Science.gov

Sample records for 2-fold rotational symmetry

  1. Mapping of sequences with 2-fold symmetry on the simian virus 40 genome: a photochemical crosslinking approach.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C K; Hearst, J E

    1977-01-01

    Sequences with 2-fold axes of symmetry have been detected and mapped on the simian virus 40 (SV40) genome by their ability to form hairpin turns in single-stranded SV40 DNA. Supercoiled SV40 DNA (SV40 I) was digested with restriction enzymes EcoRI and HpaII. The resulting linear DNA molecules with lengths of the complete SV40 genome were then denatured and photochemically reacted with 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (trioxsalen) at 16.0 +/- 0.5 degrees and different ionic strengths. Secondary structures on the single-stranded SV40 DNA were crosslinked and their positions analyzed by electron microscopy. There were no observable hairpin turns on the denatured SV40 DNA when it was photoreacted in 1 mM Tris-HCl/0.1 mM EDTA at pH 7.0. In 20 mM NaCl, one specific hairpin turn was detected at 0.17 +/- 0.02 map units on the map of EcoRI-digested SV40 DNA, where the 3' ends of early 19S mRNA, late 19S mRNA, and 16S mRNA of SV40 have been mapped. In 30 mM NaCl there are five more major hairpin turns besides the most stable one. The centers of four of these specific hairpin turns were mapped at 0.26 +/- 0.02, 0.68 +/- 0.03, 0.84 +/- 0.02, and 0.94 +/- 0.01 units on the map of EcoRI-digested SV40. The fifth one is at or near the unique EcoRI cleavage site on SV40 DNA. The possible functions of these sequences are discussed in terms of the nature of the promoter sites, the replication origin, the processing of RNA precursors, and regulation at the translational level. Images PMID:193097

  2. Theory of symmetry for a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shao-Kai; Chen, Xiang-Wei; Guo, Yong-Xin

    2002-05-01

    The theory of symmetry for a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system is studied. In terms of the invariance of the rotational relativistic Pfaff-Birkhoff-D'Alembert principle under infinitesimal transformations, the Noether symmetries and conserved quantities of a rotational relativistic Birkhoff system are given. In terms of the invariance of rotational relativistic Birkhoff equations under infinitesimal transformations, the Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of the rotational relativistic Birkhoff system are given.

  3. Discrete rotational symmetry and quantum-key-distribution protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokoff, David; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of discrete rotational symmetry in the quantum key distribution by generalizing the well-known Bennett-Brassard 1984 and Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 protocols. We observe that discrete rotational symmetry results in the protocol's invariance to continuous rotations, thus leading to a simplified relation between bit and phase error rates and consequently a straightforward security proof.

  4. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  5. Emergent rotational symmetries in disordered magnetic domain patterns.

    PubMed

    Su, Run; Seu, Keoki A; Parks, Daniel; Kan, Jimmy J; Fullerton, Eric E; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Stephen D

    2011-12-16

    Uniaxial systems often form labyrinthine domains that exhibit short-range order but are macroscopically isotropic and would not be expected to exhibit precise symmetries. However, their underlying frustration results in a multitude of metastable configurations of comparable energy, and driving such a system externally might lead to pattern formation. We find that soft x-ray speckle diffraction patterns of the labyrinthine domains in CoPd/IrMn heterostructures reveal a diverse array of hidden rotational symmetries about the magnetization axis, thereby suggesting an unusual form of emergent order in an otherwise disordered system. These symmetries depend on applied magnetic field, magnetization history, and scattering wave vector. Maps of rotational symmetry exhibit intriguing structures that can be controlled by manipulating the applied magnetic field in concert with the exchange bias condition.

  6. Effects of rotational symmetry breaking in polymer-coated nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanović, D.; Hoogenboom, B. W.; Ford, I. J.; Kerr-Winter, M.; Eccleston, R. C.

    2015-01-21

    The statistical theory of polymers tethered around the inner surface of a cylindrical channel has traditionally employed the assumption that the equilibrium density of the polymers is independent of the azimuthal coordinate. However, simulations have shown that this rotational symmetry can be broken when there are attractive interactions between the polymers. We investigate the phases that emerge in these circumstances, and we quantify the effect of the symmetry assumption on the phase behavior of the system. In the absence of this assumption, one can observe large differences in the equilibrium densities between the rotationally symmetric case and the non-rotationally symmetric case. A simple analytical model is developed that illustrates the driving thermodynamic forces responsible for this symmetry breaking. Our results have implications for the current understanding of the behavior of polymers in cylindrical nanopores.

  7. Hidden rotational symmetry in a generalized Ising model with rectangular symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hai-Yao; Hu, Kaige

    2011-08-01

    Novel quantum phases are of interest both fundamentally and practically. In this paper, a toy lattice model with exact four-fold rotational symmetry (C4), which can be taken as a straightforward generalization of the usual Ising model, is studied. The phase diagram in the t-T plane is plotted, where t is the energy controlling quantum fluctuations and T is the temperature. The diagram features an exotic phase (termed the S-phase), which meets the conventional ordered and disordered phases at a tri-critical point. The S-phase distinguishes itself from the conventional ordered phase by its symmetry properties. In fact, it is shown to arise from the spontaneous breaking of the continuous rotational symmetry rather than the C4 symmetry. This is manifested in the long-wavelength fluctuations, which are shown to be the gapless Nambu-Goldstone modes following a quadratic dispersion relation, similar to that of the XY model. Further, discontinuous quantum phase transitions are found and they are argued to occur subsequent to the S-phase.

  8. Magnetic Rotation and Chirality and X(5) Critical Symmetry in Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Hao, X.; Wang, L. L.; Zheng, Y.; Li, G. S.

    2010-05-12

    The magnetic and chiral rotation, the critical symmetry are fundamental problems in the study of nuclear structure. Here we report the recent results from the experiments on the magnetic and electric rotations in {sup 106}Ag, the chiral rotation in {sup 130}Cs and the evolution of X(5) symmetry in {sup 176}Os.

  9. Classification of stable Dirac and Weyl semimetals with reflection and rotational symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zihao; Hua, Meng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac and Weyl semimetals are novel states of quantum matter. We classify stable 3D Dirac and Weyl semimetals with reflection and rotational symmetry in the presence of time reversal symmetry and spin-orbit coupling, which belong to seventeen different point groups. They have two classes of reflection symmetry, with the mirror plane parallel and perpendicular to rotation axis. In both cases two types of Dirac points, existing through accidental band crossing (ABC) or at a time reversal invariant momentum (TBC), are determined by four different reflection symmetries. We classify those two types of Dirac points with a combination of different reflection and rotational symmetries. We further classify Dirac and Weyl line nodes to show in which types of mirror plane they can exist. Finally we discuss that Weyl line nodes and Dirac points can exist at the same time taking C4 v symmetry as an example.

  10. Spin-rotation symmetry breaking in the superconducting state of CuxBi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matano, K.; Kriener, M.; Segawa, K.; Ando, Y.; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is an important concept for understanding physics ranging from the elementary particles to states of matter. For example, the superconducting state breaks global gauge symmetry, and unconventional superconductors can break further symmetries. In particular, spin-rotational symmetry is expected to be broken in spin-triplet superconductors. However, experimental evidence for such symmetry breaking has not been conclusively obtained so far in any candidate compounds. Here, using 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we show that spin-rotation symmetry is spontaneously broken in the hexagonal plane of the electron-doped topological insulator Cu0.3Bi2Se3 below the superconducting transition temperature Tc = 3.4 K. Our results not only establish spin-triplet superconductivity in this compound, but may also serve to lay a foundation for the research of topological superconductivity.

  11. Topological charges of three-dimensional Dirac semimetals with rotation symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bohm-Jung; Morimoto, Takahiro; Furusaki, Akira

    2015-10-01

    In general, the stability of a band crossing point indicates the presence of a quantized topological number associated with it. In particular, the recent discovery of three-dimensional Dirac semimetals in Na3Bi and Cd3As2 demonstrates that a Dirac point with fourfold degeneracy can be stable as long as certain crystalline symmetries are supplemented in addition to the time-reversal and inversion symmetries. However, the topological charges associated with Na3Bi and Cd3As2 are not clarified yet. In this work, we identify the topological charge of three-dimensional Dirac points. It is found that although the simultaneous presence of the time-reversal and inversion symmetries forces the net chiral charge to vanish, a Dirac point can carry another quantized topological charge when an additional rotation symmetry is considered. Two different classes of Dirac semimetals are identified depending on the nature of the rotation symmetries. First, the conventional symmorphic rotational symmetry which commutes with the inversion gives rise to the class I Dirac semimetals having a pair of Dirac points on the rotation axes. Since the topological charges of each pair of Dirac points have the opposite sign, a pair creation or a pair annihilation is required to change the number of Dirac points in the momentum space. On the other hand, the class II Dirac semimetals possess a single isolated Dirac point at a time-reversal invariant momentum, which is protected by a screw rotation. The nonsymmorphic nature of screw rotations allows the anticommutation relation between the rotation and inversion symmetries, which enables to circumvent the doubling of the number of Dirac points and create a single Dirac point at the Brillouin zone boundary.

  12. Interfacial Octahedral Rotation Mismatch Control of the Symmetry and Properties of SrRuO3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ran; Dong, Yongqi; Xu, Han; Zhou, Hua; Yuan, Yakun; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Gao, Chen; Fong, Dillon D; Chen, Zuhuang; Luo, Zhenlin; Martin, Lane W

    2016-06-15

    Epitaxial strain can be used to tune the properties of complex oxides with perovskite structure. Beyond just lattice mismatch, the use of octahedral rotation mismatch at heterointerfaces could also provide an effective route to manipulate material properties. Here, we examine the evolution of the structural motif (i.e., lattice parameters, symmetry, and octahedral rotations) of SrRuO3 films grown on substrates engineered to have the same lattice parameters, but different octahedral rotations. SrRuO3 films grown on SrTiO3 (001) (no octahedral rotations) and GdScO3-buffered SrTiO3 (001) (with octahedral rotations) substrates are found to exhibit monoclinic and tetragonal symmetry, respectively. Electrical transport and magnetic measurements reveal that the tetragonal films exhibit higher resistivity, lower magnetic Curie temperatures, and more isotropic magnetism as compared to those with monoclinic structure. Synchrotron-based quantification of the octahedral rotation network reveals that the tilting pattern in both film variants is the same (albeit with slightly different magnitudes of in-plane rotation angles). The abnormal rotation pattern observed in tetragonal SrRuO3 indicates a possible decoupling between the internal octahedral rotation and lattice symmetry, which could provide new opportunities to engineer thin-film structure and properties.

  13. Rotational directionality via symmetry-breaking in an electrostatic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestino, A.; Croy, A.; Beims, M. W.; Eisfeld, A.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate how one can achieve a preferred rotational direction for the case of a simple electrostatic motor. The motor is composed by a rotor and two electronic reservoirs. Electronic islands on the rotor can exchange electrons with the reservoirs. An electrostatic field exerts a force on the occupied islands. The charge dynamics and the electrostatic field drive rotations of the rotor. Coupling to an environment lead to damping on the rotational degree of freedom. We use two different approaches to the charge dynamics in the electronic islands: hopping process and mean-field. The hopping process approach takes into account charge fluctuations, which can appear along Coulomb blockade effects in nanoscale systems. The mean-field approach neglects the charge fluctuations on the islands, which is typically suitable for larger systems. We show that for a system described by the mean-field equations one can in principle prepare initial conditions to obtain a desired rotational direction. In contrast, this is not possible in the stochastic description. However, for both cases one can achieve rotational directionality by changing the geometry of the rotor. By scanning the space formed by the relevant geometric parameters we find optimal geometries, while fixing the dissipation and driving parameters. Remarkably, in the hopping process approach perfect rotational directionality is possible for a large range of geometries.

  14. Collective modes and the broken symmetry of a rotating attractive Bose gas in an anharmonic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, A.

    2006-01-15

    We study the rotational properties of an attractively interacting Bose gas in an anharmonic potential. Low-energy excitations for the two possible rotational ground-state configurations (vortex and the center-of-mass rotating state) are analyzed. The vortex excitation spectrum is all positive for weak couplings, but as the interactions become stronger, the energy of the lowest mode decreases rapidly to a negative value. The broken rotational symmetry involved in the center-of-mass rotating state induces the appearance of an extra zero-energy mode in the Bogoliubov spectrum. The excitations of the center-of-mass rotational state also demonstrate the coupling between the center of mass and relative motions.

  15. More solutions with local rotational symmetry in which the dirac equation separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Luis O.

    1989-05-01

    Perfect fluid space-times with local rotational symmetry in which the Dirac equation separates and were not found or rejected on physical grounds by Iyer and Vishveswara are found. We argue that the unphysical equation of state can be understood as a physical fluid plus a vacuum fluid.

  16. Polynomial shape of an inclined ellipsoid with rotational symmetry about its major axis.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Escobar, Lizbeth A; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    We present the approximate polynomial expression for an ellipsoid with rotational symmetry about its major axis, which is on the y-z plane and at angle theta with respect to the z axis. These expressions have many possible useful applications in optics as shown. The main optical properties of these types of inclined ellipsoidal surface will be reviewed.

  17. Symmetry of extremely floppy molecules: Molecular states beyond rotation-vibration separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Schlemmer, Stephan; Jensen, Per

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, molecules are theoretically described as near-static structures rotating in space. Vibrational motion causing small structural deformations induces a perturbative treatment of the rotation-vibration interaction, which fails in highly fluxional molecules, where all vibrational motions have amplitudes comparable in size to the linear dimensions of the molecule. An example is protonated methane (CH 5+ ) [P. Kumar and D. Marx, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 573 (2006); Z. Jin et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 1569 (2006); and A. S. Petit et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7206 (2014)]. For these molecules, customary theory fails to simulate reliably even the low-energy spectrum [T. Oka, Science 347, 1313-1314 (2015) and O. Asvany et al., Science 347, 1346-1349 (2015)]. Within the traditional view of rotation and vibration being near-separable, rotational and vibrational wavefunctions can be symmetry classified separately in the molecular symmetry (MS) group [P. Bunker and P. Jensen, Molecular Symmetry and Spectroscopy, NRC Monograph Publishing Program (NRC Research Press, 2006)]. In this article, we discuss a fundamental group theoretical approach to the problem of determining the symmetries of molecular rotation-vibration states. We will show that all MS groups discussed so far are isomorphic to subgroups of the special orthogonal group in three dimensions SO(3). This leads to a group theoretical foundation of the technique of equivalent rotations [H. Longuet-Higgins, Mol. Phys. 6, 445 (1963)]. The group G240 (the MS group of protonated methane) represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first example of a MS group which is not isomorphic to a subgroup of SO(3) (nor of O(3) or of SU(2)). Because of this, a separate symmetry classification of vibrational and rotational wavefunctions becomes impossible in this MS group, consistent with the fact that a decoupling of vibrational and rotational motion is impossible. We discuss here the consequences of this. In

  18. Symmetry of extremely floppy molecules: Molecular states beyond rotation-vibration separation.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Schlemmer, Stephan; Jensen, Per

    2015-10-21

    Traditionally, molecules are theoretically described as near-static structures rotating in space. Vibrational motion causing small structural deformations induces a perturbative treatment of the rotation-vibration interaction, which fails in highly fluxional molecules, where all vibrational motions have amplitudes comparable in size to the linear dimensions of the molecule. An example is protonated methane (CH5(+)) [P. Kumar and D. Marx, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 573 (2006); Z. Jin et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 1569 (2006); and A. S. Petit et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7206 (2014)]. For these molecules, customary theory fails to simulate reliably even the low-energy spectrum [T. Oka, Science 347, 1313-1314 (2015) and O. Asvany et al., Science 347, 1346-1349 (2015)]. Within the traditional view of rotation and vibration being near-separable, rotational and vibrational wavefunctions can be symmetry classified separately in the molecular symmetry (MS) group [P. Bunker and P. Jensen, Molecular Symmetry and Spectroscopy, NRC Monograph Publishing Program (NRC Research Press, 2006)]. In this article, we discuss a fundamental group theoretical approach to the problem of determining the symmetries of molecular rotation-vibration states. We will show that all MS groups discussed so far are isomorphic to subgroups of the special orthogonal group in three dimensions SO(3). This leads to a group theoretical foundation of the technique of equivalent rotations [H. Longuet-Higgins, Mol. Phys. 6, 445 (1963)]. The group G240 (the MS group of protonated methane) represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first example of a MS group which is not isomorphic to a subgroup of SO(3) (nor of O(3) or of SU(2)). Because of this, a separate symmetry classification of vibrational and rotational wavefunctions becomes impossible in this MS group, consistent with the fact that a decoupling of vibrational and rotational motion is impossible. We discuss here the consequences of this. In

  19. Symmetry Beyond Perturbation Theory: Floppy Molecules and Rotation-Vibration States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Schlemmer, Stephan; Jensen, Per

    2015-06-01

    In the customary approach to the theoretical description of the nuclear motion in molecules, the molecule is seen as a near-static structure rotating in space. Vibrational motion causing small structural deformations induces a perturbative treatment of the rotation-vibration interaction, which fails in fluxional molecules, where all vibrational motions are large compared to the linear extension of the molecule. An example is protonated methane (CH_5^+). For this molecule, customary theory fails to simulate reliably even the low-energy spectrum. Within the traditional view of rotation and vibration being near-separable, rotational and vibrational wavefunctions can be symmetry classified separately in the molecular symmetry (MS) group. In the present contribution we discuss a fundamental group theoretical approach to the problem of determining the symmetries of molecular rotation-vibration states. We will show that all MS groups discussed so far are subgroups of the special orthogonal group in three dimensions SO(3) This leads to a group theoretical foundation of the technique of equivalent rotations. The MS group of protonated methane (G240) represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first example of an MS group which is not a subgroup of SO(3) (nor of O(3) nor of SU(2)). Because of this, a separate symmetry classification of vibrational and rotational wavefunctions becomes impossible in this MS group, consistent with the fact that a decoupling of vibrational and rotational motion is impossible. We want to discuss the consequences of this. In conclusion, we show that the prototypical floppy molecule CH_5^+ represents a new class of molecules, where usual group theoretical methods for determining selection rules and spectral assignments fail so that new methods have to be developed. P. Kumar and D. Marx, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 8, 573 (2006) Z. Jin, B. J. Braams, and J. M. Bowman, The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 110, 1569 (2006) A. S. Petit, J. E

  20. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1992-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  1. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  2. Effect of rotational symmetry on the optical rotation of using asymmetrical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor, Y. L.; Phua, W. K.; Liu, Y. J.; Wu, S.; Popp, D.; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Mok, K. L.; Teng, J. H.; Robinson, R.; Li, E. P.; Khoo, E. H.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we rotate an array of asymmetrical double layer of 4-strips windmill structure to investigate its effect on the chirality and sensitivity detection of biomolecular structures. The structure is made up of silver material with 300nm pitch and 10nm separation between layers. The spectrum shows two resonance modes on 600THz and 900THz with linear polarized light normally incident on the structure. We investigate the CD by rotating one of the layers with respect to the horizontal axis of the other layer by the angle θ. It is observed that the CD spectra at different angles are different. The rotation resulted in larger wavelength shift of the CD spectra. In addition, the CD also increases with the rotating angle given a larger absorption difference between the left and right handed circular polarized light.

  3. Polarization singularities and orbital angular momentum sidebands from rotational symmetry broken by the Pockels effect.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiancong; Wu, Ziwen; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2014-05-02

    The law of angular momentum conservation is naturally linked to the rotational symmetry of the involved system. Here we demonstrate theoretically how to break the rotational symmetry of a uniaxial crystal via the electro-optic Pockels effect. By numerical method based on asymptotic expansion, we discover the 3D structure of polarization singularities in terms of C lines and L surfaces embedded in the emerging light. We visualize the controllable dynamics evolution of polarization singularities when undergoing the Pockels effect, which behaves just like the binary fission of a prokaryotic cell, i.e., the splitting of C points and fission of L lines are animated in analogy with the cleavage of nucleus and division of cytoplasm. We reveal the connection of polarization singularity dynamics with the accompanying generation of orbital angular momentum sidebands. It is unexpected that although the total angular momentum of light is not conserved, the total topological index of C points is conserved.

  4. Rotational symmetry of the C ring and a mechanism for the flagellar rotary motor

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dennis R.; Morgan, David Gene; DeRosier, David J.

    1999-01-01

    FliG, FliM, and FliN, key proteins for torque generation, are located in two rings. The first protein is in the M ring and the last two are in the C ring. The rotational symmetries of the C and M rings have been determined to be about 34 (this paper) and 26 (previous work), respectively. The mechanism proposed here depends on the symmetry mismatch between the rings: the C ring extends 34 levers, of which 26 can bind to the 26 equivalent sites on the M ring. The remaining 8 levers bind to proton–pore complexes (studs) to form 8 torque generators. Movement results from the swapping of stud-bound levers with M ring-bound levers. The model predicts that both the M and C rings rotate in the same direction but at different speeds. PMID:10468575

  5. Polarization singularities and orbital angular momentum sidebands from rotational symmetry broken by the Pockels effect.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiancong; Wu, Ziwen; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2014-01-01

    The law of angular momentum conservation is naturally linked to the rotational symmetry of the involved system. Here we demonstrate theoretically how to break the rotational symmetry of a uniaxial crystal via the electro-optic Pockels effect. By numerical method based on asymptotic expansion, we discover the 3D structure of polarization singularities in terms of C lines and L surfaces embedded in the emerging light. We visualize the controllable dynamics evolution of polarization singularities when undergoing the Pockels effect, which behaves just like the binary fission of a prokaryotic cell, i.e., the splitting of C points and fission of L lines are animated in analogy with the cleavage of nucleus and division of cytoplasm. We reveal the connection of polarization singularity dynamics with the accompanying generation of orbital angular momentum sidebands. It is unexpected that although the total angular momentum of light is not conserved, the total topological index of C points is conserved. PMID:24784778

  6. Polarization singularities and orbital angular momentum sidebands from rotational symmetry broken by the Pockels effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiancong; Wu, Ziwen; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2014-05-01

    The law of angular momentum conservation is naturally linked to the rotational symmetry of the involved system. Here we demonstrate theoretically how to break the rotational symmetry of a uniaxial crystal via the electro-optic Pockels effect. By numerical method based on asymptotic expansion, we discover the 3D structure of polarization singularities in terms of C lines and L surfaces embedded in the emerging light. We visualize the controllable dynamics evolution of polarization singularities when undergoing the Pockels effect, which behaves just like the binary fission of a prokaryotic cell, i.e., the splitting of C points and fission of L lines are animated in analogy with the cleavage of nucleus and division of cytoplasm. We reveal the connection of polarization singularity dynamics with the accompanying generation of orbital angular momentum sidebands. It is unexpected that although the total angular momentum of light is not conserved, the total topological index of C points is conserved.

  7. Stationary observers on the symmetry axis of rotating supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrásek, Martin; Hledík, Stanislav

    2007-12-01

    Generalizing the results obtained by Semerák, O. (1993) [Semerák, O. (1993), Stationary Frames in the Kerr Field, Gen. Relativity Gravitation, 10 (1045)], an interesting difference between the Kerr and Kerr-de Sitter geometries has been found. In the case of freely falling stationary observers located on the axis of symmetry, rotating supermassive black holes (not necessarily fast rotating) behave differently from the same bodies for which the present value of cosmological constant is not included. An interesting family of "freely falling stationary observers" is described.

  8. [Symmetry types, systems and multiplicity of the structure of adenovirus capsid. II. Rotational facet-groups of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry axes].

    PubMed

    Nász, István; Adám, Eva

    2006-01-01

    The icosahedral adenovirus capsid has three rotational axes of different types. The six five-fold, ten three-fold and the fifteen two-fold axes have two superficial points each, altogether 62. The axes determine the number and location of the identical rotational facet groups and that during the different rotational phases which other regular facets and with what multiplicity shall be covered by them. The number of rotational facets of the five-, three- and two-fold rotational symmetry axes is 4, 6.66 and 10, respectively. In all the three cases, there are two kinds of possible arrangements of the facets. During the rotation - when the facets of the facet group placed on one by one to the neighbouring identical facet groups - at the five-fold axes, the facets of the rotational facet group get into cover position 12 times with all the 20 regular capsid facets, 20 times at the three-fold axes, and 30 times at the two-fold axes in a way that a different facet combination (facet hit) falls to every facet, and the original symmetry is not disturbed. After all, this means 240, 400 and 600 facet combinations, i.e. multiplicity in case of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry axes respectively, and these numbers correspond with that of the theoretically possible variations. The same results can be calculated by multiplying the number of real rotations of the capsid bringing the body into itself i.e. the number 60 with the number of facets contributing to the five-, three- and two-fold rotational phases. The other way of the determination of multiplicity takes into account that all the facet groups of the capsid rotate simultaneously during all the rotational phases, and this multiplies the number of multiplicity with the number of the rotational types five-, three- and two-fold which result in one and the same multiplicity number in the case of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry, alike 1200. Perpendicular to the five-fold symmetry axes with the line of intersection drawn

  9. Interesting polarization-independent SERS detection performance induced by the rotation symmetry of multiparticle nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, on the basis of finite difference time domain simulations and group theory, by employing regular nanosphere trimers as the main examples, we analyse and discuss the polarization-independent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon arising from the rotation symmetry of coined metallic nanomultimers. The results demonstrate why the rotationally symmetrical nanomultimers can show polarization-independent SERS performance. Because of the dramatically hybridized polarization-independent SERS performance over the whole 360° range, rotationally symmetrical coined metal nanomultimers, such as regular trimers, regular triangular tetramers and regular pentamers, are reliable and reproducible SERS substrates, which have the potential for convenient and flexible practical SERS detection without the need for optimally incident polarization outside the laboratory setting.

  10. On the vacuum Einstein equations along curves with a discrete local rotation and reflection symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Bentivegna, Eloisa E-mail: ian.hinder@aei.mpg.de

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the possibility of a dimensional reduction of the Einstein equations in S{sup 3} black-hole lattices. It was reported in previous literature that the evolution of spaces containing curves of local, discrete rotation and reflection symmetry (LDRRS) can be carried out via a system of ODEs along these curves. However, 3+1 Numerical Relativity computations demonstrate that this is not the case, and we show analytically that this is due to the presence of a tensorial quantity which is not suppressed by the symmetry. We calculate the term analytically, and verify numerically for an 8-black-hole lattice that it fully accounts for the anomalous results, and thus quantify its magnitude in this specific case. The presence of this term prevents the exact evolution of these spaces via previously-reported methods which do not involve a full 3+1 integration of Einstein's equation.

  11. Generation of protein lattices by fusing proteins with matching rotational symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, John C.; Davies, Karen M.; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine; Noble, Martin E. M.

    2011-09-01

    The self-assembly of supramolecular structures that are ordered on the nanometre scale is a key objective in nanotechnology. DNA and peptide nanotechnologies have produced various two- and three-dimensional structures, but protein molecules have been underexploited in this area of research. Here we show that the genetic fusion of subunits from protein assemblies that have matching rotational symmetry generates species that can self-assemble into well-ordered, pre-determined one- and two-dimensional arrays that are stabilized by extensive intermolecular interactions. This new class of supramolecular structure provides a way to manufacture biomaterials with diverse structural and functional properties.

  12. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  13. Optically isotropic responses induced by discrete rotational symmetry of nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ben; Liu, Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2013-06-01

    Fostered by the recent progress of the fields of plasmonics and metamaterials, the seminal topic of light scattering by clusters of nanoparticles is attracting enormous renewed interest gaining more attention than ever before. Related studies have not only found various new applications in different branches of physics and chemistry, but also spread rapidly into other fields such as biology and medicine. Despite the significant achievements, there still exists unsolved but vitally important challenges of how to obtain robust polarisation-invariant responses of different types of scattering systems. In this paper, we demonstrate polarisation-independent responses of any scattering system with a rotational symmetry with respect to an axis parallel to the propagation direction of the incident wave. We demonstrate that the optical responses such as extinction, scattering, and absorption, can be made independent of the polarisation of the incident wave for all wavelengths. Such polarisation-independent responses are proven to be a robust and generic feature that is purely due to the rotational symmetry of the whole structure. We anticipate our finding will play a significant role in various applications involving light scattering such as sensing, nanoantennas, optical switches, and photovoltaic devices.

  14. Breaking Pseudo-Rotational Symmetry through H_+^2 Metric Deformation in the Eckart Potential Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leija-Martinez, Nehemias; Alvarez-Castillo, David Edwin; Kirchbach, Mariana

    2011-12-01

    The peculiarity of the Eckart potential problem on H+2 (the upper sheet of the two-sheeted two-dimensional hyperboloid), to preserve the (2l+1)-fold degeneracy of the states typical for the geodesic motion there, is usually explained in casting the respective Hamiltonian in terms of the Casimir invariant of an so(2,1) algebra, referred to as potential algebra. In general, there are many possible similarity transformations of the symmetry algebras of the free motions on curved surfaces towards potential algebras, which are not all necessarily unitary. In the literature, a transformation of the symmetry algebra of the geodesic motion on H+2 towards the potential algebra of Eckart's Hamiltonian has been constructed for the prime purpose to prove that the Eckart interaction belongs to the class of Natanzon potentials. We here take a different path and search for a transformation which connects the (2l+1) dimensional representation space of the pseudo-rotational so(2,1) algebra, spanned by the rank-l pseudo-spherical harmonics, to the representation space of equal dimension of the potential algebra and find a transformation of the scaling type. Our case is that in so doing one is producing a deformed isometry copy to H+2 such that the free motion on the copy is equivalent to a motion on H+2, perturbed by a coth interaction. In this way, we link the so(2,1) potential algebra concept of the Eckart Hamiltonian to a subtle type of pseudo-rotational symmetry breaking through H+2 metric deformation. From a technical point of view, the results reported here are obtained by virtue of certain nonlinear finite expansions of Jacobi polynomials into pseudo-spherical harmonics. In due places, the pseudo-rotational case is paralleled by its so(3) compact analogue, the cotangent perturbed motion on S2. We expect awareness of different so(2,1)/so(3) isomet ry copies to benefit simulation studies on curved manifolds of many-body systems.

  15. Unifying the rotational and permutation symmetry of nuclear spin states: Schur-Weyl duality in molecular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    In modern physics and chemistry concerned with many-body systems, one of the mainstays is identical-particle-permutation symmetry. In particular, both the intra-molecular dynamics of a single molecule and the inter-molecular dynamics associated, for example, with reactive molecular collisions are strongly affected by selection rules originating in nuclear-permutation symmetry operations being applied to the total internal wavefunctions, including nuclear spin, of the molecules involved. We propose here a general tool to determine coherently the permutation symmetry and the rotational symmetry (associated with the group of arbitrary rotations of the entire molecule in space) of molecular wavefunctions, in particular the nuclear-spin functions. Thus far, these two symmetries were believed to be mutually independent and it has even been argued that under certain circumstances, it is impossible to establish a one-to-one correspondence between them. However, using the Schur-Weyl duality theorem we show that the two types of symmetry are inherently coupled. In addition, we use the ingenious representation-theory technique of Young tableaus to represent the molecular nuclear-spin degrees of freedom in terms of well-defined mathematical objects. This simplifies the symmetry classification of the nuclear wavefunction even for large molecules. Also, the application to reactive collisions is very straightforward and provides a much simplified approach to obtaining selection rules.

  16. Unifying the rotational and permutation symmetry of nuclear spin states: Schur-Weyl duality in molecular physics.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-08-21

    In modern physics and chemistry concerned with many-body systems, one of the mainstays is identical-particle-permutation symmetry. In particular, both the intra-molecular dynamics of a single molecule and the inter-molecular dynamics associated, for example, with reactive molecular collisions are strongly affected by selection rules originating in nuclear-permutation symmetry operations being applied to the total internal wavefunctions, including nuclear spin, of the molecules involved. We propose here a general tool to determine coherently the permutation symmetry and the rotational symmetry (associated with the group of arbitrary rotations of the entire molecule in space) of molecular wavefunctions, in particular the nuclear-spin functions. Thus far, these two symmetries were believed to be mutually independent and it has even been argued that under certain circumstances, it is impossible to establish a one-to-one correspondence between them. However, using the Schur-Weyl duality theorem we show that the two types of symmetry are inherently coupled. In addition, we use the ingenious representation-theory technique of Young tableaus to represent the molecular nuclear-spin degrees of freedom in terms of well-defined mathematical objects. This simplifies the symmetry classification of the nuclear wavefunction even for large molecules. Also, the application to reactive collisions is very straightforward and provides a much simplified approach to obtaining selection rules. PMID:27544099

  17. Unifying the rotational and permutation symmetry of nuclear spin states: Schur-Weyl duality in molecular physics.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-08-21

    In modern physics and chemistry concerned with many-body systems, one of the mainstays is identical-particle-permutation symmetry. In particular, both the intra-molecular dynamics of a single molecule and the inter-molecular dynamics associated, for example, with reactive molecular collisions are strongly affected by selection rules originating in nuclear-permutation symmetry operations being applied to the total internal wavefunctions, including nuclear spin, of the molecules involved. We propose here a general tool to determine coherently the permutation symmetry and the rotational symmetry (associated with the group of arbitrary rotations of the entire molecule in space) of molecular wavefunctions, in particular the nuclear-spin functions. Thus far, these two symmetries were believed to be mutually independent and it has even been argued that under certain circumstances, it is impossible to establish a one-to-one correspondence between them. However, using the Schur-Weyl duality theorem we show that the two types of symmetry are inherently coupled. In addition, we use the ingenious representation-theory technique of Young tableaus to represent the molecular nuclear-spin degrees of freedom in terms of well-defined mathematical objects. This simplifies the symmetry classification of the nuclear wavefunction even for large molecules. Also, the application to reactive collisions is very straightforward and provides a much simplified approach to obtaining selection rules.

  18. Unusual vortex matter in rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with SU(2) broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galteland, Peder; Babaev, Egor; Sudbo, Asle

    2015-03-01

    We consider a Ginzburg-Landau model of a rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with SU(2) broken symmetry through the use of numerical Monte Carlo techniques. We include the full spectrum of thermal amplitude- and phase-fluctuations. The model exhibits an unusual state of global phase coherence with no accompanying vortex line lattice. This state has no counterpart in single-component condensates. The conditions for such a state are experimentally realizable in, e.g., homonuclear mixes of atomic gases in separate hyperfine states, tuned to the SU(2) point with Feshbach resonance techniques. This work was supported by the Norwegian Research Council and the Norwegian Consortium for High-Performance Computing.

  19. Security proof of a three-state quantum-key-distribution protocol without rotational symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, C.-H.F.; Lo, H.-K.

    2006-10-15

    Standard security proofs of quantum-key-distribution (QKD) protocols often rely on symmetry arguments. In this paper, we prove the security of a three-state protocol that does not possess rotational symmetry. The three-state QKD protocol we consider involves three qubit states, where the first two states |0{sub z}> and |1{sub z}> can contribute to key generation, and the third state |+>=(|0{sub z}>+|1{sub z}>)/{radical}(2) is for channel estimation. This protocol has been proposed and implemented experimentally in some frequency-based QKD systems where the three states can be prepared easily. Thus, by founding on the security of this three-state protocol, we prove that these QKD schemes are, in fact, unconditionally secure against any attacks allowed by quantum mechanics. The main task in our proof is to upper bound the phase error rate of the qubits given the bit error rates observed. Unconditional security can then be proved not only for the ideal case of a single-photon source and perfect detectors, but also for the realistic case of a phase-randomized weak coherent light source and imperfect threshold detectors. Our result in the phase error rate upper bound is independent of the loss in the channel. Also, we compare the three-state protocol with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol. For the single-photon source case, our result proves that the BB84 protocol strictly tolerates a higher quantum bit error rate than the three-state protocol, while for the coherent-source case, the BB84 protocol achieves a higher key generation rate and secure distance than the three-state protocol when a decoy-state method is used.

  20. Spin and Time-Reversal Symmetries of Superconducting Electron Pairs Probed by the Muon Spin Rotation and Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Aoki, Yuji; MacLaughlin, Douglas E.

    2016-09-01

    Unconventional superconductivity based on the strong correlation of electrons is one of the central issues of solid-state physics. Although many experimental techniques are appropriate for investigating unconventional superconductivity, a complete perspective has not been established yet. The symmetries of electron pairs are crucial properties for understanding the essential state of unconventional superconductivity. In this review, we discuss the investigation of the time-reversal and spin symmetries of superconducting electron pairs using the muon spin rotation and relaxation technique. By detecting a spontaneous magnetic field under zero field and/or the temperature dependence of the muon Knight shift in the superconducting phase, the time-reversal symmetry and spin parity of electron pairs have been determined for several unconventional superconductors.

  1. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    PubMed

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra.

