karlovitz numbers observed in the DNS results are found to be mainly due to the effect of strong curvatures; for those cases the correlation shows nonlinear behavior. The sensitivity of the correlation to the definition of the flame front and the statistical importance of particular branches in the correlation are also discussed.

  11. Flame speeds and curvature of premixed, spherically expanding flames advecting in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Dan; Ochs, Bradley; Ranjan, Devesh; Menon, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Georgia Institute of Technology to study sub- and supersonic combustion, which is based on classical flame bomb studies but incorporates a mean flow, allowing for a wider variety of turbulent conditions and the inclusion of effects like compressibility, while supporting shear-free spherical flames. Homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is generated via an active vane grid. Methane-air flame kernels advecting with the mean flow are generated using Laser Induced Breakdown ignition. The facility is accessing the thin reaction zone regime with uRMS' /SL0 = 6 . 9 - 22 , L11 /δF = 44 - 68 and Reλ = 190 - 550 . The flame kernels are probed with OH-Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). To validate the facility, results at Ū = 30 m/s are compared to existing data using a scaling derived from a spectral closure of the G-equation. This indicates the reacting flow remains Galilean invariant under the given conditions. The differences between global and local turbulent consumption speeds derived from OH-PLIF results are discussed with a focus on modeling efforts. The curvature of flame wrinkles is evaluated to examine the impact of different turbulent scales on flame development. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under basic research Grant FA9550-15-1-0512 (Project monitor: Dr. Chiping Li).

  12. Intra-bubble-combustion. Premixed limit, stage I: dynamics of rapid premixed flame propagation inside a bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2003-06-01

    The propagation of a spherically symmetric premixed thin flame inside an initially centrally ignited bubble in an unconfined viscous, incompressible liquid is theoretically analysed. This model focuses on the dynamical competition between the pressure increase produced by the chemical reaction and the pressure decrease induced by the bubble expansion (a consequence of radial momentum conservation). When a balance between these two processes is achieved an oscillatory response may be observed. The conditions leading to such a response are investigated. The effective inertia (the squared ratio between the characteristic liquid response time and the combustion time) is the main parameter governing this evolution. Two qualitatively different behaviours are encountered for large and small effective inertia-parameter. An approximate analytical solution is provided for each limiting case, as well as a correlation for the gaseous state at the end of the process, based on the former approximate solutions. While the system considered is deliberately highly idealized, some of these quantitative and qualitative results are expected to be helpful in the design of intra-bubble-combustion experiments (Rosner D E, Arias-Zugasti M and La Mantia B 2001 Combustion of individual bubbles and submerged gas jets 6th International Microgravity Combustion Workshop (Cleveland, OH, USA, 22-24 May); Rosner D E, Arias-Zugasti M and La Mantia B 2002 Combustion of individual bubbles and submerged gas jets (poster) 29th Symp. (International) on Combustion (Sapporo, Japan, 21-26 July); Rosner D E 1997 Combustion synthesis and material processing Chem. Eng. Edu (ASEE) 31 228) and, ultimately, bubble reactors.

  13. Numerical investigation of flame-vortex interactions in laminar cross-flow non-premixed flames in the presence of bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhumal Shijin, Puthiyaparambath; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Babu, Viswanathan

    2016-07-01

    Flame stabilisation in a combustor having vortices generated by flame holding devices constitutes an interesting fundamental problem. The presence of vortices in many practical combustors ranging from industrial burners to high speed propulsion systems induces vortex-flame interactions and complex stabilisation conditions. The scenario becomes more complex if the flame sustains after separating itself from the flame holder. In a recent study [P.K. Shijin, S.S. Sundaram, V. Raghavan, and V. Babu, Numerical investigation of laminar cross-flow non-premixed flames in the presence of a bluff-body, Combust. Theory Model. 18, 2014, pp. 692-710], the authors reported details of the regimes of flame stabilisation of non-premixed laminar flames established in a cross-flow combustor in the presence of a square cylinder. In that, the separated flame has been shown to be three dimensional and highly unsteady. Such separated flames are investigated further in the present study. Flame-vortex interactions in separated methane-air cross flow flames established behind three bluff bodies, namely a square cylinder, an isosceles triangular cylinder and a half V-gutter, have been analysed in detail. The mixing process in the reactive flow has been explained using streamlines of species velocities of CH4 and O2. The time histories of z-vorticity, net heat release rate and temperature are analysed to reveal the close relationship between z-vorticity and net heat release rate spectra. Two distinct fluctuating layers are visible in the proper orthogonal decomposition and discrete Fourier transform of OH mass fraction data. The upper fluctuating layer observed in the OH field correlates well with that of temperature. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of OH transport has also been carried out to show the interactions between factors affecting fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics that cause multiple fluctuating layers in the OH.

  14. A two-step chemical scheme for kerosene-air premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Franzelli, B.; Riber, E.; Sanjose, M.; Poinsot, T.

    2010-07-15

    A reduced two-step scheme (called 2S-KERO-BFER) for kerosene-air premixed flames is presented in the context of Large Eddy Simulation of reacting turbulent flows in industrial applications. The chemical mechanism is composed of two reactions corresponding to the fuel oxidation into CO and H{sub 2}O, and the CO - CO{sub 2} equilibrium. To ensure the validity of the scheme for rich combustion, the pre-exponential constants of the two reactions are tabulated versus the local equivalence ratio. The fuel and oxidizer exponents are chosen to guarantee the correct dependence of laminar flame speed with pressure. Due to a lack of experimental results, the detailed mechanism of Dagaut composed of 209 species and 1673 reactions, and the skeletal mechanism of Luche composed of 91 species and 991 reactions have been used to validate the reduced scheme. Computations of one-dimensional laminar flames have been performed with the 2S{sub K}ERO{sub B}FER scheme using the CANTERA and COSILAB softwares for a wide range of pressure ([1; 12] atm), fresh gas temperature ([300; 700] K), and equivalence ratio ([0.6; 2.0]). Results show that the flame speed is correctly predicted for the whole range of parameters, showing a maximum for stoichiometric flames, a decrease for rich combustion and a satisfactory pressure dependence. The burnt gas temperature and the dilution by Exhaust Gas Recirculation are also well reproduced. Moreover, the results for ignition delay time are in good agreement with the experiments. (author)

  15. Exploring old and new benzene formation pathways in low-pressure premixed flames of aliphatic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Pope; James A. Miller

    2000-12-13

    A modeling study of benzene and phenyl radical formation is performed for three low-pressure premixed laminar flat flames having an unsaturated C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} hydrocarbon fuel (acetylene, ethylene, and propene). Predictions using three published detailed elementary-step chemical kinetics mechanisms are tested against MBMS species profile data for all three flames. The differences between the three mechanisms predictive capabilities are explored, with an emphasis on benzene formation pathways. A new chemical kinetics mechanism is created combining features of all three published mechanisms. Included in the mechanism are several novel benzene formation reactions involving combinations of radicals such as C{sub 2}H+C{sub 4}H{sub 5}, and C{sub 5}H{sub 3}+CH{sub 3}. Reactions forming fulvene (a benzene isomer) are included, such as C{sub 3}H{sub 3}+C{sub 3}H{sub 5},as well as fulvene-to-benzene reactions. Predictions using the new mechanism show virtually all of the benzene and phenyl radical to be formed by reactions of either C{sub 3}H{sub 3}+C{sub 3}H{sub 3} or C{sub 3}H{sub 3}+C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, with the relative importance being strongly dependent upon the fuel. C{sub 5}H{sub 3}+CH{sub 3} plays a minor role in fulvene formation in the acetylene flame. The C{sub 2}H{sub x}+C{sub 4}H{sub 4} reactions do not contribute noticeably to benzene or phenyl radical formation in these flames, sometimes being a major decomposition channel for either fulvene or phenyl radical. The formation pathways for C{sub 3}H{sub 3} and C{sub 3}H{sub 5}are delineated for the three flames; while the key reactions differ from flame to flame, CH{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} {Longleftrightarrow} C{sub 3}H{sub 3}+H is important for all three flames.

  16. Measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl concentration in near critical equivalence ratio premixed ethylene flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inbody, Michael Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The testing and development of existing global and detailed chemical kinetic models for soot formation requires measurements of soot and radical concentrations in flames. A clearer understanding of soot particle inception relies upon the evaluation and refinement of these models in comparison with such measurements. We present measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl (OH) concentration in sequences of flat premixed atmospheric-pressure C2H4/O2/N2 flames and 80-torr C2H4/O2 flames for a unique range of equivalence ratios bracketting the critical equivalence ratio (phi(sub c)) and extending to more heavily sooting conditions. Soot volume fraction and number density profiles are measured using a laser scattering-extinction apparatus capable of resolving a 0.1 percent absorption. Hydroxyl number density profiles are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with broadband detection. Temperature profiles are obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements. The relative volume fraction and number density profiles of the richer sooting flames exhibit the expected trends in soot formation. In near-phi(sub c) visibility sooting flames, particle scattering and extinction are not detected, but an LIF signal due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) can be detected upon excitation with an argon-ion laser. A linear correlation between the argon-ion LIF and the soot volume fraction implies a common mechanistic source for the growth of PAH's and soot particles. The peak OH number density in both the atmospheric and 80-torr flames declines with increasing equivalence ratio, but the profile shape remains unchanged in the transition to sooting, implying that the primary reaction pathways for OH remain unchanged over this transition. Chemical kinetic modeling is demonstrated by comparing predictions using two current reaction mechanisms with the atmospheric flame data. The measured and predicted OH number density profiles show good agreement. The predicted benzene

  17. A Study of Strain Rate Effects for Turbulent Premixed Flames with Application to LES of a Gas Turbine Combustor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kemenov, Konstantin A.; Calhoon, William H.

    2015-03-24

    Large-scale strain rate field, a resolved quantity which is easily computable in large-eddy simulations (LES), could have profound effects on the premixed flame properties by altering the turbulent flame speed and inducing local extinction. The role of the resolved strain rate has been investigated in a posterior LES study of GE lean premixed dry low NOx emissions LM6000 gas turbine combustor model. A novel approach which is based on the coupling of the lineareddy model with a one-dimensional counter-flow solver has been applied to obtain the parameterizations of the resolved premixed flame properties in terms of the reactive progress variable, the local strain rate measure, and local Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. The strain rate effects have been analyzed by comparing LES statistics for several models of the turbulent flame speed, i.e, with and without accounting for the local strain rate effects, with available experimental data. The sensitivity of the simulation results to the inflow velocity conditions as well as the grid resolution have been also studied. Overall, the results suggest the necessity to represent the strain rate effects accurately in order to improve LES modeling of the turbulent flame speed.

  18. A Study of Strain Rate Effects for Turbulent Premixed Flames with Application to LES of a Gas Turbine Combustor Model

    DOE PAGES

    Kemenov, Konstantin A.; Calhoon, William H.

    2015-03-24

    Large-scale strain rate field, a resolved quantity which is easily computable in large-eddy simulations (LES), could have profound effects on the premixed flame properties by altering the turbulent flame speed and inducing local extinction. The role of the resolved strain rate has been investigated in a posterior LES study of GE lean premixed dry low NOx emissions LM6000 gas turbine combustor model. A novel approach which is based on the coupling of the lineareddy model with a one-dimensional counter-flow solver has been applied to obtain the parameterizations of the resolved premixed flame properties in terms of the reactive progress variable,more » the local strain rate measure, and local Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. The strain rate effects have been analyzed by comparing LES statistics for several models of the turbulent flame speed, i.e, with and without accounting for the local strain rate effects, with available experimental data. The sensitivity of the simulation results to the inflow velocity conditions as well as the grid resolution have been also studied. Overall, the results suggest the necessity to represent the strain rate effects accurately in order to improve LES modeling of the turbulent flame speed.« less

  19. Investigation of detailed kinetic scheme performance on modelling of turbulent non-premixed sooting flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunardi, Y.; Darmadi, D.; Hisbullah, H.; Fairweather, M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an application of a first-order conditional moment closure (CMC) approach coupled with a semi-empirical soot model to investigate the effect of various detailed combustion chemistry schemes on soot formation and destruction in turbulent non-premixed flames. A two-equation soot model representing soot particle nucleation, growth, coagulation and oxidation, was incorporated into the CMC model. The turbulent flow-field of both flames is described using the Favre-averaged fluid-flow equations, applying a standard k-ɛ turbulence model. A number of five reaction kinetic mechanisms having 50-100 species and 200-1000 elementary reactions called ABF, Miller-Bowman, GRI-Mech3.0, Warnatz, and Qin were employed to study the effect of combustion chemistry schemes on soot predictions. The results showed that of various kinetic schemes being studied, each yields similar accuracy in temperature prediction when compared with experimental data. With respect to soot prediction, the kinetic scheme containing benzene elementary reactions tends to result in a better prediction on soot concentrations in comparison to those contain no benzene elementary reactions. Among five kinetic mechanisms being studied, the Qin combustion scheme mechanism turned to yield the best prediction on both flame temperature and soot levels.

  20. Influence of Aerodynamic Strain Rate on Local Extinction in Turbulent Non-premixed Jet Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Aravind; Narayanaswamy, Venkateswaran; Lyons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    2-D velocity field measurements obtained from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are used to obtain aerodynamic strain rate information in regions of local extinction in lifted turbulent non-premixed methane jet flames in coflow. Diluting the coflow to reduce the oxygen molefraction results in increased occurrences of local extinction. Statistical analysis is performed to correlate regions of high local strain rate with local extinctions in both air coflow and diluted coflow cases to study the influence of strain rate against vortical structures in extinguishing the flame front. A comparison is also made with heated and vitiated coflow cases, where autoignition is a flame stabilization mechanism and influenced by local strain rate. At high jet exit velocities (Ux > > Ur), the out-of-plane strain rate component can be neglected but the convection of extinguished pockets into the measurement plane needs to be resolved by stereoscopic (3-D) measurements which will be done in a future work. This work has been supported by the U.S. Army Research Office (Contracts W911NF1210140 and W911NF1610087) Dr. Ralph Anthenien, Technical Monitor, ARO.

  1. Measurements of the heat release rate integral in turbulent premixed stagnation flames with particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yung-Cheng; Kim, Munki; Han, Jeongjae; Yun, Sangwook; Yoon, Youngbin

    2008-08-15

    A new definition of turbulent consumption speed is proposed in this work that is based on the heat release rate integral, rather than the mass burning rate integral. Its detailed derivation and the assumptions involved are discussed in a general context that applies to all properly defined reaction progress variables. The major advantage of the proposed definition is that it does not require the thin-flame assumption, in contrast to previous definitions. Experimental determination of the local turbulent displacement speed, S{sub D}, and the local turbulent consumption speed, S{sub C}, is also demonstrated with the particle image velocimetry technique in three turbulent premixed stagnation flames. The turbulence intensity of these flames is of the same order of the laminar burning velocity. Based on the current data, a model equation for the local mean heat release rate is proposed. The relationship between S{sub D} and S{sub C} is discussed along with a possible modeling approach for the turbulent displacement speed. (author)

  2. Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) application to premixed Low Swirl Injector flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palies, Paul; Cheng, Robert; Davis, Dustin; Ilak, Milos

    2015-11-01

    DMD is implemented and applied to premixed flame image data from the Low Swirl Injector. The data consists of high speed video flame images at three different equivalence ratios, corresponding to low-amplitude oscillation, transient growth, and high-amplitude oscillation regimes. DMD reveals spectra of growth rates and frequencies with corresponding spatial modes, ranked by mode norm. For the low-amplitude oscillation regime, DMD does not capture any dominant mode shapes or frequencies. For the high-amplitude oscillation case, the frequency of the dominant mode and its harmonics match the frequency recorded by pressure measurement. The spatial mode from DMD is used to extract the propagation velocity of perturbations. In the transient regime, DMD captures the growth rate and frequency of the transient mode. The corresponding DMD spatial mode shows a similar shape to the high oscillation case indicating that the transition to a limit cycle is associated with a convective mode. The underlying mechanism of unsteady heat release is identified as induced by a convected wave along the flame front, whose velocity is confirmed by a separate analysis. Supported by Dept. of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition has been applied in various combustion systems, however, work on flame stabilization with repetitive laser-induced plasma (LIP) is rather limited. In this paper, stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond LIP is reported. The plasma energy coupling and the temporal evolution of the flame kernels generated by the LIPs are investigated with different laser repetition rates, i.e., 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 250 Hz, respectively. The plasma energy coupling is not affected in the air flow and in the premixed methane-air flow with the applied laser repetition rates. Continuous combustion flame stabilization has been achieved with LIPs of 100 Hz and 250 Hz, in terms of catch-up and merging of the consecutive flame kernels. The flame kernel formed by the last LIP does not affect the evolution of the newly formed flame kernel by the next LIP. The catch-up distance, defined as the distance from the LIP initiation site to the flame kernel catch-up position, is estimated for different laser repetition rates based on the temporal evolution of the flame kernels. A higher laser repetition rate will lead to a shorter catch-up distance which is beneficial for flame stabilization. The up limit for the laser repetition rate to realize effective flame stabilization is determined from the critical inter-pulse delay defined from the onset of the LIP to the return of the initially contraflow propagating lower front to the LIP initiation site. The up limit is 377 Hz under the flow conditions of this work (equivalence ratio of 1, flow speed of 2 m/s, and Reynolds number of 1316).

  4. Numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in non-premixed flames using detailed chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2016-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at a perturbed interface separating fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid accelerates the heavier fluid. We examine the occurrence of the RT instability, when the perturbed interface demarcates a light, fuel stream from a heavier air stream at elevated temperatures. The study is conducted using the FLASH code with modifications that include detailed chemistry, temperature-dependent EOS, and diffusive transport. The fuel-air interface is initialized at thermal equilibrium (Tfuel = Tair = 1000K) in a constant background acceleration (g). We vary the density difference across the interface by diluting the H2 fuel stream with inert N2. The non-premixed flame formed across a burning interface alters the underlying density (ρ) stratification, so that an initially RT unstable (stable) interface can be locally stabilized (destabilized). We observe this change in local stability for both single-wavelength and multimode perturbations, and draw some conclusions on the implications of these findings to applications such as ultra-compact combustors. We also make some comparisons of the reacting, non-premixed RT problem with the corresponding inert flow.

  5. Conditional statistics in a turbulent premixed flame derived from direct numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, Thierry; Bilger, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce conditional moment closure (CMC) methods for premixed systems and to derive the transport equation for the conditional species mass fraction conditioned on the progress variable based on the enthalpy. Our statistical analysis will be based on the 3-D DNS database of Trouve and Poinsot available at the Center for Turbulence Research. The initial conditions and characteristics (turbulence, thermo-diffusive properties) as well as the numerical method utilized in the DNS of Trouve and Poinsot are presented, and some details concerning our statistical analysis are also given. From the analysis of DNS results, the effects of the position in the flame brush, of the Damkoehler and Lewis numbers on the conditional mean scalar dissipation, and conditional mean velocity are presented and discussed. Information concerning unconditional turbulent fluxes are also presented. The anomaly found in previous studies of counter-gradient diffusion for the turbulent flux of the progress variable is investigated.

