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Sample records for 2-dof drive mode

  1. Fractional fuzzy adaptive sliding-mode control of a 2-DOF direct-drive robot arm.

    PubMed

    Efe, Mehmet Onder

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel parameter adjustment scheme to improve the robustness of fuzzy sliding-mode control achieved by the use of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) architecture. The proposed scheme utilizes fractional-order integration in the parameter tuning stage. The controller parameters are tuned such that the system under control is driven toward the sliding regime in the traditional sense. After a comparison with the classical integer-order counterpart, it is seen that the control system with the proposed adaptation scheme displays better tracking performance, and a very high degree of robustness and insensitivity to disturbances are observed. The claims are justified through some simulations utilizing the dynamic model of a 2-DOF direct-drive robot arm. Overall, the contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that the response of the system under control is significantly better for the fractional-order integration exploited in the parameter adaptation stage than that for the classical integer-order integration. PMID:19022726

  2. Design and fabrication of a 1-DOF drive mode and 2-DOF sense mode micro-gyroscope using SU-8 based UV-LIGA process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Payal; Juneja, Sucheta; Savelyev, Dmitry A.; Khonina, Svetlana N.; Gopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents design and fabrication of a 1-DOF (degree-of-freedom) drive mode and 2-DOF sense mode micro-gyroscope. It is an inherently robust structure and offers a high sense frequency bandwidth. The proposed design utilizes resonance of the1-DOF drive mode oscillator and employs dynamic amplification concept in sense modes to increase the sensitivity while maintaining robustness. The 2-DOF in the sense direction renders the device immune to process imperfections and environmental effects. The design is simulated using FEA software (CoventorWare®). The device is designed considering process compatibility with SU-8 based UV-LIGA process, which is an economical fabrication technique. The complete fabrication process is presented along with SEM images of the fabricated device. The device has 9 µm thick Nickel as the key structural layer with an overall reduced key structure size of 2.2 mm by 2.1 mm.

  3. Design and simulation of non-resonant 1-DOF drive mode and anchored 2-DOF sense mode gyroscope for implementation using UV-LIGA process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Payal; Gopal, Ram; Butt, M. A.; Khonina, Svetlana N.; Skidanov, Roman V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a 3-DOF (degree-of-freedom) MEMS gyroscope structure with 1-DOF drive mode and anchored 2-DOF sense mode, based on UV-LIGA technology. The 3-DOF system has the drive resonance located in the flat zone between the two sense resonances. It is an inherently robust structure and offers a high sense frequency band width and high gain without much scaling down the mass on which the sensing comb fingers are attached and it is also immune to process imperfections and environmental conditions. The design is optimized to be compatible with the UV-LIGA process, having 9 μm thick nickel as structural layer. The electrostatic gap between the drive comb fingers is 4 μm and sense comb fingers gap are 4 μm/12 μm. The damping effect is considered by assuming the flexures and the proof mass suspended about 6 μm over the substrate. Accordingly, mask is designed in L-Edit software.

  4. Electrical coupling suppression and transient response improvement for a microgyroscope using ascending frequency drive with a 2-DOF PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, Z. C.; Hao, Y. L.; Yan, G. Z.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel control strategy for the drive mode of a microgyroscope using ascending frequency drive (AFD) with an AGC-2DOF PID controller, which drives a resonator with a modulation signal not at the resonant frequency and senses the vibration signal at the resonant frequency, thus realizing the isolation between the actual mechanical response and electrical coupling signal. This approach holds the following three advantages: (1) it employs the AFD signal instead of the resonant frequency drive signal to excite the gyroscope in the drive direction, suppressing the electrical coupling from the drive electrode to the sense electrode; (2) it can reduce the noise at low frequency and resonant frequency by shifting flicker noise to the high-frequency part; (3) it can effectively improve the performance of the transient response of the closed-loop control with a 2-DOF (degree of freedom) PID controller compared with the conventional 1-DOF PID. The stability condition of the whole loop is investigated by utilizing the averaging and linearization method. The control approach is applied to drive a lateral tuning fork microgyroscope. Test results show good agreement with the theoretical and simulation results. The non-ideal electrical antiresonance peak is removed and the resonant peak height increases by approximately 10 dB over a 400 Hz span with a flicker noise reduction of 30 dB within 100 Hz using AFD. The percent overshoot is reduced from 36.2% (1DOF PID) to 8.95% (2DOF PID, about 75.3% overshoot suppression) with 15.3% improvement in setting time.

  5. Broadband energy harvesting using nonlinear 2-DOF configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Tang, Lihua; Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2013-04-01

    Vibration energy harvesting using piezoelectric material has received great research interest in the recent years. To enhance the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters, one important concern is to increase their operating bandwidth. Various techniques have been proposed for broadband energy harvesting, such as the resonance tuning approach, the frequency up-conversion technique, the multi-modal harvesting and the nonlinear technique. Usually, a nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester can be easily developed by introducing a magnetic field. Either mono-stable or bi-stable response can be achieved using different magnetic configurations. However, most of the research work for nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvesting has focused on the SDOF cantilever beam. A recently reported linear 2-DOF harvester can achieve two close resonant frequencies with significant power outputs. However, for this linear configuration, although a broader bandwidth can be achieved, there exists a deep valley in-between the two response peaks. The presence of the valley will greatly deteriorate the performance of the energy harvester. To overcome this limitation, a nonlinear 2-DOF piezoelectric energy harvester is proposed in this article. This nonlinear harvester is developed from its linear counterpart by incorporating a magnetic field using a pair of magnets. Experimental parametric study is carried out to investigate the behavior of such harvester. With different configurations, both mono-stable and bi-stable behaviors are observed and studied. An optimal configuration of the nonlinear harvester is thus obtained, which can achieve significantly wider bandwidth than the linear 2-DOF harvester and at the same time overcome its limitation.

  6. Dynamics of 2-dof regenerative chatter during turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandiramani, N. K.; Pothala, T.

    2006-02-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom (2-dof) model comprising nonlinear delay differential equations (DDEs) is analyzed for self-excited oscillations during orthogonal turning. The model includes multiple time delays, possibility of tool leaving cut, additional process damping (due to flank interference), ploughing force, and variations in shear angle and friction angle. Assuming a two-period delay at most, an algorithm based on an existing shooting method for DDEs is developed to simulate tool dynamics and seek periodic solutions. The multiple-regenerative and tool-leaving-cut effects for 2-dof chatter are simulated via an equivalent 1-dof analysis by introducing a time shift. Thus, the cut profile and instantaneous chip thickness are obtained by accounting for chatter motions along both axes. While the amplitude and minimum period of limit cycles computed via shooting and via direct numerical integration compare well, the shooting method converges much faster. Numerical studies involving machining parameters reveal period-1 motion only, for the range of cutting parameters considered here. The possibility of subcritical instability, characterized by the sudden onset of finite-amplitude chatter, is displayed. Additional process damping causes a reduction in chatter amplitudes as well as the subcritical instability to occur at a larger width of cut. An increase in the width of cut causes frequent tool-leaving-cut events and increased chatter amplitudes. The frequency of tool disengagement increases with cutting velocity, despite cutting force in the shank direction remaining constant over a certain velocity range. The chatter amplitude increases and then decreases when the cutting velocity or the uncut chip thickness is increased. The present plant model and dynamics would be useful for state estimator design in active control of tool chatter.

  7. Electron heating and current drive by mode converted slow waves

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    An approach to obtaining efficient single pass mode conversion at high parallel wavenumber from the fast magnetosonic wave to the slow ion Bernstein wave, in a two ion species tokamak plasma, is described. The intent is to produce localized electron heating or current drive via the mode converted slow wave. In particular, this technique can be adapted to off-axis current drive for current profile control. Modelling for the case of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR is presented.

  8. BATMAV: a 2-DOF bio-inspired flapping flight platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Seelecke, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Due to the availability of small sensors, Micro-Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) can be used for detection missions of biological, chemical and nuclear agents. Traditionally these devices used fixed or rotary wings, actuated with electric DC motortransmission, a system which brings the disadvantage of a heavier platform. The overall objective of the BATMAV project is to develop a biologically inspired bat-like MAV with flexible and foldable wings for flapping flight. This paper presents a flight platform that features bat-inspired wings which are able to actively fold their elbow joints. A previous analysis of the flight physics for small birds, bats and large insects, revealed that the mammalian flight anatomy represents a suitable flight platform that can be actuated efficiently using Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) artificial-muscles. A previous study of the flight styles in bats based on the data collected by Norberg [1] helped to identify the required joint angles as relevant degrees of freedom for wing actuation. Using the engineering theory of robotic manipulators, engineering kinematic models of wings with 2 and 3-DOFs were designed to mimic the wing trajectories of the natural flier Plecotus auritus. Solid models of the bat-like skeleton were designed based on the linear and angular dimensions resulted from the kinematic models. This structure of the flight platform was fabricated using rapid prototyping technologies and assembled to form a desktop prototype with 2-DOFs wings. Preliminary flapping test showed suitable trajectories for wrist and wingtip that mimic the flapping cycle of the natural flyer.

  9. Design and implementation of a 2-DOF PID compensation for magnetic levitation systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun; Rakesh Krishnan, T; Tejaswy, Pailla; Mandal, Abhisek; Pradhan, Jatin K; Ranasingh, Subhakant

    2014-07-01

    This paper employs a 2-DOF (degree of freedom) PID controller for compensating a physical magnetic levitation system. It is shown that because of having a feedforward gain in the proposed 2-DOF PID control, the transient performance of the compensated system can be changed in a desired manner unlike the conventional 1-DOF PID control. It is also shown that for a choice of PID parameters, although the theoretical loop robustness is the same for both the compensated systems, in real-time, 2-DOF PID control may provide superior robustness if a suitable choice of the feedforward parameter is made. The results are verified through simulations and experiments. PMID:24947430

  10. Disturbance observer and feedforward design for a 2-DOF high-speed/high-accuracy robotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Chu, Zhongyi

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, a novel 2-DOF high-speed/high-accuracy robotic system is proposed, which consists of two permanent linear DC servomotors and a planar parallel mechanism. Analysis of robotic dynamical model verifies that load variation is violent. Due to the direct-drive principle of a linear motor, the load disturbance can have a significant effect on position accuracy. For this purpose, a discrete-time disturbance observer, feedback controller and ZPECT feedforward controller is presented. The disturbance observer, which is applied to the plant velocity loop, provides robustness for design of both the feedback controller and the feedforward controller. The feedback controller is intended to make the command following properties fast, and the feedforward term realized as a Zero Phase Error Tracking Controller improves tracking. In the experiment, robotic max acceleration is equal to 20m/s2, max velocity is more than 1 m/s, and resolution is 0.5 μm. While the tracking errors are less than 50 μm, the steady-state errors are less than 1 μm, and steady time is less then 42 ms. Experiment results show that: high-performance motion system can be obtained with this discrete-time controller, even in large load variance motion system.

  11. Robust sliding mode continuous control of an IM drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jezernik, K.; Hren, A.; Drevensek, D.

    1995-12-31

    A control approach for robust trajectory tracking of IM servodrive based on the variable structure systems (VSS) is described. A new discrete-time control algorithm has been developed by combining VSS and Lyapunov design. It possesses all the good properties of the sliding mode and avoids the unnecessary discontinuity of the control input, thus eliminating chattering which has been considering as serious obstacles for applications of VSS. A unified control approach for current, torque and motion control based on the discrete-time sliding mode for application in indirect vector control of an IM drive is developed. The sliding mode approach can be applied to the control of an Im drive due to the replacement of the hysteresis controller with widely used PWM technique. All the theoretical issues are verified by experiment. The experimental system consists of a transputer and a microcontroller, thus allowing parallel processing.

  12. A dimensionless analysis of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Xu; John, Sabu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a dimensionless analysis method is proposed to predict the output voltage and harvested power for a 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system. This method allows us to compare the harvesting power and efficiency of the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system and to evaluate the harvesting system performance regardless the sizes or scales. The analysis method is a hybrid of time domain simulation and frequency response analysis approaches, which would be a useful tool for parametric study, design and optimisation of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. In a case study, a quarter car suspension model with a piezoelectric material insert is chosen to be studied. The 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could potentially be applied in a vehicle to convert waste or harmful ambient vibration energy into electrical energy for charging the battery. Especially for its application in a hybrid vehicle or an electrical vehicle, the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could improve charge mileage, comfort and reliability.

  13. DRIVING G-MODE PULSATIONS IN GAMMA DORADUS VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; A. KAYE; ET AL

    2000-10-10

    The {gamma} Doradus stars are a newly-discovered class of gravity-mode pulsators which lie just at or beyond the red edge of the {delta} Scuti instability strip. We present the results of calculations which predict pulsation instability of high-order g-modes with periods between 0.4 and 3 days, as observed in these stars. The pulsations are driven by the modulation of radiative flux by convection at the base of a deep envelope convection zone. Pulsation instability is predicted only for models with temperatures at the convection zone base between {approximately}200,000 and {approximately}480,000 K. The estimated shear dissipation due to turbulent viscosity within the convection zone, or in an overshoot region below the convection zone, can be comparable to or even exceed the predicted driving, and is likely to reduce the number of unstable modes, or possibly to quench the instability. Additional refinements in the pulsation modeling are required to determine the outcome. A few Doradus stars have been observed that also pulsate in {delta} Scuti-type p-modes, and at least two others have been identified as chemically peculiar. Since our calculated driving region is relatively deep, Doradus pulsations are not necessarily incompatible with surface abundance peculiarities or with {delta} Scuti p-mode pulsations driven by the H and He-ionization {kappa} effect. Such stars will provide useful observational constraints on the proposed Doradus pulsation mechanism.

  14. Mode conversion heating and current drive experiments in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schilling, G.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The first experimental demonstration that mode conversion from the fast magnetosonic wave to an ion Bernstein wave can efficiently heat electrons and drive current with low field side antennas in a tokamak plasma is reported. Up to 130 kA of current was noninductively driven, on and off axis, and the resultant current profiles were measured in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. In heating experiments, 10 keV peak electron temperatures were produced with 3.3 MW of radio-frequency heating power. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Firing Modes of Dopamine Neurons Drive Bidirectional GIRK Channel Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lalive, Arnaud L.; Munoz, Michaelanne B.; Bellone, Camilla; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels contribute to the resting membrane potential of many neurons, including dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA DA neurons are bistable, firing in two modes: one characterized by bursts of action potentials, the other by tonic firing at a lower frequency. Here we provide evidence that these firing modes drive bidirectional plasticity of GIRK channel-mediated currents. In acute midbrain slices of mice, we observed that in vitro burst activation of VTA DA neurons potentiated GIRK currents whereas tonic firing depressed these currents. This plasticity was not specific to the metabotropic receptor activating the GIRK channels, as direct activation of GIRK channels by nonhydrolyzable GTP also potentiated the currents. The plasticity of GIRK currents required NMDA receptor and CaMKII activation, and involved protein trafficking through specific PDZ domains of GIRK2c and GIRK3 subunit isoforms. Prolonged tonic firing may thus enhance the probability to switch into burst-firing mode, which then potentiates GIRK currents and favors the return to baseline. In conclusion, activity-dependent GIRK channel plasticity may represent a slow destabilization process favoring the switch between the two firing modes of VTA DA neurons. PMID:24719090

  16. Electrostatic tuning of drive and sense modes in two-gimbal torsional gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ankush; Gopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    This paper demonstrates electrostatic tuning of drive and sense modes in two-gimbal torsional gyroscope. The gyroscope is fabricated by SU-8 based UV-LIGA process and is then packaged in vacuum. The device is first characterized for frequency responses of drive and sense modes using laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Finally, electrostatic tuning of drive and sense modes is carried out by varying DC bias voltage applied to the proof-mass.

  17. Adaptive tuning of a 2DOF controller for robust cell manipulation using IPMC actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaid, A. J.; Aw, K. C.; Haemmerle, E.; Shahinpoor, M.; Xie, S. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid advancement in medicine and bioscience is causing demand for faster, more accurate and dexterous as well as safer and more reliable micro-manipulators capable of handling biological cells. Current micro-manipulation techniques commonly damage cell walls and membranes due to their stiffness and rigidity. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators have inherent compliance and with their ability to operate well in fluid and cellular environments they present a unique solution for safe cell manipulation. The reason for the downfall of IPMCs is that their complex behaviour makes them hard to control precisely in unknown environments and in the presence of sizeable external disturbances. This paper presents a novel scheme for adaptively tuning IPMC actuators for precise and robust micro-manipulation of biological cells. A two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) controller is developed to allow optimal performance for both disturbance rejection (DR) and set point (SP) tracking. These criteria are optimized using a proposed IFT algorithm which adaptively updates the controller parameters, with no model or prior knowledge of the operating conditions, to achieve a compliant manipulation system which can precisely track targets in the presence of large external disturbances, as will be encountered in real biological environments. Experiments are presented showing the performance optimization of an IPMC actuator in the presence of external mechanical disturbances as well as the optimization of the SP tracking. The IFT algorithm successfully tunes the DR and SP to an 85% and 69% improvement, respectively. Results are also presented for a one-degree-of-freedom (1DOF) controller tuned first for DR and then for SP, for a comparison with the 2DOF controller. Validation has been undertaken to verify that the 2DOF controller does indeed outperform both 1DOF controllers over a variety of operating conditions.

  18. Intrinsic rotation drive by collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Peng, Shuitao; Diamond, P. H.

    2016-04-01

    Both the parallel residual stress and parallel turbulent acceleration driven by electrostatic collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence are calculated analytically using gyrokinetic theory. Quasilinear results show that the parallel residual stress contributes an outward flux of co-current rotation for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. This may induce intrinsic counter-current rotation or flattening of the co-current rotation profile. The parallel turbulent acceleration driven by CTEM turbulence vanishes, due to the absence of a phase shift between density fluctuation and ion pressure fluctuation. This is different from the case of ion temperature gradient turbulence, for which the turbulent acceleration can provide co-current drive for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. Its order of magnitude is predicted to be the same as that of the divergence of the residual stress [L. Wang and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 265006 (2013)]. A possible connection of these theoretical results to experimental observations of electron cyclotron heating effects on toroidal rotation is discussed.

  19. Development of biomimetic quadruped walking robot with 2-DOF waist joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Se-Hoon; Lee, Yun-Jung

    2005-12-01

    This paper presented a novel bio-mimetic quadruped walking robot with 2-DOF (Degree Of Freedom) waist joint, which connects the front and the rear parts of the body. The waist-jointed walking robot can guarantee more stable and more animal-like gait than that of a conventional single-rigid-body walking robot. The developed robot, called ELIRO-II (Eating LIzard RObot version 2), can bend its body from side to side by using 1-DOF passive waist joint while the legs is transferred, thereby increasing the stride and speed of the robot. In addition, ELIRO-II has one more active DOF to bend its body up and down, which increases the mobility in irregular terrain such as slope and stairs. We design the mechanical structure of the robot, which is small and light to have high mobility. This research described characteristics of the 2-DOF waists joint and leg mechanism as well as a hardware and software of the controller of ELIRO-II.

  20. Radiometric compensation for cooperative distributed multi-projection system through 2-DOF distributed control.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Jun; Iwai, Daisuke; Kashima, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiometric compensation technique for cooperative projection system based-on distributed optimization. To achieve high scalability and robustness, we assume cooperative projection environments such that 1. each projector does not have information about other projectors as well as target images, 2. the camera does not have information about the projectors either, while having the target images, and 3. only a broadcast communication from the camera to the projectors is allowed to suppress the data transfer bandwidth. To this end, we first investigate a distributed optimization based feedback mechanism that is suitable for the required decentralized information processing environment. Next, we show that this mechanism works well for still image projection, however not necessary for moving images due to the lack of dynamic responsiveness. To overcome this issue, we propose to implement an additional feedforward mechanism. Such a 2 Degree Of Freedom (2-DOF) control structure is well-known in control engineering community as a typical method to enhance not only disturbance rejection but also reference tracking capability, simultaneously. We theoretically guarantee and experimentally demonstrate that this 2-DOF structure yields the moving image projection accuracy that is overwhelming the best achievable performance only by the distributed optimization mechanisms. PMID:26439824

  1. Approximate Linearization Control of 2-DOF Underactuated-by-1 Systems Using Higher Order Linearization Coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tasuku

    This paper deals with an approximate linearization control of 2-DOF underactuated-by-1 nonlinear systems, proposing a novel linearization coordinate which reduces the approximation error over the state space around the operating point. The coordinate is analytically constructed in a systematic way by solving two first order linear partial differential equations and the solution is given in an infinite series of configuration variables. The resulting linearization feedback is highly nonlinear and the basin of attraction of the stabilized system using proposed coordinate is large, comparing with those of a conventional first order or other lower order linearization coordinates. The approximate linearization control based on the proposed coordinate is applied to the stabilization of a rotational inverted pendulum; the advantage is verified in simulations and experiments. Some perspectives on availability of the linearization coordinate are discussed and they are computed also for a mobile inverted pendulum, Acrobot, and for Pendubot as examples.

  2. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  3. Drive Train Normal Modes Analysis for the ERDA/NASA 100-Kilowatt Wind Turbine Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Miller, D. R.; Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Natural frequencies, as a function of power were determined using a finite element model. Operating conditions investigated were operation with a resistive electrical load and operation synchronized to an electrical utility grid. The influence of certain drive train components on frequencies and mode shapes is shown. An approximate method for obtaining drive train natural frequencies is presented.

  4. Statistical linearization on 2 DOFs hydropneumatic suspension with asymmetric non-linear stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingming; Luo, Zhenxing

    2015-04-01

    Most references on hydropneumatic suspension analysis regard it as harden Duffing spring and take the white noise as the system input, which is quite different from real physical model. It will introduce considerable errors to the analytical result compared with the numerical simulation which makes it impossible to give a good depiction of the hydropneumatic suspension dynamics. In this paper, the dynamic response of the hydropneumatic suspension is worked out using statistical linearization based on 2 DOFs nonlinear suspension model. The damping of the suspension and the tire stiffness are both regarded as linear components and the real road roughness spectrum is used to work out the system input. The explicit analytical equivalent stiffness, dynamic mean value offset from statistic equilibrium position and the sprung acceleration varied with parameters of hydropneumatic spring, road roughness and vehicle velocity are worked out by substituting the nonlinear stiffness of hydropneumatic spring with its first three terms Tyler series at the static equilibrium position using James formula. The comparison of the numerical simulation and analytical result both on statistical parameters and distribution shows the validity of the analysis. The explicit form provides a concise and valid method on hydropneumatic suspension design and optimization.

  5. Sliding mode pulse-width modulation technique for direct torque controlled induction motor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounadja, M.; Belarbi, A. W.; Belmadani, B.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a novel pulse-width modulation technique based sliding mode approach for direct torque control of an induction machine drive. Methodology begins with a sliding mode control of machine's torque and stator flux to generate the reference voltage vector and to reduce parameters sensitivity. Then, the switching control of the three-phase inverter is developed using sliding mode concept to make the system tracking reference voltage inputs. The main features of the proposed methodologies are the high tracking accuracy and the much easier implementation compared to the space vector modulation. Simulations are carried out to confirm the effectiveness of proposed control algorithms.

  6. A fuzzy logic sliding mode controlled electronic differential for a direct wheel drive EV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkop, Emre; Altas, Ismail H.; Okumus, H. Ibrahim; Sharaf, Adel M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a direct wheel drive electric vehicle based on an electronic differential system with a fuzzy logic sliding mode controller (FLSMC) is studied. The conventional sliding surface is modified using a fuzzy rule base to obtain fuzzy dynamic sliding surfaces by changing its slopes using the global error and its derivative in a fuzzy logic inference system. The controller is compared with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and sliding mode controllers (SMCs), which are usually preferred to be used in industry. The proposed controller provides robustness and flexibility to direct wheel drive electric vehicles. The fuzzy logic sliding mode controller, electronic differential system and the overall electrical vehicle mechanism are modelled and digitally simulated by using the Matlab software. Simulation results show that the system with FLSMC has better efficiency and performance compared to those of PID and SMCs.

  7. Stabilization of tearing modes in DIII-D by localized electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, T. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Humphreys, D. A.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.

    2001-10-01

    Tearing modes have been shown to limit β and confinement in conventional ELMing H-mode tokamak regimes. The tearing modes grow from a "seed" island due to the destabilizing effect of pressure flattening in the island leading to a reduction in the local bootstrap current. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated stabilization of m=3/n=2 tearing modes in the presence of sawteeth through localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Variation of the deposition location indicates the ECCD remains localized despite the beam traversing an ELMing edge. The effect of the ECCD on the mode is consistent with predictions that the ECCD must be within the island for stabilization. The calculated EC current density (JEC) is greater than the calculated local bootstrap current density (JBS) also in accord with predictions. A closed-loop feedback scheme has been successfully operated for the first time using position control and magnetic signals as the actuator and sensor, respectively.

  8. Control algorithm of electric vehicle in coasting mode based on driving feeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daxu; Lan, Fengchong; Zhou, Yunjiao; Chen, Jiqing

    2015-05-01

    Coasting in gear is a common driving mode for the conventional vehicle equipped with the internal combustion engine (ICE), and the assistant braking function of ICE is utilized to decelerate the vehicle in this mode. However, the electric vehicle (EV) does not have this feature in the coasting mode due to the relatively small inertia of the driving motor, so it will cause the driver cannot obtain the similar driving feeling to that of the conventional vehicle, and even a traffic accident may occur if the driver cannot immediately adapt to the changes. In this paper, the coasting control for EV is researched based on the driving feeling. A conventional vehicle equipped with continuously variable transmission (CVT) is taken as the reference vehicle, and the combined simulation model of EV is established based on AVL CRUISE and MATLAB/Simulink. The torque characteristic of the CVT output shaft is measured in coasting mode, and the data are smoothed and fitted to a polynomial curve. For the EV in coasting mode, if the state of charge (SOC) of the battery is below 95%, the polynomial curve is used as the control target for the torque characteristic of the driving motor, otherwise, the required torque is replaced by hydraulic braking torque to keep the same deceleration. The co-simulation of Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow and AVL CRUISE, as well as the hardware-in-loop experiment combined with dSPACE are carried out to verify the effectiveness and the real-time performance of the control algorithm. The results show that the EV with coasting braking control system has similar driving feeling to that of the reference vehicle, meanwhile, the battery SOC can be increased by 0.036% and 0.021% in the initial speed of 100 km/h and 50 km/h, respectively. The proposed control algorithm for EV is beneficial to improve the driving feeling in coasting mode, and it also makes the EV has the assistant braking function.

  9. Drive Mechanisms for Peeling-Ballooning Modes and Implications for Kinetic Ballooning Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunniss, Amelia; Wilson, Howard; Snyder, Phil

    2015-11-01

    The EPED model of the H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas combines a kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) criterion for the critical pressure gradient with a non-local peeling-ballooning (P-B) mode stability criterion to provide an integrated picture of pedestal structure and ELMs. Employing a set of model tokamak equilibria with pedestal gradients constrained by the KBM criterion, we explore the P-B stability for different pedestal widths. The narrowest widths, corresponding to early in the ELM cycle, are stable. Once a critical width is realised, an intermediate-n P-B mode is destabilised, which we show to be driven by a combination of the kink and curvature contributions to δW, exceeding field line bending. Although formally of O(n-1) , we show that the kink term survives to very large n because of steep current density gradients in the pedestal. This kink term is not presently retained in gyro-kinetic codes, but may be important for an accurate prediction of the KBM stability criterion in realistic low collisionality tokamak pedestals. This project has received part funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement number 633053. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  10. Electric Circuit Model Suitable for Common Mode Current Paths Distributing in the Motor Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Nobuyoshi; Ogata, Mitsukatsu; Harashima, Fumio

    Experimental date are used to analyze conducted EMI noises which are produced in a motor drive system with power converters comprised of a converter and an inverter. The processes are investigated in which common mode noises (voltages and currents) are strongly influenced by voltage fluctuations occurring due to switching operations. It is found that the common mode currents are resonance currents which appear in series resonance circuits distributed in the motor drive system. The circuits have various kinds of resonance frequencies related to voltage fluctuations produced by switching operations and micro-surge voltages generated at the terminal of machines such as an ac rector or a motor. Thus, parameters of the distributed series resonance circuits are estimated using the transient waveforms obtained by separating the common mode current into waves analyzed by the FFT method. It is proved through simulations and experiments that the proposed circuit models closely represent actual electric circuits for common mode current paths distributed in the motor drive system.

  11. Indoor-outdoor air quality relationships in vehicle: effect of driving environment and ventilation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Andy T.; Chung, Michael W.

    Nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide concentration were measured inside and outside of a light-goods-vehicle at different locations and driving conditions for a 6-month period. To investigate the exposure of the vehicle passenger to the specified outdoor pollutant, the indoor-outdoor air quality (IO) relationships under various driving conditions, namely traffic density, ventilation modes and type of roadway were studied. Four main types of driving environments were selected: highway, countryside, urban street and tunnel. The vehicle was driven under the three main types of ventilation conditions: air-conditioning with air-recirculation, air-conditioning with fresh air intake and natural ventilation. It is found that the IO ratio is not specific only to the mode of ventilation but also depends on the driving environment. The IO value can vary drastically even using the same ventilation mode when the vehicle is travelling in a different environment. It is found that using fresh-air ventilation mode, the IO can change from approximately 0.5-3 as it commutes from a highway to the countryside. The results also indicate that indoor NO level increased as the traffic density increases. The fluctuation of indoor NO level of naturally ventilated vehicle followed the variation of outdoor NO concentration with the IO value varying from 0.5 to 5. The results also show that even in an air-conditioned van, the indoor NO and CO concentration is significantly affected by that outdoor. It suggests the use of different ventilation mode when commuting in different environment.

  12. Nonlinear adaptive observer-based sliding mode control for LAMOST mount driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wang-Ping; Zheng, Yi; Guo, Wei; Yu, Li; Yang, Chang-Song

    2010-01-01

    Heavy disturbances caused mainly by wind and friction in the mount drive system greatly impair the pointing accuracy of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST). To overcome this negative effect, a third order Higher Order Sliding Mode (HOSM) controller is proposed. The key part of this approach is to design an appropriate observer which obtains the acceleration state. A nonlinear adaptive observer is proposed in which a novel polynomial model is applied to estimate the internal disturbances of the mount drive system. Theoretical analysis demonstrates the stability of the proposed observer. Simulation results show that this nonlinear adaptive observer can obtain a high precision acceleration signal which completes the HOSM controller. Furthermore, the HOSM approach can easily satisfy the position tracking requirements of the LAMOST mount drive system.

  13. Effects of driving mode on the performance of multiple-chamber piezoelectric pumps with multiple actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Kan, Junwu; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Hongyun; Ma, Jijie; Jiang, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited output capability of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the driving voltage is frequently increased to obtain the desired output. However, the excessive voltage application may lead to a large deformation in the piezoelectric ceramics, which could cause it to breakdown or become damaged. Therefore, increasing the number of chambers to obtain the desired output is proposed. Using a check-valve quintuple-chamber pump with quintuple piezoelectric actuators, the characteristics of the pump under different driving modes are investigated through experiments. By changing the number and connection mode of working actuators, pump performances in terms of flow rate and backpressure are tested at a voltage of 150 V with a frequency range of 60 Hz -400 Hz. Experiment results indicate that the properties of the multiple-chamber pump change significantly with distinct working chambers even though the number of pumping chambers is the same. Pump performance declines as the distance between the working actuators increases. Moreover, pump performance declines dramatically when the working piezoelectric actuator closest to the outlet is involved. The maximum backpressures of the pump with triple, quadruple, and quintuple actuators are increased by 39%, 83%, and 128%, respectively, compared with the pump with double working actuators; the corresponding maximum flow rates of the pumps are simply increased by 25.9%, 49.2%, and 67.8%, respectively. The proposed research offers practical guidance for the effective utilization of the multiple-chamber pumps under different driving modes.

  14. Multi-Hierarchical Modeling of Driving Behavior Using Dynamics-Based Mode Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Nakano, Ato; Inagaki, Shinkichi; Hayakawa, Soichiro

    This paper presents a new hierarchical mode segmentation of the observed driving behavioral data based on the multi-level abstraction of the underlying dynamics. By synthesizing the ideas of a feature vector definition revealing the dynamical characteristics and an unsupervised clustering technique, the hierarchical mode segmentation is achieved. The identified mode can be regarded as a kind of symbol in the abstract model of the behavior. Second, the grammatical inference technique is introduced to develop the context-dependent grammar of the behavior, i.e., the symbolic dynamics of the human behavior. In addition, the behavior prediction based on the obtained symbolic model is performed. The proposed framework enables us to make a bridge between the signal space and the symbolic space in the understanding of the human behavior.

  15. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-12-23

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a non-inductive current fraction, f{sub NI}{approx}0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI}{approx}0.35, when P{sub RF}{>=}2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  16. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  17. Robust fuzzy neural network sliding mode control scheme for IPMSM drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, V. Q.; Mwasilu, F.; Choi, H. H.; Lee, J.; Jung, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    This article proposes a robust fuzzy neural network sliding mode control (FNNSMC) law for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives. The proposed control strategy not only guarantees accurate and fast command speed tracking but also it ensures the robustness to system uncertainties and sudden speed and load changes. The proposed speed controller encompasses three control terms: a decoupling control term which compensates for nonlinear coupling factors using nominal parameters, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) control term which approximates the ideal control components and a sliding mode control (SMC) term which is proposed to compensate for the errors of that approximation. Next, an online FNN training methodology, which is developed using the Lyapunov stability theorem and the gradient descent method, is proposed to enhance the learning capability of the FNN. Moreover, the maximum torque per ampere (MTPA) control is incorporated to maximise the torque generation in the constant torque region and increase the efficiency of the IPMSM drives. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed robust FNNSMC, simulations and experiments are performed by using MATLAB/Simulink platform and a TI TMS320F28335 DSP on a prototype IPMSM drive setup, respectively. Finally, the simulated and experimental results indicate that the proposed design scheme can achieve much better control performances (e.g. more rapid transient response and smaller steady-state error) when compared to the conventional SMC method, especially in the case that there exist system uncertainties.

  18. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  19. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  20. Characterization of neo-classical tearing modes in high-performance I-mode plasmas with ICRF mode conversion flow drive on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yijun; Granetz, R.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neo-classical tearing modes (NTM's) have been observed on Alcator C-Mod in high performance I-mode plasmas (Bt0˜5.2 T) that are heated by a combination of ICRF D(H) minority heating at 80 MHz and D(He3) mode conversion (MC) heating at 50 MHz. Due to the stabilizing effect by the energetic minority hydrogen ions, long sawtooth (>=40 ms) and large sawtooth crashes (δTe0>=3 keV) are produced in these hot (Te0<=9 keV) plasmas. NTMs with (m=4, n=3), (5, 4), (3, 2) and (2, 1) have been observed. The onset criteria of the (3, 2) NTMs, βp˜0.4-0.7, βN˜1.0-1.4, βN/ρi^*˜200-350, ν NTM (q=3/2)˜0.04-0.25, approximately follow the trend that obtained from DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade. For the (3, 2) mode, the saturated width Wsat˜0.8-1 cm, which is 3-4 times the ion banana width. Although the NTMs have a small effect on confinement degradation (δβ/β˜ a few percent), they have significant effect on plasma rotation. MC flow drive generates large toroidal rotation above 100 km/sec in L-mode, and when the plasma enters I-mode, plasma rotation is expected to increase significantly due to the additional intrinsic rotation torque from the edge Te pedestal. The appearance of the (3, 2) mode usually rapidly reduces the rotation speed, and the (2, 1) mode, if it occurs, would completely halt the rotation.

  1. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  2. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  3. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  4. Driving modes for designing the cornering response of fully electric vehicles with multiple motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Leonardo; Sorniotti, Aldo; Gruber, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Fully electric vehicles with multiple drivetrains allow a significant variation of the steady-state and transient cornering responses through the individual control of the electric motor drives. As a consequence, alternative driving modes can be created that provide the driver the option to select the preferred dynamic vehicle behavior. This article presents a torque-vectoring control structure based on the combination of feedforward and feedback contributions for the continuous control of vehicle yaw rate. The controller is specifically developed to be easily implementable on real-world vehicles. A novel model-based procedure for the definition of the control objectives is described in detail, together with the automated tuning process of the algorithm. The implemented control functions are demonstrated with experimental vehicle tests. The results show the possibilities of torque-vectoring control in designing the vehicle understeer characteristic.