  2. Symmetry superposition studied by surface second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüpke, G.; Marowsky, G.; Steinhoff, R.; Friedrich, A.; Pettinger, B.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-04-01

    The components of a third-rank χ(2) tensor have been split into contributions due to 1-fold, 2-fold, 3-fold, and ∞-fold or isotropic rotation axes for a surface of Cs symmetry. Theoretical analysis of the rotation patterns obtained by the surface second-harmonic (SH) generation indicates that a complete symmetry analysis cannot be performed without knowledge of the relevant distribution functions. Rotation axes of lower symmetry create via ``overtones'' or ``harmonics'' contributions apparent in the analysis of the rotation axes of higher symmetry. An experimental example is the observation of structural changes of Au(111) surfaces in an aqueous electrolytic environment. Potential-dependent buildup and removal of a Au(111)-(1×23) surface could be monitored in situ and in real time. Symmetry analysis of the SH rotation patterns reveals both contributions due to a 3-fold axis due to the regular (1×1) structure and simultaneously a 1-fold and a 2-fold axis due to the (1×23) reconstruction.

  3. Detection and correction of underassigned rotational symmetry prior to structure deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, Billy K.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Peter H.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2010-05-01

    An X-ray structural model can be reassigned to a higher symmetry space group using the presented framework if its noncrystallographic symmetry operators are close to being exact crystallographic relationships. About 2% of structures in the Protein Data Bank can be reclassified in this way. Up to 2% of X-ray structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) potentially fit into a higher symmetry space group. Redundant protein chains in these structures can be made compatible with exact crystallographic symmetry with minimal atomic movements that are smaller than the expected range of coordinate uncertainty. The incidence of problem cases is somewhat difficult to define precisely, as there is no clear line between underassigned symmetry, in which the subunit differences are unsupported by the data, and pseudosymmetry, in which the subunit differences rest on small but significant intensity differences in the diffraction pattern. To help catch symmetry-assignment problems in the future, it is useful to add a validation step that operates on the refined coordinates just prior to structure deposition. If redundant symmetry-related chains can be removed at this stage, the resulting model (in a higher symmetry space group) can readily serve as an isomorphous replacement starting point for re-refinement using re-indexed and re-integrated raw data. These ideas are implemented in new software tools available at http://cci.lbl.gov/labelit.

  4. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2014-08-15

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  5. Determination of 3D location and rotation of lumbar vertebrae in CT images by symmetry-based auto-registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2007-03-01

    Quantitative measurement of vertebral rotation is important in surgical planning, analysis of surgical results, and monitoring of the progression of spinal deformities. However, many established and newly developed techniques for measuring axial vertebral rotation do not exploit three-dimensional (3D) information, which may result in virtual axial rotation because of the sagittal and coronal rotation of vertebrae. We propose a novel automatic approach to the measurement of the location and rotation of vertebrae in 3D without prior volume reformation, identification of appropriate cross-sections or aid by statistical models. The vertebra under investigation is encompassed by a mask in the form of an elliptical cylinder in 3D, defined by its center of rotation and the rotation angles. We exploit the natural symmetry of the vertebral body, vertebral column and vertebral canal by dividing the vertebral mask by its mid-axial, mid-sagittal and mid-coronal plane, so that the obtained volume pairs contain symmetrical parts of the observed anatomy. Mirror volume pairs are then simultaneously registered to each other by robust rigid auto-registration, using the weighted sum of absolute differences between the intensities of the corresponding volume pairs as the similarity measure. The method was evaluated on 50 lumbar vertebrae from normal and scoliotic computed tomography (CT) spinal scans, showing relatively large capture ranges and distinctive maxima at the correct locations and rotation angles. The proposed method may aid the measurement of the dimensions of vertebral pedicles, foraminae and canal, and may be a valuable tool for clinical evaluation of the spinal deformities in 3D.

  6. A time-resolved study of rotational energy transfer into A and E symmetry species of 13CH3F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Henry O.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    1989-04-01

    Rotational energy transfer processes into the A and E symmetry species of the symmetric top molecule 13CH3F have been studied. In this time-resolved double resonance experiment a tunable millimeter/submillimeter wave spectrometer was used to monitor the change in strength of rotational transitions in the ν3 vibrational state after a Q-switched CO2 laser pumped the K=3, J=5 level in ν3. A simple numerical simulation of rotational energy transfer allowed the 13CH3F system to be modeled and collisional energy transfer rates to be obtained from the data. Two important processes were studied. The first, a process that obeys the spin statistic selection rule ΔK=3n has a rate of 29±6 ms-1 mTorr-1. The second, a vibrational quantum number swapping collision that effectively transfers population between the A and E symmetry species and thereby transcends the spin statistic selection rule, has a rate of 6.6±0.7 ms-1 mTorr-1, about 1.4 gas kinetic collisions. The numerical simulations and these rates, along with previous measurements of the ΔJ=±1 rate and vibrational decay rates, provide an accurate characterization for a large body of varied experimental data.

  7. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms. PMID:27350295

  8. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Y.; Nikitin, A. M.; Araizi, G. K.; Huang, Y. K.; Matsushita, Y.; Naka, T.; de Visser, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms. PMID:27350295

  9. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms.

  10. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Nikitin, A. M.; Araizi, G. K.; Huang, Y. K.; Matsushita, Y.; Naka, T.; de Visser, A.

    2016-06-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms.

  11. Effects of rotational-symmetry breaking on physisorption of ortho- and para-H2 on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Toshiki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2014-04-11

    Quantum-state-selective thermal desorption of H2 weakly physisorbed on Ag(111) demonstrates significantly different desorption features between the nuclear-spin modifications. An energy shift due to the rotational-symmetry breaking induced by an anisotropic interaction affects not only the enthalpy but also the entropy of adsorption. The preexponential factor for desorption of the ortho-H2 is about three times as large as that of the para-H2. The entropy difference indicates a perpendicular orientation preference of anisotropic physisorption potential, which also suggests the importance of partial hybridization interaction for weak physisorption.

  12. Separation of variables for the Dirac equation in an extended class of Lorentzian metrics with local rotational symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, B. R.; Kamran, N.

    1991-09-01

    The question of the separability of the Dirac equation in metrics with local rotational symmetry is reexamined by adapting the analysis of Kamran and McLenaghan [J. Math. Phys. 25, 1019 (1984)] for the metrics admitting a two-dimensional Abelian local isometry group acting orthogonally transitively. This generalized treatment, which involves the choice of a suitable system of local coordinates and spinor frame, allows one to establish the separability of the Dirac equation within the class of metrics for which the previous analysis of Iyer and Vishveshwara [J. Math. Phys. 26, 1034 (1985)] had left the question of separability open.

  13. A Symmetry Breaking Experiment Aboard Mir and the Stability of Rotating Liquid Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Gomes, D.; McCuan, J.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results from two parts of our study on the behavior of liquids under low-gravity conditions. The first concerns the Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) aboard the Space Station Mir on the Mir-21/NASA-2 mission; for a certain 'exotic' container, distinct asymmetric liquid configurations are found as locally stable ones, even though the container itself is rotationally symmetric, in confirmation of mathematical results and numerical computations. The second investigation concerns the behavior of slowly rotating liquids; it is found that a rotating film instability observed previously in a physical experiment in 1-g, scaled to render gravity effects small, does not correspond to mathematical and computational results obtained for low gravity. These latter results are based on the classical equilibrium theory enhanced with a van der Waals potential of adhesion.

  14. Inversion symmetry breaking by oxygen octahedral rotations in the Ruddlesden-Popper NaRTiO4 family.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Fujita, Koji; Kuge, Toshihiro; Sen Gupta, Arnab; Togo, Atsushi; Lei, Shiming; Xue, Fei; Stone, Greg; Rondinelli, James M; Chen, Long-Qing; Tanaka, Isao; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2014-05-01

    Rotations of oxygen octahedra are ubiquitous, but they cannot break inversion symmetry in simple perovskites. However, in a layered oxide structure, this is possible, as we demonstrate here in A-site ordered Ruddlesden-Popper NaRTiO4 (R denotes rare-earth metal), previously believed to be centric. By revisiting this series via synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical second-harmonic generation, piezoresponse force microscopy, and first-principles phonon calculations, we find that the low-temperature phase belongs to the acentric space group P42(1)m, which is piezoelectric and nonpolar. The mechanism underlying this large new family of acentric layered oxides is prevalent, and could lead to many more families of acentric oxides.

  15. Analysis of vibrational circular dichroism spectra of (s)-(+)-2-butanol by rotational strengths expressed in local symmetry coordinates.

    PubMed

    Shin, Saeko; Nakata, Munetaka; Hamada, Yoshiaki

    2006-02-16

    The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of (S)-(+)-2-butanol have been observed in dilute CS(2) solutions. Two strong VCD bands are assigned mainly to the OH bending modes with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The calculated VCD spectra corresponding to these bands are shown to depend on the conformation of the OH group. To understand this feature, we have calculated the contribution of each local vibrational mode to the rotational strengths and concluded that the coupling of the group vibrations between the in-plane and out-of-plane modes about the locally assumed symmetry planes play a significant role in VCD. This finding has provided a new scope of VCD in relation to molecular vibrations.

  16. Symmetry breaking of rigid/flexible plates in bluff body wakes generates rotation and drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosse, Nicolas; Lacis, Ugis; Lundell, Fredrik; Bagheri, Shervin; Ingremeau, Francois; Kellay, Hamid; Mazzino, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Bluff body wakes have historically been important for understanding nature and aiding industry. For Reynolds numbers above approximately Re ~ 10 , a recirculation bubble develops behind the bluff body. If a solid or elastic appendage is attached to the bluff body, it may exert a torque and a side force on the body. We use theory, numerical simulations and experiments to investigate and explain this phenomenon. More specifically, numerical simulations are carried out for a freely falling cylinder with an attached splitter plate for Re ~ 50 . Experiments of a fixed cylinder with an attached elastic filament are preformed using a vertical soap-film tunnel for Re ~ 2000 . Both experiments and simulations reveal that if a body has an appendage smaller than or of the same order as the body it is attached to, the body rotates and drifts. We explain our findings with a simple model and discuss the implications for propulsion.

  17. Polynomial Graphs and Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehle, Geoff; Kobayashi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Most quadratic functions are not even, but every parabola has symmetry with respect to some vertical line. Similarly, every cubic has rotational symmetry with respect to some point, though most cubics are not odd. We show that every polynomial has at most one point of symmetry and give conditions under which the polynomial has rotational or…

  18. Symmetry-breaking Hopf bifurcations to 1-, 2-, and 3-tori in small-aspect-ratio counter-rotating Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Marques, Francisco; Lopez, Juan M.

    2012-11-01

    Taylor-Couette flow in a small aspect-ratio wide-gap annulus in the counter-rotating regime is investigated by solving the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The system is invariant under rotations about the axis, reflection about the mid-plane, and time translations. A systematic investigation is presented, both in terms of the flow physics, the numerical simulations and from a dynamical systems perspective. The dynamics are primarily associated with the behavior of the jet of angular momentum that emerges from the inner cylinder boundary layer at about the mid-plane. The sequence of bifurcations as the rotation is increased consists of a Hopf bifurcation breaking the reflection symmetry and leading to an axisymmetric limit cycle associated to an invariant one-torus manifold with a spatio-temporal symmetry. This undergoes a Hopf bifurcation breaking axisymmetry, leading to quasi-periodic solutions evolving on a 2-torus that is only setwise symmetric due to precesion. These undergo a further Hopf bifurcation introducing a third incommensurate frequency leading to a 3-torus. On it, as the rotation is further increased, a SNIC bifurcation happens, destroying the 3-torus and leaving a pair of symmetrically related 2-tori states on which all symmetries of the system have been broken.

  19. A theoretical study of rotational and translational diffusion dynamics of molecules with a six-fold point symmetry adsorbed on a hexagonal lattice by neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Almazán; Miret-Artés; Fouquet

    2012-03-14

    A complete analytical model for the rotational and translational diffusion of molecules with a six-fold point symmetry on a hexagonal lattice is presented. It can be applied, in particular, to the diffusion of benzene molecules adsorbed flat on the basal plane of graphite in the case of incoherent scattering. Under the weak hindered approximation, the classical mechanics framework and making use of the van Hove formalism of correlation functions, the intermediate scattering function and its Fourier transform, the scattering law, are both obtained. They can be expressed as sums of exponential decays or Lorentzian functions, respectively, containing the contribution of each of the dynamical processes taking place. In the case of benzene lying flat on the substrate we expect translational diffusion, continuous rotations of isolated molecules and hindered rotations of molecules within clusters. Each particular diffusive mechanism can be recognized owing to its particular signature in the dependence of the quasi-elastic broadening on the momentum transfer.

  20. Use of Molecular Symmetry to Describe Pauli Principle Effects on the Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of Co2(g)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, M. L.; Colavita, P. E.; Greer, A. E.; Long, B.; Andreatta, D.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the infrared rotation-vibration spectrum of HCl(g) is a common experiment in the physical chemistry laboratory, which allows students the opportunity to explore quantization of rotational states in diatomic molecules. It is found that the CO2 vibration-rotation spectrum if used as an addition to the HCl experiment would give the…

  1. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE PAGES

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, itmore » allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  2. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2 C̃ (1)B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A; Field, Robert W

    2016-04-14

    The C̃ (1)B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X̃ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C̃ state below 1600 cm(-1) of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C̃ electronic state.

  3. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2 C ˜ 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    The C ˜ 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X ˜ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C ˜ state below 1600 cm-1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C ˜ electronic state.

  4. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  5. Amphidynamic crystals of a steroidal bicyclo[2.2.2]octane rotor: a high symmetry group that rotates faster than smaller methyl and methoxy groups.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Braulio; Pérez-Estrada, Salvador; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2013-07-17

    The synthesis, crystallization, single crystal X-ray structure, and solid state dynamics of molecular rotor 3 provided with a high symmetry order and relatively cylindrical bicyclo[2.2.2]octane (BCO) rotator linked to mestranol fragments were investigated in this work. By use of solid state (13)C NMR, three rotating fragments were identified within the molecule: the BCO, the C19 methoxy and the C18 methyl groups. To determine the dynamics of the BCO group in crystals of 3 by variable temperature (1)H spin-lattice relaxation (VT (1)H T1), we determined the (1)H T1 contributions from the methoxy group C19 by carrying out measurements with the methoxy-deuterated isotopologue rotor 3-d6. The contributions from the quaternary methyl group C18 were estimated by considering the differences between the VT (1)H T1 of mestranol 8 and methoxy-deuterated mestranol 8-d3. From these studies it was determined that the BCO rotator in 3 has an activation energy of only 1.15 kcal mol(-1), with a barrier for site exchange that is smaller than those of methyl (E(a) = 1.35 kcal mol(-1)) and methoxy groups (E(a) = 1.92 kcal mol(-1)), despite their smaller moments of inertia and surface areas.

  6. A universal symmetry detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Research on symmetry detection focuses on identifying and detecting new types of symmetry. The paper presents an algorithm that is capable of detecting any type of permutation-based symmetry, including many types for which there are no existing algorithms. General symmetry detection is library-based, but symmetries that can be parameterized, (i.e. total, partial, rotational, and dihedral symmetry), can be detected without using libraries. In many cases it is faster than existing techniques. Furthermore, it is simpler than most existing techniques, and can easily be incorporated into existing software. The algorithm can also be used with virtually any type of matrix-based symmetry, including conjugate symmetry.

  7. Atomic Scale coexistence of Periodic and quasiperiodic order in a2-fold A1-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Young; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Ribeiro,R.A.; Canfield, P.C.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.

    2005-11-14

    Decagonal quasicrystals are made of pairs of atomic planes with pentagonal symmetry periodically stacked along a 10-fold axis. We have investigated the atomic structure of the 2-fold surface of a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The surface consists of terraces separated by steps of heights 1.9, 4.7, 7.8, and 12.6{angstrom} containing rows of atoms parallel to the 10-fold direction with an internal periodicity of 4{angstrom}. The rows are arranged aperiodically, with separations that follow a Fibonacci sequence and inflation symmetry. The results indicate that the surfaces are preferentially Al-terminated and in general agreement with bulk models.

  8. The Relaxation Matrix for Symmetric Tops with Inversion Symmetry. I. Effects of Line Coupling on Self-Broadened v (sub 1) and Pure Rotational Bands of NH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of selfbroadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ?1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II).

  9. The relaxation matrix for symmetric tops with inversion symmetry. I. Effects of line coupling on self-broadened ν1 and pure rotational bands of NH3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Boulet, C

    2016-06-14

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of self-broadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ν1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II). PMID:27306003

  10. The relaxation matrix for symmetric tops with inversion symmetry. I. Effects of line coupling on self-broadened ν1 and pure rotational bands of NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Boulet, C.

    2016-06-01

    The Robert-Bonamy formalism has been commonly used to calculate half-widths and shifts of spectral lines for decades. This formalism is based on several approximations. Among them, two have not been fully addressed: the isolated line approximation and the neglect of coupling between the translational and internal motions. Recently, we have shown that the isolated line approximation is not necessary in developing semi-classical line shape theories. Based on this progress, we have been able to develop a new formalism that enables not only to reduce uncertainties on calculated half-widths and shifts, but also to model line mixing effects on spectra starting from the knowledge of the intermolecular potential. In our previous studies, the new formalism had been applied to linear and asymmetric-top molecules. In the present study, the method has been extended to symmetric-top molecules with inversion symmetry. As expected, the inversion splitting induces a complete failure of the isolated line approximation. We have calculated the complex relaxation matrices of self-broadened NH3. The half-widths and shifts in the ν1 and the pure rotational bands are reported in the present paper. When compared with measurements, the calculated half-widths match the experimental data very well, since the inapplicable isolated line approximation has been removed. With respect to the shifts, only qualitative results are obtained and discussed. Calculated off-diagonal elements of the relaxation matrix and a comparison with the observed line mixing effects are reported in the companion paper (Paper II).

  11. Fluctuation effects in rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with broken SU(2) and U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetries in the presence of intercomponent density-density interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galteland, Peder Notto; Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle

    2015-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations and melting transitions for rotating single-component superfluids have been intensively studied and are well understood. In contrast, the thermal effects on vortex states for two-component superfluids with density-density interaction, which have a much richer variety of vortex ground states, have been much less studied. Here, we investigate the thermal effects on vortex matter in superfluids with U (1 )×U (1 ) broken symmetries and intercomponent density-density interactions, as well as the case with a larger SU (2 ) broken symmetry obtainable from the [U (1 )×U (1 )] -symmetric case by tuning scattering lengths. In the former case we find that, in addition to first-order melting transitions, the system exhibits thermally driven phase transitions between square and hexagonal lattices. Our main result, however, concerns the case where the condensate exhibits SU (2 ) symmetry, and where vortices are not topological. At finite temperature, the system exhibits effects which do not have a counterpart in single-component systems. Namely, it has a state where thermally averaged quantities show no regular vortex lattice, yet the system retains superfluid coherence along the axis of rotation. In such a state, the thermal fluctuations result in transitions between different (nearly) degenerate vortex states without undergoing a melting transition. Our results apply to multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates, and we suggest how to detect some of these unusual effects experimentally in such systems.

  12. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not “renormalizable”. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged “vector” particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of

  13. Broken Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-24

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not “renormalizable”. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged “vector” particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of

  14. Teaching Point-Group Symmetry with Three-Dimensional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Three tools for teaching symmetry in the context of an upper-level undergraduate or introductory graduate course on the chemical applications of group theory are presented. The first is a collection of objects that have the symmetries of all the low-symmetry and high-symmetry point groups and the point groups with rotational symmetries from 2-fold…

  15. Superalgebra and fermion-boson symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Hironari

    2010-01-01

    Fermions and bosons are quite different kinds of particles, but it is possible to unify them in a supermultiplet, by introducing a new mathematical scheme called superalgebra. In this article we discuss the development of the concept of symmetry, starting from the rotational symmetry and finally arriving at this fermion-boson (FB) symmetry. PMID:20228617

  16. O-2 Substituted pyranosyl oxacarbenium ions are C-2-O-2 2-fold rotors with a strong syn preference.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Andrei R; Whitfield, Dennis M; Zgierski, Marek Z

    2007-12-28

    The substituent at O-2 of glycopyranosides is known to have a pronounced effect on both the formation and the cleavage of glycosides at C-1. This is primarily attributed to stereoelectronic effects on the formation and stability of the related glycopyranosyl oxacarbenium ions. Previous QM studies of 2-O-methyl substituted manno and gluco configured pyranosyl oxacarbenium ions found a preference for the methyl carbon to be syn to the CH-2 methine. This study examines the conformational preference of variously substituted O-2 tetrahydropyranosyl oxacarbenium ions and confirms this syn preference. Neutral analogues are shown to have the expected 3-fold rotation whereas the charged species exhibit 2-fold rotation about C-2-O-2. Natural bond order (NBO) calculations suggest that the dominant stabilizing interaction is a unimodal O-2 lone pair to C-1-O-5 pi-bond hyperconjugative interaction. This syn conformational preference has important implications for mimics of glycopyranosyl oxacarbenium ion transition states. It also suggests a conformational based mechanism that can be exploited to tune the reactivity of glycopyranosyl donors in the glycosylation reaction.

  17. Symmetry matters.

    PubMed

    Moubayidin, Laila; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-09-01

    985 I. 985 II. 986 III. 987 IV. 988 V. 989 989 References 989 SUMMARY: The development of multicellular organisms depends on correct establishment of symmetry both at the whole-body scale and within individual tissues and organs. Setting up planes of symmetry must rely on communication between cells that are located at a distance from each other within the organism, presumably via mobile morphogenic signals. Although symmetry in nature has fascinated scientists for centuries, it is only now that molecular data to unravel mechanisms of symmetry establishment are beginning to emerge. As an example we describe the genetic and hormonal interactions leading to an unusual bilateral-to-radial symmetry transition of an organ in order to promote reproduction.

  18. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  19. Holographic fabrication of 3D photonic crystal templates with 4, 5, and 6-fold rotational symmetry using a single beam and single exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, David; George, David; Lutkenhaus, Jeffery; Philipose, Usha; Zhang, Hualiang; Lin, Yuankun

    2016-03-01

    A method of fabricating large-volume three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates using holographic lithography is presented. Fabrication is accomplished using a single-beam and single exposure by a reflective optical element (ROE). The ROE is 3D printed support structure which holds reflecting surfaces composed of silicon or gallium arsenide. Large-volume 3D photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates with 4-fold, 5-fold, and 6-fold symmetry were fabricated and found to be in good agreement with simulation. Although the reflective surfaces were setup away from the Brewster's angle, the interference among the reflected s and p-polarizations still generated bicontinuous structures, demonstrating the flexibility of the ROE. The ROE, being a compact and inexpensive alternative to diffractive optical elements and top-cut prisms, facilitates the large-scale integration of holographically fabricated photonic structures into on-chip applications.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    One of the most fruitful and enduring advances in theoretical physics during the last half century has been the development of the role played by symmetries. One needs only to consider SU(3) and the classification of elementary particles, the Yang Mills enlargement of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the symmetry group SU(2), and indeed the tremendous activity surrounding the discovery of parity violation in the weak interactions in the late 1950s. This last example is one of a broken symmetry, though the symmetry in question is a discrete one. It was clear to Gell-Mann, who first clarified the role of SU(3) in particle physics, that this symmetry was not exact. If it had been, it would have been much easier to discover; for example, the proton, neutron, Σ, Λ and Ξ particles would all have had the same mass. For many years the SU(3) symmetry breaking was assigned a mathematical form, but the importance of this formulation fell away when the quark model began to be taken seriously; the reason the SU(3) symmetry was not exact was simply that the (three, in those days) quarks had different masses. At the same time, and in a different context, symmetry breaking of a different type was being investigated. This went by the name of `spontaneous symmetry breaking' and its characteristic was that the ground state of a given system was not invariant under the symmetry transformation, though the interactions (the Hamiltonian, in effect) was. A classic example is ferromagnetism. In a ferromagnet the atomic spins are aligned in one direction only—this is the ground state of the system. It is clearly not invariant under a rotation, for that would change the ground state into a (similar but) different one, with the spins aligned in a different direction; this is the phenomenon of a degenerate vacuum. The contribution of the spin interaction, s1.s2, to the Hamiltonian, however, is actually invariant under rotations. As Coleman remarked, a little man living in a ferromagnet would

  1. Inherited Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attanucci, Frank J.; Losse, John

    2008-01-01

    In a first calculus course, it is not unusual for students to encounter the theorems which state: If f is an even (odd) differentiable function, then its derivative is odd (even). In our paper, we prove some theorems which show how the symmetry of a continuous function f with respect to (i) the vertical line: x = a or (ii) with respect to the…

  2. Matrix Representation of Symmetry Operators in Elementary Crystallography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cody, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Presents the derivation of rotation and reflection matrix representation of symmetry operators as used in the initial discussion of crystal symmetry in elementary mineralogy at Iowa State University. Includes references and an appended list of matrix representations of the important crystallographic symmetry operators, excluding the trigonal and…

  3. Search for primordial symmetry breakings in CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-06-01

    There are possibilities to violate symmetries (e.g. parity and rotational invariance) in the primordial cosmological fluctuations. Such symmetry breakings can imprint very rich signatures in late-time phenomena, which may be possible to observe. Especially, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) will change its face drastically, corresponding to the symmetry-breaking types, since the harmonic-space representation is very sensitive to the statistical, spin and angular dependences of cosmological perturbations. Here, we discuss (1) general responses of CMB to the symmetry breakings, (2) some theoretical models creating interesting CMB signatures, and (3) aspects of the estimation from observational data.

  4. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  5. Symmetry properties in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the relations among polarimetric backscattering coefficients from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. Symmetry of geophysical media encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal cases. On the basis of the invariance under symmetry transformations in the linear polarization basis, the scattering coefficients are related by a set of equations which restrict the number of independent parameters in the polarimetric covariance matrix. The properties derived under these transformations are general and apply to all scattering mechanisms in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the derived symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is discussed. As a practical application, the results from this paper provide new methods for the external calibration of polarimetric radars without the deployment of man-made calibration targets.

  6. Continuous symmetry measures for complex symmetry group.

    PubMed

    Dryzun, Chaim

    2014-04-01

    Symmetry is a fundamental property of nature, used extensively in physics, chemistry, and biology. The Continuous symmetry measures (CSM) is a method for estimating the deviation of a given system from having a certain perfect symmetry, which enables us to formulate quantitative relation between symmetry and other physical properties. Analytical procedures for calculating the CSM of all simple cyclic point groups are available for several years. Here, we present a methodology for calculating the CSM of any complex point group, including the dihedral, tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral symmetry groups. We present the method and analyze its performances and errors. We also introduce an analytical method for calculating the CSM of the linear symmetry groups. As an example, we apply these methods for examining the symmetry of water, the symmetry maps of AB4 complexes, and the symmetry of several Lennard-Jones clusters.

  7. Illuminating Molecular Symmetries with Bicircular High-Order-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel M.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-09-01

    We present a general theory of bicircular high-order-harmonic generation from N -fold rotationally symmetric molecules. Using a rotating frame of reference we predict the complete structure of the high-order-harmonic spectra for arbitrary driving frequency ratios and show how molecular symmetries can be directly identified from the harmonic signal. Our findings reveal that a characteristic fingerprint of rotational molecular symmetries can be universally observed in the ultrafast response of molecules to strong bicircular fields.

  8. Newton–Hooke-type symmetry of anisotropic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.M.; Horvathy, P.A.; Andrzejewski, K.; Gonera, J.; Kosiński, P.

    2013-06-15

    Rotation-less Newton–Hooke-type symmetry, found recently in the Hill problem, and instrumental for explaining the center-of-mass decomposition, is generalized to an arbitrary anisotropic oscillator in the plane. Conversely, the latter system is shown, by the orbit method, to be the most general one with such a symmetry. Full Newton–Hooke symmetry is recovered in the isotropic case. Star escape from a galaxy is studied as an application. -- Highlights: ► Rotation-less Newton–Hooke (NH) symmetry is generalized to an arbitrary anisotropic oscillator. ► The orbit method is used to find the most general case for rotation-less NH symmetry. ► The NH symmetry is decomposed into Heisenberg algebras based on chiral decomposition.

  9. Continuous Symmetry and Chemistry Teachers: Learning Advanced Chemistry Content through Novel Visualization Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Blonder, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the learning process of a group of experienced chemistry teachers in a specially designed workshop on molecular symmetry and continuous symmetry. The workshop was based on interactive visualization tools that allow molecules and their symmetry elements to be rotated in three dimensions. The topic of continuous symmetry is…

  10. Geometrical symmetries of nuclear systems: {{ D }}_{3h} and {{ T }}_{d} symmetries in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof

    2016-07-01

    The role of discrete (or point-group) symmetries in α-cluster nuclei is discussed in the framework of the algebraic cluster model which describes the relative motion of the α-particles. Particular attention is paid to the discrete symmetry of the geometric arrangement of the α-particles, and the consequences for the structure of the corresponding rotational bands. The method is applied to study cluster states in the nuclei 12C and 16O. The observed level sequences can be understood in a simple way as a consequence of the underlying discrete symmetry that characterizes the geometrical configuration of the α-particles, i.e. an equilateral triangle with {{ D }}3h symmetry for 12C, and a tetrahedron with {{ T }}d symmetry for 16O. The structure of rotational bands provides a fingerprint of the underlying geometrical configuration of α-particles.

  11. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  12. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  13. Rotational dynamics of confined C60 from near-infrared Raman studies under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, D.; Yu, S.; Wang, P.; Wang, T.; Yao, M.; Li, Q.; Zou, B.; Cui, T.; Zou, G.; Wagberg, T.; Sundqvist, B.; Mao, H.-K.

    2009-12-29

    Peapods present a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained crystal structures, whose dynamical properties are very important. We have recently studied the rotational dynamics of C60 molecules confined inside single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by analyzing the intermediate frequency mode lattice vibrations using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The rotation of C60 was tuned to a known state by applying high pressure, at which condition C60 first forms dimers at low pressure and then forms a single-chain, nonrotating, polymer structure at high pressure. In the latter state the molecules form chains with a 2-fold symmetry. We propose that the C60 molecules in SWNT exhibit an unusual type of ratcheted rotation due to the interaction between C60 and SWNT in the “hexagon orientation,” and the characteristic vibrations of ratcheted rotation becomes more obvious with decreasing temperature.

  14. Relativistic Pseudospin Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N.

    2011-05-06

    We show that the pseudospin symmetry that Akito Arima discovered many years ago (with collaborators) is a symmetry of the the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of the scalar and vector potentials are a constant. In this paper we discuss some of the implications of this relativistic symmetry and the experimental data that support these predictions. In his original paper Akito also discussed pseudo-U(3) symmetry. We show that pseudo-U(3) symmetry is a symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian for which the sum of harmonic oscillator vector and scalar potentials are equal to a constant, and we give the generators of pseudo-U(3) symmetry. Going beyond the mean field we summarize new results on non relativistic shell model Hamiltonians that have pseudospin symmetry and pseudo-orbital angular momentum symmetry as a dynamical symmetries.

  15. Symmetries and elasticity of nematic gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, T. C.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Radzihovsky, Leo; Xing, Xiangjun

    2002-07-01

    A nematic liquid-crystal gel is a macroscopically homogeneous elastic medium with the rotational symmetry of a nematic liquid crystal. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the study of these gels that incorporates all underlying symmetries. After reviewing traditional elasticity and clarifying the role of broken rotational symmetries in both the reference space of points in the undistorted medium and the target space into which these points are mapped, we explore the unusual properties of nematic gels from a number of perspectives. We show how symmetries of nematic gels formed via spontaneous symmetry breaking from an isotropic gel enforce soft elastic response characterized by the vanishing of a shear modulus and the vanishing of stress up to a critical value of strain along certain directions. We also study the phase transition from isotropic to nematic gels. In addition to being fully consistent with approaches to nematic gels based on rubber elasticity, our description has the important advantages of being independent of a microscopic model, of emphasizing and clarifying the role of broken symmetries in determining elastic response, and of permitting easy incorporation of spatial variations, thermal fluctuations, and gel heterogeneity, thereby allowing a full statistical-mechanical treatment of these materials.

  16. Symmetries and elasticity of nematic gels.

    PubMed

    Lubensky, T C; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Radzihovsky, Leo; Xing, Xiangjun

    2002-07-01

    A nematic liquid-crystal gel is a macroscopically homogeneous elastic medium with the rotational symmetry of a nematic liquid crystal. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the study of these gels that incorporates all underlying symmetries. After reviewing traditional elasticity and clarifying the role of broken rotational symmetries in both the reference space of points in the undistorted medium and the target space into which these points are mapped, we explore the unusual properties of nematic gels from a number of perspectives. We show how symmetries of nematic gels formed via spontaneous symmetry breaking from an isotropic gel enforce soft elastic response characterized by the vanishing of a shear modulus and the vanishing of stress up to a critical value of strain along certain directions. We also study the phase transition from isotropic to nematic gels. In addition to being fully consistent with approaches to nematic gels based on rubber elasticity, our description has the important advantages of being independent of a microscopic model, of emphasizing and clarifying the role of broken symmetries in determining elastic response, and of permitting easy incorporation of spatial variations, thermal fluctuations, and gel heterogeneity, thereby allowing a full statistical-mechanical treatment of these materials. PMID:12241370

  17. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Raedler, K.H. ); Ness, N.F. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus, only the dipole and quadrupole contributoins are considered. The magnetic fields are analyzed by decomposing them into those parts which have simple symmetry properties with respect to the rotation axis and the equatorial plane. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter. Compared to Earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis, by now rather well known, but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets. The implications of these results for dynamo models are discussed. With a vgiew to Cowling's theorem the symmetry of the fields is investigated with respect to not only the rotation axis but also to other axes intersecting the plaentary center. Surprisingly, the high degree of asymmetry of the Uranian field that is observed with respect to the rotation axis reduces considerably to being compare to that for Earth or Jupiter when the appropriate axis is employed.

  18. Elasticity and Broken Symmetry in Nematic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Lubensky, T. C.; Xing, Xiangjun; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2002-03-01

    In nematic elastomers, the coupling between the internal liquid crystalline degrees of freedom and elastic strains lead to novel thermodynamic and mechanical behavior. Their remarkable properties make them candidates for a number of applications including artificial muscles and actuators. Other than their technological importance, their behavior highlights a major theme of physics: the interplay between broken symmetries and long-wavelength elasticity and hydrodynamics. In this talk my primary focus will be to show how the elastic "softness" and the pronounced nonlinear stress-strain relations in these materials arise as a consequence of broken rotational symmetry. We will reproduce these properties using simple models in a way that highlights this interplay between broken rotational symmetry and elasticity.

  19. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2003-12-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  20. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  1. Rotation of Nonspherical Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihao; Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Andersson, Helge I; Variano, Evan A

    2015-12-11

    The effects of particle inertia, particle shape, and fluid shear on particle rotation are examined using direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow. Particles at the channel center (nearly isotropic turbulence) and near the wall (highly sheared flow) show different rotation patterns and surprisingly different effects of particle inertia. Oblate particles at the center tend to rotate orthogonally to their symmetry axes, whereas prolate particles rotate around their symmetry axes. This trend is weakened by increasing inertia so that highly inertial oblate spheroids rotate nearly isotropically about their principle axes at the channel center. Near the walls, inertia does not move the rotation of spheroids towards isotropy but, rather, reverses the trend, causing oblate spheroids to rotate strongly about their symmetry axes and prolate spheroids to rotate normal to their symmetry axes. The observed phenomena are mostly ascribed to preferential orientations of the spheroids.

  2. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  3. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  4. Neutrinos and flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2015-07-15

    We discuss the recent progress of flavor models with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry in the lepton sector focusing on the θ{sub 13} and CP violating phase. In both direct approach and indirect approach of the flavor symmetry, the non-vanishing θ{sub 13} is predictable. The flavor symmetry with the generalised CP symmetry can also predicts the CP violating phase. We show the phenomenological analyses of neutrino mixing for the typical flavor models.

  5. Neutrinos and flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the recent progress of flavor models with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry in the lepton sector focusing on the θ13 and CP violating phase. In both direct approach and indirect approach of the flavor symmetry, the non-vanishing θ13 is predictable. The flavor symmetry with the generalised CP symmetry can also predicts the CP violating phase. We show the phenomenological analyses of neutrino mixing for the typical flavor models.

  6. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  7. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an 'Expansion' to the Smad MH2 fold.

    PubMed

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric; Llimargas, Marta; Benach, Jordi; Riera, Antoni; Pous, Joan; Macias, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  8. Sheared and unsheared rotation of driven dust clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Carstensen, Jan; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2014-07-15

    Finite size plasma crystals confined in an anisotropic potential well were studied under a rotating and radially unsheared drive in experiment and simulation at moderate rotational frequencies. A radially sheared rotation of these strongly coupled systems is observed for most cluster configurations with a low symmetry. The results show that a differential rotation can be effected by a non-sheared driving force.