  6. LES-Modeling of a Partially Premixed Flame using a Deconvolution Turbulence Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the turbulence/chemistry interaction in partially premixed and multi-stream combustion remains an outstanding issue. By extending a recently developed constrained minimum mean-square error deconvolution (CMMSED) method, to objective of this work is to develop a source-term closure for turbulent multi-stream combustion. In this method, the chemical source term is obtained from a three-stream flamelet model, and CMMSED is used as closure model, thereby eliminating the need for presumed PDF-modeling. The model is applied to LES of a piloted turbulent jet flame with inhomogeneous inlets, and simulation results are compared with experiments. Comparisons with presumed PDF-methods are performed, and issues regarding resolution and conservation of the CMMSED method are examined. The author would like to acknowledge the support of funding from Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  7. The multispecies modeling of the premixed, laminar steady-state ozone flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, J. M.; Coffee, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Species dependent kinetic, transport and thermodynamic coefficients were employed in a one dimensional model of the premixed, laminar, steady state ozone flame. Convenient expressions for these coefficients are reported. They are based on independent measurements, no arbitrary parameters are used. The governing equations are solved using a relaxation technique and the partial differential equation package, PDECOL. Species and temperature profiles and the burning velocities are found over the range of initial ozone mole fraction of 0.25 to 1.00. The computed burning velocities are no more than 30% greater than the measurements of Streng and Grosses. Comparison with the computed results of Warnatz shows agreement within + or - 12%, even though quite different expressions for some of the kinetic coefficients were used. These differences are most obvious in the atomic oxygen and temperature profiles at an initial ozone mole fraction of unity.

  8. Magnifying and Tracking Observation of Micro PET Particles Passing through a Plane Premixed Flame Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohiwa, Norio; Ishino, Yojiro; Tomatsu, Takanori; Yamakita, Ryuji

    In order to observe detailed behavior of micro plastic particles under rapid heating, a fundamental investigation is made by introducing two ingenious devices; one is the construction of a plane laminar premixed burner exhibiting extremely excellent two-dimensionality, the other is the construction of a magnifying particle-tracking system composed of a pair of rotating plane mirrors and a fixed high-speed video camera. Taking account of the flow patterns obtained using a PIV/PTV system, a series of heating processes from melting to burning of micro PET particles passing through a laminar flame sheet is optically observed. It is found that the proposed high-speed and magnifying tracking system can realize a wide straight range of particle tracking up to 50 mm and clarify many interesting facts concerning the ignition and burning processes of micro PET particles.

  9. The multispecies modeling of the premixed, laminar steady-state ozone flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, J. M.; Coffee, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Species dependent kinetic, transport and thermodynamic coefficients were employed in a one dimensional model of the premixed, laminar, steady state ozone flame. Convenient expressions for these coefficients are reported. They are based on independent measurements, no arbitrary parameters are used. The governing equations are solved using a relaxation technique and the partial differential equation package, PDECOL. Species and temperature profiles and the burning velocities are found over the range of initial ozone mole fraction of 0.25 to 1.00. The computed burning velocities are no more than 30% greater than the measurements of Streng and Grosses. Comparison with the computed results of Warnatz shows agreement within + or - 12%, even though quite different expressions for some of the kinetic coefficients were used. These differences are most obvious in the atomic oxygen and temperature profiles at an initial ozone mole fraction of unity.

  10. Low Fractal Dimension Cluster-Dilute Soot Aggregates from a Premixed Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W. Patrick; Garro, Mark A.; Tian, Guoxun; Slowik, Jay G.; Cross, Eben S.; Han, Jeong-Ho; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2009-06-01

    Using a novel morphology segregation technique, we observed minority populations (≈3%) of submicron-sized, cluster-dilute fractal-like aggregates, formed in the soot-formation window (fuel-to-air equivalence ratio of 2.0-3.5) of a premixed flame, to have mass fractal dimensions between 1.2 and 1.51. Our observations disagree with previous observations of a universal mass fractal dimension of ≈1.8 for fractal-like aerosol aggregates formed in the dilute-limit via three-dimensional diffusion-limited cluster aggregation processes. A hypothesis is presented to explain this observation. Subject to verification of this hypothesis, it may be possible to control the fractal dimension and associated properties of aggregates in the cluster-dilute limit through application of a static electric field during the aggregation process.

  11. Chemiluminescence-based multivariate sensing of local equivalence ratios in premixed atmospheric methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Markandey M.; Krishnan, Sundar R.; Srinivasan, Kalyan K.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2011-09-07

    Chemiluminescence emissions from OH*, CH*, C2, and CO2 formed within the reaction zone of premixed flames depend upon the fuel-air equivalence ratio in the burning mixture. In the present paper, a new partial least square regression (PLS-R) based multivariate sensing methodology is investigated and compared with an OH*/CH* intensity ratio-based calibration model for sensing equivalence ratio in atmospheric methane-air premixed flames. Five replications of spectral data at nine different equivalence ratios ranging from 0.73 to 1.48 were used in the calibration of both models. During model development, the PLS-R model was initially validated with the calibration data set using the leave-one-out cross validation technique. Since the PLS-R model used the entire raw spectral intensities, it did not need the nonlinear background subtraction of CO2 emission that is required for typical OH*/CH* intensity ratio calibrations. An unbiased spectral data set (not used in the PLS-R model development), for 28 different equivalence ratio conditions ranging from 0.71 to 1.67, was used to predict equivalence ratios using the PLS-R and the intensity ratio calibration models. It was found that the equivalence ratios predicted with the PLS-R based multivariate calibration model matched the experimentally measured equivalence ratios within 7%; whereas, the OH*/CH* intensity ratio calibration grossly underpredicted equivalence ratios in comparison to measured equivalence ratios, especially under rich conditions ( > 1.2). The practical implications of the chemiluminescence-based multivariate equivalence ratio sensing methodology are also discussed.

  12. Experimental study of the stabilization process of a non-premixed flame via the destabilization analysis of the blue ring flame

    SciTech Connect

    Pinguet, Guillaume; Escudie, Dany

    2007-04-15

    The flame stabilization phenomenon remains a crucial issue. The experimental study of flame stabilization behind a tulip-shaped flame-holder is addressed in this paper. The process leading to the transition between specific modes - the blue ring flame and the instable ring - of a non-premixed flame stabilized on a tulip-shaped bluff-body is detailed. The aim of this study is to provide an accurate description of the destabilization of specific combustion modes, which enables a further understanding of the entire stabilization mechanism. The aerodynamic and mixing fields are described by laser Doppler anemometry and concentration measurements by sampling probe respectively. The behaviour of shear layers developing at the wake and jet boundaries are characterized by means of a spectral analysis of the fluctuating radial velocity. Results show that the destabilization process is related to the intensification of hot gas recirculation, inducing an upheaval of the dynamical condition of stabilization and a transition of mixing phenomena. (author)

  13. Optical measurements of soot and temperature profiles in premixed propane-oxygen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Pagni, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques used were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 nm to 632.8 nm and 457.9 nm to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames wre fuel-rich (equivalence ratios from 2.1 to 2.8) and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered-bronze, water-cooled flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients K sub ext, and the scattering efficiencies, Q sub vv. Temperature measurements in the flames were made using infrared radiometry. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios (I/I sub o) between 0.1 and 0.8. For intensity ratios higher or lower than this range, the differences in extinction coefficients at the wavelengths chosen for the two-wavelength method are too small to give accurate results for comparing particle radii and number densities. However, when comparing only soot volume fractions, the agreement between the two techniques continued to be good for intensity ratios up to 0.95.

  14. Effects of Radiative Emission and Absorption on the Propagation and Extinction of Premixed Gas Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Yiguang; Masuya, Goro; Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    Premixed gas flames in mixtures of CH4, O2, N2, and CO2 were studied numerically using detailed chemical and radiative emission-absorption models to establish the conditions for which radiatively induced extinction limits may exist independent of the system dimensions. It was found that reabsorption of emitted radiation led to substantially higher burning velocities and wider extinction limits than calculations using optically thin radiation models, particularly when CO2, a strong absorber, is present in the unburned gas, Two heat loss mechanisms that lead to flammability limits even with reabsorption were identified. One is that for dry hydrocarbon-air mixtures, because of the differences in the absorption spectra of H2O and CO2, most of the radiation from product H2O that is emitted in the upstream direction cannot be absorbed by the reactants. The second is that the emission spectrum Of CO2 is broader at flame temperatures than ambient temperature: thus, some radiation emitted near the flame front cannot be absorbed by the reactants even when they are seeded with CO2 Via both mechanisms, some net upstream heat loss due to radiation will always occur, leading to extinction of sufficiently weak mixtures. Downstream loss has practically no influence. Comparison with experiment demonstrates the importance of reabsorption in CO2 diluted mixtures. It is concluded that fundamental flammability limits can exist due to radiative heat loss, but these limits are strongly dependent on the emission-absorption spectra of the reactant and product -gases and their temperature dependence and cannot be predicted using gray-gas or optically thin model parameters. Applications to practical flames at high pressure, in large combustion chambers, and with exhaust-gas or flue-gas recirculation are discussed.

  15. Optical measurements of soot and temperature profiles in premixed propane-oxygen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.; Pagni, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques used were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 nm to 632.8 nm and 457.9 nm to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames were fuel-rich (equivalence ratios from 2.1 to 2.8) and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered-bronze, water-cooled flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients K sub ext, and the scattering efficiencies, Q sub vv. Temperature measurements in the flames were made using infrared radiometry. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios (I/I sub o) between 0.1 and 0.8. For intensity ratios higher or lower than this range, the differences in extinction coefficients at the wavelengths chosen for the two-wavelength method are too small to give accurate results for comparing particle radii and number densities. However, when comparing only soot volume fractions, the agreement between the two techniques continued to be good for intensity ratios up to 0.95.

  16. Turbulent piloted partially-premixed flames with varying levels of O2/N2: stability limits and PDF calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juddoo, Mrinal; Masri, Assaad R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports measured stability limits and PDF calculations of piloted, turbulent flames of compressed natural gas (CNG) partially-premixed with either pure oxygen, or with varying levels of O2/N2. Stability limits are presented for flames of CNG fuel premixed with up to 20% oxygen as well as CNG-O2-N2 fuel where the O2 content is varied from 8 to 22% by volume. Calculations are presented for (i) Sydney flame B [Masri et al. 1988] which uses pure CNG as well as flames B15 to B25 where the CNG is partially-premixed with 15-25% oxygen by volume, respectively and (ii) Sandia methane-air (1:3 by volume) flame E [Barlow et al. 2005] as well as new flames E15 and E25 that are partially-premixed with 'reconstituted air' where the O2 content in nitrogen is 15 and 25% by volume, respectively. The calculations solve a transported PDF of composition using a particle-based Monte Carlo method and employ the EMST mixing model as well as detailed chemical kinetics. The addition of oxygen to the fuel increases stability, shortens the flames, broadens the reaction zone, and shifts the stoichiometric mixture fraction towards the inner side of the jet. It is found that for pure CNG flames where the reaction zone is narrow (∼0.1 in mixture fraction space), the PDF calculations fail to reproduce the correct level of local extinction on approach to blow-off. A broadening in the reaction zone up to about 0.25 in mixture fraction space is needed for the PDF/EMST approach to be able to capture these finite-rate chemistry effects. It is also found that for the same level of partial premixing, increasing the O2/N2 ratio increases the maximum levels of CO and NO but shifts the peak to richer mixture fractions. Over the range of oxygenation investigated here, stability limits have shown to improve almost linearly with increasing oxygen levels in the fuel and with increasing the contribution of release rate from the pilot.

  17. Sub-grid scale combustion models for large eddy simulation of unsteady premixed flame propagation around obstacles.

    PubMed

    Di Sarli, Valeria; Di Benedetto, Almerinda; Russo, Gennaro

    2010-08-15

    In this work, an assessment of different sub-grid scale (sgs) combustion models proposed for large eddy simulation (LES) of steady turbulent premixed combustion (Colin et al., Phys. Fluids 12 (2000) 1843-1863; Flohr and Pitsch, Proc. CTR Summer Program, 2000, pp. 61-82; Kim and Menon, Combust. Sci. Technol. 160 (2000) 119-150; Charlette et al., Combust. Flame 131 (2002) 159-180; Pitsch and Duchamp de Lageneste, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 2001-2008) was performed to identify the model that best predicts unsteady flame propagation in gas explosions. Numerical results were compared to the experimental data by Patel et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1849-1854) for premixed deflagrating flame in a vented chamber in the presence of three sequential obstacles. It is found that all sgs combustion models are able to reproduce qualitatively the experiment in terms of step of flame acceleration and deceleration around each obstacle, and shape of the propagating flame. Without adjusting any constants and parameters, the sgs model by Charlette et al. also provides satisfactory quantitative predictions for flame speed and pressure peak. Conversely, the sgs combustion models other than Charlette et al. give correct predictions only after an ad hoc tuning of constants and parameters.

  18. Numerical prediction of turbulent flame stability in premixed/prevaporized (HSCT) combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis of combustion instabilities that induce flashback in a lean, premixed, prevaporized dump combustor is performed. KIVA-II, a finite volume CFD code for the modeling of transient, multidimensional, chemically reactive flows, serves as the principal analytical tool. The experiment of Proctor and T'ien is used as a reference for developing the computational model. An experimentally derived combustion instability mechanism is presented on the basis of the observations of Proctor and T'ien and other investigators of instabilities in low speed (M less than 0.1) dump combustors. The analysis comprises two independent procedures that begin from a calculated stable flame: The first is a linear increase of the equivalence ratio and the second is the linear decrease of the inflow velocity. The objective is to observe changes in the aerothermochemical features of the flow field prior to flashback. It was found that only the linear increase of the equivalence ratio elicits a calculated flashback result. Though this result did not exhibit large scale coherent vortices in the turbulent shear layer coincident with a flame flickering mode as was observed experimentally, there were interesting acoustic effects which were resolved quite well in the calculation. A discussion of the k-e turbulence model used by KIVA-II is prompted by the absence of combustion instabilities in the model as the inflow velocity is linearly decreased. Finally, recommendations are made for further numerical analysis that may improve correlation with experimentally observed combustion instabilities.

  19. Lagrangian analysis of premixed turbulent combustion in hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Lagrangian analysis has long been a tool used to analyze non-reacting turbulent flows, and has recently gained attention in the reacting flow and combustion communities. The approach itself allows one to separate local molecular effects, such as those due to reactions or diffusion, from turbulent advective effects along fluid pathlines, or trajectories. Accurate calculation of these trajectories can, however, be rather difficult due to the chaotic nature of turbulent flows and the added complexity of reactions. In order to determine resolution requirements and verify the numerical algorithm, extensive tests are described in this talk for prescribed steady, unsteady, and chaotic flows, as well as for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of non-reacting homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The Lagrangian analysis is then applied to DNS of premixed hydrogen-air flames at two different turbulence intensities for both single- and multi-step chemical mechanisms. Non-monotonic temperature and fuel-mass fraction evolutions are found to exist along trajectories passing through the flame brush. Such non-monotonicity is shown to be due to molecular diffusion resulting from large spatial gradients created by turbulent advection. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0273, and the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) under a Frontier project award.

  20. Effects of nucleating species on soot formation in turbulent non-premixed sooting jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Abhishek; Xuan, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Soot nucleation is one of the most unknown processes in the soot life cycle, and it is believed to occur from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) generated from the combustion of various fuel sources under locally fuel-rich conditions. Current soot nucleation models may include as few as one (typically naphthalene) or as many as a dozen of nucleating species. In this study, the effects of PAH inclusion in the soot nucleation model on soot yield and distribution are studied by means of Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of two piloted turbulent non-premixed sooting jet flames, using ethylene and a jet fuel surrogate, respectively. Two sets of simulations are performed for each flame, one considering only a single nucleating PAH (naphthalene) and the other one considering a range of nucleating PAH from naphthalene to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene. Flamelet-based chemistry tabulation is used for the major thermochemical quantities, and a recently developed relaxation model is used for PAH species to account for the interactions between turbulence and their chemistry. The effects of nucleating PAH species on soot are highlighted by comparing the mean soot volume fraction distributions and statistical characteristics of soot obtained from both sets of simulations against experimental measurements. Graduate Student, MNE.

  1. Computational analysis of some physical issues in nonpremixed and premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1997-07-01

    Results are presented of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a randomly perturbed spatially developing planar jet under the influence of a finite rate chemical reaction of the type F+O/to Product with initially nonpremixed reactants. The objectives of the simulations are to assess the compositional structure of the flame and to determine the influence of reaction exothermicity. It is shown that as the intensity of mixing is increased and the effect of finite rate chemistry is more pronounced, the magnitudes of the ensemble mean and root mean square of the product mass fraction decrease and those of the reactants mass fraction increase. At higher mixing rates the joint probability density functions of the reactants' mass fractions shift towards higher values within the composition domain indicating a lower reactedness. These trends are consistent with those observed experimentally and are useful in portraying the statistical structure of non-equilibrium diffusion flames. The DNS generated data are also utilized to examine the applicability of the 'laminar diffusion flamelet model' in predicting the rate of the reactant conversion with finite rate chemistry. This examination indicates that the performance of the model is improved as the value of the local Damkohler number is increased. In the setting of a 'turbulent' flame, the effect of the heat liberated by the chemical reaction is shown to increase the rate of reactant conversion. This finding is different from those of earlier DNS results and laboratory investigations. Lagrangian simulations are conducted of unsteady premixed flames in a spatially developing planar mixing layer. The flames are simulated via the FLAIR (Flux Line-Segment Model for Advection and Interface Reconstruction) algorithms combined with a vortex method flow solver. The objective of the simulations is to capture the structure of the flame front, ascertain the influences of exothermicity and baroclinic torque on the flame, and to assess the

  2. Transfer function characteristics of bluff-body stabilized, conical V-shaped premixed turbulent propane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaparro, Andres; Landry, Eric; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2006-04-15

    The response of bluff-body stabilized conical V-shaped premixed flames to periodic upstream velocity oscillations was characterized as a function of oscillation frequency, mean flow velocity, and equivalence ratio. The flame heat release response to the imposed velocity oscillations was determined from the CH* chemiluminescence captured by two photomultiplier (PMT) detectors at a wavelength of 430 nm. One of the PMTs viewed flame radiation in a 10-mm horizontal slice, 50 mm above the bluff-body. The second PMT observed the overall flame radiation. The flame transfer function characteristics were determined from the spectral analysis of the velocity and PMT signals. It was found that the flame heat release amplitude response is confined to low-frequency excitation below a Strouhal number of 4. The phase relationship of the transfer function for these turbulent flames was evaluated using the signal from the spatially masked PMT. The transfer function estimate based on these data exhibits second-order characteristics with a phase lag between the velocity and heat release signals. The localized heat-release response contains frequencies that are multiples of the excitation frequency, suggesting splitting and tilting of flame structures as well as some nonlinear effects. Increase of flame equivalence ratio from lean toward stoichiometric resulted in slight amplification of the high-frequency response. (author)

  3. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  4. Application of Dielectric-Barrier Discharge to the Stabilization of Lifted Non-Premixed Methane/Air Jet Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao; Zhao, Xiang-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the application of non-thermal plasma is a promising way to enhance the flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. The present study experimentally investigates the effect of a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) on the stabilization of lifted non-premixed methane/air jet flames. The jet flame with co-annular DBD is produced by a co-flow burner and has a Reynolds number of Re = 2500, 5000, 7000, and 9000. The application of DBD is seen to have an impact on the flame lift-off height, and the degree of impact is subject to flow conditions (such as Reynolds number and co-flow velocity) and plasma power. In general, the enhancement of flame stabilization, indicated by the decrease in lift-off height, is most evident at low Reynolds number and co-flow velocity. For flames with a Reynolds number less than Re = 5000, flames are attached to the nozzle regardless of the co-flow velocity and plasma power; at Re = 5000, flames are often intermittently attached. The enhancement is not that significant at high Reynolds number and co-flow velocity at least for the plasma power employed in the current study. A slight increase in plasma power leads to enhanced flame stabilization.

