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Sample records for 2-french radiofrequency catheter

  1. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Complicating Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hai-Wen; Wei, Ping; Jiang, Sen; Gu, Shu-yi; Fan, Li-Chao; liang, Shuo; Ji, Xiaobin; Rajbanshi, Bhavana; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to characterize the clinical manifestations and features of pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) by retrospectively analyzing clinical data of patients in addition to reviewing the literature simultaneously to improve the understanding of PVS complicating radiofrequency catheter ablation and to provide evidence for early diagnosis and timely treatment. Clinical, imaging, and follow-up data of 5 patients with PVS-complicating radiofrequency catheter ablation were retrospectively analyzed between January 2012 and December 2014 in Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Relevant studies previously reported were also reviewed. Three out of 5 patients received pulmonary angiography. The initial symptoms were not specific, presenting chest pain in 3 cases, hemoptysis in 2 cases. The average duration between radiofrequency ablation to the onset of symptoms was 5.8 months. The chest image results were consolidation and pleural effusion mainly. Veins distributed in the left lungs were mostly influenced in 4 patients, and the inferior veins in 3 patients. Cardiac ultrasound examinations showed pulmonary arterial hypertension in 2 patients. Two patients received selective bronchial artery embolization after bronchial artery radiography because of hemoptysis. One patient underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy because of the suspicion of tumor. PVS is a condition mostly undetected because of its silent manifestations and inconsistent follow-up. The accurate clinical diagnosis is very difficult. A careful review of medical history and follow-up observation may be useful for all the patients who received the radiofrequency catheter ablation to recognize PVS in the early stage. PMID:26313772

  2. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  3. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  4. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  5. Chronic incomplete atrioventricular block induced by radiofrequency catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Bharati, S.; Graham, A.R.; Gorman, G.; Lev, M. )

    1989-10-01

    To determine if catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction with radiofrequency energy can induce chronic incomplete (first- and second-degree) AV block to avoid the need for a permanent pacemaker, 20 closed-chest dogs were studied. Group 1 (10 dogs) received radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) with a fixed power setting (5 or 10 W) while increasing the pulse duration from 10 to 50 seconds for each application. Group 2 (10 dogs) received energy with a fixed pulse duration (20 or 30 seconds) while increasing the power setting from 5 to 10 W or from 10 to 20 W during each energy delivery. Radiofrequency energy was delivered between a chest-patch electrode and the distal electrode of a regular 7F tripolar His bundle catheter. For each application, the energy delivery was interrupted when (1) the PR interval prolonged (greater than 50%) or (2) second-degree or complete AV block occurred and persisted up to 5 seconds. The ablation procedure ended when there was (1) persistent PR prolongation (greater than 50%) or persistent second-degree AV block (lasting greater than 30 minutes) after ablation, (2) occurrence of two consecutive transient (less than 1 minute) complete AV blocks after each energy delivery, or (3) complete AV block (lasting greater than 2 minutes) after ablation. Of seven dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which incomplete AV block was achieved 1 hour after the procedure, six in group 1 and five in group 2 remained in incomplete AV block 2-3 months after ablation. One dog in group 1 progressed into complete AV block. Of the remaining three dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which complete AV block was initially achieved 1 hour after ablation, two in group 1 and four in group 2 continued to have complete AV block, whereas one in each group had AV conduction returned to incomplete at 1-2 months of follow-up.

  6. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of atrial tissue using a suction catheter.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, T; Prunier, L; Cuize, L; Bruneval, P; Von Euw, D; Le Heuzey, J Y; Peronneau, P

    1989-01-01

    Closed chest ablative technique that avoid barotrauma would be attractive for ablation at thin walled cardiac structures, such as the atrial free wall or coronary sinus. Transcatheter radiofrequency (RF) currents produce tissue necrosis the size of which is dependent on the contact between the tissue and the electrode. In order to assess the effects of transvenous RF ablation of atrial free wall using a suction electrode catheter, we delivered in ten dogs, one single unmodulated RF pulse 1.2 MHz, in a unipolar mode, through the distal electrode of a lumen catheter (USCI 8F) (USCI, Billerica, MA USA) located in the right appendage. During the pulse an 80 KPa vacuum depression was applied to the lumen of the catheter. Each pulse had a 10 seconds duration and the mean delivered power was 4.3 +/- 1.4 W. Aortic pressure and electrocardiogram were monitored during the procedure. A right atrial electrophysiological study was performed at the ablated site, at control, after suction application and after RF pulse delivery. The animals were sacrificed after 14 or 21 days. Atrial pacing threshold values decreased after suction application in comparison to control values after the pulse (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.23 mA, P less than O.05) but increased after the pulse delivery (2.60 +/- 1.85 mA, P less than 0.01). In contrast, the atrial effective refractory period did not significantly change after suction, nor after RF pulse delivery. Aortic pressure remained unchanged throughout the procedure. Complex arrhythmias were not observed during or after RF pulse delivery. One dog died suddenly at the first day after ablation, but this death was most probably unrelated to RF ablation. Anatomic lesions had a length of 8.8 +/- 3.3 mm, a width of 4.6 +/- 2.5 mm and a depth of 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm. They were transmural in nine of the ten dogs but without atrial wall perforation in any case. Lesions suggesting tissue volatilization were present in four dogs. These results demonstrate that

  7. Reversal of ventricular premature beat induced cardiomyopathy by radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Y; Pison, L; van Opstal, J M; Dennert, R M; Heesen, W F; Crijns, H J G M

    2010-10-01

    Frequent monomorphic ventricular premature beats (VPBs) may lead to left ventricular dysfunction. We describe two patients with frequent monomorphic VPBs and dilated cardiomyopathy in whom left ventricular function normalised after elimination of the VPBs by radiofrequency catheter ablation. The recent literature on this topic is summarised and potential candidates for catheter ablation are discussed. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:493-8.).

  8. Successful control of life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia by radiofrequency catheter ablation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuriko; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okuma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Fukuhara, Junji; Ichikawa, Rie; Matsumura, Masaharu; Miyashita, Michio; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Watanabe, Mamie; Joo, Kunitaka; Makita, Naomasa; Horie, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a 9-month-old girl in whom malignant polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) was successfully controlled by radiofrequency catheter ablation under guidance with a three-dimensional mapping system. The VTs originated from the left ventricular lateral wall, left ventricular anterior wall, and left ventricular apex. At least six types of VTs were documented during the electrophysiology study. All VTs were successfully controlled after two sessions of radiofrequency catheter ablation, and she was discharged from our hospital on propranolol, mexiletine, flecainide, and aprindine. PMID:23836069

  9. A novel four-wire-driven robotic catheter for radio-frequency ablation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takahisa; Song, Sang-Eun; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Robotic catheters have been proposed to increase the efficacy and safety of the radio-frequency ablation treatment. The robotized motion of current robotic catheters mimics the motion of manual ones—namely, deflection in one direction and rotation around the catheter. With the expectation that the higher dexterity may achieve further efficacy and safety of the robotically driven treatment, we prototyped a four-wire-driven robotic catheter with the ability to deflect in two- degree-of-freedom motions in addition to rotation. Methods A novel quad-directional structure with two wires was designed and developed to attain yaw and pitch motion in the robotic catheter. We performed a mechanical evaluation of the bendability and maneuverability of the robotic catheter and compared it with current manual catheters. Results We found that the four-wire-driven robotic catheter can achieve a pitching angle of 184.7° at a pulling distance of wire for 11mm, while the yawing angle was 170.4° at 11mm. The robotic catheter could attain the simultaneous two- degree-of-freedom motions in a simulated cardiac chamber. Conclusion The results indicate that the four-wire-driven robotic catheter may offer physicians the opportunity to intuitively control a catheter and smoothly approach the focus position that they aim to ablate. PMID:24510205

  10. Reversal of premature ventricular complex-induced cardiomyopathy following successful radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Efremidis, Michalis; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Sideris, Antonios; Kardaras, Fotios

    2008-06-01

    Premature ventricular complex (PVC)-induced cardiomyopathy is an underappreciated cause of left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The present report describes the case of an elderly man with a very high burden of monomorphic PVCs and LV dysfunction. Elimination of the left ventricular focus following radiofrequency catheter ablation resulted in reversal of cardiomyopathy.

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  12. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of Type 1 atrial flutter using a large-tip electrode catheter and high-power radiofrequency energy generator.