  5. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%-70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  6. A modified integral sliding mode control to lateral stabilisation of 4-wheel independent drive electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Hasan; Bagher Bannae Sharifian, Mohammad; Sabahi, Mehran

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel sliding mode controller (SMC) and its application in the lateral stability control of a 4-wheel independent drive electric vehicle. The structure of the SMC is modified and online-tuned to ensure vehicle system stability, and to track the desired vehicle motion references when an in-wheel motor fault happens. The proposed controller is faster, more accurate, more robust, and with smaller chattering than common SMCs chatter. The effectiveness of the introduced approach is investigated through conducted simulations in the CARSIM and MATLAB software environments.

  7. Numerical study on the influence of electron cyclotron current drive on tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Mao, Aohua; Sun, Jizhong; Duan, Ping

    2014-10-15

    Controlling tearing modes by localized current drive is explored by using numerical simulation with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By examining the effects of different characteristics of driven current, such as density distribution, duration time, and deposition location, it is found that a driven current with larger magnitude and more focused deposition region shows a better suppression effect on the tearing modes. Meanwhile destabilizing effects are also observed when a driven current over a certain magnitude is applied continuously. In comparison with those on the X-point of the magnetic island, the results are better when the current deposition is targeted on the O-point. In addition, the timing control of the current deposition will be also addressed.

  8. Modeling of the influences of electron cyclotron current drive on neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Sun, Jizhong; Sun, Guanglan; Duan, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Influences of external current drive on neoclassical tearing modes are studied numerically with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By considering the effects of driven current parameters and its deposition timing, and by examining the relationship between driven current and the missing bootstrap current, the basic requirements of deposition width and external current density for effectively suppressing neoclassical tearing modes are investigated. When the driven current density is able to compensate the missing bootstrap current and the deposition region is comparable with the saturated island, the suppression results are notable. Meanwhile, the pre-emptive strategy of current deposition reported experimentally is also evaluated, and the results agree with the experimental ones that early current deposition can enhance suppression effectiveness greatly. In addition, the deficiencies of continuous driven current are discussed when the plasma rotation has been taken into account, and the application of modulated current drive, which is synchronized in phase with the rotating island, can restore the stabilizing role under some conditions. The favorable parameters of modulation such as duty cycle are also addressed.

  9. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method. PMID:24256977

  10. Mode 1 drive asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K. Edwards, M. J.; Hatchett, S.; Kritcher, A.; Lindl, J.; Munro, D.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Kilkenny, J.; Knauer, J.

    2014-04-15

    Mode 1 radiation drive asymmetry (pole-to-pole imbalance) at significant levels can have a large impact on inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This asymmetry distorts the cold confining shell and drives a high-speed jet through the hot spot. The perturbed hot spot shows increased residual kinetic energy and reduced internal energy, and it achieves reduced pressure and neutron yield. The altered implosion physics manifests itself in observable diagnostic signatures, especially the neutron spectrum which can be used to measure the neutron-weighted flow velocity, apparent ion temperature, and neutron downscattering. Numerical simulations of implosions with mode 1 asymmetry show that the resultant simulated diagnostic signatures are moved toward the values observed in many NIF experiments. The diagnostic output can also be used to build a set of integrated implosion performance metrics. The metrics indicate that P{sub 1} has a significant impact on implosion performance and must be carefully controlled in NIF implosions.

  11. Fabrication of a 2-DOF electromagnetic energy harvester with in-phase vibrational bandwidth broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Jui; Wu, Jia-Yin

    2016-09-01

    A vibration structure with two-degrees-of-freedom is proposed to increase the usable bandwidth of a micromachined electromagnetic energy harvester. Compared with the structure of a pure cantilever harvester, the proposed structure is formed by integrating a spiral diaphragm into a U-shaped cantilever diaphragm. By performing finite element analysis, the resonance frequencies of the two diaphragms are designed with a slight shift, both lower than 300 Hz. In addition, to achieve output bandwidth broadening, electroplated copper coils on the spiral and the U-shaped cantilever are coupled and the connection sequences of the coupled coils are arranged such that single- or duo-mode tuning of the energy harvester can be realized. The harvester delivers powers of 22.1 and 21.5 nW at two resonance frequencies of 211 and 274 Hz, respectively, in the duo-mode operation. The proposed spiral–cantilever coupled energy harvester has lower resonance frequencies and broader bandwidth than a pure cantilever-type harvester of equal area, and can therefore harvest more energy from the environment.

  12. Climatic dipoles drive two principal modes of North American boreal bird irruption

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Courtenay; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Betancourt, Julio L.; Koenig, Walter D.

    2015-01-01

    Pine Siskins exemplify normally boreal seed-eating birds that can be sparse or absent across entire regions of North America in one year and then appear in large numbers the next. These dramatic avian “irruptions” are thought to stem from intermittent but broadly synchronous seed production (masting) in one year and meager seed crops in the next. A prevalent hypothesis is that widespread masting in the boreal forest at high latitudes is driven primarily by favorable climate during the two to three consecutive years required to initiate and mature seed crops in most conifers. Seed production is expensive for trees and is much reduced in the years following masting, driving boreal birds to search elsewhere for food and overwintering habitat. Despite this plausible logic, prior efforts to discover climate-irruption relationships have been inconclusive. Here, analysis of more than 2 million Pine Siskin observations from Project FeederWatch, a citizen science program, reveals two principal irruption modes (North-South and West-East), both of which are correlated with climate variability. The North-South irruption mode is, in part, influenced by winter harshness, but the predominant climate drivers of both modes manifest in the warm season as continental-scale pairs of oppositely signed precipitation and temperature anomalies (i.e., dipoles). The climate dipoles juxtapose favorable and unfavorable conditions for seed production and wintering habitat, motivating a push-pull paradigm to explain irruptions of Pine Siskins and possibly other boreal bird populations in North America. PMID:25964328

  13. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guanglan Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  14. Climatic dipoles drive two principal modes of North American boreal bird irruption.

    PubMed

    Strong, Courtenay; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Betancourt, Julio L; Koenig, Walter D

    2015-05-26

    Pine Siskins exemplify normally boreal seed-eating birds that can be sparse or absent across entire regions of North America in one year and then appear in large numbers the next. These dramatic avian "irruptions" are thought to stem from intermittent but broadly synchronous seed production (masting) in one year and meager seed crops in the next. A prevalent hypothesis is that widespread masting in the boreal forest at high latitudes is driven primarily by favorable climate during the two to three consecutive years required to initiate and mature seed crops in most conifers. Seed production is expensive for trees and is much reduced in the years following masting, driving boreal birds to search elsewhere for food and overwintering habitat. Despite this plausible logic, prior efforts to discover climate-irruption relationships have been inconclusive. Here, analysis of more than 2 million Pine Siskin observations from Project FeederWatch, a citizen science program, reveals two principal irruption modes (North-South and West-East), both of which are correlated with climate variability. The North-South irruption mode is, in part, influenced by winter harshness, but the predominant climate drivers of both modes manifest in the warm season as continental-scale pairs of oppositely signed precipitation and temperature anomalies (i.e., dipoles). The climate dipoles juxtapose favorable and unfavorable conditions for seed production and wintering habitat, motivating a push-pull paradigm to explain irruptions of Pine Siskins and possibly other boreal bird populations in North America. PMID:25964328

  15. Electron-cyclotron wave propagation, absorption and current drive in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Tsironis, Christos; Vlahos, Loukas

    2012-09-01

    We analyze the propagation of electron-cyclotron waves, their absorption and current drive when neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), in the form of magnetic islands, are present in a tokamak plasma. So far, the analysis of the wave propagation and power deposition in the presence of NTMs has been performed mainly in the frame of an axisymmetric magnetic field, ignoring any effects from the island topology. Our analysis starts from an axisymmetric magnetic equilibrium, which is perturbed such as to exhibit magnetic islands. In this geometry, we compute the wave evolution with a ray-tracing code, focusing on the effect of the island topology on the efficiency of the absorption and current drive. To increase the precision in the calculation of the power deposition, the standard analytical flux-surface labeling for the island region has been adjusted from the usual cylindrical to toroidal geometry. The propagation up to the O-point is found to be little affected by the island topology, whereas the power absorbed and the driven current are significantly enhanced, because the resonant particles are bound to the small volumes in between the flux surfaces of the island. The consequences of these effects on the NTM evolution are investigated in terms of the modified Rutherford equation.

  16. Observation of ICRF Mode Conversion Plasma Flow Drive on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yijun

    2008-11-01

    Plasma flow driven by externally launched rf waves could be important in stabilizing micro- and macro-instabilities in tokamaks. We report the first observation of both toroidal (Vφ) and poloidal (Vθ) flows driven via an ICRF mode conversion (MC) process in D(^3He) plasmas. At modest ^3He levels (n3He/ne˜ 8%), in relatively low density plasmas, <= 1.3x10^20m-3, heated with 50 MHz rf power (Bt0˜ 5.1 T), strong Vφ in the co-current direction is observed by high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The central Vφ scales with the applied rf power (<= 30 km/s per MW), and is at least a factor of 2 more than the empirically determined intrinsic plasma rotation [1]. The rotation near the plasma center (r/a < 0.3) responds more quickly to the applied rf power than the outer region, indicative of a local flow drive source. Localized poloidal rotation (0.3 <= r/a <= 0.5) in the ion diamagnetic drift direction is observed when Prf >= 1.5 MW and increases with power (˜ 2 km/s at 3 MW). Turbulence spectrum broadening seen by a phase contrast imaging (PCI) system indicates strong flow also exists in the main ions. The mode converted ion cyclotron wave (MC ICW) is observed by PCI and confirmed by 2-D full wave TORIC code simulation. The simulation result shows that due to the up-shifted k||,the MC ICW is strongly damped on ^3He ions in the vicinity of the MC layer, approximately on the same flux surfaces where poloidal flow is observed. The involvement of ion heating and short-wavelength slow wave is consistent with theoretical considerations for efficient rf flow drive. Our experimental results are comparable to the predictions [2], assuming similar ion interaction mechanism for the MC ICW and direct launch ion Bernstein wave. The feasibility of ICRF flow drive on ITER will be discussed. [1] J. E. Rice, et al, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1618 (2007). [2] J. R. Myra and D. A. D'Ippolito, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3867 (2002).

  17. Complete stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes with lower hybrid current drive on COMPASS-D. RF teams.

    PubMed

    Warrick, C D; Buttery, R J; Cunningham, G; Fielding, S J; Hender, T C; Lloyd, B; Morris, A W; O'Brien, M R; Pinfold, T; Stammers, K; Valovic, M; Walsh, M; Wilson, H R

    2000-07-17

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with modest powers ( approximately 10% of the total power input) has been used for the first time to completely stabilize performance limiting neoclassical tearing modes in many COMPASS-D tokamak discharges. The stabilizing effect in these experiments is consistent with a reduction in the free energy available in the current profile to drive tearing modes (i.e., the stability index, delta(')) resulting from favorable current gradients (from the LHCD driven current) around the rational surface. PMID:10991343

  18. Neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D and calculations of the stabilizing effects of localized electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Bernabei, S.; Harvey, R. W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Lohr, J.; Perkins, F. W.; Wong, K.-L.

    1999-09-20

    Neoclassical tearing modes are found to limit the achievable beta in many high performance discharges in DIII-D. Electron cyclotron current drive within the magnetic islands formed as the tearing mode grows has been proposed as a means of stabilizing these modes or reducing their amplitude, thereby increasing the beta limit by a factor around 1.5. Some experimental success has been obtained previously on Asdex-U. Here we examine the parameter range in DIII-D in which this effect can best be studied. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D and calculations of the stabilizing effects of localized electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; La Haye, R.J.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Bernabei, S.; Perkins, F.W.; Wong, K.L.; Harvey, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes are found to limit the achievable beta in many high performance discharges in DIII-D. Electron cyclotron current drive within the magnetic islands formed as the tearing mode grows has been proposed as a means of stabilizing these modes or reducing their amplitude, thereby increasing the beta limit by a factor around 1.5. Some experimental success has been obtained previously on Asdex-U. Here the authors examine the parameter range in DIII-C in which this effect can best be studied.

  20. Observation of ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Rice, J E; Wukitch, S J; Greenwald, M J; Hubbard, A E; Ince-Cushman, A; Lin, L; Porkolab, M; Reinke, M L; Tsujii, N

    2008-12-01

    Strong toroidal flow (Vphi) and poloidal flow (Vtheta) have been observed in D-3He plasmas with ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) mode-conversion (MC) heating on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The toroidal flow scales with the rf power Prf (up to 30 km/s per MW), and is significantly larger than that in ICRF minority heated plasmas at the same rf power or stored energy. The central Vphi responds to Prf faster than the outer regions, and the Vphi(r) profile is broadly peaked for r/a < or =0.5. Localized (0.3 < or = r/a < or =0.5) Vtheta appears when Prf > or =1.5 MW and increases with power (up to 0.7 km/s per MW). The experimental evidence together with numerical wave modeling suggests a local flow drive source due to the interaction between the MC ion cyclotron wave and 3He ions. PMID:19113561

  1. Requirements on localized current drive for the suppression of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; De Lazzari, D.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-10-01

    A heuristic criterion for the full suppression of an NTM was formulated as ηNTM ≡ jCD,max/jBS >= 1.2 (Zohm et al 2005 J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 25 234), where jCD,max is the maximum in the driven current density profile applied to stabilize the mode and jBS is the local bootstrap current density. In this work we subject this criterion to a systematic theoretical analysis on the basis of the generalized Rutherford equation. Taking into account only the effect of jCD inside the island, a new criterion for full suppression by a minimum applied total current is obtained in the form of a maximum allowed value for the width of the driven current, wdep, combined with a required minimum for the total driven current in the form of wdepηNTM, where both limits depend on the marginal and saturated island sizes. These requirements can be relaxed when additional effects are taken into account, such as a change in the stability parameter Δ' from the current driven outside the island, power modulation, the accompanying heating inside the island or when the current drive is applied preemptively. When applied to ITER scenario 2, the requirement for full suppression of either the 3/2 or 2/1 NTM becomes wdep <~ 5 cm and wdepηNTM >~ 5 cm in agreement with (Sauter et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 025002). Optimization of the ITER ECRH Upper Port Launcher design towards minimum required power for full NTM suppression requires an increase in the toroidal injection angle of the lower steering mirror of several degrees compared with its present design value, while for the upper steering mirror the present design value is close to the optimum.

  2. Influence of Large-scale Climate Modes on Atmospheric Rivers That Drive Regional Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, B.; Molotch, N. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow channels of enhanced meridional water vapor transport between the tropics and extratropics that drive precipitation extremes in the west coast areas of North America and other continents. The influence of large-scale climate modes on ARs is analyzed in terms of modulation on AR frequency and AR-related snow water equivalent (SWE) anomalies, with a focus on understanding the causes of the anomalously snowy winter season of 2010/2011 in California's Sierra Nevada. Mean SWE on 1 April 2011 was ~70% above normal averaged over 100 snow sensors. AR occurrence was anomalously high during the season, with 20 AR dates from November to March and 14 dates in the month of December 2010, compared to the mean occurrence of 9 dates per season. Most of the season's ARs occurred during negative phases of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern. Analysis of all winter ARs in California during water years 1998-2011 indicates more ARs occur during the negative phase of AO and PNA, with the increase between positive and negative phases being ~90% for AO, and ~50% for PNA. The circulation pattern associated with concurrent negative phases of AO and PNA, characterized by cyclonic anomalies centered northwest of California, provides a favorable dynamical condition for ARs. The analysis suggests that the massive Sierra Nevada snowpack during the 2010/2011 winter season is primarily related to anomalously high frequency of ARs favored by the joint phasing of -AO and -PNA, and that a secondary contribution is from increased snow accumulation during these ARs favored by colder air temperatures associated with -AO, -PNA and La Niña. The results have implications for subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability of AR activities and related weather and water extremes.

  3. Plasmon and coupled plasmon-phonon modes in graphene in the presence of a driving electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C. X.; Xu, W.; Dong, H. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the plasmon and coupled plasmon-phonon modes induced by intraband electron-electron interaction in graphene in the presence of driving dc electric field. We find that the electric field dependence of these collective excitation modes in graphene differs significantly from that in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas with a parabolic energy spectrum. This is due mainly to the fact that graphene has a linear energy spectrum and the Fermi velocity of electrons in graphene is much larger than the drift velocity of electrons. The obtained results demonstrate that the plasmon and coupled plasmon-phonon modes in graphene can be tuned by applying not only the gate voltage but also the source-to-drain field. The manipulation of plasmon and coupled plasmon-phonon modes by source-to-drain voltage can let graphene be more conveniently applied as an advanced plasmonic material.

  4. A Driving Right Leg Circuit (DgRL) for Improved Common Mode Rejection in Bio-Potential Acquisition Systems.

    PubMed

    Guermandi, Marco; Scarselli, Eleonora Franchi; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a novel Driving Right Leg (DgRL) circuit designed to mitigate the effect of common mode signals deriving, say, from power line interferences. The DgRL drives the isolated ground of the instrumentation towards a voltage which is fixed with respect to the common mode potential on the subject, therefore minimizing common mode voltage at the input of the front-end. The paper provides an analytical derivation of the common mode rejection performances of DgRL as compared to the usual grounding circuit or Driven Right Leg (DRL) loop. DgRL is integrated in a bio-potential acquisition system to show how it can reduce the common mode signal of more than 70 dB with respect to standard patient grounding. This value is at least 30 dB higher than the reduction achievable with DRL, making DgRL suitable for single-ended front-ends, like those based on active electrodes. EEG signal acquisition is performed to show how the system can successfully cancel power line interference without any need for differential acquisition, signal post-processing or filtering. PMID:26285217

  5. Controlled optical high-order sidebands via bichromatic driving of a cavity mode detected by an undriven second cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Li, Jiahui; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2015-08-01

    We propose a scheme for optical high-order sideband generation and efficient sideband information transfer from one optical mode to the other in a hybrid system consisting of a quantum dot coupled to both modes of a lossy bimodal photonic crystal cavity. Here one mode of the cavity is coherently driven by a two-tone continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The influences of the system parameters including the cavity-waveguide coupling rate and all kinds of relative detunings on optical high-order sideband generation and transfer efficiency are discussed. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism and an experimental feasibility of the proposed bimodal cavity scheme are also presented. Due to an intrinsic highly multimode sideband structure in the proposed scheme, the ability to engineer and convert photons between different frequencies in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems, but also future integrated quantum networks.

  6. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, Annika Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  7. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, Annika; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at IP = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  8. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  9. Rotor reference frame models of a multiloop 2-phase motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes non-linear models of a 2-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes. The models account for everything from the main power bus up to and including the mechanical load and velocity feedback loop. In particular, the models include the power electronics for each phase complete with their internal feedback loops. Classical state space averaged power electronics models are transformed to the rotor reference frame along with the usual electromechanical variables. Since SPICE linearizes the rotor reference frame model about shaft velocity, instead of shaft angle, frequency domain methods apply. The frequency domain analysis detects unstable interactions between torque angle and deliberate feedback within the drives. Time domain simulations using stator reference frame models confirm the results. All models are SPICE-compatible but were developed on Cadence`s Analog Workbench.

  10. Driving of the solar p-modes by radiative pumping in the upper photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Emslie, A. G.; Moore, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that one viable driver of the solar p-modes is radiative pumping in the upper photosphere where the opacity is dominated by the negative hydrogen ion. This new option is suggested by the similar magnitudes of two energy flows that have been evaluated by independent empirical methods. The similarity indicates that the p-modes are radiatively pumped in the upper photosphere and therefore provide the required nonradiative cooling.

  11. High-order sliding mode control of a DC motor drive via a switched controlled multi-cellular converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djemaï, M.; Busawon, K.; Benmansour, K.; Marouf, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present a high-order sliding mode controller of a DC motor drive connected to a multi-cellular converter. More specifically, we design a second-order (super-twisting) control algorithm for the speed regulation of a DC motor. For this, a switching control for the multi-cellular converter is derived in order to supply the correct reference value for the speed regulation. A practical implementation of the controller is realised using a laboratory set-up. The performance and the validity of the controller are shown experimentally.

  12. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the "tokamak" concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of "H-mode" and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the "missing" current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM "seeding" instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a "wild card" may be broadening of the localized ECCD by the presence of

  13. Comparison of exhaust emissions resulting from cold- and hot-start motorcycle driving modes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Ye, Hui-Fen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the emissions of criteria air pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], hydrocarbons [HCs], and oxides of nitrogen [NOx]) from motorcycle exhaust at cold- and hot-start driving cycles on a chassis dynamometer. Seven four-stroke carburetors and two fuel-injection motorcycles were tested. As expected, the emission factors (g/km) of CO and HCs increased during cold-start driving. The ratio of emission factors (g/km) for cold- and hot-start driving cycles ranged from 1.1-1.5 (for CO) to 1.2-2.8 (for HCs). However, the difference of NOx emissions between the cold- and hot-start cycles was not pronounced. Further, the cold-/hot-start ratios of CO and HCs from 50-cm3 motorcycles were higher than those of 100- and 125-cm3 motorcycles; however, the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission was the lowest for the four-stroke motorcycles. High engine temperature and poor combustion efficiency of smaller cylinder-capacity motorcycles may contribute a significant amount of exhaust emission. Additionally, the fuel-base emission factor (g/L-fuel) ratios were low compared with the distance-base emission factor (g/km) in cold- and hot-start driving. This indicates that the effect of catalyst efficiency was greater than the effect of fuel combustion in the tested motorcycles. A comparison of emission ratios of motorcycles and passenger cars shows that the warm-up may be more important for cars, especially under low-temperature conditions. However, the motorcycle contributes a large proportion of CO and HC emissions in many Asian counties. The difference between cold- and hot-start emissions may affect inventory PMID:19947115

  14. Sulfur driven nucleation mode formation in diesel exhaust under transient driving conditions.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Panu; Rönkkö, Topi; Pirjola, Liisa; Heikkilä, Juha; Happonen, Matti; Arnold, Frank; Rothe, Dieter; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Keskinen, Jorma

    2014-02-18

    Sulfur driven diesel exhaust nucleation particle formation processes were studied in an aerosol laboratory, on engine dynamometers, and on the road. All test engines were equipped with a combination of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a partial diesel particulate filter (pDPF). At steady operating conditions, the formation of semivolatile nucleation particles directly depended on SO2 conversion in the catalyst. The nucleation particle emission was most significant after a rapid increase in engine load and exhaust gas temperature. Results indicate that the nucleation particle formation at transient driving conditions does not require compounds such as hydrocarbons or sulfated hydrocarbons, however, it cannot be explained only by the nucleation of sulfuric acid. A real-world exhaust study with a heavy duty diesel truck showed that the nucleation particle formation occurs even with ultralow sulfur diesel fuel, even at downhill driving conditions, and that nucleation particles can contribute 60% of total particle number emissions. In general, due to sulfur storage and release within the exhaust aftertreatment systems and transients in driving, emissions of nucleation particles can even be the dominant part of modern diesel vehicle exhaust particulate number emissions. PMID:24471707

  15. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  16. Solar wind: A possible factor driving the interannual sea surface temperature tripolar mode over North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ziniu; Li, Delin

    2016-06-01

    The effect of solar wind (SW) on the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) in boreal winter is examined through an analysis of observational data during 1964-2013. The North Atlantic SSTs show a pronounced meridional tripolar pattern in response to solar wind speed (SWS) variations. This pattern is broadly similar to the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of interannual variations in the wintertime SSTs over North Atlantic. The time series of this leading EOF mode of SST shows a significant interannual period, which is the same as that of wintertime SWS. This response also appears as a compact north-south seesaw of sea level pressure and a vertical tripolar structure of zonal wind, which simultaneously resembles the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the overlying atmosphere. As compared with the typical low SWS winters, during the typical high SWS winters, the stratospheric polar night jet (PNJ) is evidently enhanced and extends from the stratosphere to the troposphere, even down to the North Atlantic Ocean surface. Notably, the North Atlantic Ocean is an exclusive region in which the SW signal spreads downward from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Thus, it seems that the SW is a possible factor for this North Atlantic SST tripolar mode. The dynamical process of stratosphere-troposphere coupling, together with the global atmospheric electric circuit-cloud microphysical process, probably accounts for the particular downward propagation of the SW signal.

  17. Cold-mode Accretion: Driving the Fundamental Mass–Metallicity Relation at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; van de Voort, Freeke; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Allen, Rebecca J.; Alcorn, Leo; Cowley, Michael; Labbé, Ivo; Spitler, Lee; Straatman, Caroline; Tomczak, Adam

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) dependence on the stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity relation at z = 2 with MOSFIRE/Keck as part of the ZFIRE survey. We have identified 117 galaxies (1.98 ≤ z ≤ 2.56), with 8.9 ≤ log(M/M ⊙) ≤ 11.0, for which we can measure gas-phase metallicities. For the first time, we show a discernible difference between the mass–metallicity relation, using individual galaxies, when dividing the sample by low (<10 M ⊙ yr‑1) and high (>10 M ⊙ yr‑1) SFRs. At fixed mass, low star-forming galaxies tend to have higher metallicity than high star-forming galaxies. Using a few basic assumptions, we further show that the gas masses and metallicities required to produce the fundamental mass–metallicity relation and its intrinsic scatter are consistent with cold-mode accretion predictions obtained from the OWLS hydrodynamical simulations. Our results from both simulations and observations are suggestive that cold-mode accretion is responsible for the fundamental mass–metallicity relation at z = 2 and it demonstrates the direct relationship between cosmological accretion and the fundamental properties of galaxies.

  18. Non-linear effects in electron cyclotron current drive applied for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayten, B.; Westerhof, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    Due to the smallness of the volumes associated with the flux surfaces around the O-point of a magnetic island, the electron cyclotron power density applied inside the island for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can exceed the threshold for non-linear effects as derived previously by Harvey et al (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 426). We study the non-linear electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency through bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations in the magnetic geometry as created by the islands. The calculations are performed for the parameters of a typical NTM stabilization experiment on ASDEX Upgrade. A particular feature of these experiments is that the rays of the EC wave beam propagate tangential to the flux surfaces in the power deposition region. The calculations show significant non-linear effects on the ECCD efficiency, when the ECCD power is increased from its experimental value of 1 MW to a larger value of 4 MW. The nonlinear effects are largest in the case of locked islands or when the magnetic island rotation period is longer than the collisional time scale. The non-linear effects result in an overall reduction of the current drive efficiency for this case with absorption of the EC power on the low-field side of the electron cyclotron resonance layer. As a consequence of the non-linear effects, also the stabilizing effect of the ECCD on the island is reduced from linear expectations.

  19. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  20. Volatile properties of particles emitted by compressed natural gas and diesel buses during steady-state and transient driving modes.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Meyer, N K; Ristovski, Z D; Morawska, L

    2012-01-01

    Volatile properties of particle emissions from four compressed natural gas (CNG) and four diesel buses were investigated under steady-state and transient driving modes on a chassis dynamometer. The exhaust was diluted utilizing a full-flow continuous volume sampling system and passed through a thermodenuder at controlled temperature. Particle number concentration and size distribution were measured with a condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer, respectively. We show that while almost all the particles emitted by the CNG buses were in the nanoparticle size range, at least 85% and 98% were removed at 100 and 250 °C, respectively. Closer analysis of the volatility of particles emitted during transient cycles showed that volatilization began at around 40 °C, with the majority occurring by 80 °C. Particles produced during hard acceleration from rest exhibited lower volatility than those produced during other times of the cycle. On the basis of our results and the observation of ash deposits on the walls of the tailpipes, we suggest that these nonvolatile particles were composed mostly of ash from lubricating oil. Heating the diesel bus emissions to 100 °C removed ultrafine particle numbers by 69-82% when a nucleation mode was present and just 18% when it was not. PMID:22107263

  1. Distinct Pose of Discodermolide in Taxol Binding Pocket Drives a Complementary Mode of Microtubule Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in β-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in β-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and towards the N-terminal H1–S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the α-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent β-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo. PMID:19863156

  2. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-01

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  3. INCREASED STABLE BETA IN DIII-D BY SUPPRESSION OF A NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE AND ACTIVE FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    LAHAYE,RJ; HUMPHREYS,DA; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PERKINS,FW; PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 INCREASED STABLE BETA IN DIII-D BY SUPPRESSION OF A NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE AND ACTIVE FEEDBACK. In DIII-D, the first real-time active control of the electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of a neoclassical tearing mode (here m/n=3/2) is demonstrated. The plasma control system is put into a search and suppress mode to align the ECCD with the island by making either small rigid radial position shifts (of order 1 cm) of the entire plasma (and thus the island) or small changes in toroidal field (of order 0.5%) which radially moves the second harmonic resonance location (and thus the rf current drive). The optimum position minimizes the real-time mode amplitude signal and stabilization occurs despite changes in island location from discharge-to-discharge or from time-to-time. When the neutral beam heating power is programmed to rise after mode suppression by the ECCD, the plasma pressure increases above the peak at the onset of the neoclassical tearing mode until the magnetic island reappears due to the ECCD no longer being on the optimal position. Real-time tracking of the change in location of q=3/2 due to the Shafranov shift with increasing beta is necessary to position the ECCD in the absence of a mode so that higher stable beta can be sustained. The control techniques developed for the m/n=3/2 NTM are also being applied to the more deleterious m/n-2/1 NTM. For the first time in any tokamak, an m/n=2/1 mode has been completely suppressed using radially localized off-axis ECCD.

  4. State-of-the-art neoclassical tearing mode control in DIII-D using real-time steerable electron cyclotron current drive launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolemen, E.; Welander, A. S.; La Haye, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lohr, J.; Noraky, V.; Penaflor, B. G.; Prater, R.; Turco, F.

    2014-07-01

    Real-time steerable electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been demonstrated to reduce the power requirements and time needed to remove 3/2 and 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the DIII-D tokamak. In a world first demonstration of the techniques required in ITER, the island formation onset is detected automatically, gyrotrons are turned on and the real-time steerable ECCD launcher mirrors are moved promptly to drive current at the location of the islands. This shrinks and suppresses the modes well before saturation using real-time motional Stark effect constrained equilibria reconstruction with advanced feedback and search algorithms to target the deposition. In ITER, this method will reduce the ECCD energy requirement and so raise Q by keeping the EC system off when the NTM is not present. Further, in the experiments with accurate tracking of pre-emptive ECCD to resonant surfaces, both 3/2 and 2/1 modes are prevented from appearing with much lower ECCD peak power than required for removal of a saturated mode.

  5. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  6. Supermode noise suppression in an actively mode-locked fiber laser with pulse intensity feed-forward and a dual-drive MZM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Li, Jianqiang; Ji, Yuefeng; Lin, Jintong

    2013-05-01

    The supermode noise in an actively mode-locked fiber laser is suppressed for the first time by a so-called pulse-intensity-feed-forward technique. In this novel scheme, the optical pulse is firstly converted into an electronic signal, and then fed forward to a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM), where the optical pulse is modulated by the reversed intensity profile of itself. In a 12.5 m long actively mode-locked fiber ring laser experiment, the resulting power limiting shows a stable 10 GHz optical pulse train with a supermode-suppression ratio larger than 81 dB. The phase noise and pulse-to-pulse timing jitter are below -141 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz and 22.1 fs, respectively. Compared with the conventional fiber-nonlinearity-based power limiting schemes, our proposal is compact and stable.

  7. Reduction of Common-Mode Conducted Noise Emissions in PWM Inverter-fed AC Motor Drive Systems using Optimized Passive EMI Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jettanasen, C.; Ngaopitakkul, A.

    2010-10-01

    Conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by PWM inverter-fed induction motor drive systems, which are currently widely used in many industrial and/or avionic applications, causes severe parasitic current problems, especially at high frequencies (HF). These restrict power electronic drive's evolution. In order to reduce or minimize these EMI problems, several techniques can be applied. In this paper, insertion of an optimized passive EMI filter is proposed. This filter is optimized by taking into account real impedances of each part of a considered AC motor drive system contrarily to commercial EMI filters designed by considering internal impedance of disturbance source and load, equal to 50Ω. Employing the latter EMI filter would make EMI minimization less effective. The proposed EMI filter optimization is mainly dedicated to minimize common mode (CM) currents due to its most dominant effects in this kind of system. The efficiency of the proposed optimization method using two-port network approach is deduced by comparing the minimized CM current spectra to an applied normative level (ex. DO-160D in aeronautics).

  8. Using Multiple Youth Programming Delivery Modes to Drive the Development of Social Capital in 4-H Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on how 4-H youth participants are building social capital, or connections among individuals and community members, through their 4-H experiences. These experiences can be seen through the lens of such 4-H delivery modes as the traditional 4-H club, after-school programs, and school enrichment programs. In addition, other…

  9. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  10. Engineering non-linear resonator mode interactions in circuit QED by continuous driving: Manipulation of a photonic quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagor, Matthew; Pfaff, Wolfgang; Heeres, Reinier; Ofek, Nissim; Chou, Kevin; Blumoff, Jacob; Leghtas, Zaki; Touzard, Steven; Sliwa, Katrina; Holland, Eric; Albert, Victor V.; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in circuit QED have shown great potential for using microwave resonators as quantum memories. In particular, it is possible to encode the state of a quantum bit in non-classical photonic states inside a high-Q linear resonator. An outstanding challenge is to perform controlled operations on such a photonic state. We demonstrate experimentally how a continuous drive on a transmon qubit coupled to a high-Q storage resonator can be used to induce non-linear dynamics of the resonator. Tailoring the drive properties allows us to cancel or enhance non-linearities in the system such that we can manipulate the state stored in the cavity. This approach can be used to either counteract undesirable evolution due to the bare Hamiltonian of the system or, ultimately, to perform logical operations on the state encoded in the cavity field. Our method provides a promising pathway towards performing universal control for quantum states stored in high-coherence resonators in the circuit QED platform.

  11. Using multiple youth programming delivery modes to drive the development of social capital in 4-H participants.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Sharon

    2013-06-01

    This article focuses on how 4-H youth participants are building social capital, or connections among individuals and community members, through their 4-H experiences. These experiences can be seen through the lens of such 4-H delivery modes as the traditional 4-H club, after-school programs, and school enrichment programs. In addition, other experiences such as leadership camps and conferences or activities in the local community afford youth the opportunity to build the relationships, trust, and respect reflective of social capital. Examples are derived from 4-H program participants-urban, suburban and rural youth-in Camden County, New Jersey. PMID:23878086

  12. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet. PMID:12656403

  14. Sliding-mode control of a six-phase series/parallel connected two induction motors drive.

    PubMed

    Abjadi, Navid R

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a parallel configuration is proposed for two quasi six-phase induction motors (QIMs) to feed them from a single six-phase voltage source inverter (VSI). A direct torque control (DTC) based on input-output feedback linearization (IOFL) combined with sliding mode (SM) control is used for each QIM in stationary reference frame. In addition, an adaptive scheme is employed to solve the motor resistances mismatching problem. The effectiveness and capability of the proposed method are shown by practical results obtained for two QIMs in series/parallel connections supplied from a single VSI. The decoupling control of QIMs and the feasibility of their torque and flux control are investigated. Moreover, a complete comparison between series and parallel connections of two QIMs is given. PMID:25264286

  15. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  16. Type-1 and Type-2 Fuzzy Logic and Sliding-Mode Based Speed Control of Direct Torque and Flux Control Induction Motor Drives - A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Tejavathu; Panda, A. K.; Kumar, S. Shiva

    2013-08-01

    In this research study, the performance of direct torque and flux control induction motor drive (IMD) is presented using five different speed control techniques. The performance of IMD mainly depends on the design of speed controller. The PI speed controller requires precise mathematical model, continuous and appropriate gain values. Therefore, adaptive control based speed controller is desirable to achieve high-performance drive. The sliding-mode speed controller (SMSC) is developed to achieve continuous control of motor speed and torque. Furthermore, the type-1 fuzzy logic speed controller (T1FLSC), type-1 fuzzy SMSC and a new type-2 fuzzy logic speed controller are designed to obtain high performance, dynamic tracking behaviour, speed accuracy and also robustness to parameter variations. The performance of each control technique has been tested for its robustness to parameter uncertainties and load disturbances. The detailed comparison of different control schemes are carried out in a MATALB/Simulink environment at different speed operating conditions, such as, forward and reversal motoring under no-load, load and sudden change in speed.