  5. Multi-kHz temperature imaging in turbulent non-premixed flames using planar Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, R. A.; Gabet, K. N.; Jiang, N.; Lempert, W. R.; Sutton, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the development of two-dimensional, high-repetition-rate (10-kHz) Rayleigh scattering imaging as applied to turbulent combustion environments. In particular, we report what we believe to be the first sets of high-speed planar Rayleigh scattering images in turbulent non-premixed flames, yielding temporally correlated image sequences of the instantaneous temperature field. Sample results are presented for the well-characterized DLR flames A and B (CH4/H2/N2) at Reynolds numbers of 15,200 and 22,800 at various axial positions downstream of the jet exit. The measurements are facilitated by the use of a user-calibrated, intensified, high-resolution CMOS camera in conjunction with a unique high-energy, high-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser system (PBLS) at Ohio State University, which yields output energies up to 200 mJ/pulse at 532 nm with 100-μs laser pulse spacing. The spatial and temporal resolution of the imaging system and acquired images are compared to the finest spatial and temporal scales expected within the turbulent flames. One of the most important features of the PBLS is the ability to readily change the pulse-to-pulse spacing as the required temporal resolution necessitates it. The quality and accuracy of the high-speed temperature imaging results are assessed by comparing derived statistics (mean and standard deviation) to that of previously reported point-based reference data acquired at Sandia National Laboratories and available within the TNF workshop. Good agreement between the two data sets is obtained providing an initial indication of quantitative nature of the planar, kHz-rate temperature imaging results.

  6. Scaling and efficiency of PRISM in adaptive simulations of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, Shaheen R.; Bell, J.B.; Brown, N.J.; Day, M.S.; Frenklach, M.; Grcar, J.F.; Propp, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    The dominant computational cost in modeling turbulent combustion phenomena numerically with high fidelity chemical mechanisms is the time required to solve the ordinary differential equations associated with chemical kinetics. One approach to reducing that computational cost is to develop an inexpensive surrogate model that accurately represents evolution of chemical kinetics. One such approach, PRISM, develops a polynomial representation of the chemistry evolution in a local region of chemical composition space. This representation is then stored for later use. As the computation proceeds, the chemistry evolution for other points within the same region are computed by evaluating these polynomials instead of calling an ordinary differential equation solver. If initial data for advancing the chemistry is encountered that is not in any region for which a polynomial is defined, the methodology dynamically samples that region and constructs a new representation for that region. The utility of this approach is determined by the size of the regions over which the representation provides a good approximation to the kinetics and the number of these regions that are necessary to model the subset of composition space that is active during a simulation. In this paper, we assess the PRISM methodology in the context of a turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. We consider a range of turbulent intensities ranging from weak turbulence that has little effect on the flame to strong turbulence that tears pockets of burning fluid from the main flame. For each case, we explore a range of sizes for the local regions and determine the scaling behavior as a function of region size and turbulent intensity.

  7. Experimental data regarding the characterization of the flame behavior near lean blowout in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Maria Grazia; Sciolti, Aldebara; Campilongo, Stefano; Ficarella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the data related to the flame acquisitions in a liquid-fuel gas turbine derived burner operating in non-premixed mode under three different equivalence fuel/air ratio, which corresponds to a richer, an intermediate, and an ultra-lean condition, near lean blowout (LBO). The data were collected with two high speed visualization systems which acquired in the visible (VIS) and in the infrared (NIR) spectral region. Furthermore chemiluminescence measurements, which have been performed with a photomultiplier (PMT), equipped with an OH* filter, and gas exhaust measurements were also given. For each acquisition the data were related to operating parameters as pressure, temperature and equivalent fuel/air ratio. The data are related to the research article “Image processing for the characterization of flame stability in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner near lean blowout” in Aerospace Science and Technology [1]. PMID:26862557

  8. Origin of activated combustion in steady-state premixed burner flame with superposition of dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, Kazunori; Akashi, Haruaki; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the mechanism of plasma-assisted combustion in a steady-state premixed burner flame. We examined the spatiotemporal variation of the density of atomic oxygen in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). We also measured the spatiotemporal variations of the optical emission intensities of Ar and OH. The experimental results reveal that atomic oxygen produced in the preheating zone by electron impact plays a key role in the activation of combustion reactions. This understanding is consistent with that described in our previous paper indicating that the production of “cold OH(A2Σ+)” via CHO + O → OH(A2Σ+) + CO has the sensitive response to the pulsed current of DBD [K. Zaima and K. Sasaki, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 53, 110309 (2014)].

  9. Numerical Parametric Studies of Laminar Flame Structures in Opposed Jets of Partially Premixed Methane-Air Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, C. R.; Raghavan, Vasudevan

    2012-09-01

    Interactions of fuel-rich and fuel-lean mixtures and formation of interlinked multiple flame zones are observed in gas turbines and industrial furnaces. For fundamentally understanding such flames, numerical investigation of heat and mass transport, and chemical reaction processes, in laminar, counter flowing partially premixed rich and lean streams of methane and air mixtures, is presented. An axisymmetric numerical reactive flow model, with C2 detailed mechanism for describing methane oxidation in air and an optically thin radiation sub-model, is used in simulations. The numerical results are validated against the experimental results from literature. The equivalence ratios of counter flowing rich and lean reactant streams and the resulting strain rates have been varied. The effect of these parameters on the flame structure is presented. For a given rich and lean side equivalence ratios, by varying the strain rates, triple, double and single flame zones are obtained.

  10. The mechanism of two-dimensional pocket formation in lean premixed methane-air flames with implications to turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Echekki, T.; Kollmann, W.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of unburnt pocket formation in an unsteady two-dimensional premixed lean methane-air flame is investigated using direct numerical simulations. Theoretical results for nonlinear diffusion equations combined with analytical examples are used to interpret some of the results. Flame structure and propagation show three distinct stages of pocket formation: (1) flame channel closing involving head-on quenching of flames, (2) cusp recovery, and (3) pocket burnout. The flame channel closing and subsequent pocket burnout are mutual annihilation events that feature curvature, diffusion normal to the flame front, unsteady strain rate effects, and singularities in flame propagation and stretch rate. The results show that during channel closing and pocket burnout thermo-diffusive and chemical interactions result in the acceleration of the flames prior to annihilation; the time scales associated with the final stage of mutual annihilation and the initial stage of cusp recovery are significantly smaller than diffusive and convective time scales. Peak radical concentrations resulting from flame channel closing and pocket burnout exceed peak laminar values by as much as 25%. After the merging of the fuel consumption layers, radical production and flame structure shifts more towards an H{sub 2}/CO/O{sub 2} system at the expense of hydrocarbon reactions. Species thermodiffusive interaction times are shorter than the unstrained one-dimensional counterpart due to unsteady strain and convection. Curvature effects on the flame propagation are prominent during pocket burnout and cusp recovery. The recovery stage shows strong dependence on diffusion of radicals left from the channel closing stage. This diffusion is amplified by the strong curvature of the flame cusp.

  11. Combustion Characteristics in a Non-Premixed Cool-Flame Regime of n-Heptane in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.; Hicks, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    A series of distinct phenomena have recently been observed in single-fuel-droplet combustion tests performed on the International Space Station (ISS). This study attempts to simulate the observed flame behavior numerically using a gaseous n-heptane fuel source in zero gravity and a time-dependent axisymmetric (2D) code, which includes a detailed reaction mechanism (127 species and 1130 reactions), diffusive transport, and a radiation model (for CH4, CO, CO2, H2O, and soot). The calculated combustion characteristics depend strongly on the air velocity around the fuel source. In a near-quiescent air environment (< or = 2 mm/s), with a sufficiently large fuel injection velocity (1 cm/s), a growing spherical diffusion flame extinguishes at ˜1200 K due to radiative heat losses. This is typically followed by a transition to the low-temperature (cool-flame) regime with a reaction zone (at ˜700 K) in close proximity to the fuel source. The 'cool flame' regime is formed due to the negative temperature coefficient in the low-temperature chemistry. After a relatively long period (˜18 s) of the cool flame regime, a flash re-ignition occurs, associated with flame-edge propagation and subsequent extinction of the re-ignited flame. In a low-speed (˜3 mm/s) airstream (which simulates the slight droplet movement), the diffusion flame is enhanced upstream and experiences a local extinction downstream at ˜1200 K, followed by steady flame pulsations (˜0.4 Hz). At higher air velocities (4-10 mm/s), the locally extinguished flame becomes steady state. The present axisymmetric computational approach helps in revealing the non-premixed 'cool flame' structure and 2D flame-flow interactions observed in recent microgravity droplet combustion experiments.

  12. Blowoff characteristics of bluff-body stabilized conical premixed flames with upstream spatial mixture gradients and velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2008-06-15

    This experimental study concerns determination of blowoff equivalence ratios for lean premixed conical flames for different mixture approach velocities ranging from 5 to 16 m/s in the presence of spatial mixture gradients and upstream velocity modulation. Conical flames were anchored on a disk-shaped bluff body that was attached to a central rod in the burner nozzle. A combustible propane-air mixture flowed through a converging axisymmetric nozzle with a concentric insert, allowing radial mixture variation by tailoring the composition in the inner and outer parts of the nozzle. The radial mixture profiles were characterized near the location of the flame holder by laser Rayleigh light scattering. Additionally, a loudspeaker at the nozzle base allowed introduction of periodic velocity oscillations with an amplitude of 9% of the mean flow velocity up to a frequency of 350 Hz. The flame blowoff equivalence ratio was experimentally determined by continuously lowering the fuel flow rates and determining the flame detachment point from the flame holder. Flame detachment was detected by a rapid reduction of CH* emission from the flame base imaged by a photomultiplier detector. It was found that the flame blowoff is preceded by progressive narrowing of the flame cone for the case of higher inner jet equivalence ratios. In this case, the fuel-lean outer flow cannot sustain combustion, and clearly this is not a good way of operating a combustor. Nevertheless, the overall blowoff equivalence ratio is reduced by inner stream fuel enrichment. A possible explanation for this behavior is given based on the radial extent of the variable-equivalence-ratio mixture burning near the flame stabilization region. Fuel enrichment in the outer flow was found to have no effect on blowoff as compared to the case of uniform mixture. The results were similar for the whole range of mean flow velocities and upstream excitation frequencies. (author)

  13. A direct numerical simulation study of flame structure and stabilization of an experimental high Ka CH4/air premixed jet flame

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2017-03-17

    In the present work, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of an experimental high Karlovitz number (Ka) CH4/air piloted premixed flame was analyzed to study the inner structure and the stabilization mechanism of the turbulent flame. A reduced chemical mechanism for premixed CH4/air combustion with NOx based on GRI-Mech3.0 was used, including 268 elementary reactions and 28 transported species. The evolution of the stretch factor, I0, indicates that the burning rate per unit flame surface area is considerably reduced in the near field and exhibits a minimum at x/D = 8. Downstream, the burning rate gradually increases. The stretch factor ismore » different between different species, suggesting the quenching of some reactions but not others. Comparison between the turbulent flame and strained laminar flames indicates that certain aspects of the mean flame structure can be represented surprisingly well by flamelets if changes in boundary conditions are accounted for and the strain rate of the mean flow is employed; however, the thickening of the flame due to turbulence is not captured. The spatial development of displacement speeds is studied at higher Ka than previous DNS. In contrast to almost all previous studies, the mean displacement speed conditioned on the flame front is negative in the near field, and the dominant contribution to the displacement speed is normal diffusion with the reaction contribution being secondary. Further downstream, reaction overtakes normal diffusion, contributing to a positive displacement speed. The negative displacement speed in the near field implies that the flame front situates itself in the pilot region where the inner structure of the turbulent flame is affected significantly, and the flame stabilizes in balance with the inward flow. Notably, in the upstream region of the turbulent flame, the main reaction contributing to the production of OH, H+O2⇌O+OH (R35), is weak. Moreover, oxidation reactions, H2+OH⇌H+H2O (R79) and CO

  14. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert, spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport, For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  15. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  16. A numerical study of the stability of one-dimensional laminar premixed flames in inert porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, M.A.A.; Pereira, J.M.C.; Pereira, J.C.F.

    2008-06-15

    This work presents a numerical study of the stabilization diagram of methane/air premixed flames in a finite porous media foam with a uniform ambient temperature. A set of steady computations are considered, using a 1D numerical model that takes into account solid and gas energy equations as well as chemistry and radiation models. The present results show that both stable and unstable solutions, for upper and lower flames, exist either at the surface or submerged in the porous matrix. The influence of the 1D computational domain, boundary conditions, and gas/solid interface treatment on the stability of the calculated flames is also discussed. A linearized version of the discrete-ordinates radiation model is included in the linear stability analysis to discuss the influence of radiation on the stability of the flames. The full stabilization diagram and the linear stability analysis provide information on the stability of the flames, pointing to the existence of unstable upstream surface flames as well as unstable submerged flames on the downstream part of the porous media. (author)

  17. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  18. OH-PLIF Measurements of High-Pressure, Hydrogen Augmented Premixed Flames in the SimVal Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Strakey, P.A.; Woodruff, S.D.; Williams, T.C.; Schefer, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of the hydroxyl radical in lean, premixed natural gas flames augmented with hydrogen are presented. The experiments were conducted in the SimVal combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at operating pressures from 1 to 8 atmospheres. The data, which was collected in a combustor with well controlled boundary conditions, is intended to be used for validating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models under conditions directly relevant to land-based gas turbine engines. The images, which show significant effects of hydrogen on local flame quenching are discussed in terms of a turbulent premixed combustion regime and non-dimensional parameters such as Karlovitz number. Pressure was found to thin the OH region, but only had a secondary effect on overall flame shape compared to the effects of hydrogen addition which was found to decrease local quenching and shorten the turbulent flame brush. A method to process the individual images based on local gradients of fluorescence intensity is proposed and results are presented. Finally, the results of several Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are presented and compared to the experimental data in an effort to understand the issues related to model validation, especially for simulations that do not include OH as an intermediate species.

  19. In situ TDLAS measurement of absolute acetylene concentration profiles in a non-premixed laminar counter-flow flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Klein, M.; Kathrotia, T.; Riedel, U.; Kissel, T.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2012-06-01

    Acetylene (C2H2), as an important precursor for chemiluminescence species, is a key to understand, simulate and model the chemiluminescence and the related reaction paths. Hence we developed a high resolution spectrometer based on direct Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) allowing the first quantitative, calibration-free and spatially resolved in situ C2H2 measurement in an atmospheric non-premixed counter-flow flame supported on a Tsuji burner. A fiber-coupled distributed feedback diode laser near 1535 nm was used to measure several absolute C2H2 concentration profiles (peak concentrations up to 9700 ppm) in a laminar non-premixed CH4/air flame ( T up to 1950 K) supported on a modified Tsuji counter-flow burner with N2 purge slots to minimize end flames. We achieve a fractional optical resolution of up to 5×10-5 OD (1 σ) in the flame, resulting in temperature-dependent acetylene detection limits for the P17e line at 6513 cm-1 of up to 2.1 ppmṡm. Absolute C2H2 concentration profiles were obtained by translating the burner through the laser beam using a DC motor with 100 μm step widths. Intercomparisons of the experimental C2H2 profiles with simulations using our new hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms show excellent agreement in position, shape and in the absolute C2H2 values.

  20. Effects of Karlovitz number on turbulent kinetic energy transport in turbulent lean premixed methane/air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyan; Abraham, John

    2017-08-01

    Direct numerical simulations of lean methane/air flames are carried out to study the effects of premixed combustion on turbulence. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.5 and non-dimensional turbulence intensities (urms/SL) are between 2 and 25. The mixture pressure is 20 bars and temperature is 810 K to simulate approximate conditions in lean-burn natural gas engines. The Karlovitz number (Ka) varies from 1.1 to 49.4, and the Damköhler number (Da) varies from 0.26 to 3.2 corresponding to turbulent premixed combustion in the thin reaction zone (TRZ) regime. It is found that turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its dissipation rate decrease monotonically across the flame brush while the integral length scale increases monotonically for flames in the TRZ regime. The transport equation of TKE is then examined, and the scaling of the terms in the equation is discussed. It is found that the sink term which represents molecular diffusion and viscous dissipation is the dominant term in the TKE balance and it scales with the square of Ka. The relative importance of the other terms with respect to the dissipation term is studied. With increasing Ka, the other terms in the TKE balance become less important compared to the dissipation term.

  1. Experimental Study of the Flowfield of a Two-Dimensional Premixed Turbulent Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Ganji, A. R.; Sawyer, R. F.

    1980-07-01

    A turbulent reacting shear layer in a premixed propane/air flow has been studied in a two dimensional combustor, with the flame stabilized behind a rearward facing streamlined step. Spark shadowgraphs show that in the range of velocities (7.5 to 22.5 m/sec corresponding to Reynolds numbers of .5 x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1} to 1. 5 x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1} ) and equivalence ratios (0.4 to 0.7) studied, the mixing layer is dominated by Brown~ Roshko type large coherent structures in both reacting and nonreacting flows. High speed schlieren movies show that these eddies are convected downstream and increase their size and spacing by combustion and coalescence with neighboring eddies. Tracing individual eddies shows, in the reacting shear layer, that, on the average, eddies accelerate as they move downstream with the highest acceleration close to the origin of the shear layer. Combustion is confined to these large structures which develop as a result of vortical action of the shear flow. On the average, the reacting eddies have a lower growth rate than nonreacting eddies. A turbulent boundary layer created by means of a tripping wire upstream of the edge of the step virtually eliminates the large coherent structures in the shear layer, while for the case in which the wire could not trigger the transition to turbulence, the large coherent structures dominated the reacting and nonreacting flows.