    PubMed

    Feld, Gregory K

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of efficacy of 8 mm electrode-tipped or saline-irrigated-tip catheters for ablation of atrial flutter (AFL). These catheters have a theoretical advantage as they produce a large ablation lesion. However, large-tip ablation catheters have a larger surface area and require a higher power radiofrequency (RF) generator with up to 100 W capacity to produce adequate ablation temperatures (50-60 degrees C). The potential advantages of a large-tip ablation catheter and high-power RF generator include the need for fewer energy applications, shorter procedure and fluoroscopy times, and greater efficacy. Therefore, the safety and efficacy of AFL ablation using 8 or 10 mm electrode catheters and a 100-W RF generator was studied using the Boston Scientific, Inc., EPT-1000 XP cardiac ablation system. There were 169 patients, aged 61 +/- 12 years involved. Acute end points were bidirectional isthmus block and no inducible AFL. Following ablation, patients were seen at 1, 3 and 6 months, with event monitoring performed weekly and for any symptoms. Three quality of life surveys were completed during follow-up. Acute success was achieved in 158 patients (93%), with 12 +/- 11 RF energy applications. The efficacy of 8 and 10 mm electrodes did not differ significantly. The number of RF energy applications (10 +/- 8 vs. 14 +/- 8) and ablation time (0.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.6 h) were less with 10 mm compared with 8 mm electrodes (p < 0.01). Of 158 patients with acute success, 42 were not evaluated at 6 months due to study exclusions. Of the 116 patients evaluated at 6 months, 112 (97%) had no AFL recurrence. Of those without AFL recurrence at 6 months, 95 and 93% were free of symptoms at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Ablation of AFL improved quality of life scores (p < 0.05) and reduced anti-arrhythmic and rate control drug use (p < 0.05). Complications occurred in six out of 169 patients (3.6%) but there were no deaths. It was concluded

  13. In vitro assessment of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring catheter for treatment of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Merryman, W David

    2014-03-21

    Percutaneous approaches to mitral valve repair are an attractive alternative to surgical repair or replacement. Radiofrequency ablation has the potential to approximate surgical leaflet resection by using resistive heating to reduce leaflet size, and cryogenic temperatures on a percutaneous catheter can potentially be used to reversibly adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets for reliable application of radiofrequency energy. We tested a combined cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter using excised porcine mitral valves placed in a left heart flow loop capable of reproducing physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Transmitral flow and pressure were monitored during the cryo-anchoring procedure and compared to baseline flow conditions, and the extent of radiofrequency energy delivery to the mitral valve was assessed post-treatment. Long term durability of radiofrequency ablation treatment was assessed using statically treated leaflets placed in a stretch bioreactor for four weeks. Transmitral flow and pressure waveforms were largely unaltered during cryo-anchoring. Parameter fitting to mechanical data from leaflets treated with radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring revealed significant mechanical differences from untreated leaflets, demonstrating successful ablation of mitral valves in a hemodynamic environment. Picrosirius red staining showed clear differences in morphology and collagen birefringence between treated and untreated leaflets. The durability study indicated that statically treated leaflets did not significantly change size or mechanics over four weeks. A cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter can adhere to and ablate mitral valve leaflets in a physiologic hemodynamic environment, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection of mitral valve tissue.

  14. [Infectious mitral endocarditis after radiofrequency catheter ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway].

    PubMed

    Benito Bartolomé, F; Sánchez Fernández-Bernal, C

    2001-08-01

    A 2-years-old child with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with life-threatening symptoms underwent radiofrequency ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter positioned above the atrioventricular groove by transeptal approach was used for ablation. The catheters were repeatedly used after ethylene oxide sterilisation. Although immediate post-ablation echocardiography demonstrated no complications, the patient was readmitted two days later with fever and a new mitral murmur. Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated and intravenous antibiotics were administered. In the following weeks, the patient developed constrictive pericarditis requiring surgical treatment and acute hemiplegia caused by brain embolism arising from valvular vegetation. At 5 years of follow-up the patient presents residual hemiparesia and grade II/IV mitral insufficiency. PMID:11481116

  15. Teflon-buttressed sutures plus pericardium patch repair left ventricular rupture caused by radiofrequency catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hao; Zhang, Qi; He, Yanzhong; Feng, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac rupture often occurs after myocardial infarction or chest trauma with a high mortality rate. However, left ventricular rupture caused by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is extremely rare. Methods: We describe a case of a 61-year-old male who survived from left ventricular rupture caused by a RFCA procedure for frequent ventricular premature contractions. Surgical exploration with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was performed when the signs of cardiac tamponade developed 7 hours after the ablation surgery. Results: Teflon-buttressed sutures of the tear in the left ventricular posterolateral wall and pericardium patch applied to the contusion region on the wall repaired the rupture safely and effectively. Conclusion: Timely surgical intervention under CPB facilitated the survival of the patient. Teflon-buttressed sutures plus pericardium patch achieved the successful repair of the rupture. PMID:27661047

  16. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  17. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  18. Pulmonary vein stenosis complicating radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Edriss, Hawa; Denega, Tatiana; Test, Victor; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become a widely used intervention in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is one of the most serious complications associated with this procedure; the degree of stenosis ranges from mild (<50%) to complete venous occlusion. The natural history of PVS and the risk of progression of existing PVS are uncertain. Symptomatic and/or severe PVS is a serious medical problem and can be easily misdiagnosed since it is an uncommon and relatively new medical problem, often has low clinical suspicion among clinicians, and has a non-specific presentation that mimics other more common respiratory or cardiac diseases. The estimated incidence varies in literature reports from 0% to 42% of ablation procedures, depending on technical aspects of the procedure and operator skill. Most patients with significant PVS remain asymptomatic or have few symptoms. Symptomatic patients usually present with dyspnea, chest pain, or hemoptysis and are usually treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Little is known about the long term effect of PV stenosis/occlusion on the pulmonary circulation and the development of pulmonary hypertension. Evolving technology may reduce the frequency of this complication, but long term studies are needed to understand the effect of therapeutic atrial injury and adverse outcomes. This review summarizes the current literature and outlines an approach to the evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:27492534

  19. Value of Implantable Loop Recorders in Monitoring Efficacy of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Pu, Lijin; Yang, Liuqing; Li, Fang; Luo, Zhiling; Guo, Tao; Hua, Baotong; Li, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the implantable loop recorder (ILR) in diagnosing atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing the postoperative efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Material/Methods A total of 32 patients who successfully underwent RFCA were selected. These patients discontinued antiarrhythmic medication with no AF recurrence for more than 3 months after RFCA, and underwent ILR placement by a conventional method. The clinical manifestations and information on arrhythmias recorded by the ILR were followed up to assess the efficacy of AF RFCA. Results The mean follow-up period was 24.7±12.5 months. Of 32 patients with ILR information, 27 had successful RFCA and 5 had recurrent AF. The follow-up results obtained by traditional methods showed 29 patients with successful RFCA and 3 with recurrent AF (P<0.05). Among the 18 patients with clinical symptoms, 13 had recorded cardiac arrhythmic events (72.2%) and 5 showed sinus rhythm (27.8%). The ILRs recorded 18 patients with arrhythmic events (56.3%), including 12 cases of atrial arrhythmias, among whom 5 recurred at 9, 12, 16, 17, and 32 months after AF RFCA; there were also 2 patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 4 with bradycardia. Conclusions The value of ILR in assessing the efficacy of AF RFCA was superior to that of traditional methods. ILR can promptly detect asymptomatic AF, and can monitor electrocardiogram features after RFCA, thus providing objective evidence of efficacy. PMID:27518153

  20. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of intractable ventricular tachycardia in an infant following arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Costello, John P; He, Dingchao; Greene, Elizabeth A; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-01-01

    A full-term male neonate presented with cyanosis upon delivery and was subsequently diagnosed with d-transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and restrictive atrial septal defect. Following initiation of intravenous prostaglandins and balloon atrial septostomy, an arterial switch operation was performed on day 3 of life. The postoperative course was complicated by intractable ventricular tachycardia that was refractory to lidocaine, amiodarone, esmolol, fosphenytoin, and mexiletine drug therapy. Ventricular tachycardia was suppressed with overdrive atrial pacing but recurred upon discontinuation. Seven weeks postoperatively, radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed due to hemodynamically compromising persistent ventricular tachycardia refractory to medical therapy. The ventricular tachycardia was localized to the inferior-lateral right ventricular outlet septum. The procedure was successful without complications or recurrence. Antiarrhythmics were discontinued after the ablation procedure. Seven days after the ablation, a different, slower fascicular rhythm was noted to compete with the infant's sinus rhythm. This was consistent with the preablation amiodarone having reached subtherapeutic levels given its very long half-life. The patient was restarted on oral beta blockers and amiodarone. The patient was subsequently discharged home in predominantly sinus rhythm with intermittent fascicular rhythm. PMID:23647934

  1. An in vivo comparison of radiofrequency cardiac lesions formed by standard and magnetically steered 4 mm tip catheters