  9. Universal features of spin transport and breaking of unitary symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquod, Ph.; Adagideli, İ.

    2013-07-01

    When time-reversal symmetry is broken, quantum coherent systems with and without spin rotational symmetry exhibit the same universal behavior in their electric transport properties. We show that spin transport discriminates between these two cases. In systems with large charge conductance, spin transport is essentially insensitive to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. However, in the opposite limit of a single exit channel, spin currents vanish identically in the presence of time-reversal symmetry, but are turned on by breaking it with an orbital magnetic field.

  10. Dynamic Paper Constructions for Easier Visualization of Molecular Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A system for construction of simple poster-board models is described. The models dynamically demonstrate the symmetry operations of proper rotation, improper rotation, reflection, and inversion for the chemically important point groups D[subscript 3h], D[subscript 4h], D[subscript 5h], D[subscript 6h], T[subscript d], and O[subscript h]. The…

  11. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Goenner, Hubert

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  12. Baryogenesis from symmetry principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Chee Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a formalism based on symmetry which allows one to express asymmetries of all the particles in terms of conserved charges is developed. The manifestation of symmetry allows one to easily determine the viability of a baryogenesis scenario and also to identify the different roles played by the symmetry. This formalism is then applied to the standard model and its supersymmetric extension, which constitute two important foundations for constructing models of baryogenesis.

  13. Rotations in a Vertebrate Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Gin

    2003-05-01

    Rotational movements of the head are often considered to be measured in a single three dimensional coordinate system implemented by the semicircular canals of the vestibular system of the inner ear. However, the vertebrate body -- including the nervous system -- obeys rectangular symmetries alien to rotation groups. At best, nervous systems mimic the physical rotation group in a fragmented way, only partially reintegrating physical movements in whole organism responses. The vestibular canal reference frame is widely used in nervous systems, for example by eye movements. It is used to some extent even in the cerebrum, as evidenced by the remission of hemineglect -- in which half of space is ignored -- when the vestibular system is stimulated. However, reintegration of space by the organism remains incomplete. For example, compensatory eye movements (which in most cases aid visual fixation) may disagree with conscious self-motion perception. In addition, movement-induced nausea, illusions, and cue-free perceptions demonstrate symmetry breaking or incomplete spatial symmetries. As part of a long-term project to investigate rotation groups in nervous systems, we have analyzed the symmetry group of a primary vestibulo-spinal projection.

  14. Breaking the Symmetry in Molecular Nanorings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Because of their unique electronic properties, cyclic molecular structures ranging from benzene to natural light-harvesting complexes have received much attention. Rigid π-conjugated templated porphyrin nanorings serve as excellent model systems here because they possess well-defined structures that can readily be controlled and because they support highly delocalized excitations. In this study, we have deliberately modified a series of six-porphyrin nanorings to examine the impact of lowering the rotational symmetry on their photophysical properties. We reveal that as symmetry distortions increase in severity along the series of structures, spectral changes and an enhancement of radiative emission strength occur, which derive from a transfer of oscillator strength into the lowest (k = 0) state. We find that concomitantly, the degeneracy of the dipole-allowed first excited (k = ±1) state is lifted, leading to an ultrafast polarization switching effect in the emission from strongly symmetry-broken nanorings. PMID:26735906

  15. Facial symmetry assessment based on geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoping; Cao, Hanqiang

    2015-12-01

    Face image symmetry is an important factor affecting the accuracy of automatic face recognition. Selecting high symmetrical face image could improve the performance of the recognition. In this paper, we proposed a novel facial symmetry evaluation scheme based on geometric features, including centroid, singular value, in-plane rotation angle of face and the structural similarity index (SSIM). First, we calculate the value of the four features according to the corresponding formula. Then, we use fuzzy logic algorithm to integrate the value of the four features into a single number which represents the facial symmetry. The proposed method is efficient and can adapt to different recognition methods. Experimental results demonstrate its effectiveness in improving the robustness of face detection and recognition.

  16. Symmetry in Mathematics Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfus, Tommy; Eisenberg, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the creed in symmetry and the omnipresence of symmetrical relationships in mathematics and nature, discusses mathematicians' attraction toward looking for symmetrical relationships as an unstated problem-solving heuristic, and shows how symmetry can be used as a didactical tool. (Author/MKR)

  17. Symmetry and Interculturality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2009-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the fundamental concepts in Geometry. It is a Mathematical concept, which can be very well connected with Art and Ethnography. The aim of the article is to show how to link the geometrical concept symmetry with interculturality. For this mosaics from different countries are used.

  18. Symmetries in Lagrangian Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrario, Carlo; Passerini, Arianna

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of Noether's theorem, a distinction between Lagrangian and dynamical symmetries is made, in order to clarify some aspects neglected by textbooks. An intuitive setting of the concept of invariance of differential equations is presented. The analysis is completed by deriving the symmetry properties in the motion of a charged…

  19. Translational Symmetry-Breaking for Spiral Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, V. G.; Wulff, C.

    2000-10-01

    Spiral waves are observed in numerous physical situations, ranging from Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) chemical reactions, to cardiac tissue, to slime-mold aggregates. Mathematical models with Euclidean symmetry have recently been developed to describe the dynamic behavior (for example, meandering) of spiral waves in excitable media. However, no physical experiment is ever infinite in spatial extent, so the Euclidean symmetry is only approximate. Experiments on spiral waves show that inhomogeneities can anchor spirals and that boundary effects (for example, boundary drifting) become very important when the size of the spiral core is comparable to the size of the reacting medium. Spiral anchoring and boundary drifting cannot be explained by the Euclidean model alone. In this paper, we investigate the effects on spiral wave dynamics of breaking the translation symmetry while keeping the rotation symmetry. This is accomplished by introducing a small perturbation in the five-dimensional center bundle equations (describing Hopf bifurcation from one-armed spiral waves) which is SO(2)-equivariant but not equivariant under translations. We then study the effects of this perturbation on rigid spiral rotation, on quasi-periodic meandering and on drifting.

  20. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  1. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  2. Sequential flavor symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Jung, Martin; Mannel, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The gauge sector of the standard model exhibits a flavor symmetry that allows for independent unitary transformations of the fermion multiplets. In the standard model the flavor symmetry is broken by the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs boson, and the resulting fermion masses and mixing angles show a pronounced hierarchy. In this work we connect the observed hierarchy to a sequence of intermediate effective theories, where the flavor symmetries are broken in a stepwise fashion by vacuum expectation values of suitably constructed spurion fields. We identify the possible scenarios in the quark sector and discuss some implications of this approach.

  3. Symmetry Constraints on the Dynamics of Magnetically Confined Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arter, Wayne

    2009-05-15

    In respect of their symmetry properties, toroidal magnetically confined plasmas have much in common with the Taylor-Couette flow. A symmetry-based analysis (equivalent bifurction theory) has proved very powerful in the analysis of the latter problem. This Letter discusses the applicability of the method to nuclear fusion experiments such as tokamaks and pinches. The likely behavior of the simplest models of rotationally symmetric tokamaks is described, and found to be potentially consistent with observation.

  4. Exact SU(2) symmetry and persistent spin helix in a spin-orbit coupled system.

    PubMed

    Bernevig, B Andrei; Orenstein, J; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2006-12-01

    Spin-orbit coupled systems generally break the spin rotation symmetry. However, for a model with equal Rashba and Dresselhauss coupling constants, and for the [110] Dresselhauss model, a new type of SU(2) spin rotation symmetry is discovered. This symmetry is robust against spin-independent disorder and interactions and is generated by operators whose wave vector depends on the coupling strength. It renders the spin lifetime infinite at this wave vector, giving rise to a persistent spin helix. We obtain the spin fluctuation dynamics at, and away from, the symmetry point and suggest experiments to observe the persistent spin helix.

  5. An Exact SU(2) Symmetry and Persistent Spin Helix in a Spin-Orbit Coupled System

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, Andrei

    2010-02-10

    Spin-orbit coupled systems generally break the spin rotation symmetry. However, for a model with equal Rashba and Dresselhauss coupling constant (the ReD model), and for the [110] Dresselhauss model, a new type of SU(2) spin rotation symmetry is discovered. This symmetry is robust against spin-independent disorder and interactions, and is generated by operators whose wavevector depends on the coupling strength. It renders the spin lifetime infinite at this wavevector, giving rise to a Persistent Spin Helix (PSH). We obtain the spin fluctuation dynamics at, and away, from the symmetry point, and suggest experiments to observe the PSH.

  6. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  7. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  8. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  9. The Symmetries of QCD

    ScienceCinema

    Sekhar Chivukula

    2016-07-12

    The symmetries of a quantum field theory can be realized in a variety of ways. Symmetries can be realized explicitly, approximately, through spontaneous symmetry breaking or, via an anomaly, quantum effects can dynamically eliminate a symmetry of the theory that was present at the classical level.  Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interactions, exemplify each of these possibilities. The interplay of these effects determine the spectrum of particles that we observe and, ultimately, account for 99% of the mass of ordinary matter. 

  10. Another Broken Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Resistance destroys symmetry. In this note, a graphical exploration serves as a guide to a rigorous elementary proof of a specific asymmetry in the trajectory of a point projectile in a medium offering linear resistance.

  11. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this course is to study the evolution of the symmetry concept and establish its influence in the knowledge of the fundamental laws of nature. Physicist have been using the symmetry concept in two ways: to solve problems and to search for new understanding of the world around us. In quantum physics symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the physical laws governing the behavior of matter and field systems. It provides, generally, a shortcut based on geometry for discovering the secrets of the Universe. Because it is believed that the laws of physics are invariant under discrete and continuous transformation operations of the space and time, there are continuous symmetries, for example, energy and momentum together with discrete ones corresponding to charge, parity and time reversal operations.

  12. Dynamical spacetime symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin C.; Wheeler, James T.

    2016-04-01

    According to the Coleman-Mandula theorem, any gauge theory of gravity combined with an internal symmetry based on a Lie group must take the form of a direct product in order to be consistent with basic assumptions of quantum field theory. However, we show that an alternative gauging of a simple group can lead dynamically to a spacetime with compact internal symmetry. The biconformal gauging of the conformal symmetry of n-dimensional Euclidean space doubles the dimension to give a symplectic manifold. Examining one of the Lagrangian submanifolds in the flat case, we find that in addition to the expected S O (n ) connection and curvature, the solder form necessarily becomes Lorentzian. General coordinate invariance gives rise to an S O (n -1 ,1 ) connection on the spacetime. The principal fiber bundle character of the original S O (n ) guarantees that the two symmetries enter as a direct product, in agreement with the Coleman-Mandula theorem.

  13. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  15. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aaronson, Gene

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  16. Covariant density functional theory for magnetic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Meng, J.; Ring, P.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2008-08-01

    The tilted axis cranking formalism is implemented in relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. It is used for a microscopic description of magnetic rotation in the framework of covariant density functional theory. We assume that the rotational axis is in the xz plane and consider systems with the two symmetries P (space reflection) and PyT (a combination of a reflection in the y direction and time reversal). A computer code based on these symmetries is developed, and first applications are discussed for the nucleus Gd142: the rotational band based on the configuration πh11/22⊗νh11/2-2 is investigated in a fully microscopic and self-consistent way. The results are compared with available data, such as spectra and electromagnetic transition ratios B(M1)/B(E2). The relation between rotational velocity and angular momentum are discussed in detail together with the shears mechanism characteristic of magnetic rotation.

  17. Symmetry, Equivalence and Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack

    2006-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly at equilibrium is central to the formation of many biological structures and the emulation of this process through the creation of synthetic counterparts offers great promise for nanofabrication. The central problems in this field are an understanding of how the symmetry of the interacting particles encodes the geometrical structure of the organized structure and the nature of the thermodynamic transitions involved. Our approach is inspired by the self-assembly of actin, tubulin and icosahedral structures of plant and animal viruses. We observe chain, membrane,`nanotube' and hollow icosahedron structures using `equivalent' particles exhibiting an interplay between directional (dipolar and multi-polar) interactions and short-range (van der Waals) interactions. Specifically, a dipolar potential (continuous rotational symmetry) gives rise to chain formation, while potentials having discrete rotational symmetries (e.g., square quadrupole or triangular ring of dipoles) led to the self-organization of nanotube and icosahedral structures with some resemblance to tubulin and icosahedral viruses. The simulations are compared to theoretical models of molecular self-assembly, especially in the case of dipolar fluids where the corresponding analytic theory of equilibrium polymerization is well developed. These computations give insights into the design elements required for the development of synthetic systems exhibiting this type of organization.

  18. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  19. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang–Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang–Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross–Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang–Mills theory in four dimensions.

  20. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  1. Multicenter comparison of the ISO standard 20776-1 and the serial 2-fold dilution procedures to dilute hydrophilic and hydrophobic antifungal agents for susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Lass-Floerl, Cornelia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan-Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    A multicenter study was conducted to assess the accuracy of the ISO standard 20776-1 and the serial 2-fold dilution procedures for antifungal susceptibility testing. Fluconazole trays can be accurately prepared by following ISO and serial dilution schemes. However, itraconazole trays showed a significant lack of reproducibility that was independent of which method was followed.

  2. Symmetry of priapulids (Priapulida). 2. Symmetry of larvae.

    PubMed

    Adrianov, A V; Malakhov, V V

    2001-02-01

    Larvae of priapulids are characterized by radial symmetry evident from both external and internal characters of the introvert and lorica. The bilaterality appears as a result of a combination of several radial symmetries: pentaradial symmetry of the teeth, octaradial symmetry of the primary scalids, 25-radial symmetry of scalids, biradial symmetry of the neck, and biradial and decaradial symmetry of the trunk. Internal radiality is exhibited by musculature and the circumpharyngeal nerve ring. Internal bilaterality is evident from the position of the ventral nerve cord and excretory elements. Externally, the bilaterality is determined by the position of the anal tubulus and two shortened midventral rows of scalids bordering the ventral nerve cord. The lorical elements define the biradial symmetry that is missing in adult priapulids. The radial symmetry of larvae is a secondary appearance considered an evolutionary adaptation to a lifestyle within the three-dimensional environment of the benthic sediment. PMID:11223922

  3. Symmetry in context: salience of mirror symmetry in natural patterns.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elias H; Zaidi, Qasim

    2013-05-31

    Symmetry is a biologically relevant, mathematically involving, and aesthetically compelling visual phenomenon. Mirror symmetry detection is considered particularly rapid and efficient, based on experiments with random noise. Symmetry detection in natural settings, however, is often accomplished against structured backgrounds. To measure salience of symmetry in diverse contexts, we assembled mirror symmetric patterns from 101 natural textures. Temporal thresholds for detecting the symmetry axis ranged from 28 to 568 ms indicating a wide range of salience (1/Threshold). We built a model for estimating symmetry-energy by connecting pairs of mirror-symmetric filters that simulated cortical receptive fields. The model easily identified the axis of symmetry for all patterns. However, symmetry-energy quantified at this axis correlated weakly with salience. To examine context effects on symmetry detection, we used the same model to estimate approximate symmetry resulting from the underlying texture throughout the image. Magnitudes of approximate symmetry at flanking and orthogonal axes showed strong negative correlations with salience, revealing context interference with symmetry detection. A regression model that included the context-based measures explained the salience results, and revealed why perceptual symmetry can differ from mathematical characterizations. Using natural patterns thus produces new insights into symmetry perception and its possible neural circuits.

  4. Symmetry in context: Salience of mirror symmetry in natural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elias H.; Zaidi, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry is a biologically relevant, mathematically involving, and aesthetically compelling visual phenomenon. Mirror symmetry detection is considered particularly rapid and efficient, based on experiments with random noise. Symmetry detection in natural settings, however, is often accomplished against structured backgrounds. To measure salience of symmetry in diverse contexts, we assembled mirror symmetric patterns from 101 natural textures. Temporal thresholds for detecting the symmetry axis ranged from 28 to 568 ms indicating a wide range of salience (1/Threshold). We built a model for estimating symmetry-energy by connecting pairs of mirror-symmetric filters that simulated cortical receptive fields. The model easily identified the axis of symmetry for all patterns. However, symmetry-energy quantified at this axis correlated weakly with salience. To examine context effects on symmetry detection, we used the same model to estimate approximate symmetry resulting from the underlying texture throughout the image. Magnitudes of approximate symmetry at flanking and orthogonal axes showed strong negative correlations with salience, revealing context interference with symmetry detection. A regression model that included the context-based measures explained the salience results, and revealed why perceptual symmetry can differ from mathematical characterizations. Using natural patterns thus produces new insights into symmetry perception and its possible neural circuits. PMID:23729773

  5. Test of Lorentz symmetry with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of an experiment should not depend on the orientation of the apparatus in space. This important cornerstone of physics is deeply engrained into the Standard Model of Physics by requiring that all fields must be Lorentz invariant. However, it is well-known that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some theories conjecture that at the Planck scale Lorentz symmetry might be broken and measurable at experimentally accessible energy scales. Therefore, a search for violation of Lorentz symmetry directly probes physics beyond the Standard model. We present a novel experiment utilizing trapped calcium ions as a direct probe of Lorentz-violation in the electron-photon sector. We monitor the energy between atomic states with different orientations of the electronic wave-functions as they rotate together with the motion of the Earth. This is analogous to the famous Michelson-Morley experiment. To remove magnetic field noise, we perform the experiment with the ions prepared in the decoherence-free states. Our result improves on the most stringent bounds on Lorentz symmetry for electrons by 100 times. The experimental scheme is readily applicable to many ion species, hence opening up paths toward much improved test of Lorentz symmetry in the future. (Ph. D. Advisor: Hartmut Haeffner, University of California, Berkeley).

  6. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  8. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  9. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: luca.santoni@sns.it E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar φ invariant under the internal galileon symmetry φ→φ+b{sub μ} x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon's quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  10. Symmetry constraint for foreground extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huazhu; Cao, Xiaochun; Tu, Zhuowen; Lin, Dongdai

    2014-05-01

    Symmetry as an intrinsic shape property is often observed in natural objects. In this paper, we discuss how explicitly taking into account the symmetry constraint can enhance the quality of foreground object extraction. In our method, a symmetry foreground map is used to represent the symmetry structure of the image, which includes the symmetry matching magnitude and the foreground location prior. Then, the symmetry constraint model is built by introducing this symmetry structure into the graph-based segmentation function. Finally, the segmentation result is obtained via graph cuts. Our method encourages objects with symmetric parts to be consistently extracted. Moreover, our symmetry constraint model is applicable to weak symmetric objects under the part-based framework. Quantitative and qualitative experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate the advantages of our approach in extracting the foreground. Our method also shows improved results in segmenting objects with weak, complex symmetry properties.

  11. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raedler, Karl-Heinz; Ness, Norman F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus only the dipole and quadrupole contributions are considered. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of earth and Jupiter. Compared to earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets.

  12. Symmetry analysis of translational symmetry broken density waves: Application to hexagonal lattices in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venderbos, J. W. F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we introduce a symmetry classification for electronic density waves which break translational symmetry due to commensurate wave-vector modulations. The symmetry classification builds on the concept of extended point groups: symmetry groups which contain, in addition to the lattice point group, translations that do not map the enlarged unit cell of the density wave to itself, and become "nonsymmorphic"-like elements. Multidimensional representations of the extended point group are associated with degenerate wave vectors. Electronic properties such as (nodal) band degeneracies and topological character can be straightforwardly addressed, and often follow directly. To further flesh out the idea of symmetry, the classification is constructed so as to manifestly distinguish time-reversal invariant charge (i.e., site and bond) order, and time-reversal breaking flux order. For the purpose of this work, we particularize to spin-rotation invariant density waves. As a first example of the application of the classification we consider the density waves of a simple single- and two-orbital square lattice model. The main objective, however, is to apply the classification to two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattices, specifically the triangular and the honeycomb lattices. The multicomponent density waves corresponding to the commensurate M -point ordering vectors are worked out in detail. To show that our results generally apply to 2 D hexagonal lattices, we develop a general low-energy SU(3 ) theory of (spinless) saddle-point electrons.

  13. Model of the Newtonian cosmology: Symmetries, invariant and partially invariant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebanov, I.; Startsun, O.; Ivanov, S.

    2016-10-01

    Symmetry group of the equation system of ideal nonrelativistic self-gravitating fluid with zero pressure is calculated. Submodel invariant under the subgroup of rotations SO(3) is built and symmetry group of the factorsystem is calculated. A particular analytical invariant solution of the factorsystem is obtained.

  14. Horror Vacui Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson used with children in the third grade to help them learn about symmetry, as well as encouraging them to draw larger than usual. Explains that students learn about the belief called "Horror Vacui" of the Northwest American Indian tribes and create their interpretation of this belief. (CMK)

  15. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  16. Exploring Metric Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, P.H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.W.; Adams, P.D.

    2006-07-31

    Relatively minor perturbations to a crystal structure can in some cases result in apparently large changes in symmetry. Changes in space group or even lattice can be induced by heavy metal or halide soaking (Dauter et al, 2001), flash freezing (Skrzypczak-Jankun et al, 1996), and Se-Met substitution (Poulsen et al, 2001). Relations between various space groups and lattices can provide insight in the underlying structural causes for the symmetry or lattice transformations. Furthermore, these relations can be useful in understanding twinning and how to efficiently solve two different but related crystal structures. Although (pseudo) symmetric properties of a certain combination of unit cell parameters and a space group are immediately obvious (such as a pseudo four-fold axis if a is approximately equal to b in an orthorhombic space group), other relations (e.g. Lehtio, et al, 2005) that are less obvious might be crucial to the understanding and detection of certain idiosyncrasies of experimental data. We have developed a set of tools that allows straightforward exploration of possible metric symmetry relations given unit cell parameters and a space group. The new iotbx.explore{_}metric{_}symmetry command produces an overview of the various relations between several possible point groups for a given lattice. Methods for finding relations between a pair of unit cells are also available. The tools described in this newsletter are part of the CCTBX libraries, which are included in the latest (versions July 2006 and up) PHENIX and CCI Apps distributions.

  17. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  18. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in sliding nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X H; Santoro, G E; Tartaglino, U; Tosatti, E

    2009-03-27

    We discover in simulations of sliding coaxial nanotubes an unanticipated example of dynamical symmetry breaking taking place at the nanoscale. While both nanotubes are perfectly left-right symmetric and nonchiral, a nonzero angular momentum of phonon origin appears spontaneously at a series of critical sliding velocities, in correspondence with large peaks of the sliding friction. The nonlinear equations governing this phenomenon resemble the rotational instability of a forced string. However, several new elements, exquisitely "nano" appear here, with the crucial involvement of umklapp and of sliding nanofriction.

  19. Application of symmetry properties to polarimetric remote sensing with JPL AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, Simon H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Based on symmetry properties, polarimetric remote sensing of geophysical media is studied. From the viewpoint of symmetry groups, media with reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetries are considered. The symmetries impose relations among polarimetric scattering coefficients, which are valid to all scattering mechanisms in the symmetrical configurations. Various orientation distributions of non-spherical scatterers can be identified from the scattering coefficients by a comparison with the symmetry calculations. Experimental observations are then analyzed for many geophysical scenes acquired with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne polarimetric SAR at microwave frequencies over sea ice and vegetation. Polarimetric characteristics of different ice types are compared with symmetry behaviors. The polarimetric response of a tropical rain forest reveals characteristics close to the centrical symmetry properties, which can be used as a distributed target to relatively calibrate polarimetric radars without any deployment of manmade calibration targets.

  20. Symmetry in the Generalized Rotor Model for Extremely Floppy Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Protonated methane CH_5^+ is unique: It is an extremely fluxional molecule. All attempts to assign quantum numbers to the high-resolution transitions obtained over the last 20 years have failed because molecular rotation and vibration cannot be separated in the conventional way. The first step towards a theoretical description is to include internal rotational degrees of freedom into the overall ones, which can be used to formulate a fundamentally new zero order approximation for the (now) generalized rotational states and energies. Predictions from this simple five-dimensional rotor model compare very favorably with the combination differences of protonated methane found in recent low temperature experiments. This talk will focus on symmetry aspects and implications of permutation symmetry for the generalized rotational states. Furthermore, refinements of the theory will be discussed, ranging from the generalization to even higher-dimensional rotors to explicit symmetry breaking and corresponding energy splittings. The latter includes the link to well-known theories of internal rotation dynamics and will show the general validity of the presented theory. Schmiedt, H., et al.; J. Chem. Phys. 143 (15), 154302 (2015) Wodraszka, R. et al.; J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 4229-4232 (2015) Asvany, O. et al.; Science, 347, (6228), 1346-1349 (2015)

  1. Reflections on Symmetry and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The concept of symmetry is fundamental to mathematics. Arguments and proofs based on symmetry are often aesthetically pleasing because they are subtle and succinct and non-standard. This article uses notions of symmetry to approach the solutions to a broad range of mathematical problems. It responds to Krutetskii's criteria for mathematical…

  2. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  3. Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-07-15

    The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

  4. Surface Broken Symmetry on Orthorhombic Double-layer Sr3(Ru1-xMnx)2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Nascimento, V. B.; Diao, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jiandi; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E. W.

    The surface of double-layered ruthenate Sr3Ru2O7 exhibits octahedra tilt distortion and an enhanced rotational distortion caused by the broken symmetry. Previous LEED IV calculation reveals that the tilt angle is (2.5+/-1.7)°at 80 K (B. Hu et. al., Physical Review B 81, 184104 (2010). A glideline symmetry and a mirror symmetry along this direction are both broken. Results from LEED IV simulations show that both broken symmetries originate from the emergence of surface tilt. The degree of broken symmetry is more sensitive to the tilt angle, thus producing a smaller error than from conventional LEED IV calculation. When Mn doping is induced into the compound, the tilt is removed and the symmetry of the LEED pattern returns to what is expected for rotation, two glide planes and four-fold symmetry. Supported by NSF DMR-1002622.

  5. Hexagonal projected symmetries.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliane F; Castro, Sofia B S D; Labouriau, Isabel S

    2015-09-01

    In the study of pattern formation in symmetric physical systems, a three-dimensional structure in thin domains is often modelled as a two-dimensional one. This paper is concerned with functions in {\\bb R}^{3} that are invariant under the action of a crystallographic group and the symmetries of their projections into a function defined on a plane. A list is obtained of the crystallographic groups for which the projected functions have a hexagonal lattice of periods. The proof is constructive and the result may be used in the study of observed patterns in thin domains, whose symmetries are not expected in two-dimensional models, like the black-eye pattern. PMID:26317198

  6. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  7. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  8. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  9. Chiral symmetry and pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, mesons and baryons are illustrated in the language of the Dirac theory. Various forces acting between quarks inside baryons are discussed. I explain why the naive quark models typically overestimate pentaquark masses by some 500 MeV and why in the fully relativistic approach to baryons pentaquarks turn out to be light. I discuss briefly why it can be easier to produce pentaquarks at low than at high energies.

  10. PT symmetry in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-03-01

    Interest in complex Hamiltonians has been rekindled after the realization that a wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can have entirely real spectra as long as they simultaneously respect parity and time reversal operators. In non-relativistic quantum mechanics, governed by the Schrödinger equation, a necessary but not sufficient condition for PT symmetry to hold is that the complex potential should involve real and imaginary parts which are even and odd functions of position respectively. As recently indicated, optics provides a fertile ground to observe and utilize notions of PT symmetry. In optics, the refractive index and gain/loss profiles play the role of the real and imaginary parts of the aforementioned complex potentials. As it has been demonstrated in several studies, PT-symmetric optical structures can exhibit peculiar properties that are otherwise unattainable in traditional Hermitian (conservative) optical settings. Among them, is the possibility for breaking this symmetry through an abrupt phase transition, band merging effects and unidirectional invisibility. Here we review recent developments in the field of -symmetric optics.

  11. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  12. Symmetry in DIET phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. P.; Marks, L. D.

    1989-11-01

    Analysis of the route of the phase transitions in transition metal oxides driven by DIET of oxygen from the surfaces observed by high resolution electron microscopy indicates that there is a symmetry selection rule. The phase transitions are to a structure with a higher point group symmetry where the new phase with a lower oxygen content is either one with a supergroup symmetry with respect to the original phase, or is an amorphous intermediary. The final phase has the highest symmetry and is also a metallic conductor. If a possible lower oxygen content phase does not have the correct supergroup symmetry, it is not formed. It is also found that the point group is conserved during the phase transition if the oxide belongs to the highest groups O h or D 6h. This symmetry selection rule can therefore be used to predict the route of the phase transition. The symmetry rule operates when the phase transition is diffusional.

  13. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander; Borchers, Julie; Kirby, Brian; He, Chunyong; Arenholz, Elke; Vailionis, Arturas; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Atomically precise complex oxide heterostructures provide model systems for the discovery of new emergent phenomena since their magnetism, structure and electronic properties are strongly coupled. Octahedral tilts and rotations have been shown to alter the magnetic properties of complex oxide heterostructures, but typically induce small, gradual magnetic changes. Here, we demonstrate sharp switching between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order at the emergent ferromagnetic interfaces of CaRuO3/CaMnO3 superlattices. Through synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectometry, we show that octahedral distortions in superlattices with an odd number of CaMnO3 unit cells in each layer are symmetry mismatched across the interface. In this case, the rotation symmetry switches across the interface, reducing orbital overlap, suppressing charge transfer from Ru to Mn, and disrupting the interfacial double exchange. This disruption switches half of the interfaces from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic and lowers the saturation magnetic of the superlattice from 1.0 to 0.5 μB/interfacial Mn. By targeting a purely interfacial emergent magnetic system, we achieve drastic alterations to the magnetic ground state with extremely small changes in layer thickness.

  14. Polarization properties of optical metasurfaces of different symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, Sergey S.; Poddubny, Alexander N.; Powell, David A.; Helgert, Christian; Decker, Manuel; Pertsch, Thomas; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-05-01

    Optical metasurfaces have become a new paradigm for creating flat optical devices. While being typically an order of magnitude thinner than the wavelength of light, metasurfaces allow control of the phase of propagating light waves across the full 2 π range and therefore enable the realization of optical elements such as lenses, waveplates, and beam converters. Currently one of the limiting factors of functional metasurfaces is their small range of operational angles. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the angular range can be broadened by increasing the rotational symmetry of metasurfaces. We develop an analytical model based on the discrete dipole approximation that quantitatively describes the response of metasurfaces under oblique excitation. It shows that the effective optical symmetry is doubled for structures with odd rotational symmetry, increasing the angular range correspondingly. We apply and experimentally verify our model for metasurfaces consisting of identical meta-atoms, arranged into square lattices, hexagonal lattices, and on the vertices of a Penrose tiling. The results demonstrate the increasing angular performance with increasing rotational symmetry.

  15. The Platonic Solids from Their Rotation Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grovei, Larry

    2005-01-01

    The five Platonic solids are constructed (as graphs) from their rotational symmetry groups. The constructions are based on an idea of Bertram Kostant and are quite simple; conjugacy classes in the group are the vertices of the graphs and products determine adjacency.

  16. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  17. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  18. The fundamental role of symmetry in nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D. J.

    2013-06-10

    The purpose of these lectures is to illustrate how symmetry and pattern recognition play essential roles in the progression from experimental observation to an understanding of nuclear phenomena in terms of interacting neutrons and protons. We do not discuss weak interactions nor relativistic and sub-nucleon degrees of freedom. The explicit use of symmetry and the power of algebraic methods, in combination with analytical and geometrical methods are illustrated by their use in deriving a shell-model description of nuclear rotational dynamics and the structure of deformed nuclei.

  19. Topological Insulators and Nematic Phases from Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2010-05-26

    We investigate the stability of a quadratic band-crossing point (QBCP) in 2D fermionic systems. At the non-interacting level, we show that a QBCP exists and is topologically stable for a Berry flux {-+}2{pi}, if the point symmetry group has either fourfold or sixfold rotational symmetries. This putative topologically stable free-fermion QBCP is marginally unstable to arbitrarily weak shortrange repulsive interactions. We consider both spinless and spin-1/2 fermions. Four possible ordered states result: a quantum anomalous Hall phase, a quantum spin Hall phase, a nematic phase, and a nematic-spin-nematic phase.

  20. Symmetry-breaking boundary states for WZW models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeley, Daniel; Recknagel, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Starting with the SU(2 WZW model, we construct boundary states that generically preserve only a parafermion times Virasoro subalgebra of the full affine Lie algebra symmetry of the bulk model. The boundary states come in families: intervals for generic k, quotients of SU(2) by discrete groups if k is a square. In that case, special members of the families can be viewed as superpositions of rotated Cardy branes. Using embeddings of SU(2) into higher groups, the new boundary states can be lifted to symmetry-breaking branes for other WZW models.

  1. Kohn's theorem and Newton-Hooke symmetry for Hill's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P. M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2012-02-01

    Hill’s equations, which first arose in the study of the Earth-Moon-Sun system, admit the two-parameter centrally extended Newton-Hooke symmetry without rotations. This symmetry allows us to extend Kohn’s theorem about the center-of-mass decomposition. Particular light is shed on the problem using Duval’s “Bargmann” framework. The separation of the center-of-mass motion into that of a guiding center and relative motion is derived by a generalized chiral decomposition.

  2. Rotational Energy Transfer in N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1994-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 intermolecular potential of van der Avoird et al. rotational energy transfer cross sections have been calculated using both the coupled state (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximations. The rotational energy transfer rate constants at 300 K, calculated in the CS approximation, are in reasonable agreement with the measurements of Sitz and Farrow. The IOS approximation qualitatively reproduces the dependence of the rate constants on the rotational quantum numbers, but consistently overestimates their magnitudes. The treatment of exchange symmetry will be discussed.

  3. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, Franco

    One of the most powerful ideas of modern theoretical physics is the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. It is at the basis of most of the recent achievements in the description of phase transitions in Statistical Mechanics as well as of collective phenomena in solid state physics. It has also made possible the unification of weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions in elementary particle physics. Philosophically, the idea is very deep and subtle (this is probably why its exploitation is a rather recent achievement) and the popular accounts do not fully do justice to it.

  4. Little Conformal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houtz, Rachel; Colwell, Kitran; Terning, John

    2016-09-01

    We explore a new class of natural models which ensure the one-loop divergences in the Higgs mass are cancelled. The top-partners that cancel the top loop are new gauge bosons, and the symmetry relation that ensures the cancellation arises at an infrared fixed point. Such a cancellation mechanism can, a la Little Higgs models, push the scale of new physics that completely solves the hierarchy problem up to 5-10 TeV. When embedded in a supersymmetric model, the stop and gaugino masses provide the cutoffs for the loops, and the mechanism ensures a cancellation between the stop and gaugino mass dependence of the Higgs mass parameter.

  5. Surface defects and symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jürgen; Schweigert, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    In quantum field theory, defects of various codimensions are natural ingredients and carry a lot of interesting information. In this contribution we concentrate on topological quantum field theories in three dimensions, with a particular focus on Dijkgraaf-Witten theories with abelian gauge group. Surface defects in Dijkgraaf-Witten theories have applications in solid state physics, topological quantum computing and conformal field theory. We explain that symmetries in these topological field theories are naturally defined in terms of invertible topological surface defects and are thus Brauer-Picard groups.

  6. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  7. Wigner rotations and Iwasawa decompositions in polarization optics.

    PubMed

    Han, D; Kim, Y S; Noz, M E

    1999-07-01

    Wigner rotations and Iwasawa decompositions are manifestations of the internal space-time symmetries of massive and massless particles, respectively. It is shown to be possible to produce combinations of optical filters which exhibit transformations corresponding to Wigner rotations and Iwasawa decompositions. This is possible because the combined effects of rotation, phase-shift, and attenuation filters lead to transformation matrices of the six-parameter Lorentz group applicable to Jones vectors and Stokes parameters for polarized light waves. The symmetry transformations in special relativity lead to a set of experiments which can be performed in optics laboratories. PMID:11969850

  8. How does symmetry impact the flexibility of proteins?

    PubMed

    Schulze, Bernd; Sljoka, Adnan; Whiteley, Walter

    2014-02-13

    It is well known that (i) the flexibility and rigidity of proteins are central to their function, (ii) a number of oligomers with several copies of individual protein chains assemble with symmetry in the native state and (iii) added symmetry sometimes leads to added flexibility in structures. We observe that the most common symmetry classes of protein oligomers are also the symmetry classes that lead to increased flexibility in certain three-dimensional structures-and investigate the possible significance of this coincidence. This builds on the well-developed theory of generic rigidity of body-bar frameworks, which permits an analysis of the rigidity and flexibility of molecular structures such as proteins via fast combinatorial algorithms. In particular, we outline some very simple counting rules and possible algorithmic extensions that allow us to predict continuous symmetry-preserving motions in body-bar frameworks that possess non-trivial point-group symmetry. For simplicity, we focus on dimers, which typically assemble with twofold rotational axes, and often have allosteric function that requires motions to link distant sites on the two protein chains.