  2. Dissipation element analysis of a turbulent non-premixed jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauding, Michael; Dietzsch, Felix; Goebbert, Jens Henrik; Thévenin, Dominique; Abdelsamie, Abouelmagd; Hasse, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the present work is to examine the interaction between turbulent mixing and chemistry by employing the method of dissipation elements in a non-premixed turbulent jet flame. The method of dissipation elements [L. Wang and N. Peters, J. Fluid Mech. 554, 457-475 (2006)] is used to perform a space-filling decomposition of the turbulent jet flow into different regimes conditioned on their location with respect to the reaction zone. Based on the non-local structure of dissipation elements, this decomposition allows us to discern whether points away from stoichiometry are connected through a diffusive layer with the reaction zone. In a next step, a regime based statistical analysis of dissipation elements is carried out by means of data obtained from a direct numerical simulation. Turbulent mixing and chemical reactions depend strongly on the mixture fraction gradient. From a budget between strain and dissipation, the mechanism for the formation and destruction of mean gradients along dissipation elements is inspected. This budget reveals that large gradients in the mixture fraction field occur at a small but finite length scale. Finally, the inner structure of dissipation elements is examined by computing statistics along gradient trajectories of the mixture fraction field. Thereby, the method of dissipation elements provides a statistical characterization of flamelets and novel insight into the interaction between chemistry and turbulence.

  3. A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenyu; Pitz, William J.; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexander; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C4 + C2 species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C6H4CH3 radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a methyl C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C6H4CH3 radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics. PMID:23762016

  4. Nitric oxide formation in a lean, premixed-prevaporized jet A/air flame tube: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Bianco, Jean; Deur, John M.; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on a lean, premixed-prevaporized Jet A/air flame tube. The NO(x) emissions were measured in a flame tube apparatus at inlet temperatures ranging from 755 to 866 K (900 to 1100 F), pressures from 10 to 15 atm, and equivalence ratios from 0.37 to 0.62. The data were then used in regressing an equation to predict the NO(x) production levels in combustors of similar design. Through an evaluation of parameters it was found that NO(x) is dependent on adiabatic flame temperature and combustion residence time, yet independent of pressure and inlet air temperature for the range of conditions studied. This equation was then applied to experimental data that were obtained from the literature, and a good correlation was achieved.

  5. The effect of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and thermal radiation in turbulent, non-premixed methane flames

    DOE PAGES

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Williams, Timothy C.

    2016-07-12

    Non-premixed oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas is used in industrial applications where high-intensity heat is required, such as glass manufacturing and metal forging and shaping. In these applications, the high flame temperatures achieved by oxy-fuel combustion increase radiative heat transfer to the surfaces of interest and soot formation within the flame is desired for further augmentation of radiation. However, the high cost of cryogenic air separation has limited the penetration of oxy-fuel combustion technologies. New approaches to air separation are being developed that may reduce oxygen production costs, but only for intermediate levels of oxygen enrichment of air. To determinemore » the influence of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and radiation, we developed a non-premixed coannular burner in which oxygen concentrations and oxidizer flow rates can be independently varied, to distinguish the effects of turbulent mixing intensity from oxygen enrichment on soot formation and flame radiation. Local radiation intensities, soot concentrations, and soot temperatures have been measured using a thin-film thermopile, planar laser-induced incandescence (LII), and two-color imaging pyrometry, respectively. The measurements show that soot formation increases as the oxygen concentration decreases from 100% to 50%, helping to moderate a decrease in overall flame radiation. An increase in turbulence intensity has a marked effect on flame height, soot formation and thermal radiation, leading to decreases in all of these. The soot temperature decreases with a decrease in the oxygen concentration and increases with an increase in turbulent mixing intensity. Altogether, the results suggest that properly designed oxygen-enriched burners that enhance soot formation for intermediate levels of oxygen purity may be able to achieve thermal radiation intensities as high as 85% of traditional oxy-fuel burners utilizing high-purity oxygen.« less

  6. The effect of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and thermal radiation in turbulent, non-premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Williams, Timothy C.

    2016-07-12

    Non-premixed oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas is used in industrial applications where high-intensity heat is required, such as glass manufacturing and metal forging and shaping. In these applications, the high flame temperatures achieved by oxy-fuel combustion increase radiative heat transfer to the surfaces of interest and soot formation within the flame is desired for further augmentation of radiation. However, the high cost of cryogenic air separation has limited the penetration of oxy-fuel combustion technologies. New approaches to air separation are being developed that may reduce oxygen production costs, but only for intermediate levels of oxygen enrichment of air. To determine the influence of oxygen enrichment on soot formation and radiation, we developed a non-premixed coannular burner in which oxygen concentrations and oxidizer flow rates can be independently varied, to distinguish the effects of turbulent mixing intensity from oxygen enrichment on soot formation and flame radiation. Local radiation intensities, soot concentrations, and soot temperatures have been measured using a thin-film thermopile, planar laser-induced incandescence (LII), and two-color imaging pyrometry, respectively. The measurements show that soot formation increases as the oxygen concentration decreases from 100% to 50%, helping to moderate a decrease in overall flame radiation. An increase in turbulence intensity has a marked effect on flame height, soot formation and thermal radiation, leading to decreases in all of these. The soot temperature decreases with a decrease in the oxygen concentration and increases with an increase in turbulent mixing intensity. Altogether, the results suggest that properly designed oxygen-enriched burners that enhance soot formation for intermediate levels of oxygen purity may be able to achieve thermal radiation intensities as high as 85% of traditional oxy-fuel burners utilizing high-purity oxygen.

  7. A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z; Pitz, W J; Fournet, R; Glaude, P; Battin-Leclerc, F

    2009-12-18

    An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene, decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C{sub 4} + C{sub 2} species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics.

  8. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  9. Effects of buoyancy on lean premixed v-flames, Part II. VelocityStatistics in Normal and Microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D.T.

    1999-07-01

    The field effects of buoyancy on laminar and turbulent premixed v-flames have been studied by the use of laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity statistics in +1g, -1g and {micro}g flames. The experimental conditions covered mean velocity, Uo, of 0.4 to 2 m/s, methane/air equivalence ratio, f, of 0.62 to 0.75. The Reynolds numbers, from 625 to 3130 and the Richardson number from 0.05 to 1.34. The results show that a change from favorable (+1g) to unfavorable (-1g) mean pressure gradient in the plume create stagnating flows in the far field whose influences on the mean and fluctuating velocities persist in the near field even at the highest Re we have investigated. The use of Richardson number < 0.1 as a criterion for momentum dominance is not sufficient to prescribe an upper limit for these buoyancy effects. In {micro}g, the flows within the plumes are non-accelerating and parallel. Therefore, velocity gradients and hence mean strain rates in the plumes of laboratory flames are direct consequences of buoyancy. Furthermore, the rms fluctuations in the plumes of {micro}g flames are lower and more isotropic than in the laboratory flames to show that the unstable plumes in laboratory flames also induce velocity fluctuations. The phenomena influenced by buoyancy i.e. degree of flame wrinkling, flow acceleration, flow distribution, and turbulence production, can be subtle due to their close coupling with other flame flow interaction processes. But they cannot be ignored in fundamental studies or else the conclusions and insights would be ambiguous and not very meaningful.

  10. Effects of Turbulence on the Combustion Properties of Partially Premixed Flames of Canola Methyl Ester and Diesel Blends

    DOE PAGES

    Dhamale, N.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Gollahalli, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Canola methyl ester (CME) is a biofuel that is a renewable alternative energy resource and is produced by the transesterification of canola oil. The objective of this study was to document the effects of turbulence on the combustion characteristics of blends of CME and No 2 diesel fuel in a partially-premixed flame environment. The experiments were conducted with mixtures of pre-vaporized fuel and air at an initial equivalence ratio of 7 and three burner exit Reynolds numbers, 2700, 3600, and 4500. Three blends with 25, 50, and 75% volume concentration of CME were studied. The soot volume fraction was highestmore » for the pure diesel flames and did not change significantly with Reynolds number due to the mutually compensating effects of increased carbon input rate and increased air entrainment as the Reynolds number was increased. The global NOx emission index was highest and the CO emission index was the lowest for the pure CME flame, and varied non-monotonically with biofuel content in the blend The mean temperature and the NOx concentration at three-quarter flame height were generally correlated, indicating that the thermal mechanism of NOx formation was dominant in the turbulent biofuel flames also.« less

  11. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  12. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  13. Characterization of temperature non-uniformity over a premixed CH4-air flame based on line-of-sight TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangle; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Zhenyu; He, Yabai; Kan, Ruifeng

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing temperature non-uniformity has been investigated based on measurements of line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. It utilized two fiber-coupled distributed feedback diode lasers at wavelengths around 1339 and 1392 nm as light sources to probe the field at multiple absorptions lines of water vapor and applied a temperature binning strategy combined with Gauss-Seidel iteration method to explore the temperature non-uniformity of the field in one dimension. The technique has been applied to a McKenna burner, which produced a flat premixed laminar CH4-air flame. The flame and its adjacent area formed an atmospheric field with significant non-uniformity of temperature and water vapor concentration. The effect of the number of temperature bins on column-density and temperature results has also been explored.

  14. The effect of stratification on premixed swirl-flame flashback by using porous center-body injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaslin, Andrew; Ranjan, Rakesh; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Boundary layer flashback must be prevented in order to stably operate stationary gas turbines. One strategy to avoid flashback is to create equivalence-ratio stratification, such as by reducing the fuel/air ratio in the boundary layer below the flammability limit. Typically, stratification is achieved by using radially non-uniform fuel injection. The goal of the current study is to reduce the propensity of flashback in a premixed annular swirl combustor that uses a premix section with center-body. A porous metal center-body (10 micron pore size) is used to bleed air directly into the boundary layer and thus locally reduce the equivalence ratio. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of anisole-seeded flow is carried out to assess the stratification in the flow. Time-resolved PIV and chemiluminescence imaging are used to investigate flashback at atmospheric pressure conditions. A comparative study between fully premixed and stratified flame flashback is conducted to determine how stratification influences flashback physics. This work was sponsored by the DOE NETL under Grant DEFC2611-FE0007107. This source of funding is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. 2D-imaging of sampling-probe perturbations in laminar premixed flames using Kr X-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, N.; Tranter, R. S.; Moshammer, K.; ...

    2017-04-14

    The perturbation of the temperature field caused by a quartz sampling probe has been investigated in a fuel-rich low-pressure premixed ethylene/oxygen/argon/krypton flame using X-ray fluorescence. The experiments were performed at the 7-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory where a continuous beam of X-rays at 15 keV was used to excite krypton atoms that were added to the unburnt flame gases in a concentration of 5% (by volume). The resulting krypton X-ray fluorescence at 12.65 keV was collected and the spatially resolved signal was subsequently converted into the local temperature of the imaged spot.more » One and two dimensional scans of the temperature field were obtained by translating the entire flame chamber through a pre-programmed sequence of positions on high precision translation stages and measuring the X-ray fluorescence at each location. Multiple measurements were performed at various separations between the burner surface and probe tip, representing sampling positions from the preheat, reaction, and postflame zones of the low-pressure flame. Distortions of up to 1000 K of the burner-probe centerline flame temperature were found with the tip of the probe in the preheat zone and distortions of up to 500 K were observed with it in the reaction and postflame zones. Furthermore, perturbations of the temperature field have been revealed that radially reach as far as 20 mm from the burner-probe centerline and about 3 mm in front of the probe tip. Finally, these results clearly reveal the limitations of one-dimensional models for predicting flame-sampling experiments and comments are made with regard to model developments and validations based on quantitative speciation data from low-pressure flames obtained via intrusive sampling techniques.« less

  16. Propagation and extinction of premixed C{sub 5}-C{sub 12}n-alkane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chunsheng; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Yang L.; Wang, Hai; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2010-02-15

    Laminar flame speeds and extinction strain rates of premixed C{sub 5}-C{sub 12}n-alkane flames were determined at atmospheric pressure and elevated unburned mixture temperatures, over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Experiments were performed in the counterflow configuration and flow velocities were measured using Laser Doppler Velocimetry. The laminar flame speeds were obtained using a non-linear extrapolation technique utilizing numerical simulations of the counterflow experiments with detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. Compared to linearly extrapolated values, the laminar flame speeds obtained using non-linear extrapolations were found to be 1-4 cm/s lower depending on the equivalence ratio. It was determined that the laminar flame speeds of all n-alkane/air mixtures considered in this investigation are similar to each other and sensitive largely to the H{sub 2}/CO and C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbon kinetics. Additionally, the resistance to extinction decreases as the fuel molecular weight increases. Simulations of the experiments were performed using the recently developed JetSurF 0.2 reaction model consisting of 194 species and 1459 reactions. The laminar flame speeds were predicted with good accuracy for all the n-alkane-air mixtures considered. The experimental extinction strain rates are well predicted by the model for fuel-lean mixtures. For stoichiometric and fuel-rich mixtures, the predicted extinction strain rates are approximately 10% lower than the experimental values. Insights into the physical and chemical processes that control the response of n-alkane flames are provided through detailed sensitivity analyses on both reaction rates and binary diffusion coefficients. (author)

  17. Flame behaviors of propane/air premixed flame propagation in a closed rectangular duct with a 90-deg bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuechao; Sun, Jinhua; Yuen, K. K.; Ding, Yibin; Chen, Sining

    2008-11-01

    Experiments of flame propagation in a small, closed rectangular duct with a 90° bend were performed for a propane-air mixture. The high speed camera and Schlieren techniques were used to record images of flame propagation process in the combustion pipe. Meanwhile, the fine thermocouples and ion current probes were applied to measure the temperature distribution and reaction intensity of combustion. The characteristics of propane-air flame and its microstructure were analyzed in detail by the experimental results. In the test, the special tulip flame formation was observed. Around the bend, the flame tip proceeded more quickly at the lower side with the flame front elongated toward the axial direction. And transition to turbulent flame occurred. It was suggested that fluctuations of velocity, ion current and temperature were mainly due to the comprehensive effects of multi-wave and the intense of turbulent combustion.

  18. An experimental study of low-pressure premixed pyrrole/oxygen/argon flames with tunable synchrotron photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zhenyu; Li, Yuyang; Zhang, Taichang; Qi, Fei; Zhu, Aiguo; Cui, Zhifeng

    2007-10-15

    Two premixed laminar pyrrole/oxygen/argon flames at 3.33 kPa (25 Torr) with equivalence ratios of 0.55 (C/O/N = 1:5.19:0.25) and 1.84 (C/O/N = 1:1.56:0.25) have been investigated using tunable synchrotron photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry techniques. All observed flame species, including some nitrogen-containing intermediates, have been identified by measurements of photoionization efficiency spectra. Mole fraction profiles of species including reactants, intermediates, and products have been determined by scanning burner position at some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds, and flame temperature has been measured by a Pt/Pt-13% Rh thermocouple. The results indicate that N{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} are the major nitrogenous products, while hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, and 2-propenenitrile are the most important nitrogen-containing intermediates in pyrrole flames. Radicals such as methyl, propargyl, allyl, cyanomethyl, n-propyl, isobutyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenyl, cyclohexyl, phenoxy, and 4-methylbenzyl are observed as well. Moreover, ethenol and methylacrylonitrile are also detected. Reaction pathways involving the major species are proposed. The new results will be useful in developing a kinetic model of nitrogenous compound combustion. (author)

  19. Diode laser absorption measurement and analysis of HCN in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    2008-10-15

    Measurements of HCN in flat, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure are reported. Quartz-microprobe sampling followed by wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second harmonic detection was used to obtain an overall measurement uncertainty of better than 20% for mole fractions HCN on the order of 10 ppm. The equivalence ratio, {phi}, was varied between 1.3 and 1.5, while the flame temperature was varied independently by changing the mass flux through the burner surface at constant equivalence ratio. Under the conditions of the experiments, the peak mole fractions vary little, in the range of 10-15 ppm. Increasing the flame temperature by increasing the mass flux had little influence on the peak mole fraction, but accelerated HCN burnout substantially. At high equivalence ratio and low flame temperature, HCN burnout is very slow: at {phi}=1.5, {proportional_to}10ppm HCN is still present 7 mm above the burner surface. Substantial quantitative disagreement is observed between the experimental profiles and those obtained from calculations using GRI-Mech 3.0, with the calculations generally overpredicting the results significantly. Changing the rates of key formation and consumption reactions for HCN can improve the agreement, but only by making unreasonable changes in these rates. Inclusion of reactions describing NCN formation and consumption in the calculations improves the agreement with the measurements considerably. (author)

  20. Dimensionality estimate of the manifold in chemical composition space for a turbulent premixed H2+air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, Shaheen R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-02-26

    The dimensionality (D) of manifolds of active chemical composition space has been measured using three different approaches: the Hausdorff geometrical binning method, Principal Component Analysis, and the Grassberger-Procaccia cumulative distribution method. A series of artificial manifolds is also generated using a Monte Carlo approach to discern the advantages and limitations of the three methods. Dimensionality is quantified for different levels of turbulent intensity in a simulation of the interactions of a 2D premixed hydrogen flame with a localized region of turbulence superimposed over the cold region upstream of the flame front. The simulations are conducted using an adaptive mesh refinement code for low Mach number reacting flows. By treating the N{sub s} species and temperature of the local thermo-chemical state as a point in multi-dimensional chemical composition space, a snapshot of a flame region is mapped into chemical composition space to generate the manifold associated with the 2-D flame system. An increase in D was observed with increasing turbulent intensity for all three methods. Although each method provides useful information, the Grassberger-Procaccia method is subject to fewer artifacts than the other two thereby providing the most reliable quantification of D.

  1. Evaluation of Presumed Probability-Density-Function Models in Non-Premixed Flames by using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hong-Jun; Zhang, Hui-Qiang; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Four kinds of presumed probability-density-function (PDF) models for non-premixed turbulent combustion are evaluated in flames with various stoichiometric mixture fractions by using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES code is validated by the experimental data of a classical turbulent jet flame (Sandia flame D). The mean and rms temperatures obtained by the presumed PDF models are compared with the LES results. The β-function model achieves a good prediction for different flames. The predicted rms temperature by using the double-δ function model is very small and unphysical in the vicinity of the maximum mean temperature. The clip-Gaussian model and the multi-δ function model make a worse prediction of the extremely fuel-rich or fuel-lean side due to the clip at the boundary of the mixture fraction space. The results also show that the overall prediction performance of presumed PDF models is better at mediate stoichiometric mixture fractions than that at very small or very large ones.