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, A.S.; De Castro, C.A. Brito; van Deel, E.; van Beusekom, H.M.M.; Jordaens, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background. In vivo comparison of cardiac radiofrequency ablation lesions between standard and magnetically steered 4 mm tip catheters has never been reported. Methods. High and low right atrium (RA) free wall, isthmus, right ventricle (RV) free wall and outflow tract lesions were studied macroscopically and microscopically five days after lesion formation in seven pigs. Shape, size, thrombus formation, and ablation parameters were compared. The effect of minimal, medium and high wall contact was assessed by a contact measurement utility for magnetic catheters. Results. All 14 RA free wall lesions were transmural with a similar epicardial and endocardial surface area. In the RV, the epicardial area usually appeared to be smaller than the endocardial area with standard catheters. Isthmus lesions were difficult to assess transmurality. There was no difference in endocardial area: standard 39 mm2 (range 16 to 82 mm2) vs. magnetic 36 mm2 (range 23 to 111 mm2). If the catheter tip was perpendicular to the tissue, magnetic lesions were more often round or oval, while standard lesions were more often elongated (p<0.05). When the catheter tip was parallel to tissue, lesions always tended to be elongated. Microscopic characteristics were similar. The contact utility was not useful. Average impedance (p<0.0001) and energy delivered (p<0.05) were less with magnetic catheters. Conclusion. Lesions from magnetically steered catheters are transmural of similar size, but with less variability than standard catheter lesions when the tip is perpendicular to the tissue. Magnetic lesions are associated with lower impedance and energy delivery. This suggests a more stable tip-to-tissue contact. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:66–71.) PMID:20200611

  2. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: different cooled and noncooled electrode systems induce specific lesion geometries and adverse effects profiles.

    PubMed

    Dorwarth, Uwe; Fiek, Michael; Remp, Thomas; Reithmann, Cristopher; Dugas, Martin; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Ellen

    2003-07-01

    The success and safety of standard catheter radiofrequency ablation may be limited for ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare different cooled and noncooled catheter systems in terms of their specific lesion geometry, incidence of impedance rise, and crater and coagulum formation to facilitate appropriate catheter selection for special indications. The study investigated myocardial lesion generation of three cooled catheter systems (7 Fr, 4-mm tip): two saline irrigation catheters with a showerhead-type electrode tip (sprinkler) and a porous metal tip and an internally cooled catheter. Noncooled catheters (7 Fr) had a large tip electrode (8 mm) and a standard tip electrode (4 mm). RF energy was delivered on isolated porcine myocardium superfused with heparinized pig blood (37 degrees C) at power settings of 10-40 W. Both irrigated systems were characterized by a large lesion depth (8.1 +/- 1.6 mm) and a large lesion diameter (13.8 +/- 1.6 mm). In comparison, internally cooled lesions showed a similar lesion depth (8.0 +/- 1.0 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion diameter (12.3 +/- 1.2 mm,P = 0.04). Large tip lesions had a similar lesion diameter (14.5 +/- 1.6 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion depth (6.3 +/- 1.0 mm,P = 0.002) compared to irrigated lesions. However, lesion volume was not significantly different between the three cooled and the large tip catheter. To induce maximum lesion size, power requirements were three times higher for the irrigation systems and two times higher for the internally cooled and the large tip catheter compared to the standard catheter. Impedance rise was rarest with irrigated and large tip ablation. In case of impedance rise crater formation was a frequent observation (61-93%). Irrigated catheters prevented coagulum formation most effectively. Irrigated rather than internally cooled ablation appears to be most adequate for the induction of deep and

  3. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  4. Pediatric Tachyarrhythmia and Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results From 1993 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoung-Seob; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kim, Yoon-Nyun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives We performed a retrospective study to elucidate the frequency of tachycardia mechanisms and the characteristics of accessory pathways (APs), confirmed by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in pediatric tachycardia. In addition, we analyzed the efficacy and safety of pediatric RFCA. Subjects and Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of a total of 260 patients (aged 2 to 18 years) who had undergone RFCA between August 1993 and July 2011 at two medical centers in Daegu. Results Two hundred and sixty patients underwent 272 RFCAs at less than 18 years of age. Of these 260 patients, 9 patients (3%) were younger than 6 years, and 175 patients (67%) were older than 12 years. The tachycardia mechanisms observed were atrioventricular reentry tachycardia (AVRT) in 175 patients (65%), atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) in 83 patients (30%), ventricular tachycardia in 12 patients (4%), and atrial tachycardia in 2 patients (0.7%). Among the patients with AVRT, there were 94 concealed APs and 81 manifest APs. Left-side APs were more common in concealed APs than in manifest APs (72/94, 77% vs. 33/81, 41%, p<0.001). Sixty-six percent (55/83) of AVNRT cases were located at the M1 and/or M2 sites. Four patients had multiple tachycardia mechanisms (AVNRT+AVRT) and 9 patients had multiple APs. The recurrence rate was 5% (13/272). Of these recurrent cases, 12 patients had AVRT. The overall success rate was 95%. Conclusion Pediatric RFCA provides a good success rate and an acceptable recurrence. In addition, we suggest that the APs location may be associated with concealed or manifest property of APs. PMID:23236324

  5. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort. One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation. There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001–27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred. The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  6. Patient Characteristics and the Incidence of Radiation-induced Dermatitis Following Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Myung-Jin; Jo, Seong Jin; Cho, Youngjin; Choi, Eue-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) exposes patients to fixed angle radiation for extended periods of time. We investigated the incidence and characteristics of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID) associated with RFCA. Subjects and Methods We screened 1347 consecutive patients from 2000 to 2011 who underwent RFCA for any indication and reviewed patients with dermatologic issues at the 1-month follow-up. Skin lesions were classified into three groups: most likely RID, probable RID, and possible RID. Results Of the 1347 enrolled patients, 12 (0.89%) experienced dermatologic issues within 1 month after RFCA, including six patients (0.45%) clinically classified as 'most likely RID' and four patients (0.30%) with 'probable RID'. Ten patients, including most likely RID or probable RID patients, developed skin lesions on the right back and upper arm. Skin lesions did not improve without meticulous treatment, and three cases required surgical intervention. We compared the RID group to the remaining 1335 patients (normal group). The mean body mass indices (BMIs) of the RID and normal groups were 29.3 and 23.9 kg/m2, respectively (p<0.001). Radiation exposure times were longer in the RID group (180±31.0 vs. 47±49.9 minutes, p<0.001). We further analyzed 44 patients (6 RID cases and 38 normal patients) that had BMIs >26 kg/m2 and exposure times >115 minutes based on receiver operator characteristic curve analyses. Among the 35 patients without RID, 29 patients (82.9%) did not use biplane fluoroscopy. Conclusions Patients with high BMIs have a higher risk of developing severe RID with increasing fluoroscopy times using biplane fluoroscopy. PMID:27721855

  7. Non-fluoroscopic navigation systems for radiofrequency catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia reduce ionising radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    See, Jason; Amora, Jonah L; Lee, Sheldon; Lim, Paul; Teo, Wee Siong; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Lee, Chee Wan; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of non-fluoroscopic systems (NFS) to guide radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is associated with lower radiation exposure. This study aimed to determine if NFS reduces fluoroscopy time, radiation dose and procedure time. METHODS We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing RFCA for SVT. NFS included EnSite™ NavX™ or CARTO® mapping. We compared procedure and fluoroscopy times, and radiation exposure between NFS and conventional fluoroscopy (CF) cohorts. Procedural success, complications and one-year success rates were reported. RESULTS A total of 200 patients over 27 months were included and RFCA was guided by NFS for 79 patients; those with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT), left-sided atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) and right-sided AVRT were included (n = 101, 63 and 36, respectively). Fluoroscopy times were significantly lower with NFS than with CF (10.8 ± 11.1 minutes vs. 32.0 ± 27.5 minutes; p < 0.001). The mean fluoroscopic dose area product was also significantly reduced with NFS (NSF: 5,382 ± 5,768 mGy*cm2 vs. CF: 21,070 ± 23,311 mGy*cm2; p < 0.001); for all SVT subtypes. There was no significant reduction in procedure time, except for left-sided AVRT ablation (NFS: 79.2 minutes vs. CF: 116.4 minutes; p = 0.001). Procedural success rates were comparable (NFS: 97.5% vs. CF: 98.3%) and at one-year follow-up, there was no significant difference in the recurrence rates (NFS: 5.2% vs. CF: 4.2%). No clinically significant complications were observed in both groups. CONCLUSION The use of NFS for RFCA for SVT is safe, with significantly reduced radiation dose and fluoroscopy time. PMID:26805664

  8. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-01

    As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort.One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation.There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0-3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001-27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred.The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  9. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV.