  17. Polarization-dependent force driving the Eg mode in bismuth under optical excitation: comparison of first-principles theory with ultra-fast x-ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, Stephen; Murray, Eamonn

    2015-03-01

    Using first principles electronic structure methods, we calculate the induced force on the Eg (zone centre transverse optical) phonon mode in bismuth immediately after absorption of a ultrafast pulse of polarized light. To compare the results with recent ultra-fast, time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we include the decay of the force due to carrier scattering, as measured in optical Raman scattering experiments, and simulate the optical absorption process, depth-dependent atomic driving forces, and x-ray diffraction in the experimental geometry. We find excellent agreement between the theoretical predictions and the observed oscillations of the x-ray diffraction signal, indicating that first-principles theory of optical absorption is well suited to the calculation of initial atomic driving forces in photo-excited materials following ultrafast excitation. This work is supported by Science Foundation Ireland (Grant No. 12/IA/1601) and EU Commission under the Marie Curie Incoming International Fellowships (Grant No. PIIF-GA-2012-329695).

  18. Advanced control of neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D with real-time steering of the electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welander, A. S.; Kolemen, E.; La Haye, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lohr, J.; Noraky, S.; Penaflor, B. G.; Prater, R.; Turco, F.

    2013-12-01

    The system for controlling neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in DIII-D now catches the NTM the moment it becomes unstable by turning on the stabilizing electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and promptly bringing it back to stable before it has grown to a large size. Between NTMs, the ECCD can be turned off to save power, which will improve the fusion gain, Q, when used in ITER. This technique, named ‘catch and subdue’ (C&S), has been made possible by several advancements over the years at DIII-D. Firstly, ECCD must be very accurately aligned to the NTM; this is achieved by algorithms that probe how the NTM responds to changes in the alignment. Secondly, the alignment must be maintained even when the NTM is gone so that the ECCD will immediately stabilize when turned on in response to a new NTM. This is made possible by real-time equilibrium reconstructions that include measurements of the motional Stark effect and by a refraction estimator. Thirdly, real-time steerable mirrors are now fast and accurate actuators for the alignment adjustments. Fourthly, early NTM detection is made possible by a real-time mode analysis that filters noise to minimize false positives. These various control elements will be described and followed by a discussion of the further development needed for NTM control on ITER.

  19. Observation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion plasma flow drive on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lin, L.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Tsujii, N.; Wright, J. C.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-05-01

    At modest H3e levels (n3He/ne˜8%-12%), in relatively low density D(H3e) plasmas, n¯e≤1.3×1020 m-3, heated with 50 MHz rf power at Bt0˜5.1 T, strong (up to 90 km/s) toroidal rotation (Vϕ) in the cocurrent direction has been observed by high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod. The change in central Vϕ scales with the applied rf power (≤30 km s-1 MW-1), and is generally at least a factor of 2 higher than the empirically determined intrinsic plasma rotation scaling. The rotation in the inner plasma (r /a≤0.3) responds to the rf power more quickly than that of the outer region (r /a≥0.7), and the rotation profile is broadly peaked for r /a≤0.5. Localized poloidal rotation (0.3≤r/a≤0.6) in the ion diamagnetic drift direction (˜2 km/s at 3 MW) is also observed, and similarly increases with rf power. Changing the toroidal phase of the antenna does not affect the rotation direction, and it only weakly affects the rotation magnitude. The mode converted ion cyclotron wave (MC ICW) has been detected by a phase contrast imaging system and the MC process is confirmed by two-dimensional full wave TORIC simulations. The simulations also show that the MC ICW is strongly damped on H3e ions in the vicinity of the MC layer, approximately on the same flux surfaces where the rf driven flow is observed. The flow shear in our experiment is marginally sufficient for plasma confinement enhancement based on the comparison of the E ×B shearing rate and gyrokinetic linear stability analysis.

  20. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M/N = 2/1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING RADIALLY LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ITER

    SciTech Connect

    LAHAYE,RJ; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PERKINS,FW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-07-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M/N = 2/1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING RADIALLY LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ITER. DIII-D experiments demonstrate the first real-time feedback control of the relative location of a narrow beam of microwaves to completely suppress and eliminate a growing tearing mode at the q = 2 surface. long wavelength tearing modes such as the m/n = 2/1 instability are particularly deleterious to tokamak operation. Confinement is seriously degraded by the island, plasma rotation can cease (mode-lock) and disruption can occur. The neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) becomes unstable due to the presence of a helically-perturbed bootstrap current and can be stabilized by replacing the missing bootstrap current in the island O-point by precisely located co-electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). The optimum position is found when the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) is put into a search and suppress mode that makes small radial shifts (in about 1 cm steps) in the ECCD location based on minimizing the Mirnov amplitude. Requirements for ITER are addressed.

  1. Study on H-mode access at low density with lower hybrid current drive and lithium-wall coatings on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Shan, J. F.; Li, H.; Mansfield, D. K.; Humphreys, D. A.; Naulni, V.; EAST Team International Collaborators

    2011-07-01

    The first high-confinement mode (H-mode) with type-III edge localized modes at an H factor of HIPB98(y,2) ~ 1 has been obtained with about 1 MW lower hybrid wave power on the EAST superconducting tokamak. The first H-mode plasma appeared after wall conditioning by lithium (Li) evaporation before plasma breakdown and the real-time injection of fine Li powder into the plasma edge. The threshold power for H-mode access follows the international tokamak scaling even in the low density range and a threshold in density has been identified. With increasing accumulation of deposited Li the H-mode duration was gradually extended up to 3.6 s corresponding to ~30 confinement times, limited only by currently attainable durations of the plasma current flat top. Finally, it was observed that neutral density near the lower X-point was progressively reduced by a factor of 4 with increasing Li accumulation, which is considered the main mechanism for the H-mode power threshold reduction by the Li wall coatings.

  2. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE m/n=2/1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING RADIALLY LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ITER

    SciTech Connect

    LA HAYE,RJ; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PERKINS,FW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 DIII-D experiments demonstrate the first real-time feedback control of the relative location of a narrow beam of microwaves to completely suppress and eliminate a growing tearing mode at the q=2 surface. long wavelength tearing modes such as the m/n = 2/1 instability are particularly deleterious to tokamak operation. Confinement is seriously degraded by the island, plasma rotation can cease (mode-lock) and disruption can occur. The neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) becomes unstable due to the presence of a helically-perturbed bootstrap current and can be stabilized by replacing the missing bootstrap current in the island O-point by precisely located co-electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). The geometry for the ECCD launch, the second harmonic resonance 2f{sub ce} and the q=2 surface are shown. The optimum position is found when the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) is put into a search and suppress mode that makes small radial shifts (in about 1 cm steps) in the ECCD location based on minimizing the Mirnov amplitude.

  3. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving stylesmore » in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.« less

  4. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  5. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors BAC Effects Prevention Additional Resources How big is the problem? In 2014, 9,967 people ... Driving: A Threat to Everyone (October 2011) Additional Data Drunk Driving State Data and Maps Motor Vehicle ...

  6. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  7. Shear-Mode-Based Cantilever Driving Low-Frequency Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Using 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhou; Ren, Bo; Gai, Linlin; Zhao, Xiangyong; Luo, Haosu; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Energy harvesting from external mechanical excitation has become a hot interest area, and relaxor piezoelectric single crystal ( 1 - x )Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3- x PbTiO3 (PMN- x PT or PMN-PT) has attracted continuous attention due to the well-known ultrahigh shear-mode electromechanical response. To exploit the low-frequency application of excellent shear-mode performance of the PMN-PT single crystal, we proposed a Shear-mode-based CANtilever Driving Low-frequency Energy harvester. The device is composed of two symmetrically assembled sandwich structures and a cantilever, in which sandwich structures can be driven by the cantilever. An analytical method was used to illustrate the high output mechanism, and a finite-element method model of the device was also established to optimize the generated electric energy in this device. The electrical properties of the device under different excitation frequencies and load resistances were studied systematically. The maximum voltage and power density at resonance frequency (43.8 Hz) were measured to be 60.8 V and 10.8 mW/cm(3) under a proof mass of 13.5 g, respectively. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the considerable potential of the resonance-excited shear-mode energy harvester applied to wireless sensors and low-power portable electronics. PMID:27244735

  8. Monolithic integration of enhancement-mode vertical driving transistorson a standard InGaN/GaN light emitting diode structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xing; Liu, Chao; Jiang, Huaxing; Zou, Xinbo; Zhang, Anping; Lau, Kei May

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, monolithic integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) with vertical metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (VMOSFET) drivers have been proposed and demonstrated. The VMOSFET was achieved by simply regrowing a p- and n-GaN bilayer on top of a standard LED structure. After fabrication, the VMOSFET is connected with the LED through the conductive n-GaN layer, with no need of extra metal interconnections. The junction-based VMOSFET is inherently an enhancement-mode (E-mode) device with a threshold voltage of 1.6 V. By controlling the gate bias of the VMOSFET, the light intensity emitted from the integrated VMOSFET-LED device could be well modulated, which shows great potential for various applications, including solid-state lighting, micro-displays, and visible light communications.

  9. Evaluation on two-port configuration of a Lamé-mode octagonal microelectromechanical systems resonator driven by sliding driving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujishita, Katsuhiro; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Furutsuka, Takashi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we report significant improvements for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonators. In our previous work, the reduction in gap between a driving electrode (DE) and a resonant plate was achieved by sliding DEs, showing a clear resonance at 12 MHz. However, it needed a large pull-in voltage and an elaborate measurement technique. In this study, we design soft springs for DEs and evaluate a two-port configuration to cancel feedthrough current. Measurement results show that the pull-in voltage is successfully decreased by one-third that for the previous resonator and a resonance is observed in a fabricated two-port circuit. Such a pull-in voltage can be sufficiently generated from a 2.5 V source in combination with a charge pump circuit. These results are useful for adopting the MEMS resonators to real applications.

  10. Mobile air quality studies (MAQS) in inner cities: particulate matter PM10 levels related to different vehicle driving modes and integration of data into a geographical information program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Particulate matter (PM) is assumed to exert a major burden on public health. Most studies that address levels of PM use stationary measure systems. By contrast, only few studies measure PM concentrations under mobile conditions to analyze individual exposure situations. Methods By combining spatial-temporal analysis with a novel vehicle-mounted sensor system, the present Mobile Air Quality Study (MAQS) aimed to analyse effects of different driving conditions in a convertible vehicle. PM10 was continuously monitored in a convertible car, driven with roof open, roof closed, but windows open, or windows closed. Results PM10 values inside the car were nearly always higher with open roof than with roof and windows closed, whereas no difference was seen with open or closed windows. During the day PM10 values varied with high values before noon, and occasional high median values or standard deviation values due to individual factors. Vehicle speed in itself did not influence the mean value of PM10; however, at traffic speed (10 – 50 km/h) the standard deviation was large. No systematic difference was seen between PM10 values in stationary and mobile cars, nor was any PM10 difference observed between driving within or outside an environmental (low emission) zone. Conclusions The present study has shown the feasibility of mobile PM analysis in vehicles. Individual exposure of the occupants varies depending on factors like time of day as well as ventilation of the car; other specific factors are clearly identifiably and may relate to specific PM10 sources. This system may be used to monitor individual exposure ranges and provide recommendations for preventive measurements. Although differences in PM10 levels were found under certain ventilation conditions, these differences are likely not of concern for the safety and health of passengers. PMID:23031208

  11. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  12. The role of defoliation and root rot pathogen infection in driving the mode of drought-related physiological decline in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguadé, D; Poyatos, R; Gómez, M; Oliva, J; Martínez-Vilalta, J

    2015-03-01

    Drought-related tree die-off episodes have been observed in all vegetated continents. Despite much research effort, however, the multiple interactions between carbon starvation, hydraulic failure and biotic agents in driving tree mortality under field conditions are still not well understood. We analysed the seasonal variability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in four organs (leaves, branches, trunk and roots), the vulnerability to embolism in roots and branches, native embolism (percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC)) in branches and the presence of root rot pathogens in defoliated and non-defoliated individuals in a declining Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) population in the NE Iberian Peninsula in 2012, which included a particularly dry and warm summer. No differences were observed between defoliated and non-defoliated pines in hydraulic parameters, except for a higher vulnerability to embolism at pressures below -2 MPa in roots of defoliated pines. No differences were found between defoliation classes in branch PLC. Total NSC (TNSC, soluble sugars plus starch) values decreased during drought, particularly in leaves. Defoliation reduced TNSC levels across tree organs, especially just before (June) and during (August) drought. Root rot infection by the fungal pathogen Onnia P. Karst spp. was detected but it did not appear to be associated to tree defoliation. However, Onnia infection was associated with reduced leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity and sapwood depth, and thus contributed to hydraulic impairment, especially in defoliated pines. Infection was also associated with virtually depleted root starch reserves during and after drought in defoliated pines. Moreover, defoliated and infected trees tended to show lower basal area increment. Overall, our results show the intertwined nature of physiological mechanisms leading to drought-induced mortality and the inherent difficulty of isolating their contribution under field conditions. PMID

  13. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (more » $${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$), image-to-image timing ($${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$$ ps) and absolute timing ($${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of$${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$and an error in velocity of$${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  14. Distracted Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... combines all three types of distraction. 3 How big is the problem? Deaths In 2013, 3,154 ... European countries. More A CDC study analyzed 2011 data on distracted driving, including talking on a cell ...

  15. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay safe with a cell phone in the car. ... for Disease Control and Prevention Injury Prevention & Control. Motor Vehicle Safety. www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving . Accessed May ...

  16. Driving Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... drivers’ flexibility and coordination, and reduced driving errors. S l Hand grip strengthening to help you hold on to the steering wheel l Shoulder and upper arm flexibility exercises to make ...

  17. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Drives Differentiation of Human and Murine Dendritic Cells from a Pro- into an Anti-Inflammatory Mode

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Romana; Valookaran, Sneha; Knapp, Natalie; Vizzardelli, Caterina; Dohnal, Alexander M.; Felzmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) coordinates innate and adaptive immunity to fight infections and cancer. Our observations reveal that DCs exposed to the microbial danger signal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) acquire a continuously changing activation/maturation phenotype. The DCs’ initial mode of action is pro-inflammatory via up-regulation among others of the signaling molecule interleukin (IL) 12, which polarizes IFN-γ secreting type 1 helper T-cells (Th1). Within 24 hours the same DC switches from the pro- into an anti-inflammatory phenotype. This is mediated by autocrine IL-10 release and secretion of soluble IL-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2RA) molecules. T-cells, when contacted with DCs during their anti-inflammatory phase loose their proliferative capacity and develop regulatory T-cell (Treg) -like anti-inflammatory functions indicated by IL-10 secretion and elevated FoxP3 levels. Studying the kinetics of IL-12 and IL-10 expression from LPS/IFN-γ activated myeloid DCs on a single cell level confirmed these observations. When T-cells are separated from DCs within 24 hours, they are spared from the anti-inflammatory DC activity. We conclude that, in addition to differentiation of DCs into distinct subsets, the observed sequential functional phases of DC differentiation permit the fine-tuning of an immune response. A better understanding of time-kinetic DC features is required for optimally exploiting the therapeutic capacity of DCs in cancer immune therapy. PMID:23408948

  19. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic £elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi£cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  20. 'Hybrid-PLEMO', rehabilitation system for upper limbs with active / passive force feedback mode.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Jin, Ying; Fukushima, Kazuki; Akai, Hiroki; Furusho, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Several rehabilitation robots for upper limbs have been proposed so far, and clinical effectiveness was reported in several studies for the aged people or patients with stroke. However most of them have only 2-DOF for its active motion. It is important for designing a rehabilitation system which trains in the 3-DOF space because the upper limbs of humans works in 3-DOF space even expect for the wrist. We developed the quasi 3-DOF rehabilitation system which has 2-DOF force-feedback function in working plane but its working plane can be adjusted the inclination. And we named it Hybrid-PLEMO for it can be switched between active type and passive type. Hybrid-PLEMO is a compact, low-cost rehabilitation system for upper limbs with high safety by using ER brakes or ER actuators. Additionally, in Hybrid-PLEMO, we take direct-drive linkage mechanism by adding sub links. In this paper, we describe the mechanism and haptic control of Hybrid-PLEMO. PMID:19163078

  1. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... not drive at times of the day when traffic is heaviest. Do not drive when the weather is bad. Do not drive long distances. Drive only on roads the person is used to. Caregivers should try to lessen ...

  2. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  3. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Silva, Rafael R C; Rubel, Oleg; Curiel, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  4. The onset of driving phobias.

    PubMed

    Munjack, D J

    1984-12-01

    Thirty driving phobics who called the Psychiatry Outpatient Phobia Clinic (25 females and five males) were given a 20-min semi-standardized telephone interview during which they were asked about the circumstances of the onset of their driving fears. Twelve (40%) reported that their fears were precipitated by a panic attack on the freeway; six (20%) by a collision; and three (10%) by other frightening experiences in automobiles. Four (13.3%) related the onset to family stress or upheaval. Other modes of onset also occurred. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of existing theories of fear acquisition and treatment approaches. PMID:6526942

  5. Motion Response of 2 DOF Circular Cylinder in Bundle Arrangment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Hendik; Nguyen, Vinh Tan

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the motion response of a freely vibrating in streamwise and crossflow circular cylinder in the wake of two leading stationary circular cylinders. Studies on the effects of spatial positioning of the trailing circular cylinder to its amplitude and frequency response are conducted. In order to explain the effects of mass ratio and phase angle on the motion response of the structure, analytical model based on tandem cylinder arrangement are presented. For almost all reduced velocities, the results indicated larger crossflow amplitude of oscillation as the trailing cylinder is aligned to the centerline of one of the leading circular cylinder. Two dominant response frequencies are found on the trailing circular cylinder. Switching between the two response frequencies as the dominant response frequency is found to be strongly related to the natural frequency of the system. Additionally, the mass ratio played a significant role in determining the intermittent domination of the Vortex-Induced Vibrating (VIV) frequency of the structure. For low mass ratio, larger mass ratio is found to increase its amplitude of oscillation.

  6. Self-driving capacitive cantilevers for high-frequency atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Yang, Benjamin H.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to actuate an atomic force microscope cantilever at high frequencies by electrically driving a thin-film capacitor on its surface. Capacitive driving directly actuates the vibrational mode of the cantilever, removing the effects of unwanted mechanical modes present in conventional driving systems and removing the need for a drive piezoelectric. Practical vibration amplitudes are attainable at drive voltages <5 V. We capacitively drive the first mechanical resonance of a tapping mode cantilever (243 kHz) and a high-frequency cantilever (1.5 MHz) with vibration amplitudes in agreement with our model of capacitive driving.

  7. Sliding mode control of a spherical haptic device featuring electrorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Min; Nguyen, Hung Quoc; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents force-feedback control performance of a new type of haptic device featuring spherical geometry and smart materials that can be used for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). A spherical electrorheological (ER) joint is designed and optimized based on the mathematical torque modeling. Force response of the manufactured ER joint is then experimentally evaluated. Subsequently, the 2-DOF force-feedback device is manufactured by integrating the spherical ER joint with AC motor. In order to achieve desired force trajectories of the haptic device, a sliding mode controller (SMC), which is robust to uncertainty, is formulated and experimentally realized. Tracking control performances for various force trajectories are presented in time domain, and their tracking errors are evaluated.

  8. Extended Driving Impairs Nocturnal Driving Performances

    PubMed Central

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Åkerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3–5am, 1–5am and 9pm–5am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [±SD] = 23.4 [±1.7] years) participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC) in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3–5am) driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05) for the intermediate (1–5am) driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001) for the long (9pm–5am) driving session. Compared to the reference session (9–10pm), the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001), 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001) and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001), respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05) and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01). At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited. PMID:18941525

  9. Electrical drive for automobile

    SciTech Connect

    Fobbs, H.

    1980-09-16

    Electrical apparatus for driving an automobile is described that is comprised of a dc motor operationally connected to the rear axle through a drive shaft with the motor energized from storage batteries and recharged from alternators coupled to the drive shaft adjacent a clutch at the rear end of the automobile through an auxiliary drive shaft.

  10. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  11. Solar array drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Sturman, J. C.; Stanhouse, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A solar array drive system consisting of a solar array drive mechanism and the corresponding solar array drive electronics is being developed. The principal feature of the solar array drive mechanism is its bidirectional capability which enables its use in mechanical redundancy. The solar array drive system is of a widely applicable design. This configuration will be tested to determine its acceptability for generic mission sets. Foremost of the testing to be performed is the testing for extended duration.

  12. Coupled-Mode Flutter of a Cleaning Blade System in a Laser Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasama, Minoru; Yoshizawa, Masatsugu; Yu, Yimei; Itoh, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Yoshiaki

    This paper discusses a mechanism of a self-excited vibration of a cleaning blade in a laser printer. We present a coupled-mode flutter model using a finite element model. A stability analysis based on the proposed model is carried out. From this result, it is clarified that two modes couple each other with increasing coefficient of friction. At that time, the natural frequency of the coupled-mode is corresponding to the frequency of the self-excited vibration. This root locus reveals a typical argand diagram for coupled-mode flutter of an undamped system via so-called Hamiltonian-Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, we discuss about the steady-state amplitude of the self-excited vibration. First, we present a nonlinear amplitude equation by extracting the unstable modes with introduction of the adjoint vector to the eigenvector of the system. Second, from consideration about the nonlinear term which is able to restrain an increasing of amplitude, we decide the nonlinear term referring to the Rayleigh's equation. Then, the unstable mode solution obtained by the method of multiple scales is reconstructed in 2-DOF system by referring to Herrmann and Roussellet's method in pipes conveying fluid. Finally, we present the theoretical equation of the steady-state amplitude. We reveal a validity of our study by a comparison between an experiment and a numerical simulation of some modified blades.

  13. Novel method for driving the ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoung woo; Dong, Shuxiang; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Uchino, Kenji; Park, Tae gone

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports a novel driving method for an annular plate-type ultrasonic motor. Instead of the direct current/alternating current (DC/AC) converter type driver using conventional electromagnetic transformer, a compact disc-type piezoelectric transformer is used to obtain high voltage output for driving the ultrasonic motor. The piezoelectric transformer is operated in the radial vibration mode at resonance frequency close to the resonance frequency of the ultrasonic motor. Later, it was found that the piezoelectric transformer could drive the ultrasonic motor, even if their resonance frequencies are not exactly the same by incorporating the matching network in the circuit. The maximum speed of the ultrasonic motor obtained by using this driving method is over 300 rpm. It is believed that the results of this study will have impact on the integration and miniaturization of the ultrasonic motor and its driving circuit. PMID:12403137

  14. Landau-Zener interference at bichromatic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Florian; Mühlbacher, Max; Blattmann, Ralf; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Ludwig, Stefan; Kohler, Sigmund

    2015-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the interference at avoided crossings which are repeatedly traversed as a consequence of an applied ac field. Our model system is a charge qubit in a serial double quantum dot connected to two leads. Our focus lies on effects caused by simultaneous driving with two different frequencies. We work out how the commensurability of the driving frequencies affects the symmetry of the interference patterns both in real space and in Fourier space. For commensurable frequencies, the symmetry depends sensitively on the relative phase between the two modes, whereas for incommensurable frequencies the symmetry of monochromatic driving is always recovered.

  15. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  16. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  17. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase. PMID:23126766

  18. Driving and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Uc, Ergun Y; Rizzo, Matthew

    2008-09-01

    The proportion of elderly people in the general population is rising, resulting in greater numbers of drivers with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These neurodegenerative disorders impair cognition, visual perception, and motor function, leading to reduced driver fitness and greater crash risk. Yet neither medical diagnosis nor age alone is reliable enough to predict driver safety or crashes or to revoke the driving privileges of these individuals. Driving research utilizes tools such as questionnaires about driving habits and history, driving simulators, standardized road tests utilizing instrumented vehicles, and state driving records. Research challenges include outlining the evolution of driving safety, understanding the mechanisms of driving impairment, and developing a reliable and efficient standardized test battery for prediction of driver safety in neurodegenerative disorders. This information will enable healthcare providers to advise their patients with neurodegenerative disorders with more certainty, affect policy, and help develop rehabilitative measures for driving. PMID:18713573

  19. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  20. Magnetic drive coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The driving and driven members of a magnetic drive are separated by en enlarged gap to provide clearance for a conduit or other member. Flux pins in the gap maintain the torque transmitting capability of the drive. The spacing between two of the flux pins is increased to provide space for the conduit.

  1. Magnetic drive coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The driving (30) and driven (32) members of a magnetic drive (20) are separated by an enlarged gap (35) to provide clearance for a conduit (23) or other member. Flux pins (40) in the gap (35) maintain the torque transmitting capability of the drive (20). The spacing between two of the flux pins is increased to provide space for the conduit (23).

  2. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  3. Grieving while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    Secondary analysis of data from 84 people in 2 interview studies shows that some bereaved people grieve actively while driving. The grief can be intense, even years after a death. Grief while driving may erupt spontaneously or be set off by a wide range of reminders. Some bereaved people seem to save their grieving for times when they drive,…

  4. Electric versus hydraulic drives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This volume records the proceedings of a conference organised by the Engineering Manufacturing Industries Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Topics considered include high performance position control - a review of the current state of developments; hydrostatic drives - present and future; electric drives - present and future trends; electrical and hydraulic drives for heavy industrial robots; the development of an electro-mechanical tilt system for the advanced passenger train; industrial hydraulic ring mains - effective or efficient. the comparison of performance of servo feed-drive systems; overhead crane drives; the future of d.c. servodrives; the choice of actuator for military systems; linear electro-hydraulic actuators; and actuation for industrial robots.

  5. Drill drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  6. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  7. Mechanical vs electric drive: which to choose

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, C.H.

    1983-03-01

    One of the more basic decisions in haul truck selection is whether to buy a mechanical drive unit with transmission, torque converter, and propeller shaft or a unit with alternator, rectifier, and wheel drive motors. Both drives offer advantages and disadvantages for 85- to 120-ton trucks. The amount of horsepower actually available to the wheel via the 2 drive modes is discussed. It is suggested that an accurate comparison of life and cost of maintenance should be based on the number of tons of material moved as well as hours of service. Mechanical systems do have an advantage on very sharp grades (16% or more) at very low speeds and on gentle grades of 6% or less at speeds in excess of 30 mph. Between those 2 extremes, performance is nearly equal.

  8. Magnetostrictive roller drive motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A magnetostrictive drive motor is disclosed which has a rotary drive shaft in the form of a drum which is encircled by a plurality of substantially equally spaced roller members in the form of two sets of cones which are in contact with the respective cam surfaces on the inside surface of an outer drive ring. The drive ring is attached to sets of opposing pairs of magnetostrictive rods. Each rod in a pair is mutually positioned end to end within respective energizing coils. When one of the coils in an opposing pair is energized, the energized rod expands while the other rod is caused to contract, causing the drive ring to rock, i.e., rotate slightly in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction, depending upon which rod in a pair is energized. As the drive ring is activated in repetitive cycles in either direction, one set of drive cones attempts to roll up their respective cam surface but are pinned between the drive shaft drum and the drive ring. As the frictional force preventing sliding builds up, the cones become locked, setting up reaction forces including a tangential component which is imparted to the drive shaft drum to provide a source of motor torque. Simultaneously the other set of cones are disengaged from the drive shaft drum. Upon deactivation of the magnetostrictive rod coils, the force on the drive cones is released, causing the system to return to an initial rest position. By repetitively cycling the energization of the magnetostrictive rods, the drive shaft drum indexes in microradian rotational steps.

  9. Rotating Microphone Rake Measures Spinning Acoustic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating rake of pressure transducers developed for use in experimental studies of sources and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. Pressure transducers used as microphones to measure acoustic modes generated by, and spin with, fans. Versatility of control software used in rake-drive system enables measurements of acoustic modes on wide range of test-engine configurations. Rake-drive hardware easily adapted to different engines because not mechanically coupled to engine under test.

  10. Superluminal warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Pedro F.

    2007-09-01

    In this Letter we consider a warp drive spacetime resulting from that suggested by Alcubierre when the spaceship can only travel faster than light. Restricting to the two dimensions that retains most of the physics, we derive the thermodynamic properties of the warp drive and show that the temperature of the spaceship rises up as its apparent velocity increases. We also find that the warp drive spacetime can be exhibited in a manifestly cosmological form.

  11. Diabetes and driving.

    PubMed

    Inkster, B; Frier, B M

    2013-09-01

    The principal safety concern for driving for people treated with insulin or insulin secretagogues is hypoglycaemia, which impairs driving performance. Other complications, such as those causing visual impairment and peripheral neuropathy, are also relevant to medical fitness to drive. Case control studies have suggested that drivers with diabetes pose a modestly increased but acceptable and measurable risk of motor vehicle accidents compared to non-diabetic drivers, but many studies are limited and of poor quality. Factors which have been shown to increase driving risk include previous episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, previous hypoglycaemia while driving, strict glycaemic control (lower HbA1c) and absence of blood glucose monitoring before driving. Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia may be counteracted by frequent blood glucose testing. The European Union Third directive on driving (2006) has necessitated changes in statutory regulations for driving licences for people with diabetes in all European States, including the UK. Stricter criteria have been introduced for Group 1 vehicle licences while those for Group 2 licences have been relaxed. Insulin-treated drivers can now apply to drive Group 2 vehicles, but in the UK must meet very strict criteria and be assessed by an independent specialist to be issued with a 1-year licence. PMID:23350766

  12. On recent results in the modelling of neoclassical-tearing-mode stabilization via electron cyclotron current drive and their impact on the design of the upper EC launcher for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, E.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Goodman, T. P.; Maj, O.; Sauter, O.; Weber, H.; Zohm, H.; Saibene, G.; Henderson, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cyclotron wave beams injected from a launcher placed in the upper part of the vessel will be used in ITER to control MHD instabilities, in particular neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). Simplified NTM stabilization criteria have been used in the past to guide the optimization of the launcher. Their derivation is reviewed in this paper and their range of applicability clarified. Moreover, possible effects leading to a deterioration of the predicted performance are discussed. Particularly critical in this context is the broadening of the electron-cyclotron (EC) deposition profiles. It is argued that the most detrimental effect for ITER is likely to be the scattering of the EC beams from density fluctuations due to plasma turbulence, resulting in a beam broadening by about a factor of two. The combined impact of these effects with that of beam misalignment (with respect to the targeted surface) is investigated by solving the Rutherford equation in a form that retains the most relevant terms. The perspectives for NTM stabilization in the Q = 10 ITER scenario are discussed.

  13. New Edge Coherent Mode Providing Continuous Transport in Long-Pulse H-mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, S. Y.; Guo, H. Y.; Shao, L. M.; Liu, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, E.; Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Candy, J.; Bravenec, R.; Sun, Y. W.; Shi, T. H.; Liang, Y. F.; Chen, R.; Zhang, W.; Wang, L.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, Y. L.; Hu, G. H.; Gong, X. Z.

    2014-05-01

    An electrostatic coherent mode near the electron diamagnetic frequency (20-90 kHz) is observed in the steep-gradient pedestal region of long pulse H-mode plasmas in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak, using a newly developed dual gas-puff-imaging system and diamond-coated reciprocating probes. The mode propagates in the electron diamagnetic direction in the plasma frame with poloidal wavelength of ˜8 cm. The mode drives a significant outflow of particles and heat as measured directly with the probes, thus greatly facilitating long pulse H-mode sustainment. This mode shows the nature of dissipative trapped electron mode, as evidenced by gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

  14. Reading Text While Driving

    PubMed Central

    Horrey, William J.; Hoffman, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated how drivers adapt secondary-task initiation and time-sharing behavior when faced with fluctuating driving demands. Background Reading text while driving is particularly detrimental; however, in real-world driving, drivers actively decide when to perform the task. Method In a test track experiment, participants were free to decide when to read messages while driving along a straight road consisting of an area with increased driving demands (demand zone) followed by an area with low demands. A message was made available shortly before the vehicle entered the demand zone. We manipulated the type of driving demands (baseline, narrow lane, pace clock, combined), message format (no message, paragraph, parsed), and the distance from the demand zone when the message was available (near, far). Results In all conditions, drivers started reading messages (drivers’ first glance to the display) before entering or before leaving the demand zone but tended to wait longer when faced with increased driving demands. While reading messages, drivers looked more or less off road, depending on types of driving demands. Conclusions For task initiation, drivers avoid transitions from low to high demands; however, they are not discouraged when driving demands are already elevated. Drivers adjust time-sharing behavior according to driving demands while performing secondary tasks. Nonetheless, such adjustment may be less effective when total demands are high. Application This study helps us to understand a driver’s role as an active controller in the context of distracted driving and provides insights for developing distraction interventions. PMID:25850162

  15. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  16. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  17. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  18. Design of traction drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Traction drives are among the simplest of all speed-changing mechanisms. Because of their simplicity and their ability to smoothly and continuously adjust speed, they are excellent choices for many drive system applications. They have been used in industrial service for more than 100 years. Today's traction drives have power capacities which rival the best gear and belt drives due to modern traction fluids and highly fatigue-resistant bearing steels. This report summarizes methods to analyze and size traction drives. Lubrication principles, contact kinematics, stress, fatigue life, and performance prediction methods are presented. The effects of the lubricant's traction characteristics on life and power loss are discussed. An example problem is given which illustrates the effects of spin on power loss. Loading mechanism design and the design of nonlubricated friction wheels and rings are also treated.

  19. Mode Launcher Design for the Multi-moded DLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai

    2003-04-30

    The DLDS (Delay Line Distribution System) power delivery system proposed by KEK combines several klystrons to obtain the high peak power required to drive a TeV scale linear collider. In this system the combined klystron output is subdivided into shorter pulses by proper phasing of the sources, and each subpulse is delivered to various accelerator sections via separate waveguides. A cost-saving improvement suggested by SLAC is to use a single multimoded waveguide to deliver the power of all the subpulses. This scheme requires a mode launcher that can deliver each subpulse by way of a different waveguide mode through selective phasing of the sources when combining their power. We present a compact design for such a mode launcher that converts the power from four rectangular waveguide feeds to separate modes in a multi-moded circular guide through coupling slots. Such a design has been simulated and found to satisfy the requirements for high efficiency and low surface fields.

  20. Speed sensorless hybrid vector controlled induction motor drive

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, B.K.; Simoes, M.G.; Crecelius, D.R.; Rajashekara, K.; Martin, R.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a speed and flux sensorless vector-controlled induction motor drive primarily aimed for electric vehicle type applications. The stator flux oriented drive starts at zero speed in indirect vector control mode, transitions to direct vector control mode as the speed develops, and then transitions back to indirect vector control at zero speed. The vector control uses stator flux orientation in both indirect and direct vector control modes with the stator resistance variation compensated by measurement of stator temperature. The problem of integration at low stator frequency is solved by cascaded low pass filters with programmable time constants. The control strategy of the four-quadrant drive has been analyzed, validated by simulation study, and finally evaluated by experimental study on a laboratory 5 hp drive system.

  1. Vision and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Driving is the primary means of personal travel in many countries and is relies heavily on vision for its successful execution. Research over the past few decades has addressed the role of vision in driver safety (motor vehicle collision involvement) and in driver performance (both on-road and using interactive simulators in the laboratory). Here we critically review what is currently known about the role of various aspects of visual function in driving. We also discuss translational research issues on vision screening for licensure and re-licensure and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons who want to drive. PMID:20580907

  2. Redundant motor drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, J. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A drive system characterized by a base supporting a pair of pillars arranged in spaced parallelism, a shaft extended between and supported by the pillars for rotation about the longitudinal axis thereof, a worm gear affixed to the shaft and supported in coaxial relation therewith is described. A bearing housing of a sleeve like configuration is concentrically related to the shaft and is supported thereby for free rotation. A first and a second quiescent drive train, alternatively activatable, is provided for imparting rotation into said bearing housing. Each of the drive trains is characterized by a selectively energizable motor connected to a spur gear.