  2. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet withmore » Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal to s3¯.« less

  3. Investigation of non-premixed flame combustion characters in GO2/GH2 shear coaxial injectors using non-intrusive optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian; Yu, NanJia; Cai, GuoBiao

    2015-12-01

    Single-element combustor experiments are conducted for three shear coaxial geometry configuration injectors by using gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) as propellants. During the combustion process, several spatially and timeresolved non-intrusive optical techniques, such as OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), high speed imaging, and infrared imaging, are simultaneously employed to observe the OH radical concentration distribution, flame fluctuations, and temperature fields. The results demonstrate that the turbulent flow phenomenon of non-premixed flame exhibits a remarkable periodicity, and the mixing ratio becomes a crucial factor to influence the combustion flame length. The high speed and infrared images have a consistent temperature field trend. As for the OH-PLIF images, an intuitionistic local flame structure is revealed by single-shot instantaneous images. Furthermore, the means and standard deviations of OH radical intensity are acquired to provide statistical information regarding the flame, which may be helpful for validation of numerical simulations in future. Parameters of structure configurations, such as impinging angle and oxygen post thickness, play an important role in the reaction zone distribution. Based on a successful flame contour extraction method assembled with non-linear anisotropic diffusive filtering and variational level-set, it is possible to implement a fractal analysis to describe the fractal characteristics of the non-premixed flame contour. As a result, the flame front cannot be regarded as a fractal object. However, this turbulent process presents a self-similarity characteristic.

  4. Propagation and Extinction of a Cylindrical Premixed Flame Undergoing Equivalence Ratio Fluctuation Near the Lean Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, Yosuke; Kitano, Michio; Takahashi, Yoichi

    Experimental study was made to investigate the propagation and extinction characteristics of a stretched cylindrical flame undergoing periodic fluctuation of equivalence ratio near the lean limit. With a lean methane-air and a lean propane-air mixture, burning velocity, flame luminosity and flame stretch rate were measured or evaluated for the fluctuation frequencies of 5Hz and 20Hz. The results were summarized as follows: (1) In some part of a period, burning velocity and flame luminosity of the dynamic flame near the lean limit were possible to become lower than those at the lean flammability limit of the static flame. (2) At the high frequency of 20Hz, the burning velocity took a negative value in a certain time range. In spite of this loss of propagation ability, the flame was not extinguished but sustained, indicating the recovery of the flame intensity due to the dynamic effect of fluctuating flame. (3) Flame recovery phenomenon could occur more easily for the methane flame which was strengthened by the Lewis number effect than the propane flame which was weakened by that effect.

  5. Extinction of premixed H{sub 2}/air flames: Chemical kinetics and molecular diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yufei; Holley, Adam T.; Andac, Mustafa G.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai; Davis, Scott G.; Middha, Prankul

    2005-09-01

    Laminar flame speed has traditionally been used for the partial validation of flame kinetics. In most cases, however, its accurate determination requires extensive data processing and/or extrapolations, thus rendering the measurement of this fundamental flame property indirect. Additionally, the presence of flame front instabilities does not conform to the definition of laminar flame speed. This is the case for Le<1 flames, with the most notable example being ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames, which develop cellular structures at low strain rates so that determination of laminar flame speeds for such mixtures is not possible. Thus, this low-temperature regime of H{sub 2} oxidation has not been validated systematically in flames. In the present investigation, an alternative/supplemental approach is proposed that includes the experimental determination of extinction strain rates for these flames, and these rates are compared with the predictions of direct numerical simulations. This approach is meaningful for two reasons: (1) Extinction strain rates can be measured directly, as opposed to laminar flame speeds, and (2) while the unstretched lean H{sub 2}/air flames are cellular, the stretched ones are not, thus making comparisons between experiment and simulations meaningful. Such comparisons revealed serious discrepancies between experiments and simulations for ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames by using four kinetic mechanisms. Additional studies were conducted for lean and near-stoichiometric H{sub 2}/air flames diluted with various amounts of N{sub 2}. Similarly to the ultralean flames, significant discrepancies between experimental and predicted extinction strain rates were also found. To identify the possible sources of such discrepancies, the effect of uncertainties on the diffusion coefficients was assessed and an improved treatment of diffusion coefficients was advanced and implemented. Under the conditions considered in this study, the sensitivity of diffusion

  6. Chemical structures of low-pressure premixed methylcyclohexane flames as benchmarks for the development of a predictive combustion chemistry model

    DOE PAGES

    Skeen, Scott A.; Yang, Bin; Jasper, Ahren W.; ...

    2011-11-14

    The chemical compositions of three low-pressure premixed flames of methylcyclohexane (MCH) are investigated with the emphasis on the chemistry of MCH decomposition and the formation of aromatic species, including benzene and toluene. The flames are stabilized on a flat-flame (McKenna type) burner at equivalence ratios of φ = 1.0, 1.75, and 1.9 and at low pressures between 15 Torr (= 20 mbar) and 30 Torr (= 40 mbar). The complex chemistry of MCH consumption is illustrated in the experimental identification of several C7H12, C7H10, C6H12, and C6H10 isomers sampled from the flames as a function of distance from the burner.more » Three initiation steps for MCH consumption are discussed: ring-opening to heptenes and methyl-hexenes (isomerization), methyl radical loss yielding the cyclohexyl radical (dissociation), and H abstraction from MCH. Mole fraction profiles as a function of distance from the burner for the C7 species supplemented by theoretical calculations are presented, indicating that flame structures resulting in steeper temperature gradients and/or greater peak temperatures can lead to a relative increase in MCH consumption through the dissociation and isomerization channels. Trends observed among the stable C6 species as well as 1,3-pentadiene and isoprene also support this conclusion. Relatively large amounts of toluene and benzene are observed in the experiments, illustrating the importance of sequential H-abstraction steps from MCH to toluene and from cyclohexyl to benzene. Furthermore, modeled results using the detailed chemical model of Pitz et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst.2007, 31, 267–275) are also provided to illustrate the use of these data as a benchmark for the improvement or future development of a MCH mechanism.« less

  7. Chemical structures of low-pressure premixed methylcyclohexane flames as benchmarks for the development of a predictive combustion chemistry model

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Yang, Bin; Jasper, Ahren W.; Pitz, William J.; Hansen, Nils

    2011-11-14

    The chemical compositions of three low-pressure premixed flames of methylcyclohexane (MCH) are investigated with the emphasis on the chemistry of MCH decomposition and the formation of aromatic species, including benzene and toluene. The flames are stabilized on a flat-flame (McKenna type) burner at equivalence ratios of φ = 1.0, 1.75, and 1.9 and at low pressures between 15 Torr (= 20 mbar) and 30 Torr (= 40 mbar). The complex chemistry of MCH consumption is illustrated in the experimental identification of several C7H12, C7H10, C6H12, and C6H10 isomers sampled from the flames as a function of distance from the burner. Three initiation steps for MCH consumption are discussed: ring-opening to heptenes and methyl-hexenes (isomerization), methyl radical loss yielding the cyclohexyl radical (dissociation), and H abstraction from MCH. Mole fraction profiles as a function of distance from the burner for the C7 species supplemented by theoretical calculations are presented, indicating that flame structures resulting in steeper temperature gradients and/or greater peak temperatures can lead to a relative increase in MCH consumption through the dissociation and isomerization channels. Trends observed among the stable C6 species as well as 1,3-pentadiene and isoprene also support this conclusion. Relatively large amounts of toluene and benzene are observed in the experiments, illustrating the importance of sequential H-abstraction steps from MCH to toluene and from cyclohexyl to benzene. Furthermore, modeled results using the detailed chemical model of Pitz et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst.2007, 31, 267–275) are also provided to illustrate the use of these data as a benchmark for the improvement or future development of a MCH mechanism.

  8. NO formation in the burnout region of a partially premixed methane-air flame with upstream heat loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of temperature and NO concentration in laminar, partially premixed methane-air flames stabilized on a ceramic burner in coflow are reported. The NO concentration and temperature were determined by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), respectively. Upstream heat loss to the burner was varied by changing the exit velocity of the fuel-air mixture at a constant equivalence ratio of 1,3; this alters the structure of the flame from an axisymmetric Bunsen-type to a strongly stabilized flat flame. To facilitate analysis of the results, a method is derived for separating the effects of dilution from those of chemical reaction based on the relation between the measured temperature and the local mixture fraction, including the effects of upstream heat loss. Using this method, the amount of NO formed during burnout of the hot, fuel-rich combustion products can be ascertained. In the Bunsen-type flame, it is seen that {approximately}40 ppm of NO are produced in this burnout region, at temperatures between {approximately}2,100 K and {approximately}1,900 K, probably via the Zeldovich mechanism. Reducing the exit velocity of 12 cm/s reduces the flame temperature substantially, and effectively eliminates this contribution. At velocities of 12 and 8 cm/s, {approximately}10 ppm of NO are formed in the burnout region, even though the gas temperatures are too low for Zeldovich NO to be significant. Although the mechanism responsible for these observations is as yet unclear, the results are consistent with the idea that the low temperatures in the fuel-rich gases caused by upstream heat loss retard the conversion of HCN (formed via the Fenimore mechanism) to NO, with this residual HCN then being converted to NO during burnout.

  9. Exhaust emissions from a premixing, prevaporizing flame tube using liquid jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured in a burner where liquid Jet A fuel was sprayed into the heated air stream and vaporized upstream of a perforated plate flameholder. The burner was tested at inlet air temperatures at 640, 800, and 833 K, an inlet pressure of 5.6 X 100,000 N/m squared, a reference velocity of 25 m/sec, and equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.7. Nitrogen oxide levels of below 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at combustion efficiencies greater than 99 percent. The measured emission levels for the liquid fuel agreed well with previously reported premixed gaseous propane data and agreed with well stirred reactor predictions. Autoignition of the premixed fuel air mixture was a problem at inlet temperatures above 650 K with 104 msec premixing time.

  10. Effects of platinum stagnation surface on the lean extinction limits of premixed methane/air flames at moderate surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiswall, J.T.; Li, J.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Im, H.G.

    2011-01-15

    A stagnation flow reactor was used to study the effects of platinum on the lean flammability limits of atmospheric pressure premixed methane/air flames at moderate stagnation surface temperatures. Experimental and computational methods were used to quantify the equivalence ratio at the lean extinction limit ({phi}{sub ext}) and the corresponding stagnation surface temperature (T{sub s}). A range of flow rates (57-90 cm/s) and corresponding strain rates were considered. The results indicate that the gas-phase methane/air flames are sufficiently strong relative to the heterogeneous chemistry for T{sub s} conditions less than 750 K that the platinum does not affect {phi}{sub ext}. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed trends and further indicate that higher reactant flow rates (>139 cm/s) and levels of dilution (>{proportional_to}10% N{sub 2}) are required to weaken the gas-phase flame sufficiently for surface reaction to play a positive role on extending the lean flammability limits. (author)

  11. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane¯oxygen¯argon burner s...

  12. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane¯oxygen¯argon burner s...

  13. Implementation of Thermal Diffusion in Chemistry Tabulation for Unstable Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlup, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    The inclusion of thermal diffusion, by means of multicomponent diffusion transport models, has been shown to affect the results of numerical simulations of thermo-diffusively unstable lean hydrogen flames. However, the multicomponent diffusion model involves costly matrix inversion operations, leading it to be useful in only simplified flame configurations and computational domains. In this work, a mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model is implemented into a tabulated chemistry framework. The resulting reacting flows are compared to one- and two-dimensional detailed chemistry simulations of lean hydrogen-air flames with multicomponent diffusion. The configurations used to validate the mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model with tabulated chemistry include flat and cellular tubular flames. Three-dimensional flames, both laminar and turbulent, are also considered as an application of the mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model using tabulated chemistry. These flames are compared to cases neglecting thermal diffusion and cases using detailed chemistry with the mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model.

  14. Quantitative measurement of soot particle size distribution in premixed flames - The burner-stabilized stagnation flame approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abid, Aamir D.; Camacho, Joaquin; Sheen, David A.; Wang, Hai

    2009-10-15

    A burner-stabilized, stagnation flame technique is introduced. In this technique, a previously developed sampling probe is combined with a water-cooled circular plate such that the combination simultaneously acts as a flow stagnation surface and soot sample probe for mobility particle sizing. The technique allows for a rigorous definition of the boundary conditions of the flame with probe intrusion and enables less ambiguous comparison between experiment and model. Tests on a 16.3% ethylene-23.7% oxygen-argon flame at atmospheric pressure show that with the boundary temperatures of the burner and stagnation surfaces accurately determined, the entire temperature field may be reproduced by pseudo one-dimensional stagnation reacting flow simulation using these temperature values as the input boundary conditions. Soot particle size distribution functions were determined for the burner-stabilized, stagnation flame at several burner-to-stagnation surface separations. It was found that the tubular probe developed earlier perturbs the flow and flame temperature in a way which is better described by a one-dimensional stagnation reacting flow than by a burner-stabilized flame free of probe intrusion. (author)

  15. Buoyancy induced limits for nanoparticle synthesis experiments in horizontal premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, C.; Faccinetto, A.; Kluge, S.; Kasper, T.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.; Wlokas, I.; Kempf, A.

    2013-06-01

    Premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors can be used to investigate the synthesis of nanoparticles. The present work examines the flow field inside such a reactor during the formation of carbon (soot) and iron oxide (from Fe(CO)5) nanoparticles, and how it affects the measurements of nanoparticle size distribution. The symmetry of the flow and the impact of buoyancy were analysed by three-dimensional simulations and the nanoparticle size distribution was obtained by particle mass spectrometry (PMS) via molecular beam sampling at different distances from the burner. The PMS measurements showed a striking, sudden increase in particle size at a critical distance from the burner, which could be explained by the flow field predicted in the simulations. The simulation results illustrate different fluid mechanical phenomena which have caused this sudden rise in the measured particle growth. Up to the critical distance, buoyancy does not affect the flow, and an (almost) linear growth is observed in the PMS experiments. Downstream of this critical distance, buoyancy deflects the hot gas stream and leads to an asymmetric flow field with strong recirculation. These recirculation zones increase the particle residence time, inducing very large particle sizes as measured by PMS. This deviation from the assumed symmetric, one-dimensional flow field prevents the correct interpretation of the PMS results. To overcome this problem, modifications to the reactor were investigated; their suitability to reduce the flow asymmetry was analysed. Furthermore, 'safe' operating conditions were identified for which accurate measurements are feasible in premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors that are transferrable to other experiments in this type of reactor. The present work supports experimentalists to find the best setup and operating conditions for their purpose.

  16. The Soret Effect in Naturally Propagating, Premixed, Lean, Hydrogen-Air Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.

    2008-06-30

    Comparatively little attention has been given to multicomponent diffusion effects in lean hydrogen-air flames, in spite of the importance of these flames in safety and their potential importance to future energy technologies. Prior direct numerical simulations either have considered only the mixture-averaged transport model, or have been limited to stabilized flames that do not exhibit the thermo-diffusive instability. The so-called full, multicomponent transport model with cross-diffusion is found to predict hotter, significantly faster flames with much faster extinction and division of cellular structures.

  17. Turbulence effects on cellular burning structures in lean premixed hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marc; Bell, John; Beckner, Vince; Lijewski, Michael; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2009-05-15

    We present numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames interacting with turbulence. The simulations are performed in an idealized setting using an adaptive low Mach number model with a numerical feedback control algorithm to stabilize the flame. At the conditions considered here, hydrogen flames are thermodiffusively unstable, and burn in cellular structures. For that reason, we consider two levels of turbulence intensity and a case without turbulence whose dynamics is driven by the natural flame instability. An overview of the flame structure shows that the burning in the cellular structures is quite intense, with the burning patches separated by regions in which the flame is effectively extinguished. We explore the geometry of the flame surface in detail, quantifying the mean and Gaussian curvature distributions and the distribution of the cell sizes. We next characterize the local flame speed to quantify the effect of flame intensification on local propagation speed. We then introduce several diagnostics aimed at quantifying both the level of intensification and diffusive mechanisms that lead to the intensification. (author)

  18. The optical characterization of high molecular mass carbonaceous structures produced in premixed laminar flames across the soot threshold limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, C.; D'Alessio, A.; D'Anna, A.; Gambi, G.; Minutolo, P.; Russo, S.

    1995-02-01

    The consistence of the dark material in interstellar space is still under discussion. Reasonable candidates are structures containing silicon or carbon. In that light it is interesting to know the physical and chemical properties of carbonaceous structures produced in flames and to compare them with the spectroscopical properties of interstellar dust. Light scattering, fluorescence induced by UV laser and light absorption have been employed to analyse phenomenological aspects of formation; destruction and chemical transformation of carbonaceous structures formed in rich premixed Laminar methane-oxygen and ethylene-oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure with different C/O ratio, at and above the soot threshold limit. Light scattering measurements also show that in non-sooting conditions, i.e. in the non-sooting zone of sooting flames or in flames below the soot threshold limit, high molecular mass structures are formed. Absorption spectra measured in non-sooting conditions show a continuous decay from 200 to 300 Dill, while in fully sooting conditions an additional peak at around 235 nm appears. Further information is obtained by laser-induced fluorescence investigations. Here. a broad-band peak with a maximum at around 320 nm is always measurable. Approaching the soot nucleation zone a further broad-band fluorescence emission in the visible. in addition to that in the UV, is observed. All the experimental results produce evidence that the early formation of high molecular mass carbonaceous molecules containing aromatic functionalities with not more than two rings occurs. Their role as soot precursors seems to be connected to their change into higher polycondensed aromatic structures. Our results give a hint that these soot precursors and the interstellar dust are members of the same family of carbonaceous structures.

  19. Effects of combined dimension reduction and tabulation on the simulations of a turbulent premixed flame using a large-eddy simulation/probability density function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-05-01

    A turbulent lean-premixed propane-air flame stabilised by a triangular cylinder as a flame-holder is simulated to assess the accuracy and computational efficiency of combined dimension reduction and tabulation of chemistry. The computational condition matches the Volvo rig experiments. For the reactive simulation, the Lagrangian Large-Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) formulation is used. A novel two-way coupling approach between LES and PDF is applied to obtain resolved density to reduce its statistical fluctuations. Composition mixing is evaluated by the modified Interaction-by-Exchange with the Mean (IEM) model. A baseline case uses In Situ Adaptive Tabulation (ISAT) to calculate chemical reactions efficiently. Its results demonstrate good agreement with the experimental measurements in turbulence statistics, temperature, and minor species mass fractions. For dimension reduction, 11 and 16 represented species are chosen and a variant of Rate Controlled Constrained Equilibrium (RCCE) is applied in conjunction with ISAT to each case. All the quantities in the comparison are indistinguishable from the baseline results using ISAT only. The combined use of RCCE/ISAT reduces the computational time for chemical reaction by more than 50%. However, for the current turbulent premixed flame, chemical reaction takes only a minor portion of the overall computational cost, in contrast to non-premixed flame simulations using LES/PDF, presumably due to the restricted manifold of purely premixed flame in the composition space. Instead, composition mixing is the major contributor to cost reduction since the mean-drift term, which is computationally expensive, is computed for the reduced representation. Overall, a reduction of more than 15% in the computational cost is obtained.