  10. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV. PMID:26498938

  11. Radiofrequency ablation with a vibrating catheter: A new method for electrode cooling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kaihong; Yamashita, Tetsui; Shingyochi, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    A new electrode cooling system using a vibrating catheter is described for conditions of low blood flow when saline irrigation cannot be used. Vibrations of the catheter are hypothesized to disturb blood flow around the electrode, leading to increased convective cooling of the electrode. The aim of this study is to confirm the cooling effect of vibration and investigate the associated mechanisms. As methods, an in vitro system with polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel (PVA-H) as ablated tissue and saline flow in an open channel was used to measure changes in electrode and tissue temperatures under vibration of 0-63 Hz and flow velocity of 0-0.1 m/s. Flow around the catheter was observed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Results show that under conditions of no flow, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing vibration frequency, and in the absence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing flow velocity. In the presence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased under conditions of low flow velocity, but not under those of high flow velocity. PIV analyses showed disturbed flow around the vibrating catheter, and flow velocity around the catheter increased with higher-frequency vibrations. In conclusion, catheter vibration facilitated electrode cooling by increasing flow around the catheter, and cooling was proportional to vibration frequency.

  12. Intracardiac echocardiography to guide transseptal catheterization for radiofrequency catheter ablation of left-sided accessory pathways: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Citro, Rodolfo; Ducceschi, Valentino; Salustri, Alessandro; Santoro, Michele; Salierno, Michele; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2004-10-08

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) is a useful tool for guiding transseptal puncture during electrophysiological mapping and ablation procedures. Left-sided accessory pathways (LSAP) can be ablated by using two different modalities: retrograde approach through the aortic valve and transseptal approach with puncture of the fossa ovalis. We shall report two cases of LSAP where transcatheter radiofrequency ablation (TCRFA) was firstly attempted via transaortic approach with ineffective results. Subsequently, a transseptal approach under ICE guidance has been performed. During atrial septal puncture ICE was able to locate the needle tip position precisely and provided a clear visualization of the "tenting effect" on the fossa ovalis. ICE allowed a better mapping of the mitral ring and a more effective catheter ablation manipulation and tip contact which resulted in a persistent and complete ablation of the accessory pathway with a shorter time of fluoroscopic exposure. ICE-guided transseptal approach might be a promising modality for TCRFA of LSAP.

  13. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  14. Contact Geometry Affects Lesion Formation in Radio-Frequency Cardiac Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Neal; Fear, Elise C.; Byrd, Israel A.; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    One factor which may be important for determining proper lesion creation during atrial ablation is catheter-endocardial contact. Little information is available that relates geometric contact, depth and angle, to ablation lesion formation. We present an electrothermal computer model of ablation that calculated lesion volume and temperature development over time. The Pennes bioheat equation was coupled to a quasistatic electrical problem to investigate the effect of catheter penetration depth, as well as incident catheter angle as may occur in practice. Biological experiments were performed to verify the modelling of electrical phenomena. Results show that for deeply penetrating tips, acute catheter angles reduced the rate of temperature buildup, allowing larger lesions to form before temperatures elevated excessively. It was also found that greater penetration did not lead to greater transmurality of lesions. We conclude that catheter contact angle plays a significant role in lesion formation, and the time course must be considered. This is clinically relevant because proper identification and prediction of geometric contact variables could improve ablation efficacy. PMID:24086275

  15. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  16. Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia in a patient with dextrocardia due to unilateral pulmonary agenesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Tolga; Guler, Tumer Erdem; Golcuk, Ebru; Erden, Ismail; Ozcan, Kazım Serhan

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the slow pathway is considered to be the treatment of choice for patients with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. We report a 34-year-old female with mirror image dextrocardia due to unilateral pulmonary agenesis who underwent successful slow pathway ablation for typical atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. Using contrast injection, cardiac anatomy was identified in a short time and successfully ablated. PMID:25674017

  17. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  18. Incidence and Factors Predicting Skin Burns at the Site of Indifferent Electrode during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Hussain; Finta, Bohuslav; Rind, Jubran

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has become a mainstay for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Skin burns at the site of an indifferent electrode patch have been a rare, serious, and likely an underreported complication of RFA. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin burns in cardiac RFA procedures performed at one institution. Also, we wanted to determine the factors predicting skin burns after cardiac RFA procedures at the indifferent electrode skin pad site. Methods. A retrospective case control study was performed to compare the characteristics in patients who developed skin burns in a 2-year period. Results. Incidence of significant skin burns after RFA was 0.28% (6/2167). Four of the six patients were female and all were Caucasians. Four controls for every case were age and sex matched. Burn patients had significantly higher BMI, procedure time, and postprocedure pain, relative to control subjects (p < 0.05, one-tailed testing). No one in either group had evidence of dispersive pad malattachment. Conclusions. Our results indicate that burn patients had higher BMI and longer procedure times compared to control subjects. These findings warrant further larger studies on this topic. PMID:27213077

  19. Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation: Location Effects on Renal Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxing; Hata, Cary; Narciso, Irvin; Hall, Michael E.; Hall, John E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical studies indicate that blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of radiofrequency (RF) renal denervation (RD) are sustained for up to 2 years, although a recent clinical trial failed to find a major effect compared to sham treatment. In most previous studies, the efficacy of RD has not been assessed. The current study determined whether RD in different regions of the renal artery causes different degrees of RD as assessed with renal norepinephrine (NE) levels. METHODS AND RESULTS Unilateral RD was performed on 14 pigs divided into 3 groups: RD near the ostium, in the main renal artery near the bifurcation, and in extrarenal branches of the renal artery. After 2 weeks post-RD, the pigs were euthanized, renal cortex tissue was collected for NE measurement, and renal arteries were prepared for histological analysis. Renal NE decreased by 12% with RD at the ostium, 45% with RD near the bifurcation in the main renal artery, and 74% when RD was performed in extrarenal artery branches. The number of renal nerves was greatest in extrarenal branches and in the main artery compared to the ostium and the average distance from the lumen was greatest for nerves at the ostium and least at the branches. CONCLUSIONS RF RD lowers renal NE more significantly when performed in branches of the renal artery closer to the kidney. Increased efficacy of RF RD in extrarenal arterial branches may be due to the greater number of nerves in close proximity to the artery lumen in the branches. PMID:25576624

  20. Acute success and short-term follow-up of catheter ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter; a comparison of 8 mm tip radiofrequency and cryothermy catheters

    PubMed Central

    Janse, P.; Alings, M.; Scholten, M. F.; Mekel, J. M.; Miltenburg, M.; Jessurun, E.; Jordaens, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To compare the acute success and short-term follow-up of ablation of atrial flutter using 8 mm tip radiofrequency (RF) and cryocatheters. Methods Sixty-two patients with atrial flutter were randomized to RF or cryocatheter (cryo) ablation. Right atrial angiography was performed to assess the isthmus. End point was bidirectional isthmus block on multiple criteria. A pain score was used and the analgesics were recorded. Patients were followed for at least 3 months. Results The acute success rate for RF was 83% vs 69% for cryo (NS). Procedure times were similar (mean 144 ± 48 min for RF, vs 158 ± 49 min for cryo). More applications were given with RF than with cryo (26 ± 17 vs. 18 ± 10, p < 0.05). Fluoroscopy time was longer with RF (29 ± 15 vs. 19 ± 12 min, p < 0.02). Peak CK, CK-MB and CK-MB mass were higher, also after 24 h in the cryo group. Troponin T did not differ. Repeated transient block during application (usually with cryoablation) seemed to predict failure. Cryothermy required significantly less analgesia (p < 0.01), and no use of long sheaths (p < 0.005). The isthmus tended to be longer in the failed procedures (p = 0.117). This was similar for both groups, as was the distribution of anatomic variations. Recurrences and complaints in the successful patients were similar for both groups, with a very low recurrence of atrial flutter after initial success. Conclusions In this randomized study there was no statistical difference but a trend to less favorable outcome with 8 mm tip cryocatheters compared to RF catheters for atrial flutter ablation. Cryoablation was associated with less discomfort, fewer applications, shorter fluoroscopy times and similar procedure times. The recurrence rate was very low. Cryotherapy can be considered for atrial flutter ablation under certain circumstances especially when it has been used previously in the same patient, such as in an AF ablation. PMID:18363087

  1. Radiofrequency catheter ablation for idiopathic right ventricular tachycardia with special reference to morphological variation and long-term outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Chinushi, M.; Aizawa, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Kitazawa, H.; Shibata, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the long term outcome of radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the outflow tract of the right ventricle, with special reference to the morphological variation in the VT-QRS complexes. PATIENTS: 13 patients whose ventricular tachycardia was treated with RF ablation were followed up more than 18 months after RF ablation. RESULTS: Endocardial mapping revealed the various extensions of ventricular tachycardia origin (from 0.5 x 0.5 cm to 2.0 x 2.0 cm) in which the earliest local electrogram was recorded during ventricular tachycardia. In all five tachycardias from a relatively wider origin (more than 0.5 x 0.5 cm) and in four of eight from a narrow origin (< 0.5 x 0.5 cm), subtle morphological variation in the VT-QRS complexes was observed. In tachycardias with morphological variation, the local electrogram at the tachycardia origin also showed concomitant variation in morphology and activation sequence. Ventricular tachycardia from a narrow site was eliminated by RF ablation to the confined site, but a larger number of RF applications was required in tachycardias from a wider origin. All 13 tachycardias were successfully ablated by RF current, and during the follow up period of 28.2 (SD 7.2) months, recurrence was observed in only one patient who had a wider origin. CONCLUSIONS: Long term efficacy of RF ablation was excellent in idiopathic ventricular tachycardia originating from the outflow tract of the right ventricle. Subtle morphological variations were frequently observed in this type of ventricular tachycardia, and about half of them represented a relatively wider arrhythmogenic area. PMID:9391287

  2. Successful radiofrequency ablation of atrial tachycardias in surgically repaired Ebstein's anomaly using the Carto XP system and the QwikStar catheter.