  3. The Test Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows engineers rehearsing the sol 133 (June 8, 2004) drive into 'Endurance' crater by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Engineers and scientists have recreated the martian surface and slope the rover will encounter using a combination of bare and thinly sand-coated rocks, simulated martian 'blueberries' and a platform tilted at a 25-degree angle. The results of this test convinced engineers that the rover was capable of driving up and down a straight slope before it attempted the actual drive on Mars.

  4. Scalar control on speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of ABB ACS800 variable speed drive operating under Scalar Control mode, and eventually develop a set of experimental procedures for undergraduate laboratory purposes. Scalar Control is the most widespread form of ac drive, for its low cost and simplicity especially implemented in the open loop mode. Scalar control is achieved by controlling the stator voltage and frequency, thus maintaining the motor's air-gap flux at a constant value. To illustrate the control method, the ac drive is configured according to the wiring diagram in the firmware manual that the drive control location can be both local and external. The drive is selected to operate under Factory application macro, whereby either ordinary speed control applications or constant speeds applications may be used. Under ordinary speed control, frequency reference signals are provided to the drive through the analogue input AI1. The drive will operate at the given frequency reference value throughout the operation regardless of any changes in the load. The torque speed curve moves along the speed axis with no changes to the shape as the supply frequencies changes. On the other hand, the drive allows three preset constant speed through digital inputs DI5 and DI6. The drive operate at a constant speed value over a time period, and only switch from one constant speed to another constant speed by triggering the two input switches. Scalar control is most suitable for applications not required high precision, such as blowers, fans and pumps.

  5. Integrated Inverter For Driving Multiple Electric Machines

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN; Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2006-04-04

    An electric machine drive (50) has a plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) for controlling respective electric machines (57, 62), which may include a three-phase main traction machine (57) and two-phase accessory machines (62) in a hybrid or electric vehicle. The drive (50) has a common control section (53, 54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) with only one microelectronic processor (54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), only one gate driver circuit (53) for controlling conduction of semiconductor switches (S1-S10) in the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), and also includes a common dc bus (70), a common dc bus filtering capacitor (C1) and a common dc bus voltage sensor (67). The electric machines (57, 62) may be synchronous machines, induction machines, or PM machines and may be operated in a motoring mode or a generating mode.

  6. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting more dangerous include: Getting lost on familiar roads Reacting more slowly in traffic Driving too slowly ... attention to traffic signs Taking chances on the road Drifting into other lanes Getting more agitated in ...

  7. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  8. Drive program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, S.

    1979-01-01

    The program description and user's guide for the Downlist Requirement Integrated Verification and Evaluation (DRIVE) program is provided. The program is used to compare existing telemetry downlist files with updated downlist requirements.

  9. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... drivers. Do not use cell phones for talking, texting, or email when you are driving. Mobile phones ... pull off of the road before answering or texting. Other tips include: Avoid putting on makeup while ...

  10. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  11. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  14. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  15. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  16. Self-driving carsickness.

    PubMed

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels. PMID:26446454

  17. Parkinson disease and driving

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Sherrilene; Uc, Ergun Y.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growing literature on driving in Parkinson disease (PD) has shown that driving is impaired in PD compared to healthy comparison drivers. PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder leading to motor, cognitive, and visual impairments, all of which can affect fitness to drive. In this review, we examined studies of driving performance (on-road tests and simulators) in PD for outcome measures and their predictors. We searched through various databases and found 25 (of 99) primary studies, all published in English. Using the American Academy of Neurology criteria, a study class of evidence was assigned (I–IV, I indicating the highest level of evidence) and recommendations were made (Level A: predictive or not; B: probably predictive or not; C: possibly predictive or not; U: no recommendations). From available Class II and III studies, we identified various cognitive, visual, and motor measures that met different levels of evidence (usually Level B or C) with respect to predicting on-road and simulated driving performance. Class I studies reporting Level A recommendations for definitive predictors of driving performance in drivers with PD are needed by policy makers and clinicians to develop evidence-based guidelines. PMID:23150533

  18. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.

  19. Family Influences and Unconscious Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fanita

    2001-01-01

    Drives for survival, expression, and quiescence influence early human development and continue to influence career development throughout life. Turmoil may arise when a drive conflicts with others or is suppressed by other drives. (SK)

  20. Cylindrical Implosion Experiments using Laser Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbs, David

    1998-11-01

    Development of high-gain targets for the National Ignition Facility relies considerably on computational modeling, and it is important that our codes are validated against relevant experimental data in convergent geometry.(W. J. Krauser et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2084 (1996); D. C. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1953 (1998)) In collaboration with the University of Rochester, we have begun a campaign of hydrodynamic instability experiments in cylindrical geometry using direct drive,(D. L. Tubbs et al., submitted to Laser and Particle Beams (1998); C. W. Barnes et al., submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrm. (1998)) building on our success in indirect drive.( W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1832 (1997); W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 3876 (1997)) Cylindrical targets facilitate direct diagnostic access to the convergent, hydrodynamic flow. The energy advantage of direct drive and its excellent target-illumination symmetry (achieved at OMEGA through use of Distributed Phase Plates and SSD) permit more energetic implosions, larger target scale (hence greater diagnostic resolution), longer acceleration timescales, and higher convergence than were possible using indirect drive. We estimate that specific laser energy delivered to the target for direct drive at OMEGA is roughly 4 times that achieved for indirect drive at Nova. Our first experiments (January 1998) yield excellent data for the first highly symmetrical direct-drive implosions, with which we benchmark zeroth-order hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX calculations, using as-shot laser power histories and no further physics adjustments, match measured target-implosion data within theoretical and experimental errors. In addition, 2-D LASNEX simulations of single-mode (m=28, azimuthally symmetric) perturbation growth agree well with data obtained during our first week of experiments. For 1.5-micron initial perturbation amplitude, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor growth factors of order 10

  1. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOEpatents

    Tankersley, J.B.; Boothe, R.W.; Konrad, C.E.

    1995-04-04

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox. 6 figures.

  2. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOEpatents

    Tankersley, Jerome B.; Boothe, Richard W.; Konrad, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox.

  3. Simulation of Trolleybus Traction Induction Drive With Supercapacitor Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazis, V.; Latkovskis, L.; Grigans, L.

    2010-01-01

    The article considers the possibilities of saving the regenerative braking energy in Škoda 24Tr type trolleybuses by installing the onboard supercapacitor energy storage system (ESS) and improving its performance with automated switching to the autonomous traction mode. Proposed is an ESS control system with constant DC bus voltage in the supercapacitor charging mode and supercapacitor current proportional to the AC drive current in the discharging mode. The authors investigate stability of the trolleybus ESS control system operating together with AC traction drive in various overhead voltage failure modes. The co-simulation of ESS operation was done by Matlab/Simulink AC drive and PSIM ESS continuous models.

  4. Mental workload and driving

    PubMed Central

    Paxion, Julie; Galy, Edith; Berthelon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the most representative measures of subjective and objective mental workload in driving, and to understand how the subjective and objective levels of mental workload influence the performance as a function of situation complexity and driving experience, i.e., to verify whether the increase of situation complexity and the lack of experience increase the subjective and physiological levels of mental workload and lead to driving performance impairments. This review will be useful to both researchers designing an experimental study of mental workload and to designers of drivers’ training content. In the first part, we will broach the theoretical approach with two factors of mental workload and performance, i.e., situation complexity and driving experience. Indeed, a low complex situation (e.g., highways), or conversely a high complex situation (e.g., town) can provoke an overload. Additionally, performing the driving tasks implies producing a high effort for novice drivers who have not totally automated the driving activity. In the second part, we will focus on subjective measures of mental workload. A comparison of questionnaires usually used in driving will allow identifying the most appropriate ones as a function of different criteria. Moreover, we will review the empirical studies to verify if the subjective level of mental workload is high in simple and very complex situations, especially for novice drivers compared to the experienced ones. In the third part, we will focus on physiological measures. A comparison of physiological indicators will be realized in order to identify the most correlated to mental workload. An empirical review will also take the effect of situation complexity and experience on these physiological indicators into consideration. Finally, a more nuanced comparison between subjective and physiological measures will be established from the impact on situation complexity and experience. PMID:25520678

  5. Driving Anger and Driving Behavior in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Tracy L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Rosen, Lee A.; Barkley, Russell A.; Rodricks, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether anger in the context of driving is associated with the negative driving outcomes experienced by individuals with ADHD. Method: ADHD adults (n = 56) complete measures of driving anger, driving anger expression, angry thoughts behind the wheel, and aggressive, risky, and crash-related behavior. Results are…

  6. Driving anger in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sullman, Mark J M; Stephens, Amanda N; Yong, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the types of situations that cause Malaysian drivers to become angry. The 33-item version of the driver anger scale (Deffenbacher et al., 1994) was used to investigate driver anger amongst a sample of 339 drivers. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the fit of the original six-factor model (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and police presence), after removing one item and allowing three error pairs to covary, was satisfactory. Female drivers reported more anger, than males, caused by traffic obstruction and hostile gestures. Age was also negatively related to five (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving and police presence) of the six factors and also to the total DAS score. Furthermore, although they were not directly related to crash involvement, several of the six forms of driving anger were significantly related to the crash-related conditions of: near misses, loss of concentration, having lost control of a vehicle and being ticketed. Overall the pattern of findings made in the present research were broadly similar to those from Western countries, indicating that the DAS is a valid measure of driving anger even among non-European based cultures. PMID:24863369

  7. [Drug use and driving].

    PubMed

    Lemaire-Hurtel, Anne-Sophie; Goullé, Jean-Pierre; Alvarez, Jean-Claude; Mura, Patrick; Verstraete, Alain G

    2015-10-01

    Some drugs are known to impair driving because they can change the vision or hearing, and/or disrupt the intellectual or motor abilities: impaired vigilance, sedation, disinhibition effect, the coordination of movement disorders and the balance. The doctor during prescribing and the pharmacist during deliverance of drug treatment should inform their patients of the potential risks of drugs on driving or operating machinery. The driver has direct responsibility, who hired him and him alone, to follow the medical advice received. The pictograms on the outer packaging of medicinal products intended to classify substances according to their risk driving: The driver can whether to observe simple precautions (level one "be prudent"), or follow the advice of a health professional (level two "be very careful"), or if it is totally not drive (level three "danger caution: do not drive"). This classification only evaluates the intrinsic danger of drugs but not the individual variability. Medicines should be taken into account also the conditions for which the medication is prescribed. It is important to inform the patient on several points. PMID:25956300

  8. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  9. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  10. U.S. DRIVE

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    U.S. DRIVE, which stands for United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability, is an expanded government-industry partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies – BP America, Chevron Corporation, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities – Southern California Edison and Michigan-based DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The U.S. DRIVE mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable a full range of affordable and clean advanced light-duty vehicles, as well as related energy infrastructure.

  11. Preparation of topological modes by Lyapunov control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2015-01-01

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasi-particles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by a quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control is the individual manipulations on the boundary sites. We take the Kitaev’s chain as an illustration for Fermi systems and show that an arbitrary excitation mode can be steered into the Majorana zero mode by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites. For Bose systems, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode. The sensitivity of the fidelity to perturbations and uncertainties in the control fields and initial modes is also examined. The experimental feasibility of the proposal and the possibility to replace the continuous control field with square wave pulses is finally discussed. PMID:26346317

  12. Preparation of topological modes by Lyapunov control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z. C.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2015-09-01

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasi-particles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by a quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control is the individual manipulations on the boundary sites. We take the Kitaev’s chain as an illustration for Fermi systems and show that an arbitrary excitation mode can be steered into the Majorana zero mode by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites. For Bose systems, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode. The sensitivity of the fidelity to perturbations and uncertainties in the control fields and initial modes is also examined. The experimental feasibility of the proposal and the possibility to replace the continuous control field with square wave pulses is finally discussed.

  13. Preparation of topological modes by Lyapunov control.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z C; Zhao, X L; Yi, X X

    2015-01-01

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasi-particles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by a quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control is the individual manipulations on the boundary sites. We take the Kitaev's chain as an illustration for Fermi systems and show that an arbitrary excitation mode can be steered into the Majorana zero mode by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites. For Bose systems, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode. The sensitivity of the fidelity to perturbations and uncertainties in the control fields and initial modes is also examined. The experimental feasibility of the proposal and the possibility to replace the continuous control field with square wave pulses is finally discussed. PMID:26346317

  14. LCLS Injector Drive Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Castro, J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    Requirements for the LCLS injector drive laser present significant challenges to the design of the system. While progress has been demonstrated in spatial shape, temporal shape, UV generation and rep-rate, a laser that meets all of the LCLS specifications simultaneously has yet to be demonstrated. These challenges are compounded by the stability and reliability requirements. The drive laser and transport system has been installed and tested. We will report on the current operational state of the laser and plans for future improvements.

  15. Optotech 5984 Drive Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tzuo-Chang; Chen, Di

    1987-01-01

    We present in this paper an overview of Optotech's 5984 Optical Disk Drive. Key features such as the modulation code, the disk format, defect mapping scheme and the optical head and servo subsystem will be singled out for discussion. Description of Optotech's 5984 disk drive The Optotech 5984 optical disk drive is a write-once-read-mostly (WORM) rotating optical memory with 200 Megabyte capacity on each side of the disk. It has a 5 1/4 inch form factor that will fit into any personal computer full-height slot. The drive specification highlights are given in Table 1. A perspective view of the drive mechanical assembly is shown in Figure 1. The spindle that rotates the disk has a runout of less than 10 um. The rotational speed at 1200 revolutions per minute (rpm) is held to an accuracy of 10-3. The total angular tolerance from perfect perpendicular alignment between the rotating disk and the incident optical beam axis is held to less than 17 milliradians. The coarse seek is accomplished through a stepping motor driving the optical head with 1.3 milliseconds per step or 32 tracks per step. The analog channels including read/write, the phase lock loop and the servo loops for focus and track control are contained on one surface mount pc board while the digital circuitry that interfaces with the drive and the controller is on a separate pc board. A microprocessor 8039 is used to control the handshake and the sequence of R/W commands. A separate power board is used to provide power to the spindle and the stepping motors. In the following we will discuss some of the salient features in the drive and leave the details to three accompanying Optotech papers. These salient features are derived from a design that is driven by three major considerations. One is precise control of the one micron diameter laser spot to any desired location on the disk. The second consideration is effective management of media defects. Given the state of the art of the Te-based disk technology with

  16. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  17. Driving platform for OLED lighting investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Elgner, Andreas; Kreye, Daniel; Amelung, Jörg; Scholles, Michael

    2006-08-01

    OLED technology may be excellently suitable for lighting applications by combining high efficiency, cost effective manufacturing and the use of low cost materials. Certain issues remain to be solved so far, including OLED brightness, color, lifetime, large area uniformity and encapsulation. Another aspect, that might be capable in addressing some of the mentioned issues, is OLED lighting electrical driving. We report on the design of a driving platform for OLED lighting test panels or substrates. It is intended for being a test environment for lighting substrates as well as demonstration/presentation environment. It is based on a 128-channel passive-matrix driver/controller ASIC OC2. Its key component is an MSP430-compatible 16-bit micro-controller core including embedded Flash memory (program), EEPROM (parameter), and RAM (data memory). A significant feature of the device is an electronic approach for improving the lifetime/uniformity behavior of connected OLED. The embedded micro-controller is the key to the high versatility of OC2, since by firmware modification it can be adapted to various applications and conditions. Here its application for an OLED lighting driving platform is presented. Major features of this platform are PC-control mode (via USB interface), stand-alone mode (no external control necessary, just power supply), on-board OLED panel parameter storage, flat geometry of OLED lighting panel carrier (board), AC and DC driving regimes, adjustable reverse voltage, dedicated user SW (PC/Windows-based), sub-tile patterning and single sub-tile control, combination of multiple channels for increasing driving current. This publication contains results of the project "High Brightness OLEDs for ICT & Next Generation Lighting Applications" (OLLA), funded by the European Commission.

  18. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  19. Key Aspects of EBW Heating and Current Drive in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2010-11-01

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and current drive is modeled by coupled mode conversion, ray-tracing (AMR) and Fokker-Planck (LUKE) codes. Deposition and current drive profiles are determined for EBW with various injection parameters under realistic spherical tokamak conditions. There parameters are varied to investigate the robustness of the applied scenarios. The importance of relativistic corrections to EBW absorption is considered. The differences between various relativistic models are explored.

  20. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  1. DrivePy

    2014-08-30

    DrivePy is physics-based drivetrain model that sizes drivetrain components based on aerodynamic and operational loads for use in a systems engineering model. It also calculates costs based on empirical data collected by NREL's National Wind Technology Center.

  2. No Pass, No Drive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses basis for Kentucky appellate court decision that state's no-pass, no-drive statute did not violate due-process and equal-protection clauses of the Kentucky and federal constitutions, but did violate the federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, but nevertheless did not invalidate the statute. Explains why the decision is…

  3. Teachers with Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Celine; Diffenbaugh, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    For students in U.S. classrooms today, the odds of being assigned to an inexperienced teacher are higher than they have ever been because so many teachers, some in the top 20 percent of effectiveness are leaving the classroom in their first five years. Coggins and Diffenbaugh turn to Daniel Pink's work on drive to determine how to motivate…

  4. [Epilepsy and driving].

    PubMed

    Adam, Claude

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy contributes little to road traffic accidents (0.25% of accidents) compared, for instance, to alcohol abuse (at least 30 times higher). Current factors, such as age and sex, or other chronic medical conditions also increase the risk of road traffic accidents but do not carry driving restrictions. So, the European Commission fairly established rules permitting individuals having experienced one or more epileptic seizures to drive if their road accident risk is low. Road accident risk related to epileptic seizures in various clinical situations is evaluated by the driving license commission, mainly with the aid of criteria based on seizure-free periods. A person who has had an epileptic seizure should notify the authorities. He should be advised by treating physician not to drive before. In case of an authorisation, any new relevant event should be notified to the authorities in the course of legal follow-up. Improvements of the current regulations by European data registries are under way. PMID:26482490

  5. COMMENT: No warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coule, D. H.

    1998-08-01

    The warp drive spacetime of Alcubierre is impossible to set up without first being able to distribute matter at tachyonic speed, put roughly, you need one to make one! However, over small distances, where the energy conditions possibly can be violated, one can envision opening the light-cones to increase the apparent speed of light.

  6. Drive-Through Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the early childhood field's approach to staff training reflects the drive-through, fast-food culture. Year after year directors send their teachers to workshops to get some quick refresher techniques. The author suggests that rather than focusing professional development on topics, focus on observing…

  7. Driving skills after whiplash.

    PubMed

    Gimse, R; Bjørgen, I A; Straume, A

    1997-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that some persons with longlasting problems after whiplash have changed eye movements. These changes have been related to disturbance of the posture control system. The question raised in the present study is whether such disturbances can influence daily life functions connected with balance, position and external movements, such as car driving. A group of 23 persons with disturbed eye movements due to whiplash injury, was tested in a driving simulator, together with a closely matched control group. The results revealed significant differences between the two groups with respect to response times to the traffic signs presented, identification of type of sign, as well as steering precision while the subjects' attention was directed to the process of identifying the signs. Alternative explanations such as driving experience, pain, medication or malingering are at least partly controlled for, but cannot completely be ruled out. A distorted posture control system leading to disturbance of eye movements seems to be the most likely primary causative factor, but these disturbances are most certainly complexly determined. Reduced attention capacity is considered to be a mediating secondary factor. Registration of eye movements may be a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate driving skill after whiplash. PMID:9309948

  8. Driving While Intoxicated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, John

    Alcohol intoxication increases the risk of highway accidents, the relative risk of crash probability increasing as a function of blood alcohol content (BAC). Because alcohol use is more prevalent than use of other drugs, more is known about the relationship between alcohol use and driving. Most states presume a BAC of .10% to be evidence of drunk…

  9. Global Alfven modes: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Chu, M.S.; Duong, H.H.; Greene, J.M.; Lao, L.L.; Taylor, T.S.; Thompson, S.J. )

    1993-07-01

    It is shown that the theoretical predictions and experimental observations of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE's) are now in good agreement, with particularly detailed agreement in the mode frequencies. Calculations of the driving and damping rates predict the importance of continuum damping for low toroidal mode numbers and this is confirmed experimentally. However, theoretical calculations in finite-[beta], shaped discharges predict the existence of other global Alfven modes, in particular the ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmode (EAE) and a new mode, the beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE). The BAE mode is calculated to be in or below the same frequency range as the TAE mode and may contribute to the experimental observations at high [beta]. Experimental evidence and complementary analyses are presented confirming the presence of the EAE mode at higher frequencies.

  10. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Horton, Wendell; Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan

    2012-10-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is the most robust and efficient method of driving the tokamak current with external radio frequency waves in steady-state tokamak operation. The electron distribution functions in the LHCD experiments contain substantial parallel thermal fluxes with radial gradients that are greater than those in the current and temperature profiles. We re-examine the growth rates of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes in these plasmas based on an analytic model for electron distribution function with three temperatures T, T|F, and T|B. The stability and turbulent transport is also analyzed using the electron distribution functions computed with a combined ray tracing/Fokker Planck code (DELPHINE C3P/LUKE). Electron Landau damping is reduced compared to its value in a Maxwell distribution. These potential instability drives are controlled by the magnetic sheared induced electron Landau damping that becomes strong as the fluctuations propagate into regions of large parallel wavenumber away from the mode rational surfaces. The feedback of the ETG turbulence on the propagation of the penetration of RF fields that shape the electron distribution function feeding the ETG growth rate make the problem a complex dynamical system.

  11. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  12. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities. PMID:24906536

  13. Multilevel converters for large electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.; Peng, F.Z.

    1997-11-01

    Traditional two-level high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters for motor drives have several problems associated with their high frequency switching which produces common-mode voltage and high voltage change (dV/dt) rates to the motor windings. Multilevel inverters solve these problems because their devices can switch at a much lower frequency. Two different multilevel topologies are identified for use as a converter for electric drives, a cascade inverter with separate dc sources and a back-to-back diode clamped converter. The cascade inverter is a natural fit for large automotive all electric drives because of the high VA ratings possible and because it uses several levels of dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells. The back to back diode damped converter is ideal where a source of ac voltage is available such as a hybrid electric vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show the superiority of these two converters over PWM based drives.

  14. Drive-by-Downloads

    SciTech Connect

    Narvaez, Julia; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Seifert, Christian; Aval, Chiraag U.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-02-01

    Abstract: Drive-by-downloads are malware that push, and then execute, malicious code on a client system without the user's consent. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a discussion of the usefulness of antivirus software for detecting the installation of such malware, providing groundwork for future studies. Client honeypots collected drive-by malware which was then evaluated using common antivirus products. Initial analysis showed that most of such antivirus products identified less than 70% of these highly polymorphic malware programs. Also, it was observed that the antivirus products tested, even when successfully detecting this malware, often failed to classify it, leading to the conclusion that further work could involve not only developing new behavioral detection technologies, but also empirical studies that improve general understanding of these threats. Toward that end, one example of malicious code was analyzed behaviorally to provide insight into next steps for the future direction of this research.

  15. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    Developing magnetostrictive direct drive research motors to power robot joints is discussed. These type motors are expected to produce extraordinary torque density, to be able to perform microradian incremental steps and to be self-braking and safe with the power off. Several types of motor designs have been attempted using magnetostrictive materials. One of the candidate approaches (the magnetostrictive roller drive) is described. The method in which the design will function is described as is the reason why this approach is inherently superior to the other approaches. Following this, the design will be modelled and its expected performance predicted. This particular candidate design is currently undergoing detailed engineering with prototype construction and testing scheduled for mid 1991.

  16. Variable speed drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A variable speed drive wherein a first embodiment is comprised of a pivotally mounted prime mover coupled to a rotary fluid output device, such as a fan or pump, through a variable and fixed pulley drive arrangement is described. The pivotal position of the prime mover and accordingly the pitch diameter of variable pulley means is controlled in accordance with fluid motor means coupled to the prime mover. This is actuated in response to a fluid feedback control signal derived from a sensed output of the rotary fluid output device. The pivotal motion of the prime mover imparts an arcuate motion to the variable pulley means which effects a speed variation of the rotary fluid output device in accordance with the variation of the pitch diameter ratio of opposing variable and fixed pulley means.

  17. Sex chromosome drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  18. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  19. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  20. Gear Drive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Philadelphia Gear Corporation used two COSMIC computer programs; one dealing with shrink fit analysis and the other with rotor dynamics problems in computerized design and test work. The programs were used to verify existing in-house programs to insure design accuracy by checking its company-developed computer methods against procedures developed by other organizations. Its specialty is in custom units for unique applications, such as Coast Guard ice breaking ships, steel mill drives, coal crusher, sewage treatment equipment and electricity.

  1. Driving on the Descartes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, drives the 'Rover', Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to its final parking place near the end of the third extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot, took this photograph looking southward. The flank of Stone Mountain can be seen on the horizon at left. The shadow of the Lunar Module 'Orion' is visible in the foreground.

  2. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  3. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt. PMID:25791047

  4. Who's Driving Home?: Assessing Adolescent Drinking and Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, John D.; Bibeau, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Data from 13,998 students revealed that high percentages of students drank often and that many of these students reported being drunk often. While most students indicated they would prefer not to drive home after drinking, approximately one-third of driving age students indicated they would drive under the influence of alcohol or would ride with…

  5. New Conception of Waving Machine CamEl Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílkovský, A.; Marek, O.; Jirásko, P.; Volanský, Z.

    New mechatronic conception of waving machine CamEl drive is realized by two electronic cams Yaskawa and planetary gears. The first servo motor is used to slay and shedding motion in position mode and the second servo motor is used in automatic weaving mode. Moment of inertia of kinematic chain was reduced that it was possible used a smaller servo motor of electronic cam Yaskawa.

  6. Innovative Controlled Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, C.

    2009-01-01

    The considered converter-fed permanent magnet motor could alternatively be operated in two basically different states—the vector control mode or alternatively the brushless dc, also known as electronically commutated mode. Several quality aspects concerning the system performance have been comparatively investigated in practical as well as theoretical manner. Focus is thereby given to the numerical analysis and previous evaluation of the well interaction between the novel axially un-skewed higher harmonic air-gap wave based permanent magnet motor design and both different control algorithms

  7. PRIMUS: autonomous driving robot for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ingo

    2000-07-01

    This article describes the government experimental program PRIMUS (PRogram of Intelligent Mobile Unmanned Systems) and the achieved results of phase C demonstrated in summer 1999 on a military prooving ground. In this program there shall be shown the autonomous driving on an unmanned robot in open terrain. The most possible degree of autonomy shall be reached with today's technology to get a platform for different missions. The goal is to release the soldier from high dangerous tasks, to increase the performance and to come to a reduction of personnel and costs with unmanned systems. In phase C of the program two small tracked vehicles (Digitized Wiesel 2, airtransportable by CH53) are used. One as a robot vehicle the other as a command & control system. The Wiesel 2 is configured as a drive by wire-system and therefore well suited for the adaption of control computers. The autonomous detection and avoidance of obstacles in unknown, not cooperative environment is the main task. For navigation and orientation a sensor package is integrated. To detect obstacles the scene in the driving corridor of the robot is scanned 4 times per second by a 3D- Range image camera (LADAR). The measured 3D-range image is converted into a 2D-obstacle map and used as input for calculation of an obstacle free path. The combination of local navigation (obstacle avoidance) and global navigation leads to a collission free driving in open terrain to a predefined goal point with a velocity of up to 25km/h. A contour tracker with a TV-camera as sensor is also implemented which allows to follow contours (e.g. edge of a meadow) or to drive on paved or unpaved roads with a velocity up to 50km/h. In addition to these autonomous driving modes the operator in the command & control station can drive the robot by remote control. All the functions were successfully demonstrated in the summer 1999 on a military prooving ground. During a mission example the robot vehicle covered a distance of several

  8. Effect of drive mechanisms on dynamic characteristics of spacecraft tracking-drive flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shi-yao; Lei, Yong-jun; Wu, Xin-feng; Zhang, Da-peng

    2015-05-01

    Spacecraft tracking-drive flexible systems (STFS) consist of drive mechanisms and flexible structures, including solar array and a variety of large-scale antennas. The electromechanical interaction inside drive mechanisms makes it quite complicated to directly analyze the dynamic characteristics of an STFS. In this paper, an indirect dynamic characteristic analysis method for operating-state STFS is presented. The proposed method utilizes the structure dynamics approximation of drive mechanisms that converts the electromechanical model of an STFS into a structure dynamic model with elastic boundary conditions. The structure dynamics approximation and the dynamic characteristic analysis method are validated by experimental and analytical results, respectively. The analysis results indicate that the gear transmission ratio and viscous friction coefficient are the primary factors in approximating boundary stiffness and damping. Dynamic characteristics of an STFS with a large gear transmission ratio are close to that of a flexible structure with a cantilever boundary. Otherwise, torsion-mode natural frequencies of the STFS become smaller and corresponding modal damping ratios become larger, as a result of the local stiffness and damping features of drive mechanisms.

  9. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  10. Drive Diagnostic Filter Wheel Control

    2007-07-17

    DrD Filter Wheel Control is National Instrument's Labview software that drives a Drive Diagnostic filter wheel. The software can drive the filter wheel between each end limit, detect the positive and negative limit and each home position and post the stepper motot values to an Excel spreadsheet. The software can also be used to cycle the assembly between the end limits.

  11. Coherent Modes in the Edge of DIII--D H--modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, R. A.; Lehmer, R.; Boedo, J. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Rettig, C. L.; Doyle, E. J.; Watkins, J. G.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.

    1997-11-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations in the edge of DIII--D H--modes are often characterized by the presense of a large amplitude, coherent or quasi-coherent mode (f=50--60 kHz; δf=5--20 kHz). This mode is similar to coherent modes in the edge of ohmic discharges in TEXT(Tsui, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 70) (1993) 1565. and has also been seen in the edge of H--modes in PBX-M.(Tynan et al., Phys. Plasmas 1) (1994) 3301. The mode is localized to a narrow radial extent just inside the separatrix. In ohmic H--modes, the ``mode'' is a quasi-coherent, localized burst of turbulence. In beam heated discharges, the mode is coherent and dominates the power spectra for both density and potential fluctuations after onsetting 10--30 ms into the H--mode phase. In DIII--D, this mode directly drives particle and convective heat fluxes. Mode characteristics and plasma conditions at onset of the mode will be compared with theoretical predictions of such modes.

  12. Mode Switching and Filtering in Nanowire Lasers.

    PubMed

    Röder, Robert; Sidiropoulos, Themistoklis P H; Buschlinger, Robert; Riediger, Max; Peschel, Ulf; Oulton, Rupert F; Ronning, Carsten

    2016-04-13

    Coherent light sources confining the light below the vacuum wavelength barrier will drive future concepts of nanosensing, nanospectroscopy, and photonic circuits. Here, we directly image the angular emission of such a light source based on single semiconductor nanowire lasers. It is confirmed that the lasing switches from the fundamental mode in a thin ZnO nanowire to an admixture of several transverse modes in thicker nanowires approximately at the multimode cutoff. The mode competition with higher order modes substantially slows down the laser dynamics. We show that efficient photonic mode filtering in tapered nanowires selects the desired fundamental mode for lasing with improved performance including power, efficiency, and directionality important for an optimal coupling between adjacent nanophotonic waveguides. PMID:27007261

  13. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  14. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, A.C.

    1995-04-04

    An improved base drive circuit having a level shifter for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays. The non-linear delays provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors through a corresponding pair of buffer components. The non-linear delays provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors while an associated pair of transistors shunt the non-linear delays during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor. 2 figures.

  15. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  16. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, Arnold C.

    1995-01-01

    An improved base drive circuit (10) having a level shifter (24) for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays (30, 32). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors (100, 106) through a corresponding pair of buffer components (88, 94). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors (100, 106) while an associated pair of transistors (72, 80) shunt the non-linear delays (30, 32) during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor (100, 106).

  17. Advances in traction drive technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Traction drives are traced from early uses as main transmissions in automobiles at the turn of the century to modern, high-powered traction drives capable of transmitting hundreds of horsepower. Recent advances in technology are described which enable today's traction drive to be a serious candidate for off-highway vehicles and helicopter applications. Improvements in materials, traction fluids, design techniques, power loss and life prediction methods will be highlighted. Performance characteristics of the Nasvytis fixed-ratio drive are given. Promising future drive applications, such as helicopter main transmissions and servo-control positioning mechanisms are also addressed.

  18. Quasicoherent modes on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Markovic, T.; Eliseev, L. G.; Adámek, J.; Aftanas, M.; Bilkova, P.; Boehm, P.; Gryaznevich, M.; Imrisek, M.; Lysenko, S. E.; Medvedev, S. Y.; Panek, R.; Peterka, M.; Seidl, J.; Stefanikova, E.; Stockel, J.; Weinzettl, V.; the COMPASS Team

    2015-06-01

    Multiple quasicoherent electromagnetic modes with steady-state frequency and different nature and location were observed in the COMPASS tokamak (R = 0.56 m, = 0.2 m) at Bt = 1.14 T with Co-NBI (PNBI = 0.2-0.5 MW, Eb = 32 keV) at frequencies 5 kHz < f < 250 kHz. Modes were observed in both low and high confinement (L- and H-modes) plasmas. Lower frequency modes with f < 50 kHz were identified as low m tearing and kink MHD modes, while higher frequency modes with 50 kHz < f < 250 kHz were considered as having Alfvénic nature. Unexpectedly, such modes were only observed in the H-mode, both in neutral beam injector-assisted and Ohmic, so the mode driving force is not yet clear. Using the linear MHD code KINX, we initially identified the observed mode with a ballooning structure is as beta induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) with m, n < 5, while an antiballooning mode is initially identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) with m, n < 9.

  19. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Lianqing E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang; Li, Guangyong E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  20. Glaucoma and Driving: On-Road Driving Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Joanne M.; Black, Alex A.; Mallon, Kerry; Thomas, Ravi; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To comprehensively investigate the types of driving errors and locations that are most problematic for older drivers with glaucoma compared to those without glaucoma using a standardized on-road assessment. Methods Participants included 75 drivers with glaucoma (mean = 73.2±6.0 years) with mild to moderate field loss (better-eye MD = -1.21 dB; worse-eye MD = -7.75 dB) and 70 age-matched controls without glaucoma (mean = 72.6 ± 5.0 years). On-road driving performance was assessed in a dual-brake vehicle by an occupational therapist using a standardized scoring system which assessed the types of driving errors and the locations where they were made and the number of critical errors that required an instructor intervention. Driving safety was rated on a 10-point scale. Self-reported driving ability and difficulties were recorded using the Driving Habits Questionnaire. Results Drivers with glaucoma were rated as significantly less safe, made more driving errors, and had almost double the rate of critical errors than those without glaucoma. Driving errors involved lane positioning and planning/approach, and were significantly more likely to occur at traffic lights and yield/give-way intersections. There were few between group differences in self-reported driving ability. Conclusions Older drivers with glaucoma with even mild to moderate field loss exhibit impairments in driving ability, particularly during complex driving situations that involve tactical problems with lane-position, planning ahead and observation. These results, together with the fact that these drivers self-report their driving to be relatively good, reinforce the need for evidence-based on-road assessments for evaluating driving fitness. PMID:27472221

  1. ELM phenomenon as an interaction between bootstrap-current driven peeling modes and pressure-driven ballooning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarelma, S.; Günter, S.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2000-05-01

    An ELMy ASDEX Upgrade plasma equilibrium is reconstructed taking into account the bootstrap current. The peeling mode stability of the equilibrium is numerically analysed using the GATO [1] code, and it is found that the bootstrap current can drive the plasma peeling mode unstable. A high-n ballooning mode stability analysis of the equilibria revealed that, while destabilizing the peeling modes, the bootstrap current has a stabilizing effect on the ballooning modes. A combination of these two instabilities is a possible explanation for the type I ELM phenomenon. A triangularity scan showed that increasing triangularity stabilizes the peeling modes and can produce ELM-free periods observed in the experiments.