  9. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven; Whalen, Andrew; Brennan, Sean; Sauer, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems may have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces are difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since most of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. We find that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks. National Academies - Keck Futures Initiative, NSF grant DMS 1216568, and Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience NIH Grant 1R01EB014641.

  10. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Andrew J.; Brennan, Sean N.; Sauer, Timothy D.; Schiff, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces can be difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since almost all of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and nonlinear measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. Our analysis shows that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks.

  11. Origami Optimization: Role of Symmetry in Accelerating Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Durstock, Michael; Reich, Gregory; Joo, James; Vaia, Richard

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. Design optimization tools have recently been developed to predict optimal fold patterns with mechanics-based metrics, such as the maximal energy storage, auxetic response and actuation. Origami actuator design problems possess inherent symmetries associated with the grid, mechanical boundary conditions and the objective function, which are often exploited to reduce the design space and computational cost of optimization. However, enforcing symmetry eliminates the prediction of potentially better performing asymmetric designs, which are more likely to exist given the discrete nature of fold line optimization. To better understand this effect, actuator design problems with different combinations of rotation and reflection symmetries were optimized while varying the number of folds allowed in the final design. In each case, the optimal origami patterns transitioned between symmetric and asymmetric solutions depended on the number of folds available for the design, with fewer symmetries present with more fold lines allowed. This study investigates the interplay of symmetry and discrete vs continuous optimization in origami actuators and provides insight into how the symmetries of the reference grid regulate the performance landscape. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. Squash operator and symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2010-01-01

    This article begins with a simple proof of the existence of squash operators compatible with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol that suits single-mode as well as multimode threshold detectors. The proof shows that, when a given detector is symmetric under cyclic group C4, and a certain observable associated with it has rank two as a matrix, then there always exists a corresponding squash operator. Next, we go on to investigate whether the above restriction of “rank two” can be eliminated; i.e., is cyclic symmetry alone sufficient to guarantee the existence of a squash operator? The motivation behind this question is that, if this were true, it would imply that one could realize a device-independent and unconditionally secure quantum key distribution protocol. However, the answer turns out to be negative, and moreover, one can instead prove a no-go theorem that any symmetry is, by itself, insufficient to guarantee the existence of a squash operator.

  13. Squash operator and symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2010-01-15

    This article begins with a simple proof of the existence of squash operators compatible with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol that suits single-mode as well as multimode threshold detectors. The proof shows that, when a given detector is symmetric under cyclic group C{sub 4}, and a certain observable associated with it has rank two as a matrix, then there always exists a corresponding squash operator. Next, we go on to investigate whether the above restriction of 'rank two' can be eliminated; i.e., is cyclic symmetry alone sufficient to guarantee the existence of a squash operator? The motivation behind this question is that, if this were true, it would imply that one could realize a device-independent and unconditionally secure quantum key distribution protocol. However, the answer turns out to be negative, and moreover, one can instead prove a no-go theorem that any symmetry is, by itself, insufficient to guarantee the existence of a squash operator.

  14. Up-down symmetry of the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael

    2011-06-15

    Two symmetries of the local nonlinear {delta}f gyrokinetic system of equations in tokamaks in the high flow regime are presented. The turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum changes sign under an up-down reflection of the tokamak and a sign change of both the rotation and the rotation shear. Thus, the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum must vanish for up-down symmetric tokamaks in the absence of both rotation and rotation shear. This has important implications for the modeling of spontaneous rotation.

  15. Dynamical Symmetries in atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jolie, J.

    2010-04-26

    We review the use of dynamical symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclear physics using the interacting boson approximation. Special emphasis will be put on the experimental techniques used and the influence of symmetry on experimental observables. We illustrate this by a detailed study on mixed symmetry states in {sup 94}Mo. We present also experiments performed to test predictions of dynamical supersymmetries in the Pt-Au region.

  16. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Ivan

    2012-05-15

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  17. In search of symmetry lost.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Frank

    2005-01-20

    Powerful symmetry principles have guided physicists in their quest for nature's fundamental laws. The successful gauge theory of electroweak interactions postulates a more extensive symmetry for its equations than are manifest in the world. The discrepancy is ascribed to a pervasive symmetry-breaking field, which fills all space uniformly, rendering the Universe a sort of exotic superconductor. So far, the evidence for these bold ideas is indirect. But soon the theory will undergo a critical test depending on whether the quanta of this symmetry-breaking field, the so-called Higgs particles, are produced at the Large Hadron Collider (due to begin operation in 2007).

  18. Parity symmetry in QED3

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Pok Man; Swanson, Eric S.

    2011-03-15

    Schwinger-Dyson equations are used to study spontaneous chiral and parity symmetry breaking of three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics with two-component fermions. This theory admits a topological photon mass that explicitly breaks parity symmetry and generates a fermion mass. We show for the first time that it is possible to spontaneously break both parity and chiral symmetry. We also find that chiral symmetry is restored at a critical number of fermion flavors in our truncation scheme. Finally, the Coleman-Hill theorem is used to demonstrate that the results are reasonably accurate.

  19. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  20. Unified Symmetry of Hamilton Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xue-Jun; Qin, Mao-Chang; Mei, Feng-Xiang

    2005-11-01

    The definition and the criterion of a unified symmetry for a Hamilton system are presented. The sufficient condition under which the Noether symmetry is a unified symmetry for the system is given. A new conserved quantity, as well as the Noether conserved quantity and the Hojman conserved quantity, deduced from the unified symmetry, is obtained. An example is finally given to illustrate the application of the results. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10272021 and the Doctoral Program Foundation of Institution of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20040007022

  1. Givental Graphs and Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, Petr; Shadrin, Sergey; Spitz, Loek

    2013-05-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to a Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in terms of Feynman graphs and obtain an interpretation of the inversion symmetry in terms of the action of the Givental group. We also consider the implication of this interpretation of the inversion symmetry for the Schlesinger transformations and for the Hamiltonians of the associated principle hierarchy.

  2. Equilibrium, multistability, and chiral asymmetry in rotated mirror plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P.M.; Mahajan, S.M.; Quevedo, H.J.

    2006-06-15

    The Hall term in two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics is shown to be necessary to balance the curl of the ion inertial force in a rotating plasma with spatially nonuniform crossed electric and magnetic fields. Two-fluid solutions are obtained that qualitatively explain the multistable rotational response observed in magneto-Bernoulli experiment, imply chiral symmetry breaking, i.e., handedness, and yield new dynamo-like electromotive terms in the effective circuit equation for externally rotated mirror plasma equilibria.

  3. Symmetry in halo displays and symmetry in halo-making crystals.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P

    2003-01-20

    The relation between the symmetry in halo displays and crystal symmetry is investigated for halo displays that are generated by ensembles of crystals. It is found that, regardless of the symmetry of the constituent crystals, such displays are always left-right (L-R) symmetric if the crystals are formed from the surrounding vapor. L-R symmetry of a halo display implies here that the cross sections for formation of a halo arc on the left-hand side of the solar vertical and its right-hand side mirror image are equal. This property leaves room for two types of halo display only: a full symmetric one (mmm-symmetric), and a partial symmetric one (mm2-symmetric) in which halo constituents lack their counterparts on the other side of the parhelic circle. A partial symmetric display can occur only for point halos. Its occurrence implies that a number of symmetry elements are not present in the shape of the halo-making crystals. These elements are a center of inversion, any rotatory-inversion axis that is parallel to the crystal spin axis P, a mirror plane perpendicular to the P axis, and a twofold rotation axis perpendicular to the P axis. A simple conceptual method is presented to reconstruct possible shapes of the halo-generating crystals from the halos in the display. The method is illustrated in two examples. Halos that may occur on the Saturnian satellite Titan are discussed. The possibilities for the Huygens probe to detect these halos during its descent through the Titan clouds in 2005 are detailed. PMID:12570252

  4. Symmetry in halo displays and symmetry in halo-making crystals.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P

    2003-01-20

    The relation between the symmetry in halo displays and crystal symmetry is investigated for halo displays that are generated by ensembles of crystals. It is found that, regardless of the symmetry of the constituent crystals, such displays are always left-right (L-R) symmetric if the crystals are formed from the surrounding vapor. L-R symmetry of a halo display implies here that the cross sections for formation of a halo arc on the left-hand side of the solar vertical and its right-hand side mirror image are equal. This property leaves room for two types of halo display only: a full symmetric one (mmm-symmetric), and a partial symmetric one (mm2-symmetric) in which halo constituents lack their counterparts on the other side of the parhelic circle. A partial symmetric display can occur only for point halos. Its occurrence implies that a number of symmetry elements are not present in the shape of the halo-making crystals. These elements are a center of inversion, any rotatory-inversion axis that is parallel to the crystal spin axis P, a mirror plane perpendicular to the P axis, and a twofold rotation axis perpendicular to the P axis. A simple conceptual method is presented to reconstruct possible shapes of the halo-generating crystals from the halos in the display. The method is illustrated in two examples. Halos that may occur on the Saturnian satellite Titan are discussed. The possibilities for the Huygens probe to detect these halos during its descent through the Titan clouds in 2005 are detailed.

  5. Measured symmetry of facial 3D shape and perceived facial symmetry and attractiveness before and after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Julia; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Dirksen, Dieter; Runte, Christoph; Wermker, Kai; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Jung, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    One aim of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery is to strive for an esthetical appearance. Do facial symmetry and attractiveness correlate? How are they affected by surgery? Within this study faces of patients with orthognathic surgery were captured and analyzed regarding their symmetry. A total of 25 faces of patients were measured three-dimensionally by an optical sensor using the fringe projection technique before and after orthognathic surgery. Based upon this data an asymmetry index was calculated for each case. In order to gather subjective ratings each face was presented to 100 independent test subjects in a 3D rotation sequence. Those were asked to rate the symmetry and the attractiveness of the faces. It was analyzed to what extend the ratings correlate with the measured asymmetry indices and whether pre- and post-surgical data differ. The measured asymmetry indices correlate significantly with the subjective ratings of both items. The measured symmetry as well as the rated symmetry and attractiveness increased on average after surgery. The increase of the ratings was even statistically significant. A larger enhancement of symmetry is achieved in pre-surgical strongly asymmetric faces than in rather symmetric faces.

  6. Solitary waves of the rotation-modified Kadomtsev Petviashvili equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Mikyoung Hur, Vera; Liu, Yue

    2008-12-01

    The rotation-modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation describes small-amplitude, long internal waves propagating in one primary direction in a rotating frame of reference. The main investigation is the existence and properties of its solitary waves. The existence and nonexistence results for the solitary waves are obtained, and their regularity and decay properties are established. Various characterizations are given for the ground states and their cylindrical symmetry is demonstrated. When the effects of rotation are weak, the energy minima constrained by constant momentum are shown to be nonlinearly stable. The weak rotation limit of solitary waves as the rotation parameter tends to zero is studied.

  7. Topological classification of crystalline insulators with space group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaun, Priyamvada; Xiao, Di; Niu, Q.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    We show that in crystalline insulators, space group symmetry alone gives rise to a topological classification based on the discretization of electric polarization. Using C3 rotational symmetry as an example, we first prove that the polarization is discretized into three distinct classes, i.e., it can only take three inequivalent values. We then prove that these classes are topologically distinct. Therefore, a Z3 topological classification exists, with polarization as a topological class index. A concrete tight-binding model is derived to demonstrate the Z3 topological phase transition. Using first-principles calculations, we identify graphene on a BN substrate as a possible candidate to realize these Z3 topological states. To complete our analysis, we extend the classification of band structures to all 17 two-dimensional space groups. This work will contribute to a complete theory of symmetry-conserved topological phases and also elucidate topological properties of graphenelike systems.

  8. Symmetries and deformations in the spherical shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Pittel, S.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss symmetries of the spherical shell model that make contact with the geometric collective model of Bohr and Mottelson. The most celebrated symmetry of this kind is SU(3), which is the basis of Elliott’s model of rotation. It corresponds to a deformed mean field induced by a quadrupole interaction in a single major oscillator shell N and can be generalized to include several major shells. As such, Elliott’s SU(3) model establishes the link between the spherical shell model and the (quadrupole component of the) geometric collective model. We introduce the analogue symmetry induced by an octupole interaction in two major oscillator shells N-1 and N, leading to an octupole-deformed solution of the spherical shell model. We show that in the limit of large oscillator shells, N\\to ∞ , the algebraic octupole interaction tends to that of the geometric collective model.

  9. Symmetry and stability in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubitsky, M.; Stewart, I.

    1986-01-01

    The flow of a fluid between concentric rotating cylinders (the Taylor problem) is studied by exploiting the symmetries of the system. The Navier-Stokes equations, linearized about Couette flow, possess two zero and four purely imaginary eigenvalues at a suitable value of the speed of rotation of the outer cylinder. There is thus a reduced bifurcation equation on a six-dimensonal space which can be shown to commute with an action of the symmetry group 0(2) x S0(2). The group structure is used to analyze this bifurcation equation in the simplest (nondegenerate) case, and to compute the stabilities of solutions. In particular, when the outer cylinder is counterrotated, transitions which seem to agree with recent experiments of Andereck, Liu, and Swinney (1984) are obtained. It is also possible to obtain the 'main sequence' in this model. This sequence is normally observed in experiments when the outer cylinder is held fixed.

  10. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  11. Crystallographic and Spectroscopic Symmetry Notations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Compares Schoenflies and Hermann-Mauguin notations of symmetry. Although the former (used by spectroscopists) and latter (used by crystallographers) both describe the same symmetry, there are distinct differences in the manner of description which may lead to confusion in correlating the two notations. (Author/JN)

  12. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  13. Asymptotic symmetries from finite boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Marolf, Donald

    2016-01-01

    It is natural to regulate an infinite-sized system by imposing a boundary condition at finite distance, placing the system in a 'box.' This breaks symmetries, though the breaking is small when the box is large. One should thus be able to obtain the asymptotic symmetries of the infinite system by studying regulated systems. We provide concrete examples in the context of Einstein-Hilbert gravity (with negative or zero cosmological constant) by showing in 4 or more dimensions how the anti-de Sitter and Poincaré asymptotic symmetries can be extracted from gravity in a spherical box with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In 2 + 1 dimensions we obtain the full double-Virasoro algebra of asymptotic symmetries for AdS3 and, correspondingly, the full Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra for asymptotically flat space. In higher dimensions, a related approach may continue to be useful for constructing a good asymptotically flat phase space with BMS asymptotic symmetries.

  14. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  15. Mutants at the 2-Fold Interface of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Structural Proteins Suggest a Role in Viral Transcription for AAV Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Fikret; Salganik, Maxim; Resztak, Justyna; Singh, Jasbir; Bennett, Antonette; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that an amino acid substitution, Y704A, near the 2-fold interface of adeno-associated virus (AAV) was defective for transcription of the packaged genome (M. Salganik, F. Aydemir, H. J. Nam, R. McKenna, M. Agbandje-McKenna, and N. Muzyczka, J Virol 88:1071–1079, 2013, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02093-13). In this report, we have characterized the defect in 6 additional capsid mutants located in a region ∼30 Å in diameter on the surface of the AAV type 2 (AAV2) capsid near the 2-fold interface. These mutants, which are highly conserved among primate serotypes, displayed a severe defect (3 to 6 logs) in infectivity. All of the mutants accumulated significant levels of uncoated DNA in the nucleus, but none of the mutants were able to accumulate significant amounts of genomic mRNA postinfection. In addition, wild-type (wt) capsids that were bound to the conformational antibody A20, which is known to bind the capsid surface in the region of the mutants, were also defective for transcription. In all cases, the mutant virus particles, as well as the antibody-bound wild-type capsids, were able to enter the cell, travel to the nucleus, uncoat, and synthesize a second strand but were unable to transcribe their genomes. Taken together, the phenotype of these mutants provides compelling evidence that the AAV capsid plays a role in the transcription of its genome, and the mutants map this functional region on the surface of the capsid near the 2-fold interface. This appears to be the first example of a viral structural protein that is also involved in the transcription of the viral genome that it delivers to the nucleus. IMPORTANCE Many viruses package enzymes within their capsids that assist in expressing their genomes postinfection, e.g., retroviruses. A number of nonenveloped viruses, including AAV, carry proteases that are needed for capsid maturation or for capsid modification during infection. We describe here what appears to

  16. Human Rhinovirus Subviral A Particle Binds to Lipid Membranes over a Twofold Axis of Icosahedral Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Minor group human rhinoviruses bind low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors for endocytosis. Once they are inside endosomes, the acidic pH triggers their dissociation from the receptors and conversion into hydrophobic subviral A particles; these attach to the membrane and transfer their single-strand, positive-sense RNA genome into the cytosol. Here, we allowed human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) A particles, produced in vitro by incubation at pH 5.4, to attach to liposomes; cryo-electron microscopy 3-dimensional single-particle image reconstruction revealed that they bind to the membrane around a 2-fold icosahedral symmetry axis. PMID:23946453

  17. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    SciTech Connect

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric; Llimargas, Marta; Benach, Jordi; Riera, Antoni; Pous, Joan; Macias, Maria J.

    2015-04-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  18. Spontaneous Planar Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Lubensky, David

    Recent progress in animal development has highlighted the central role played by planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial tissue morphogenesis. Through PCP, cells have the ability to collectively polarize in the plane of the epithelium by localizing morphogenetic proteins along a certain axis. This allows direction-dependent modulation of tissue mechanical properties that can translate into the formation of complex, non-rotationally invariant shapes. Recent experimental observations[1] show that cells, in addition to being planar-polarized, can also spontaneously develop planar chirality, perhaps in the effort of making yet more complex shapes that are reflection non-invariant. In this talk we will present our work in characterizing general mechanisms that can lead to spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in cells. We decompose interfacial concentration of polarity proteins in a hexagonal cell packing into irreducible representations. We find that in the case of polar concentration distributions, a chiral state can only be reached from a secondary instability after the cells are polarized. However in the case of nematic distributions, we show that a finite-amplitude (subcritical, or ``first-order'') nematic transition can send the system from disorder directly to a chiral state. In addition, we find that perturbing the system by stretching the hexagonal packing enables direct (supercritical, or ``second-order'') chiral transition in the nematic case. Finally, we do a Landau expansion to study competition between stretch-induced chirality and the tendency towards a non-chiral state in packings that have retained the full 6-fold symmetry.

  19. Functional Symmetry of Endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In higher eukaryotic cells pleiomorphic compartments composed of vacuoles, tubules and vesicles move from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane to the cell center, operating in early biosynthetic trafficking and endocytosis, respectively. Besides transporting cargo to the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, a major task of these compartments is to promote extensive membrane recycling. The endocytic membrane system is traditionally divided into early (sorting) endosomes, late endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). Recent studies on the intermediate compartment (IC) between the ER and the Golgi apparatus suggest that it also consists of peripheral (“early”) and centralized (“late”) structures, as well as a third component, designated here as the biosynthetic recycling compartment (BRC). We propose that the ERC and the BRC exist as long-lived “mirror compartments” at the cell center that also share the ability to expand and become mobilized during cell activation. These considerations emphasize the functional symmetry of endomembrane compartments, which provides a basis for the membrane rearrangements taking place during cell division, polarization, and differentiation. PMID:17267686

  20. Spectral theorem and partial symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A.; Gozdz, M.

    2012-10-15

    A novel method of the decompositon of a quantum system's Hamiltonian is presented. In this approach the criterion of the decomposition is determined by the symmetries possessed by the sub-Hamiltonians. This procedure is rather generic and independent of the actual global symmetry, or the lack of it, of the full Hamilton operator. A detailed investigation of the time evolution of the various sub-Hamiltonians, therefore the change in time of the symmetry of the physical object, is presented for the case of a vibrator-plus-rotor model. Analytical results are illustrated by direct numerical calculations.

  1. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  2. Symmetries in the Schwarzschild Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.

    The two-body problem associated to a force field described by a potential of the form U = A/r + B/r3 (r is a distance between particles, A and B are real parameters) is resumed from the only standpoint of symmetries. Such symmetries, expressed in Hamiltonian coordinates, or in standard polar coordinates, are recovered for McGehee-type coordinates of both collision-blow-up and infinity-blow-up kind. They form isomorphic commutative groups endowed with an idempotent structure. Expressed in Levi-Civita's coordinates, the problem exhibits a larger group of symmetries, also commutative and presenting an idempotent structure.

  3. Symmetries from the solution manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Víctor; Guerrero, Julio; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco F.; Cossío, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    We face a revision of the role of symmetries of a physical system aiming at characterizing the corresponding Solution Manifold (SM) by means of Noether invariants as a preliminary step towards a proper, non-canonical, quantization. To this end, "point symmetries" of the Lagrangian are generally not enough, and we must resort to the more general concept of contact symmetries. They are defined in terms of the Poincaré-Cartan form, which allows us, in turn, to find the symplectic structure on the SM, through some sort of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) transformation. These basic symmetries are realized as Hamiltonian vector fields, associated with (coordinate) functions on the SM, lifted back to the Evolution Manifold through the inverse of this HJ mapping, that constitutes an inverse of the Noether Theorem. The specific examples of a particle moving on S3, at the mechanical level, and nonlinear SU(2)-sigma model in field theory are sketched.

  4. Trace formula for broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Creagh, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    We derive a trace formula for systems that exhibit an approximate continuous symmetry. It interpolates between the sum over continuous families of periodic orbits that holds in the case of exact continuous symmetry, and the discrete sum over isolated orbits that holds when the symmetry is completely broken. It is based on a simple perturbation expansion of the classical dynamics, centered around the case of exact symmetry, and gives an approximation to the usual Gutzwiller formula when the perturbation is large. We illustrate the computation with some 2-dimensional examples: the deformation of the circular billiard into an ellipse, and anisotropic and anharmonic perturbations of a harmonic oscillator. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Broken Symmetries and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Phase space symmetries inherent in the statistical theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are known to be broken dynamically to produce large-scale coherent magnetic structure. Here, results of a numerical study of decaying MHD turbulence are presented that show large-scale coherent structure also arises and persists in the presence of dissipation. Dynamically broken symmetries in MHD turbulence may thus play a fundamental role in the dynamo process.

  6. Dynamical symmetries in nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the concept of dynamical symmetries in nuclei has witnessed a renaissance of interest and activity. Much of this work has been developed in the context of the Interacting Boson Approximation (or IBA) model. The appearance and properties of dynamical symmetries in nuclei will be reviewed, with emphasis on their characteristic signatures and on the role of the proton-neutron interaction in their formation, systematics and evolution. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  7. Anomalies and Discrete Chiral Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2009-09-07

    The quantum anomaly that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.

  8. /SU(3) symmetry and scissors mode vibrations in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Wu, Cheng-Li; Bhatt, Kumar; Guidry, Mike

    2002-05-01

    We show that a nearly perfect SU(3) symmetry emerges from an extended projected shell model. Starting from a deformed potential we construct separate bases for neutron and proton collective rotational states by exact angular momentum projection. These rotational states are then coupled by diagonalizing a residual pairing plus quadrupole interaction. The states obtained exhibit a one-to-one correspondence with an SU(3) spectrum up to high angular momentum and excitation, and their wave functions have a near-maximal overlap with the SU(3) states. They can also be classified as rotational bands built on spin-1ℏ phonon excitations, which correspond to a geometrical scissors mode and its generalizations. This work is a direct demonstration that numerical angular momentum projection theory extends the Elliott's original idea to heavy nuclear systems.

  9. Novel symmetries in Christ-Lee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Shukla, A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the gauge-fixed Lagrangian of the Christ-Lee model respects four fermionic symmetries, namely; (anti-)BRST symmetries, (anti-)co-BRST symmetries within the framework of BRST formalism. The appropriate anticommutators amongst the fermionic symmetries lead to a unique bosonic symmetry. It turns out that the algebra obeyed by the symmetry transformations (and their corresponding conserved charges) is reminiscent of the algebra satisfied by the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry. We also provide the physical realizations of the cohomological operators in terms of the symmetry properties. Thus, the present model provides a simple model for the Hodge theory.

  10. Parity-time symmetry broken by point-group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Francisco M. Garcia, Javier

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a parity-time (PT) symmetric Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. It is based on the dimensionless Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square box with the PT-symmetric potential V(x, y) = iaxy. Perturbation theory clearly shows that some of the eigenvalues are complex for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point-group symmetry proves useful to guess if some of the eigenvalues may already be complex for all values of the coupling constant. We confirm those conclusions by means of an accurate numerical calculation based on the diagonalization method. On the other hand, the Schrödinger equation with the potential V(x, y) = iaxy{sup 2} exhibits real eigenvalues for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point group symmetry suggests that PT-symmetry may be broken in the former case and unbroken in the latter one.

  11. A quantum reduction to spherical symmetry in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.; Lewandowski, J.; Świeżewski, J.

    2015-07-01

    Based on a recent purely geometric construction of observables for the spatial diffeomorphism constraint, we propose two distinct quantum reductions to spherical symmetry within full 3 + 1-dimensional loop quantum gravity. The construction of observables corresponds to using the radial gauge for the spatial metric and allows to identify rotations around a central observer as unitary transformations in the quantum theory. Group averaging over these rotations yields our first proposal for spherical symmetry. Hamiltonians of the full theory with angle-independent lapse preserve this spherically symmetric subsector of the full Hilbert space. A second proposal consists in implementing the vanishing of a certain vector field in spherical symmetry as a constraint on the full Hilbert space, leading to a close analogue of diffeomorphisms invariant states. While this second set of spherically symmetric states does not allow for using the full Hamiltonian, it is naturally suited to implement the spherically symmetric midisuperspace Hamiltonian, as an operator in the full theory, on it. Due to the canonical structure of the reduced variables, the holonomy-flux algebra behaves effectively as a one parameter family of 2 + 1-dimensional algebras along the radial coordinate, leading to a diagonal non-vanishing volume operator on 3-valent vertices. The quantum dynamics thus becomes tractable, including scenarios like spherically symmetric dust collapse.

  12. Symmetry Guide to Ferroaxial Transitions.

    PubMed

    Hlinka, J; Privratska, J; Ondrejkovic, P; Janovec, V

    2016-04-29

    The 212 species of the structural phase transitions with a macroscopic symmetry breaking are inspected with respect to the occurrence of the ferroaxial order parameter, the electric toroidal moment. In total, 124 ferroaxial species are found, some of them being also fully ferroelectric (62) or fully ferroelastic ones (61). This ensures a possibility of electrical or mechanical switching of ferroaxial domains. Moreover, there are 12 ferroaxial species that are neither ferroelectric nor ferroelastic. For each species, we have also explicitly worked out a canonical form for a set of representative equilibrium property tensors of polar and axial nature in both high-symmetry and low-symmetry phases. This information was gathered into the set of 212 mutually different symbolic matrices, expressing graphically the presence of nonzero independent tensorial components and the symmetry-imposed links between them, for both phases simultaneously. Symmetry analysis reveals the ferroaxiality in several currently debated materials, such as VO_{2}, LuFe_{2}O_{4}, and URu_{2}Si_{2}.

  13. Symmetry Guide to Ferroaxial Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, J.; Privratska, J.; Ondrejkovic, P.; Janovec, V.

    2016-04-01

    The 212 species of the structural phase transitions with a macroscopic symmetry breaking are inspected with respect to the occurrence of the ferroaxial order parameter, the electric toroidal moment. In total, 124 ferroaxial species are found, some of them being also fully ferroelectric (62) or fully ferroelastic ones (61). This ensures a possibility of electrical or mechanical switching of ferroaxial domains. Moreover, there are 12 ferroaxial species that are neither ferroelectric nor ferroelastic. For each species, we have also explicitly worked out a canonical form for a set of representative equilibrium property tensors of polar and axial nature in both high-symmetry and low-symmetry phases. This information was gathered into the set of 212 mutually different symbolic matrices, expressing graphically the presence of nonzero independent tensorial components and the symmetry-imposed links between them, for both phases simultaneously. Symmetry analysis reveals the ferroaxiality in several currently debated materials, such as VO2 , LuFe2 O4 , and URu2 Si2 .

  14. On the symmetries of integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Bellon, M.; Maillard, J.M.; Viallet, C. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper the authors show that the Yang-Baxter equations for two-dimensional models admit as a group of symmetry the infinite discrete group A{sub 2}{sup (1)}. The existence of this symmetry explains the presence of a spectral parameter in the solutions of the equations. The authors show that similarly, for three-dimensional vertex models and the associated tetrahedron equations, there also exists an infinite discrete group of symmetry. Although generalizing naturally the previous one, it is a much bigger hyperbolic Coxeter group. The authors indicate how this symmetry can help to resolve the Yang-Baxter equations and their higher-dimensional generalizations and initiate the study of three-dimensional vertex models. These symmetries are naturally represented as birational projective transformations. They may preserve non-trivial algebraic varieties, and lead to proper parametrizations of the models, be they integrable or not. The authors mention the relation existing between spin models and the Bose-Messner algebras of algebraic combinatorics. The authors' results also yield the generalization of the condition q{sup n} = 1 so often mentioned in the theory of quantum groups, when no q parameter is available.

  15. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  16. Expediting model-based optoacoustic reconstructions with tomographic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lutzweiler, Christian; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Image quantification in optoacoustic tomography implies the use of accurate forward models of excitation, propagation, and detection of optoacoustic signals while inversions with high spatial resolution usually involve very large matrices, leading to unreasonably long computation times. The development of fast and memory efficient model-based approaches represents then an important challenge to advance on the quantitative and dynamic imaging capabilities of tomographic optoacoustic imaging. Methods: Herein, a method for simplification and acceleration of model-based inversions, relying on inherent symmetries present in common tomographic acquisition geometries, has been introduced. The method is showcased for the case of cylindrical symmetries by using polar image discretization of the time-domain optoacoustic forward model combined with efficient storage and inversion strategies. Results: The suggested methodology is shown to render fast and accurate model-based inversions in both numerical simulations andpost mortem small animal experiments. In case of a full-view detection scheme, the memory requirements are reduced by one order of magnitude while high-resolution reconstructions are achieved at video rate. Conclusions: By considering the rotational symmetry present in many tomographic optoacoustic imaging systems, the proposed methodology allows exploiting the advantages of model-based algorithms with feasible computational requirements and fast reconstruction times, so that its convenience and general applicability in optoacoustic imaging systems with tomographic symmetries is anticipated.

  17. Forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical, user's, programmer's and demonstration manuals for this new capability are presented.

  18. Heisenberg symmetry and hypermultiplet manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Marios Petropoulos, P.; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We study the emergence of Heisenberg (Bianchi II) algebra in hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces. This is motivated by the rôle these spaces with this symmetry play in N = 2 hypermultiplet scalar manifolds. We show how to construct related pairs of hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces under general symmetry assumptions, the former being a zooming-in limit of the latter at vanishing scalar curvature. We further apply this method for the two hyper-Kähler spaces with Heisenberg algebra, which is reduced to U (1) × U (1) at the quaternionic level. We also show that no quaternionic spaces exist with a strict Heisenberg symmetry - as opposed to Heisenberg ⋉ U (1). We finally discuss the realization of the latter by gauging appropriate Sp (2 , 4) generators in N = 2 conformal supergravity.

  19. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  20. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  1. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  2. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  3. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model.

  4. The Broken Symmetry of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2011-11-29

    This paper seeks to clarify features of time asymmetry in terms of symmetry breaking. It is observed that, in general, a contingent situation or event requires the breaking of an underlying symmetry. The distinction between the universal anisotropy of temporal processes and the irreversibility of certain physical processes is clarified. It is also proposed that the Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics offers an effective way to explain general thermodynamic asymmetry in terms of the time asymmetry of radiation, where prior such efforts have fallen short.

  5. On the symmetry and degeneracy of H3(+).

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Kyle N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2013-10-01

    The fundamental molecular ion H3(+) has impacted astronomy, chemistry, and physics, particularly since the discovery of its rovibrational spectrum. Consisting of three identical fermions, its properties are profoundly influenced by the requirements of exchange symmetry, most notably the nonexistence of its ground rotational state. Spectroscopy of H3(+) is often used to infer the relative abundances of its two nuclear spin modifications, ortho- and para-H3(+), which are important in areas as diverse as electron dissociative recombination and deuterium fractionation in cold interstellar clouds. In this paper, we explore in detail the impact of exchange symmetry on the states of H3(+), with a particular focus on the state degeneracies necessary for converting spectral transition intensities to relative abundances. We address points of confusion in the literature surrounding these issues and discuss the implications for proton-transfer reactions of H3(+) at low temperatures.

  6. Non-Newtonian rotational swimming: experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S.; Godinez, F. A.; Zenit, R.; Lauga, E.

    2013-11-01

    Recently Pak et al. (PoF, 2012) showed that a device composed of two unequal spheres (snowman) could swim in a viscoelastic fluid under a rotational actuation. By symmetry such device isn't able to move in a Newtonian fluid but because of its geometrical asymmetry is able to generate asymmetric elastic response and generate a purely viscoelastic thrust. We implemented this swimmer experimentally using a magnetic snowman driven by an external rotating magnetic field. We demonstrate that the snowman swims solely as a result of fluid elasticity. We conduct tests in Newtonian and Boger fluids, varying the sphere size ratio and rotation speed. We also conducted measurements in a confined environment, which showed an improved swimming performance.

  7. Rotation of methyl radicals in molecular solids.

    PubMed

    Kiljunen, Toni; Popov, Evgeny; Kunttu, Henrik; Eloranta, Jussi

    2010-04-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were carried out to study the rotation of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in solid carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen matrices. The radicals were produced by dissociating methane by plasma bursts generated by a focused 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation during the gas condensation on the substrate. The ESR spectra exhibit anisotropic features that persist over the temperature range examined, and in most cases this indicates a restriction of rotation about the C(2) symmetry axis. A nonrotating CH(3) was also observed in a CO(2) matrix. The intensity ratio between the symmetric (A) and antisymmetric (E) nuclear spin states was recorded as a function of temperature for each molecular matrix. The rotational energy levels are modified from their gas phase structure with increasing crystal field strength. An anomalous situation was observed where the A/E ratio extended below the high temperature limit of 1/2. PMID:20141192

  8. Spin symmetry in the antinucleon spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shan-Gui; Meng, Jie; Ring, P

    2003-12-31

    We discuss spin and pseudospin symmetry in the spectrum of single nucleons and single antinucleons in a nucleus. As an example we use relativistic mean field theory to investigate single antinucleon spectra. We find a very well developed spin symmetry in single antineutron and single antiproton spectra. The dominant components of the wave functions of the spin doublet are almost identical. This spin symmetry in antiparticle spectra and the pseudospin symmetry in particle spectra have the same origin. However, it turns out that the spin symmetry in antinucleon spectra is much better developed than the pseudospin symmetry in normal nuclear single particle spectra. PMID:14754045

  9. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  10. Spin symmetry in the antinucleon spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shan-Gui; Meng, Jie; Ring, P

    2003-12-31

    We discuss spin and pseudospin symmetry in the spectrum of single nucleons and single antinucleons in a nucleus. As an example we use relativistic mean field theory to investigate single antinucleon spectra. We find a very well developed spin symmetry in single antineutron and single antiproton spectra. The dominant components of the wave functions of the spin doublet are almost identical. This spin symmetry in antiparticle spectra and the pseudospin symmetry in particle spectra have the same origin. However, it turns out that the spin symmetry in antinucleon spectra is much better developed than the pseudospin symmetry in normal nuclear single particle spectra.

  11. Symmetry theorems on the forward and backward scattering Mueller matrices for light scattering from a nonspherical dielectric scatterer.

    PubMed

    Hu, C R; Kattawar, G W; Parkin, M E; Herb, P

    1987-10-01

    The symmetry theorems on the complete forward and backward scattering Mueller matrices for light scattering from a single dielectric scatterer (as opposed to an ensemble of scatterers) are systematically and thoroughly analyzed. Symmetry operations considered include discrete rotations about the incident direction and mirror planes not coinciding with the scattering plane. For forward scattering we find sixteen different symmetry shapes (not including the totally asymmetric one), which may be classified into five symmetry classes, with identical reductions in the forward scattering matrices for all symmetry shapes that fall into the same symmetry class. For backward scattering we find only four different symmetry shapes, which may be classified into only two symmetry classes. The forward scattering symmetry theorems also lead to a symmetry theorem on the total extinction cross section. Based on the conclusions of this work it should be possible to design quick and nondestructive methods for the identification of certain small objects, when suitable partial information about the objects to be identified is already available. A promising practical example is given.

  12. Vibration of microgravity environment for rotating fluids in high and low rotating speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, F. W.; Hong, B. B.