    PubMed

    Drago, Fabrizio; Brancaccio, Gianluca; Grutter, Giorgia; De Santis, Antonella; Fazio, Giovanni; Silvetti, Massimo Stefano

    2007-06-01

    We describe the case of a child with three different atrial tachyarrhythmias originating from the right atrium, in whom a limited modified maze procedure was performed during surgical repair of an Ebstein's anomaly. Successful radiofrequency transcatheter ablation of all atrial tachyarrhythmias, one re-entrant and two focal, was obtained using the Carto XP EP three-dimensional navigation and ablation system, the new QwikMap software technology and the new mapping/ablation QwikStar multipolar catheter. No conventional mapping was used in addition to the three-dimensional system. Total procedural time was about 3 h and fluoroscopy time was 40 min. There were neither recurrences of the tachycardias nor complications during the follow-up (15 months).

  3. Acute Safety of an Open-Irrigated Ablation Catheter with 56-Hole Porous Tip for Radiofrequency Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Analysis from 2 Observational Registry Studies

    PubMed Central

    OZA, SAUMIL R; HUNTER, TINA D; BIVIANO, ANGELO B; DANDAMUDI, GOPI; HERWEG, BENGT; PATEL, ANSHUL M; POLLAK, SCOTT J; WANG, HUIJIAN; FISHEL, ROBERT S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Safety from 2 AF Ablation Registries Introduction This report presents safety data on the use of a new open-irrigation radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter with a 56-hole porous tip in 742 patients enrolled in 2 US prospective, multicenter observational registry studies representing real-world use of the catheter. Methods This analysis is comprised of patients who underwent RFA of drug-refractory recurrent symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Acute adverse events (AEs) were collected and categorized by seriousness, timing, and relatedness, with 7 days of follow-up data in one study and at least 120 days of data from a 1-year follow-up in the other. Acute serious adverse events (SAEs) that were identified as potentially related to the device and/or procedure were adjudicated by an independent safety committee. Results A total of 30 patients (4.0%) in the combined studies experienced an acute SAE related to the device and/or procedure, which was similar in the subset of patients age 65 and over (4.2%). These SAEs included 1.2% cardiac tamponade/perforation, 0.7% pericarditis, 0.5% pulmonary events, and 0.8% vascular access complications. No myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or atrioesophageal fistulas within 7 days postprocedure were reported. In the study with extended follow-up, 1 pulmonary vein stenosis and 1 esophageal injury were seen beyond 7 days postprocedure (0.2% each). There were no device or procedure related deaths. Conclusion Results from 2 large observational studies demonstrated that a new porous tip RFA catheter was safe for the treatment of drug refractory, recurrent, symptomatic paroxysmal AF, including treatment of older patients (≥65 years). PMID:24602038

  4. Minimal Use of Fluoroscopy to Reduce Fetal Radiation Exposure during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Maternal Supraventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiologic procedures in the young engender concern about the potential long-term effects of radiation exposure. This concern is manifold if such procedures are contemplated during pregnancy. Catheter ablations in pregnancy are indicated only in the presence of an unstable tachycardia that cannot be controlled by antiarrhythmic agents. This report describes the case of an 18-year-old pregnant woman and our stratagem to minimize irradiation of the mother and the fetus. PMID:25873828

  5. Minimal use of fluoroscopy to reduce fetal radiation exposure during radiofrequency catheter ablation of maternal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Sharma, Saumya; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2015-04-01

    Electrophysiologic procedures in the young engender concern about the potential long-term effects of radiation exposure. This concern is manifold if such procedures are contemplated during pregnancy. Catheter ablations in pregnancy are indicated only in the presence of an unstable tachycardia that cannot be controlled by antiarrhythmic agents. This report describes the case of an 18-year-old pregnant woman and our stratagem to minimize irradiation of the mother and the fetus. PMID:25873828

  6. Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a right posterolateral bypass tract in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome after a previous failed ablative procedure: taking the high road.

    PubMed

    Cohen, T J

    2000-07-01

    A 16-year-old high school basketball player with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome underwent an unsuccessful radiofrequency catheter ablative procedure from the femoral venous approach. During this procedure, the patient received 30 applications of radiofrequency energy without injury to the accessory pathway. The patient was treated with flecinide 100 mg orally twice daily and rescheduled for a second ablative procedure via the right internal jugular venous approach. At the second session, prior to any right internal jugular venous applications, 3 additional applications were delivered via the right femoral venous approach using a different catheter, without success. A single radiofrequency energy application from the right internal jugular venous approach eliminated the bypass tract in approximately 2 seconds. The superior approach achieved a more stable catheter position thereby eliminating the bypass tract. In conclusion, an alternative plan of attack should be considered after multiple failures from a given approach. In other words, take the high road if you can't take the low road.

  7. Adenosine-induced atrioventricular block: a rapid and reliable method to assess surgical and radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways.

    PubMed

    Keim, S; Curtis, A B; Belardinelli, L; Epstein, M L; Staples, E D; Lerman, B B

    1992-04-01

    Adenosine has been shown to inhibit anterograde and retrograde conduction through the atrioventricular (AV) node while having little or no effect on accessory pathway conduction. Its rapid onset of action and short half-life make it particularly suitable for repetitive measurements. In this study, the utility of adenosine was tested in assessing completeness of accessory pathway ablation. Sixteen patients with an accessory pathway were studied (eight surgical ablations, eight catheter ablations with radiofrequency energy). Before ablation, no accessory pathway was sensitive to adenosine. Twelve patients with pre-excitation showed high grade AV node block with maximal pre-excitation on the administration of adenosine during atrial pacing. Four patients with a concealed accessory pathway demonstrated high grade AV block without evidence of latent anterograde accessory pathway conduction. Preablation ventriculoatrial (VA) block was not observed in any of the 16 patients in response to adenosine during ventricular pacing. Immediately after accessory pathway ablation, all patients developed AV and VA block with the administration of adenosine during atrial and ventricular pacing, respectively. These findings were confirmed during follow-up study 1 week later. Atrioventricular block during atrial and ventricular pacing with adenosine affords a reliable and immediate assessment of successful pathway ablation. PMID:1552087

  8. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    Catheter - urine; Foley catheter; Indwelling catheter; Suprapubic catheters ... many sizes, materials (latex, silicone, Teflon™), and types (Foley, straight, coude tip). A Foley catheter, for example, ...

  9. Prediction of Primary Slow-Pathway Ablation Success Rate according to the Characteristics of Junctional Rhythm Developed during the Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh, Ataallah; Rezaee, Mohammad Esmaeel; Farahani, Maryam Moshkani

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, developed junctional rhythm (JR) that occurs during slow-pathway radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) has been focused upon as a highly sensitive surrogate end point for successful radiofrequency ablation. This study was conducted to assess the relationship between the presence and pattern of developed JR during the RF ablation of AVNRT and a successful outcome. Methods Seventy-five patients aged between 14 and 88 who underwent slow-pathway RF ablation due to symptomatic AVNRT were enrolled into the study and received a total of 162 RF energy applications. Combined anatomic and electrogram mapping approach was used for slow-pathway RF ablation. The ablation procedure consisted of 60-second, 60 °C temperature-controlled energy delivery. After each ablation pulse, successful ablation was assessed according to the loss of AVNRT inducibility via isoproterenol infusion. Four different patterns were considered for the developed JR, namely sparse, intermittent, continuous, and transient block. Success ablation rate was assessed with respect to the position, pattern, and number of junctional beats. Results Successful RF ablation with a loss of AVNRT inducibility was achieved in 43 (57.3%) patients using 119 RF energy applications (73.5%). JR developed in 133 of the 162 (82.1%) applications with a given sensitivity of 90.8% and low specificity of 41.9% as an end point of successful RF ablation, with a negative predictive value of 62.1%. The mean number of the developed junctional beats was significantly higher in the successful ablations (p value < 0.001), and the ROC analysis revealed that the best cut-off point of the cumulative junctional beats for identifying accurate AVNRT ablation therapy is 14 beats with 90.76 % sensitivity and 90.70% specificity. There were no significant differences in terms of successful ablation rates according to the four different patterns of JR and its positions (p