  2. Electronic response to nuclear breathing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Ruffini, Remo; Xue, She-Sheng

    2015-12-17

    Based on our previous work on stationary oscillation modes of electrons around giant nuclei, we show how to treat a general driving force on the electron gas, such as the one generated by the breathing mode of the nucleus, by means of the spectral method. As an example we demonstrate this method for a system with Z = 10{sup 4} in β-equilibrium with the electrons compressed up to the nuclear radius. In this case the stationary modes can be obtained analytically, which allows for a very speedy numerical calculation of the final result.

  3. Development of a drive system for a sequential space camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpsteen, J. T.; Solheim, C. D.; Stoap, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Breadboard models of single and dual motor drives for the shutter, claw and magazine of a space camera system were designed and tested. The single motor technique utilizes a single electronically commutated motor to drive the claw and shutter without resorting to a solenoid actuated clutch for pulse operation. Shutter speed is established by a combination of the cinemode speed and the opening of the conventional DAC two piece shutter. Pulse mode operation is obtained by applying power at a fixed clock rate and removing power at an appropriate point in the mechanical cycle such that the motor comes to rest by system friction. The dual motor approach utilizes a stepper motor to drive the shutter and an electronically commutated dc motor to drive the claw and magazine functions. The motors are synchronized electronically.

  4. Experiment study on friction drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guomin; Ma, Lisheng; Yao, Zhengqiu; Li, Guoping

    2004-09-01

    In the past years, friction drive was developed to overcome the inherent deficiencies in both worm drive and gear drive. No periodical error and free of backlash are the main advantages of friction drive. With the trend towards bigger and bigger aperture of the optical telescopes, there are some reports about friction drive employed to drive the telescopes. However friction drive has its own deficiencies, such as slippage and creepage. This report here describes the study on the friction drive finished in an experiment arranged by LAMOST project. It comprises three main parts. First, it introduces the experiment apparatus and proposes a new kind of measurement and adjustment mechanisms. Secondly, the report gives the analysis of friction drive characteristics theoretically, such as slippage, creepage and gives the results of corresponding experiments. The experiment shows that the lowest stable speed reaches 0.05″/s with precision of 0.009″(RMS), the preload has little influence on the drive precision in the case of constant velocity and the variable velocity when the angle acceleration is less than 5″/s2 with close loop control and the creepage velocity of this experiment system is 1.47″/s. Lastly, the analysis in the second section lists some measures to improve the precision and stability further. These measures have been actually conducted in the testing system and proved to be reliable.

  5. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  6. Automatism and driving offences.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, John

    2013-10-01

    Automatism is a rarely used defence, but it is particularly used for driving offences because many are strict liability offences. Medical evidence is almost always crucial to argue the defence, and it is important to understand the bars that limit the use of automatism so that the important medical issues can be identified. The issue of prior fault is an important public safeguard to ensure that reasonable precautions are taken to prevent accidents. The total loss of control definition is more problematic, especially with disorders of more gradual onset like hypoglycaemic episodes. In these cases the alternative of 'effective loss of control' would be fairer. This article explores several cases, how the criteria were applied to each, and the types of medical assessment required. PMID:24112330

  7. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  8. Head tilt during driving.

    PubMed

    Zikovitz, D C; Harris, L R

    1999-05-01

    In order to distinguish between the use of visual and gravito-inertial force reference frames, the head tilt of drivers and passengers were measured as they went around corners at various speeds. The visual curvature of the corners were thus dissociated from the magnitude of the centripetal forces (0.30-0.77 g). Drivers' head tilts were highly correlated with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r2=0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r2<0.1). Passengers' head tilts were inversely correlated with the lateral forces (r2=0.3-0.7) and seem to reflect a passive sway. The strong correlation of the tilt of drivers' heads with a visual aspect of the road ahead, supports the use of a predominantly visual reference frame for the driving task. PMID:10722313

  9. All wheel drive vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, M.; Yagasaki, A.; Kawashima, Y.

    1986-07-15

    An all-wheel-drive vehicle is described which consists of: (a) a body; (b) an engine mounted on the body and having an output shaft; (c) front and rear pairs of wheels drivable by power from the engine, the front and rear wheels being vertically movably suspended from the body; (d) axles coupled to the front and rear wheels; (e) first power transmitting means for transmitting power from the output shaft of the engine to one of the axles of the front and rear wheels; (f) a power output unit mounted on the one axle; and (g) second power transmitting means for transmitting power from the power output unit to the other of the axles of the front and rear wheels.

  10. Rotary drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kenderdine, Eugene W.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary drive mechanism includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de-energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti-overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

  11. Hyperactive children as young adults: driving abilities, safe driving behavior, and adverse driving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mariellen; Barkley, Russell A; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    ADHD has been linked to poorer driving abilities and greater adverse outcomes (crashes, citations) in clinic-referred cases of teens and adults with ADHD. No study, however, has focused systematically on ADHD children followed into adulthood. The present paper does so while measuring driving-related cognitive abilities, driving behavior, and history of adverse driving outcomes. A multi-method, multi-source battery of driving measures was collected at the young adult follow-up on hyperactive (H; N=147; mean age=21.1) and community control children (CC; N=71; mean age=20.5) followed for more than 13 years. More of the H than CC groups had been ticketed for reckless driving, driving without a license, hit-and-run crashes, and had their licenses suspended or revoked. Official driving records found more of the H group having received traffic citations and a greater frequency of license suspensions. The cost of damage in their initial crashes was also significantly greater in the H than CC group. Both self-report and other ratings of actual driving behavior revealed less safe driving practices being used by the H group. Observations by driving instructors during a behind-the-wheel road test indicated significantly more impulsive errors. Performance on a simulator further revealed slower and more variable reaction times, greater errors of impulsiveness (false alarms, poor rule following), more steering variability, and more scrapes and crashes of the simulated vehicle against road boundaries in the H than in the CC group. These findings suggest that children growing up with ADHD may either have fewer driving risks or possibly under-report those risks relative to clinic-referred adults with this disorder. Deficits in simulator performance and safe driving behavior, however, are consistent with clinic-referred adults with ADHD suggesting ongoing risks for such adverse driving outcomes in children growing up with ADHD. PMID:16919226

  12. Dimensions of driving anger and their relationships with aberrant driving.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between driving anger and aberrant driving behaviours. An internet-based questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of Chinese drivers, with driving anger measured by a 14-item short Driving Anger Scale (DAS) and the aberrant driving behaviours measured by a 23-item Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ). The results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the three-factor model (hostile gesture, arrival-blocking and safety-blocking) of the DAS fitted the driving anger data well. The Exploratory Factor Analysis on DBQ data differentiated four types of aberrant driving, viz. emotional violation, error, deliberate violation and maintaining progress violation. For the anger-aberration relation, it was found that only "arrival-blocking" anger was a significant positive predictor for all four types of aberrant driving behaviours. The "safety-blocking" anger revealed a negative impact on deliberate violations, a finding different from previously established positive anger-aberration relation. These results suggest that drivers with different patterns of driving anger would show different behavioural tendencies and as a result intervention strategies may be differentially effective for drivers of different profiles. PMID:25984643

  13. Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

    2011-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

  14. Effects of fuel-capsule shimming and drive asymmetry on inertial-confinement-fusion symmetry and yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; DeCiantis, J. L.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Marshall, F. J.; Smalyuk, V.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; et al

    2016-03-22

    Three orthogonal proton emission imaging cameras were used to study the 3D effects of low-mode drive asymmetries and target asymmetries on nuclear burn symmetry and yield in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments. The fusion yield decreased quickly as the burn region became asymmetric due to either drive or capsule asymmetry. Here, measurements and analytic scaling are used to predict how intentionally asymmetric capsule shells could improve performance by compensating for drive asymmetry when it cannot be avoided (such as with indirect drive or with polar direct drive).

  15. Effects of fuel-capsule shimming and drive asymmetry on inertial-confinement-fusion symmetry and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; DeCiantis, J. L.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Marshall, F. J.; Smalyuk, V.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    Three orthogonal proton emission imaging cameras were used to study the 3D effects of low-mode drive asymmetries and target asymmetries on nuclear burn symmetry and yield in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments. The fusion yield decreased quickly as the burn region became asymmetric due to either drive or capsule asymmetry. Measurements and analytic scaling are used to predict how intentionally asymmetric capsule shells could improve performance by compensating for drive asymmetry when it cannot be avoided (such as with indirect drive or with polar direct drive).

  16. Dual Mode Transmission Designs for Motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Kuen-Bao; Yan, Hong-Sen

    This paper presents two types of the dual mode transmission for use in a motorcycle. A motorcycle transmission typically using the discrete speed ratio transmission that works by alternating the gear drive, and the continuously variable transmission (CVT) that transmits power by using the rubber V-belt. The dual mode transmission described in this paper, utilizing a V-belt drive, a fixed ratio mechanism, and a planetary gear train, can provide two operation regimes over the full speed ratio range by means engaged clutches. One is the fixed gear ratio and differential transmission system; the other is the differential and continuously variable transmission system. The kinematics, power flow, and mechanical efficiency of each transmission system are analyzed. An example is employed to illustrate the design procedure. Furthermore, several available design concepts of the dual mode transmissions for motorcycle applications are proposed.

  17. Sequenced drive for rotary valves

    DOEpatents

    Mittell, Larry C.

    1981-01-01

    A sequenced drive for rotary valves which provides the benefits of applying rotary and linear motions to the movable sealing element of the valve. The sequenced drive provides a close approximation of linear motion while engaging or disengaging the movable element with the seat minimizing wear and damage due to scrubbing action. The rotary motion of the drive swings the movable element out of the flowpath thus eliminating obstruction to flow through the valve.

  18. Sizing criterial for traction drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified traction drive fatigue analysis which was derived from the Lundberg-Palmgren theory is measured and the effects of rotational speed, multiplicity of contacts, and variation in the available traction coefficient on traction drive system life, size, and power capacity was investigated. Simplified equations are provided for determining the 90% survival life rating of steel traction drive contacts of arbitrary geometry. References to life modifying factors for material, lubrication, and traction will be made.

  19. The drive-wise project: driving simulator training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Gianclaudio; Theill, Nathan; Martin, Mike; Keller, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training. Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62–87 years) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) a driving simulator training group, (2) an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention), or (3) a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85%) completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned orthogonal comparisons. Results: The driving simulator-training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention-training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers' safety on the road. PMID:24860497

  20. Driving anger in Ukraine: Appraisals, not trait driving anger, predict anger intensity while driving.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A N; Hill, T; Sullman, M J M

    2016-03-01

    Trait driving anger is often, but not always, found to predict both the intensity of anger while driving and subsequent crash-related behaviours. However, a number of studies have not found support for a direct relationship between one's tendency to become angry and anger reported while driving, suggesting that other factors may mediate this relationship. The present self-report study investigated whether, in anger provoking driving situations, the appraisals made by drivers influence the relationship between trait and state anger. A sample of 339 drivers from Ukraine completed the 33-item version of the Driver Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994) and eight questions about their most recent experience of driving anger. A structural equation model found that the intensity of anger experienced was predicted by the negative evaluations of the situation, which was in turn predicted by trait driving anger. However, trait driving anger itself did not predict anger intensity; supporting the hypothesis that evaluations of the driving situation mediate the relationship between trait and state anger. Further, the unique structure of the DAS required to fit the data from the Ukrainian sample, may indicate that the anger inducing situations in Ukraine are different to those of a more developed country. Future research is needed to investigate driving anger in Ukraine in a broader sample and also to confirm the role of the appraisal process in the development of driving anger in both developed and undeveloped countries. PMID:26710267

  1. Gravity drives Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Gordon; Forster, Marnie

    2010-05-01

    The most violent of Great Earthquakes are driven by ruptures on giant megathrusts adjacent to actively forming mountain belts. Current theory suggests that the seismic rupture harvests (and thus releases) elastic energy that has been previously stored in locked segments of the megathrust. The general belief, however, is that this energy was accumulated as the result of relative motion of the adjacent stiff elastic tectonic plates. This mechanism fails to explain many first order aspects of large earthquakes, however. The energy source for strain accumulation must also include gravitational collapse of orogenic crust and/or in the foundering (or roll-back) of an adjacent subducting lithospheric slab. Therefore we have conducted an analysis of the geometry of aftershocks, and report that this allows distinction of two types of failure on giant megathrusts. Mode I failure involves horizontal shortening, and is consistent with the classic view that megathrusts fail in compression, with motion analogous to that expected if accretion takes place against a rigid (or elastic) backstop. Mode II failure involves horizontal extension, and requires the over-riding plate to stretch during an earthquake. This process is likely to continue during the subsequent period of afterslip, and therefore will again be evident in aftershock patterns. Mode I behaviour may well have applied to the southern segment of the Sumatran megathrust, from whence emanated the rupture that drove the 2004 Great Earthquake. Mode II behaviour appears to apply to the northern segment of the same rupture, however. The geometry of aftershocks beneath the Andaman Sea suggest that the crust above the initial rupture failed in an extensional mode. The edge of the Indian plate is foundering, with slab-hinge roll-back in a direction orthogonal to its motion vector. The only possible cause for this extension therefore is westward roll-back of the subducting Indian plate, and the consequent gravity-driven movement

  2. 26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, second floor above canning area. The belt has been removed from the conveyor, but sections of can conveyor tracks are visible on the floor. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  3. VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. RF current drive and plasma fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan; Morini, L.; Coda, S.

    2011-12-01

    The role played by electron density fluctuations near the plasma edge on rf current drive in tokamaks is assessed quantitatively. For this purpose, a general framework for incorporating density fluctuations in existing modelling tools has been developed. It is valid when rf power absorption takes place far from the fluctuating region of the plasma. The ray-tracing formalism is modified in order to take into account time-dependent perturbations of the density, while the Fokker-Planck solver remains unchanged. The evolution of the electron distribution function in time and space under the competing effects of collisions and quasilinear diffusion by rf waves is determined consistently with the time scale of fluctuations described as a statistical process. Using the ray-tracing code C3PO and the 3D linearized relativistic bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck solver LUKE, the effect of electron density fluctuations on the current driven by the lower hybrid (LH) and the electron cyclotron (EC) waves is estimated quantitatively. A thin fluctuating layer characterized by electron drift wave turbulence at the plasma edge is considered. The effect of fluctuations on the LH wave propagation is equivalent to a random scattering process with a broadening of the poloidal mode spectrum proportional to the level of the perturbation. However, in the multipass regime, the LH current density profile remains sensitive to the ray chaotic behaviour, which is not averaged by fluctuations. The effect of large amplitude fluctuations on the EC driven current is found to be similar to an anomalous radial transport of the fast electrons. The resulting lower current drive efficiency and broader current profile are in better agreement with experimental observations. Finally, applied to the ITER ELMy H-mode regime, the model predicts a significant broadening of the EC driven current density profile with the fluctuation level, which can make the stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode potentially

  5. Role of subdominant stable modes in plasma microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, D. R.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Merz, F.; Pueschel, M. J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.

    2011-05-15

    In gyrokinetic simulations, thousands of degrees of freedom are available to contribute to the fluctuation spectrum. For wavevectors with a single linear instability, the unstable eigenmode accounts for only one of these degrees of freedom. Little has been known about the role of the remaining fluctuations in the turbulent dynamics. In this paper, these fluctuations are characterized as modes in mode decompositions of gyrokinetic distribution functions from nonlinear simulations. This analysis reveals the excitation of a hierarchy of damped modes at the same perpendicular scales as the driving instabilities. Two effects of these subdominant modes are described: First, these damped modes define a potent energy sink, creating a situation where energy drive and energy dissipation peak at the same perpendicular scales. Second, damped modes with tearing parity (even parity about the outboard midplane for A fluctuations) are driven to significant amplitudes and facilitate the development of magnetic stochasticity in electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations.

  6. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  7. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  8. Handbook for Driving Knowledge Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, William T.; McDole, Thomas L.

    Materials intended for driving knowledge test development for use by operational licensing and education agencies are presented. A pool of 1,313 multiple choice test items is included, consisting of sets of specially developed and tested items covering principles of safe driving, legal regulations, and traffic control device knowledge pertinent to…

  9. Bidirectional drive and brake mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A space transport vehicle is disclosed as including a body which is arranged to be movably mounted on an elongated guide member disposed in outer space and driven therealong. A drive wheel is mounted on a drive shaft and arranged to be positioned in rolling engagement with the elongated guide carrying the vehicle. A brake member is arranged on the drive shaft for movement into and out of engagement with an adjacent surface of the drive wheel. An actuator is mounted on the body to be manually moved back and forth between spaced positions in an arc of movement. A ratchet-and-pawl mechanism is arranged to operate upon movements of the actuator in one direction between first and second positions for coupling the actuator to the drive wheel to incrementally rotate the wheel in one rotational direction and to operate upon movements of the actuator in the opposite direction for uncoupling the actuator from the wheel. The brake member is threadedly coupled to the drive shaft in order that the brake member will be operated only when the actuator is moved on beyond its first and second positions for shifting the brake member along the drive shaft and into frictional engagement with the adjacent surface on the drive wheel.

  10. Students: You... Alcohol and Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this manual is to provide accurate information about alcohol and about drinking and driving, so that the student may make responsible decisions about both. It covers youth drinking, drinking and driving, and the individual's responsibility to others in drinking situations. The booklet consists of eight readings, as well as…

  11. Microwave mode shifting antenna system for regenerating particulate filters

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

    2011-04-26

    A regeneration system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter including a microwave energy absorbing surface, and an antenna system comprising N antennas and an antenna driver module that sequentially drives the antenna system in a plurality of transverse modes of the antenna system to heat selected portions of the microwave absorbing surface to regenerate the PM filter, where N is an integer greater than one. The transverse modes may include transverse electric (TE) and/or transverse magnetic (TM) modes.

  12. Driving difficulties in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Matthew; Uc, Ergun Y; Dawson, Jeffrey; Anderson, Steven; Rodnitzky, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Safe driving requires the coordination of attention, perception, memory, motor and executive functions (including decision-making) and self-awareness. PD and other disorders may impair these abilities. Because age or medical diagnosis alone is often an unreliable criterion for licensure, decisions on fitness to drive should be based on empirical observations of performance. Linkages between cognitive abilities measured by neuropsychological tasks, and driving behavior assessed using driving simulators, and natural and naturalistic observations in instrumented vehicles, can help standardize the assessment of fitness-to-drive. By understanding the patterns of driver safety errors that cause crashes, it may be possible to design interventions to reduce these errors and injuries and increase mobility. This includes driver performance monitoring devices, collision alerting and warning systems, road design, and graded licensure strategies. PMID:20187237

  13. [Driving and health at work].

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-09-01

    The role of the occupational physician is to prevent occupational accidents and diseases. Therefore, he is the one to decide if a worker is fit to drive in the context of his professional activity, including in cases where no specific driving license is required (e.g. forklift truck, mobile crane). This decision is an important one, as two thirds of fatal occupational accidents occur on the road. The decision is made on the basis of both a medical examination and the regulation, which indicates all contraindications to driving. The physician's responsibility is involved, as is the employer's, as he must ensure that his employee is fit to drive and possesses a valid driving license at all times. PMID:25960440

  14. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  15. Driving the Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Technological modification of the earth's surface (e.g., agriculture, urbanization) is an old story in human history, but what about the future? The future of landscape in an accelerating technological world, beyond a relatively short time horizon, lies hidden behind an impenetrable veil of complexity. Sufficiently complex dynamics generates not only the trajectory of a variable of interest (e.g., vegetation cover) but also the environment in which that variable evolves (e.g., background climate). There is no way to anticipate what variables will define that environment—the dynamics creates its own variables. We are always open to surprise by a change of conditions we thought or assumed were fixed or by the appearance of new phenomena of whose possible existence we had been unaware or thought unlikely. This is especially true under the influence of technology, where novelty is the rule. Lack of direct long-term predictability of landscape change does not, however, mean we cannot say anything about its future. The presence of persistence (finite time scales) in a system means that prediction by a calibrated numerical model should be good for a limited period of time barring bad luck or faulty implementation. Short-term prediction, despite its limitations, provides an option for dealing with the longer-term future. If a computer-controlled car tries to drive itself from New York to Los Angeles, no conceivable (or possible) stand-alone software can be constructed to predict a priori the space-time trajectory of the vehicle. Yet the drive is normally completed easily by most drivers. The trip is successfully completed because each in a series of very short (linear) steps can be "corrected" on the fly by the driver, who takes her cues from the environment to keep the car on the road and headed toward its destination. This metaphor differs in a fundamental way from the usual notion of predicting geomorphic change, because it involves a goal—to reach a desired

  16. Electric vehicle drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, M.

    1992-01-01

    New legislation in the State of California requires that 2% of vehicles sold there from 1998 will be 'zero-emitting'. This provides a unique market opportunity for developers of electric vehicles but substantial improvements in the technology are probably required if it is to be successfully exploited. There are around a dozen types of battery that are potentially relevant to road vehicles but, at the present, lead/acid and sodium—sulphur come closest to combining acceptable performance, life and cost. To develop an efficient, lightweight electric motor system requires up-to-date techniques of magnetics design, and the latest power-electronic and microprocessor control methods. Brushless machines, coupled with solid-state inverters, offer the most economical solution for mass production, even though their development costs are higher than for direct-current commutator machines. Fitted to a small car, even the highest energy-density batteries will only provide around 200 km average range before recharging. Therefore, some form of supplementary on-board power generation will probably be needed to secure widespread acceptance by the driving public. Engine-driven generators of quite low power can achieve useful increases in urban range but will fail to qualify as 'zero-emitting'. On the other hand, if the same function could be economically performed by a small fuel-cell using hydrogen derived from a methanol reformer, then most of the flexibility provided by conventional vehicles would be retained. The market prospects for electric cars would then be greatly enhanced and their dependence on very advanced battery technology would be reduced.

  17. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  18. A generic mode selection strategy for high-order mode gyrotrons operating at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Joachim; Avramidis, Konstantinos; Gantenbein, Gerd; Illy, Stefan; Jin, Jianbo; Thumm, Manfred; Jelonnek, John

    2015-01-01

    High-power, high-frequency gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive, such as proposed for the demonstration thermonuclear fusion reactor DEMO, require operating modes of very high order. As it is shown, the selection of the operating modes for such gyrotrons can be based on multi-frequency operability. A general selection strategy is derived, suitable for multi-purpose multi-frequency gyrotrons with quasi-optical mode converter and single-disc output window. Two examples, one of them relevant for future DEMO gyrotron designs, are discussed.

  19. Oil well pump driving unit

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, T. A.

    1984-11-06

    An oil well pumping apparatus which includes a submerged reciprocating pump mounted in a tubing arrangement communicating with the wellhead, a sucker rod string extending through the tubing arrangement and connected in driving relation with the pump, and a pumping tee and stuffing box arrangement mounted on the casing of the well at the wellhead and including a sealed drive rod arrangement in the stuffing box connected in driving relation to said sucker rod string, and a pump driving unit. The pump driving unit includes a hydraulic cylinder and support means including a gimbal arrangement for supporting the hydraulic cylinder over the stuffing box with the axis of the cylinder rod aligned with the axis of said stuffing box. A coupling means is provided for coupling the cylinder rod to the sealed drive rod arrangement. A hydraulic drive/control unit is coupled to said in/out fluid line for operating cycle consisting of a hydraulic power upstroke and a gravity power downstroke. An assist cylinder and accumulator combination are provided to counteract part of the weight of the rod string and thus reduce the workload on t

  20. Berreman mode and epsilon near zero mode.

    PubMed

    Vassant, Simon; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of an electromagnetic mode propagating in a thin dielectric film deposited on a metallic film at the particular frequency such that the dielectric permittivity vanishes. We discuss the remarkable properties of this mode in terms of extreme subwavelength mode confinment and its potential applications. We also discuss the link between this mode, the IR absorption peak on a thin dielectric film known as Berreman effect and the surface phonon polariton mode at the air/dielectric interface. Finally, we establish a connection with the polarization shift occuring in quantum wells. PMID:23188363

  1. Driving Performance Under Alcohol in Simulated Representative Driving Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Kaussner, Yvonne; Jagiellowicz-Kaufmann, Monika; Hoffmann, Sonja; Krüger, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Comparing drug-induced driving impairments with the effects of benchmark blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) is an approved approach to determine the clinical relevance of findings for traffic safety. The present study aimed to collect alcohol calibration data to validate findings of clinical trials that were derived from a representative test course in a dynamic driving simulator. The driving performance of 24 healthy volunteers under placebo and with 0.05% and 0.08% BACs was measured in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Trained investigators assessed the subjects’ driving performance and registered their driving errors. Various driving parameters that were recorded during the simulation were also analyzed. Generally, the participants performed worse on the test course (P < 0.05 for the investigators’ assessment) under the influence of alcohol. Consistent with the relevant literature, lane-keeping performance parameters were sensitive to the investigated BACs. There were significant differences between the alcohol and placebo conditions in most of the parameters analyzed. However, the total number of errors was the only parameter discriminating significantly between all three BAC conditions. In conclusion, data show that the present experimental setup is suitable for future psychopharmacological research. Thereby, for each drug to be investigated, we recommend to assess a profile of various parameters that address different levels of driving. On the basis of this performance profile, the total number of driving errors is recommended as the primary endpoint. However, this overall endpoint should be completed by a specifically sensitive parameter that is chosen depending on the effect known to be induced by the tested drug. PMID:25689289

  2. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  3. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  4. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-10-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 {mu}sec, and therefore, making control of ``reflex-type`` of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver`s aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver`s aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  5. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 [mu]sec, and therefore, making control of reflex-type'' of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  6. Floquet generation of Majorana edge modes and topological invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Thakurathi, Manisha; Patel, Aavishkar; Dutta, Amit; Sengupta, Krishnendu

    2014-03-01

    We show that periodic driving of one of the parameters in the Hamiltonian of a system can produce Majorana modes at its edges. The systems studied include a p-wave superconducting wire and the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. For the wire, we show that periodic δ-function kicks of the on-site potential can produce a number of Majorana modes at the two ends; these modes can appear or disappear as the driving frequency is varied. The end modes correspond to eigenvalues of the Floquet operator equal to +/- 1 . Using Floquet theory for the bulk, we derive a topological invariant which correctly predicts the number of these modes as a function of the frequency and the Floquet eigenvalue. We also discuss the generation of end modes by periodic kicking of the hopping and superconducting terms. For the Kitaev model, we derive the phase diagram where Majorana edge modes appear on zigzag and armchair edges. We then show that if one of the couplings is given periodic δ-function kicks, modes can appear on some edges even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no modes on those edges. The Floquet theory of the bulk can again be used to predict the frequencies at which edge modes appear or disappear for different values of the momentum of the modes. This work was supported by DST and CSIR, India.

  7. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  8. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  9. Pulse Selection Control for the IR FEL Photocathode Drive Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.; Evans, R.; Garza, O.; Hill, R.; Shinn, M.; Song, J.; Venhaus, D.

    1997-05-01

    The method for current control of the photocathode source is described. This device allows remote control of drive laser output pulses for resulting beam currents of less than 1 microamp to full current of 5 milliamps. The low current modes are accomplished by counting discrete micropulses and gating electro-optical cells. The higher current modes are done by varying both the photons per pulse and the frequency of the laser output pulses. Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) provide the choice in micropulses per macropulse and the macropulse frequency. All macropulses are line locked to 60 Hz and have the ability to be slewed through a line cycle in discrete steps.

  10. Numerical Modeling of HHFW Heating and Current Drive on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2008-11-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive, at frequencies up to 15 times the fundamental deuterium cyclotron frequency, are being studied on NSTX. Recent experiments indicate that the core heating efficiency depends strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [1], and improves significantly at higher toroidal magnetic fields. Wave propagation, absorption and current drive characteristics for L-mode and H-mode NSTX discharges have been analyzed using both ray tracing and full wave models. Simulations obtained with the AORSA and TORIC full codes agree reasonably well with Motional Stark Effect measurements of the driven current, and indicate the importance of trapping effects on the driven current profile. Collisional damping effects on the wave absorption, particularly in edge regions, will be considered. [1] J. C. Hosea, et al, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008).

  11. An 18-Inch Direct Drive Alt-Az Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Rowe, Dave; Gray, Dan; Albertson, Billy; Chiu, Wilson; Kirkup, Michelle; Murphy, Drew; Ridgely, John; Schmitt, Josh; Swanson, Matt; Urban, Rob; Liu, Tong; Branch, Howard; Chelborad, Cary; Keller, Allan

    2008-05-01

    A modest aperture alt-az telescope has been designed and is being built for student use at California Polytechnic State University. The telescope's drive system has no gears, belts, or friction wheels; instead direct drive motors and high resolution encoders are completely integrated into the bearing assemblies and telescope superstructure. In altitude, for instance, a ring of permanent magnets is firmly mounted to the OTA while an opposing ring of coils is mounted on the inside of a fork arm. The electronic control system has been designed to operate these brushless motors in a high- precision mode. To achieve the highest possible closed loop servo bandwidth, the structure was designed -- using finite element analysis as well as traditional tools -- to have a very high natural frequency. The direct drive system and stiff structure should effectively counter wind gusts when the telescope is operated out in the open or within a roll-off roof observatory.

  12. Driving Speed vs Fuel Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical treatment of the relationship between driving speed and fuel efficiency is presented. The material involves applications of exponentials, logarithms, and elementary calculus, and is intended to be enrichment material for secondary and lower college mathematics classes. (MP)

  13. Apparatus for forming drive belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topits, A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus for manufacturing belts, such as seamless belts, is provided, the apparatus has relatively movable rollers that are mounted in an oven. A belt blank, for example, of a thin polyester film, is rotated on the rollers as heat is applied. Four rollers, each mounted on a separate roller assembly, are movable along appropriate tracks while a fifth centrally located roller is stationary. A pair of dc motors are operatively connected to a speed reduction gear assembly to provide a pair of rotating drive shafts that extend into the oven. One rotating shaft drives all of the rollers through a rotational gear assembly while the other drive shaft is capable of positioning the movable rollers through respective rotating threaded shafts. Control devices are provided for controlling the motors while measuring devices are operatively connected to the positional drive shaft to indicate the position of the rollers.

  14. Novel driving scheme for FLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiin-chuan; Wang, Chi-Chang

    1996-03-01

    A frame change data driving scheme (FCDDS) for ferroelectric LCD(FLCD) of matrix- addressing is developed which uses only positive voltages for the row and column waveforms to achieve bipolar driving waveforms on the FLCD pixels. Thus the required supply voltage for the driver chips is half that of the conventional driving scheme. Each scan line is addressed in only twice the switching time (tau) (minimum response time of FLC) so that this scheme is suitable for high duty ratio panels. In order to meet this bistable electro-optic effect of FLCD and zero net dc voltage across each pixel of the liquid crystal, turning on and turning off pixels are done at different time slots and frame slots. This driving scheme can be easily implemented using commercially available STN LCD drivers plus a small external circuit or by making an ASIC which is a slight modification of the STN driver. Both methods are discussed.

  15. Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Raises Crash Risk Video technology and in-vehicle sensors showed that distracted driving, especially among new drivers, ... whenever the cars were moving. A suite of sensors recorded acceleration, sudden braking or swerving, and other ...

  16. Dopaminergic Circuitry Underlying Mating Drive.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Stephen X; Rogulja, Dragana; Crickmore, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    We develop a new system for studying how innate drives are tuned to reflect current physiological needs and capacities, and how they affect sensory-motor processing. We demonstrate the existence of male mating drive in Drosophila, which is transiently and cumulatively reduced as reproductive capacity is depleted by copulations. Dopaminergic activity in the anterior of the superior medial protocerebrum (SMPa) is also transiently and cumulatively reduced in response to matings and serves as a functional neuronal correlate of mating drive. The dopamine signal is transmitted through the D1-like DopR2 receptor to P1 neurons, which also integrate sensory information relevant to the perception of females, and which project to courtship motor centers that initiate and maintain courtship behavior. Mating drive therefore converges with sensory information from the female at the point of transition to motor output, controlling the propensity of a sensory percept to trigger goal-directed behavior. PMID:27292538

  17. [Driving licenses and medical fitness].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Antoine; Manaouil, Cécile

    2015-09-01

    The Highway Code requires that any vehicle driver is constantly in a state and in position of performing easily and without delay all the maneuvers required of them. What about a vehicle driver suffering from a medical condition that does not allow it to meet the requirements of the Highway Code? While it may seem obvious that some diseases irrefutably presumed inability to drive, the regulatory authority had to answer a number of questions. What people should be subject to medical control of driving ability? What constitutes control? Who may be responsible for this control? The government, through a decree dated 17 July 2012 relating to medical control of driving ability, came to ask a new legal framework in this area meets all of these issues. In addition, a decree of 31 July 2012 came to specify the implementation rules for monitoring medical fitness to drive. PMID:25900083

  18. Dangers of Texting While Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... laws Currently there is no national ban on texting or using a wireless phone while driving, but a number of states have passed laws banning texting or wireless phones or requiring hands-free use ...

  19. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. T.; Wang, L.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, ω∗, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to ρi/Ln, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  20. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-15

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, {omega}{sup *}, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to {rho}{sub i}/L{sub n}, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  1. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  2. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  3. Warp drive with zero expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José

    2002-03-01

    It is commonly believed that Alcubierre's warp drive works by contracting space in front of the warp bubble and expanding the space behind it. We show that this contraction/expansion is but a marginal consequence of the choice made by Alcubierre and explicitly construct a similar spacetime where no contraction/expansion occurs. Global and optical properties of warp-drive spacetimes are also discussed.

  4. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  5. Stabilisation of a class of 2-DOF underactuated mechanical systems via direct Lyapunov approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turker, Turker; Gorgun, Haluk; Cansever, Galip

    2013-06-01

    This paper represents an alternative stabilisation procedure for a class of two degree-of-freedom underactuated mechanical systems based on a set of transformations and a Lyapunov function. After simplifying dynamic equations of the system via partial feedback linearisation and coordinate changes, the stability of the system is provided with Lyapunov's direct method. Proposed control scheme is used on two different examples and asymptotic convergence for each system is proven by means of La Salle's invariance principle. The designed controller is successfully illustrated through numerical simulations for each example.

  6. Design, dynamic modelling and experimental validation of a 2DOF flexible antenna sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Claudia F.; Naci Engin, Seref; Feliu Batlle, Vicente

    2014-04-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom flexible antenna sensor platform was designed to physically simulate the ability of a robotic arm, which rapidly reorients and targets itself towards specific surfaces from different approachable angles. An accurate antenna model involves non-linear expressions that represent the system dynamics. Therefore, a comprehensive study along with experimental work has been carried out in order to achieve accurate system identification and validate the dynamic model. The model developed has proven useful in controlling the antenna tip, minimising the effects of the non-linear flexural dynamics and the Coulomb friction. The system was driven by servo motors. Algebraic controllers were developed for the antenna tip to track the reference trajectory. The platform system used encoders to measure the joint angles and a loadcell sensor to obtain the flexible link tip position. To validate the sensory information, the results obtained by the integrated sensors were compared to that of an external camera system.

  7. Sound Absorption of a 2DOF Resonant Liner with Negative Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Cataldi, P.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experimental study conducted to determine the effect of negative bias flow on the sound absorption of a two degree-of-freedom liner. The backwall for the liner was designed to act as a double-Helmholtz resonator so as to act as a hard wall at all frequencies except at its resonant frequencies. The effect of bias flow is investigated for a buried septum porosity of 2% and 19.5% for bias flow orifice Mach numbers up to 0.311. The bias flow appears to modify the resistance and reactance of the backwall alone at lower frequencies up to about 2 kHz, with marginal effects at higher frequencies. Absorption coefficients close to unity are achieved for a frequency range of 500 - 4000 Hz for the overall liner for a septum porosity of 2% and orifice Mach number of 0.128. Insertion loss tests performed in a flow duct facility for grazing flow Mach numbers up to 0.2 and septum Mach numbers up to 0.15 showed that negative bias flow can increase insertion loss by as much as 10 dB at frequencies in the range of 500 D 1400 Hz compared to no grazing flow. The effectiveness of the negative bias flow is diminished as the grazing flow velocity is increased.