    1989-01-01

    Time dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out with the sinusoidal function vibration of gravity environment in high and low rotating cylinder speeds. The initial condition of bubble profiles was adopted from the steady-state formulations in which the computer algorithms have been developed by Hung and Leslie (1988), and Hung et al. (1988).

  13. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  14. The Symmetry of Natural Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.

    This document is a monograph intended for advanced undergraduate students, or beginning graduate students, who have some knowledge of modern physics as well as classical physics, including the elementary quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom and angular momentum. The first chapter introduces symmetry and relates it to the mathematical…

  15. Turning Students into Symmetry Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilders, Richard; VanOyen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Exploring mathematical symmetry is one way of increasing students' understanding of art. By asking students to search designs and become pattern detectives, teachers can potentially increase their appreciation of art while reinforcing their perception of the use of math in their day-to-day lives. This article shows teachers how they can interest…

  16. Superdeformations and fermion dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cheng-Li . Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN )

    1990-01-01

    In this talk, I will present a link between nuclear collective motions and their underlying fermion dynamical symmetries. In particular, I will focus on the microscopic understanding of deformations. It is shown that the SU{sub 3} of the one major shell fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM) is responsible for the physics of low and high spins in normal deformation. For the recently observed phenomena of superdeformation, the physics of the problem dictates a generalization to a supershell structure (SFDSM), which also has an SU{sub 3} fermion dynamical symmetry. Many recently discovered feature of superdeformation are found to be inherent in such an SU{sub 3} symmetry. In both cases the dynamical Pauli effect plays a vital role. A particularly noteworthy discovery from this model is that the superdeformed ground band is not the usual unaligned band but the D-pair aligned (DPA) band, which sharply crosses the excited bands. The existence of such DPA band is a key point to understand many properties of superdeformation. Our studies also poses new experimental challenge. This is particularly interesting since there are now plans to build new and exciting {gamma}-ray detecting systems, like the GAMMASPHERE, which could provide answers to some of these challenges. 34 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes. PMID:25008961

  18. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  19. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  20. Paper Models Illustrating Virus Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Instructions are given for constructing two models, one to illustrate the general principles of symmetry in T=1, T=3, and T=4 viruses, and the other to illustrate the disposition of protein subunits in the T=3 plant viruses and the picornaviruses. (Author/CW)

  1. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  2. Monster symmetry and extremal CFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiotto, Davide

    2012-11-01

    We test some recent conjectures about extremal selfdual CFTs, which are the candidate holographic duals of pure gravity in AdS 3. We prove that no c = 48 extremal selfdual CFT or SCFT may possess Monster symmetry. Furthermore, we disprove a recent argument against the existence of extremal selfdual CFTs of large central charge.

  3. Dynamics of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcias, F.; de La Mota, V.; Remaud, B.; Royer, G.; Sébille, F.

    1991-02-01

    The deexcitation of hot rotating nuclei is studied within a microscopic semiclassical transport formalism. This framework allows the study of the competition between the fission and evaporation channels of deexcitation, including the mean-field and two-body interactions, without shape constraint for the fission channel. As a function of initial angular momenta and excitation energies, the transitions between three regimes is analyzed [particle evaporation, binary (ternary) fussion and multifragmentation], which correspond to well-defined symmetry breakings in the inertia tensor of the system. The competition between evaporation and binary fission is studied, showing the progressive disappearance of the fission process with increasing excitation energies, up to a critical point where nuclei pass directly from evaporation to multifragmentation channels.

  4. Rotational Doppler effect in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    The translational Doppler effect of electromagnetic and sound waves has been successfully applied in measurements of the speed and direction of vehicles, astronomical objects and blood flow in human bodies, and for the Global Positioning System. The Doppler effect plays a key role for some important quantum phenomena such as the broadened emission spectra of atoms and has benefited cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light. Despite numerous successful applications of the translational Doppler effect, it fails to measure the rotation frequency of a spinning object when the probing wave propagates along its rotation axis. This constraint was circumvented by deploying the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves--the so-called rotational Doppler effect. Here, we report on the demonstration of rotational Doppler shift in nonlinear optics. The Doppler frequency shift is determined for the second harmonic generation of a circularly polarized beam passing through a spinning nonlinear optical crystal with three-fold rotational symmetry. We find that the second harmonic generation signal with circular polarization opposite to that of the fundamental beam experiences a Doppler shift of three times the rotation frequency of the optical crystal. This demonstration is of fundamental significance in nonlinear optics, as it provides us with insight into the interaction of light with moving media in the nonlinear optical regime.

  5. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  6. Search for and discovery of chiral symmetry in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    Studies devoted to the discovery and investigation of chiral-symmetry breaking in nuclei are briefly reviewed. Unlike the case of molecules and the macrocosm, where chirality manifests itself in the spatial structure of objects, chirality in nuclei is connected with different relative orientation of valence-quasiparticle spins and the angular momentum of collective rotation of the triaxial core. Decisive arguments in favor of the existence of this effect are based on measurements of lifetimes of high-spin nuclear levels in the picosecond range by Doppler methods of {gamma} spectroscopy.

  7. Surprises and pitfalls arising from (pseudo)symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Peter H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Lebedev, Andrey A.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Adams, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    It is not uncommon for protein crystals to crystallize with more than a single molecule per asymmetric unit. When more than a single molecule is present in the asymmetric unit, various pathological situations such as twinning, modulated crystals and pseudo translational or rotational symmetry can arise. The presence of pseudosymmetry can lead to uncertainties about the correct space group, especially in the presence of twinning. The background to certain common pathologies is presented and a new notation for space groups in unusual settings is introduced. The main concepts are illustrated with several examples from the literature and the Protein Data Bank. PMID:18094473

  8. Distorted stationary rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoom, Andrey A.

    2015-03-01

    We study the interior of distorted stationary rotating black holes on the example of a Kerr black hole distorted by external static and axisymmetric mass distribution. We show that there is a duality transformation between the outer and inner horizons of the black hole, which is different from that of an electrically charged static distorted black hole. The duality transformation is directly related to the discrete symmetry of the space-time. The black hole horizon areas, surface gravity, and angular momentum satisfy the Smarr formula constructed for both the horizons. We formulate the zeroth, the first, and the second laws of black hole thermodynamics for both the horizons of the black hole and show the correspondence between the local and the global forms of the first law. The Smarr formula and the laws of thermodynamics formulated for both the horizons are related by the duality transformation. The distortion is illustrated on the example of a quadrupole and octupole fields. The distortion fields noticeably affect the proper time of a free fall from the outer to the inner horizon of the black hole along the symmetry semiaxes. There is some minimal nonzero value of the quadrupole and octupole moments when the time becomes minimal. The minimal proper time indicates the closest approach of the horizons due to the distortion.

  9. Effective field theory of emergent symmetry breaking in deformed atomic nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-09-03

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking in non-relativistic quantum systems has previously been addressed in the framework of effective field theory. Low-lying excitations are constructed from Nambu–Goldstone modes using symmetry arguments only. In this study, we extend that approach to finite systems. The approach is very general. To be specific, however, we consider atomic nuclei with intrinsically deformed ground states. The emergent symmetry breaking in such systems requires the introduction of additional degrees of freedom on top of the Nambu–Goldstone modes. Symmetry arguments suffice to construct the low-lying states of the system. Lastly, in deformed nuclei these are vibrational modes each of whichmore » serves as band head of a rotational band.« less

  10. Effective field theory of emergent symmetry breaking in deformed atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-09-03

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking in non-relativistic quantum systems has previously been addressed in the framework of effective field theory. Low-lying excitations are constructed from Nambu–Goldstone modes using symmetry arguments only. In this study, we extend that approach to finite systems. The approach is very general. To be specific, however, we consider atomic nuclei with intrinsically deformed ground states. The emergent symmetry breaking in such systems requires the introduction of additional degrees of freedom on top of the Nambu–Goldstone modes. Symmetry arguments suffice to construct the low-lying states of the system. Lastly, in deformed nuclei these are vibrational modes each of which serves as band head of a rotational band.

  11. PT Symmetry, Conformal Symmetry, and the Metrication of Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2016-05-01

    We present some interesting connections between PT symmetry and conformal symmetry. We use them to develop a metricated theory of electromagnetism in which the electromagnetic field is present in the geometric connection. However, unlike Weyl who first advanced this possibility, we do not take the connection to be real but to instead be PT symmetric, with it being iA_{μ } rather than A_{μ } itself that then appears in the connection. With this modification the standard minimal coupling of electromagnetism to fermions is obtained. Through the use of torsion we obtain a metricated theory of electromagnetism that treats its electric and magnetic sectors symmetrically, with a conformal invariant theory of gravity being found to emerge. An extension to the non-Abelian case is provided.

  12. Universal Formulation For Symmetries In Computed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    Universal formulation for high-order symmetries in boundary conditions on flows devised. Eliminates need for special procedures to incorporate symmetries and corresponding boundary conditions into computer codes solving Navier-Stokes and Euler equations of flow.

  13. Meridional circulation in rotating stars. V. Cooling white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Tassoul, M.; Tassoul, J.

    1983-04-01

    In this paper we discuss the large-scale meridonal circulation and concomitant differential rotation in a cooling white dwarf that does not greatly depart from spherical symmetry. It is found that the circulation velocities are utterly negligible in the degenerate interior as well as in the thin nondegenerate envelope, where the presence of a (turbulent) viscous boundary layer allows the velocities to satisfy all of the surface boundary conditions. There are no 1/rho singularities in the meridional flow. The back reaction of the circulatory currents on the overall rotation rate is not very large either, thus implying at most a mild differential rotation when departure from sphericity is small.

  14. Yet another symmetry breaking to be discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, M.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of spontaneous symmetry breaking in particle physics was the greatest contribution in Nambu's achievements. There is another class of symmetries that exist in low-energy nature, yet is doomed to be broken at high energy, due to a lack of protection of the gauge symmetry. I shall review our approach to searching for this class of symmetry breaking, the lepton number violation linked to the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe.

  15. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E

    2003-06-02

    Partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) extends and complements the concepts of exact and dynamical symmetry. It allows one to remove undesired constraints from an algebraic theory, while preserving some of the useful aspects of a dynamical symmetry, and to study the effects of symmetry breaking in a controlled manner. An example of a PDS in an interacting fermion system is presented. The associated PDS Hamiltonians are closely related with a realistic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction and provide new insights into this important interaction.

  16. Symmetry Engineering of Graphene Plasmonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kitty Y M; Chee, Jingyee; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Ham, Donhee

    2015-08-12

    The dispersion relation of plasmons in graphene with a periodic lattice of apertures takes a band structure. Light incident on this plasmonic crystal excites only particular plasmonic modes in select bands. The selection rule is not only frequency/wavevector matching but also symmetry matching, where the symmetry of plasmonic modes originates from the point group symmetry of the lattice. We demonstrate versatile manipulation of light-plasmon coupling behaviors by engineering the symmetry of the graphene plasmonic crystal.

  17. Black holes and Abelian symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-09-01

    Black hole configurations offer insights on the nonlinear aspects of gravitational theories, and can suggest testable predictions for modifications of General Relativity. In this work, we examine exact black hole configurations in vector–tensor theories, originally proposed to explain dark energy by breaking the Abelian symmetry with a non-minimal coupling of the vector to gravity. We are able to evade the no-go theorems by Bekenstein on the existence of regular black holes in vector–tensor theories with Proca mass terms, and exhibit regular black hole solutions with a profile for the longitudinal vector polarisation, characterised by an additional charge. We analytically find the most general static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions with and without a cosmological constant, and study in some detail their features, such as how the geometry depends on the vector charges. We also include angular momentum, and find solutions describing slowly-rotating black holes. Finally, we extend some of these solutions to higher dimensions.

  18. Black holes and Abelian symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-09-01

    Black hole configurations offer insights on the nonlinear aspects of gravitational theories, and can suggest testable predictions for modifications of General Relativity. In this work, we examine exact black hole configurations in vector-tensor theories, originally proposed to explain dark energy by breaking the Abelian symmetry with a non-minimal coupling of the vector to gravity. We are able to evade the no-go theorems by Bekenstein on the existence of regular black holes in vector-tensor theories with Proca mass terms, and exhibit regular black hole solutions with a profile for the longitudinal vector polarisation, characterised by an additional charge. We analytically find the most general static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions with and without a cosmological constant, and study in some detail their features, such as how the geometry depends on the vector charges. We also include angular momentum, and find solutions describing slowly-rotating black holes. Finally, we extend some of these solutions to higher dimensions.

  19. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015).

  20. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015). PMID:27074485

  1. Emergence of a new S U (4 ) symmetry in the baryon spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denissenya, M.; Glozman, L. Ya.; Pak, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a large degeneracy of J =1 mesons—that is, larger than the S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )A symmetry of the QCD Lagrangian—has been discovered upon truncation of the near-zero modes from the valence quark propagators. It has been found that this degeneracy represents the S U (4 ) group that includes the chiral rotations as well as the mixing of left- and right-handed quarks. This symmetry group turns out to be a symmetry of confinement in QCD. Consequently, one expects that the same symmetry should persist upon the near-zero mode removal in other hadron sectors as well. It has been shown that indeed the J =2 mesons follow the same symmetry pattern upon the low-lying mode elimination. Here we demonstrate the S U (4 ) symmetry of baryons once the near-zero modes are removed from the quark propagators. We also show a degeneracy of states belonging to different irreducible representations of S U (4 ). This implies a larger symmetry that includes S U (4 ) as a subgroup.

  2. Noether symmetries and duality transformations in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the relation between Noether (point) symmetries and discrete symmetries for a class of minisuperspace cosmological models. We show that when a Noether symmetry exists for the gravitational Lagrangian, then there exists a coordinate system in which a reversal symmetry exists. Moreover, as far as concerns, the scale-factor duality symmetry of the dilaton field, we show that it is related to the existence of a Noether symmetry for the field equations, and the reversal symmetry in the normal coordinates of the symmetry vector becomes scale-factor duality symmetry in the original coordinates. In particular, the same point symmetry as also the same reversal symmetry exists for the Brans-Dicke scalar field with linear potential while now the discrete symmetry in the original coordinates of the system depends on the Brans-Dicke parameter and it is a scale-factor duality when ωBD = 1. Furthermore, in the context of the O’Hanlon theory for f(R)-gravity, it is possible to show how a duality transformation in the minisuperspace can be used to relate different gravitational models.

  3. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson–Nambu–Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  4. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson-Nambu-Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  5. New charge for BMS symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Aruna; Ashtekar, Abhay

    2016-03-01

    Conservation laws of asymptotic symmetries are essential to quantify the amount of energy-momentum and angular momentum carried away by gravitational radiation from isolated systems. The asymptotic symmetry group of asymptotically flat spacetimes at null infinity is the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group. While the flux associated to an arbitrary BMS vector field was provided by Ashtekar and Streubel (1981) using symplectic methods, the tensorial expression of a corresponding two-dimensional charge integral linear in an arbitrary BMS vector field has not been available in the literature. We fill this gap by providing such a charge. I will discuss its properties and relation to Geroch's supermomentum and the charge of Dray and Streubel (1984).

  6. Facial symmetry in robust anthropometrics.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Image analysis methods commonly used in forensic anthropology do not have desirable robustness properties, which can be ensured by robust statistical methods. In this paper, the face localization in images is carried out by detecting symmetric areas in the images. Symmetry is measured between two neighboring rectangular areas in the images using a new robust correlation coefficient, which down-weights regions in the face violating the symmetry. Raw images of faces without usual preliminary transformations are considered. The robust correlation coefficient based on the least weighted squares regression yields very promising results also in the localization of such faces, which are not entirely symmetric. Standard methods of statistical machine learning are applied for comparison. The robust correlation analysis can be applicable to other problems of forensic anthropology.

  7. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function.

  8. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  9. Tensionless strings from worldsheet symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Chakrabortty, Shankhadeep; Parekh, Pulastya

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the construction of the tensionless limit of closed bosonic string theory in the covariant formulation in the light of Galilean conformal symmetry that rises as the residual gauge symmetry on the tensionless worldsheet. We relate the analysis of the fundamentally tensionless theory to the tensionless limit that is viewed as a contraction of worldsheet coordinates. Analysis of the quantum regime uncovers interesting physics. The degrees of freedom that appear in the tensionless string are fundamentally different from the usual string states. Through a Bogoliubov transformation on the worldsheet, we link the tensionless vacuum to the usual tensile vacuum. As an application, we show that our analysis can be used to understand physics of strings at very high temperatures and propose that these new degrees of freedom are naturally connected with the long-string picture of the Hagedorn phase of free string theory. We also show that tensionless closed strings behave like open strings.

  10. Symmetry breaking around a wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. L.

    1996-11-01

    We have modified the extended version Coule and Maeda's version (D. H. Coule and Kei-ichi Maeda, Class.Quant.Grav.7,995(1990)) of the Gidding-Strominger model (S. B. Giddings and A. Strominger, Nucl.Phys. B307, 854(l988)) of the euclidean gravitational field interacting with axion. The new model has R-symmetry in contrast to the previous model. At the lowest perturbation case the model retains a wormhole solution. We assume that the scalar expands adiabatically and satisfies ideal gas law in a crude first approximation. Under the Higg's mechanism the symmetry can be broken at the tree approximation. This mechanism, we hope, can be used to introduce the degeneracy of quark masses.

  11. Lepton mixing and discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, D.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2012-09-01

    The pattern of lepton mixing can emerge from breaking a flavor symmetry in different ways in the neutrino and charged lepton Yukawa sectors. In this framework, we derive the model-independent conditions imposed on the mixing matrix by the structure of discrete groups of the von Dyck type which include A4, S4, and A5. We show that, in general, these conditions lead to at least two equations for the mixing parameters (angles and CP phase δ). These constraints, which correspond to unbroken residual symmetries, are consistent with nonzero 13 mixing and deviations from maximal 2-3 mixing. For the simplest case, which leads to an S4 model and reproduces the allowed values of the mixing angles, we predict δ=(90°-120°).

  12. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  13. Quaternary association in beta-prism I2 fold plant lectins: insights from X-ray crystallography, modelling and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2011-12-01

    Dimeric banana lectin and calsepa, tetrameric artocarpin and octameric heltuba are mannose-specific beta-prism I fold lectins of nearly the same tertiary structure. MD simulations on individual subunits and the oligomers provide insights into the changes in the structure brought about in the protomers on oligomerization, including swapping of the N-terminal stretch in one instance. The regions that undergo changes also tend to exhibit dynamic flexibility during MD simulations. The internal symmetries of individual oligomers are substantially retained during the calculations. Energy minimization and simulations were also carried out on models using all possible oligomers by employing the four different protomers. The unique dimerization pattern observed in calsepa could be traced to unique substitutions in a peptide stretch involved in dimerization. The impossibility of a specific mode of oligomerization involving a particular protomer is often expressed in terms of unacceptable steric contacts or dissociation of the oligomer during simulations. The calculations also led to a rationale for the observation of a heltuba tetramer in solution although the lectin exists as an octamer in the crystal, in addition to providing insights into relations among evolution, oligomerization and ligand binding.

  14. Chiral symmetry and nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, B.R. . Dept. of Physics and Astromony Washington Univ., Seattle, WA . Inst. for Nuclear Theory)

    1992-01-01

    Recently it has been realized that significant tests of the validity of QCD are available in low energy experiments (E < 500 MeV) by exploiting the property of (broken) chiral symmetry. This technique has been highly developed in The Goldstone boson sector by the work of Gasser and Leutwyler. Application to the nucleon system is much more difficult and is now being carefully developed.

  15. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  16. Dark matter and global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  17. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  18. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  19. Enhanced Facial Symmetry Assessment in Orthodontists.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Tate H; Clark, Kait; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    Assessing facial symmetry is an evolutionarily important process, which suggests that individual differences in this ability should exist. As existing data are inconclusive, the current study explored whether a group trained in facial symmetry assessment, orthodontists, possessed enhanced abilities. Symmetry assessment was measured using face and non-face stimuli among orthodontic residents and two control groups: university participants with no symmetry training and airport security luggage screeners, a group previously shown to possess expert visual search skills unrelated to facial symmetry. Orthodontic residents were more accurate at assessing symmetry in both upright and inverted faces compared to both control groups, but not for non-face stimuli. These differences are not likely due to motivational biases or a speed-accuracy tradeoff-orthodontic residents were slower than the university participants but not the security screeners. Understanding such individual differences in facial symmetry assessment may inform the perception of facial attractiveness.

  20. Relativity symmetries and Lie algebra contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the notion of possible relativity or kinematic symmetries mutually connected through Lie algebra contractions under a new perspective on what constitutes a relativity symmetry. Contractions of an SO(m , n) symmetry as an isometry on an m + n dimensional geometric arena which generalizes the notion of spacetime are discussed systematically. One of the key results is five different contractions of a Galilean-type symmetry G(m , n) preserving a symmetry of the same type at dimension m + n - 1, e.g. a G(m , n - 1) , together with the coset space representations that correspond to the usual physical picture. Most of the results are explicitly illustrated through the example of symmetries obtained from the contraction of SO(2 , 4) , which is the particular case for our interest on the physics side as the proposed relativity symmetry for "quantum spacetime". The contractions from G(1 , 3) may be relevant to real physics.

  1. Enhanced Facial Symmetry Assessment in Orthodontists

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tate H.; Clark, Kait; Mitroff, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing facial symmetry is an evolutionarily important process, which suggests that individual differences in this ability should exist. As existing data are inconclusive, the current study explored whether a group trained in facial symmetry assessment, orthodontists, possessed enhanced abilities. Symmetry assessment was measured using face and non-face stimuli among orthodontic residents and two control groups: university participants with no symmetry training and airport security luggage screeners, a group previously shown to possess expert visual search skills unrelated to facial symmetry. Orthodontic residents were more accurate at assessing symmetry in both upright and inverted faces compared to both control groups, but not for non-face stimuli. These differences are not likely due to motivational biases or a speed-accuracy tradeoff—orthodontic residents were slower than the university participants but not the security screeners. Understanding such individual differences in facial symmetry assessment may inform the perception of facial attractiveness. PMID:24319342

  2. Geometry defects in bosonic symmetry-protected topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we focus on the interplay between geometry defects and topological properties in bosonic symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases. We start from eight copies of 3D time-reversal (T ) invariant topological superconductors (TSC) on a crystal lattice. We melt the lattice by condensation of disclinations and therefore restore the rotation symmetry. Such a disclination condensation procedure confines the fermion and afterwards turns the system into a 3D boson topological liquid crystal (TCL). The low energy effective theory of this crystalline-liquid transition contains a topological term inherited from the geometry axion response in TSC. In addition, we investigate the interplay between dislocation and superfluid vortex on the surface of TCL. We demonstrate that the T and translation invariant surface state is a double [e T m T ] state with intrinsic surface topological order. We also look into the exotic behavior of dislocation in the 2D boson SPT state described by an O (4 ) nonlinear σ model (NL σ M ) with topological Θ term. By dressing the O (4 ) vector with spiral order and gauging the symmetry, the dislocation has mutual semion statistics with the gauge flux. Further reducing the O (4 )NL σ M to the Ising limit, we arrive at the Levin-Gu model with stripy modulation whose dislocation has nontrivial braiding statistics.

  3. TESTING CPT SYMMETRY WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE CMB MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Li, Mingzhe

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector L{sub cs}∼p{sub μ}A{sub ν} F-tilde {sup μν}, which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle α-bar =−2.12±1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δα( n-hat )] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C {sup α}(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on α-bar and Δα( n-hat ). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  4. Stability and bifurcation diagram of Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the stability and bifurcation of Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell, with the inner sphere free to rotate as a solid body due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres and the Prandtl number are fixed to 0.4 and 1, respectively. The Taylor number is varied from 522 to 5002 and the Rayleigh number from 1500 to 10 000. In this parameter range, the finite-amplitude traveling wave solutions, which have four-fold symmetry in the azimuthal direction, bifurcate supercritically at the critical points. The inner sphere rotates in the prograde direction due to the viscous torque of the fluid when the rotation rate is small while it rotates in the retrograde direction when the rotation rate is large. However, the stable region of these traveling wave solutions is quantitatively similar to that in the co-rotating system where the inner and outer spheres rotate with the same angular velocity. The structures of convective motions of these solutions such as the radial component of velocity are quantitatively similar to those in the co-rotating system, but the structure of mean zonal flows is effectively changed by the inner sphere rotation.

  5. Curl force dynamics: symmetries, chaos and constants of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, Pragya

    2016-06-01

    This is a theoretical study of Newtonian trajectories governed by curl forces, i.e. position-dependent but not derivable from a potential, investigating in particular the possible existence of conserved quantities. Although nonconservative and nonhamiltonian, curl forces are not dissipative because volume in the position-velocity state space is preserved. A physical example is the effective forces exerted on small particles by light. When the force has rotational symmetry, for example when generated by an isolated optical vortex, particles spiral outwards and escape, even with an attractive gradient force, however strong. Without rotational symmetry, and for dynamics in the plane, the state space is four-dimensional, and to search for possible constants of motion we introduce the Volume of section: a numerical procedure, in which orbits are plotted as dots in a three-dimensional subspace. For some curl forces, e.g. optical fields with two opposite-strength vortices, the dots lie on a surface, indicating a hidden constant of motion. For other curl forces, e.g. those from four vortices, the dots explore clouds, in an unfamiliar kind of chaos, suggesting that no constant of motion exists. The curl force dynamics generated by optical vortices could be studied experimentally.

  6. Curl force dynamics: symmetries, chaos and constants of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, Pragya

    2016-06-01

    This is a theoretical study of Newtonian trajectories governed by curl forces, i.e. position-dependent but not derivable from a potential, investigating in particular the possible existence of conserved quantities. Although nonconservative and nonhamiltonian, curl forces are not dissipative because volume in the position–velocity state space is preserved. A physical example is the effective forces exerted on small particles by light. When the force has rotational symmetry, for example when generated by an isolated optical vortex, particles spiral outwards and escape, even with an attractive gradient force, however strong. Without rotational symmetry, and for dynamics in the plane, the state space is four-dimensional, and to search for possible constants of motion we introduce the Volume of section: a numerical procedure, in which orbits are plotted as dots in a three-dimensional subspace. For some curl forces, e.g. optical fields with two opposite-strength vortices, the dots lie on a surface, indicating a hidden constant of motion. For other curl forces, e.g. those from four vortices, the dots explore clouds, in an unfamiliar kind of chaos, suggesting that no constant of motion exists. The curl force dynamics generated by optical vortices could be studied experimentally.

  7. Algorithms for computer detection of symmetry elements in molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Beruski, Otávio; Vidal, Luciano N

    2014-02-01

    Simple procedures for the location of proper and improper rotations and reflexion planes are presented. The search is performed with a molecule divided into subsets of symmetrically equivalent atoms (SEA) which are analyzed separately as if they were a single molecule. This approach is advantageous in many aspects. For instance, in those molecules that are symmetric rotors, the number of atoms and the inertia tensor of the SEA provide one straight way to find proper rotations of any order. The algorithms are invariant to the molecular orientation and their computational cost is low, because the main information required to find symmetry elements is interatomic distances and the principal moments of the SEA. For example, our Fortran implementation, running on a single processor, took only a few seconds to locate all 120 symmetry operations of the large and highly symmetrical fullerene C720, belonging to the Ih point group. Finally, we show how the interatomic distances matrix of a slightly unsymmetrical molecule is used to symmetrize its geometry. PMID:24403016

  8. Coexistence of chiral symmetry restoration and random orientation of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, B.; Paudel, S.; Saurer, W.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the chiral symmetry restoration and the spatial orientation of 2288 spiral and spiral barred galaxies that have radial velocities (RV) less than 5000 km s-1. A random direction of the rotation of galaxies is assumed in order to classify the structural modes. The distribution of spin vector and spin vector projections of leading and trailing arm galaxies in the total sample and subsamples are studied. We use chi-square, auto-correlation and Fourier tests in order to discriminate the preferred alignments from the random alignments. A good correlation between the random alignment and the chiral symmetry is noticed in the Local Supercluster (RV < 3000 km s-1) and in galaxies nearby the Local Supercluster (3000 < RV (km s-1) ≤ 5000). Spiral galaxies show a similar result. The barred spirals show an opposite trend to that observed for the spirals. Nearby the Local Supercluster, we noticed a preferred spatial alignment and non-chiral property in the leading and trailing arm spiral barred galaxies. Our result predicts that the progressive loss of chirality might have some connection with the rotationally supported (spirals, barred spirals) and randomized (lenticulars, ellipticals) systems. Thus, we suspect that the dynamical processes in the cluster evolution give rise to a dynamical loss of chirality.

  9. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon–Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  10. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, M.; Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon-Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  11. Symmetry Breaking in the Hidden-Order Phase of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibauchi, Takasada

    2013-03-01

    In the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2, the hidden-order transition occurs at 17.5 K, whose nature has posed a long-standing mystery. A second-order phase transition is characterized by spontaneous symmetry breaking, and thus the nature of the hidden order cannot be determined without understanding which symmetry is being broken. Our magnetic torque measurements in small pure crystals reveal the emergence of an in-plane anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility below the transition temperature, indicating the spontaneous breaking of four-fold rotational symmetry of the tetragonal URu2Si2. In addition, our recent observation of cyclotron resonance allows the full determination of the electron-mass structure of the main Fermi-surface sheets, which implies an anomalous in-plane mass anisotropy consistent with the rotational symmetry breaking. These results impose strong constraints on the symmetry of the hidden order parameter. This work has been done in collaboration with R. Okazaki, S. Tonegawa, K. Hashimoto, K. Ikada, Y. H. Lin, H. Shishido, H. J. Shi, Y. Haga, T. D. Matsuda, E. Yamamoto, Y. Onuki, H. Ikeda, and Y. Matsuda.

  12. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder ... Rotator cuff tendinitis refers to irritation of these tendons and inflammation of the bursa (a normally smooth ...

  14. Acoustic Faraday rotation in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Donghao; Shi, Junren

    We investigate the phonon problems in Weyl semimetals, from which both the phonon Berry curvature and the phonon Damping could be obtained. We show that even without a magnetic field, the degenerate transverse acoustic modes could also be split due to the adiabatic curvature. In three dimensional case, acoustic Faraday rotation shows up. And furthermore, since the attenuation procedure could distinguish the polarized mode, single circularly polarized acoustic wave could be realized. We study the mechanism in the novel time reversal symmetry broken Weyl semimetal. New effects rise because of the linear dispersion, which give enlightenment in the measurement of this new kind of three-dimensional material.

  15. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  16. Symmetry breaking in neural nets.

    PubMed

    Pessa, E

    1988-01-01

    In this paper two well-known homogeneous models of neural nets undergoing symmetry-breaking transitions are studied in order to see if, after the transition, there is the appearance of Goldstone modes. These have been found only in an approximate way; there are indications, however, that they can play a prominent role when the tissue is subjected to external inputs, constraining it to be slaved to the characteristics of those. This circumstance should be essential in explaining how a structured net can store complex inputs and give subsequently ordered outputs.

  17. Hidden symmetries in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Peter K.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2016-07-01

    There are deep, but hidden, geometric structures within jammed systems, associated with hidden symmetries. These can be revealed by repeated transformations under which these structures lead to fixed points. These geometric structures can be found in the Voronoi tesselation of space defined by the packing. In this paper we examine two iterative processes: maximum inscribed sphere (MIS) inversion and a real-space coarsening scheme. Under repeated iterations of the MIS inversion process we find invariant systems in which every particle is equal to the maximum inscribed sphere within its Voronoi cell. Using a real-space coarsening scheme we reveal behavior in geometric order parameters which is length-scale invariant.

  18. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  19. Spontaneous rotation in a driven mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a mass free to circulate around a shaken pivot point exhibits resonance-like effects and large amplitude dynamics even though there is no natural frequency in the system, simply through driving under geometrical constraint. We find that synchronization between force and mass occurs over a wide range of forcing amplitudes and frequencies, even when the forcing axis is dynamically, and randomly, changed. Above a critical driving amplitude the mass will spontaneously rotate, with a fractal boundary dividing clockwise and anti-clockwise rotations. We show that this has significant implications for energy harvesting, with large output power over a wide frequency range. We examine also the effect of driving symmetry on the resultant dynamics, and show that if the shaking is circular the motion becomes constrained, whereas for anharmonic rectilinear shaking the dynamics may become chaotic, with the system mimicking that of the kicked rotor.

  20. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  1. Symmetry and Symmetry Breaking in Planetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Russell, C. T.; Aurnou, J. M.; Soderlund, K. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Six out of eight solar system planets currently possess global-scale intrinsic magnetic fields. Different symmetry and symmetry breaking with respect to the spin-axis and the equatorial plane of the host planet can be found for different planetary magnetic fields. With respect to the spin-axis, the magnetic fields of Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn are dominated by the axisymmetric part while the magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune show no such alignment. Moreover, non-axisymmetric components have not been determined unambiguously for the magnetic fields of Mercury and Saturn. With respect to the equatorial plane, the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn show small but non-negligible asymmetry while the magnetic field of Mercury shows a significant asymmetry. The magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune likely possess similar strength in the two hemispheres divided by the equatorial plane, but this needs to be confirmed with future measurements. Here we present our interpretation of the magnetic fields of Mercury and Saturn, both of which are often referred to as anomalous dipolar dynamos. For Mercury, we will show that volumetrically distributed buoyancy sources in its liquid iron core can naturally lead to equatorial symmetry breaking in the dynamo generated magnetic field as observed by MESSENGER. We will also show that the size of the solid inner core inside Mercury is likely smaller than 1000 km and could be detected indirectly with high-spatial-resolution magnetic field measurements near Mercury's north pole. In addition, we will show that degree-2 longitudinal variations observed in the magnetic equator positions of Mercury could have an internal origin. For Saturn's magnetic field, although its extreme axisymmetry could in principle be explained by a stably-stratified electrically-conducting layer on top of the dynamo region, more features such as equator-to-pole field contrasts cannot be explained by this same mechanism simultaneously. Towards

  2. Periodic orbit analysis of a system with continuous symmetry--A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Budanur, Nazmi Burak; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel; Cvitanović, Predrag

    2015-07-01

    Dynamical systems with translational or rotational symmetry arise frequently in studies of spatially extended physical systems, such as Navier-Stokes flows on periodic domains. In these cases, it is natural to express the state of the fluid in terms of a Fourier series truncated to a finite number of modes. Here, we study a 4-dimensional model with chaotic dynamics and SO(2) symmetry similar to those that appear in fluid dynamics problems. A crucial step in the analysis of such a system is symmetry reduction. We use the model to illustrate different symmetry-reduction techniques. The system's relative equilibria are conveniently determined by rewriting the dynamics in terms of a symmetry-invariant polynomial basis. However, for the analysis of its chaotic dynamics, the "method of slices," which is applicable to very high-dimensional problems, is preferable. We show that a Poincaré section taken on the "slice" can be used to further reduce this flow to what is for all practical purposes a unimodal map. This enables us to systematically determine all relative periodic orbits and their symbolic dynamics up to any desired period. We then present cycle averaging formulas adequate for systems with continuous symmetry and use them to compute dynamical averages using relative periodic orbits. The convergence of such computations is discussed.

  3. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  4. Local discrete symmetries from superstring derived models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.

    1997-02-01

    Discrete and global symmetries play an essential role in many extensions of the Standard Model, for example, to preserve the proton lifetime, to prevent flavor changing neutral currents, etc. An important question is how can such symmetries survive in a theory of quantum gravity, like superstring theory. In a specific string model I illustrate how local discrete symmetries may arise in string models and play an important role in preventing fast proton decay and flavor changing neutral currents. The local discrete symmetry arises due to the breaking of the non-Abelian gauge symmetries by Wilson lines in the superstring models and forbids, for example dimension five operators which mediate rapid proton decay, to all orders of nonrenormalizable terms. In the context of models of unification of the gauge and gravitational interactions, it is precisely this type of local discrete symmetries that must be found in order to insure that a given model is not in conflict with experimental observations.

  5. Symmetry energy of dilute warm nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Natowitz, J B; Röpke, G; Typel, S; Blaschke, D; Bonasera, A; Hagel, K; Klähn, T; Kowalski, S; Qin, L; Shlomo, S; Wada, R; Wolter, H H

    2010-05-21

    The symmetry energy of nuclear matter is a fundamental ingredient in the investigation of exotic nuclei, heavy-ion collisions, and astrophysical phenomena. New data from heavy-ion collisions can be used to extract the free symmetry energy and the internal symmetry energy at subsaturation densities and temperatures below 10 MeV. Conventional theoretical calculations of the symmetry energy based on mean-field approaches fail to give the correct low-temperature, low-density limit that is governed by correlations, in particular, by the appearance of bound states. A recently developed quantum-statistical approach that takes the formation of clusters into account predicts symmetry energies that are in very good agreement with the experimental data. A consistent description of the symmetry energy is given that joins the correct low-density limit with quasiparticle approaches valid near the saturation density.