  20. Simultaneous particle image velocimetry and chemiluminescence visualization of millisecond-pulsed current-voltage-induced perturbations of a premixed propane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Kostka, Stanislav; Lynch, Amy; Ganguly, Biswa

    2011-09-01

    The effects of millisecond-wide, pulsed current-voltage-induced behavior in premixed laminar flames have been investigated through the simultaneous collection of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and chemiluminescence data with particular attention paid to the onset mechanisms. Disturbances caused by applied voltages of 2 kV over a 30-mm gap to a downward propagating, atmospheric pressure, premixed propane/air flame with a flow speed near 2 m/s and an equivalence ratio of 1.06 are investigated. The combined PIV and chemiluminescence-based experimental data show the observed disturbance originates only in or near the cathode fall region very close to the burner base. The data also suggest that the coupling mechanism responsible for the flame disturbance behavior is fluidic in nature, developing from the radial positive chemi-ion distribution and an ion-drift current-induced net body force that acts along the annular space discharge distribution in the reaction zone in or near the cathode fall. This net body force causes a reduction in flow speed above these near cathodic regions causing the base of the flame to laterally spread. Also, this effect seems to produce a velocity gradient leading to the transition of a laminar flame to turbulent combustion for higher applied current-voltage conditions as shown in previous work (Marcum and Ganguly in Combust Flame 143:27-36, 2005; Schmidt and Ganguly in 48th AIAA aerospace sciences meeting. Orlando, 2010).

  1. Simultaneous Burst Imaging of Dual Species Using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence at 50 kHz in Turbulent Premixed Flames.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheming; Rosell, Joakim; Aldén, Marcus; Richter, Mattias

    2016-11-18

    Spatially and temporally resolved measurements are of great importance in turbulent premixed flame studies, especially when investigating rapid processes such as when flame local extinction, re-ignition, or flashback occur in a reacting flow. Here, an experimental approach for simultaneously probing two different species at high frame rates (50 kHz) is presented by employing a multi-YAG laser system. The laser radiation at 355 nm generated by a multi-YAG laser system was split into two beam paths: one beam for exciting formaldehyde and the other for pumping an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). To be able to capture the resulting fluorescence at such a high frame rate without significant loss in spatial resolution, two framing cameras, containing a total of 16 intensified charge-coupled devices (CCDs), were employed. In principle, the proposed setup provides the possibility of probing formaldehyde and simultaneously accessing the distribution of one other relevant species at this high frame rate. In this demonstration, the laser wavelength was tuned to 283 nm and, in conjunction with the 355 nm beam path, simultaneously high speed two-dimensional (2D) visualization of OH-radicals and formaldehyde was achieved. A modified flat flame, McKenna-type burner was used to provide a turbulent premixed jet-flame supported by a surrounding pilot flame. Local flame extinction and re-ignition processes were recorded for fuel/air jet speeds of 120 m/s.

  2. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal

  3. Structure of turbulent non-premixed flames modeled with two-step chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Mahalingam, S.; Puri, I. K.; Vervisch, L.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent diffusion flames modeled with finite-rate, two-step chemistry, A + B yields I, A + I yields P, were carried out. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flame structure reveals the complex nature of the penetration of various reactive species across two reaction zones in mixture fraction space. Due to this two zone structure, these flames were found to be robust, resisting extinction over the parameter ranges investigated. As in single-step computations, mixture fraction dissipation rate and the mixture fraction were found to be statistically correlated. Simulations involving unequal molecular diffusivities suggest that the small scale mixing process and, hence, the turbulent flame structure is sensitive to the Schmidt number.

  4. An equivalent dissipation rate model for capturing history effects in non-premixed flames

    DOE PAGES

    Kundu, Prithwish; Echekki, Tarek; Pei, Yuanjiang; ...

    2016-11-11

    The effects of strain rate history on turbulent flames have been studied in the. past decades with 1D counter flow diffusion flame (CFDF) configurations subjected to oscillating strain rates. In this work, these unsteady effects are studied for complex hydrocarbon fuel surrogates at engine relevant conditions with unsteady strain rates experienced by flamelets in a typical spray flame. Tabulated combustion models are based on a steady scalar dissipation rate (SDR) assumption and hence cannot capture these unsteady strain effects; even though they can capture the unsteady chemistry. In this work, 1D CFDF with varying strain rates are simulated using twomore » different modeling approaches: steady SDR assumption and unsteady flamelet model. Comparative studies show that the history effects due to unsteady SDR are directly proportional to the temporal gradient of the SDR. A new equivalent SDR model based on the history of a flamelet is proposed. An averaging procedure is constructed such that the most recent histories are given higher weights. This equivalent SDR is then used with the steady SDR assumption in 1D flamelets. Results show a good agreement between tabulated flamelet solution and the unsteady flamelet results. This equivalent SDR concept is further implemented and compared against 3D spray flames (Engine Combustion Network Spray A). Tabulated models based on steady SDR assumption under-predict autoignition and flame lift-off when compared with an unsteady Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF) model. However, equivalent SDR model coupled with the tabulated model predicted autoignition and flame lift-off very close to those reported by the RIF model. This model is further validated for a range of injection pressures for Spray A flames. As a result, the new modeling framework now enables tabulated models with significantly lower computational cost to account for unsteady history effects.« less

  5. An equivalent dissipation rate model for capturing history effects in non-premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Prithwish; Echekki, Tarek; Pei, Yuanjiang; Som, Sibendu

    2016-11-11

    The effects of strain rate history on turbulent flames have been studied in the. past decades with 1D counter flow diffusion flame (CFDF) configurations subjected to oscillating strain rates. In this work, these unsteady effects are studied for complex hydrocarbon fuel surrogates at engine relevant conditions with unsteady strain rates experienced by flamelets in a typical spray flame. Tabulated combustion models are based on a steady scalar dissipation rate (SDR) assumption and hence cannot capture these unsteady strain effects; even though they can capture the unsteady chemistry. In this work, 1D CFDF with varying strain rates are simulated using two different modeling approaches: steady SDR assumption and unsteady flamelet model. Comparative studies show that the history effects due to unsteady SDR are directly proportional to the temporal gradient of the SDR. A new equivalent SDR model based on the history of a flamelet is proposed. An averaging procedure is constructed such that the most recent histories are given higher weights. This equivalent SDR is then used with the steady SDR assumption in 1D flamelets. Results show a good agreement between tabulated flamelet solution and the unsteady flamelet results. This equivalent SDR concept is further implemented and compared against 3D spray flames (Engine Combustion Network Spray A). Tabulated models based on steady SDR assumption under-predict autoignition and flame lift-off when compared with an unsteady Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF) model. However, equivalent SDR model coupled with the tabulated model predicted autoignition and flame lift-off very close to those reported by the RIF model. This model is further validated for a range of injection pressures for Spray A flames. As a result, the new modeling framework now enables tabulated models with significantly lower computational cost to account for unsteady history effects.

  6. Route to chaos for combustion instability in ducted laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Wahi, Pankaj; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-06-01

    Complex thermoacoustic oscillations are observed experimentally in a simple laboratory combustor that burns lean premixed fuel-air mixture, as a result of nonlinear interaction between the acoustic field and the combustion processes. The application of nonlinear time series analysis, particularly techniques based on phase space reconstruction from acquired pressure data, reveals rich dynamical behavior and the existence of several complex states. A route to chaos for thermoacoustic instability is established experimentally for the first time. We show that, as the location of the heat source is gradually varied, self-excited periodic thermoacoustic oscillations undergo transition to chaos via the Ruelle-Takens scenario.

  7. Flame holding tolerant fuel and air premixer for a gas turbine combustor

    DOEpatents

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2012-11-20

    A fuel nozzle with active cooling is provided. It includes an outer peripheral wall, a nozzle center body concentrically disposed within the outer wall in a fuel and air pre-mixture. The fuel and air pre-mixture includes an air inlet, a fuel inlet and a premixing passage defined between the outer wall in the center body. A gas fuel flow passage is provided. A first cooling passage is included within the center body in a second cooling passage is defined between the center body and the outer wall.

  8. Premixed flame response to pressure fluctuations using an implicit solver with detailed chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge in combustion research is the coupling of the compressible flow field to the detailed thermochemistry. Recent advances in numerical solvers has met this challenge within an implicit numerical framework, retaining the full stiffness of the realistic comprehensive chemistry and multicomponent transport properties in the system. Here, the solver TARDIS (Transient Advection Reaction Diffusion Implicit Simulations) is demonstrated, first, by investigating the laminar flame speed in stoichiometric H2/air and CH4/air flames as a function of the flame curvature and found to follow non-linear regimes, contrary to previous thinking. Second, planar and curved laminar flames are subjected to pressure and equivalence ratio oscillations and found to respond through a spectrum of time and length scales. TARDIS has the potential to elucidate fundamental aspects of flame structure and thermochemistry, and could be the basis for a new generation of implicit DNS solvers. The author acknowledge financial support from SABIC, #SB101018, through the Dean of Scientific Research at KFUPM.

  9. Influence of G-jitter on the characteristics of a non-premixed flame: Experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulain, Pierre; Cordeiro, Pierre; Rouvreau, Sébastien; Legros, Guillaume; Fuentes, Andres; Torero, José L.

    2005-03-01

    The combustion of a flat plate in a boundary layer under microgravity conditions, which was first described by Emmons, is studied using a gas burner. Magnitude of injection and blowing velocities are chosen to be characteristic of pyrolyzing velocity of solid fuels, and of ventilation systems in space stations. These velocities are about 0.1 m/s for oxidiser flow and 0.004m/s for fuel flow. In this configuration, flame layout results from a coupled interaction between oxidiser flow, fuel flow and thermal expansion. Influences of these parameters are studied experimentally by means of flame length and standoff distance measurements using CH* chemiluminescence's and visible emission of the flame. Flow was also studied with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Inert flows, with and without injection, and reacting flow in a microgravity environment were considered to distinguish aerodynamic from thermal effect. Thermal expansion effects have been shown by means of the acceleration of oxidiser flow. Three-dimensional effects, which are strongly marked for high injection velocities were studied. Three-dimensional tools adaptability to parabolic flights particular conditions were of concern. Flame sensitivity to g-jitters was investigated according to g-jitters frequency and range involved by parabolic flights. It appears that flame location (standoff distance), flame characteristics (length, thickness, brightness) and the aerodynamic field of the low velocity reacting flow are very much affected by the fluctuation of the gravity level or g-jitter. The lower the g-jitter frequency is, the higher the perturbation. Consequently it is difficult to perform relevant experiments for a main flow velocity lower than 0.05m/s. DNS calculations confirm the present observations, but most of the results are presented elsewhere.

  10. Large eddy simulations of partially premixed ethanol dilute spray flames using the flamelet generated manifold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.; Braun, Markus; Masri, Assaad R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents Large Eddy Simulations (LESs) for the Sydney ethanol piloted turbulent dilute spray flames ETF2, ETF6, and ETF7. The Flamelet Generated Manifold (FGM) approach is employed to predict mixing and burning of the evaporating fuel droplets. A methodology to match the experimental inflow spray profiles is presented. The spray statistical time-averaged results show reasonable agreement with mean and RMS data. The Particle Size Distribution (PSD) shows a good match downstream of the nozzle exit and up to x/D = 10. At x/D = 20 and 30 the PSD is under-predicted for droplets with mean diameter D10 > 20μm and over-predicted for the smaller size droplets. The simulations reasonably predict the reported mean flame structure and length. The effect of increasing the carrier velocity (ETF2-ETF7) or decreasing the liquid fuel injection mass flow rate (ETF2-ETF6) is found to result in a leaner, shorter flame and stronger spray-flow interactions. Higher tendency to local extinction is observed for ETF7 which is closer to blow-off compared to ETF2 and has higher scalar dissipation rates, higher range of Stokes number, and faster droplet response. The possible sources of LES-FGM deviations from the measurements are discussed and highlighted. In particular, the spray time-averaged statistical error contribution is quantified and the impact of the inflow uncertainty is studied. Sensitivity analysis to the pre-vaporized nozzle fuel mass fraction show that such small inflow perturbations (by ± 2% for the ETF2 flame) have a strong impact on the flame structure, and the droplets' dynamics. Conditional scatter plots show that the flame exhibits wide range of mixing conditions and bimodal mixing lines particularly at upstream locations (x/D < 20), where the injected droplets are still penetrating the centerline. This is relaxed further downstream as droplets gradually evaporate and burn in a diffusion like mode.

  11. Experiments and Modeling of Impinging Jets and Premixed Hydrocarbon Stagnation Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-26

    coupling of the acoustic properties of the two jets could lead to oscillations and instabilities in the flames. Impinging-jet flames are found to be more...the Knudsen-Weber slip correction factor [see Eq. (A.10)], τS is the Stokes time, and σ = dup/dx ∼= duf /dx is the (local) velocity gradient [see...that act on a particle in a typical flow are ΣF = FPG + FFI + FUD + FG + FSD + FTP , (A.2) where FPG = ρf ρp mp duf dt (A.3) is the pressure-gradient

  12. LES of Sooting Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    effect of radiation is introduced as an optically thin model. As a validation the model is first applied to a non-premixed non- sooting flame , then a...set of canonically premixed flames. Finally, the model is validated against a non-premixed jet sooting flame . Good results are predicted with reasonable accuracy.

  13. Mixing and stabilization study of a partially premixed swirling flame using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, D.; Ducruix, S.; Lacas, F.; Veynante, D.

    2011-01-15

    A laboratory-scale swirling burner, presenting many similarities with gas turbines combustors, has been studied experimentally using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) on OH radical and acetone vapor in order to characterize the flame stabilization process. These diagnostics show that the stabilization point rotates in the combustion chamber and that air and fuel mixing is not complete at the end of the mixing tube. Fuel mass fraction decays exponentially along the mixing tube axis and transverse profiles show a gaussian shape. However, radial pressure gradients tend to trap the fuel in the core of the vortex that propagates axially in the mixing tube. As the mixing tube vortex enters the combustion chamber, vortex breakdown occurs through a precessing vortex core (PVC). The axially propagating vortex shows a helicoidal trajectory in the combustion chamber which trace is observed with transverse acetone PLIF. As a consequence, the stabilizing point of the flame in the combustion chamber rotates with the PVC structure. This phenomenon has been observed in the present study with a high speed camera recording spontaneous emission of the flame. The stabilization point rotation frequency tends to increase with mass flow rates. It was also shown that the coupling between the PVC and the flame stabilization occurs via mixing, explaining one possible coupling mechanism between acoustic waves in the flow and the reaction rate. This path may also be envisaged for flashback, an issue that will be more completely treated in a near future. (author)

  14. Thermoacoustic instability of a laminar premixed flame in Rijke tube with a hydrodynamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Chow, Z. H.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, a Rijke tube with a hydrodynamic region confined is considered to investigate its non-normality and the effect of the hydrodynamic region on the system stability behaviors. Experiments are first conducted on Rijke tubes with different lengths. It is found that the fundamental mode frequency is decreased and then increased, as the flame is placed at different axial positions at the bottom half of the tube. This trend agrees well with the prediction from the thermoacoustic model developed, of which the hydrodynamic region is modelled as an oscillating 'airplug' and the flame dynamics is captured by using classical G-equation. In addition, the flame as measured is found to respond differently to oncoming acoustic disturbances. Modal and non-modal stability analyses are then conducted to determine the eigenmode growth rate and the transient one of acoustic disturbances. The 'safest' and most 'dangerous' flame locations as defined as those corresponding to extreme eigenmode and transient growth rate are estimated, and compared with those from the model without the hydrodynamic region. In order to mitigate such detrimental oscillations, identification and mitigation algorithms are experimentally implemented on the Rijke tube. The sound pressure level is reduced by approximately 50 dB. To gain insights on the thermoacoustic system, transfer function of the actuated Rijke tube system is measured by injecting a broad-band white noise. Compared with the estimation from our model, good agreement is observed. Finally, the marginal stability regions are estimated.

  15. Roles of displacement speed on evolution of flame surface density for different turbulent intensities and Lewis numbers in turbulent premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Insuk; Huh, Kang Y.

    2008-01-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted in 3D to investigate the evolution of flame surface density (FSD) in turbulent premixed combustion. A parametric study is performed with respect to turbulent intensity and Lewis number to investigate all component terms in the FSD transport equation. A higher turbulent intensity leads to a higher turbulent burning velocity due to increased flame area, while the mean consumption speed remains close to the laminar flame speed. A lower Lewis number leads to a higher turbulent burning velocity, with increases in both total flame area and mean consumption speed. There are two source terms to govern FSD: tangential strain and propagation term, given as a product of displacement speed and curvature. The mean strain rate varies linearly with the turbulent intensity, but shows no noticeable dependence on the Lewis number. The correlation between curvature and displacement speed does not depend on the turbulent intensity, but shows significant influence of the Lewis number. The propagation term decreases with increasing turbulent intensity to become a larger negative sink in the rear of flame brush with flame elements of smaller radii of curvature and higher displacement speeds. A lower Lewis number leads to a larger positive propagation term in the front due to an increased displacement speed to produce more flame area through diffusive thermal instability. (author)

  16. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-23

    flames [16], while acetone undergoes pyrolysis near the reaction zone; therefore the technique is incapable of providing the mixture fraction in the...vapor pressure in order to achieve accurate control of the iodine mass fraction. We found that a major problem for this seeding method is 3...level (≈ 0.05% by volume) at the saturation vapor pressure at room temperature is approximately 80% of the Rayleigh signal of pure air. In addition

  17. Joint PDF Modelling of Local Extinction and Pollutant Formation in Non-premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Xu, Jun; Pope, Stephen B.

    2000-11-01

    A velocity-composition-turbulence frequency joint PDF approach is applied to model piloted methane/air turbulent diffusion flames investigated experimentally by Barlow and Frank. These flames exhibit an increasing amount of local extinction with increasing jet velocity, and are good cases to test the capabilities of turbulence-chemistry and combustion-chemistry models to account for local extinction and pollutant formation. In this study, the chemistry is an augmented reduced mechanism (19 species and 15 reaction steps) derived from the GRI2.11 detailed mechanism for methane oxidation by Sung and co-workers. The mechanism takes account of C2 chemistry, and the formation of oxides of nitrogen is treated by the inclusion of NO, NH3 and HCN. The turbulence models include the simplified Langevin model (SLM) for velocity, a stochastic model of Jayesh and Pope for turbulence frequency, the EMST model of Subramaniam and Pope for molecular mixing. The computational method for the solution of the modeled joint PDF equation features moving particles in a Lagrangian framework. The reaction calculations are performed via the in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm of Pope. The calculation results show good agreement with the experimental data, including the minor species NO and CO. The increase of local extinction (quantitatively characterized by a single variable - burning index) with increasing jet velocity is also accurately predicted by the calculations. It is founded that a small change of the inlet pilot temperature has a significant influence on the calculations and a systematic study has been made to investigate this sensitivity. For the flame with lowest velocity, the large influence is mainly observed close to the nozzle, while for the flame close to extinction, the calculated behavior is exquisitely sensitive to the pilot temperature, i.e., a 10K lower pilot temperature may cause global extinction.