  8. Sound Absorption of a 2DOF Resonant Liner with Negative Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Cataldi, P.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experimental study conducted to determine the effect of negative bias flow on the sound absorption of a two degree-of-freedom liner. The backwall for the liner was designed to act as a double-Helmholtz resonator so as to act as a hard wall at all frequencies except at its resonant frequencies. All normal incident impedance data presented herein was acquired in an impedance tube. The effect of bias flow is investigated for a buried septum porosity of 2% and 19.5% for bias flow orifice mach numbers up to 03 11. As a porous backwall is needed for the flow to pass through, the effect of bias flow on this backwall all had to be evaluated first. The bias flow appears to modify the resistance and reactance of the backwall alone at lower frequencies up to about 2 kHz, with marginal effects at higher frequencies. Absorption coefficients close to unity are achieved for a frequency range of 500-4000 Hz for the overall liner for a septum porosity of 2% and orifice mach number of 0.128. Insertion loss tests performed in a flow duct facility for grazing flow Mach numbers up to 0.2 and septum mach numbers up to 0.15 showed that negative bias flow can increase insertion loss by as much as 10 dB at frequencies in the range of 500 - 1400 Hz compared to no grazing flow. The effectiveness of the negative bias flow is diminished as the grazing flow velocity is increased.

  9. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  10. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  11. [Driving license and mellitus diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cimino, Luc; Deneufgermain, Alain; Lalau, Jean-Daniel

    2015-10-01

    For the "light group" as for the "heavy group" driving license cannot be issued or renewed to the applicant or drivers suffering from a condition that may constitute or lead to functional disability jeopardize road safety when driving a motor vehicle. The decision to issue or renew the license by the prefectural authority is taken on the advice of the departmental medical commission or a licensed physician. The decree of August 31, 2010 establishes the list of medical conditions incompatible with obtaining or maintaining the driving license or which may give rise to the issue of driving license limited validity. "Diabetes mellitus treated with medications that can cause hypoglycemia" belongs to this list. If the medical control of driving ability comes at the initiative of the user, the treating physician should firstly ensure the understanding of prescribed treatments that can cause hypoglycaemic episodes and other by informing diabetic person she must pass a medical examination of fitness to drive in a licensed physician. PMID:25956301

  12. Flux averaged current drive efficiency of electron Bernstein waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, D. E.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore Davies, C. N.; O'Brien, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Electron Bernstein waves are of interest for heating and current drive in spherical tokamaks where the central region of the plasma is not accessible to the ordinary and extraordinary modes. In this paper we adapt an analytical theory of current drive in toroidal geometry developed by Lin-Liu et al (2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 4064) to this system. This involves taking account of the fact that the ratio of the Larmor radius to the perpendicular wavelength is not, in general, small for the Bernstein waves and also including the effects of a non-circular plasma cross section. By comparing the results with those of a full Fokker-Planck code, we demonstrate that the analytical method can yield a good approximation to the current drive efficiency in most regimes of practical interest. Since it is much less computationally demanding than using a Fokker-Planck code we suggest that it could be a useful tool for analysing experiments on Bernstein mode current drive in spherical tokamaks.

  13. Two modes for dune orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; Narteau, Clément; Gao, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Earth sand seas experience winds that blow with different strengths and from different directions in line with the seasons. In response, dune fields show a rich variety of shapes from small crescentic barchans to big star and linear dunes. Linear dunes often exhibit complex and compound patterns with different length scales and orientations, which seem difficult to relate to a single wind cycle. We present results of underwater experiments and numerical simulations where a single wind regime can lead to two different dunes orientation depending on sediment availability. Sediment availability selects the overriding mechanism for the formation of dunes: increasing in height from the destabilization of a sand bed or elongating in a finger on a non-erodible ground from a localized sand source. These mechanisms drive the dunes orientation. Therefore, dunes alignment maximizes dunes orthogonality to sand fluxes in the bed instability mode, while dunes are aligned with the sand transport direction in the fingering mode. Then, we derive a model for dunes orientation, which explains the coexistence of bedforms with different alignments and quantitatively predicts the orientation of dunes in Earth deserts. Finally, we explore the phase diagram and the stability of the fingering mode.

  14. Relationship Between Onset Thresholds, Trigger Types, and Rotation Shear for the m/n=2/1 Neoclassical Tearing Mode in a High-β Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Brennan, D. P.; Buttery, R.; La Haye, R. J.; Sabbagh, S.; Strait, E.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Menard, J.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Yuh, H.

    2009-02-24

    The onset conditions for the m/n=2/1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) are studied in terms of neoclassical drive, triggering instabilities, and toroidal rotation or rotation shear, in the spherical torus NSTX [M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. There are three typical onset conditions for these modes, given in order of increasing neoclassical drive required for mode onset: triggering by energetic particle modes, triggering by edge localized modes, and cases where the modes appear to grow without a trigger. In all cases, the required drive increases with toroidal rotation shear, implying a stabilizing effect from the shear.

  15. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  16. Driving performance and driver discomfort in an elevated and standard driving position during a driving simulation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan; Mansfield, Neil; Gyi, Diane; Pagett, Mark; Bateman, Bob

    2015-07-01

    The primary purposes of a vehicle driver's seat, is to allow them to complete the driving task comfortably and safely. Within each class of vehicle (e.g. passenger, commercial, industrial, agricultural), there is an expected driving position to which a vehicle cabin is designed. This paper reports a study that compares two driving positions, in relation to Light Commercial Vehicles (LCVs), in terms of driver performance and driver discomfort. In the 'elevated' driving position, the seat is higher than usually used in road vehicles; this is compared to a standard driving position replicating the layout for a commercially available vehicle. It is shown that for a sample of 12 drivers, the elevated position did not, in general, show more discomfort than the standard position over a 60 min driving simulation, although discomfort increased with duration. There were no adverse effects shown for emergency stop reaction time or for driver headway for the elevated posture compared to the standard posture. The only body part that showed greater discomfort for the elevated posture compared to the standard posture was the right ankle. A second experiment confirmed that for 12 subjects, a higher pedal stiffness eliminated the ankle discomfort problem. PMID:25766419

  17. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes. PMID:24507472

  18. Injection locking of a two-mode electron oscillator with close frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Starodubova, E. N.; Usacheva, S. A.; Ryskin, N. M.; Novozhilova, Y. V.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    Theory of injection locking is developed for a two-mode electron maser with close frequencies, when the driving signal affects both modes. There exist two regimes of phase locking in which either first or second mode dominates. Hard transitions between the two regimes are observed with variation of the driving frequency. The results of numerical simulations are presented for the case of driving by a signal with linear frequency chirp, as well as by a signal with sinusoidal frequency modulation. The effect of bifurcation delay is observed with the increase of chirp rate.

  19. Sequential control by speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    The speed drive for ac motor is widely used in the industrial field to allow direct control for the speed and torque without any feedback from the motor shaft. By using the ABB ACS800 speed drive unit, the speed and torque can be controlled using sequential control method. Sequential control is one of the application control method provided in the ABB ACS800 Drive, where a set of events or action performed in a particular order one after the other to control the speed and torque of the ac motor. It was claimed that sequential control method is using the preset seven constant speeds being provided in ABB ACS800 drive to control the speed and torque in a continuous and sequential manner. The characteristics and features of controlling the speed and torque using sequential control method can be investigated by observing the graphs and curves plotted which are obtained from the practical result. Sequential control can run either in the Direct Torque Control (DTC) or Scalar motor control mode. By using sequential control method, the ABB ACS800 drive can be programmed to run the motor automatically according to the time setting of the seven preset constant speeds. Besides, the intention of this project is to generate a new form of the experimental set up.

  20. Aging induced cortical drive alterations during sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2015-03-01

    We followed the impact of healthy aging on cortical drive during sleep in rats by using the corticomuscular coherence (CMC). We employed the chronic electrodes implantation for sleep recording in adult, male Wistar rats, and followed the aging impact during sleep from 3 to 5.5 months age. We have analyzed the sleep/wake states architecture, and the sleep/wake state related EEG microstructure and CMCs. We evidenced the topographically distinct impact of aging on sleep/wake states architecture within the sensorimotor (SMCx) vs. motor cortex (MCx) from 4.5 to 5.5 months age. Healthy aging consistently altered only the SMCx sleep/wake states architecture, and increased the delta and beta CMCs through both cortical drives during Wake, but only through the MCx drive during REM. According to the delta and beta CMCs values, aging impact through the SMCx drive was opposite, but it was convergent through the MCx drive during Wake vs. REM, and there was a dual and inverse mode for the motor control during REM. PMID:25773067

  1. Global Alfvén modes: Theory and experiment*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Strait, E. J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Chu, M. S.; Duong, H. H.; Greene, J. M.; Lao, L. L.; Taylor, T. S.; Thompson, S. J.

    1993-07-01

    It is shown that the theoretical predictions and experimental observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE's) are now in good agreement, with particularly detailed agreement in the mode frequencies. Calculations of the driving and damping rates predict the importance of continuum damping for low toroidal mode numbers and this is confirmed experimentally. However, theoretical calculations in finite-β, shaped discharges predict the existence of other global Alfvén modes, in particular the ellipticity-induced Alfvén eigenmode (EAE) and a new mode, the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE). The BAE mode is calculated to be in or below the same frequency range as the TAE mode and may contribute to the experimental observations at high β. Experimental evidence and complementary analyses are presented confirming the presence of the EAE mode at higher frequencies.

  2. Near-field imaging of quantum cascade laser transverse modes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nanfang; Diehl, Laurent; Cubukcu, Ertugrul; Pflügl, Christian; Bour, David; Corzine, Scott; Zhu, Jintian; Höfler, Gloria; Crozier, Kenneth B; Capasso, Federico

    2007-10-01

    We report near field imaging of the transverse lasing modes of quantum cascade lasers. A mid-infrared apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope was used to characterize the modes on the laser facet. A very stable mode pattern corresponding to a TM(00) mode was observed as function of increasing driving current for a narrow active region quantum cascade laser. Higher order modes were observed for devices with a larger active region width-to-wavelength ratio operated in pulsed mode close to threshold. A theoretical model is proposed to explain why specific transverse modes are preferred close to threshold. The model is in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:19550591

  3. Optimized Direct-Drive Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Kessler, T. J.; Forties, R.; Kelly, J. A.; Waxer, L. J.

    2002-11-01

    The means of optimizing direct-drive illumination uniformity in laser fusion implosions will be discussed. To provide the most-uniform drive, the target must be illuminated by smooth single beams, symmetrically placed on target, with the optimum beam shape. On the 60-beam OMEGA laser system these near-optimum, direct-drive illumination conditions have been achieved by smoothing each beam with 1-THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), which incorporates distributed phase plates (DPP's) and polarization smoothing (PS), and by the modified soccer-ball orientation of the beams. The current beam smoothing provides for unprecedented levels of direct-drive uniformity, approaching σ_rms ˜ 2% up to ℓ = 200 after ˜300 ps. The sensitivity of the illumination to beam shape has been studied, and a new set of DPP's have been designed and are being built to further optimize the uniformity on OMEGA. Also, the sensitivity of the drive to beam balance, beam pointing, and target positioning has been studied both by calculation and by performing target implosions allowing quantitative limits to be placed on all contributors. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  4. Time-Resolved Nonlinear Coupling between Orthogonal Flexural Modes of a Pristine GaAs Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Cadeddu, D; Braakman, F R; Tütüncüoglu, G; Matteini, F; Rüffer, D; Fontcuberta i Morral, A; Poggio, M

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate nonlinear coupling between two orthogonal flexural modes of single as-grown GaAs nanowires. The resonant frequency of one mode can be shifted over many line widths by mechanically driving the other mode. We present time-domain measurements of the mode coupling and characterize it further by pump-probe experiments. Measurements show that a geometric nonlinearity causes the frequency of one mode to depend directly on the square amplitude of the other mode. Nearly degenerate orthogonal modes in nanowires are particularly interesting given their potential use in vectorial force sensing. PMID:26785132

  5. Simulations of Edge Current Driven Kink Modes with BOUT + + code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Xu, X. Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Xia, T. Y.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.

    2013-10-01

    Edge kink modes (or peeling modes) play a key role in the ELMs. The edge kink modes are driven by peak edge current, which comes from the bootstrap current. We calculated sequences of equilibria with different edge current using CORSICA by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, with the 3-field BOUT + + code, we calculated the MHD instabilities driven by edge current. For linear low-n ideal MHD modes, BOUT + + results agree with GATO results. With the edge current increasing, the dominant modes are changed from high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes. The edge current provides also stabilizing effects on high-n ballooning modes. Furthermore, for edge current scan without keeping total current fixed, the increasing edge current can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes and cannot drive kink modes. The diamagnetic effect can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes, but has no effect on the low-n kink modes. Also, the nonlinear behavior of kink modes is analyzed. Work supported by China MOST grant 2013GB111000 and by China NSF grant 10975161. Also performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  7. Virtual Rover Drives Toward Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a screenshot from the software used by engineers to test and drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course. Here, engineers simulated Spirit's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. The 3-meter (10-foot) drive totaled approximately 30 minutes, including time to stop and take images. The rover drove toward its first rock target, a mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack. The blue line denotes the path of the rover's 'belly button,' as engineers like to call it, as the rover drove toward Adirondack. The virtual 3-D world around the rover was built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige.

  8. Drive: Theory and Construct Validation

    PubMed Central

    Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article explicates the theory of drive and describes the development and validation of two measures. A representative set of drive facets was derived from an extensive corpus of human attributes (Study 1). Operationalised using an International Personality Item Pool version (the Drive:IPIP), a three-factor model was extracted from the facets in two samples and confirmed on a third sample (Study 2). The multi-item IPIP measure showed congruence with a short form, based on single-item ratings of the facets, and both demonstrated cross-informant reliability. Evidence also supported the measures’ convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validity (Study 3). Based on very promising findings, the authors hope to initiate a stream of research in what is argued to be a rather neglected niche of individual differences and non-cognitive assessment. PMID:27409773

  9. Drive: Theory and Construct Validation.

    PubMed

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    This article explicates the theory of drive and describes the development and validation of two measures. A representative set of drive facets was derived from an extensive corpus of human attributes (Study 1). Operationalised using an International Personality Item Pool version (the Drive:IPIP), a three-factor model was extracted from the facets in two samples and confirmed on a third sample (Study 2). The multi-item IPIP measure showed congruence with a short form, based on single-item ratings of the facets, and both demonstrated cross-informant reliability. Evidence also supported the measures' convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validity (Study 3). Based on very promising findings, the authors hope to initiate a stream of research in what is argued to be a rather neglected niche of individual differences and non-cognitive assessment. PMID:27409773

  10. MULTIPLE DIFFERENTIAL ROTARY MECHANICAL DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Smits, R.G.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a mechanism suitable for such applications as driving two spaced-apart spools which carry a roll film strip under conditions where the film movement must be rapidly started, stopped, and reversed while maintaining a constant tension on the film. The basic drive is provided by a variable speed, reversible rnotor coupled to both spools through a first differential mechanism and driving both spools in the same direction. A second motor, providing a constant torque, is connected to the two spools through a second differential mechanism and is coupled to impart torque to one spool in a first direction anid to the other spool in the reverse direction thus applying a constant tension to the film passing over the two spools irrespective of the speed or direction of rotation thereof. (AEC)

  11. Rover Takes a Sunday Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation, made with images from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard-identification camera, shows the rover's perspective of its first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. Engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack. The drive took approximately 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. Spirit first made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet).

  12. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  13. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  14. Basic principles of variable speed drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    An understanding of the principles which govern variable speed drive operation is discussed for successful drive application. The fundamental factors of torque, speed ratio, and power as they relate to drive selection are discussed. The basic types of variable speed drives, their operating characteristics and their applications are also presented.

  15. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research. PMID:20046818

  16. A Traction Control Strategy with an Efficiency Model in a Distributed Driving Electric Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Both active safety and fuel economy are important issues for vehicles. This paper focuses on a traction control strategy with an efficiency model in a distributed driving electric vehicle. In emergency situation, a sliding mode control algorithm was employed to achieve antislip control through keeping the wheels' slip ratios below 20%. For general longitudinal driving cases, an efficiency model aiming at improving the fuel economy was built through an offline optimization stream within the two-dimensional design space composed of the acceleration pedal signal and the vehicle speed. The sliding mode control strategy for the joint roads and the efficiency model for the typical drive cycles were simulated. Simulation results show that the proposed driving control approach has the potential to apply to different road surfaces. It keeps the wheels' slip ratios within the stable zone and improves the fuel economy on the premise of tracking the driver's intention. PMID:25197697

  17. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  18. Drive reconfiguration mechanism for tracked robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Willis, W. David

    2000-01-01

    Drive reconfiguration apparatus for changing the configuration of a drive unit with respect to a vehicle body may comprise a guide system associated with the vehicle body and the drive unit which allows the drive unit to rotate about a center of rotation that is located at about a point where the drive unit contacts the surface being traversed. An actuator mounted to the vehicle body and connected to the drive unit rotates the drive unit about the center of rotation between a first position and a second position.

  19. The g-modes of white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobouti, Y.; Khajehpour, M. R. H.; Dixit, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    The neutral g-modes of a degenerate fluid at zero temperature are analyzed. The g-modes of a degenerate fluid at finite but small temperatures are then expanded in terms of those of the zero temperature fluid. For nonrelativistic degenerate fluids it is found that (1) the g-eigenvalues are proportional to T mu(6)sub e mu(-1)sub i, where T is the internal temperature of the fluid, mu sub e and mu sub i are the mean molecular weights of electrons and ions, respectively; (2) the ion pressure is solely responsible for driving the g-modes. For white dwarfs of about a solar mass, the periods of the g-oscillations are in the range of a few hundredths of seconds.

  20. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  1. Virtual Rewards for Driving Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide from automobiles is a major contributor to global climate change. In "Virtual Rewards for Driving Green," Josh Pritchard proposes a computer application that will enable fuel-efficient drivers to earn "green" dollars with which to buy digital merchandise on the Web. Can getting items that exist only in cyberspace actually change a…

  2. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  3. Test-Driving Their Passions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Noah

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how the Watson fellowships give recipients an opportunity to test-drive their passions and see if they could lead to a career path. Over the last 40 years, the Thomas J. Watson Foundation has awarded $29 million in fellowships to seniors graduating from 50 mostly top-tier colleges with fewer than 3,000 students. In 2007, 50…

  4. Driving and working with syncope.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Franca; Casazza, Giovanni; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Costantino, Giorgio; Orlandi, Mauro; Dipaola, Franca; Capitanio, Chiara; Achenza, Sara; Sheldon, Robert; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is usually addressed in the Emergency Department (ED) by the doctor in charge of the clinical picture, i.e. the patient's risk is stratified, a diagnostic work-up is done and a prognosis is set. Patients are ultimately admitted to hospital or discharged. However, other aspects related to syncope may deeply affect their daily lives. These include how and when to return to work and to driving, the feelings about a recent loss of consciousness, and the potential relapse of syncope. This is particularly significant if the work setting is intrinsically hazardous. These patients need adequate clinical and psychological support. For patients with syncope, two main parameters should be considered regarding returning to work and to driving. The first is to evaluate the risk of syncope recurrence and the second is to consider the expected harm if syncope does indeed occur during these activities. In the present paper we detail the problem of driving (including professional driving) and work after syncope. We propose a new quantitative model that will guide the physician in stratifying the risk for patients who have had a previous syncope event. The new model considers the syncope recurrence risk, the job task duration, and features that facilitate a syncope during work. On the basis of these variables, the global risk index for a worker is calculated. Following appropriate validation, this method might help ED and occupational physicians in their decision-making process with the goal of safely readmitting syncope patients to the workplace. PMID:24881013

  5. Driving Competencies for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    Designed for use by directors of senior citizen groups, continuing education directors, and driver education instructors, this manual suggests a course outline, subject content, and instructional materials for effectively teaching a refresher driving course. The first seven topics represent the basic content and none should be omitted: orientation…

  6. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  7. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  8. Patterned flattened modes.

    PubMed

    Messerly, Michael J; Pax, Paul H; Dawson, Jay W

    2013-09-01

    We show that field-flattened strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattened shell to create patterned, flattened modes. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flatness of the flattened mode but does alter the characteristics of other modes; we show that it can improve a flattened mode's bend performance significantly. Patterning provides a new and potentially valuable waveguide design tool that may lead to higher-power transport and laser fibers. PMID:23988948

  9. Interaction between turbulence and a nonlinear tearing mode in the low {beta} regime

    SciTech Connect

    Militello, F.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W.

    2008-05-15

    The interaction between turbulence and a nonlinear tearing mode is investigated numerically using a 2D electrostatic model. Turbulence is found to cause transitions between the different roots for the propagation velocity of the mode. The transitions take the mode towards roots with slower propagation that are characterized by a locally flattened density profile. For sufficiently large islands the transition reduces the drive for the tearing mode.

  10. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  11. Principal nonlinear dynamical modes of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Feigin, Alexander; Loskutov, Evgeny; Kurths, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    We suggest a new nonlinear expansion of space-distributed observational time series. The expansion allows constructing principal nonlinear manifolds holding essential part of observed variability. It yields low-dimensional hidden time series interpreted as internal modes driving observed multivariate dynamics as well as their mapping to a geographic grid. Bayesian optimality is used for selecting relevant structure of nonlinear transformation, including both the number of principal modes and degree of nonlinearity. Furthermore, the optimal characteristic time scale of the reconstructed modes is also found. The technique is applied to monthly sea surface temperature (SST) time series having a duration of 33 years and covering the globe. Three dominant nonlinear modes were extracted from the time series: the first efficiently separates the annual cycle, the second is responsible for ENSO variability, and combinations of the second and the third modes explain substantial parts of Pacific and Atlantic dynamics. A relation of the obtained modes to decadal natural climate variability including current hiatus in global warming is exhibited and discussed.

  12. Cannabis Effects on Driving Skills

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Rebecca L.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cannabis is the most prevalent illicit drug identified in impaired drivers. The effects of cannabis on driving continue to be debated, making prosecution and legislation difficult. Historically, delays in sample collection, evaluating the inactive Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC, and polydrug use have complicated epidemiologic evaluations of driver impairment after cannabis use. CONTENT We review and evaluate the current literature on cannabis’ effects on driving, highlighting the epidemiologic and experimental data. Epidemiologic data show that the risk of involvement in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) increases approximately 2-fold after cannabis smoking. The adjusted risk of driver culpability also increases substantially, particularly with increased blood THC concentrations. Studies that have used urine as the biological matrix have not shown an association between cannabis and crash risk. Experimental data show that drivers attempt to compensate by driving more slowly after smoking cannabis, but control deteriorates with increasing task complexity. Cannabis smoking increases lane weaving and impaired cognitive function. Critical-tracking tests, reaction times, divided-attention tasks, and lane-position variability all show cannabis-induced impairment. Despite purported tolerance in frequent smokers, complex tasks still show impairment. Combining cannabis with alcohol enhances impairment, especially lane weaving. SUMMARY Differences in study designs frequently account for inconsistencies in results between studies. Participant-selection bias and confounding factors attenuate ostensible cannabis effects, but the association with MVA often retains significance. Evidence suggests recent smoking and/or blood THC concentrations 2–5 ng/mL are associated with substantial driving impairment, particularly in occasional smokers. Future cannabis-and-driving research should emphasize challenging tasks, such as divided attention

  13. Neural substrates of driving behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Hugo J.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2007-01-01

    Driving a vehicle is an indispensable daily behaviour for many people, yet we know little about how it is supported by the brain. Given that driving in the real world involves the engagement of many cognitive systems that rapidly change to meet varying environmental demands, identifying its neural basis presents substantial problems. By employing a unique combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), an accurate interactive virtual simulation of a bustling central London (UK) and a retrospective verbal report protocol, we surmounted these difficulties. We identified different events that characterise the driving process on a second by second basis and the brain regions that underlie them. Prepared actions such as starting, turning, reversing and stopping were associated with a common network comprised of premotor, parietal and cerebellar regions. Each prepared action also recruited additional brain areas. We also observed unexpected hazardous events such as swerving and avoiding collisions that were associated with activation of lateral occipital and parietal regions, insula, as well as a more posterior region in the medial premotor cortex than prepared actions. By contrast, planning future actions and monitoring fellow road users were associated with activity in superior parietal, lateral occipital cortices and the cerebellum. The anterior pre-SMA was also recruited during action planning. The right lateral prefrontal cortex was specifically engaged during the processing of road traffic rules. By systematically characterising the brain dynamics underlying naturalistic driving behaviour in a real city, our findings may have implications for how driving competence is considered in the context of neurological damage. PMID:17412611

  14. Pulsed FM mode locking of a Nd:BEL laser.

    PubMed

    Godil, A A; Li, K D; Bloom, D M

    1991-08-15

    A novel but simple and practical mode locker was built and demonstrated for a diode-pumped Nd:BEL laser. Fast electrical pulses from a comb generator drive a LiNbO(3) crystal, which produces pulsed electro-optic phase modulation in the laser cavity. Stable mode-locked pulses of 7.5-ps duration were obtained at a repetition rate of 250 MHz. PMID:19776932

  15. Driving with Hemianopia, I: Detection Performance in a Driving Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Alex R.; Mandel, Aaron J.; Goldstein, Robert B.; Peli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine the effect of homonymous hemianopia (HH) on detection of pedestrian figures in multiple realistic and hazardous situations within the controlled environment of a driving simulator. Methods Twelve people with complete HH and without visual neglect or cognitive decline and 12 matched (age, sex, and years of driving experience) normally sighted (NV) drivers participated. They drove predetermined city and rural highway routes (total, 120 minutes) during which pedestrian figures appeared at random intervals along the roadway (R-Peds; n = 144) and at intersections (I-Peds; n = 10). Detection rates and response times were derived from participant horn presses. Results Drivers with HH exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) lower R-Ped detection rates on the blind side than did NV drivers (range, 6%–100%). Detection of I-Peds on the blind side was also poor (8%–55%). Age and blind-side detection rates correlated negatively (Spearman r = −0.71, P = 0.009). Although blind-side response times of drivers with HH were significantly (P < 0.001) longer than those of NV drivers, most were within a commonly used 2.5-second guideline. Conclusions Most participants with HH had blind-side detection rates that seem incompatible with safe driving; however, the relationship of our simulator detection performance measures to on-road performance has yet to be established. In determining fitness to drive for people with HH, the results underscore the importance of individualized assessments including evaluations of blind-side hazard detection. PMID:19608541

  16. Driving Control for Electric Power Assisted Wheelchair Based on Regenerative Brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tadakuma, Susumu

    This paper describes a novel safety driving control scheme for electric power assisted wheelchairs based on the regenerative braking system. “Electric power assisted wheelchair” which assists the driving force by electric motors is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly people and disabled people, however, the safe and secure driving performance especially on downhill roads must be further improved because electric power assisted wheelchairs have no braking devices. The proposed control system automatically switches the driving mode, from “assisting mode” to “braking mode”, based on the wheelchair's velocity and the declined angle and smoothly suppresses the wheelchair's acceleration based on variable duty ratio control in order to realize the safety driving and to improve the ride quality. Some experiments on the practical roads and subjective evaluation show the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  17. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    PRATER,R; PETTY,CC; LUCE,TC; HARVEY,RW; CHOI,M; LAHAYE,RJ; LIN-LIU,Y-R; LOHR,J; MURAKAMI,M; WADE,MR; WONG,K-L

    2003-07-01

    A271 ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in which the measured off-axis electron cyclotron current drive has been compared systematically to theory over a broad range of parameters have shown that the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D provides an excellent model of the relevant current drive physics. This physics understanding has been critical in optimizing the application of ECCD to high performance discharges, supporting such applications as suppression of neoclassical tearing modes and control and sustainment of the current profile.

  18. A laboratory stand for research concerning drive units applied in unmanned flying micro vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech; Oldziej, Daniel; Golinski, Pawel

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a laboratory stand used for research concerning static and dynamic characteristics of MAV (micro air vehicle) drive units. An electric powered drive unit, applied in unmanned flying vehicles of short range was chosen as the research object. Such device consists of the following elements: acquisition and control unit, a variable frequency drive (VFD), an engine and a propeller. The article contains a description of the stand structure as well as the way of data acquisition and an example of its processing in the post-processing mode. Moreover, example tests and the results are presented here.

  19. Geometrical influences on neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    1998-02-01

    The influence of geometry on the pressure drives of nonideal magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes is presented. In order to study the effects of elongation, triangularity, and aspect ratio, three different machines are considered to provide a range of tokamak configurations: Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (circular) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)], DIII-D (D-shaped) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159], and Pegasus (extremely low aspect ratio) [Fonck et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41, 1400 (1996)]. For large aspect ratio tokamaks, shaping does very little to influence the pressure gradient drives, while at low aspect ratios, a very strong sensitivity to the profiles is found. In particular, this sensitivity is connected to the strong dependence on the magnetic shear. This suggests that at low aspect ratio it may be possible to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes by a flattening the q profile near low order rational surfaces (e.g., q=2/1) using a combination of shaping and localized current drive, whereas at large aspect ratio it is more difficult.

  20. Speed control of switched reluctance motor using sliding mode control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    John, G.; Eastham, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    A robust speed drive system for a switched reluctance motor (SRM) using sliding mode control strategy (SLMC) is presented. After reviewing the operation of an SRM drive, a SLMC based scheme is formulated to control the drive speed. The scheme is implemented using a micro-controller and a high resolution position sensor. The parameter insensitive characteristics are demonstrated through computer simulations and experimental verification.

  1. [Driving fitness/driving capacity of patients treated with methadone].

    PubMed

    Hauri-Bionda, R; Bär, W; Friedrich-Koch, A

    1998-10-10

    To answer the question whether or not therapeutic methadone doses significantly reduce traffic-related performance of drivers on medically supervised methadone programmes, 34 methadone substitution patients, all of them volunteers, were subjected to a test series: the focus of the study was a psychophysical test battery consisting of 10 individual performance tests to assess essential functions with regard to driving ability, such as concentration, attention, reaction capability, memory, perception and sensorimotor coordination. In evaluating the results of the psychophysical tests, multiple drug use and subjective methadone influence at the time of the examination were taken into consideration but current methadone blood level was neglected. The results were compared to those of a control group. The methadone group (n = 34) consisted of 25 men and 9 women aged between 18 and 38. At the time of the study, the majority of the test persons (29) were on low dosage methadone maintenance (up to 60 mg/day). In the urine samples of approximately 2/3 of the test persons, evidence was found for multiple drug use together with other psychotropic substances, the most frequent (14) being cannabis metabolites. Referring to their driving practices, a mere 4 out of 29 drivers had not committed any driving offences. A comparison of the psychophysical performance of the whole methadone group (n = 34) with a control group demonstrated that the methadone substitution patients achieved rather lower results in almost all variables. These performance deficits were particularly conspicuous in sustained attention, sensorimotor coordination and reaction capability. 12 "methadone only" participants, i.e. methadone probands without any additional consumption of psychotropic substances showed-partly considerably-better performance than the methadone group as a whole and also achieved normal results in relation to the test norm. Nevertheless, once again, results tended to be of lower level in

  2. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Drive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Winiarski, David W.

    2002-08-18

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) technologies have the ability to precisely control motor sytems output and produce a numbr of benefits including energy and demand savings. This report examines the performance and cost effectiveness of a specific class of ASDs called magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drives (MC-ASD) which use the strength of a magnetic field to control the amount of torque transferred between motor and drive shaft. The MagnaDrive Adjustable Speed Coupling System uses fixed rare-earth magnets and varies the distance between rotating plates in the assembly. the PAYBACK Variable Speed Drive uses an electromagnet to control the speed of the drive

  3. Dancing bunches as Van Kampen modes

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Van Kampen modes are eigen-modes of Jeans-Vlasov equation [1-3]. Their spectrum consists of continuous and, possibly, discrete parts. Onset of a discrete van Kampen mode means emergence of a coherent mode without any Landau damping; thus, even a tiny couple-bunch wake is sufficient to drive instability. Longitudinal instabilities observed at Tevatron [4], RHIC [5] and SPS [6] can be explained as loss of Landau damping (LLD), which is shown here to happen at fairly low impedances. For repulsive wakes and single-harmonic RF, LLD is found to be extremely sensitive to steepness of the bunch distribution function at small amplitudes. Based on that, a method of beam stabilization is suggested. Emergence of a discrete van Kampen mode means either loss of Landau damping or instability. Longitudinal bunch stability is analysed in weak head-tail approximation for inductive impedance and single-harmonic RF. The LLD threshold intensities are found to be rather low: for cases under study all of them do not exceed a few percent of the zero-amplitude incoherent synchrotron frequency shift, strongly decreasing for shorter bunches. Because of that, LLD can explain longitudinal instabilities happened at fairly low impedances at Tevatron [4], and possibly for RHIC [5] and SPS [6], being in that sense an alternative to the soliton explanation [5, 20]. Although LLD itself results in many cases in emergence of a mode with zero growth rate, any couple-bunch (and sometimes multi-turn) wake would drive instability for that mode, however small this wake is. LLD is similar to a loss of immune system of a living cell, when any microbe becomes fatal for it. The emerging discrete mode is normally very different from the rigid-bunch motion; thus the rigid-mode model significantly overestimates the LLD threshold. The power low of LLD predicted in Ref. [17] agrees with results of this paper. However, the numerical factor in that scaling low strongly depends on the bunch distribution function

  4. Warp Drive - A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obousy, R. K.; Cleaver, G.

    Certain classes of higher dimensional models suggest that the Casimir Effect is a candidate for the cosmological constant. In this paper we demonstrate that a sufficiently advanced civilization could, in principal, manipulate the radius of the extra dimension to locally adjust the value of the cosmological constant. This adjustment could be tuned to generate an expansion/ contraction of spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. Due to the fact that spacetime expansion itself is not restricted by relativity, a faster-than-light `warp drive' could be created. Calculations of the energy requirements of such a drive are performed and an `ultimate' speed limit, based on the Planckian limits on the size of the extra dimensions is found.

  5. Conditional dynamics driving financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguñá, M.; Masoliver, J.

    2004-08-01

    We revisit the problem of daily correlations in speculative prices and report empirical evidences on the existence of what we term a conditional or dual dynamics driving the evolution of financial assets. This dynamics is detected in several markets around the world and for different historical periods. In particular, we have analyzed the DJIA database from 1900 to 2002 as well as 65 companies trading in the LIFFE market of futures and 12 of the major European and American treasury bonds. In all cases, we find a twofold dynamics driving the financial evolution depending on whether the previous price went up or down. We conjecture that this effect is universal and intrinsic to all markets.

  6. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  7. [Daytime sleepiness and driving behaviour].

    PubMed

    Mathis, Johannes; Schreier, David

    2014-11-01

    Daytime sleepiness is reported by 10-15 % within the general population of industrialised countries. According to federal statistics in Switzerland, only ~1.5 % of motor vehicle crashes are caused by excessive daytime sleepiness, which is in sharp contrast to the scientific literature, indicating a figure of 10 to 30 %. This is most likely related to the difficulty to detect the underlying sleepiness by police officers and their low awareness of this cause in case of car accidents. As a consequence of this massively reduced figure, the real problem is underestimated and countermeasures as well as examinations of drivers at fault are inadequately realised in our country. The risk factors for sleepiness induced accidents are young age, male sex, driving at night or long distances and a number of diseases or sedative drugs. The most prevalent cause of sleepiness related accidents is the behaviourally induced sleep insufficiency syndrome or irregular sleep-wake rhythm in otherwise healthy subjects. Disease related sleepiness which may also cause motor vehicle accidents must be managed by physicians. In the diagnostic work-up sedative drugs, medical causes of sleepiness or tiredness as well as primary sleep-wake disorders must be considered. The most important duty of the treating physician, in addition to correct diagnosis and treatment, is to inform the affected patient of his or her responsibility not to drive while sleepy, about the theoretical legal consequences in case of an accident and about efficient countermeasures such as stopping in a rest area, drinking coffee, and taking a nap. For legal reasons, this information must be written in the patient's notes. Professional drivers suffering from sleep apnoea syndrome or other disorders with excessive daytime sleepiness, or private drivers who have already experienced a sleepiness induced accident, should be referred to a sleep-wake-centre for objective assessment of their sleepiness in the maintenance of

  8. Electric vehicle drive train components

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, F.