  10. Safety and efficacy of multipolar pulmonary vein ablation catheter vs. irrigated radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    McCready, J.; Chow, A. W.; Lowe, M. D.; Segal, O. R.; Ahsan, S.; de Bono, J.; Dhaliwal, M.; Mfuko, C.; Ng, A.; Rowland, E. R.; Bradley, R. J. W.; Paisey, J.; Roberts, P.; Morgan, J. M.; Sandilands, A.; Yue, A.; Lambiase, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The current challenge in atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment is to develop effective, efficient, and safe ablation strategies. This randomized controlled trial assesses the medium-term efficacy of duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation via the circular pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) vs. conventional electro-anatomically guided wide-area circumferential ablation (WACA). Methods and results One hundred and eighty-eight patients (mean age 62 ± 12 years, 116 M : 72 F) with paroxysmal AF were prospectively randomized to PVAC or WACA strategies and sequentially followed for 12 months. The primary endpoint was freedom from symptomatic or documented >30 s AF off medications for 7 days at 12 months post-procedure. One hundred and eighty-three patients completed 12 m follow-up. Ninety-four patients underwent PVAC PV isolation with 372 of 376 pulmonary veins (PVs) successfully isolated and all PVs isolated in 92 WACA patients. Three WACA and no PVAC patients developed tamponade. Fifty-six percent of WACA and 60% of PVAC patients were free of AF at 12 months post-procedure (P = ns) with a significant attrition rate from 77 to 78%, respectively, at 6 months. The mean procedure (140 ± 43 vs. 167 ± 42 min, P<0.0001), fluoroscopy (35 ± 16 vs. 42 ± 20 min, P<0.05) times were significantly shorter for PVAC than for WACA. Two patients developed strokes within 72 h of the procedure in the PVAC group, one possibly related directly to PVAC ablation in a high-risk patient and none in the WACA group (P = ns). Two of the 47 patients in the PVAC group who underwent repeat ablation had sub-clinical mild PV stenoses of 25–50% and 1 WACA patient developed delayed severe PV stenosis requiring venoplasty. Conclusion The pulmonary vein ablation catheter is equivalent in efficacy to WACA with reduced procedural and fluoroscopy times. However, there is a risk of thrombo-embolic and pulmonary stenosis complications which needs to be addressed and prospectively monitored. Clinical

  11. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Improves the Quality of Life Measured with a Short Form-36 Questionnaire in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of performing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is to improve the quality of life (QoL) and alleviate AF-related symptoms. We aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of RFCA on the QoL in AF patients. Methods We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis using a random effects model. We searched for the studies that reported the physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) of the short form-36, a validated system to assess and quantify the QoL, before and after RFCA in AF patients. PCS and MCS are T-scores with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. Results Of the 470 studies identified through systematic search, we included 13 studies for pre-RFCA vs. the post-RFCA analysis and 5 studies for treatment success vs. AF recurrence analyses. In the pre-RFCA vs. post-RFCA analysis, RFCA was associated with a significant increase in both the PCS (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 6.33 [4.81–7.84]; p < 0.001) and MCS (WMD = 7.80 [6.15–9.44]; p < 0.001). The ΔPCS (post-RFCA PCS–pre-RFCA PCS) and ΔMCS values were used for the treatment success vs. AF recurrence analysis. Patients with successful ablation had a higher ΔPCS (WMD = 7.46 [4.44–10.49]; p < 0.001) and ΔMCS (WMD = 7.59 [4.94–10.24]; p < 0.001). Conclusions RFCA is associated with a significant increase in the PCS and MCS in AF patients. Patients without AF recurrence after RFCA had a better improvement in the PCS and MCS than patients who had AF recurrence. PMID:27681507

  12. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  13. Transient sinus node dysfunction following sinus node artery occlusion due to radiofrequency catheter ablation of the septal superior vena cava-right atrium junction.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takeshi; Fukamizu, Seiji; Arai, Ken; Hojo, Rintaro; Aoyama, Yuya; Komiyama, Kota; Sakurada, Harumizu; Hiraoka, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    We performed catheter ablation to septal superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium (RA) junction rapid firing in a 57-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. He later experienced transient sinus node dysfunction resulting from injury to the sinus node artery (SNA), which branched only from the proximal region of the left circumflex artery. The direction of the SNA should be considered during catheter ablation at the septal SVC-RA junction, especially if the sinus node is supplied by only one SNA from the right coronary artery or the left circumflex artery.

  14. Urinary catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  15. The transponder system: a new method of precise catheter placement in the right atrium under echocardiographic guidance.

    PubMed

    Landzberg, J S; Franklin, J O; Langberg, J J; Herre, J M; Scheinman, M M; Schiller, N B

    1988-09-01

    The ability to localize catheters within the heart has gained importance with the use of percutaneous catheter ablation and the transseptal approach for valvuloplasty. A prototype interactive transponder catheter system, specifically designed to mark the catheter tip for echocardiographic visualization, was used to place catheters at the tricuspid anulus and the fossa ovalis in anesthetized dogs. Catheter tip location was marked by lesions produced by radiofrequency energy delivered at the distal catheter electrode. At autopsy, the center of the radiofrequency-induced lesion was located 2.8 +/- 0.7 mm from the edge of the lateral tricuspid anulus and 3.5 +/- 3.1 mm from the center of the fossa ovalis. The transponder catheter system offers the ability to precisely position catheters in the right atrium under echocardiographic guidance.

  16. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  17. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  18. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, B I; Becker, G J; Waller, B F; Barry, K J; Connolly, R J; Kaplan, J; Shapiro, A R; Nardella, P C

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal "hot-tip" catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal "molding" of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Connolly, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Shapiro, A.R.; Nardella, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal hot-tip catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal molding of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.

  20. [Radiofrequency transcatheter ablation in atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Morales Hernández, J A

    2000-01-01

    Incessant atrial tachycardia is an infrequent arrhythmia. Specially difficult to treat medically. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has been used successfully to cure a variety of supraventricular tachycardias. The purpose of this work is to report our initial experience in the treatment of atrial tachycardia. Ten patients, mean age 28.7 +/- 15 year with conventional drug-resistant symptomatic atrial tachycardia were treated with selective ablation of the focus using radiofrequency energy. It was found an abnormal automaticity in 10 tachycardias and in only one patient intra-atrial reentrant was supported. Radiofrequency energy was successful in 10 of 11 tachycardias with a mean of 9.3 +/- 6.8 applications using the technique of local atrial electrogram activation time with a mean value of -54 +/- -31 milliseconds at the successful ablation sites. No complications were observed and one patient had an early clinical recurrence. All patients with successful ablation are symptom-free, in sinus rhythm and without antiarrhythmic medications after 1 to 28 months of follow-up. Our initial experience support that radiofrequency catheter ablation is a safe and effective therapeutic option for incessant atrial tachycardia. PMID:10855411

  1. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  2. Presternal peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Zbylut J

    2002-04-01

    The swan neck presternal catheter is composed of 2 flexible (silicon rubber) tubes joined by a titanium connector at the time of implantation. The exit site is located in the parasternal area. The catheter located on the chest was designed to reduce the incidence of exit site infections compared to peritoneal dialysis catheters with abdominal exits. From August 1991 to September 30, 2001, 974 swan neck presternal catheters were implanted worldwide. At the university of Missouri, 150 of these catheters were implanted and followed for over 130 patient years. Presternal catheters tended to perform better than swan neck abdominal catheters regarding exit and tunnel infections, even though they were implanted in several patients in whom regular catheters with the exit on the abdomen would be difficult or impossible to implant. Two-year survival probability of presternal catheters was 0.95. Recurrent/refractory peritonitis was the only reason for catheter failure. The catheter is particularly useful in obese patients (body mass index >35), patients with ostomies, children with diapers and fecal incontinence, and patients who want to take baths without the risk of exit contamination. Many patients prefer presternal catheter because of better body image. Disadvantages of the presternal catheter are minimal. Compared with abdominal catheters, dialysis-solution flow is slightly slower because of the increased catheter length; however, slower flow is insignificant clinically. There is a possibility of catheter disconnection in the tunnel, but this complication is extremely rare in adults and easily corrected. Finally, the implantation technique is more challenging compared with that of single-piece, abdominal catheters. PMID:12085389

  3. Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia: feasibility and efficacy of catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Velazquez Rodriguez, E; Frank, R; Fontaine, G; Tonet, J; Lascault, G; Rosas, F; Eslami, M; Nakazato, Y

    1995-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is a well described syndrome of both left and right ventricular origin. This study reports the feasibility and efficacy of catheter ablation in this entity. Fourteen patients (mean age 30 +/- 10 years of age) and six patients (mean age 51 +/- 9 years of age) underwent endocardial catheter ablation with either direct-current shocks and radiofrequency energy, respectively. Earliest right and left ventricular activation and endocardial mapping during tachycardia were made to localize the site of ventricular tachycardia origin. The overall clinical efficacy was 93% for direct-current method with a mean number of shocks of 3.3 +/- 0.9/patient after a mean follow-up of 38 +/- 25 months. Radiofrequency ablation achieved an overall clinical efficacy of 83.6% with a mean of 3.2 pulses/patient during a follow-up of 10.5 +/- 4 months. The isoenzyme MB fraction of peak creatine kinase after ablation was less than 5%. There were no complications in any patient who underwent radiofrequency energy. Endocardial catheter ablation is feasible in patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia. Both methods are highly effective but radiofrequency energy is most desirable because of its lack of barotrauma, and may be considered as early therapy. PMID:7620280

  4. Biopsy catheter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... examination, a heart biopsy can be performed. A catheter is carefully threaded into an artery or vein to gain access into the heart. A bioptome (catheter with jaws in its tip) is then introduced. ...