  18. Apparatus for studying premixed laminar flames using mass spectrometry and fiber-optic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Jim O.; Andersson, Lars L.; Lenner, Magnus; Simonson, Margaret

    1990-03-01

    An integrated flat-flame/ microprobe sampling quadrupole mass spectrometer system, complemented by optical spectrometry based on optical fibers, is presented. The short microprobe sampling line (total 25 cm) is directly connected to an open ion source closely flanked by two nude cryopumps (900 l/s) yielding a background pressure of 10-9 Torr and a sampling pressure of about 10-5 Torr. Due to this improved microprobe system, mass spectrometry can be used for analysis of stable species (including fuel, O2, H2O, CO2, CO, and Ar) with less disturbance of the sample than with a conventional microprobe with a back pressure of about 1 Torr. Optical spectrometry is used for the study of emission from important radical species (such as C2, CH, and OH). The system is proposed as a complement to more conventional flat-flame/MBMS systems in which the sampling cone can effect the experimental system. Details are provided concerning the configuration of the whole system ranging from gas delivery to data evaluation. Test data are presented for a 16% methanol/68% oxygen/16% argon flame studied at a pressure of 40 Torr, to elucidate the special features of this system.

  19. Time-dependent solution of pre-mixed laminar flames with a known temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.O.; Andersson, L.L.

    1985-07-01

    A computer program designed for the evaluation of molecular flows interacting through chemical kinetics and molecular diffusion is described. Measured values of temperature profile and mass flow are used. The starting profiles and the hot boundary values are calculated by a kinetics approximation found by neglecting diffusion. A time-dependent method is used together with successive grid refinements. The successive grid refinements reduced the execution times by a factor of 5 for a H/sub 2//air flame at a pressure of 1 atm. For a CH/sub 4//O/sub 2/ flame at 0.05 atm the reduction due to grid refinements was a factor 50 or more according to the estimations. The execution times for the test flames were a factor 4 slower than a current implementation of the steady state method. Possible optimizations of the present time-dependent version can decrease that difference significantly. The computed concentration profiles agreed with published computed results with 1%.

  20. Gaseous Non-Premixed Flame Research Planned for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Hickman, J. Mark; Suttles, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, studies of gaseous diffusion flames on the International Space Station (ISS) have been limited to research conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in mid-2009 and early 2012. The research was performed with limited instrumentation, but novel techniques allowed for the determination of the soot temperature and volume fraction. Development is now underway for the next experiments of this type. The Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) project consists of five independent experiments that will be conducted with expanded instrumentation within the stations Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). ACMEs goals are to improve our understanding of flame stability and extinction limits, soot control and reduction, oxygen-enriched combustion which could enable practical carbon sequestration, combustion at fuel lean conditions where both optimum performance and low emissions can be achieved, the use of electric fields for combustion control, and materials flammability. The microgravity environment provides longer residence times and larger length scales, yielding a broad range of flame conditions which are beneficial for simplified analysis, e.g., of limit behaviour where chemical kinetics are important. The detailed design of the modular ACME hardware, e.g., with exchangeable burners, is nearing completion, and it is expected that on-orbit testing will begin in 2016.

  1. Proposal of quantitative measurement of OH radical using planar laser induced fluorescence calibrated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang; Tu, Xiaobo; Su, Tie; Mu, Jinhe; Yang, Furong

    2017-05-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) has been a very important species analysis approach in combustion research, but is most often presented qualitatively. Therefore, another supplementary techniques are needed for quantitative PLIF measurement. In this paper, we propose a quantitative OH concentration measurement method using PLIF calibrated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The CRDS measurement is firstly applied to a methane-air atmospheric pressure flame on a McKenna burner and determine the OH absolute density. Then the PLIF signal is calibrated by the determined OH concentration on the same flame under the same condition. The calibrated PLIF setup is fixed, and another PLIF setup is added to form a two-line OHPLIF thermometry to measure the 2D temperature distribution. Finally, a quantitative OH-PLIF measurement method is provided for the turbulent premixed flame on a Bunsen burner based on this setup.

  2. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis of detailed soot particle size distribution in laminar premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasdeep; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Kraft, Markus; Wang, Hai

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the prediction of a soot model [J. Appel, H. Bockhorn, M. Frenklach, Combust. Flame 121 (2000) 122-136] is compared to a recently published set of highly detailed soot particle size distributions [B. Zhao, Z. Yang, Z. Li, M.V. Johnston, H. Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005)]. A stochastic approach is used to obtain soot particle size distributions (PSDs). The key features of the measured and simulated particle size distributions are identified and used as a simple way of comparing PSDs. The sensitivity of the soot PSDs to the parameters defining parts of the soot model, such as soot inception, particle and PAH collision efficiency and enhancement, and surface activity is investigated. Incepting soot particle size is found to have a very significant effect on the small-size end of the PSDs, especially the position of the trough for a bimodal soot PSDs. A new model for the decay in the surface activity is proposed in which the activity of the soot particle depends only on the history of that particle and the local temperature in the flame. This is a first attempt to use local flame variables to define the surface aging which has major impact on the prediction of the large-size end of the PSDs. Using these modifications to the soot model it is possible to improve the agreement between some of the points of interest in the simulated and measured PSDs. The paper achieves the task to help advance the soot models to predict soot PSD in addition to soot volume fraction and number density, which has been the focus of the literature. (author)

  3. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  4. Approximate Deconvolution and Explicit Filtering For LES of a Premixed Turbulent Jet Flame

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-19

    circle in Fig. 2), which peaks at c = 0.75 in the non-filtered flame, thus on the burnt gas side, moves towards c̃ = 0.5 with mod- erate filtering...and even on the fresh gas side for larger filter widths (Fig. 2(b)), a shift that is reinforced here by the fact that the terms have been divided by...filtered density to examine the time derivative of temperature (Eq. (15)). The SGS convective term (Triangle) is pos- itive in the fresh gas and negative

  5. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation Through Non-Uniform Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; White, Ed; Ross, Howard D.

    1997-01-01

    We have built an apparatus for measuring flame spread rates through non-homogeneous fuel-air mixtures as a function of layer thickness and concentration. The layer thickness is adjusted by controlling the diffusion time above a fuel-saturated porous media, while the concentration is controlled by the fuel temperature. Normal gravity tests with methanol have so far explored largely the effect of temperature, as well as the effects of various aspects of the apparatus. Good agreement with previous research has been obtained. We have also demonstrated the ability of a rainbow schlieren system to quantitatively measure fuel vapor concentrations in the static case.

  6. Verification and Improvement of Flamelet Approach for Non-Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaitsev, S.; Buriko, Yu.; Guskov, O.; Kopchenov, V.; Lubimov, D.; Tshepin, S.; Volkov, D.

    1997-01-01

    Studies in the mathematical modeling of the high-speed turbulent combustion has received renewal attention in the recent years. The review of fundamentals, approaches and extensive bibliography was presented by Bray, Libbi and Williams. In order to obtain accurate predictions for turbulent combustible flows, the effects of turbulent fluctuations on the chemical source terms should be taken into account. The averaging of chemical source terms requires to utilize probability density function (PDF) model. There are two main approaches which are dominant in high-speed combustion modeling now. In the first approach, PDF form is assumed based on intuitia of modelliers (see, for example, Spiegler et.al.; Girimaji; Baurle et.al.). The second way is much more elaborate and it is based on the solution of evolution equation for PDF. This approach was proposed by S.Pope for incompressible flames. Recently, it was modified for modeling of compressible flames in studies of Farschi; Hsu; Hsu, Raji, Norris; Eifer, Kollman. But its realization in CFD is extremely expensive in computations due to large multidimensionality of PDF evolution equation (Baurle, Hsu, Hassan).

  7. Visualization and Analysis of a Hydrocarbon Premixed Flame a in Small Scale Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Luca Maria Luigi

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 flight enthalpy. A mixture of NO and N2 was injected at the upstream end of the inlet isolator as a surrogate for ethylene fuel, and the mixing of this fuel simulant was studied with and without a shock train. The shock train was produced by an air throttle, which simulated the blockage effects of combustion downstream of the cavity flame holder. NO PLIF signal was imaged in a plane orthogonal to the freestream at the leading edge of the cavity. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to identify the most uniform cases, which were achieved by varying the location of the fuel injection and shock train. This method was used to screen different possible fueling configurations to provide optimized test conditions for follow-on combustion measurements using ethylene fuel. A theoretical study of the selected NO rotational transitions was performed to obtain a LIF signal that is linear with NO mole fraction and approximately independent of pressure and temperature. In the same facility, OH PLIF measurements were also performed; OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulations. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical

  8. Premixed Atmosphere and Convection Influences on Flame Inhibition and Combustion (PACIFIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Under NASA-Lewis Grant NAG3-1611, starting date 6/1/94, a three-year experimental and theoretical study of the effects of ambient atmosphere on the properties of flame spread over thin and thick solid fuel beds has been initiated. In particular the effect of the type of inert gas, which affects the Lewis numbers of fuel and oxidant, and the effect of the addition of sub-flammability-limit concentrations of gaseous fuels to the oxidizing atmosphere will be studied. The effect of convection will be studied through one-g and mu g experiments with and without a forced flow. Moreover, the influence of thermal radiation, whose effect is known to be markedly different depending on the convection level, will be addressed.

  9. Enhanced Laser System for Two-Point Scalar Time-Series Measurements in Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-15

    combustion systems of interest to the Air Force to be studied including thermoacoustic instabilities and partially premixed turbulent combustion. 15...SUBJECT TERMS Laser diagnostics, turbulent combustion, thermoacoustic instabilities, partially premixed combustion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... thermoacoustic instabilities in a Rijke combustor. TECHNICAL DISCUSSION Two-point time-series measurements of OH have been obtained in four turbulent

  10. A semi-analytical emission model for diffusion flame, rich/lean and premixed lean combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, N.K.; Mongia, H.C.

    1995-04-01

    To enhanced gas turbine combustor performance and emissions characteristics, better design methods need to be developed. In the present investigation, an emission model that simulates a detailed chemical kinetic scheme has been developed to provide the rate of reactions of the parent fuel, an intermediate hydrocarbon compound, CO, and H{sub 2}. The intermediate fuel has variable carbon and hydrogen contents depending on operating conditions, that were selected in the development effort to simulate actual operating conditions, that were selected in the development effort to simulate actual operation of rich/lean, diffusion flame, and lean combustor concepts. The developed reaction rate expressions address also the limited reaction rates that may occur in the near-wall regions of the combustor due to the admittance of radial air jets and cooling air in these regions. The validation effort included the application of the developed model to a combustor simulated by a multiple-reactor arrangement. The results indicate the accurate duplication of the calculations obtained from the detailed kinetic scheme using the developed model. This illustrates the great potential of using such a unified approach to guide the design of various types of combustor to meet the more stringent emissions and performance requirements of next-generation gas turbine engines.

  11. A lean methane premixed laminar flame doped with components of diesel fuel part III: Indane and comparison between n-butylbenzene, n-propylcyclohexane and indane

    SciTech Connect

    Pousse, E.; Tian, Z.Y.; Glaude, P.A.; Fournet, R.; Battin-Leclerc, F.

    2010-07-15

    To better understand the chemistry of the combustion of components of diesel fuel, the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame doped with indane has been investigated. The inlet gases contained 7.1% (molar) of methane, 36.8% of oxygen and 0.9% of indane corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 0.67 and a ratio C{sub 10}H{sub 14}/CH{sub 4} of 12.8%. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa (50 Torr) using argon as diluent, with a gas velocity at the burner of 49.1 cm s{sup -1} at 333 K. Quantified species included the usual methane C{sub 0}-C{sub 2} combustion products, but also 16 C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} non-aromatic hydrocarbons, 6 C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} non-aromatic oxygenated compounds, as well as 22 aromatic products, namely benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenylacetylene, ethylbenzene, styrene, propenylbenzene, allylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, methylstyrenes, ethyltoluenes, trimethylbenzenes, n-butylbenzene, dimethylethylbenzene, indene, methylindenes, methylindane, benzocyclobutene, naphthalene, phenol, benzaldehyde, and benzofuran. A new mechanism for the oxidation of indane was proposed whose predictions were in satisfactory agreement with measured species profiles in both flames and jet-stirred reactor experiments. The main reaction pathways of consumption of indane have been derived from flow rate analyses in the two types of reactors. A comparison of the effect of the addition of three components of diesel fuel, namely indane, n-butylbenzene and n-propylcyclohexane (parts I and II of this series of paper), on the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame is also presented. (author)

  12. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  13. Electrical Characteristics, Electrode Sheath and Contamination Layer Behavior of a Meso-Scale Premixed Methane-Air Flame Under AC/DC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Yan, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Li, Guoxiu

    2016-05-01

    Electrical characteristics of a nozzle-attached meso-scale premixed methane-air flame under low-frequency AC (0-4300 V, 0-500 Hz) and DC (0-3300 V) electric fields were studied. I-V curves were measured under different experimental conditions to estimate the magnitude of the total current 100-102 μA, the electron density 1015-1016 m-3 and further the power dissipation ≤ 0.7 W in the reaction zone. At the same time, the meso-scale premixed flame conductivity 10-4-10-3 Ω-1·m-1 as a function of voltage and frequency was experimentally obtained and was believed to represent a useful order-of magnitude estimate. Moreover, the influence of the collision sheath relating to Debye length (31-98 μm) and the contamination layer of an active electrode on measurements was discussed, based on the combination of simulation and theoretical analysis. As a result, the electrode sheath dimension was evaluated to less than 0.5 mm, which indicated a complex effect of the collision sheath on the current measurements. The surface contamination effect of an active electrode was further analyzed using the SEM imaging method, which showed elements immigration during the contamination layer formation process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51376021), and the Fundamental Research Fund for Major Universities (No. 2013JBM079)

  14. Temporally resolved planar measurements of transient phenomena in a partially pre-mixed swirl flame in a gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents observations and analysis of the time-dependent behavior of a 10 kW partially pre-mixed, swirl-stabilized methane-air flame exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations. This analysis is based on a series of measurements wherein particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the OH radical were performed simultaneously at 5 kHz repetition rate over durations of 0.8 s. Chemiluminescence imaging of the OH{sup *} radical was performed separately, also at 5 kHz over 0.8 s acquisition runs. These measurements were of sufficient sampling frequency and duration to extract usable spatial and temporal frequency information on the medium to large-scale flow-field and heat-release characteristics of the flame. This analysis is used to more fully characterize the interaction between the self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations and the dominant flow-field structure of this flame, a precessing vortex core (PVC) present in the inner recirculation zone. Interpretation of individual measurement sequences yielded insight into various physical phenomena and the underlying mechanisms driving flame dynamics. It is observed for this flame that location of the reaction zone tracks large-scale fluctuations in axial velocity and also conforms to the passage of large-scale vortical structures through the flow-field. Local extinction of the reaction zone in regions of persistently high principal compressive strain is observed. Such extinctions, however, are seen to be self healing and thus do not induce blowout. Indications of auto-ignition in regions of unburned gas near the exit are also observed. Probable auto-ignition events are frequently observed coincident with the centers of large-scale vortical structures, suggesting the phenomenon is linked to the enhanced mixing and longer residence times associated with fluid at the core of the PVC as it moves through the flame. (author)

  15. PIV, 2D-LIF and 1D-Raman measurements of flow field, composition and temperature in premixed gas turbine flames

    SciTech Connect

    Stopper, U.; Aigner, M.; Ax, H.; Meier, W.; Sadanandan, R.; Stoehr, M.; Bonaldo, A.

    2010-04-15

    Several laser diagnostic measurement techniques have been applied to study the lean premixed natural gas/air flames of an industrial swirl burner. This was made possible by equipping the burner with an optical combustion chamber that was installed in the high-pressure test rig facility at the DLR Institute of Combustion Technology in Stuttgart. The burner was operated with preheated air at various operating conditions with pressures up to p = 6 bar and a maximum thermal power of P = 1 MW. The instantaneous planar flow field inside the combustor was studied with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals on a single-shot basis was used to determine the shape and the location of the flame front as well as the spatial distribution of reaction products. 1D laser Raman spectroscopy was successfully applied for the measurement of the temperature and the concentration of major species under realistic gas turbine conditions. Results of the flow field analysis show the shape and the size of the main flow regimes: the inflow region, the inner and the outer recirculation zone. The highly turbulent flow field of the inner shear layer is found to be dominated by small and medium sized vortices. High RMS fluctuations of the flow velocity in the exhaust gas indicate the existence of a rotating exhaust gas swirl. From the PLIF images it is seen that the primary reactions happened in the shear layers between inflow and the recirculation zones and that the appearance of the reaction zones changed with flame parameters. The results of the multiscalar Raman measurements show a strong variation of the local mixture fraction allowing conclusions to be drawn about the premix quality. Furthermore, mixing effects of unburnt fuel and air with fully reacted combustion products are studied giving insights into the processes of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. (author)

  16. Turbulent burning velocities of premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames in intense isotropic turbulence with consideration of radiation losses

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, S.S.; Yang, S.I.; Lin, W.J.; Su, R.C.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents turbulent burning velocities, S{sub T}, of several premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames at the same laminar burning velocity S{sub L}=0.1 m/s for two equivalence ratios f=0.7 and 1.4 near flammability limits with consideration of radiation heat losses from small (N{sub 2} diluted) to large (CO{sub 2} diluted). Experiments are carried out in a cruciform burner, in which the long vertical vessel is used to provide a downward propagating premixed flame and the large horizontal vessel equipped with a pair of counterrotating fans and perforated plates can be used to generate an intense isotropic turbulence in the central region between the two perforated plates. Turbulent flame speeds are measured by four different arrangements of pairs of ion-probe sensors at different positions from the top to the bottom of the central region in the burner. It is found that the effect of gas velocity on S{sub T} measured in the central region can be neglected. Simultaneous measurements using the pressure transducer and ion-probe sensors show that the pressure rise due to turbulent burning has little influence on S{sub T}. These measurements prove the accuracy of the S{sub T} data. At f=0.7, the percentage of [(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub CO{sub 2}}-(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}}]/(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}} decreases gradually from -4 to -17% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} increase from 4 to 46, while at f=1.4 such decrease is much more abrupt from -19 to -53% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} only increase from 4 to 18. The larger the radiation losses, the smaller the values of S{sub T}. This decreasing effect is augmented by increasing u{sup '}/S{sub L} and is particularly pronounced for rich CH{sub 4} flames. When u{sup '}/S{sub L}=18, lean CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames have much higher, 3.6 and/or 1.8 times higher, values of S{sub T}/S{sub L} than rich CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames, respectively. It is found that

  17. Demonstration of a new laser diagnostic based on photodissociation spectroscopy for imaging mixture fraction in a non-premixed jet flame.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Tong, Chenning; Ma, Lin

    2010-04-01

    The study of turbulent combustion calls for new diagnostics that can measure multidimensional mixture fraction under a wide range of flame conditions. A laser diagnostic technique based on photodissociation spectroscopy (PDS) is proposed to address this need. This paper describes the concept of the PDS-based diagnostic, reports its experimental demonstration in a non-premixed jet flame, and assesses its performance and applicable range. This new technique is centered around the creative use of photodissociation (PD) for flow visualization. A carefully chosen PD precursor is seeded into the flow of interest to measure mixture fraction. The precursor is chosen such that (1) both the precursor itself and the products formed from the precursor (if it reacts) can be completely and rapidly photodissociated; thus, the concentration of one of the photofragments forms a conserved scalar and can be used to infer the mixture fraction, and (2) the target photofragment offers friendly spectroscopic properties (e.g., strong laser-induced fluorescence signals and/or simple signal interpretation) so multidimensional imaging can be readily obtained. Molecular iodine (I(2)) was identified as a precursor satisfying both requirements and was seeded into a carbon monoxide (CO)-air jet flame for single-shot two-dimensional imaging of mixture fraction. This demonstration illustrates the potential of the PDS-based technique to overcome the limitations of existing techniques and to provide multidimensional measurements of mixture fraction in a variety of reactive flows.