    1994-12-31

    Power Control Systems has developed a family of electric vehicle drive systems that range from 65 horsepower through 300 horse power. These propulsion systems support vehicle applications ranging from light cars and pickups to buses and trucks weighing as much as 40,000 lbs (18,400 kg). These robust systems are designed specifically for automotive applications including safety, electromagnetic emissions, and environment ruggedness. Dolphin Drive Systems are very flexible. Their inverter controllers are programmable and can be provided as stand alone components matched to customer specified motors. A selection of pre-calibrated systems including motor and inverter/controller can be provided. Accessory tools are also available for customer self programming. Dolphin Drive Systems provide precision control of AC induction motors providing excellent torque-speed performance usually eliminating the need for multistage transmissions. In addition, they are very efficient over a wide speed/torque range. This provides for excellent power management over a variety of continuous speed and stop and go applications.

  9. Warp drive space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Pedro F.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper the problem of the quantum stability of the two-dimensional warp drive spacetime moving with an apparent faster than light velocity is considered. We regard as a maximum extension beyond the event horizon of that spacetime its embedding in a three-dimensional Minkowskian space with the topology of the corresponding Misner space. It is obtained that the interior of the spaceship bubble becomes then a multiply connected nonchronal region with closed spacelike curves and that the most natural vacuum allows quantum fluctuations which do not induce any divergent behavior of the renormalized stress-energy tensor, even on the event (Cauchy) chronology horizon. In such a case, the horizon encloses closed timelike curves only at scales close to the Planck length, so that the warp drive satisfies Ford's negative energy-time inequality. Also found is a connection between the superluminal two-dimensional warp drive space and two-dimensional gravitational kinks. This connection allows us to generalize the considered Alcubierre metric to a standard, nonstatic metric which is only describable on two different coordinate patches.

  10. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion whenmore » speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  11. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion when speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.

  12. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  13. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  14. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing...

  16. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  17. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  18. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing...

  20. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing...

  3. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  4. The driving mechanism of roAp stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupret, M.-A.; Théado, S.; Noels, A.

    2008-10-01

    We analyse in detail the driving mechanism of roAp stars and present the theoretical instability strip predicted by our models with solar metallicity. A particular attention is given to the interpretation of the role played by the different eigenfunctions in the stabilization of the modes at the red edge of the instability strip. The gradient of temperature in the HI opacity bump appears to play a major role in this context. We also consider the particular and complex role played by the shape of the eigenfunctions (location of the nodes, ...).

  5. Dynamic analysis of a gear drive system in aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangdong; Zhou, Chuanrong

    1993-04-01

    A new technique of structural dynamic analysis especially for analysis of a gear drive system has been developed, which combines the principle of substructure analysis with the idea of structure modification. A gear stiffness model of the degrees of the freedom of the structure node in which the gear relation exists has also been developed. It has the advantages of both the method of substructure analysis and vibration reanalysis of modified structure. The natural frequencies and modes calculated by the present program are in quite good agreement with the results calculated by FEM.

  6. Intelligent control system for 16-unit synchronous driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ruwang; Jiang, Xiuming; Yang, Gongyuan

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with intelligent control system with 16 unit A.C motor of synchronous-driving. It has dealt with the method of the system analysis and design. Mainly, this paper dwelt on the mathematic model of the take-up process. The configuration of the system based on the mathematic model. In the aspect of control algorithm, advance control strategy, including parameter adaptive, signal adaptive, multi-mode control and expert control, has been applied in the system. The control system is designed with IPC and OMRON C200HG PLC. The system has been put into production, from which the customer has been benefited economically and socially.

  7. Update on NIF indirect drive ignition target fabrication specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S W; Amendt, P A; Dittrich, T R; Hatchett, S P; Herrmann, M C; Hurricane, O A; Marinak, M M; Munro, D; Pollaine, S M; Strobel, G A; Suter, L J

    2003-10-17

    Indirect drive ignition target simulations are described as they are used to determine target fabrication specifications. Simulations are being used to explore options for making the targets more robust, and to develop more detailed understanding of the performance of a few point designs. The current array of targets is described. A new target is described with radially dependent Cu dopant in Be. This target has significantly looser specifications for high-mode perturbations than previous targets. Current estimates of size limitations for fill tubes, holes, and isolated defect are discussed. Recent 3D simulations are described.

  8. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  9. Non-linear saturation mechanism of electron temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokluoglu, E. K.; Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K.

    2012-10-15

    The electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode is a very plausible candidate to explain the large electron particle transport and thermal conduction. Production and identification of slab ETG modes and measurement electron transport have been already reported [X. Wei, V. Sokolov, and A. K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010); V. Sokolov and A. K. Sen, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2011)]. Now, we develop a theoretical model of non-linear saturation mechanism of ETG mode based on the three wave coupling of an unstable high frequency ETG mode with a damped ETG radial harmonic and a damped ion acoustic (IA) mode. Bicoherence analysis of Columbia linear machine (CLM) data show coupling between ETG modes ({approx}2.4 MHz) and a low frequency mode ({approx}50 kHz). The large damping drive of the ETG radial harmonic accompanied by the smaller but finite damping of the IA mode presents an energy sink for the unstable ETG mode, thus causing saturation. This model predicts a saturation level of {approx}10% and agrees with the observed levels of ETG modes in the CLM.

  10. SDO Delta H Mode Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Starin, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    While on orbit, disturbance torques on a three axis stabilized spacecraft tend to increase the system momentum, which is stored in the reaction wheels. Upon reaching the predefined momentum capacity (or maximum wheel speed) of the reaction wheel, an external torque must be used to unload the momentum. The purpose of the Delta H mode is to manage the system momentum. This is accomplished by driving the reaction wheels to a target momentum state while the attitude thrusters, which provide an external torque, are used to maintain the attitude. The Delta H mode is designed to meet the mission requirements and implement the momentum management plan. Changes in the requirements or the momentum management plan can lead to design changes in the mode. The momentum management plan defines the expected momentum buildup trend, the desired momentum state and how often the system is driven to the desired momentum state (unloaded). The desired momentum state is chosen based on wheel capacity, wheel configuration, thruster layout and thruster sizing. For the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the predefined wheel momentum capacity is a function of the jitter requirements, power, and maximum momentum capacity. Changes in jitter requirements or power limits can lead to changes in the desired momentum state. These changes propagate into the changes in the momentum management plan and therefore the Delta H mode design. This paper presents the analysis and design performed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Delta H mode. In particular, the mode logic and processing needed to meet requirements is described along with the momentum distribution formulation. The Delta H mode design is validated using the Solar Dynamics Observatory High Fidelity simulator. Finally, a summary of the design is provided along with concluding remarks.

  11. Driving trajectories in chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Macau, Elbert E N; Caldas, Iberê L

    2002-02-01

    In this work we introduce a general approach for targeting in chaotic scattering that can be used to find a transfer trajectory between any two points located inside the scattering region. We show that this method can be used in association with a control of chaos strategy to drive around and keep a particle inside the scattering region. As an illustration of how powerful this approach is, we use it in a case of practical interest in celestial mechanics in which it is desired to control the evolution of two satellites that evolve around a large central body. PMID:11863640

  12. Computer-Aided Remote Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    1994-01-01

    System for remote control of robotic land vehicle requires only small radio-communication bandwidth. Twin video cameras on vehicle create stereoscopic images. Operator views cross-polarized images on two cathode-ray tubes through correspondingly polarized spectacles. By use of cursor on frozen image, remote operator designates path. Vehicle proceeds to follow path, by use of limited degree of autonomous control to cope with unexpected conditions. System concept, called "computer-aided remote driving" (CARD), potentially useful in exploration of other planets, military surveillance, firefighting, and clean-up of hazardous materials.

  13. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  14. Efficient alternatives for electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A.; Barnes, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    This analysis of industrial electric motors describes the current motor stock, its energy use and operating characteristics, and innovations that could change current use patterns. It provides calculations characterizing the economic attractiveness of several existing and potential options. One attractive option given particular attention is the adjustable-speed drive which can replace throttles or valves for many pumping operations. A major conclusion is that, throughout industry, options that are both energy-saving and economically attractive appear to penetrate markets more slowly than would be socially optimal. The final section examines characteristics of industry that may contribute to slow market penetration. 29 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Phonon localization drives polar nanoregions in a relaxor ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Manley, M E; Lynn, J W; Abernathy, D L; Specht, E D; Delaire, O; Bishop, A R; Sahul, R; Budai, J D

    2014-01-01

    Relaxor ferroelectrics exemplify a class of functional materials where interplay between disorder and phase instability results in inhomogeneous nanoregions. Although known for about 30 years, there is no definitive explanation for polar nanoregions (PNRs). Here we show that ferroelectric phonon localization drives PNRs in relaxor ferroelectric PMN-30%PT using neutron scattering. At the frequency of a preexisting resonance mode, nanoregions of standing ferroelectric phonons develop with a coherence length equal to one wavelength and the PNR size. Anderson localization of ferroelectric phonons by resonance modes explains our observations and, with nonlinear slowing, the PNRs and relaxor properties. Phonon localization at additional resonances near the zone edges explains competing antiferroelectric distortions known to occur at the zone edges. Our results indicate the size and shape of PNRs that are not dictated by complex structural details, as commonly assumed, but by phonon resonance wave vectors. This discovery could guide the design of next generation relaxor ferroelectrics. PMID:24718289

  16. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  17. Fault tolerant vector control of induction motor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnokopylov, G.; Bragin, A.

    2014-10-01

    For electric composed of technical objects hazardous industries, such as nuclear, military, chemical, etc. an urgent task is to increase their resiliency and survivability. The construction principle of vector control system fault-tolerant asynchronous electric. Displaying recovery efficiency three-phase induction motor drive in emergency mode using two-phase vector control system. The process of formation of a simulation model of the asynchronous electric unbalance in emergency mode. When modeling used coordinate transformation, providing emergency operation electric unbalance work. The results of modeling transient phase loss motor stator. During a power failure phase induction motor cannot save circular rotating field in the air gap of the motor and ensure the restoration of its efficiency at rated torque and speed.

  18. Voight variable speed drive. [for windpowered generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The variable speed drive transmission is mounted within the gondola and connected with the wind turbine blades and the hub. This unit is designed for the production of ac power. The turbine turns by means of the variable speed drive and a set of synchronous three phase generators. This motion is controlled automatically by two wind rosettes in such a way that the wind turbine always opposes the wind direction. The Voight variable speed drive is a mechanical variable positive drive gear transmission. It has an unlimited power and torque transmission, a constant ratio with high degree of accuracy, a speed variation over a wide range, and a nonslip drive.

  19. Perceptual and Cognitive Impairments and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Coopersmith, Henry; Mayo, Nancy; Leblanc, Ginette; Kaizer, Franceen

    1990-01-01

    Perceptual and cognitive disorders that frequently accompany stroke and head injury influence an individual's ability to drive a motor vehicle. Canadian physicians are legally responsible for identifying patients who are potentially unsafe to drive and, if they fail to do so, may be held liable in a civil action suit. The authors review the guidelines for physicians evaluating a patient's fitness to drive after brain injury. They also examine the actions a physician should take when a patient with perceptual and cognitive problems wants to drive. Ultimately, by taking these actions, physicians will help to prevent driving accidents. PMID:21234047

  20. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  1. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  2. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  3. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  4. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  5. The driving mechanism of roAp stars : effects of global metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theado, S.; Dupret, M.-A.; Noels, A.

    2008-12-01

    We have investigated the influence of global metallicity on the excitation mechanism of roAp star pulsations. Our computations show that the opacity in the driving region of the roAp modes is strongly sensitive to the metal content but surprisingly the roAp theoretical instability strip is only weakly affected by metallicity changes.

  6. The driving mechanism of roAp stars : effects of local metallicity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théado, S.; Dupret, M.-A.; Noels, A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of a local metallicity enhancement on the excitation mechanism of roAp star pulsations. Our computations show that such accumulations poorly affect the position of the theoretical roAp star instability strip although the opacity in the driving region of roAp modes is affected by metal accumulation.

  7. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1996-01-23

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figs.

  8. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  9. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  10. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1994-02-15

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figures.

  11. Dual-decay converter for switched reluctance motor drives in low-voltage applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, Mehrdad; Husain, Iqbal; Ramani, K.R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Galloway, J.H. )

    1993-04-01

    A modified converter topology for star-connected switched reluctance motors suitable for low-voltage applications is proposed in this paper. A dual time constant freewheeling circuit has been designed to improve the drive performance and efficiency over a wide range of speeds. The different modes of operation of the converter are discussed, and a comparison is made with other converter configurations.

  12. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  13. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  14. Excursions through KK modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this article we study Kaluza-Klein (KK) dimensional reduction of massive Abelian gauge theories with charged matter fields on a circle. Since local gauge transformations change position dependence of the charged fields, the decomposition of the charged matter fields into KK modes is gauge dependent. While whole KK mass spectrum is independent of the gauge choice, the mode number depends on the gauge. The masses of the KK modes also depend on the field value of the zero-mode of the extra dimensional component of the gauge field. In particular, one of the KK modes in the KK tower of each massless 5D charged field becomes massless at particular values of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field. When the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field is identified with the inflaton, this structure leads to recursive cosmological particle productions.

  15. Neoclassical tearing mode seeding by coupling with infernal modes in low-shear tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, A.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Halpern, F. D.; Luciani, J.-F.; Lütjens, H.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical and an analytical study of the triggering of resistive MHD modes in tokamak plasmas with low magnetic shear core is presented. Flat q profiles give rise to fast growing pressure driven MHD modes, such as infernal modes. It has been shown that infernal modes drive fast growing islands on neighbouring rational surfaces. Numerical simulations of such instabilities in a MAST-like configuration are performed with the initial value stability code XTOR-2F in the resistive frame. The evolution of magnetic islands are computed from XTOR-2F simulations and an analytical model is developed based on Rutherford’s theory in combination with a model of resistive infernal modes. The parameter {{Δ }\\prime} is extended from the linear phase to the non-linear phase. Additionally, the destabilising contribution due to a helically perturbed bootstrap current is considered. Comparing the numerical XTOR-2F simulations to the model, we find that coupling has a strong destabilising effect on (neoclassical) tearing modes and is able to seed 2/1 magnetic islands in situations when the standard NTM theory predicts stability.

  16. Four-wheel drive car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.

    1986-03-25

    A drive train in a four-wheel drive vehicle is described having an engine mounted on one end with a crankshaft oriented transverse to the direction of vehicle travel which consists of: a transmission having an output gear driven by the crankshaft and rotatable around an axis parallel to the axis of the crankshaft; a reduction gear operatively engaged with the output gear; a first differential gear having a gear and being concentrically engaged with the reduction gear to transmit the output of the reduction gear in a divided manner; a second differential gear transmitting power from one output of the differential gear to left and right wheels of the one end of the vehicle; a transmission gear meshing with the gear of the first differential gear for transmitting power from another output of the first differential gear in a direction generally perpendicular to the crankshaft through a propeller shaft to the other end of the vehicle, opposite the one end; a third differential gear receiving power from the propeller shaft for transmitting power to left and right wheels on the other end; and wherein a mesh portion where the transmission gear meshes with the gear of the first differential gear is closer to the crankshaft axis of engine than is the axis of the reduction gear.

  17. Current drive by helicon waves

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Manash Kumar; Bora, Dhiraj

    2009-01-01

    Helicity in the dynamo field components of helicon wave is examined during the novel study of wave induced helicity current drive. Strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field components is observed during helicon discharges formed in a toroidal vacuum chamber of small aspect ratio. High frequency regime is chosen to increase the phase velocity of helicon waves which in turn minimizes the resonant wave-particle interactions and enhances the contribution of the nonresonant current drive mechanisms. Owing to the strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field structures, plasma current is driven mostly by the dynamo-electric-field, which arise due to the wave helicity injection by helicon waves. Small, yet finite contribution from the suppressed wave-particle resonance cannot be ruled out in the operational regime examined. A brief discussion on the parametric dependence of plasma current along with numerical estimations of nonresonant components is presented. A close agreement between the numerical estimation and measured plasma current magnitude is obtained during the present investigation.

  18. Driving Extreme Efficiency to Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbesi, Karina

    2014-03-01

    The rapid development of extremely energy efficient appliances and equipment is essential to curtail catastrophic climate disruption. This will require the on-going development of products that apply all best-practices and that take advantage of the synergies of hybridization and building integration. Beyond that, it requires the development of new disruptive technologies and concepts. To facilitate these goals, in 2011 the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy launched the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances and Equipment. Now in its third year, the competition supports faculty-lead student design teams at U.S. universities to develop and test new technology prototypes. This talk describes what the competition and the Max Tech Program are doing to drive such rapid technology progress and to facilitate the entry to the market of successful Max Tech prototypes. The talk also initiates a discussion of physicists' unique role in driving that technology progress faster and farther. Emerging Technologies, Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Microtearing modes in spherical and conventional tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Guttenfelder, W.; Fülöp, T.; Mollén, A.

    2013-06-01

    The onset and characteristics of microtearing modes (MTM) in the core of spherical (NSTX) and conventional tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade and JET) are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). For experimentally relevant core plasma parameters in the NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks, in agreement with previous works, we find MTMs as the dominant linear instability. Also, for JET-like core parameters considered in our study an MTM is found as the most unstable mode. In all of these plasmas, finite collisionality is needed for MTMs to become unstable and the electron temperature gradient is found to be the fundamental drive. However, a significant difference is observed in the dependence of the linear growth rate of MTMs on electron temperature gradient. While it varies weakly and non-monotonically in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, in NSTX it increases with the electron temperature gradient.

  20. Collective modes in the fluxonium qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelani, Gianluigi; Viola, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    In the fluxonium qubit, an array comprising a large number of identical Josephson junctions form a so-called superinductance. The superinductance is connected to a junction - the phase slip element - with a smaller Josephson energy and a different charging energy. We investigate the effects of unavoidable capacitive couplings to ground as well as non-linearities of the superinductance: they both introduce interactions between the low-energy qubit degree of freedom and higher-energy collective modes of the circuit. We also consider the role of the additional capacitances that are used to couple the qubit to a resonator for driving and read-out. We show that the interactions with the collective modes can affect not only the spectrum of the qubit but also its coherence. Work supported in part by the EU under REA Grant Agreement No. CIG-618258.

  1. Exposure to Movie Reckless Driving in Early Adolescence Predicts Reckless, but Not Inattentive Driving

    PubMed Central

    Kostermans, Evelien; Stoolmiller, Mike; de Leeuw, Rebecca N. H.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Sargent, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examine the association between exposure to depictions of reckless driving in movies and unsafe driving, modeling inattentive and reckless driving as separate outcomes. Methods Data were obtained by telephone from 1,630 US adolescents aged 10 to 14 years at baseline who were drivers at a survey 6 years later. Exposure to movie reckless driving was measured based on movies seen from a randomly selected list of 50 movie titles that had been content coded for reckless driving among characters. Associations were tested with inattentive and reckless driving behaviors in the subsequent survey–controlling for baseline age, sex, socioeconomic status, parental education, school performance, extracurricular activities, daily television and video/computer game exposure, number of movies watched per week, self-regulation and sensation seeking. Results Exposure to movie reckless driving was common, with approximately 10% of movie characters having driven recklessly. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a significant distinction between items tapping reckless and inattentive driving at the 6th wave. Age and exposure to movie reckless driving at baseline were directly associated with wave-6 reckless (but not inattentive) driving. Additionally, growth in sensation seeking mediated a prospective relation between the total number of movies watched per week at baseline and reckless driving, independent of exposure to movie reckless driving. Males and high sensation seekers reported lower seatbelt usage and more reckless driving, whereas lower self-regulation predicted inattentive driving. Discussion In this study, exposure to movie reckless driving during early adolescence predicted adolescents’ reckless driving, suggesting a direct modeling effect. Other aspects of movies were also associated with reckless driving, with that association mediated through growth in sensation seeking. Predictors of reckless driving were different from predictors of inattentive driving

  2. Effects due to nonlinear modification of driven current on tearing mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ge; Reiman, Allan; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can be destabilized by a helical perturbation in the boostrap current, and can result in large magnetic islands which are detrimental to confinement in toroidal plasma devices. NTM stability properties and dynamics can be strongly affected by current drive in various scenarios. The modified Rutherford equation is generally used to calculate the contributions from the current drive, without considering the self- consistent change in the driven current associated with the nonlinear effects. In this study, we evaluated the importance of such nonlinear effects as the effect of the change in Te on the current drive efficiency, and the nonlinear interaction of the current drive and the electric field.

  3. Reactivity controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle systems simulations - IJER

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Curran, Scott; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity- controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. However, the current range of the experimental RCCI engine map investigated here does not allow for RCCI operation over the entirety of somemore » drive cycles. A multi-mode RCCI strategy is employed where the engine switches from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the experimentally determined RCCI range. The potential for RCCI to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode RCCI, CDC, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. RCCI fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 PFI gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared to CDC, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  4. Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts an oscillator circuit for driving a piezoelectric transducer to excite vibrations in a mechanical structure. The circuit was designed and built to satisfy application-specific requirements to drive a selected one of 16 such transducers at a regulated amplitude and frequency chosen to optimize the amount of work performed by the transducer and to compensate for both (1) temporal variations of the resonance frequency and damping time of each transducer and (2) initially unknown differences among the resonance frequencies and damping times of different transducers. In other words, the circuit is designed to adjust itself to optimize the performance of whichever transducer is selected at any given time. The basic design concept may be adaptable to other applications that involve the use of piezoelectric transducers in ultrasonic cleaners and other apparatuses in which high-frequency mechanical drives are utilized. This circuit includes three resistor-capacitor networks that, together with the selected piezoelectric transducer, constitute a band-pass filter having a peak response at a frequency of about 2 kHz, which is approximately the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric transducers. Gain for generating oscillations is provided by a power hybrid operational amplifier (U1). A junction field-effect transistor (Q1) in combination with a resistor (R4) is used as a voltage-variable resistor to control the magnitude of the oscillation. The voltage-variable resistor is part of a feedback control loop: Part of the output of the oscillator is rectified and filtered for use as a slow negative feedback to the gate of Q1 to keep the output amplitude constant. The response of this control loop is much slower than 2 kHz and, therefore, does not introduce significant distortion of the oscillator output, which is a fairly clean sine wave. The positive AC feedback needed to sustain oscillations is derived from sampling the current through the

  5. Simulations of EBW current drive and power deposition in the WEGA Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2009-11-26

    The WEGA stellarator is well suited for fundamental electron Bernstein wave (EBW) studies. Heating and current drive experiments at 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, carried out in WEGA's low temperature, steady state overdense plasmas, were supported by intensive modelling. We employ our AMR (Antenna-Mode-conversion-Ray-tracing) code to calculate the O-X-EBW conversion efficiency with a full-wave equation solver, while the power deposition and current drive profiles using ray tracing. Several phenomena have been studied and understood. Particularly, EBW current drive was theoretically predicted and experimentally detected at 2.45 GHz. Simulations confirmed the presence of two (cold and hot) electron components and the resonant behaviour of the EBW power deposition and its dependence on the magnetic field configuration. Furthermore, the code is used to predict the 28 GHz heating and current drive performance and to simulate EBW emission spectra.

  6. Sleep Drive Is Encoded by Neural Plastic Changes in a Dedicated Circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Wu, Mark N

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged wakefulness leads to an increased pressure for sleep, but how this homeostatic drive is generated and subsequently persists is unclear. Here, from a neural circuit screen in Drosophila, we identify a subset of ellipsoid body (EB) neurons whose activation generates sleep drive. Patch-clamp analysis indicates these EB neurons are highly sensitive to sleep loss, switching from spiking to burst-firing modes. Functional imaging and translational profiling experiments reveal that elevated sleep need triggers reversible increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, NMDA receptor expression, and structural markers of synaptic strength, suggesting these EB neurons undergo "sleep-need"-dependent plasticity. Strikingly, the synaptic plasticity of these EB neurons is both necessary and sufficient for generating sleep drive, indicating that sleep pressure is encoded by plastic changes within this circuit. These studies define an integrator circuit for sleep homeostasis and provide a mechanism explaining the generation and persistence of sleep drive. PMID:27212237

  7. Optimizing digital 8mm drive performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schadegg, Gerry

    1993-01-01

    The experience of attaching over 350,000 digital 8mm drives to 85-plus system platforms has uncovered many factors which can reduce cartridge capacity or drive throughput, reduce reliability, affect cartridge archivability and actually shorten drive life. Some are unique to an installation. Others result from how the system is set up to talk to the drive. Many stem from how applications use the drive, the work load that's present, the kind of media used and, very important, the kind of cleaning program in place. Digital 8mm drives record data at densities that rival those of disk technology. Even with technology this advanced, they are extremely robust and, given proper usage, care and media, should reward the user with a long productive life. The 8mm drive will give its best performance using high-quality 'data grade' media. Even though it costs more, good 'data grade' media can sustain the reliability and rigorous needs of a data storage environment and, with proper care, give users an archival life of 30 years or more. Various factors, taken individually, may not necessarily produce performance or reliability problems. Taken in combination, their effects can compound, resulting in rapid reductions in a drive's serviceable life, cartridge capacity, or drive performance. The key to managing media is determining the importance one places upon their recorded data and, subsequently, setting media usage guidelines that can deliver data reliability. Various options one can implement to optimize digital 8mm drive performance are explored.

  8. [Useful assessment for identifying unsafe driving].

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Régis; Fabrigoule, Colette; Domont, Alain

    2005-03-01

    Ability to drive safely is the resultant of interactions between the individual (the driver), the vector (the car) and the environment (the state of the road). For some aged drivers, an important decline of visual, musculosquelettic and cognitive performances, may affect the ability to drive and increase the rate of crashes per vehicle-kilometer-driven, and the morbidity and mortality related to crash. Therefore, each holder of a driving licence should be medically suited to control his driving ability. In case of transitory or lasting driving incapacity, drivers must, of their own initiative, stop driving according to the Highway code and the contractual obligations appearing in their vehicle insurance contract. A medical examination for aptitude to driving requires a standardized, reliable, reproducible procedure based on consensual assessment tools to avoid arbitrary decisions for driving cessation. We propose a multidisciplinary approach to detect important decline of visuospatial and motor skills, paroxystic drops of attention and vigilance, and decreased cognitive capacity to anticipate and adapt driving at every moment. This assessment is based on a semi-directed interview and simple diagnostic tests. According to the present French law, only twelve medical conditions or functional deficits are inconsistent with the retain of the driving licence for a light vehicle. PMID:15814324

  9. Driving, brain injury and assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Amy K; Benoit, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with brain injury often present with cognitive, physical and emotional impairments which impact their ability to resume independence in activities of daily living. Of those activities, the resumption of driving privileges is cited as one of the greatest concerns by survivors of brain injury. The integration of driving fundamentals within the hierarchical model proposed by Keskinen represents the complexity of skills and behaviors necessary for driving. This paper provides a brief review of specific considerations concerning the driver with TBI and highlights current vehicle technology which has been developed by the automotive industry and by manufacturers of adaptive driving equipment that may facilitate the driving task. Adaptive equipment technology allows for compensation of a variety of operational deficits, whereas technological advances within the automotive industry provide drivers with improved safety and information systems. However, research has not yet supported the use of such intelligent transportation systems or advanced driving systems for drivers with brain injury. Although technologies are intended to improve the safety of drivers within the general population, the potential of negative consequences for drivers with brain injury must be considered. Ultimately, a comprehensive driving evaluation and training by a driving rehabilitation specialist is recommended for individuals with brain injury. An understanding of the potential impact of TBI on driving-related skills and knowledge of current adaptive equipment and technology is imperative to determine whether return-to-driving is a realistic and achievable goal for the individual with TBI. PMID:21558628

  10. Alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) while driving.

    PubMed

    Oron-Gilad, Tal; Ronen, Adi; Shinar, David

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) on driver performance, subjective feelings, and psychophysiological state in monotonous simulated driving in two experiments. In the first experiment, 12 professional truck drivers participated in five sessions of simulated driving: driving only, driving with one of three AMTs (counterbalanced), and driving while listening to music. AMTs were not equally effective in maintaining alertness. The trivia AMT prevented driving performance deterioration, and increased alertness (measured by standardized HRV). The choice reaction time AMT was least demanding but also increased subjective sleepiness and reduced arousal (measured by alpha/beta ratio). The working memory AMT caused a significant decrement in driving speed, increased subjective fatigue, and was regarded by the participants as detrimental to driving. Trivia was preferred by the majority of the drivers over the other two AMTs. Experiment 2 further examined the utility of the trivia AMT. When the drivers engaged in the trivia AMT they maintained better driving performance and perceived the driving duration as shorter than the control condition. The two experiments demonstrated that AMTs can have a positive effect on alertness. The effect is localized in the sense that it does not persist beyond the period of the AMT activation. PMID:18460351

  11. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  12. Dual Mode Shock-Expansion/Reflected-Shock Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, John I.; Bakos, Robert J.; Castrogiovanni, Anthony; Rogers, R. Clayton

    1998-01-01

    NASA s HYPULSE facility at GASL has been reconfigured to permit free jet testing of the Hyper-X flowpath at flight Mach numbers of 7 and 10. Among the required changes are addition of a converging-diverging nozzle to permit operation in a reflected shock tunnel mode, a 7 ft. diameter test cabin and a 30 in. diameter contoured nozzle. However, none of these changes were allowed to interfere with rapid recovery of the prior shock-expansion tunnel mode of operation, and indeed certain changes should enhance facility usefulness and productivity in either mode. A previously-developed shock-induced detonation mode of driving the facility has been successfully applied to both reflected shock tunnel operation at Mach 10 flight conditions, with tailored interface operation, and shock-expansion tunnel operation at flight conditions corresponding to Mach numbers from 12 to 25. Tailored interface operation at Mach 7 has been achieved with an unheated helium driver. In the present paper, the rationale for a dual mode shock expansion/reflected shock tunnel is discussed, and the capabilities and limitations for each mode are outlined. The physical changes in the HYPULSE facility to achieve dual mode capability are also described. Limited calibration data obtained to date in the new reflected shock tunnel mode are presented and the anticipated flight simulation map with dual mode operation is also outlined.

  13. Diaphragm Pump With Resonant Piezoelectric Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Shimko, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    make it oscillate at the resonance frequency of the spring and- mass structure. This frequency could be made high enough (of the order of 400 Hz) that the masses of all components could be made conveniently small. The resonance would amplify the relatively small motion of the piezoelectric stack (a stroke of the order of 10 m) to a diaphragm stroke of the order of 0.5 mm. The exact amplification factor would depend on the rate of damping of oscillations; this, in turn, would depend on details of design and operation, including (but not limited to) the desired pressure rise and volumetric flow rate. In order to obtain resonance with large displacement, the damping rate must be low enough that the energy imparted to the pumped fluid on each stroke is much less than the kinetic and potential energy exchanged between the mass and spring during each cycle of oscillation. To minimize the power demand of the pump, a highly efficient drive circuit would be used to excite the piezoelectric stack. This circuit (see Figure 2) would amount to a special-purpose regenerative, switching power supply that would operate in a power-source mode during the part of an oscillation cycle when the excitation waveform was positive and in a power-recovery mode during the part of the cycle when the excitation waveform was negative. The circuit would include a voltage-boosting dc-to-dc converter that would convert between a supply potential of 24 Vdc and the high voltage needed to drive the piezoelectric stack. Because of the power-recovery feature, the circuit would consume little power. It should be possible to build the circuit as a compact unit, using readily available components.

  14. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  15. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  16. Fast-particle-driven Alfvénic modes in a reversed field pinch.

    PubMed

    Koliner, J J; Forest, C B; Sarff, J S; Anderson, J K; Liu, D; Nornberg, M D; Waksman, J; Lin, L; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Spong, D A

    2012-09-14

    Alfvénic modes are observed due to neutral beam injection for the first time in a reversed field pinch plasma. Modeling of the beam deposition and slowing down shows that the velocity and radial localization are high. This allows instability drive from inverse Landau damping of a bump-on-tail in the parallel distribution function or from free energy in the fast ion density gradient. Mode switching from a lower frequency toroidal mode number n=5 mode that scales with beam injection velocity to a higher frequency n=4 mode with Alfvénic scaling is observed. PMID:23005639

  17. Constraints on the R-mode oscillations from surface temperatures of millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Schwenzer, Kai

    2016-07-01

    r-modes are toroidal oscillation modes expected to occur in neutron stars and carry away energy and angular momentum in the form of gravitational waves. These modes can be unstable as long as the gravitational wave emission drives the oscillation faster than viscosity damps it. Unstable r-modes have to be saturated by a non-linear dissipative mechanism which could strongly heat the star and result in observable X-ray signatures. Using the existing spin frequency and surface temperature measurements or limits of millisecond pulsars we present our initial results constraining the physics of the r-mode oscillations.

  18. Labs drive the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1984-11-01

    The conviction of laboratory managers that high technology can provide safety and national security in a dangerous world and that technological solutions are paramount over political solutions has been a major driving force in perpetuating the nuclear arms race. The credo in the laboratories appears to be that there are never enough designs of nuclear weapons for deterrence so that there is always a need to develop such new ideas as the nuclear-pumped X-ray laser as a defense against energy missiles. The author outlines several alternative steps, including the ratification and reaffirmation of arms control treaties, negotiations, and a halt to the Star Wars program. A central point is to stop nuclear weapons testing. 7 references.

  19. Incentives required to drive change.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The authors of "Chartbook: Shining a Light on the Quality of Healthcare in Canada," focus on building a Canadian healthcare performance baseline, highlighting opportunities to improve the system and then raising policy questions. This is a thoughtful approach to gaining awareness of the relative performance across the Canadian healthcare system. In essence, it is necessary to first establish a felt need, identify areas to improve and then ensure the system will implement the necessary changes to improve. The authors build a reasonable case for why improvements are necessary, and they identify key barriers that must be removed to actually realize improvements and offer a wide range of policy recommendations. However, not all of these recommendations are focused on the key point of ensuring that there are incentives in place to drive participants to implement changes. PMID:22543330

  20. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  1. [Stress of driving: general overview].

    PubMed

    Costa, G

    2012-01-01

    Driving is a stressful task that requires high levels of attention and vigilance to cope properly with job demands, mainly related to working hours and timetables, weather and traffic conditions, passengers and goods safety, responsibility in case of error and/or accident. Scientific literature shows a higher prevalence of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neuropsychic and musculoskeletal disorders, and consequent sick leaves, in professional bus/lorry and train drivers. Several studies have emphasized that stress, fatigue and excessive sleepiness give a significant contribution to occupational road and rail accidents. There are noteworthy, interindividual differences concerning alertness/sleepiness and tolerance to fatigue, related to psychophysiological and behavioural characteristics and health status, in particular: age, ability to overcome drowsiness, morningness/eveningness, diet and intake of psychotropic substances (alcohol, drugs, medicaments), primary and secondary sleep disorders (insomnia, ipersomnias, parasomnias). PMID:23213814

  2. Numerical investigation on operation mode influenced by external frequency in atmospheric pressure barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qi; Sun Jizhong; Wang Dezhen

    2011-10-15

    The influence of external driving frequency on the discharge mode in the dielectric barrier discharge was investigated with a two-dimensional, self-consistent fluid model. The simulation results show that the helium discharge exhibits three operation modes: Townsend, homogeneous glow, and local glow discharges from the lower frequency (1 kHz) to the higher frequency (100 kHz) under discharge parameters specified in this work. The discharge operates in a Townsend mode when the driving frequency varies from 1 to about 7 kHz; while it exhibits homogenous glow characteristics in an approximate range from 7 to 65 kHz; when the external frequency exceeds 65 kHz, it turns into a local glow discharge. The effects of external driving frequency on the discharge mode were revealed and the physical reasons were discussed.