  6. Quantum Deformations of Einstein's Relativistic Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lukierski, Jerzy

    2006-11-03

    We shall outline two ways of introducing the modification of Einstein's relativistic symmetries of special relativity theory -- the Poincare symmetries. The most complete way of introducing the modifications is via the noncocommutative Hopf-algebraic structure describing quantum symmetries. Two types of quantum relativistic symmetries are described, one with constant commutator of quantum Minkowski space coordinates ({theta}{mu}{nu}-deformation) and second with Lie-algebraic structure of quantum space-time, introducing so-called {kappa}-deformation. The third fundamental constant of Nature - fundamental mass {kappa} or length {lambda} - appears naturally in proposed quantum relativistic symmetry scheme. The deformed Minkowski space is described as the representation space (Hopf-module) of deformed Poincare algebra. Some possible perspectives of quantum-deformed relativistic symmetries will be outlined.

  7. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  8. Symmetry-protected single-photon subradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Han; Wang, Da-Wei; Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    We study the protection of subradiant states by the symmetry of the atomic distributions in the Dicke limit, in which collective Lamb shifts cannot be neglected. We find that antisymmetric states are subradiant states for distributions with reflection symmetry. Continuous symmetry can also be used to achieve subradiance. This study is relevant to the problem of robust quantum memory with long storage time and fast readout.

  9. Symmetry relations of magnetic twin laws.

    PubMed

    Schlessman, J; Litvin, D B

    2001-11-01

    Symmetry relationships between two simultaneously observed domain states (domain pair) are used to determine physical properties that can distinguish between the observed domains. Here the tabulation of these symmetry relationships is extended from non-magnetic cases to magnetic cases, in terms of magnetic point groups, i.e. all possible magnetic symmetry groups and magnetic twinning groups of domain pairs are determined and tabulated. PMID:11679705

  10. The near-symmetry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Bonjack-Shterengartz, Maayan; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    The majority of protein oligomers form clusters which are nearly symmetric. Understanding of that imperfection, its origins, and perhaps also its advantages requires the conversion of the currently used vague qualitative descriptive language of the near-symmetry into an accurate quantitative measure that will allow to answer questions such as: "What is the degree of symmetry deviation of the protein?," "how do these deviations compare within a family of proteins?," and so on. We developed quantitative methods to answer this type of questions, which are capable of analyzing the whole protein, its backbone or selected portions of it, down to comparison of symmetry-related specific amino-acids, and which are capable of visualizing the various levels of symmetry deviations in the form of symmetry maps. We have applied these methods on an extensive list of homomers and heteromers and found that apparently all proteins never reach perfect symmetry. Strikingly, even homomeric protein clusters are never ideally symmetric. We also found that the main burden of symmetry distortion is on the amino-acids near the symmetry axis; that it is mainly the more hydrophilic amino-acids that take place in symmetry-distortive interactions; and more. The remarkable ability of heteromers to preserve near-symmetry, despite the different sequences, was also shown and analyzed. The comprehensive literature on the suggested advantages symmetric oligomerizations raises a yet-unsolved key question: If symmetry is so advantageous, why do proteins stop shy of perfect symmetry? Some tentative answers to be tested in further studies are suggested in a concluding outlook.

  11. Issues in standard model symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, M.

    1988-04-01

    This work discusses the symmetry breaking sector of the SU(2) x U(1) electroweak model. The first two chapters discuss Higgs masses in two simple Higgs models. The author proves low-enery theorems for the symmetry breaking sector: The threshold behavior of gauge-boson scattering is completely determined, whenever the symmetry breaking sector meets certain simple conditions. The author uses these theorems to derive event rates for the superconducting super collider (SSC). The author shows that the SSC may be able to determine whether the interactions of the symmetry breaking sector are strong or weak. 54 refs.

  12. Noether gauge symmetry approach in quintom cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Adnan; Jamil, Mubasher; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad; Raza, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    In literature usual point like symmetries of the Lagrangian have been introduced to study the symmetries and the structure of the fields. This kind of Noether symmetry is a subclass of a more general family of symmetries, called Noether gauge symmetries (NGS). Motivated by this mathematical tool, in this paper, we study the generalized Noether symmetry of quintom model of dark energy, which is a two component fluid model with quintessence and phantom scalar fields. Our model is a generalization of the Noether symmetries of a single and multiple components which have been investigated in detail before. We found the general form of the quintom potential in which the whole dynamical system has a point like symmetry. We investigated different possible solutions of the system for diverse family of gauge function. Specially, we discovered two family of potentials, one corresponds to a free quintessence (phantom) and the second is in the form of quadratic interaction between two components. These two families of potential functions are proposed from the symmetry point of view, but in the quintom models they are used as phenomenological models without clear mathematical justification. From integrability point of view, we found two forms of the scale factor: one is power law and second is de-Sitter. Some cosmological implications of the solutions have been investigated.

  13. Functional ferroic heterostructures with tunable integral symmetry.

    PubMed

    Becher, C; Trassin, M; Lilienblum, M; Nelson, C T; Suresha, S J; Yi, D; Yu, P; Ramesh, R; Fiebig, M; Meier, D

    2014-07-02

    The relation between symmetry and functionality was pinpointed by Pierre Curie who stated that it is the symmetry breaking that creates physical properties. This fundamental principle is nowadays used for engineering heterostructures whose integral symmetry leads to exotic phenomena such as one-way transparency. For switching devices, however, such symmetry-related functionalities cannot be used because the symmetry in conventional heterostructures is immutable once the material has been synthesized. Here we demonstrate a concept for post-growth symmetry control in PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 and BiFeO3-based heterostructures. A conducting oxide is sandwiched between two ferroelectric layers, and inversion symmetry is reversibly switched on or off by layer-selective electric-field poling. The generalization of our approach to other materials and symmetries is discussed. We thus establish ferroic trilayer structures as device components with reversibly tunable symmetry and demonstrate their use as light emitters that can be activated and deactivated by applying moderate electric voltages.

  14. Asymptotic symmetries of Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Asymptotic symmetries at future null infinity ( +) of Minkowski space for electrodynamics with massless charged fields, as well as nonabelian gauge theories with gauge group G, are considered at the semiclassical level. The possibility of charge/color flux through + suggests the symmetry group is infinite-dimensional. It is conjectured that the symmetries include a G Kac-Moody symmetry whose generators are "large" gauge transformations which approach locally holomorphic functions on the conformal two-sphere at + and are invariant under null translations. The Kac-Moody currents are constructed from the gauge field at the future boundary of +. The current Ward identities include Weinberg's soft photon theorem and its colored extension.

  15. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  16. A K3 sigma model with : symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Taormina, Anne; Volpato, Roberto; Wendland, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    The K3 sigma model based on the -orbifold of the D 4-torus theory is studied. It is shown that it has an equivalent description in terms of twelve free Majorana fermions, or as a rational conformal field theory based on the affine algebra . By combining these different viewpoints we show that the = (4 , 4) preserving symmetries of this theory are described by the discrete symmetry group : . This model therefore accounts for one of the largest maximal symmetry groups of K3 sigma models. The symmetry group involves also generators that, from the orbifold point of view, map untwisted and twisted sector states into one another.

  17. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Logo Bregenz, the peaceful monastery of Mehrerau and the Opera on the Floating Stage again provided the setting for the international symposium 'Symmetries in Science'. The series which has been running for more than 30 years brings together leading theoreticians whose area of research is, in one way or another, related to symmetry. Since 1992 the meeting took place biannually in Brengez until 2003. In 2009, with the endorsement of the founder, Professor Bruno Gruber, we succeeded in re-establishing the series without external funding. The resounding success of that meeting encouraged us to continue in 2011 and, following on the enthusiasm and positive feedback of the participants, we expect to continue in 2013. Yet again, our meeting in 2011 was very international in flavour and brought together some 30 participants representing 12 nationalities, half of them from countries outside the European Union (from New Zealand to Mexico, Russia to Israel). The broad spectrum, a mixture of experienced experts and highly-motivated newcomers, the intensive exchange of ideas in a harmonious and relaxed atmosphere and the resulting joint projects are probably the secrets of why this meeting is considered to be so special to its participants. At the resumption in 2009 some leading experts and younger scientists from economically weak countries were unable to attend due to the lack of financial resources. This time, with the very worthy and unbureaucratic support of the 'Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der J W Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main' (in short: 'Friends and Supporters of the Frankfurt University'), it was possible for all candidates to participate. In particular some young, inspired scientists had the chance of presenting their work to a very competent, but also friendly, audience. We wish to thank the 'Freunde und Förderer' for supporting Symmetries in Science XV. Almost all participants contributed to the publication of this Conference Proceedings. There

  18. The rotational spectrum of diethyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2011-07-11

    We report on the rotational spectrum of diethyl ketone, C(2)H(5)-C(=O)-C(2)H(5), as observed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy under pulsed molecular beam conditions. Almost all lines were split into narrow quartets in a range from 10 kHz up to 2 MHz, arising from the hindered rotation of the two equivalent terminal methyl groups. In a global analysis using the xiam code, which is based on the rho axis method, three rotational constants, five quartic centrifugal distortion constants, the torsional barrier of the terminal methyl groups, and the angles between the principal inertial axes and the internal rotor axes were determined. The methyl torsional barrier was found to be 771.93(27) cm(-1). In total, 199 lines were fitted to a standard deviation of 3.5 kHz. The experimental work was supplemented by quantum chemical calculations. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces describing the rotation of both ethyl groups against the C=O frame were calculated with the MP2 method as well as the DFT method using the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and the B3LYP functional, respectively. Combining the experimental and theoretical results, an effective structure with C(2v) symmetry was deduced for the diethyl ketone molecule. Moreover, the torsional barrier of the methyl groups was determined by ab initio methods.

  19. Rotationally resolved photoionization with coherent VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmann, R.T.; Tonkyn, R.G.; White, M.G.

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed field ionization (PFI) has been used in conjunction with coherent VUV radiation to investigate the rotational state distributions of molecular cations following single photon ionization. The rotational state distributions for several linear cations (O{sub 2}, NO, OH(OD), HCl and N{sub 2}0) can be interpreted predominately on the basis of the near-threshold, one-electron photoionization dynamics; however, field-induced autoionization is often the dominate ionization pathway for rotational branches involving negative changes in core angular momentum. For photoionization of the H{sub 2}X (X = 0, S) non-linear triatomic molecules, transitions between asymmetric top levels involving the rotational angular momentum projections, K{sub a} and K{sub c} permit resolution of the photoelectron continua according to symmetry. The observed spectra clearly demonstrate the importance of the non-spherical nature of the molecular ion potential which leads to photoelectron final states which are unexpected from atomic-like analogies.

  20. Rotationally resolved photoionization with coherent VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmann, R.T.; Tonkyn, R.G.; White, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed field ionization (PFI) has been used in conjunction with coherent VUV radiation to investigate the rotational state distributions of molecular cations following single photon ionization. The rotational state distributions for several linear cations (O{sub 2}, NO, OH(OD), HCl and N{sub 2}0) can be interpreted predominately on the basis of the near-threshold, one-electron photoionization dynamics; however, field-induced autoionization is often the dominate ionization pathway for rotational branches involving negative changes in core angular momentum. For photoionization of the H{sub 2}X (X = 0, S) non-linear triatomic molecules, transitions between asymmetric top levels involving the rotational angular momentum projections, K{sub a} and K{sub c} permit resolution of the photoelectron continua according to symmetry. The observed spectra clearly demonstrate the importance of the non-spherical nature of the molecular ion potential which leads to photoelectron final states which are unexpected from atomic-like analogies.

  1. Wormhole dynamics in spherical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2009-06-15

    A dynamical theory of traversable wormholes is detailed in spherical symmetry. Generically a wormhole consists of a tunnel of trapped surfaces between two mouths, defined as temporal outer trapping horizons with opposite senses, in mutual causal contact. In static cases, the mouths coincide as the throat of a Morris-Thorne wormhole, with surface gravity providing an invariant measure of the radial curvature or ''flaring-out''. The null energy condition must be violated at a wormhole mouth. Zeroth, first, and second laws are derived for the mouths, as for black holes. Dynamic processes involving wormholes are reviewed, including enlargement or reduction, and interconversion with black holes. A new area of wormhole thermodynamics is suggested.

  2. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20-26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long-standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster

  3. Rare Isotopes and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex; Engel, Jonathan; Haxton, Wick; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Romalis, Michael; Savard, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments searching for new interactions in nuclear beta decay / Klaus P. Jungmann -- The beta-neutrino correlation in sodium-21 and other nuclei / P. A. Vetter ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries/ B. Alex Brown -- Schiff moments and nuclear structure / J. Engel -- Superallowed nuclear beta decay: recent results and their impact on V[symbol] / J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner -- New calculation of the isospin-symmetry breaking correlation to superallowed Fermi beta decay / I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy -- Precise measurement of the [symbol]H to [symbol]He mass difference / D. E. Pinegar ... [et al.] -- Limits on scalar currents from the 0+ to 0+ decay of [symbol]Ar and isospin breaking in [symbol]Cl and [symbol]Cl / A. Garcia -- Nuclear constraints on the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction / W. C. Haxton -- Atomic PNC theory: current status and future prospects / M. S. Safronova -- Parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions: what can we learn from nuclear anapole moments? / B. Desplanques -- Proposed experiment for the measurement of the anapole moment in francium / A. Perez Galvan ... [et al.] -- The Radon-EDM experiment / Tim Chupp for the Radon-EDM collaboration -- The lead radius Eexperiment (PREX) and parity violating measurements of neutron densities / C. J. Horowitz -- Nuclear structure aspects of Schiff moment and search for collective enhancements / Naftali Auerbach and Vladimir Zelevinsky -- The interpretation of atomic electric dipole moments: Schiff theorem and its corrections / C. -P. Liu -- T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / M. D. Swallows ... [et al.] -- The new concept for FRIB and its potential for fundamental interactions studies / Guy Savard -- Collinear laser spectroscopy and polarized exotic nuclei at NSCL / K. Minamisono -- Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants / M. Pospelov.

  4. Neutrino properties and fundamental symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There are two components to this work. The first is a development of a new detection scheme for neutrinos. The observed deficit of neutrinos from the Sun may be due to either a lack of understanding of physical processes in the Sun or may be due to neutrinos oscillating from one type to another during their transit from the Sun to the Earth. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to use a water Cerenkov detector employing one thousand tonnes of heavy water to resolve this question. The ability to distinguish muon and tau neutrinos from electron neutrinos is crucial in order to carry out a model-independent test of neutrino oscillations. We describe a developmental exploration of a novel technique to do this using {sup 3}He proportional counters. Such a method offers considerable advantages over the initially proposed method of using Cerenkov light from capture on NaCl in the SNO. The second component of this work is an exploration of optimal detector geometry for a time-reversal invariance experiment. The question of why time moves only in the forward direction is one of the most puzzling problems in modern physics. We know from particle physics measurements of the decay of kaons that there is a charge-parity symmetry that is violated in nature, implying time-reversal invariance violation. Yet, we do not understand the origin of the violation of this symmetry. To promote such an understanding, we are developing concepts and prototype apparatus for a new, highly sensitive technique to search for time-reversal-invariance violation in the beta decay of the free neutron. The optimized detector geometry is seven times more sensitive than that in previous experiments. 15 refs.

  5. Flavor symmetries and fermion masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We introduce several ways in which approximate flavor symmetries act on fermions and which are consistent with observed fermion masses and mixings. Flavor changing interactions mediated by new scalars appear as a consequence of approximate flavor symmetries. We discuss the experimental limits on masses of the new scalars, and show that the masses can easily be of the order of weak scale. Some implications for neutrino physics are also discussed. Such flavor changing interactions would easily erase any primordial baryon asymmetry. We show that this situation can be saved by simply adding a new charged particle with its own asymmetry. The neutrality of the Universe, together with sphaleron processes, then ensures a survival of baryon asymmetry. Several topics on flavor structure of the supersymmetric grand unified theories are discussed. First, we show that the successful predictions for the Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix elements, V{sub ub}/V{sub cb} = {radical}m{sub u}/m{sub c} and V{sub td}/V{sub ts} = {radical}m{sub d}/m{sub s}, are a consequence of a large class of models, rather than specific properties of a few models. Second, we discuss how the recent observation of the decay {beta} {yields} s{gamma} constrains the parameter space when the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets, tan{Beta}, is large. Finally, we discuss the flavor structure of proton decay. We observe a surprising enhancement of the branching ratio for the muon mode in SO(10) models compared to the same mode in the SU(5) model.

  6. Nonlocalization of Nonlocal Symmetry and Symmetry Reductions of the Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Jia, Man; Lou, Sen-Yue

    2012-12-01

    Symmetry reduction method is one of the best ways to find exact solutions. In this paper, we study the possibility of symmetry reductions of the well known Burgers equation including the nonlocal symmetry. The related new group invariant solutions are obtained. Especially, the interactions among solitons, Airy waves, and Kummer waves are explicitly given.

  7. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  8. An Inquiry-Based Learning Approach to the Introduction of the Improper Rotation-Reflection Operation, S[subscript n

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Symmetry properties of molecules are generally introduced in second-year or third-year-level inorganic or physical chemistry courses. Students generally adapt readily to understanding and applying the operations of rotation (C[subscript n]), reflection (s), and inversion (i). However, the two-step operation of improper rotation-reflection…

  9. Nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic equations for rotating axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.

    1994-03-01

    The influence of sheared equilibrium flows on the confinement properties of tokamak plasmas is a topic of much current interest. A proper theoretical foundation for the systematic kinetic analysis of this important problem has been provided here by presented the derivation of a set of nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic equations applicable to low frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. The subsonic rotation velocity considered is in the direction of symmetry with the angular rotation frequency being a function of the equilibrium magnetic flux surface. In accordance with experimental observations, the rotation profile is chosen to scale with the ion temperature. The results obtained represent the shear flow generalization of the earlier analysis by Frieman and Chen where such flows were not taken into account. In order to make it readily applicable to gyrokinetic particle simulations, this set of equations is cast in a phase-space-conserving continuity equation form.

  10. Asteroid rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Harris, A. W.; Murray, C. D.

    1984-01-01

    A trend of increasing mean rotational frequency with increasing diameter is noted in asteroids with diameters greater than 120 km, irrespective of M-, S-, and C-type asteroid subset and family or nonfamily membership. This trend cannot be accounted for by observational selection. For asteroids with diameters smaller than 120 km mean rotational frequency increases with decreasing diameter, but within this group there is a subset with exceptionally long rotational periods. This marked change in the distribution at 120-km diameter could separate primordial asteroids from their collision products. It is also noted that, for asteroids of a given diameter, M asteroids rotate faster than S asteroids, which in turn rotate faster than C asteroids. For all types, family members rotate faster than nonfamily members.

  11. Symmetry is less than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Apthorp, Deborah; Bell, Jason

    2015-03-30

    Symmetry is a ubiquitous feature in the visual environment and can be detected by a variety of species, ranging from insects through to humans [1,2]. Here we show it can also bias estimates of basic scene properties. Mirror (reflective) symmetry can be detected in as little as 50 ms, in both natural and artificial visual scenes, and even when embedded within cluttered backgrounds [1]. In terms of its biological relevance, symmetry is a key determinant in mate selection; the degree of symmetry in a face is positively associated with perceived healthiness and attractiveness ratings [3]. In short, symmetry processing mechanisms are an important part of the neural machinery of vision. We reveal that the importance of symmetry extends beyond the processing of shape and objects. Mirror symmetry biases our perception of scene content, with symmetrical patterns appearing to have fewer components than their asymmetric counterparts. This demonstrates an interaction between two fundamental dimensions of visual analysis: symmetry [1] and number [4]. We propose that this numerical underestimation results from a processing bias away from the redundant information within mirror symmetrical displays, extending existing theories regarding redundancy in visual analysis [5,6]. PMID:25829006

  12. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D; Bassler, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  13. Symmetry is less than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Apthorp, Deborah; Bell, Jason

    2015-03-30

    Symmetry is a ubiquitous feature in the visual environment and can be detected by a variety of species, ranging from insects through to humans [1,2]. Here we show it can also bias estimates of basic scene properties. Mirror (reflective) symmetry can be detected in as little as 50 ms, in both natural and artificial visual scenes, and even when embedded within cluttered backgrounds [1]. In terms of its biological relevance, symmetry is a key determinant in mate selection; the degree of symmetry in a face is positively associated with perceived healthiness and attractiveness ratings [3]. In short, symmetry processing mechanisms are an important part of the neural machinery of vision. We reveal that the importance of symmetry extends beyond the processing of shape and objects. Mirror symmetry biases our perception of scene content, with symmetrical patterns appearing to have fewer components than their asymmetric counterparts. This demonstrates an interaction between two fundamental dimensions of visual analysis: symmetry [1] and number [4]. We propose that this numerical underestimation results from a processing bias away from the redundant information within mirror symmetrical displays, extending existing theories regarding redundancy in visual analysis [5,6].

  14. Order in the Universe: The Symmetry Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Integrative Education, Inc., New York, NY.

    The first two papers in this booklet provide a review of the pervasiveness of symmetry in nature and art, discussing how symmetry can be traced through every domain open to our understanding, from all aspects of nature to the special provinces of man; the checks and balances of government, the concept of equal justice, and the aesthetic ordering…

  15. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  16. Hidden flavor symmetries of SO(10) GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The Yukawa interactions of the SO(10) GUT with fermions in 16-plets (as well as with singlets) have certain intrinsic ("built-in") symmetries which do not depend on the model parameters. Thus, the symmetric Yukawa interactions of the 10 and 126 dimensional Higgses have intrinsic discrete Z2 ×Z2 symmetries, while the antisymmetric Yukawa interactions of the 120 dimensional Higgs have a continuous SU(2) symmetry. The couplings of SO(10) singlet fermions with fermionic 16-plets have U(1) 3 symmetry. We consider a possibility that some elements of these intrinsic symmetries are the residual symmetries, which originate from the (spontaneous) breaking of a larger symmetry group Gf. Such an embedding leads to the determination of certain elements of the relative mixing matrix U between the matrices of Yukawa couplings Y10, Y126, Y120, and consequently, to restrictions of masses and mixings of quarks and leptons. We explore the consequences of such embedding using the symmetry group conditions. We show how unitarity emerges from group properties and obtain the conditions it imposes on the parameters of embedding. We find that in some cases the predicted values of elements of U are compatible with the existing data fits. In the supersymmetric version of SO(10) such results are renormalization group invariant.

  17. Teaching symmetry in the introductory physics curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C. T.; Lederman, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Modern physics is largely defined by fundamental symmetry principles and Noether's Theorem. Yet these are not taught, or rarely mentioned, to beginning students, thus missing an opportunity to reveal that the subject of physics is as lively and contemporary as molecular biology, and as beautiful as the arts. We prescribe a symmetry module to insert into the curriculum, of a week's length.

  18. Cubic Icosahedra? A Problem in Assigning Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a standard convention that the icosahedral groups are classified separately from the cubic groups, but these two symmetry types have been conflated as "cubic" in some chemistry textbooks. In this note, the connection between cubic and icosahedral symmetries is examined, using a simple pictorial model. It is shown that octahedral and…

  19. Complementarity and Symmetry in Family Therapy Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heatherington, Laurie; Friedlander, Myrna L.

    1990-01-01

    Examined relational control communication patterns in systemic family therapy sessions. Results from 29 families showed significantly more complementarity than symmetry. Neither complementarity nor symmetry was predictive of family members' perceptions of the therapeutic alliance as measured by Couple and Family Therapy Alliance Scales. (Author/NB)

  20. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  1. S4 flavored CP symmetry for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, R. N.; Nishi, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    A generalized CP symmetry for leptons is presented where CP transformations are part of an S4 symmetry that connects different families. We study its implications for lepton mixings in a gauge model realization of the idea using a type II seesaw for neutrino masses. The model predicts maximal atmospheric mixing, nonzero θ13 and maximal Dirac phase δD=±(π)/(2).

  2. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  3. Neoclassical electron and ion transport in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1997-06-01

    Neoclassical transport processes of electrons and ions are investigated in detail for toroidally rotating axisymmetric plasmas with large flow velocities on the order of the ion thermal speed. The Onsager relations for the flow-dependent neoclassical transport coefficients are derived from the symmetry properties of the drift kinetic equation with the self-adjoint collision operator. The complete neoclassical transport matrix with the Onsager symmetry is obtained for the rotating plasma consisting of electrons and single-species ions in the Pfirsch{endash}Schl{umlt u}ter and banana regimes. It is found that the inward banana fluxes of particles and toroidal momentum are driven by the parallel electric field, which are phenomena coupled through the Onsager symmetric off-diagonal coefficients to the parallel currents caused by the radial thermodynamic forces conjugate to the inward fluxes, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallo­graphic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate. PMID:19690368

  5. Tests of gravitational symmetries with radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, LiJing; Wex, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  6. Ermakov's Superintegrable Toy and Nonlocal Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, P. G. L.; Karasu Kalkanli, A.; Nucci, M. C.; Andriopoulos, K.

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the symmetry properties of a pair of Ermakov equations. The system is superintegrable and yet possesses only three Lie point symmetries with the algebra sl(2, R). The number of point symmetries is insufficient and the algebra unsuitable for the complete specification of the system. We use the method of reduction of order to reduce the nonlinear fourth-order system to a third-order system comprising a linear second-order equation and a conservation law. We obtain the representation of the complete symmetry group from this system. Four of the required symmetries are nonlocal and the algebra is the direct sum of a one-dimensional Abelian algebra with the semidirect sum of a two-dimensional solvable algebra with a two-dimensional Abelian algebra. The problem illustrates the difficulties which can arise in very elementary systems. Our treatment demonstrates the existence of possible routes to overcome these problems in a systematic fashion.

  7. Symmetries, weak symmetries, and related solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.; Ceccherini, F.

    2010-10-15

    We discuss a new family of solutions of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation that describes D-shaped toroidal plasma equilibria with sharp gradients at the plasma edge. These solutions have been derived by exploiting the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the GS equation and in particular a special type of 'weak' symmetries. In addition, we review the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the GS equation and present a short but exhaustive survey of the possible choices for the arbitrary flux functions that yield GS equations admitting some continuous Lie symmetry. Particular solutions related to these symmetries are also discussed.

  8. Anomalous Symmetry Fractionalization and Surface Topological Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xie; Burnell, F. J.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2015-10-01

    In addition to possessing fractional statistics, anyon excitations of a 2D topologically ordered state can realize symmetry in distinct ways, leading to a variety of symmetry-enriched topological (SET) phases. While the symmetry fractionalization must be consistent with the fusion and braiding rules of the anyons, not all ostensibly consistent symmetry fractionalizations can be realized in 2D systems. Instead, certain "anomalous" SETs can only occur on the surface of a 3D symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining whether a SET of a discrete, on-site, unitary symmetry group G is anomalous or not. The basic idea is to gauge the symmetry and expose the anomaly as an obstruction to a consistent topological theory combining both the original anyons and the gauge fluxes. Utilizing a result of Etingof, Nikshych, and Ostrik, we point out that a class of obstructions is captured by the fourth cohomology group H4(G ,U (1 )) , which also precisely labels the set of 3D SPT phases, with symmetry group G . An explicit procedure for calculating the cohomology data from a SET is given, with the corresponding physical intuition explained. We thus establish a general bulk-boundary correspondence between the anomalous SET and the 3D bulk SPT whose surface termination realizes it. We illustrate this idea using the chiral spin liquid [U (1 )2 ] topological order with a reduced symmetry Z2×Z2⊂SO (3 ) , which can act on the semion quasiparticle in an anomalous way. We construct exactly solved 3D SPT models realizing the anomalous surface terminations and demonstrate that they are nontrivial by computing three-loop braiding statistics. Possible extensions to antiunitary symmetries are also discussed.

  9. Stationary axisymmetric and slowly rotating spacetimes in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anzhong

    2013-03-01

    Stationary, axisymmetric, and slowly rotating vacuum spacetimes in the Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity are studied, and it is shown that, for any given spherical static vacuum solution of the HL theory (of any model, including the ones with an additional U(1) symmetry), there always exists a corresponding slowly rotating, stationary, and axisymmetric vacuum solution, which reduces to the former, when the rotation is switched off. The rotation is universal and only implicitly depends on the models of the HL theory and their coupling constants through the spherical seed solution. As a result, all asymptotically flat slowly rotating vacuum solutions are asymptotically identical to the slowly rotating Kerr solution. This is in contrast to the claim of Barausse and Sotiriou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 181101 (2012)], in which slowly rotating black holes were reported (incorrectly) not to exist in the infrared limit of the nonprojectable HL theory.

  10. Three-dimensional nonparaxial beams in parabolic rotational coordinates.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongmei; Gao, Yuanmei; Zhao, Juanying; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a class of three-dimensional nonparaxial optical beams found in a parabolic rotational coordinate system. These beams, representing exact solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation, have inherent parabolic symmetries. Assisted with a computer-generated holography, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of different modes of these beams. The observed transverse beam patterns along the propagation direction agree well with those from our theoretical predication.

  11. Quasi-periodic continuation along a continuous symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone, Matthew David

    Given a system of differential equations which admits a continuous group of symmetries and possesses a periodic solution, we show that under certain nondegeneracy assumptions there always exists a continuous family containing infinitely many periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories. This generalizes the continuation method of Poincaré to orbits which are not necessarily periodic. We apply these results in the setting of the Lagrangian N -body problem of homogeneous potential to characterize an infinite family of rotating nonplanar "hip-hop" orbits in the four-body problem of equal masses, and show how some other trajectories in the N -body theory may be extended to infinite families of periodic and quasi-periodic trajectories.

  12. Fainter and closer: finding planets by symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Erez N; Gladysz, Szymon

    2008-09-29

    Imaging of planets is very difficult, due to the glare from their nearby, much brighter suns. Static and slowly-evolving aberrations are the limiting factors, even after application of adaptive optics. The residual speckle pattern is highly symmetrical due to diffraction from the telescope's aperture. We suggest to break this symmetry and thus to locate planets hidden beneath it. An eccentric pupil mask is rotated to modulate the residual light pattern not removed by other means. This modulation is then exploited to reveal the planet's constant signal. In well-corrected ground-based observations we can reach planets six stellar magnitudes fainter than their sun, and only 2-3 times the diffraction limit from it. At ten times the diffraction limit, we detect planets 16 magnitudes fainter. The stellar background drops by five magnitudes.

  13. Jumps, somersaults, and symmetry breaking in Leidenfrost drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2016-08-01

    When a droplet of water impacts a heated surface, the drop may be observed to bounce. Recently is has been found that small quantities (˜100 ppm) of polymer additives such as polyethylene oxide can significantly increase the maximum bouncing height of drops. This effect has been explained in terms of the reduction of energy dissipation caused by polymer additives during the drop retraction and rebound, resulting in higher mechanical energy available for bouncing. Here we demonstrate, by comparing three types of fluids (Newtonian, shear-thinning, and viscoelastic), that the total kinetic energy carried by low-viscosity Newtonian drops during retraction is partly transformed into rotational kinetic energy rather than dissipated when compared with high-viscosity or non-Newtonian drops. We also show that non-Newtonian effects play little role in the energy distribution during drop impact, while the main effect is due to the symmetry break observed during the retraction of low-viscosity drops.

  14. Jumps, somersaults, and symmetry breaking in Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2016-08-01

    When a droplet of water impacts a heated surface, the drop may be observed to bounce. Recently is has been found that small quantities (∼100 ppm) of polymer additives such as polyethylene oxide can significantly increase the maximum bouncing height of drops. This effect has been explained in terms of the reduction of energy dissipation caused by polymer additives during the drop retraction and rebound, resulting in higher mechanical energy available for bouncing. Here we demonstrate, by comparing three types of fluids (Newtonian, shear-thinning, and viscoelastic), that the total kinetic energy carried by low-viscosity Newtonian drops during retraction is partly transformed into rotational kinetic energy rather than dissipated when compared with high-viscosity or non-Newtonian drops. We also show that non-Newtonian effects play little role in the energy distribution during drop impact, while the main effect is due to the symmetry break observed during the retraction of low-viscosity drops. PMID:27627234

  15. Symmetry in chemistry from the hydrogen atom to proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Michael E.

    1996-01-01

    The last 2 decades have seen discoveries in highly excited states of atoms and molecules of phenomena that are qualitatively different from the “planetary” model of the atom, and the near-rigid model of molecules, characteristic of these systems in their low-energy states. A unified view is emerging in terms of approximate dynamical symmetry principles. Highly excited states of two-electron atoms display “molecular” behavior of a nonrigid linear structure undergoing collective rotation and vibration. Highly excited states of molecules described in the “standard molecular model” display normal mode couplings, which induce bifurcations on the route to molecular chaos. New approaches such as rigid–nonrigid correlation, vibrons, and quantum groups suggest a unified view of collective electronic motion in atoms and nuclear motion in molecules. PMID:8962040

  16. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  17. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  18. The Weighted Oblimin Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates that the weighting procedure proposed by E. Cureton and S. Mulaik (1975) can be applied to the Direct Oblimin approach of D. Clarkson and R. Jennrich (1988) to provide good results. The rotation method obtained is called Weighted Oblimin. Compared this method to other rotation methods with favorable results. (SLD)

  19. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  20. Serious rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W

    1983-07-01

    Usually, serious rotator cuff injuries can be operated upon and a high level of performance can be achieved afer surgery. This is not so for the substantial tears seen in baseball pitchers. However, a damaged rotator cuff can be rehabilitated and can recover from the threatened tear without surgery if detected early enough and given the proper treatment.

  1. Symmetry Breaking in a Model for Nodal Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokaw, Charles J.

    2005-03-01

    Nodal cilia are very short cilia found in the embryonic node on the ventral surface of early mammalian embryos. They create a right to left fluid flow that is responsible for determining the normal asymmetry of the internal organs of the mammalian body. To do this, the distal end of the cilium must circle in a counterclockwise sense. Computer simulations with 3-dimensional models of flagella allow examination of 3-dimensional movements such as those of nodal cilia. 3-dimensional circling motions of short cilia can be achieved with velocity controlled models, in which dynein activity is regulated by sliding velocity. If dyneins on one outer doublet are controlled by the sliding velocity experienced by that doublet, the system is symmetric, and the 3-dimensional models can show either clockwise or counterclockwise circling. My computer simulations have examined two possible symmetry breaking mechanisms: 1) dyneins on doublet N are regulated by a mixture of the sliding velocities experienced by doublets N and N+1 (numbered in a clockwise direction, looking from the base). or 2) symmetry is broken by an off-axis force that produces a right-handed twist of the axoneme, consistent with observations that some dyneins can rotate their substrate microtubules in a clockwise direction.

  2. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  3. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Symmetries Logo This volume of the proceedings "Symmetries in Science XIV" is dedicated to the memory of our colleagues and dear friends Marcos Moshinsky and Yuriĭ Smirnov who regularly participated in these Symposia and were a great inspiration to many. We shall miss them. Dieter Schuch and Michael Ramek The international symposium "Symmetries in Science XIV" held at Collegium Mehrerau in Bregenz, Austria from July 19-24, 2009, attended by 32 scientists from 11 countries, was an experiment, performed by theoreticians. Aim of this experiment was to find out if the desire to revive or even continue this conference series was stronger than the very restricted pecuniary boundary conditions. It obviously was! After its establishment by Bruno Gruber in 1979, the biennial series settled in the very stimulating atmosphere of the monastery Mehrerau, which provided the ideal environment for a limited number of invited participants to exchange ideas, without parallel sessions, and pursue deeper discussions (at the latest in the evening at "Gasthof Lamm"). When the conference series terminated in 2003, former participants were quite disappointed. Meeting again at several (larger) conferences in subsequent years, there were repeated expressions of "the lack of a Bregenz-type meeting in our field nowadays" and the question of a possible "revitalization", even without external funding. After some hesitation, but also driven by our own desire to reinstate the series, we consulted Bruno who not only approved wholeheartedly but also offered his full support. It all finally led to the symposium in July 2009. The atmosphere was really like in the "good old days" and the interesting and thought-provoking presentations culminated in the publication of these Proceedings. We are grateful to Carl Bender for establishing contact with IOP making it possible for us to publish these Proceedings in the Journal of Physics Conference Series. A majority of the participants contributed to these

  4. Natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bindi, Luca; Yao, Nan; Lin, Chaney; Hollister, Lincoln S.; Andronicos, Christopher L.; Distler, Vadim V.; Eddy, Michael P.; Kostin, Alexander; Kryachko, Valery; MacPherson, Glenn J.; Steinhardt, William M.; Yudovskaya, Marina; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first occurrence of a natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry. The quasicrystal, with composition Al71Ni24Fe5, was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Icosahedrite, Al63Cu24Fe13, the first natural quasicrystal to be identified, was found in the same meteorite. The new quasicrystal was found associated with steinhardtite (Al38Ni32Fe30), Fe-poor steinhardtite (Al50Ni40Fe10), Al-bearing trevorite (NiFe2O4) and Al-bearing taenite (FeNi). Laboratory studies of decagonal Al71Ni24Fe5 have shown that it is stable over a narrow range of temperatures, 1120 K to 1200 K at standard pressure, providing support for our earlier conclusion that the Khatyrka meteorite reached heterogeneous high temperatures [1100 < T(K) ≤ 1500] and then rapidly cooled after being heated during an impact-induced shock that occurred in outer space 4.5 Gya. The occurrences of metallic Al alloyed with Cu, Ni, and Fe raises new questions regarding conditions that can be achieved in the early solar nebula. PMID:25765857

  5. Bilateral symmetry across Aphrodite Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, J. W.; Campbell, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    There are three main highland areas on Venus: Beta Regio, Ishtar Terra and Aphrodite Terra. The latter is least known and the least mapped, yet existing analyses of Aphrodite Terra based on available Pioneer-Venus orbiter data suggest that it may be the site of extensive rifting. Some of the highest resolution (30 km) PV data (SAR) included most of the western half of Aphrodite Terra. Recent analysis of the SAR data together with Arecibo range-doppler topographic profiling (10 X 100 km horizontal and 10 m vertical resolution) across parts of Aphrodite, further characterized the nature of possible tectonic processes in the equatorial highlands. The existence of distinct topographic and radar morphologic linear discontinuities across the nearly east-west strike of Aphrodite Terra is indicated. Another prominent set of linear features is distinctly parallel to and orthogonal to the ground tracks of the PV spacecraft and are not included because of the possibility that they are artifacts. Study of the northwest trending cross-strike discontinuities (CSD's) and the nature of topographic and morphologic features along their strike suggest the presence of bilateral topographic and morphologic symmetry about the long axis of Aphrodite Terra.