  18. Quantitative Studies on the Propagation and Extinction of Near-Limit Premixed Flames under Normal- and Micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Dong, Y.; Spedding, G.; Cuenot, B.; Poinsot, T.

    2001-01-01

    Strained laminar flames have been systematically studied, as the understanding of their structure and dynamic behavior is of relevance to turbulent combustion.. Most of these studies have been conducted in opposed-jet, stagnation-type flow configurations. Studies at high strain rates are important in quantifying and understanding the response of vigorously burning flames and determine extinction states. Studies of weakly strained flames can be of particular interest for all stoichiometries. For example, the laminar flame speeds, S(sup o)(sub u), can be accurately determined by using the counterflow technique only if measurements are obtained at very low strain rates. Furthermore, near-limit flames are stabilized by weak strain rates. Previous studies have shown that near-limit flames are particularly sensitive to chain mechanisms, thermal radiation, and unsteadiness. The stabilization and study of weakly strained flames is complicated by the presence of buoyancy that can render the flames unstable to the point of extinction. Thus, the use of microgravity (mu-g) becomes essential in order to provide meaningful insight into this important combustion regime. In our past studies the laminar flame speeds and extinction strain rates were directly measured at ultra-low strain rates. The laminar flame speeds were measured by having a positively strained planar flame undergoing a transition to a negatively strained Bunsen flame and by measuring the propagation speed during that transition. The extinction strain rates of near-limit flames were measured in mu-g. Results obtained for CH4/air and C3H8/air mixtures are in agreement with those obtained by Maruta et al.

  19. Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas on Low-Pressure, Premixed Flames. Part 1: CH* Chemiluminescence, Temperature, and OH

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-15

    showed significant increases in O-atom concentration and an extension of the extinction limits in the presence of the plasma discharge. In a recent...Carter, C.D., and Ju, Y. Effects of Non- Equilibrium Plasma Discharge of Counterflow Diffusion Flame Extinction . Proc. Combust. Inst. 33(2), 3211...Oxidation on Diffusion Flame Extinction Limits. Combust. Flame, 159, 221 31. Sun, W., Won, S., Ombrello, T., Carter, C., Ju, Y., Direct ignition and S

  20. The behavior of fuel-lean premixed flames in a standard flammability limit tube under controlled gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wherley, B. L.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel-lean flames in methane-air mixtures from 4.90 to 6.20 volume percent fuel and propane-air mixtures from 1.90 to 3.00 volume percent fuel were studied in the vicinity of the limit for a variety of gravity conditions. The limits were determined and the behavior of the flames studied for one g upward, one g downward, and zero g propagation. Photographic records of all flammability tube firings were obtained. The structure and behavior of these flames were detailed including the variations of the curvature of the flame front, the skirt length, and the occurrence of cellular instabilities with varying gravity conditions. The effect of ignition was also discussed. A survey of flame speeds as a function of mixture strength was made over a range of lean mixture compositions for each of the fuels studied. The results were presented graphically with those obtained by other researchers. The flame speed for constant fractional gravity loadings were plotted as a function of gravity loadings from 0.0 up to 2.0 g's against flame speeds extracted from the transient gravity flame histories for corresponding gravity loadings. The effects of varying gravity conditions on the extinguishment process for upward and downward propagating flames were investigated.

  1. Studies in premixed combustion. Progress report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on premixed combustion: theory of turbulent flame propagation; pattern formation in premixed flames and related problems; and pattern formation in extended systems. (LSP)

  2. Effects of H{sub 2} and H preferential diffusion and unity Lewis number on superadiabatic flame temperatures in rich premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengshan; Guelder, OEmer L.

    2005-11-01

    The structures of freely propagating rich CH{sub 4}/air and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} flames were studied numerically using a relatively detailed reaction mechanism. Species diffusion was modeled using five different methods/assumptions to investigate the effects of species diffusion, in particular H{sub 2} and H, on superadiabatic flame temperature. With the preferential diffusion of H{sub 2} and H accounted for, significant amount of H{sub 2} and H produced in the flame front diffuse from the reaction zone to the preheat zone. The preferential diffusion of H{sub 2} from the reaction zone to the preheat zone has negligible effects on the phenomenon of superadiabatic flame temperature in both CH{sub 4}/air and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} flames. It is therefore demonstrated that the superadiabatic flame temperature phenomenon in rich hydrocarbon flames is not due to the preferential diffusion of H{sub 2} from the reaction zone to the preheat zone as recently suggested by Zamashchikov et al. [V.V. Zamashchikov, I.G. Namyatov, V.A. Bunev, V.S. Babkin, Combust. Explosion Shock Waves 40 (2004) 32]. The suppression of the preferential diffusion of H radicals from the reaction zone to the preheat zone drastically reduces the degree of superadiabaticity in rich CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} flames. The preferential diffusion of H radicals plays an important role in the occurrence of superadiabatic flame temperature. The assumption of unity Lewis number for all species leads to the suppression of H radical diffusion from the reaction zone to the preheat zone and significant diffusion of CO{sub 2} from the postflame zone to the reaction zone. Consequently, the degree of superadiabaticity of flame temperature is also significantly reduced. Through reaction flux analyses and numerical experiments, the chemical nature of the superadiabatic flame temperature phenomenon in rich CH{sub 4}/air and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} flames was identified to be the relative scarcity of H radical, which leads to overshoot of

  3. Asymptotic expressions for turbulent burning velocity at the leading edge of a premixed flame brush and their validation by published measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeseo; Lee, Gwang G.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents validation of new analytical expressions for the turbulent burning velocity, ST, based on asymptotic behavior at the leading edge (LE) in turbulent premixed combustion. Reaction and density variation are assumed to be negligible at the LE to avoid the cold boundary difficulty in the statistically steady state. Good agreement is shown for the slopes, dST/du', with respect to Lc/δf at low turbulence, with both normalized by those of the reference cases. δf is the inverse of the maximum gradient of reaction progress variable through an unstretched laminar flame, and Lc is the characteristic length scale given as burner diameter or measured integral length scale. Comparison is made for thirty-five datasets involving different fuels, equivalence ratios, H2 fractions in fuel, pressures, and integral length scales from eight references [R. C. Aldredge et al., "Premixed-flame propagation in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow," Combust. Flame 115, 395 (1998); M. Lawes et al., "The turbulent burning velocity of iso-octane/air mixtures," Combust. Flame 159, 1949 (2012); H. Kido et al., "Influence of local flame displacement velocity on turbulent burning velocity," Proc. Combust. Inst. 29, 1855 (2002); J. Wang et al., "Correlation of turbulent burning velocity for syngas/air mixtures at high pressure up to 1.0 MPa," Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 50, 90 (2013); H. Kobayashi et al., "Experimental study on general correlation of turbulent burning velocity at high pressure," Proc. Combust. Inst. 27, 941 (1998); C. W. Chiu et al., "High-pressure hydrogen/carbon monoxide syngas turbulent burning velocities measured at constant turbulent Reynolds numbers," Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 37, 10935 (2012); P. Venkateswaran et al., "Pressure and fuel effects on turbulent consumption speeds of H2/CO blends," Proc. Combust. Inst. 34, 1527 (2013); M. Fairweather et al., "Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures," Combust. Flame 156, 780 (2009)]. The turbulent

  4. Simultaneous temperature and relative oxygen and methane concentration measurements in a partially premixed sooting flame using a novel CARS-technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Thomas; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Schenk, Martin; Leipertz, Alfred

    2003-12-01

    Using combined 'smeared' vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (VCARS) and dual-broadband rotational CARS (DBB-RCARS) simultaneous measurements of temperature and relative concentrations of O 2/N 2 and CH 4/N 2 have been conducted in a fuel-rich ( φ=10), laminar, partially premixed CH 4/air-flame. The equivalence ratio was calculated from the relative concentration data determined. Using a dye laser which has been tuned to the Q-branch transitions of methane both VCARS and DBB-CARS signals were generated and detected simultaneously by a conventional DBB-RCARS-setup and a planar BOXCARS phase-matching scheme. In contrast to previous approaches, an important advantage of this technique is that no modification of the experimental setup is necessary which would increase the complexity of the system. Due to its molecular symmetry, methane can only be observed by VCARS. The DBB-RCARS approach was used to probe nitrogen and oxygen. In this way the measured signal is separated into two parts. The relative intensity of the 'smeared' VCARS signal determines the relative concentration of methane and the residual DBB-RCARS signal is evaluated by a conventional contour fit to obtain the temperature and the relative concentration of oxygen. Radial temperature and concentration profiles are measured at different downstream positions in the flame. A comparison of the obtained temperatures with previous results from spontaneous Raman scattering and filtered Rayleigh scattering indicates good agreement.

  5. Investigation on thermal accommodation coefficient and soot absorption function with two-color Tire-LII technique in rich premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffi, S.; De Iuliis, S.; Cignoli, F.; Zizak, G.

    2011-08-01

    Although the two-color laser-induced incandescence technique (2C-LII) has proved to be a significant tool for soot diagnostics, many efforts are still required to gain a whole understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved. Time-resolved two-color LII measurements are carried out in a rich ethylene/air premixed flame at different heights above the burner and by changing the laser fluence. The prompt LII at two wavelengths and the corresponding soot incandescence temperature are obtained at different stages of the soot growth and under different laser irradiations. The decay rate of the LII signals, as a method for soot sizing, is investigated at different laser fluence. The time-resolved LII curves, obtained in the low laser fluence regime, are analyzed by a numerical simulation, available on the web. By considering the gas/particle initial temperature obtained with thermocouple measurements and by knowing soot particle diameter with previous TEM and extinction/scattering measurements, information about soot parameters, such as absorption function and thermal accommodation coefficient are obtained. The presence of the so-called young or mature soot along the flame height is strictly related to different optical and heat-exchange properties necessary to fit all the experimental data available.

  6. High-Resolution OH and CH2O Visualization in a Premixed Cavity-Anchored Ethylene-Air Flame in a M = 0.6 Flowfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geipel, Clayton M.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Chelliah, Harsha K.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Spelker, Christopher A.; Hashem, Zeid; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    OH and CH2O were imaged in a premixed, cavity-anchored, ethylene-air turbulent flame using a high resolution planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) system. The electrically-heated, continuous flow facility (UVa Supersonic Combustion Facility, Configuration E) consisted of a Mach 2 nozzle, an isolator with fuel injectors, a test section with a cavity flame holder and optical access, and an extender. Standard test conditions comprised total temperature 1200 K, total pressure 300 kPa, local equivalence ratio near 0.4, and local Mach number near 0.6. OH PLIF data was also collected for a case with reduced total temperature and another with reduced equivalence ratio. OH and CH2O were excited in separate experiments with light sheets at 283.55 nm and 352.48 nm, respectively. A light sheet of approximate thickness 25 ?m illuminated the stream-wise midplane. This plane was imaged for 120 mm downstream of the backward-facing step. The intensified camera system imaged OH with magnification 1.97, a square 6.67 mm field of view, and in-plane resolution of 39 ?m. The smallest observed OH structures observed were approximately 100 ?m wide. The CH2O PLIF image signal was much weaker; the smallest observed structures were approximately 200 ?m wide. Composite fluorescence images were computed for the observed area.

  7. Non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry of trace amounts of bismuth by introduction of its gaseous hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Nakahara, T; Musha, S

    1979-10-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of bismuth by generation of its gaseous hydride and introduction of the hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame, the atomic-fluorescence lines from which are all detected by use of a non-dispersive system. The detection limit is 5 pg/ml, or 0.1 ng of bismuth, but the reagent blank found in a 20-ml sample volume was approximately 2 ng of bismuth. Analytical working curves obtained by measuring peak-heights and integrated peak-areas of the signals are linear over a range of about four orders of magnitude from the detection limit. Perchloric, phosphoric and sulphuric acids up to 2.0M concentration give no interference, but nitric acid gives slight depression of the signal. The presence of silver, gold, nickel, palladium, platinum, selenium and tellurium in 1000-fold ratio to bismuth causes pronounced depression of the signal, whereas mercury and tin slightly enhance the atomic-fluorescence signal. The method has been applied to the determination of bismuth in aluminium-base alloys and sulphide ores with use of the standard additions method. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry with an inductively coupled plasma.

  8. Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Echavarria, Carlos A.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Lighty, JoAnn S.; D'Anna, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes were more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)

  9. Preliminary studies of autoignition and flashback in a premixing-prevaporizing flame tube using Jet-A fuel at lean equivalence ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.; Verbulecz, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Lean equivalence ratios from 0.3 to 0.7 were observed. Combustor inlet air pressures were varied from 0.54 to 2.5 MPa, combustor inlet air temperatures from 550 to 700 K, and reference velocities from 8 to 35 meters per second. Autoignition delay times ranged from 15 to 100 milliseconds and varied inversely with pressure. The Arrhenius activation energy was 41,840 joules per mole. Temperature rise data were obtained in a long premixing-prevaporizing tube at a pressure of 0.56 MPa. Preflame temperature rise data were a function of equivalence ratio, inlet air temperature, and tube residence time. Significant temperature rise occurred above temperatures of 760 K, with autoignition occurring at 775 K for equivalence ratios greater than 0.47. The reactions were similar to cool-flame phenomena. Flashback velocities were measured at temperatures of 610 and 700 K, pressure of 0.56 MPa, and equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 1. Flashback velocities varied from 30 to 65 meters per second.

  10. Laser induced incandescence determination of the ratio of the soot absorption functions at 532 nm and 1064 nm in the nucleation zone of a low pressure premixed sooting flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cléon, G.; Amodeo, T.; Faccinetto, A.; Desgroux, P.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, the two-excitation wavelength laser induced incandescence (LII) method has been applied in a low-pressure premixed methane/oxygen/nitrogen flame (equivalence ratio 2.32) to determine the variation of the ratio of the soot absorption functions at 532 nm and 1064 nm E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm) along the flame. This method relies on the comparison of LII signals measured upon two different excitation wavelengths (here 532 nm and 1064 nm) and with laser fluences selected in such a way that the soot particles are equally laser-heated. The comparison of the laser fluences at 532 nm and 1064 nm leads to an easy determination of E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm). The reliability of the method is demonstrated for the first time in a low pressure flame in which the soot nucleation zone can be spatially resolved and which contains soot particles acting differently with the laser fluence according to their residence time in the flame. The method is then applied to determine the profile of E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm) along the flame. A very important decrease of this ratio is observed in the region of nascent soot, while the ratio remains constant at high distance above the burner. Implication on temperature determination from spectrally resolved measurement of flame emission is studied.

  11. Triple flames and flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadwell, James E.

    1994-01-01

    It is now well established that when turbulent jet flames are lifted, combustion begins, i.e., the flame is stabilized, at an axial station where the fuel and air are partially premixed. One might expect, therefore, that the beginning of the combustion zone would be a triple flame. Such flames have been described; however, other experiments provide data that are difficult to reconcile with the presence of triple flames. In particular, laser images of CH and OH, marking combustion zones, do not exhibit shapes typical of triple flames, and, more significantly, the lifted flame appears to have a propagation speed that is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar flame speed. The speed of triple flames studied thus far exceeds the laminar value by a factor less than two. The objective of the present task is the resolution of the apparent conflict between the experiments and the triple flame characteristics, and the clarification of the mechanisms controlling flame stability. Being investigated are the resolution achieved in the experiments, the flow field in the neighborhood of the stabilization point, propagation speeds of triple flames, laboratory flame unsteadiness, and the importance of flame ignition limits in the calculation of triple flames that resemble lifted flames.

  12. Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Air-Contamination Effects on Extinction Limits of Non-Premixed Hydrocarbon-Air Flames for a HIFiRE Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Dawson, Lucy C.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2009-01-01

    Unique nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen air-contamination effects on the extinction Flame Strength (FS) of non-premixed hydrocarbon (HC) vs. air flames are characterized for 7 gaseous HCs, using a new idealized 9.3 mm straight-tube Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) at 1 atm. FS represents a laminar strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, Uair, that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. Besides ethane, propane, butane, and propylene, the HCs include ethylene, methane, and a 64 mole-% ethylene / 36 % methane mixture, the writer s previously recommended gaseous surrogate fuel for HIFiRE scramjet tests. The HC vs. clean air part of the work is an extension of a May 2008 JANNAF paper that characterized surrogates for the HIFiRE project that should mimic the flameholding of reformed (thermally- or catalytically-cracked) endothermic JP-like fuels. The new FS data for 7 HCs vs. clean air are thus consolidated with the previously validated data, normalized to absolute (local) axial-input strain rates, and co-plotted on a dual kinetically dominated reactivity scale. Excellent agreement with the prior data is obtained for all 7 fuels. Detailed comparisons are also made with recently published (Univ. Va) numerical results for ethylene extinction. A 2009-revised ethylene kinetic model (Univ. Southern Cal) led to predicted limits within approx. 5 % (compared to 45 %, earlier) of this writer s 2008 (and present) ethylene FSs, and also with recent independent data (Univ. Va) obtained on a new OJB system. These +/- 5 % agreements, and a hoped-for "near-identically-performing" reduced kinetics model, would greatly enhance the capability for accurate numerical simulations of surrogate HC flamehold