  3. Unsafe driving behaviors and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Van Tuinen, M

    1994-04-01

    The medical costs associated with motor vehicle crashes are difficult to measure. Most attempts have used crash data and cost data that are only indirectly related to each other or have followed patients in a few hospitals or trauma centers. These studies produce localized estimates or rough national estimates of limited use to policy makers. The result has been a dependence on more readily available mortality data, such as the Fatal Accident Reporting System, to guide automotive safety efforts. The limitations of mortality data and the increasing sophistication of medical care data bases have resulted in a strong interest in obtaining crash-linked morbidity data. Hence, in 1993, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) awarded the Missouri Department of Health and six other applicants grants to link automotive crash records to statewide ambulance trip, outpatient care, hospitalization and mortality records. By identifying an individual across multiple data sets, states would be able to determine directly the relationship of driver behaviors and crash characteristics to hospitalization rates and other medical outcomes. Examination of hospital pay source information would expose the toll of automotive crashes on public tax dollars. Having recently completed the record linkage phase of this project, Missouri Department of Health staff are beginning to analyze the impact of automotive crashes on health care costs in Missouri. In this report, three unsafe driving behaviors, failure to use a safety device (seatbelts and motorcycle helmets), driving under the influence of alcohol, and speeding, are related to the risk of hospitalization or death, hospital costs, and expected pay source. PMID:8202067

  4. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  5. Single mode thermal emission.

    PubMed

    Fohrmann, Lena Simone; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Lang, Slawa; Jalas, Dirk; Krauss, Thomas F; Eich, Manfred

    2015-10-19

    We report on the properties of a thermal emitter which radiates into a single mode waveguide. We show that the maximal power of thermal radiation into a propagating single mode is limited only by the temperature of the thermal emitter and does not depend on other parameters of the waveguide. Furthermore, we show that the power of the thermal emitter cannot be increased by resonant coupling. For a given temperature, the enhancement of the total emitted power is only possible if the number of excited modes is increased. Either a narrowband or a broadband thermal excitation of the mode is possible, depending on the properties of the emitter. We finally discuss an example system, namely a thermal source for silicon photonics. PMID:26480429

  6. Supersymmetric mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Stützer, Simon; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity transmission systems has driven remarkable advances in technologies that encode information on an optical signal. Mode-division multiplexing makes use of individual modes supported by an optical waveguide as mutually orthogonal channels. The key requirement in this approach is the capability to selectively populate and extract specific modes. Optical supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently been proposed as a particularly elegant way to resolve this design challenge in a manner that is inherently scalable, and at the same time maintains compatibility with existing multiplexing strategies. Supersymmetric partners of multimode waveguides are characterized by the fact that they share all of their effective indices with the original waveguide. The crucial exception is the fundamental mode, which is absent from the spectrum of the partner waveguide. Here, we demonstrate experimentally how this global phase-matching property can be exploited for efficient mode conversion. Multimode structures and their superpartners are experimentally realized in coupled networks of femtosecond laser-written waveguides, and the corresponding light dynamics are directly observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. We show that SUSY transformations can readily facilitate the removal of the fundamental mode from multimode optical structures. In turn, hierarchical sequences of such SUSY partners naturally implement the conversion between modes of adjacent order. Our experiments illustrate just one of the many possibilities of how SUSY may serve as a building block for integrated mode-division multiplexing arrangements. Supersymmetric notions may enrich and expand integrated photonics by versatile optical components and desirable, yet previously unattainable, functionalities.

  7. Development of a driving cycle for intra-city buses in Chennai, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesamani, K. S.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2011-10-01

    In India the emissions rate and fuel consumption of intra-city buses are estimated using the European driving cycles, which don't represent Indian driving conditions and in-use operation of vehicles. This leads to underestimation or overestimation of emissions and fuel consumption. In this context, this paper offers some insight into the driving characteristics of intra-city buses using a Global Positioning System. The study has revealed that irrespective of road type and time of travel, a higher percentage of time is spent in idle mode. This is primarily due to alighting and boarding of passengers at regular intervals and fixed delays caused by traffic lights. More than 90 percent of trips have an average speed of less than 30 km h -1. This study has also developed an intra-city bus driving cycle for Chennai and compared it with some well-known international driving cycles. It has revealed that Chennai has unique driving characteristics and, therefore, it may not be appropriate to adopt a driving cycle of another country or city.

  8. Error analysis of friction drive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guomin; Yang, Shihai; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    Friction drive is used in some large astronomical telescopes in recent years. Comparing to the direct drive, friction drive train consists of more buildup parts. Usually, the friction drive train consists of motor-tachometer unit, coupling, reducer, driving roller, big wheel, encoder and encoder coupling. Normally, these buildup parts will introduce somewhat errors to the drive system. Some of them are random error and some of them are systematic error. For the random error, the effective way is to estimate their contributions and try to find proper way to decrease its influence. For the systematic error, the useful way is to analyse and test them quantitively, and then feedback the error to the control system to correct them. The main task of this paper is to analyse these error sources and find out their characteristics, such as random error, systematic error and contributions. The methods or equations used in the analysis will be also presented detail in this paper.

  9. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  10. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  11. Application of traction drives as servo mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of traction drives for a wide class of aerospace control mechanisms is examined. Potential applications include antenna or solar array drive positioners, robotic joints, control moment gyro (CMG) actuators and propeller pitch change mechanisms. In these and similar applications the zero backlash, high torsional stiffness, low hysteresis and torque ripple characteristics of traction drives are of particular interest, as is the ability to run without liquid lubrication in certain cases. Wear and fatigue considerations for wet and dry operation are examined along with the tribological performance of several promising self lubricating polymers for traction contracts. The speed regulation capabilities of variable ratio traction drives are reviewed. A torsional stiffness analysis described suggests that traction contacts are relatively stiff compared to gears and are significantly stiffer than the other structural elements in the prototype CMG traction drive analyzed. Discussion is also given of an advanced turboprop propeller pitch change mechanism that incorporates a traction drive.

  12. An analysis of traction drive torsional stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The tangential compliance of elastic bodies in concentrated contact applied to traction drive elements to determine their torsional stiffness was analyzed. Static loading and rotating conditions are considered. The effects of several design variables are shown. The theoretical torsional stiffness of a fixed ratio multiroller drive is computed and compared to experimental values. It is shown that the torsional compliance of the traction contacts themselves is a relatively small portion of the overall drive system compliance.

  13. Driving Miss Bradley: performance measurement to support thermal driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Dino; Ferrett, Donald A.

    1998-07-01

    The Driver's Vision Enhancer (DVE) program is providing a system to enlarge the driving envelope for the community of military wheeled and tracked vehicles. The DVE, an IR device, provides the driver with images of the forward scene under night and adverse day conditions. During the DVE development program, several questions emerged requiring performance-based data to resolve. A comprehensive program to provide the Project Manager, Night Vision/Reconnaissance, Surveillance and Target Acquisition with driver performance data that will aid in the decision-making process is described in this paper. The program involves several linked efforts including: the relative merits of the DVE and night vision goggles (NVG); drivers' ability to detect the presence of drop-offs when using the DVE and NVG; the effect on performance of various levels of nonuniformity and nonresponsiveness in the display/sensor system; the analysis of drivers' vision using an eye-tracker in a vehicle; and the evaluation of candidate symbology to enhance the DVE's utility in the M2 Bradley. The data collected will aid in making decisions on how to write a system specification to reduce cost without sacrificing driver performance, gain an understanding of how drivers use the DVE in operational settings, and determine where training is needed to enhance safety and reduce risk on the battlefield.

  14. Women drive better if not stereotyped.

    PubMed

    Moè, Angelica; Cadinu, Mara; Maass, Anne

    2015-12-01

    A commonly held stereotype is that women are poor drivers. This stereotype is recognized and endorsed by women and girls very early on, long before taking their driving licence, nevertheless they are less involved in accidents and drive safer and less fast than men. In line with the stereotype threat theory, the present study tests the hypothesis that making the driving stereotype salient will lead women to underperform in a driving simulation task. In Experiment 1women in the stereotype threat condition were told that the aim of the study was to detect gender differences in driving whereas in a control condition no study aim was provided. In Experiment 2, two conditions were compared: stereotype threat (same instructions as in Experiment 1), and stereotype boost (the alleged goal was to compare driving ability of young vs. old people). As predicted, the results of both experiments showed that women under stereotype threat, as compared to either control or stereotype boost participants, doubled the number of mistakes. Nevertheless, they overall expected/self-reported to drive/have driven poorly. Importantly, their level of expectation was a significant predictor of their actual driving performance only in the stereotype threat condition. Implications of these effects of stereotype threat on women's driving performance and self-assessment are discussed. PMID:26457739

  15. Camshaft driving device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ebesu, H.

    1988-06-14

    A camshaft driving device for use in a double overhead cam type internal combustion engine having a cylinder block, an upper deck formed at an upper portion of the cylinder block, a cylinder head disposed on the cylinder block, a driving shaft rotatably mounted at a lower portion of the cylinder block, and a pair of camshafts rotatably mounted at an upper portion of the cylinder head, is described comprising: driving force transmitting endless chain members engaging in the reduction gear means for transmitting a driving force from the driving shaft to the pair of camshaft through the reduction gear means. The camshaft driving device further including chain tensioners for tightening the chain, a nozzle means for supplying a lubricating oil to the driving force chain members on the side of the drive shaft and an oil guide wall formed immediately above the sprocket of the transmitting portion of the reduction gear means at a lower end portion of the journal boss and lapping thereover both in the radial direction and in the axial direction of the driving shaft. A mounting boss for mounting the reduction gear means thereon is formed on the upper deck of the cylinder block.

  16. Configuring NIF for direct drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.; Rothenberg, J.; Key, M.

    1995-07-11

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a proposed 1.8 MJ laser facility for carrying out experiments in inertial confinement fusion, currently designed for indirect drive experiments. The direct drive approach is being pursued at the 30 kJ Omega facility at the University of Rochester. In this paper we discuss the modifications to the NIF laser that would be required for both indirect and direct drive experiments. A primary concern is the additional cost of adding direct drive capability to the facility.

  17. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-01-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  18. Warp Drive - From Imagination to Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, J.

    The realisation of warp drive is far beyond current science and technology; nevertheless, setting out a timetable for the realisation of warp drive is instructive as this will set expectations for the progress of future research. It is proposed that a time scale for the realisation of warp drive can be estimated by historical analogy with the development of manned space travel to the Moon, using conventional project estimation techniques. A timeline for space travel to the Moon begins with Cyrano de Bergerac's Voyage dans la Lune in 1657 and culminates with the Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969, a little over 300 years later. A similar timeline for warp drive begins with John W. Campbell's novel Islands of Space in 1930. Fictional conjecture on the warp drive has given way to serious scientific speculation following publication of Alcubierre's seminal warp drive paper in 1994. It is concluded that the realisation of warp drive might be achieved around the year 2180. A projected timetable for the realisation of warp drive through phases of conjecture , speculation , science , technology and application suggests that the warp drive proposal should enter the science phase around the year 2030.

  19. Commuter exposure to volatile organic compounds under different driving conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Park, Kun-Ho

    The driving conditions that were tested for the in-vehicle concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) included transport modes, fuel distributions, vehicle ventilation conditions, driving routes, commute seasons, car models, and driving periods. This study involved two sampling seasons (winter and summer). The in-auto/in-bus/fixed site ratio of the wintertime mean concentrations was about 6/3/1 for total VOCs and 8/3/1 for benzene. On the median, the in-auto/in-bus exposure ratio ranged from 1.5 to 2.8 for the morning commutes, and ranged from 2.4 to 4.5 for evening commutes, depending on the target compounds. The wintertime in-auto concentrations were significantly higher ( p<0.05), on the average 3-5 times higher, in a carbureted engine than in the three electronic fuel-injected cars. For the summertime in-auto concentrations of the target compounds except benzene, there were no significant differences between low and high ventilation conditions on the two urban routes. The urban in-auto benzene concentration was significantly higher ( p<0.05) under the low ventilation condition. For the rural commutes, the in-auto concentrations of all target compounds were significantly higher ( p<0.05) under the low ventilation condition. The in-auto VOC concentrations on the two urban routes did not differ significantly, and they were greater than the rural in-auto concentrations, with the differences being significant ( p<0.05) for all target compounds. The summertime in-auto concentrations of benzene and toluene were greater than the wintertime in-auto concentrations, with the difference being significant ( p<0.05), while the concentrations of the other target compounds were not significantly different between the two seasons. Neither car models nor driving periods influenced the in-auto VOC concentrations.

  20. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  1. NASTRAN component-mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guyan, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Procedure for dynamic substructuring analysis technique is generally as follows: calculation of component modes; selection of component normal modes, calculation of component generalized matrices, assembly of system matrices, and computation of normal modes; and retrieval of component response.

  2. Growth Rate of the Tidal p-Mode g-Mode Instability in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.

    2016-03-01

    We recently described an instability due to the nonlinear coupling of p-modes to g-modes and, as an application, we studied the stability of the tide in coalescing binary neutron stars. Although we found that the tide is p-g unstable early in the inspiral and rapidly drives modes to large energies, our analysis only accounted for three-mode interactions. Venumadhav et al. showed that four-mode interactions must also be accounted for as they enter into the analysis at the same order. They found a near-exact cancellation between three- and four-mode interactions and concluded that while the tide in binary neutron stars can be p-g unstable, the growth rates are not fast enough to impact the gravitational wave signal. Their analysis assumes that the linear tide is incompressible, which is true of the static linear tide (the m = 0 harmonic) but not the non-static linear tide (m=+/- 2). Here we account for the compressibility of the linear tide and find that three- and four-mode interactions no longer cancel. As a result, we find that the instability can rapidly drive modes to significant energies well before the binary merges. We also show that linear damping interferes with the cancellation and may further enhance the growth rates. The early onset of the instability (at gravitational wave frequencies ≈ 50 {Hz}) and the large number of rapidly growing modes suggest that the instability could impact the gravitational wave signal. Assessing its impact will require an understanding of how the instability saturates and is left to future work.

  3. Saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars. II. Applications and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnigouras, Pantelis; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first results on the saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars due to nonlinear mode coupling. Emission of gravitational waves drives the f -mode (fundamental mode) unstable in fast-rotating, newborn neutron stars. The initial growth phase of the mode is followed by its saturation, because of energy leaking to other modes of the star. The saturation point determines the strain of the generated gravitational-wave signal, which can then be used to extract information about the neutron star's equation of state. The parent (unstable) mode couples via parametric resonances with pairs of daughter modes, with the triplets' evolution exhibiting a rich variety of behaviors. We study both supernova- and merger-derived neutron stars, simply modeled as polytropes in a Newtonian context, and show that the parent may couple to many different daughter pairs during the star's evolution through the instability window, with the saturation amplitude changing by orders of magnitude.

  4. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  5. The contribution of perceived parental and familial characteristics to attitudes toward accompanied driving among young drivers.

    PubMed

    Taubman-Ben-Ari, Orit

    2011-09-01

    One of the main requirements of the graduated driving licensing system in Israel is that new drivers be accompanied by an experienced driver (usually one of their parents) for the first three months after receipt of their license. The current series of studies examined the associations between young drivers' attitudes toward accompanied driving (ATAD) and their perception of their parents' driving styles and parenting modes, as well as dynamic of their family. Young drivers completed questionnaires assessing their ATAD, and either perceived parental driving style (Study 1, n=100), perceived parenting style (Study 2, n=120), or perceived family dynamic (Study 3, n=254). The results indicated significant associations between the young drivers' ATAD of tension, relatedness, avoidance, disapproval, and anxiety, and their own perceptions of the characteristic driving styles of their parents (risky, anxious, angry, and careful). They also indicated significant relationship between youngsters' ATAD and their perceptions of their parents' parenting modes (responsive, demanding, and autonomy-granting). Finally, the results indicated significant negative associations between ATAD of tension, avoidance, disapproval, and anxiety, and family cohesion and adaptability, and a positive association between these two and relatedness. The results are discussed in respect to the relationship between the parental model and the young drivers' ATAD in particular, and risk management in general, and practical implications of these results are offered. PMID:21658499

  6. Driving DSA into volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somervell, Mark; Yamauchi, Takashi; Okada, Soichiro; Tomita, Tadatoshi; Nishi, Takanori; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Muramatsu, Makoto; Iijima, Etsuo; Rastogi, Vinayak; Nakano, Takeo; Iwao, Fumiko; Nagahara, Seiji; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Dojun, Makiko; Yatsuda, Koichi; Tobana, Toshikatsu; Romo Negreira, Ainhoa; Parnell, Doni; Rathsack, Benjamen; Nafus, Kathleen; Peyre, Jean-Luc; Kitano, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is being extensively evaluated for application in semiconductor process integration.1-7 Since 2011, the number of publications on DSA at SPIE has exploded from roughly 26 to well over 80, indicating the groundswell of interest in the technology. Driving this interest are a number of attractive aspects of DSA including the ability to form both line/space and hole patterns at dimensions below 15 nm, the ability to achieve pitch multiplication to extend optical lithography, and the relatively low cost of the processes when compared with EUV or multiple patterning options. Tokyo Electron Limited has focused its efforts in scaling many laboratory demonstrations to 300 mm wafers. Additionally, we have recognized that the use of DSA requires specific design considerations to create robust layouts. To this end, we have discussed the development of a DSA ecosystem that will make DSA a viable technology for our industry, and we have partnered with numerous companies to aid in the development of the ecosystem. This presentation will focus on our continuing role in developing the equipment required for DSA implementation specifically discussing defectivity reduction on flows for making line-space and hole patterns, etch transfer of DSA patterns into substrates of interest, and integration of DSA processes into larger patterning schemes.

  7. Redundant arrays of IDE drives

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Sanders et al.

    2002-01-02

    The authors report tests of redundant arrays of IDE disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. Parts costs of total systems using commodity EIDE disks are now at the $4000 per Terabyte level. Disk storage prices have now decreased to the point where they equal the cost per Terabyte of Storage Technology tape silos. The disks, however, offer far better granularity; even small institutions can afford to deploy systems. The tests include reports on software RAID-5 systems running under Linux 2.4 using Promise Ultra 100{trademark} disk controllers. RAID-5 protects data in case of a single disk failure by providing parity bits. Tape backup is not required. Journaling file systems are used to allow rapid recovery from crashes. The data analysis strategy is to encapsulate data and CPU processing power. Analysis for a particular part of a data set takes place on the PC where the data resides. The network is only used to put results together. They explore three methods of moving data between sites; internet transfers, not pluggable IDE disks in FireWire cases, and DVD-R disks.

  8. Empathic concern drives costly altruism

    PubMed Central

    FeldmanHall, Oriel; Dalgleish, Tim; Evans, Davy; Mobbs, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Why do we self-sacrifice to help others in distress? Two competing theories have emerged, one suggesting that prosocial behavior is primarily motivated by feelings of empathic other-oriented concern, the other that we help mainly because we are egoistically focused on reducing our own discomfort. Here we explore the relationship between costly altruism and these two sub-processes of empathy, specifically drawing on the caregiving model to test the theory that trait empathic concern (e.g. general tendency to have sympathy for another) and trait personal distress (e.g. predisposition to experiencing aversive arousal states) may differentially drive altruistic behavior. We find that trait empathic concern – and not trait personal distress – motivates costly altruism, and this relationship is supported by activity in the ventral tegmental area, caudate and subgenual anterior cingulate, key regions for promoting social attachment and caregiving. Together, this data helps identify the behavioral and neural mechanisms motivating costly altruism, while demonstrating that individual differences in empathic concern-related brain responses can predict real prosocial choice. PMID:25462694

  9. The Thermodynamics of Drunk Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    1997-05-01

    Chemical and instrumental tests for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) measure the concentration of ethanol in the breath (BrAC), while state DUI laws are described in terms of blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Consequently, accurate and fair conversion from BrAC to BAC is crucial to the judicial process. Theoretical treatment of the water-air-ethanol equilibrium system and the related blood-breath-ethanol system, based on principles from general chemistry and biology, yields an equation relating the ratio of BAC to BrAC to the absolute temperature of the breath, the fraction of water in the blood, and the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization of ethanol from aqueous solution. The model equation predicts an average value for the ratio of 2350+100, not significantly different from reported experimental values. An exponential temperature dependence is predicted and has been confirmed experimentally as well. Biological, chemical, and instrumental variables are described along with their contributions to the overall uncertainty in the value of BrAC/BAC. While the forensic science community uses, and debates, a fixed ratio of 2100, the theoretical model suggests that a value of 1880 should be used to reduce the fraction of false positives to <1%.

  10. Kinesin 1 Drives Autolysosome Tubulation.

    PubMed

    Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Chen, Yang; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Rong, Yueguang; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Yixiao; Ren, He; Zhang, Chuanmao; Wang, Xinquan; Gao, Ning; Wang, Yanfeng; Sun, Lingfei; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2016-05-23

    Autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR) plays an important role in maintaining lysosome homeostasis. During ALR, lysosomes are reformed by recycling lysosomal components from autolysosomes. The most noticeable step of ALR is autolysosome tubulation, but it is currently unknown how the process is regulated. Here, using an approach combining in vivo studies and in vitro reconstitution, we found that the kinesin motor protein KIF5B is required for autolysosome tubulation and that KIF5B drives autolysosome tubulation by pulling on the autolysosomal membrane. Furthermore, we show that KIF5B directly interacts with PtdIns(4,5)P2. Kinesin motors are recruited and clustered on autolysosomes via interaction with PtdIns(4,5)P2 in a clathrin-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that clathrin promotes formation of PtdIns(4,5)P2-enriched microdomains, which are required for clustering of KIF5B. Our study reveals a mechanism by which autolysosome tubulation was generated. PMID:27219061

  11. What drives polymer glasses ductile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Panpan; Liu, Jianning

    2015-03-01

    The presentation aims to explore an important question in polymer physics: what makes polymer glasses of high molecular weight ductile? Upon deformation, load-bearing strands (LBS) emerge along the direction of the stress. Chain tension builds up in LBS due to the displacement of LBS. Segments that do not belong to LBS sequentially get activated by the LBS in the order of their proximity to LBS. If the chain network breaks down before driving the glass into a state of global plasticity, crazing and brittle fracture takes place instead of yielding and macroscopic plastic deformation. Fast deformation assures that chain pullout does not have time to materialize. Global plasticity also takes time to develop. Thus, the outcome is dictated by which process takes place first. In light of the recently proposed molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses, we present different examples from experiment to illustrate the importance to understand the interplay between short-ranged intersegmental interactions and long-ranged intrachain networking. NSF-DMR (EAGER- 1444859)

  12. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  13. Parafermion chain with 2 π /k Floquet edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, G. J.; Lazarides, Achilleas; Moessner, Roderich

    2016-07-01

    We study parafermion chains with Zk symmetry subject to a periodic binary drive, focusing on the case k =3 . We find that the chains support different Floquet edge modes at nontrivial quasienergies, distinct from those for the static system. We map out the corresponding phase diagram by a combination of analytics and numerics, and provide the location of 2 π /3 modes in parameter space. We also show that the modes are robust to weak disorder. While the previously studied Z2-invariant Majorana systems possess a transparent weakly interacting limit where the existence of a π -Majorana mode is manifest, our intrinsically strongly interacting generalization demonstrates that the existence of such a limit is not necessary.

  14. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  15. Mode-selective control of the crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Mankowsky, R; Cavalleri, A

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Driving phase changes by selective optical excitation of specific vibrational modes in molecular and condensed phase systems has long been a grand goal for laser science. However, phase control has to date primarily been achieved by using coherent light fields generated by femtosecond pulsed lasers at near-infrared or visible wavelengths. This field is now being advanced by progress in generating intense femtosecond pulses in the mid-infrared, which can be tuned into resonance with infrared-active crystal lattice modes of a solid. Selective vibrational excitation is particularly interesting in complex oxides with strong electronic correlations, where even subtle modulations of the crystallographic structure can lead to colossal changes of the electronic and magnetic properties. In this Account, we summarize recent efforts to control the collective phase state in solids through mode-selective lattice excitation. The key aspect of the underlying physics is the nonlinear coupling of the resonantly driven phonon to other (Raman-active) modes due to lattice anharmonicities, theoretically discussed as ionic Raman scattering in the 1970s. Such nonlinear phononic excitation leads to rectification of a directly excited infrared-active mode and to a net displacement of the crystal along the coordinate of all anharmonically coupled modes. We present the theoretical basis and the experimental demonstration of this phenomenon, using femtosecond optical spectroscopy and ultrafast X-ray diffraction at a free electron laser. The observed nonlinear lattice dynamics is shown to drive electronic and magnetic phase transitions in many complex oxides, including insulator-metal transitions, charge/orbital order melting and magnetic switching in manganites. Furthermore, we show that the selective vibrational excitation can drive high-TC cuprates into a transient structure with enhanced superconductivity. The combination of nonlinear phononics with ultrafast crystallography at

  16. Whispering Bloch modes

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate eigenvalue problems for the planar Helmholtz equation in open systems with a high order of rotational symmetry. The resulting solutions have similarities with the whispering gallery modes exploited in photonic micro-resonators and elsewhere, but unlike these do not necessarily require a surrounding material boundary, with confinement instead resulting from the geometry of a series of inclusions arranged in a ring. The corresponding fields exhibit angular quasi-periodicity reminiscent of Bloch waves, and hence we refer to them as whispering Bloch modes (WBMs). We show that if the geometry of the system is slightly perturbed such that the rotational symmetry is broken, modes with asymmetric field patterns can be observed, resulting in field enhancement and other potentially desirable effects. We investigate the WBMs of two specific geometries first using expansion methods and then by applying a two-scale asymptotic scheme. PMID:27493564

  17. The nonlinear tearing mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A series of nonlinear computations of tearing-mode development have been performed which achieve higher values of the magnetic Reynolds number and larger wavelengths than previously considered. A prime candidate for the realization of dynamic reconnection is the resistive magnetic tearing mode, a spontaneous instability of a stressed magnetic field. Typical simulations are described for a magnetic Lundquist number S of 10 to the 4th and wavelength parameters alpha from 0.05 to 0.5. In all cases, the nonlinear mode initially evolves at the linear growth rate, followed by a period of reduced growth. Another common feature is the formation of secondary flow vortices, near the tearing surface, which are opposite in direction to the initial linear vortices.

  18. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  19. Controlled optimization of mode conversion from electron Bernstein waves to extraordinary mode in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Efthimion, P C; Taylor, G; Munsat, T; Wilson, J R; Hosea, J C; Kaita, R; Majeski, R; Maingi, R; Shiraiwa, S; Spaleta, J; Ram, A K

    2003-04-25

    In the CDX-U spherical torus, agreement between radiation temperature and Thomson scattering electron temperature profiles indicates approximately 100% conversion of thermally emitted electron Bernstein waves to the X mode. This has been achieved by controlling the electron density scale length (L(n)) in the conversion region with a local limiter outside the last closed flux surface, shortening L(n) to the theoretically required value for optimal conversion. From symmetry of the conversion process, prospects for efficient coupling in heating and current drive scenarios are strongly supported. PMID:12731979

  20. Enhanced Mode Conversion of Thermally Emitted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)to Extraordinary Mode

    SciTech Connect

    B. Jones; P.C. Efthimion; G. Taylor; T. Munsat; J.R. Wilson; J.C. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Maingi; S. Shiraiwa; J. Spaleta

    2002-01-28

    In the CDX-U spherical torus, approximately 100% conversion of thermal EBWs to X-mode has been observed by controlling the electron density scale length (Ln) in the conversion region with a local limiter outside the last closed flux surface. The radiation temperature profile agrees with Thomson scattering electron temperature data. Results are consistent with theoretical calculations of conversion efficiency using measured Ln. By reciprocity of the conversion process, prospects for efficient coupling in EBW heating and current drive scenarios are strongly supported.

  1. 77 FR 61048 - Distracted Driving Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... grant program, 77 FR 51610 (Aug. 24, 2012), which established an application deadline of October 9, 2012... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Distracted Driving Grant Program AGENCY: National Highway... Transportation (DOT) announced the availability of funding authorized for distracted driving grants on August...

  2. Mechanical vs electric drive: which to choose

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, C.H.

    1983-03-01

    In the highly competitive 85 to 120 ton haul truck market, mechanical drive units have become increasingly popular because of their lower initial investment costs. But when total ownership costs over the life of the vehicle are considered, electric drive remains highly competitive.

  3. Steady State Tokamak Equilibria without Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    Steady state tokamak equilibria without current drive are found. This is made possible by including the potato bootstrap current close to the magnetic axis. Tokamaks with this class of equilibria do not need seed current or current drive, and are intrinsically steady state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Determining the focus of driving fears.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Deane, F P; Podd, J V

    2000-01-01

    Fear of driving has been recognized as a complex diagnostic entity. Studies on flying phobia have drawn similar conclusions, although increasing clarity has been gained through research that indicates that there may be subtypes of flying phobia based on the focus of fear. However, it is unclear if similar subtypes exist for fear of driving. The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary investigation of driving fear subtypes and to clarify further whether there were differences between driving-fearful respondents who had been in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and those who had not. Eighty-five driving-fearful, media-recruited respondents completed a questionnaire that assessed anxiety, avoidance, and concerns related to their driving fears. The sample had high expectations of negative events while driving. There were no significant differences between those who had experienced an MVA and those who had not on various measures of fear severity. Cluster analysis revealed two main foci of fear, one characterized by danger expectancies and the other based on anxiety expectancies and unpleasant driving situations. This emphasizes the importance of assessing both internal and external foci of fear. Although this finding is consistent with the results obtained for flying phobia, more research is required to replicate and extend these results and to develop and evaluate differential treatment programs. PMID:11095540

  5. Responsibility for Drinking and Driving in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, J. P.; And Others

    An attempt to measure responsibility for the effects of careful or careless driving involved the development of a scale for driving locus of control (DLOC). An early version of the DLOC was given to 43 college students. Preliminary results indicated that test-retest reliability and internal consistency were high enough to warrant further…

  6. Dynamics and control of instrumented harmonic drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazerooni, H.; Ellis, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Since torque in harmonic drives is transmitted by a pure couple, harmonic drives do not generate radial forces and therefore can be instrumented with torque sensors without interference from radial forces. The installation of torque sensors on the stationary component of harmonic drives (the Flexipline cup in this research work) produce backdrivability needed for robotic and telerobotic compliant maneuvers. Backdrivability of a harmonic drive, when used as torque increaser, means that the output shaft can be rotated via finite amount of torque. A high ratio harmonic drive is non-backdrivable because its output shaft cannot be turned by applying a torque on it. This article first develops the dynamic behavior of a harmonic drive, in particular the non-backdrivability, in terms of a sensitivity transfer function. The instrumentation of the harmonic drive with torque sensor is then described. This leads to a description of the control architecture which allows modulation of the sensitivity transfer function within the limits established by the closed-loop stability. A set of experiments on an active hand controller, powered by a DC motor coupled to an instrumented harmonic drive, is given to exhibit this method's limitations.

  7. Drive integration in perpendicular recording (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarisco, Davide; Li, Zhaohui; Higgins, Bill E.; Saito, Kaz; Wu, Yan; Lefebvre, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports on the progress in perpendicular drive integration. In the first part, an experiment comparing the effect of magnetic spacing variation between longitudinal and perpendicular recordings is discussed. First, it is shown that the Wallace equation applies to perpendicular recording provided that the density of the recorded signal is sufficiently high. Using a thermal actuator, the effect of separately changing the read and write magnetic spacings of longitudinal and perpendicular head and media is compared. It is shown that the bit error rate is more sensitive to write space variations versus read space variations. However, the dependence is similar between longitudinal and perpendicular components. In the second part, two types of single-head, 95 mm, 7200 rpm desktop perpendicular drives (40 and 80 Gbyte capacity) are presented. They both achieve good bit error rate and off-track capability in all zones. The thermal decay rate of the 40 Gbyte drive was measured and compared to a similar longitudinal drive. It was found that the decay rate is much smaller in the case of the perpendicular drive in the range of -6-+80 °C. The thermal decay rate of the two perpendicular drives was compared at ambient temperature and found to be equally small. Finally, a measurement of the bit error rate of the 40 Gbyte perpendicular drive over the same temperature range demonstrates that the drive operates well in this temperature range.

  8. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving records. Each Service and DLA will use its own form to record vehicle traffic accidents, moving violations, suspension or revocation actions, and traffic point assessments involving military and DOD civilian...

  9. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving records. Each Service and DLA will use its own form to record vehicle traffic accidents, moving violations, suspension or revocation actions, and traffic point assessments involving military and DOD civilian...

  10. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  11. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Cynthia; Bell, R. E.; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  12. DRIVE Analysis Tool Generates Custom Vehicle Drive Cycles Based on Real-World Data (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This fact sheet from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory describes the Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation, Visualization, and Evaluation (DRIVE) analysis tool, which uses GPS and controller area network data to characterize vehicle operation and produce custom vehicle drive cycles, analyzing thousands of hours of data in a matter of minutes.

  13. DriveWise: An Interdisciplinary Hospital-Based Driving Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Margaret G.; Kapust, Lissa R.; Hollis, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals working with the elderly have opportunities through research and clinical practice to shape public policy affecting the older driver. This article describes DriveWise, an interdisciplinary hospital-based driving assessment program developed in response to clinical concerns about the driving safety of individuals with…

  14. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  15. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures (˜140 °C) the discharge transitions from "ring mode" to "red mode," which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from "good emission" for optical pumping to "poor emission." Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  16. Energy Characteristics of Electric Drive of Oscillatory Motion at the Shock-Free Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payuk, L. A.; Voronina, N. A.; Galtseva, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The peculiarity of operation of oscillatory electric drive with doubly-fed motor at realization of algorithm of shock-free start was considered. The method of evaluating of energy parameters of such motors operating at the resonance mode with yueTOM of quantitative and qualitative components of the process of energy conversion by an electric motor (doubly-fed motor) is proposed. The calculation of energy characteristics of electric drive of this type was made, the results of calculation show an increase of energy efficiency (an average, generalized efficiency coefficient nE increased by 10%), which confirms the practical significance of the research object.

  17. Extracting the driving force from ozone data using slow feature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geli; Yang, Peicai; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-05-01

    Slow feature analysis (SFA) is a recommended technique for extracting slowly varying features from a quickly varying signal. In this work, we apply SFA to total ozone data from Arosa, Switzerland. The results show that the signal of volcanic eruptions can be found in the driving force, and wavelet analysis of this driving force shows that there are two main dominant scales, which may be connected with the effect of climate mode such as North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and solar activity. The findings of this study represent a contribution to our understanding of the causality from observed climate data.

  18. Multi-mode horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Jeffrey M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A horn has an input aperture and an output aperture, and comprises a conductive inner surface formed by rotating a curve about a central axis. The curve comprises a first arc having an input aperture end and a transition end, and a second arc having a transition end and an output aperture end. When rotated about the central axis, the first arc input aperture end forms an input aperture, and the second arc output aperture end forms an output aperture. The curve is then optimized to provide a mode conversion which maximizes the power transfer of input energy to the Gaussian mode at the output aperture.

  19. Adjustable Speed Drive Study, Part 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Alan K.; Oregon State University. Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    1989-08-01

    Advances in speed control for motors in recent years, notably those in power electronics, have widened the range of application for several adjustable speed drive (ASD) types to include the smaller horsepower sizes. The DC motor drive, formerly in almost universal use for speed control, is being challenged by the high efficiency induction motor/pulse width modulation (PWM) drive; and for special small horsepower size applications, by the permanent magnet motor/PWM inverter drive or by the switched reluctance motor drive. The main characteristics of the several ASD types suitable for small horsepower size applications are discussed, as well as their unwanted side effects: poor power factor, harmonic distortion of the supply, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic interference. A procedure is recommended for determining which, if any, ASD to use.

  20. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198