  6. Natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Bindi, Luca; Yao, Nan; Lin, Chaney; Hollister, Lincoln S; Andronicos, Christopher L; Distler, Vadim V; Eddy, Michael P; Kostin, Alexander; Kryachko, Valery; MacPherson, Glenn J; Steinhardt, William M; Yudovskaya, Marina; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    We report the first occurrence of a natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry. The quasicrystal, with composition Al71Ni24Fe5, was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Icosahedrite, Al63Cu24Fe13, the first natural quasicrystal to be identified, was found in the same meteorite. The new quasicrystal was found associated with steinhardtite (Al38Ni32Fe30), Fe-poor steinhardtite (Al50Ni40Fe10), Al-bearing trevorite (NiFe2O4) and Al-bearing taenite (FeNi). Laboratory studies of decagonal Al71Ni24Fe5 have shown that it is stable over a narrow range of temperatures, 1120 K to 1200 K at standard pressure, providing support for our earlier conclusion that the Khatyrka meteorite reached heterogeneous high temperatures [1100 < T(K) ≤ 1500] and then rapidly cooled after being heated during an impact-induced shock that occurred in outer space 4.5 Gya. The occurrences of metallic Al alloyed with Cu, Ni, and Fe raises new questions regarding conditions that can be achieved in the early solar nebula. PMID:25765857

  7. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20-26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long-standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster

  8. Structural symmetry in evolutionary games

    PubMed Central

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary game theory, an important measure of a mutant trait (strategy) is its ability to invade and take over an otherwise-monomorphic population. Typically, one quantifies the success of a mutant strategy via the probability that a randomly occurring mutant will fixate in the population. However, in a structured population, this fixation probability may depend on where the mutant arises. Moreover, the fixation probability is just one quantity by which one can measure the success of a mutant; fixation time, for instance, is another. We define a notion of homogeneity for evolutionary games that captures what it means for two single-mutant states, i.e. two configurations of a single mutant in an otherwise-monomorphic population, to be ‘evolutionarily equivalent’ in the sense that all measures of evolutionary success are the same for both configurations. Using asymmetric games, we argue that the term ‘homogeneous’ should apply to the evolutionary process as a whole rather than to just the population structure. For evolutionary matrix games in graph-structured populations, we give precise conditions under which the resulting process is homogeneous. Finally, we show that asymmetric matrix games can be reduced to symmetric games if the population structure possesses a sufficient degree of symmetry. PMID:26423436

  9. Emergent SO(5) Symmetry at the Néel to Valence-Bond-Solid Transition.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Serna, P; Chalker, J T; Ortuño, M; Somoza, A M

    2015-12-31

    We show numerically that the "deconfined" quantum critical point between the Néel antiferromagnet and the columnar valence-bond solid, for a square lattice of spin 1/2, has an emergent SO(5) symmetry. This symmetry allows the Néel vector and the valence-bond solid order parameter to be rotated into each other. It is a remarkable (2+1)-dimensional analogue of the SO(4)=[SU(2)×SU(2)]/Z(2) symmetry that appears in the scaling limit for the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain. The emergent SO(5) symmetry is strong evidence that the phase transition in the (2+1)-dimensional system is truly continuous, despite the violations of finite-size scaling observed previously in this problem. It also implies surprising relations between correlation functions at the transition. The symmetry enhancement is expected to apply generally to the critical two-component Abelian Higgs model (noncompact CP(1) model). The result indicates that in three dimensions there is an SO(5)-symmetric conformal field theory that has no relevant singlet operators, so is radically different from conventional Wilson-Fisher-type conformal field theories.

  10. Emergent SO(5) Symmetry at the Néel to Valence-Bond-Solid Transition.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Serna, P; Chalker, J T; Ortuño, M; Somoza, A M

    2015-12-31

    We show numerically that the "deconfined" quantum critical point between the Néel antiferromagnet and the columnar valence-bond solid, for a square lattice of spin 1/2, has an emergent SO(5) symmetry. This symmetry allows the Néel vector and the valence-bond solid order parameter to be rotated into each other. It is a remarkable (2+1)-dimensional analogue of the SO(4)=[SU(2)×SU(2)]/Z(2) symmetry that appears in the scaling limit for the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain. The emergent SO(5) symmetry is strong evidence that the phase transition in the (2+1)-dimensional system is truly continuous, despite the violations of finite-size scaling observed previously in this problem. It also implies surprising relations between correlation functions at the transition. The symmetry enhancement is expected to apply generally to the critical two-component Abelian Higgs model (noncompact CP(1) model). The result indicates that in three dimensions there is an SO(5)-symmetric conformal field theory that has no relevant singlet operators, so is radically different from conventional Wilson-Fisher-type conformal field theories. PMID:26765019

  11. Laws of Conservation as Related to Brain Growth, Aging, and Evolution: Symmetry of the Minicolumn

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Switala, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Development, aging, and evolution offer different time scales regarding possible anatomical transformations of the brain. This article expands on the perspective that the cerebral cortex exhibits a modular architecture with invariant properties in regards to these time scales. These properties arise from morphometric relations of the ontogenetic minicolumn as expressed in Noether’s first theorem, i.e., that for each continuous symmetry there is a conserved quantity. Whenever minicolumnar symmetry is disturbed by either developmental or aging processes the principle of least action limits the scope of morphometric alterations. Alternatively, local and global divergences from these laws apply to acquired processes when the system is no longer isolated from its environment. The underlying precepts to these physical laws can be expressed in terms of mathematical equations that are conservative of quantity. Invariant properties of the brain include the rotational symmetry of minicolumns, a scaling proportion or “even expansion” between pyramidal cells and core minicolumnar size, and the translation of neuronal elements from the main axis of the minicolumn. It is our belief that a significant portion of the architectural complexity of the cerebral cortex, its response to injury, and its evolutionary transformation, can all be captured by a small set of basic physical laws dictated by the symmetry of minicolumns. The putative preservations of parameters related to the symmetry of the minicolumn suggest that the development and final organization of the cortex follows a deterministic process. PMID:22207838

  12. Stability of skyrmion lattices and symmetries of quasi-two-dimensional chiral magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Gungordu, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Belashchenko, Kirill; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2016-02-24

    Recently there has been substantial interest in realizations of skyrmions, in particular in quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems due to increased stability resulting from reduced dimensionality. A stable skyrmion, representing the smallest realizable magnetic texture, could be an ideal element for ultradense magnetic memories. Here we use the most general form of the quasi-2D free energy with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions constructed from general symmetry considerations reflecting the underlying system. We predict that the skyrmion phase is robust and it is present even when the system lacks the in-plane rotational symmetry. In fact, the lowered symmetry leads to increased stability of vortex-antivortex lattices withmore » fourfold symmetry and in-plane spirals, in some instances even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Our results relate different hexagonal and square cell phases to the symmetries of materials used for realizations of skyrmions. This will give clear directions for experimental realizations of hexagonal and square cell phases, and will allow engineering of skyrmions with unusual properties. We also predict striking differences in gyrodynamics induced by spin currents for isolated skyrmions and for crystals where spin currents can be induced by charge carriers or by thermal magnons. As a result, we find that under certain conditions, isolated skyrmions can move along the current without a side motion which can have implications for realizations of magnetic memories.« less

  13. Laws of conservation as related to brain growth, aging, and evolution: symmetry of the minicolumn.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Manuel F; El-Baz, Ayman; Switala, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Development, aging, and evolution offer different time scales regarding possible anatomical transformations of the brain. This article expands on the perspective that the cerebral cortex exhibits a modular architecture with invariant properties in regards to these time scales. These properties arise from morphometric relations of the ontogenetic minicolumn as expressed in Noether's first theorem, i.e., that for each continuous symmetry there is a conserved quantity. Whenever minicolumnar symmetry is disturbed by either developmental or aging processes the principle of least action limits the scope of morphometric alterations. Alternatively, local and global divergences from these laws apply to acquired processes when the system is no longer isolated from its environment. The underlying precepts to these physical laws can be expressed in terms of mathematical equations that are conservative of quantity. Invariant properties of the brain include the rotational symmetry of minicolumns, a scaling proportion or "even expansion" between pyramidal cells and core minicolumnar size, and the translation of neuronal elements from the main axis of the minicolumn. It is our belief that a significant portion of the architectural complexity of the cerebral cortex, its response to injury, and its evolutionary transformation, can all be captured by a small set of basic physical laws dictated by the symmetry of minicolumns. The putative preservations of parameters related to the symmetry of the minicolumn suggest that the development and final organization of the cortex follows a deterministic process.

  14. Symmetry and range limits in importance indices.

    PubMed

    Seifan, Tal; Seifan, Merav

    2015-10-01

    Recently, Mingo has analyzed the properties of I imp, an importance index, and demonstrated that its range is not symmetrical. While agreeing with this comment, we believe that more light needs to be shed on the issue of symmetry in relation to such indices. Importance indices are calculated using three values: performance of the organism in the absence and in the presence of neighbors and maximum performance of the organism in ideal conditions. Because of this structure, importance indices can hardly ever achieve symmetry along the whole range of potential performances. We discuss the limitation of the symmetry range for different symmetry types and for both additive and multiplicative indices. We conclude that importance indices, as other interactions indices, are practical tools for interpreting ecological outcomes, especially while comparing between studies. Nevertheless, the current structure of importance indices prevents symmetry along their whole range. While the lack of "perfect" symmetry may call for the development of more sophisticated importance metrics, the current indices are still helpful for the understanding of biological systems and should not be discarded before better alternatives are well established. To prevent potential confusion, we suggest that ecologists present the relevant index symmetry range in addition to their results, thus minimizing the probability of misinterpretation. PMID:26668718

  15. Symmetry and range limits in importance indices.

    PubMed

    Seifan, Tal; Seifan, Merav

    2015-10-01

    Recently, Mingo has analyzed the properties of I imp, an importance index, and demonstrated that its range is not symmetrical. While agreeing with this comment, we believe that more light needs to be shed on the issue of symmetry in relation to such indices. Importance indices are calculated using three values: performance of the organism in the absence and in the presence of neighbors and maximum performance of the organism in ideal conditions. Because of this structure, importance indices can hardly ever achieve symmetry along the whole range of potential performances. We discuss the limitation of the symmetry range for different symmetry types and for both additive and multiplicative indices. We conclude that importance indices, as other interactions indices, are practical tools for interpreting ecological outcomes, especially while comparing between studies. Nevertheless, the current structure of importance indices prevents symmetry along their whole range. While the lack of "perfect" symmetry may call for the development of more sophisticated importance metrics, the current indices are still helpful for the understanding of biological systems and should not be discarded before better alternatives are well established. To prevent potential confusion, we suggest that ecologists present the relevant index symmetry range in addition to their results, thus minimizing the probability of misinterpretation.

  16. Symmetries in fluctuations far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; del Pozo, Jesús J; Garrido, Pedro L

    2011-05-10

    Fluctuations arise universally in nature as a reflection of the discrete microscopic world at the macroscopic level. Despite their apparent noisy origin, fluctuations encode fundamental aspects of the physics of the system at hand, crucial to understand irreversibility and nonequilibrium behavior. To sustain a given fluctuation, a system traverses a precise optimal path in phase space. Here we show that by demanding invariance of optimal paths under symmetry transformations, new and general fluctuation relations valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium are unveiled. This opens an unexplored route toward a deeper understanding of nonequilibrium physics by bringing symmetry principles to the realm of fluctuations. We illustrate this concept studying symmetries of the current distribution out of equilibrium. In particular we derive an isometric fluctuation relation that links in a strikingly simple manner the probabilities of any pair of isometric current fluctuations. This relation, which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by time-reversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations. The new symmetry implies remarkable hierarchies of equations for the current cumulants and the nonlinear response coefficients, going far beyond Onsager's reciprocity relations and Green-Kubo formulas. We confirm the validity of the new symmetry relation in extensive numerical simulations, and suggest that the idea of symmetry in fluctuations as invariance of optimal paths has far-reaching consequences in diverse fields.

  17. Symmetries in fluctuations far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; del Pozo, Jesús J.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations arise universally in nature as a reflection of the discrete microscopic world at the macroscopic level. Despite their apparent noisy origin, fluctuations encode fundamental aspects of the physics of the system at hand, crucial to understand irreversibility and nonequilibrium behavior. To sustain a given fluctuation, a system traverses a precise optimal path in phase space. Here we show that by demanding invariance of optimal paths under symmetry transformations, new and general fluctuation relations valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium are unveiled. This opens an unexplored route toward a deeper understanding of nonequilibrium physics by bringing symmetry principles to the realm of fluctuations. We illustrate this concept studying symmetries of the current distribution out of equilibrium. In particular we derive an isometric fluctuation relation that links in a strikingly simple manner the probabilities of any pair of isometric current fluctuations. This relation, which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti–Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by time-reversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations. The new symmetry implies remarkable hierarchies of equations for the current cumulants and the nonlinear response coefficients, going far beyond Onsager’s reciprocity relations and Green–Kubo formulas. We confirm the validity of the new symmetry relation in extensive numerical simulations, and suggest that the idea of symmetry in fluctuations as invariance of optimal paths has far-reaching consequences in diverse fields. PMID:21493865

  18. Relativity symmetries and Lie algebra contractions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Kong, Otto C.W.

    2014-12-15

    We revisit the notion of possible relativity or kinematic symmetries mutually connected through Lie algebra contractions under a new perspective on what constitutes a relativity symmetry. Contractions of an SO(m,n) symmetry as an isometry on an m+n dimensional geometric arena which generalizes the notion of spacetime are discussed systematically. One of the key results is five different contractions of a Galilean-type symmetry G(m,n) preserving a symmetry of the same type at dimension m+n−1, e.g. a G(m,n−1), together with the coset space representations that correspond to the usual physical picture. Most of the results are explicitly illustrated through the example of symmetries obtained from the contraction of SO(2,4), which is the particular case for our interest on the physics side as the proposed relativity symmetry for “quantum spacetime”. The contractions from G(1,3) may be relevant to real physics.

  19. Dynamical flavor origin of ZN symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Dhen, Mikaël; Fong, Chee Sheng; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-05-01

    Discrete Abelian symmetries (ZN ) are a common "artifact" of beyond the standard model physics models. They provide different avenues for constructing consistent scenarios for lepton and quark mixing patterns, radiative neutrino mass generation as well as dark matter stabilization. We argue that these symmetries can arise from the spontaneous breaking of the Abelian U (1 ) factors contained in the global flavor symmetry transformations of the gauge-invariant kinetic Lagrangian. This will be the case provided the ultraviolet completion responsible for the Yukawa structure involves scalar fields carrying nontrivial U (1 ) charges. Guided by minimality criteria, we demonstrate the viability of this approach with two examples: first, we derive the "scotogenic" model Lagrangian, and second, we construct a setup where the spontaneous symmetry-breaking pattern leads to a Z3 symmetry which enables dark matter stability as well as neutrino mass generation at the two-loop order. This generic approach can be used to derive many other models, with residual ZN or ZN1×⋯×ZNk symmetries, establishing an intriguing link between flavor symmetries, neutrino masses and dark matter.

  20. Symmetries and "simple" solutions of the classical n-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenciner, Alain

    2006-03-01

    The Lagrangian of the classical n-body problem has well known symmetries: isometries of the ambient Euclidean space (translations, rotations, reflexions) and changes of scale coming from the homogeneity of the potential. To these symmetries are associated "simple" solutions of the problem, the so-called homographic motions, which play a basic role in the global understanding of the dynamics. The classical subproblems (planar, isosceles) are also consequences of the existence of symmetries: invariance under reflexion through a plane in the first case, invariance under exchange of two equal masses in the second. In these two cases, the symmetry acts at the level of the "shape space" (the oriented one in the first case) whose existence is the main difference between the 2-body problem and the (n ≥ 3)-body problem. These symmetries of the Lagrangian imply symmetries of the action functional, which is defined on the space of regular enough loops of a given period in the configuration space of the problem. Minimization of the action under well-chosen symmetry constraints leads to remarkable solutions of the n-body problem which may also be called simple and could play after the homographic ones the role of organizing centers in the global dynamics. In [13] and [16], I have given a survey of the new classes of solutions which had been obtained in this way, mainly choreographies of n equal masses in a plane or in space and generalized Hip-Hops of at least 4 arbitrary masses in space. I give here an updated overview of the results and a quick glance at the methods of proofs.

  1. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

  2. Dark Matter from Binary Tetrahedral Flavor Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, David; Frampton, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Binary Tetrahedral Flavor Symmetry, originally developed as a quark family symmetry and later adapted to leptons, has proved both resilient and versatile over the past decade. In 2008 a minimal T' model was developed to accommodate quark and lepton masses and mixings using a family symmetry of (T'xZ2). We examine an expansion of this earlier model using an additional Z2 group that facilitates predictions of WIMP dark matter, the Cabibbo angle, and deviations from Tribimaximal Mixing, while giving hints at the nature of leptogenesis.

  3. Discrete symmetries and de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Cotăescu, Ion I. Pascu, Gabriel

    2014-11-24

    Aspects of the ambiguity in defining quantum modes on de Sitter spacetime using a commuting system composed only of differential operators are discussed. Discrete symmetries and their actions on the wavefunction in commonly used coordinate charts are reviewed. It is argued that the system of commuting operators can be supplemented by requiring the invariance of the wavefunction to combined discrete symmetries- a criterion which selects a single state out of the α-vacuum family. Two such members of this family are singled out by particular combined discrete symmetries- states between which exists a well-known thermality relation.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation under explicit symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2015-04-10

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  5. Lie symmetry theorem of fractional nonholonomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Chen, Ben-Yong; Fu, Jing-Li

    2014-11-01

    The Lie symmetry theorem of fractional nonholonomic systems in terms of combined fractional derivatives is established, and the fractional Lagrange equations are obtained by virtue of the d'Alembert—Lagrange principle with fractional derivatives. As the Lie symmetry theorem is based on the invariance of differential equations under infinitesimal transformations, by introducing the differential operator of infinitesimal generators, the determining equations are obtained. Furthermore, the limit equations, the additional restriction equations, the structural equations, and the conserved quantity of Lie symmetry are acquired. An example is presented to illustrate the application of results.

  6. \\cal{PT} -symmetry in Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    We propose a scheme to realize parity-time ( {PT} )-symmetry in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as superatoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. We show that Rydberg-dressed 87Rb atoms in a four-level inverted Y-type configuration is highly efficient to generate the refractive index for a probe field, with a symmetric (antisymmetric) profile spatially in the corresponding real (imaginary) part. Comparing with earlier investigations, the present scheme provides a versatile platform to control the system from {PT} -symmetry to non-PT -symmetry via different external parameters, i.e., coupling field detuning, probe field intensity and control field intensity.

  7. Electromagnetic radiation under explicit symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2015-04-10

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna. PMID:25910163

  8. Electromagnetic Radiation under Explicit Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-04-01

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  9. The zonal satellite problem. III. Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.

    The two-body problem associated with a force field described by a potential of the form U=sum_{k=1}nak/rk (r = distance between particles, ak = real parameters) is resumed from the only standpoint of symmetries. Such symmetries, expressed in Hamiltonian coordinates, or in standard polar coordinates, are recovered for McGehee-type coordinates of both collision-blow-up and infinity-blow-up kind. They form diffeomorphic commutative groups endowed with a Boolean structure. Expressed in Levi-Civita's coordinates, the problem exhibits a larger group of symmetries, also commutative and presenting a Boolean structure.

  10. Symmetries in the Anisotropic Kepler Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Vasile

    The two-body problem associated to an anisotropic Newtonian-type potential function is being considered. We point out the complex symmetries that feature this problem. Such symmetries, expressed in standard polar coordinates, are recovered for McGee-type coordinates of both collision-blow-up kind and infinity-blow-up kind. They form isomorphic commutative groups endowed with an idempotent structure. Expressed in Levi-Civita's coordinates, the problem exhibits a larger group of symmetries, also commutative and endowed with an idempotent structure.

  11. High-speed measurement of rotational anisotropy nonlinear optical harmonic generation using position-sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Harter, J W; Niu, L; Woss, A J; Hsieh, D

    2015-10-15

    We present a method of performing high-speed rotational anisotropy nonlinear optical harmonic generation experiments at rotational frequencies of several hertz by projecting the harmonic light reflected at different angles from a sample onto a stationary position-sensitive detector. The high rotational speed of the technique, 10(3) to 10(4) times larger than existing methods, permits precise measurements of the crystallographic and electronic symmetries of samples by averaging over low frequency laser-power, beam-pointing, and pulse-width fluctuations. We demonstrate the sensitivity of our technique by resolving the bulk fourfold rotational symmetry of GaAs about its [001] axis using second-harmonic generation. PMID:26469591

  12. Stability of unsteady flow in a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Richard; Hazel, Andrew; Clarke, Richard; Denier, James

    2011-11-01

    We consider the temporal evolution of a viscous incompressible fluid in a torus of finite curvature; a problem first investigated experimentally by Madden and Mullin (1994), herein referred to as MM. The system is initially in a state of rigid-body rotation (about the axis of rotational symmetry) and the container's rotation rate is then changed impulsively. We describe the transient flow that is induced at small values of the Ekman number, over a time scale that is comparable to one complete rotation of the container. We show that (rotationally symmetric) eruptive singularities (of the boundary layer) occur at the inner or outer bend of the pipe for a decrease or an increase in rotation rate respectively. Moreover, there is a ratio of initial-to-final rotation frequencies for which eruptive singularities can occur at both the inner and outer bend simultaneously. We also demonstrate that the flow is susceptible to non-axisymmetric inflectional instabilities. The inflectional instability arises as a consequence of the developing eruption and is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations of MM. Detailed quantitative comparisons are made between asymptotic predictions and finite (but small) Ekman number Navier-Stokes computations using a finite-element method.

  13. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  14. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  15. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  16. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  17. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  18. Turbulent momentum transport and intrinsic rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Michael

    2012-03-01

    A key physics issue for magnetic confinement fusion is the presence of high levels of turbulent particle and energy transport in magnetized plasmas. This transport is detrimental to fusion because it significantly lowers the plasma density and temperature, both of which must be kept high to increase fusion energy yield. Sheared flows have been shown to strongly reduce this plasma turbulent transport. Many current fusion experiments induce sheared flows by injecting beams of neutral particles, which make the plasma differentially rotate. However, this external momentum injection will be much less effective in the large, dense plasmas that may be required for a fusion reactor. A number of recent fusion experiments have measured significant differential rotation even without external momentum injection. This `intrinsic' rotation is a result of the rearrangement of momentum within the plasma. Since this rotation may determine the extent to which turbulent transport is suppressed, it is critical for the community to understand how momentum transport produces intrinsic rotation profiles. This is challenging, as intrinsic rotation exhibits a complex phenomenology that defies simple empirical scalings or heuristic models. This talk gives a brief overview of the intrinsic rotation phenomenology and elucidates features that any viable model for intrinsic rotation must contain. We propose a fully self-consistent, first-principles model for intrinsic rotation, which is based on an asymptotic expansion in the smallness of the turbulence fluctuation frequency relative to the ion Larmor frequency (known as gyrokinetics). Stringent conditions are placed on this model by a symmetry of the gyrokinetic equations. This model has been implemented in the gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2, from which we present simulation results on turbulent momentum transport. Various physical mechanisms that contribute to the momentum transport are studied to determine their dependences on key plasma

  19. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Single-charge rotating black holes in four-dimensional gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, David D. K.

    2011-02-01

    We consider four-dimensional U(1)4 gauged supergravity, and obtain asymptotically AdS4, non-extremal, charged, rotating black holes with one non-zero U(1) charge. The thermodynamic quantities are computed. We obtain a generalization that includes a NUT parameter. The general solution has a discrete symmetry involving inversion of the rotation parameter, and has a string frame metric that admits a rank-2 Killing-Stäckel tensor.

  20. Type Ia Supernovae: Can Coriolis Force Break the Symmetry of the Gravitational Confined Detonation Explosion Mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Domínguez, I.; Thielemann, F. K.

    2016-03-01

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.

  1. Personal recollections on chiral symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The author's work on the mass of pseudoscalar mesons is briefly reviewed. The emergence of the study of CP violation in the renormalizable gauge theory from consideration of chiral symmetry in the quark model is discussed.

  2. Shift symmetry and inflation in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome

    2005-07-15

    We consider models of inflation in supergravity with a shift symmetry. We focus on models with one modulus and one inflaton field. The presence of this symmetry guarantees the existence of a flat direction for the inflaton field. Mildly breaking the shift symmetry using a superpotential which depends not only on the modulus, but also on the inflaton field allows one to lift the inflaton flat direction. Along the inflaton direction, the {eta} problem is alleviated. Combining the KKLT mechanism for modulus stabilization and a shift symmetry breaking superpotential of the chaotic inflation type, we find models reminiscent of 'mutated hybrid inflation' where the inflationary trajectory is curved in the modulus-inflaton plane. We analyze the phenomenology of these models and stress their differences with both chaotic and hybrid inflation.

  3. Symmetry and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollock, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy and cosmology will be presented. The close relationship between the properties of light, symmetry, and our understanding the contents of our universe will be explored.

  4. Dynamical symmetries in contemporary nuclear structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. I.; Ivanov, M. I.; Drenska, S. L.; Sviratcheva, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    In terms of group theory—the language of symmetries, the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented in terms of chains of group-subgroup structures that define the dynamical symmetry of the system under consideration. This framework enables exact analytic solutions of the associated eigenvalue problems. We review two types of applications of dynamical symmetries in contemporary theoretical nuclear structure physics: first for a classification of the many-body systems under consideration, with respect to an important characteristic of their behavior; and second for the creation of exactly solvable algebraic models that describe specific aspects of this behavior. This is illustrated with the boson and fermion realizations of symplectic structures. In the first case with an application of the sp(4, R) classification scheme of even-even nuclei within the major nuclear shells and next with of the sp(4) microscopic model for the description of isovector pairing correlations.

  5. Modelling Symmetry Classes 233 and 432.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Offers instructions and geometrical data for constructing solids of the enantiomorphous symmetry classes 233 and 432. Provides background information for each class and highlights symmetrical relationships and construction patterns. (ML)

  6. Matrix Models, Emergent Spacetime and Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Steinacker, Harold; Lizzi, Fedele

    2009-12-15

    We discuss how a matrix model recently shown to describe emergent gravity may contain extra degrees of freedom which reproduce some characteristics of the standard model, in particular the breaking of symmetries and the correct quantum numbers of fermions.

  7. Spatial Symmetries of the Local Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Rohozinski, S.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2010-01-01

    Spatial symmetries of the densities appearing in the nuclear Density Functional Theory are discussed. General forms of the local densities are derived by using methods of construction of isotropic tensor fields. The spherical and axial cases are considered.

  8. Breaking of Gauge Symmetry: A Geometrical View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriyasu, K.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a simple introduction to the fundamental physical ideas involved in the breaking of local gauge symmetry. The purpose of this article is to show how these ideas can be understood independently of any particular application. (Author/HM)

  9. Soliton surfaces in the generalized symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundland, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate some features of generalized symmetries of integrable systems aiming to obtain the Fokas-Gel'fand formula for the immersion of two-dimensional soliton surfaces in Lie algebras. We show that if there exists a common symmetry of the zero-curvature representation of an integrable partial differential equation and its linear spectral problem, then the Fokas-Gel'fand immersion formula is applicable in its original form. In the general case, we show that when the symmetry of the zero-curvature representation is not a symmetry of its linear spectral problem, then the immersion function of the two-dimensional surface is determined by an extended formula involving additional terms in the expression for the tangent vectors. We illustrate these results with examples including the elliptic ordinary differential equation and the C P N-1 sigma-model equation.

  10. Symmetry breaking of quasihelical stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-04-01

    A mean-field Ohm's law is used to determine the effects of the bootstrap current on quasihelically symmetric stellarator equilibria. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the effects of the bootstrap current break the quasihelical stellarator symmetry at second order in an inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic field strength. The level of symmetry breaking suggests that good approximations to quasihelical stellarator fusion reactors may not be attainable.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  12. Noether's second theorem for BRST symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirov, D.; Giachetta, G.; Mangiarotti, L.; Sardanashvily, G.

    2005-05-01

    We present Noether's second theorem for graded Lagrangian systems of even and odd variables on an arbitrary body manifold X in a general case of BRST symmetries depending on derivatives of dynamic variables and ghosts of any finite order. As a preliminary step, Noether's second theorem for Lagrangian systems on fiber bundles Y{yields}X possessing gauge symmetries depending on derivatives of dynamic variables and parameters of arbitrary order is proved.

  13. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  14. Squeezing lepton pairs out of broken symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt-Mazumder, A. K.; Gale, C.; Majumder, A.; Teodorescu, O.

    2002-04-01

    We discuss two possible signatures of symmetry breaking that can appear in dilepton spectra, as measured in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The first involves scalar-vector meson mixing and is related to the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by a hot medium. The second is related to the breaking of Furry's theorem by a charged quark-gluon plasma. Those signals will be accessible to upcoming measurements to be performed at the GSI, RHIC, and the LHC. .

  15. Sorting photons of different rotational Doppler shifts (RDS) by orbital angular momentum of single-photon with spin-orbit-RDS entanglement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixiang; She, Weilong

    2008-09-15

    We demonstrate that single photons from a rotating q-plate exhibit an entanglement in three degrees of freedom of spin, orbital angular momentum, and the rotational Doppler shift (RDS) due to the nonconservation of total spin and orbital angular momenta. We find that the rotational Doppler shift deltaomega = Omega((delta)s + deltal) , where s, l and Omega are quantum numbers of spin, orbital angular momentum, and rotating velocity of the q-plate, respectively. Of interest is that the rotational Doppler shift directly reflects the rotational symmetry of q-plates and can be also expressed as deltaomega = (Omega)n , where n = 2(q-1) denotes the fold number of rotational symmetry. Besides, based on this single-photon spin-orbit-RDS entanglement, we propose an experimental scheme to sort photons of different frequency shifts according to individual orbital angular momentum.

  16. What does physical rotation reveal about mental rotation?

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2014-02-01

    In a classic psychological science experiment, Shepard and Metzler (1971) discovered that the time participants took to judge whether two rotated abstract block figures were identical increased monotonically with the figures' relative angular disparity. They posited that participants rotate mental images to achieve a match and that mental rotation recruits motor processes. This interpretation has become central in the literature, but until now, surprisingly few researchers have compared mental and physical rotation. We had participants rotate virtual Shepard and Metzler figures mentally and physically; response time, accuracy, and real-time rotation data were collected. Results suggest that mental and physical rotation processes overlap and also reveal novel conclusions about physical rotation that have implications for mental rotation. Notably, participants did not rotate figures to achieve a match, but rather until they reached an off-axis canonical difference, and rotational strategies markedly differed for judgments of whether the figures were the same or different.

  17. Symmetry calculation for molecules and transition states.

    PubMed

    Vandewiele, Nick M; Van de Vijver, Ruben; Van Geem, Kevin M; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B

    2015-01-30

    The symmetry of molecules and transition states of elementary reactions is an essential property with important implications for computational chemistry. The automated identification of symmetry by computers is a very useful tool for many applications, but often relies on the availability of three-dimensional coordinates of the atoms in the molecule and hence becomes less useful when these coordinates are a priori unavailable. This article presents a new algorithm that identifies symmetry of molecules and transition states based on an augmented graph representation of the corresponding structures, in which both topology and the presence of stereocenters are accounted for. The automorphism group order of the graph associated with the molecule or transition state is used as a starting point. A novel concept of label-stereoisomers, that is, stereoisomers that arise after labeling homomorph substituents in the original molecule so that they become distinguishable, is introduced and used to obtain the symmetry number. The algorithm is characterized by its generic nature and avoids the use of heuristic rules that would limit the applicability. The calculated symmetry numbers are in agreement with expected values for a large and diverse set of structures, ranging from asymmetric, small molecules such as fluorochlorobromomethane to highly symmetric structures found in drug discovery assays. The new algorithm opens up new possibilities for the fast screening of the degree of symmetry of large sets of molecules.

  18. Fluency Expresses Implicit Knowledge of Tonal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaoli; Li, Fengying; Qiao, Fuqiang; Guo, Xiuyan; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were twofold. First, we sought to establish whether tonal symmetry produces processing fluency. Second, we sought to explore whether symmetry and chunk strength express themselves differently in fluency, as an indication of different mechanisms being involved for sub- and supra-finite state processing. Across two experiments, participants were asked to listen to and memorize artificial poetry showing a mirror symmetry (an inversion, i.e., a type of cross serial dependency); after this training phase, people completed a four-choice RT task in which they were presented with new artificial poetry. Participants were required to identify the stimulus displayed. We found that symmetry sped up responding to the second half of strings, indicating a fluency effect. Furthermore, there was a dissociation between fluency effects arising from symmetry vs. chunk strength, with stronger fluency effects for symmetry rather than chunks in the second half of strings. Taken together, we conjecture a divide between finite state and supra-finite state mechanisms in learning grammatical sequences.

  19. A new paradigm for animal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Holló, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    My aim in this article is to soften certain rigid concepts concerning the radial and bilateral symmetry of the animal body plan, and to offer a more flexible framework of thinking for them, based on recent understandings of how morphogenesis is regulated by the mosaically acting gene regulatory networks. Based on general principles of the genetic regulation of morphogenesis, it can be seen that the difference between the symmetry of the whole body and that of minor anatomical structures is only a question of a diverse timing during development. I propose that the animal genome, as such, is capable of expressing both radial and bilateral symmetries, and deploys them according to the functional requirements which must be satisfied by both the anatomical structure and body as a whole. Although it may seem paradoxical, this flexible view of symmetry, together with the idea that symmetry is strongly determined by function, bolsters the concept that the presence of the two main symmetries in the animal world is not due to chance: they are necessary biological patterns emerging in evolution.

  20. SUGRA new inflation with Heisenberg symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Cefalà, Francesco E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch

    2013-10-01

    We propose a realisation of ''new inflation'' in supergravity (SUGRA), where the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected by a Heisenberg symmetry. Inflation can be associated with a particle physics phase transition, with the inflaton being a (D-flat) direction of Higgs fields which break some symmetry at high energies, e.g. of GUT Higgs fields or of Higgs fields for flavour symmetry breaking. This is possible since compared to a shift symmetry, which is usually used to protect a flat inflaton potential, the Heisenberg symmetry is compatible with a (gauge) non-singlet inflaton field. In contrast to conventional new inflation models in SUGRA, where the predictions depend on unknown parameters of the Kaehler potential, the model with Heisenberg symmetry makes discrete predictions for the primordial perturbation parameters which depend only on the order n at which the inflaton appears in the effective superpotential. The predictions for the spectral index n{sub s} can be close to the best-fit value of the latest Planck 2013 results.