  5. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... Catheters are used when you need medical treatment over a long period of time. For example, you ...

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other equipment such as needle electrodes, an electrical generator and grounding pads may also be used. Radiofrequency ... retractable electrodes that extend when needed. The radiofrequency generator produces electrical currents in the range of radiofrequency ...

  7. Problems of indwelling Foley catheters.

    PubMed

    Ndirangu, K; Ngugi, M

    1994-02-01

    One hundred patients undergoing urinary bladder catheterization for various reasons were studied. 42 patients received Sewoon catheters of various sizes. 38 received Eschmann catheters of various sizes and 20 received Bard catheters of various sizes. The duration of catheterization ranged from a few hours to 21 days. Various problems associated with catheterization were recorded whenever encountered. Stuck catheter was found to occur in 15 of the 40 patients who received Sewoon catheters. There were no stuck catheters recorded for Eschmann or Bard catheters. Infections occurred in 9 out of 100 patients, 7 of whom had Sewoon catheters. Leakage was recorded in 12 of the 100 patients, 9 of whom had Sewoon catheters. Blockage of balloon occurred in 5 patients, 3 of whom had Sewoon catheters. Painful spasms occurred in 8 patients, 4 with Bard, 4 with Sewoon catheters. It is concluded that Sewoon type of Foley catheters was associated with more problems than the other types studied.

  8. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  9. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step.

  10. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  11. The echo-transponder electrode catheter: a new method for mapping the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Langberg, J J; Franklin, J O; Landzberg, J S; Herre, J M; Kee, L; Chin, M C; Bharati, S; Lev, M; Himelman, R B; Schiller, N B

    1988-07-01

    The ability to locate catheter position in the left ventricle with respect to endocardial landmarks might enhance the accuracy of ventricular tachycardia mapping. An echo-transponder system (Telectronics, Inc.) was compared with biplane fluoroscopy for left ventricular endocardial mapping. A 6F electrode catheter was modified with the addition of a piezoelectric crystal 5 mm from the tip. This crystal was connected to a transponder that received and transmitted ultrasound, resulting in a discrete artifact on the two-dimensional echocardiographic image corresponding to the position of the catheter tip. Catheters were introduced percutaneously into the left ventricle of nine anesthetized dogs. Two-dimensional echo-transponder and biplane fluoroscopic images were recorded on videotape with the catheter at multiple endocardial sites. Catheter location was marked by delivering radiofrequency current to the distal electrode, creating a small endocardial lesion. Catheter location by echo-transponder and by fluoroscopy were compared with lesion location without knowledge of other data. Location by echo-transponder was 8.7 +/- 5.1 mm from the center of the radiofrequency lesion versus 14 + 7.8 mm by fluoroscopy (n = 15, p = 0.023). Echo-transponder localization is more precise than is biplane fluoroscopy and may enhance the accuracy of left ventricular electrophysiologic mapping.

  12. Suprapubic catheter removal: the cuffing effect of deflated catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John

    2003-05-01

    Supra-pubic catheterization plays an important role in patient care and management when this method of indwelling catheterization is required. However, one area of concern often experienced by nurses is the problem removing supra-pubic catheters or not being able to remove it. Catheter balloons, when deflated, incur crease or ridge formation. Removing supra-pubic catheters, a 'cuffing' effect occurs as the catheter is being removed. This seems to affect 100% silicone catheters more than non-silicone catheters. This article looks at the changes 100% silicone catheter balloons undergo following deflation and removal.

  13. Radiofrequency coblation tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Grobler, Alethea; Carney, A Simon

    2006-06-01

    Radiofrequency coblation is a new technology that is finding favour as a method for performing tonsillectomy. Its benefits include reduced pain and postoperative morbidity but there is controversy regarding possible increased postoperative haemorrhage rates.

  14. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  15. [Radiofrequency ablation in ventricular tachycardia: initial experience and evaluation of its limitations].

    PubMed

    Velázquez, E; Rosas, F; Frank, R; Tonet, J; Fontaine, G; Lascault, G; Gallais, Y

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report our initial experience with radiofrequency catheter ablation in 21 patients with ventricular tachycardia of different etiologies and to evaluate the causes which play a role in its limitation. The results show a low rate of effectiveness: total clinical success of 43%. Nevertheless there was a high success rate in a specific subsets of patients. The results depends on several factors: the electrophysiologic mechanisms and substrates of the tachycardia, the criteria to localize the critical area perpetuating the arrhythmia and the biophysical aspects of radiofrequency energy. Its usefulness is manifested in ventricular tachycardia with structurally normal heart and it has a limited success in cases with organic heart disease. Improvement of technical aspects and better understanding of the mechanisms of the tachycardia and characteristics of the target site will enhance the results of radiofrequency catheter ablation in ventricular tachycardia. PMID:7979818

  16. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  17. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  18. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  19. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common reasons to have an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... gov/pubmed/22094023 . Read More Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Transurethral resection of the prostate Urge incontinence Urinary ...

  20. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... vaginal wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension Urinary incontinence - ...

  1. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  2. Beginners' Progress in Decoding L2 French: Some Longitudinal Evidence from English Modern Foreign Languages Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woore, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Decoding"--converting the written symbols (or graphemes) of an alphabetical writing system into the sounds (or phonemes) they represent, using knowledge of the language's symbol/sound correspondences--has been argued to be an important but neglected skill in the teaching of second language (L2) French in English secondary schools. Previous…

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... computed tomography (CT) imaging, needle electrodes , an electrical generator and grounding pads are used. There are two ... retractable electrodes that extend when needed. The radiofrequency generator produces electrical currents in the range of radiofrequency ...

  4. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  5. The Growth of Complexity and Accuracy in L2 French: Past Observations and Recent Applications of Developmental Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agren, Malin; Granfeldt, Jonas; Schlyter, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses the question of the growth of accuracy and complexity in L2 French from the perspective of developmental sequences of morphosyntax, developmental stages and linguistic profiling. The six developmental stages for L2 French proposed by Bartning and Schlyter (2004) are presented and exemplified and new results are added to the…

  6. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  7. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  8. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  9. A simple and fast technique for radiofrequency-assisted perforation of the atrial septum in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Juan Pablo; Chaturvedi, Rajiv R

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) assisted perforation of the atrial septum was performed successfully in three infants using a 0.035” RF wire deployed through a Williams right posterior catheter. Balloon atrial septoplasty was performed over the 0.035” RF wire in two of them, shortening the procedural time. PMID:27011690

  10. Thermistor guided radiofrequency ablation of atrial insertion sites in patients with accessory pathways.

    PubMed

    Tracy, C M; Moore, H J; Solomon, A J; Rodak, D J; Fletcher, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has gained acceptance in the treatment of patients with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relation between temperature and other electroconductive parameters in patients undergoing atrial insertion accessory pathway ablation utilizing a thermistor equipped catheter. The mean temperature and power at sites of atrial insertion ablation are lower than has been previously associated with creation of radiofrequency lesions in the ventricle. While high cavitary blood flow in the atrium may result in cooling, the thinner atrial tissue may require less energy to achieve adequate heating than ventricular myocardium.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  12. Catheter Ablation of Multiple Accessory Pathways in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Steger, Christine; Gatterer, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) experienced self-limiting palpitations at age 19 years for the first time. Palpitations recurred not earlier than at age 23 years, and were attributed to narrow complex tachycardia, which could be terminated with adenosine. Since electrocardiography showed a delta-wave, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome was diagnosed, ajmaline prescribed and radio-frequency catheter ablation of three accessory pathways carried out one week later. One day after ablation, however, a relapse of the supraventricular tachycardia occurred and was terminated with ajmaline. Re-entry tachycardia occurred a second time six days after ablation, and as before, it was stopped only with ajmaline. Despite administration of verapamil to prevent tachycardia, it occurred a third time four months after ablation. This case shows that cardiac involvement in DMD may manifest also as WPW-syndrome. In these patients, repeated radio-frequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways may be necessary to completely block the re-entry mechanism. PMID:23508228

  13. Radiofrequency Guide Wire Recanalization of Venous Occlusions in Patients with Malignant Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert M.; David, Elizabeth; Pugash, Robyn A.; Annamalai, Ganesan

    2012-06-15

    Fibrotic central venous occlusions in patients with thoracic malignancy and prior radiotherapy can be impassable with standard catheters and wires, including the trailing or stiff end of a hydrophilic wire. We report two patients with superior vena cava syndrome in whom we successfully utilized a radiofrequency guide wire (PowerWire, Baylis Medical, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) to perforate through the occlusion and recanalize the occluded segment to alleviate symptoms.