  1. Fluency Expresses Implicit Knowledge of Tonal Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiaoli; Li, Fengying; Qiao, Fuqiang; Guo, Xiuyan; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were twofold. First, we sought to establish whether tonal symmetry produces processing fluency. Second, we sought to explore whether symmetry and chunk strength express themselves differently in fluency, as an indication of different mechanisms being involved for sub- and supra-finite state processing. Across two experiments, participants were asked to listen to and memorize artificial poetry showing a mirror symmetry (an inversion, i.e., a type of cross serial dependency); after this training phase, people completed a four-choice RT task in which they were presented with new artificial poetry. Participants were required to identify the stimulus displayed. We found that symmetry sped up responding to the second half of strings, indicating a fluency effect. Furthermore, there was a dissociation between fluency effects arising from symmetry vs. chunk strength, with stronger fluency effects for symmetry rather than chunks in the second half of strings. Taken together, we conjecture a divide between finite state and supra-finite state mechanisms in learning grammatical sequences. PMID:26869960

  2. Exploring symmetry in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with near-vacuum hohlraums, which utilize a minimal but non-zero helium fill, have demonstrated performance improvements relative to conventional gas-filled (0.96 - 1.6 mg/cc helium) hohlraums: minimal backscatter, reduced capsule drive degradation, and minimal suprathermal electron generation. Because this is a low laser-plasma interaction platform, implosion symmetry is controlled via pulse-shaping adjustments to laser power balance. Extending this platform to high-yield designs with high-density carbon capsules requires achieving adequate symmetry control throughout the pulse. In simulations, laser propagation is degraded suddenly by hohlraum wall expansion interacting with ablated capsule material. Nominal radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have not yet proven predictive on symmetry of the final hotspot, and experiments show more prolate symmetry than preshot calculations. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the discrepancy between simulated and measured symmetry and on alternate designs for symmetry control through varying cone fraction, trade-offs between laser power and energy, and modifications to case-to-capsule ratio. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Neutrino mass, mixing and discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexei Y.

    2013-07-01

    Status of the discrete symmetry approach to explanation of the lepton masses and mixing is summarized in view of recent experimental results, in particular, establishing relatively large 1-3 mixing. The lepton mixing can originate from breaking of discrete flavor symmetry Gf to different residual symmetries Gl and Gv in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. In this framework the symmetry group condition has been derived which allows to get relations between the lepton mixing elements immediately without explicit model building. The condition has been applied to different residual neutrino symmetries Gv. For generic (mass independent) Gv = Z2 the condition leads to two relations between the mixing parameters and fixes one column of the mixing matrix. In the case of Gv = Z2 × Z2 the condition fixes the mixing matrix completely. The non-generic (mass spectrum dependent) Gv lead to relations which include mixing angles, neutrino masses and Majorana phases. The symmetries Gl, Gv, Gf are identified which lead to the experimentally observed values of the mixing angles and allow to predict the CP phase.

  4. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  5. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  6. Unconventional Superconductivity in La7Ir3 Revealed by Muon Spin Relaxation: Introducing a New Family of Noncentrosymmetric Superconductor That Breaks Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. A. T.; Singh, D.; Thamizhavel, A.; Hillier, A. D.; Lees, M. R.; Balakrishnan, G.; Paul, D. McK.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The superconductivity of the noncentrosymmetric compound La7 Ir3 is investigated using muon spin rotation and relaxation. Zero-field measurements reveal the presence of spontaneous static or quasistatic magnetic fields below the superconducting transition temperature Tc=2.25 K —a clear indication that the superconducting state breaks time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, transverse-field rotation measurements suggest that the superconducting gap is isotropic and that the pairing symmetry of the superconducting electrons is predominantly s wave with an enhanced binding strength. The results indicate that the superconductivity in La7 Ir3 may be unconventional and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials.

  7. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  8. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  9. Rotating superfluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Makoto; Araki, Tsunehiko; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2003-05-23

    Almost all studies of vortex states in helium II have been concerned with either ordered vortex arrays or disordered vortex tangles. This work numerically studies what happens in the presence of both rotation (which induces order) and thermal counterflow (which induces disorder). We find a new statistically steady state in which the vortex tangle is polarized along the rotational axis. Our results are used to interpret an instability that was discovered experimentally by Swanson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 190 (1983)

  10. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  11. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  12. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  13. The role of symmetry for the orientational ordering of hard regular polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenbo; Engel, Michael; Anderson, Joshua A.; Antonaglia, James A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Glotzer Group Team

    Understanding the relationship between particle shape and structure is critical for targeted self-assembly. Hard particles, whose phase behavior is governed by geometry alone, spontaneously order when compressed to high enough packing density. Different routes of ordering have been suggested: a direct transition from fluid to crystal as well as the appearance of an intermediate liquid crystalline or a rotator phase. Here, we investigate a family of hard shapes in two dimensions that interpolate from highly anisotropy to highly circular. For this purpose, we determine the phase behavior of hard regular polygons from triangles to dodecagons at densities comprising the development of orientational order. In particular, we focus on the role of particle symmetry on rotational motion and the appearance of rotator phases.

  14. The rotational order–disorder structure of the reversibly photoswitchable red fluorescent protein rsTagRFP

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of the reversibly photoswitchable red fluorescent protein rsTagRFP is presented. The rotational order–disorder (OD) structure of the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsTagRFP is discussed in detail. The structure is composed of tetramers of 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different orientations rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis and with tetramer axes coinciding with the crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates the rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry. Despite order–disorder pathology, the structure of rsTagRFP has electron-density maps of good quality for both non-overlapping and overlapping parts of the model. The crystal contacts, crystal internal architecture and a possible mechanism of rotational OD crystal formation are discussed.

  15. Vortex formation in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2004-04-01

    We study rotational motion of an interacting atomic Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a quadratic-plus-quartic potential. We calculate the lowest energy surface mode frequency and show that a symmetric trapped (harmonic and quartic) Bose-Einstein condensate breaks the rotational symmetry of the Hamiltonian when rotational frequency is greater than one-half of the lowest energy surface mode frequency. We argue that the formation of a vortex is not possible in a noninteracting as well as in an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a harmonic trap due to the absence of the spontaneous shape deformation, but it can occur which leads to the vortex formation if we add an additional quartic potential. Moreover, the spontaneous shape deformation and consequently the formation of a vortex in an attractive system depends on the strengths of the two-body interaction and the quartic potential.

  16. Current analysis for rotating and vibrating heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, J.; Schuh, A.; Mosel, U.; Wuest, E.

    Microscopic current distributions are calculated for rotations and quadrupole vibrations of heavy nuclei in the cranking model using the Nilsson Hamiltonian and pairing correlations. The currents are analyzed in terms of vector spherical harmonics; symmetry relations are taken into account. In the case of collective rotations magnetic and electric current contributions occur. The two dominant contributions correspond to rigid and irrotational flow. The strong influence of pairing on the rotational currents is demonstrated. It can be understood by investigating the delta N = 0 and delta N = 2 contributions to the currents. For collective quadrupole vibrations only electric current contributions occur. In contrast to the irrotational Bohr-Tassie flow the realistic current fields show a vortex structure.

  17. Flow through rotating rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, K.; Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    1991-05-01

    The bifurcation structure of two-dimensional, pressure-driven flows through a rectangular duct that is rotating about an axis perpendicular to its own is examined at a fixed Ekman number (Ek=ν/b2Ω) of 0.01. The solution structure for flow through a square duct (aspect ratio γ=1) is determined for Rossby numbers (Ro=U/bΩ) in the range of 0-5 using a computational scheme based on the arclength continuation method. The structure is much more complicated than reported earlier by Kheshgi and Scriven [Phys. Fluids 28, 2968 (1985)]. The primary branch with two limit points in Rossby number and a hysteresis behavior between the two- and four-cell flow structure that was computed by Kheshgi and Scriven is confirmed. An additional symmetric solution branch, which is disconnected from the primary branch (or rather connected via an asymmetric solution branch), is found. This has a two-cell flow structure at one end, a four-cell flow structure at the other and three limit points are located on the path. Two asymmetric solution branches emanating from symmetry breaking bifurcation points are also found for a square duct. Thus even within a Rossby number range of 0-5 a much richer solutions structure is found with up to five solutions at Ro=5. An eigenvalue calculation indicates that all two-dimensional solutions develop some form of unstable mode by the time Ro is increased to 5.0. In particular, the four-cell solution becomes unstable to asymmetric perturbations as found in a related problem of flow through a curved duct. The paths of the singular points are tracked with respect to variation in the aspect ratio using the fold following algorithm. A transcritical point is found at an aspect ratio of 0.815 and below which the four-cell solution is no longer on the primary branch. When the channel cross section is tilted even slightly (1°) with respect to the axis of rotation, the bifurcation points unfold and the two-cell solution evolves smoothly as Rossby number is

  18. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  19. Perception of Mirror Symmetry in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falter, Christine M.; Bailey, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt grouping in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is selectively impaired for certain organization principles but for not others. Symmetry is a fundamental Gestalt principle characterizing many biological shapes. Sensitivity to symmetry was tested using the Picture Symmetry Test, which requires finding symmetry lines on pictures. Individuals…

  20. Residual symmetries of the gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Velázquez-Rodríguez, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    We develop a geometric criterion that unambiguously characterizes the residual symmetries of a gravitational Ansatz. It also provides a systematic and effective computational procedure for finding all the residual symmetries of any gravitational Ansatz. We apply the criterion to several examples starting with the Collinson Ansatz for circular stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We reproduce the residual symmetries already known for this Ansatz including their conformal symmetry, for which we identify the corresponding infinite generators spanning the two related copies of the Witt algebra. We also consider the noncircular generalization of this Ansatz and show how the noncircular contributions on the one hand break the conformal invariance and on the other hand enhance the standard translation symmetries of the circular Killing vectors to supertranslations depending on the direction along which the circularity is lost. As another application of the method, the well-known relation defining conjugate gravitational potentials introduced by Chandrasekhar, which makes possible the derivation of the Kerr black hole from a trivial solution of the Ernst equations, is deduced as a special point of the general residual symmetry of the Papapetrou Ansatz. In this derivation we emphasize how the election of Weyl coordinates, which determines the Papapetrou Ansatz, breaks also the conformal freedom of the stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. Additionally, we study AdS waves for any dimension generalizing the residual symmetries already known for lower dimensions and exhibiting a very complex infinite-dimensional Lie algebra containing three families: two of them span the semidirect sum of the Witt algebra and scalar supertranslations and the third generates vector supertranslations. Independently of this complexity we manage to comprehend the true meaning of the infinite connected group as the precise diffeomorphisms subgroup allowing to locally deform the AdS background into Ad

  1. Relativistic symmetries in nuclear single-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-You; Liang, Hao Zhao; Meng, Jie; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    Symmetry is a fundamental concept in quantum physics. The quasi-degeneracy between single-particle orbitals (n, l, j = l + 1/2) and (n -1, l + 2, j = l + 3/2) indicates a hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei, the so-called pseudospin symmetry. Since the pseudospin symmetry was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, many special features, including the spin symmetry for anti-nucleons, and many new concepts have been introduced. In this Chapter, we will illustrate the schematic picture of spin and pseudospin symmetries, derive the basic formalism, highlight the recent progress from several different aspects, and discuss selected open issues in this topic.

  2. Unconventional pairings and radial line nodes in inversion symmetry broken superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakioğlu, T.; Günay, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    Noncentrosymmetric superconductors (NCSs) with broken inversion symmetry can have spin-dependent order parameters (OPs) with mixed parity which can also have nodes in the pair potential as well as the energy spectra. These nodes are distinct features that are not present in conventional superconductors. They appear as points or lines in the momentum space where the latter can have angular or radial geometries dictated by the dimensionality, the lattice structure and the pairing interaction. In this work we study the nodes in time reversal symmetry (TRS) preserving NCSs at the OP, the pair potential, and the energy spectrum levels. Nodes are examined by using spin independent pairing interactions respecting the rotational C∞v symmetry in the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The pairing symmetries and the nodal topology are affected by the relative strength of the pairing channels which is studied for the mixed singlet-triplet, pure singlet, and pure triplet. Complementary to the angular line nodes widely present in the literature, the C∞v symmetry here allows radial line nodes (RLNs) due to the nonlinear momentum dependence in the OPs. The topology of the RLNs in the mixed case shows a distinctly different characterization than the half-spin quantum vortex at the Dirac point. We apply this NCS physics to the inversion symmetry broken exciton condensates (ECs) in double quantum wells where the point and the RLNs can be found. On the other hand, for a pure triplet condensate, two fully gapped and topologically distinct regimes exist, separated by a QSHI-like zero energy superconducting state with even number of Majorana modes. We also remark on how the point and the RLNs can be manipulated, enabling an external control on the topology.

  3. Floppy Molecules with Internal Rotation and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreglewski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    There are different ways to analyze rovibrational structure of molecules having several large amplitude motions of different type, like internal rotation and inversion or ring-puckering. In my research group we have developed and used methods starting from potential surfaces for large amplitude motions but also applied purely effective Hamiltonians, where tunneling splittings were key parameters. Whatever is the method the following problems must be solved when addressing a rovibrational problem with large amplitude vibrations: 1) a definition of the permutation-inversion molecular symmetry group, 2) a choice of the internal coordinates and their transformation in the symmetry group, 3) derivation of the Hamiltonian in chosen coordinates, 4) calculation of the Hamiltonian matrix elements in a symmetrized basis set. These points will be discussed. The advantage of methods which start from the geometry and potential surface for large amplitude vibrations give much clearer picture of internal dynamics of molecules but generally the fit to experimental data is much poorer. The fitting procedure is strongly non-linear and the iteration procedure much longer. The effective Hamiltonians the fit is generally much better since almost all optimized parameters are linear but the parameters have no clear physical meaning. This method is very useful in the assignment of experimental spectra. Results of the application of both method to methylamine and hydrazine will be presented.

  4. Numerical simulation of flow in mechanical heart valves: grid resolution and the assumption of flow symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Jones, S Casey; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Healy, Timothy M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2003-10-01

    A numerical method is developed for simulating unsteady, 3-D, laminar flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the leaflets fixed. The method employs a dual-time-stepping artificial-compressibility approach together with overset (Chimera) grids and is second-order accurate in space and time. Calculations are carried out for the full 3-D valve geometry under steady inflow conditions on meshes with a total number of nodes ranging from 4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6). The computed results show that downstream of the leaflets the flow is dominated by two pairs of counter-rotating vortices, which originate on either side of the central orifice in the aortic sinus and rotate such that the common flow of each pair is directed away from the aortic wall. These vortices intensify with Reynolds number, and at a Reynolds number of approximately 1200 their complex interaction leads to the onset of unsteady flow and the break of symmetry with respect to both geometric planes of symmetry. Our results show the highly 3-D structure of the flow; question the validity of computationally expedient assumptions of flow symmetry; and demonstrate the need for highly resolved, fully 3-D simulations if computational fluid dynamics is to accurately predict the flow in prosthetic mechanical heart valves.

  5. Discovering Symmetry in Everyday Environments: A Creative Approach to Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchigami, Kei; Schrandt, Matthew; Miessler, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on symmetry project is proposed as an innovative way of teaching point groups to undergraduate chemistry students. Traditionally, courses teaching symmetry require students to identify the point group of a given object. This project asks the reverse: students are instructed to identify an object that matches each point group. Doing so…

  6. Symmetry in social exchange and health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, Johannes

    2005-10-01

    Symmetry is a relevant concept in sociological theories of exchange. It is rooted in the evolutionary old norm of social reciprocity and is particularly important in social contracts. Symmetry breaking through violation of the norm of reciprocity generates strain in micro-social systems and, above all, in victims of non-symmetric exchange. In this contribution, adverse healthconsequences of symmetry breaking in contractual social exchange are analysed, with a main focus on the employment contract. Scientific evidence is derived from prospective epidemiological studies testing the model of effort-reward imbalance at work. Overall, a twofold elevated risk of incident disease is observed in employed men and women who are exposed to non-symmetric exchange. Health risks include coronary heart disease, depression and alcohol dependence, among others. Preliminary results suggest similar effects on health produced by symmetry breaking in other types of social relationships (e.g. partnership, parental roles). These findings underline the importance of symmetry in contractual social exchange for health and well-being.

  7. Graph fibrations and symmetries of network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Eddie; Rink, Bob; Sanders, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical systems with a network structure can display remarkable phenomena such as synchronisation and anomalous synchrony breaking. A methodology for classifying patterns of synchrony in networks was developed by Golubitsky and Stewart. They showed that the robustly synchronous dynamics of a network is determined by its quotient networks. This result was recently reformulated by DeVille and Lerman, who pointed out that the reduction from a network to a quotient is an example of a graph fibration. The current paper exploits this observation and demonstrates the importance of self-fibrations of network graphs. Self-fibrations give rise to symmetries in the dynamics of a network. We show that every network admits a lift with a semigroup or semigroupoid of self-fibrations. The resulting symmetries impact the global dynamics of the network and can therefore be used to explain and predict generic scenarios for synchrony breaking. Also, when the network has a trivial symmetry groupoid, then every robust synchrony in the lift is determined by symmetry. We finish this paper with a discussion of networks with interior symmetries and nonhomogeneous networks.

  8. Symmetries in proteins: A knot theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Jie; Dill, Ken A.

    1996-04-01

    Whereas the symmetries of small molecules are described by the methods of group theory, there is no corresponding way to describe the complex symmetries in proteins. We develop a quantitative method to define and classify symmetries in compact polymers, based on the mathematical theory of graphs and knots. We represent different chain folds by their ``polymer graphs,'' equivalent to contact maps. We transform those graphs into mathematical knots to give a parsing of different possible chain folds into conformational taxonomies. We use Alexander-Conway knot polynomials to characterize the knots. We find that different protein structures with the same tertiary fold, e.g., a βαβ motif with different lengths of α helix and β sheet, can be described in terms of the different powers of the propagation matrices of the knot polynomial. This identifies a fundamental type of topological length invariance in proteins, ``elongatable'' symmetries. For example, ``helix,'' ``sheet,'' ``helix-turn-helix,'' and other secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary structures define structures of any chain length. Possibly the nine superfolds identified by Thornton et al. have elongatable symmetries.

  9. Reflections on the concept of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Kuno

    2005-10-01

    The concept of symmetry is omnipresent, although originally, in Greek antiquity, distinctly different from the modern logical notion. In logic a binary relation R is called symmetric if xRy implies yRx. In Greek, "being symmetric" in general usage is synonymous with "being harmonious", and in technical usage, as in Euclid's Elements, it is synonymous with "commensurable". Due to the second meaning, which is close to the etymology of συ´μμɛτρoς, "with measure" has likewise to be read as "being [in] rational [ratios]" and displays the origin of the concept of rationality of establishing a proportion. Heraclitus can be read as a master of such connections. Exercising rationality is a case of simultaneously finding and inventing symmetries. On that basis a proposal is made of how to relate the modern logical notion of symmetry, a second-order concept, on the one hand with modern first-order usages of the term symmetric in geometry and other fields, and on the other hand with the notion of balance that derives from the ancient usage of symmetric. It is argued that symmetries as states of balance exist only in theory, in practice they function as norms vis-à-vis broken symmetries.

  10. Weyl-gauge symmetry of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Alfredo

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Graphene action's Weyl symmetry identifies shapes for which the DOS is invariant. > Electrons on graphene might experience a general-relativistic-like spacetime. > Rich mathematical structures, such as the Liouville's equation, naturally arise. - Abstract: The conformal invariance of the low energy limit theory governing the electronic properties of graphene is explored. In particular, it is noted that the massless Dirac theory in point enjoys local Weyl symmetry, a very large symmetry. Exploiting this symmetry in the two spatial dimensions and in the associated three dimensional spacetime, we find the geometric constraints that correspond to specific shapes of the graphene sheet for which the electronic density of states is the same as that for planar graphene, provided the measurements are made in accordance to the inner reference frame of the electronic system. These results rely on the (surprising) general relativistic-like behavior of the graphene system arising from the combination of its well known special relativistic-like behavior with the less explored Weyl symmetry. Mathematical structures, such as the Virasoro algebra and the Liouville equation, naturally arise in this three-dimensional context and can be related to specific profiles of the graphene sheet. Speculations on possible applications of three-dimensional gravity are also proposed.

  11. The symmetries of the Carroll superparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Parra, Lorena

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent applications of Carroll symmetries we investigate, using the method of nonlinear realizations, the geometry of flat and curved (AdS) Carroll space and the symmetries of a particle moving in such a space both in the bosonic as well as in the supersymmetric case. In the bosonic case we find that the Carroll particle possesses an infinite-dimensional symmetry which only in the flat case includes dilatations. The duality between the Bargmann and Carroll algebra, relevant for the flat case, does not extend to the curved case. In the supersymmetric case we study the dynamics of the { N }=1 AdS Carroll superparticle. Only in the flat limit we find that the action is invariant under an infinite-dimensional symmetry that includes a supersymmetric extension of the Lifshitz Carroll algebra with dynamical exponent z = 0. We also discuss in the flat case the extension to { N }=2 supersymmetry and show that the flat { N }=2 superparticle is equivalent to the (non-moving) { N }=1 superparticle and that therefore it is not BPS unlike its Galilei counterpart. This is due to the fact that in this case kappa-symmetry eliminates the linearized supersymmetry. In an appendix we discuss the { N }=2 curved case in three-dimensions only and show that there are two { N }=2 theories that are physically different.

  12. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  13. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  14. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  15. An Exhaustive Symmetry Approach to Structure Determination: Phase Transitions in Bi2Sn2O7.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Payne, Julia L; Evans, Ivana Radosavljevic; Stokes, Harold T; Campbell, Branton J; Evans, John S O

    2016-06-29

    The exploitable properties of many materials are intimately linked to symmetry-lowering structural phase transitions. We present an automated and exhaustive symmetry-mode method for systematically exploring and solving such structures which will be widely applicable to a range of functional materials. We exemplify the method with an investigation of the Bi2Sn2O7 pyrochlore, which has been shown to undergo transitions from a parent γ cubic phase to β and α structures on cooling. The results include the first reliable structural model for β-Bi2Sn2O7 (orthorhombic Aba2, a = 7.571833(8), b = 21.41262(2), and c = 15.132459(14) Å) and a much simpler description of α-Bi2Sn2O7 (monoclinic Cc, a = 13.15493(6), b = 7.54118(4), and c = 15.07672(7) Å, β = 125.0120(3)°) than has been presented previously. We use the symmetry-mode basis to describe the phase transition in terms of coupled rotations of the Bi2O' anti-cristobalite framework, which allow Bi atoms to adopt low-symmetry coordination environments favored by lone-pair cations.

  16. Computational Study of the Grad--Shafranov Equation with Flow in Helical Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddi, Lorenzo; Guazzotto, Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni; Paccagnella, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    We present a numerical solution of the modified Grad--Shafranov equation in cylinder geometry and in the presence of macroscopic rotation. The main challenge is the full inclusion of helical symmetry, a problem relevant in a variety of scenarios. Cylindrical symmetry is often used as lowest-order approximation of the Grad--Shafranov equation in Tokamaks. However, in many other situations in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, helical symmetry is a better assumption, in particular in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configurations in Single-Helicity states. The ``Grad--Shafranov'' equation is written in helical symmetry with a convective term expressed by toroidal and poloidal velocities. Two equations are obtained: a non-linear PDE for the magnetic flux ψ(r,u) and an algebraic equation for the density ρ(r,u,ψ) (u is the variable along the helix). Here, we report on our progress in the development of a numerical method and computational code to solve the coupled non-linear system. Examples of applications are described.

  17. Direct terrestrial test of Lorentz symmetry in electrodynamics to 10−18

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Moritz; Parker, Stephen R.; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Hartnett, John G.; Ivanov, Eugene N.; Peters, Achim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry is a foundational property of modern physics, underlying the standard model of particles and general relativity. It is anticipated that these two theories are low-energy approximations of a single theory that is unified and consistent at the Planck scale. Many unifying proposals allow Lorentz symmetry to be broken, with observable effects appearing at Planck-suppressed levels; thus, precision tests of Lorentz invariance are needed to assess and guide theoretical efforts. Here we use ultrastable oscillator frequency sources to perform a modern Michelson–Morley experiment and make the most precise direct terrestrial test to date of Lorentz symmetry for the photon, constraining Lorentz violating orientation-dependent relative frequency changes Δν/ν to 9.2±10.7 × 10−19 (95% confidence interval). This order of magnitude improvement over previous Michelson–Morley experiments allows us to set comprehensive simultaneous bounds on nine boost and rotation anisotropies of the speed of light, finding no significant violations of Lorentz symmetry. PMID:26323989

  18. Direct terrestrial test of Lorentz symmetry in electrodynamics to 10(-18).

    PubMed

    Nagel, Moritz; Parker, Stephen R; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Stanwix, Paul L; Hartnett, John G; Ivanov, Eugene N; Peters, Achim; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Lorentz symmetry is a foundational property of modern physics, underlying the standard model of particles and general relativity. It is anticipated that these two theories are low-energy approximations of a single theory that is unified and consistent at the Planck scale. Many unifying proposals allow Lorentz symmetry to be broken, with observable effects appearing at Planck-suppressed levels; thus, precision tests of Lorentz invariance are needed to assess and guide theoretical efforts. Here we use ultrastable oscillator frequency sources to perform a modern Michelson-Morley experiment and make the most precise direct terrestrial test to date of Lorentz symmetry for the photon, constraining Lorentz violating orientation-dependent relative frequency changes Δν/ν to 9.2±10.7 × 10(-19) (95% confidence interval). This order of magnitude improvement over previous Michelson-Morley experiments allows us to set comprehensive simultaneous bounds on nine boost and rotation anisotropies of the speed of light, finding no significant violations of Lorentz symmetry.

  19. Direct terrestrial test of Lorentz symmetry in electrodynamics to 10(-18).

    PubMed

    Nagel, Moritz; Parker, Stephen R; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Stanwix, Paul L; Hartnett, John G; Ivanov, Eugene N; Peters, Achim; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry is a foundational property of modern physics, underlying the standard model of particles and general relativity. It is anticipated that these two theories are low-energy approximations of a single theory that is unified and consistent at the Planck scale. Many unifying proposals allow Lorentz symmetry to be broken, with observable effects appearing at Planck-suppressed levels; thus, precision tests of Lorentz invariance are needed to assess and guide theoretical efforts. Here we use ultrastable oscillator frequency sources to perform a modern Michelson-Morley experiment and make the most precise direct terrestrial test to date of Lorentz symmetry for the photon, constraining Lorentz violating orientation-dependent relative frequency changes Δν/ν to 9.2±10.7 × 10(-19) (95% confidence interval). This order of magnitude improvement over previous Michelson-Morley experiments allows us to set comprehensive simultaneous bounds on nine boost and rotation anisotropies of the speed of light, finding no significant violations of Lorentz symmetry. PMID:26323989

  20. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}ȯ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  1. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, C A; Butterworth, G; Roberts, T; Graupner, L; Hole, G

    1994-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:7845772

  2. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:24601036

  3. Approximate flavor symmetries in the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A. ); Silva, J.P. )

    1994-01-01

    Approximate flavor symmetries in the quark sector have been used as a handle on physics beyond the standard model. Because of the great interest in neutrino masses and mixings and the wealth of existing and proposed neutrino experiments it is important to extend this analysis to the leptonic sector. We show that in the seesaw mechanism the neutrino masses and mixing angles do not depend on the details of the right-handed neutrino flavor symmetry breaking, and are related by a simple formula. We propose several [ital Ansa]$[ital uml]---[ital tze] which relate different flavor symmetry-breaking parameters and find that the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem is always easily fit. Further, the [nu][sub [mu]-][nu][sub [tau

  4. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  5. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  6. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  7. Symmetry transforms for ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg I

    2002-11-01

    A method for constructing ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria is introduced. The method consists of the application of symmetry transforms to any known MHD equilibrium [ O. I. Bogoyavlenskij, Phys. Rev. E. 62, 8616, (2000)]. The transforms break the geometrical symmetries of the field-aligned solutions and produce continuous families of the nonsymmetric MHD equilibria. The method of symmetry transforms also allows to obtain MHD equilibria with current sheets and exact solutions with noncollinear vector fields B and V. A model of the nonsymmetric astrophysical jets outside of their accretion disks is developed. The total magnetic and kinetic energy of the jet is finite in any layer c(1)

  8. Topological phases with generalized global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Beni

    2016-04-01

    We present simple lattice realizations of symmetry-protected topological phases with q -form global symmetries where charged excitations have q spatial dimensions. Specifically, we construct d space-dimensional models supported on a (d +1 ) -colorable graph by using a family of unitary phase gates, known as multiqubit control-Z gates in quantum information community. In our construction, charged excitations of different dimensionality may coexist and form a short-range entangled state which is protected by symmetry operators of different dimensionality. Nontriviality of proposed models, in a sense of quantum circuit complexity, is confirmed by studying protected boundary modes, gauged models, and corresponding gapped domain walls. We also comment on applications of our construction to quantum error-correcting codes, and discuss corresponding fault-tolerant logical gates.

  9. A torus bifurcation theorem with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangils, S. A.; Golubitsky, M.

    1989-01-01

    Hopf bifurcation in the presence of symmetry, in situations where the normal form equations decouple into phase/amplitude equations is described. A theorem showing that in general such degeneracies are expected to lead to secondary torus bifurcations is proved. By applying this theorem to the case of degenerate Hopf bifurcation with triangular symmetry it is proved that in codimension two there exist regions of parameter space where two branches of asymptotically stable two-tori coexist but where no stable periodic solutions are present. Although a theory was not derived for degenerate Hopf bifurcations in the presence of symmetry, examples are presented that would have to be accounted for by any such general theory.

  10. Discrete Abelian gauge symmetries and axions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honecker, Gabriele; Staessens, Wieland

    2015-07-01

    We combine two popular extensions of beyond the Standard Model physics within the framework of intersecting D6-brane models: discrete ℤn symmetries and Peccei-Quinn axions. The underlying natural connection between both extensions is formed by the presence of massive U(1) gauge symmetries in D-brane model building. Global intersecting D6-brane models on toroidal orbifolds of the type T6/ℤ2N and T6/ℤ2 × ℤ2M with discrete torsion offer excellent playgrounds for realizing these extensions. A generation-dependent ℤ2 symmetry is identified in a global Pati-Salam model, while global left-right symmetric models give rise to supersymmetric realizations of the DFSZ axion model. In one class of the latter models, the axion as well as Standard Model particles carry a non-trivial ℤ3 charge.

  11. Preserving Symmetry in Preconditioned Krylov Subspace Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Chow, E.; Saad, Y.; Yeung, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the problem of solving a linear system Ax = b when A is nearly symmetric and when the system is preconditioned by a symmetric positive definite matrix M. In the symmetric case, one can recover symmetry by using M-inner products in the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. This idea can also be used in the nonsymmetric case, and near symmetry can be preserved similarly. Like CG, the new algorithms are mathematically equivalent to split preconditioning, but do not require M to be factored. Better robustness in a specific sense can also be observed. When combined with truncated versions of iterative methods, tests show that this is more effective than the common practice of forfeiting near-symmetry altogether.

  12. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillations.

  13. SU(3) breaking and hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; OConnell, H.B.

    1998-10-01

    We study the various existing implementations of SU(3) breaking in the hidden local symmetry model for the low energy hadronic sector following a mechanism originally proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki (BKY). We pay particular attention to Hermiticity and current conservation. Following this, we present a new method for including symmetry breaking effects which preserves the BKY mass relation among vector mesons. Symmetry breaking (SB) necessarily requires a transformation of the pseudoscalar fields, which, following BKY, we refer to as field renormalization. We examine the consequences of propagating this through all Lagrangian terms including the anomalous ones. We thus explore the consequences of these various SB schemes for both charged and neutral pseudoscalar decay constants as measured in weak and anomalous decays respectively. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  15. Symmetry transforms for ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg I

    2002-11-01

    A method for constructing ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria is introduced. The method consists of the application of symmetry transforms to any known MHD equilibrium [ O. I. Bogoyavlenskij, Phys. Rev. E. 62, 8616, (2000)]. The transforms break the geometrical symmetries of the field-aligned solutions and produce continuous families of the nonsymmetric MHD equilibria. The method of symmetry transforms also allows to obtain MHD equilibria with current sheets and exact solutions with noncollinear vector fields B and V. A model of the nonsymmetric astrophysical jets outside of their accretion disks is developed. The total magnetic and kinetic energy of the jet is finite in any layer c(1)

  16. Viable axion from gauged flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, David; Perkins, Erik

    2010-11-15

    We consider a string-inspired nonsupersymmetric extension of the standard model with gauged anomalous U(1) flavor symmetries. Consistency requires the Green-Schwarz (GS) mechanism to cancel mixed anomalies. The additional required scalars provide Stueckelberg masses for the Z{sup '} particles associated to the gauged flavor symmetry, so they decouple at low energies. Our models also include a complex scalar field {phi} to generate Froggatt-Nielsen mass terms for light particles, giving a partial solution to the fermion mass problem. A residual approximate (anomalous) global symmetry survives at low energies. The associated pseudo-Goldstone mode is the phase of the {phi} scalar field, and it becomes the dominant contribution to the physical axion. An effective field theory analysis that includes neutrino masses gives a prediction for the axion decay constant. We find a simple model where the axion decay constant is in the center of the allowed window.

  17. Hidden conformal symmetry and quasinormal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang

    2010-12-01

    We provide an algebraic way to calculate the quasinormal modes of a black hole, which possesses a hidden conformal symmetry. We construct an infinite tower of quasinormal modes from the highest-weight mode, in a simple and elegant way. For the scalar, the hidden conformal symmetry manifests itself in the fact that the scalar Laplacian could be rewritten in terms of the SL(2,R) quadratic Casimir. For the vector and the tensor, the hidden conformal symmetry acts on them through Lie derivatives. We show that for three-dimensional black holes, with an appropriate combination of the components, the radial equations of the vector and the tensor could be written in terms of the Lie-induced quadratic Casimir. This makes the algebraic construction of the quasinormal modes feasible. Our results are in good agreement with the previous study.

  18. New Algorithms For Automated Symmetry Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jody; Kilgore, Tammy Elaine; Klinger, Allen

    1988-02-01

    In this paper we present new methods for computer-based symmetry identification that combine elements of group theory and pattern recognition. Detection of symmetry has diverse applications including: the reduction of image data to a manageable subset with minimal information loss, the interpretation of sensor data,1 such as the x-ray diffraction patterns which sparked the recent discovery of a new "quasicrystal" phase of solid matter,2 and music analysis and composition.3,4,5 Our algorithms are expressed as parallel operations on the data using the matrix representation and manipulation features of the APL programming language. We demonstrate the operation of programs that characterize symmetric and nearly-symmetric patterns by determining the degree of invariance with respect to candidate symmetry transformations. The results are completely general; they may be applied to pattern data of arbitrary dimension and from any source.

  19. Wave-driven rotation and mass separation in rotating magnetic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.

    Axisymmetric mirrors are attractive for fusion because of their simplicity, high plasma pressure at a given magnetic pressure, and steady state operation. Their subclass, rotating mirrors, are particularly interesting because they have increased parallel confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and a natural heating mechanism. This thesis finds and explores an unusual effect in supersonically rotating plasmas: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. Extending the alpha channeling concept to rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field is a particularly simple way to achieve the latter effect. In the rotating frame, this perturbation is seen as a wave near the alpha particle cyclotron harmonic, and can break the azimuthal symmetry and magnetic moment conservation without changing the particles total energy. The particle may exit if it reduces its kinetic energy and becomes more trapped if it gains kinetic energy, leading to a steady state current that maintains the field. Simulations of single particles in rotating mirrors show that a stationary wave can extract enough energy from alpha particles for a reactor to be self-sustaining. In the same way, rotation can be produced in non-fusion plasmas. Waves are identified to produce rotation in plasma centrifuges, which separate isotopes based on their mass difference. Finally, a new high throughput mass filter which is well suited to separating nuclear waste is presented. The new filter, the magnetic centrifugal mass filter (MCMF), has well confined output streams and less potential for nuclear proliferation than competing technologies. To assess the usefulness of the

  20. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. 2; Mean Flows and Differential Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1998-01-01

    with symmetries broken by rotation and stratification. Such structure is here found to play a crucial role in defining the mean zonal and meridional flows that coexist with the convection. Though they are subject to strong inertial oscillations, the strength and type of the mean flows are determined by a combination of the laminar tilting and the turbulent alignment mechanisms. Varying the parameters produces a wide range of mean motions. Among these, some turbulent solutions exhibit a mean zonal velocity profile that is nearly constant with depth, much as deduced by helioseismology at midlatitudes within the Sun. The solutions exhibit a definite handedness, with the direction of the persistent mean flows often prescribing a spiral with depth near the boundaries, also in accord with helioseismic deductions. The mean helicity has a profile that is positive in the upper portion of the domain and negative in the lower portion, a property bearing on magnetic dynamo processes that may be realized within such rotating layers of turbulent convection.