  14. [Clinical study of Silver Lubricath Foley catheter].

    PubMed

    Nakada, J; Kawahara, M; Onodera, S; Oishi, Y

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated the Silver Lubricath Foley Catheter (silver catheter) coated with silver and hydrogel developed to prevent urinary infection, in comparison with the silicone-coated catheter (silicone catheter). Twelve patients ranging from 71 to 95 years of age (median age, 82 years) were catheterized and the 16 of 18F catheter was replaced every 2 weeks. They answered a questionnaire which included inquiry about the treatment with urinary catheter. Because of less leakage and discomfort to the urethra, the silver catheter had advantages over the silicone catheter. The risk of bacteriuria after 14 days of catheterization was not significantly different between the two types of catheter. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that bacterial biofilm developed on the inner surface of both catheters after 14 days of catheterization. On the other hand, the amount of bacterial biofilm on the outer surface of a silver catheter was less than that on the outer surface of a silicone catheter.

  15. 5-F catheter in cerebral angiography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Colucci, V.M.; Hammerschlag, S.B.

    1981-11-01

    Although the 5-F catheter is reputed to cause less vascular trauma than larger catheters, subintimal injections of contrast material have occurred following intimal damage by the catheter tip. Microscopic studies of the tips of two widely used 5-F polyethylene catheters have revealed a difference in configuration resulting in one of the catheters becoming markedly damaged during angiography. The authors make recommendations for finishing and protecting the catheter tip.

  16. Transcatheter desiccation of the canine left ventricle using radiofrequency energy: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Graham, A.R.; Hoyt, R.H.; Odell, R.C.

    1987-07-01

    Catheter ablation of cardiac tissue by means of direct-current electrical energy is associated with several complications. We assessed the efficacy and safety of closed-chest catheter desiccation of the left ventricular myocardium with microbipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy (750 kHz) in five dogs. The unipolar configuration was used with RF energy delivered between the tip electrode of a standard No. 7F tripolar catheter in the left ventricle and an external patch electrode on the left lateral chest wall. A single application with different RF energy settings (100 J, 200 J, and 300 J) was delivered to three individual endocardial sites of the left ventricle. Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation was not observed during energy application and 24 hours after ablation, as assessed by a Holter recording. There was no damage to the electrode catheter. Dogs were killed on the fifth day. Pathology showed well-delineated ovoid or round-shaped coagulation necrosis at the ablation sites. Microscopic findings consisted of circumscribed areas of necrosis surrounded by a zone of fibroblastic and mononuclear proliferation. In conclusion, catheter ablation of the ventricular myocardium with RF energy is an apparently safe procedure and can effectively produce discrete areas of injury without destruction of surrounding uninvolved myocardium. This method offers potential clinical utility for catheter ablation of refractory sustained ventricular tachycardia.

  17. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  18. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency ablation in left ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ichiro; Nuo, Min; Okumura, Yasuo; Ohkubo, Kimie; Ashino, Sonoko; Kofune, Masayoshi; Kofune, Tatsuya; Nakai, Toshiko; Kasamaki, Yuji; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2010-05-01

    Steam pop and intramural charring have been reported during cooled-tip radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). We studied the feasibility of temperature-controlled cooled-tip RFCA in the canine heart.An internally cooled ablation catheter was inserted into the left ventricle. A custom-made radiofrequency (RF) generator capable of controlling the tip-temperature at the preset level by slow increases in the power was used. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip RF applications were performed at a target temperature of 40 degrees C for 90 seconds. Acute study: Intramyocardial temperature was measured at the ablation site in 10 dogs by inserting a fluoroptic probe. Chronic study: Lesion depth and volume were measured in 5 dogs after 3 weeks of survival. In the acute study, no pop or abrupt impedance rise was observed. Maximum intramyocardial temperature was 72.4 + or - 14.4 degrees C at 2-4 mm above the endocardium. No coagulum formation, craters, or intramural charring were observed. Maximum lesion depth was 6.7 + or - 1.5 mm, and lesion volume was 404 + or - 219 mm3. In the chronic study, maximum lesion depth was 5.9 + or - 1.1 mm, and lesion volume was 281 + or - 210 mm(3).Temperature controlled RFCA is feasible with a cooled-tip catheter and an RF generator that slowly increases the RF power until the preset catheter-tip temperature is reached. PMID:20558910

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  20. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  1. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  2. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  3. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  4. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  5. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - insertion ... A PICC is a long, thin tube (called a catheter) that goes into your body through a vein in ... into a large vein near your heart. The PICC helps carry nutrients and medicines into your body. ...

  6. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  7. Hemodialysis catheter exit site care.

    PubMed

    Astle, Colleen M

    2007-01-01

    Tunneled, cuffed central venous catheters are used extensively throughout the hemodialysis patient population as a permanent arterio-venous access. One of the major complications associated with these devices is infection. The strategies aimed at reducing catheter-related infection include nurse-patient ratio, use of barrier precautions, hand washing, ointments, dressings, and skin antiseptics. The intent of this paper is to examine the types of skin antiseptics and compare their effectiveness.

  8. On the Role of Linguistic Contextual Factors for Morphosyntactic Stabilization in High-Level L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartning, Inge; Lundell, Fanny Forsberg; Hancock, Victorine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer contextual linguistic explanations for morphosyntactic deviances (MSDs) in high-level second language (L2) French (30 nonnative speakers vs. 10 native speakers). It is hypothesized that the distribution of formulaic sequences (FSs) and the complexity of information structure will influence the occurrence of…

  9. Switches to English during French Service Encounters: Relationships with L2 French Speakers' Willingness to Communicate and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stephanie; McDonough, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated second language (L2) French speakers' service encounters in the multilingual setting of Montreal, specifically whether switches to English during French service encounters were related to L2 speakers' willingness to communicate or motivation. Over a two-week period, 17 French L2 speakers in Montreal submitted…

  10. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  11. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  16. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP) procedures under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF) field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany) using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany). The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N). The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation system. The irrigated tip

  17. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  20. Successful catheter ablation of a left anterior accessory pathway from the non-coronary cusp of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Oliveira, Mário; Trigo, Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Left anterior accessory pathways are considered to be rare findings. Catheter ablation of accessory pathways in this location remains a challenging target, and few reports about successful ablation of these accessory pathways are available. We describe our experience regarding a case of a manifest left anterior accessory pathway ablation using radiofrequency energy at the junction of the left coronary cusp with the non-coronary cusp.

  1. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  2. Evaluation of catheter ablation of periatrial ganglionic plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Neuzil, Petr; d'Avila, Andre; Malchano, Zachary J; Kralovec, Stepan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2008-09-01

    Recent data suggests that the cardiac autonomic nervous system has an important role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study investigated (1) the feasibility of identifying and targeting these autonomic ganglia using endocardial radiofrequency stimulation and ablation, respectively; (2) the efficacy of endocardial ablation to completely eliminate the vagal response elicited from epicardial stimulation; and (3) the effect of autonomic ablation on the acute inducibility of AF. The study included 18 patients referred for catheter ablation of suspected vagal-mediated AF. The endocardial left atrial surface was stimulated at high frequency (20 to 50 Hz) to elicit a vagal response. In selected patients (n = 5), pericardial access was obtained using a subxyphoid puncture to permit epicardial stimulation. Catheter ablation of the putative autonomic ganglionic sites was performed from the left atrial endocardium using irrigated radiofrequency energy. After ablation of all identifiable autonomic ganglia, high-frequency pacing was repeated to induce AF. In all patients, stimulation at certain endocardial sites elicited a vagal response. Endocardial ablation abrogated this vagal responsiveness. Furthermore, for sites accessible from the pericardium, the vagal response elicited using epicardial stimulation was also eliminated. Despite successful ablation of these ganglia, AF was still inducible in 17 of 18 patients. In conclusion, successful ablation of autonomic ganglia from an endocardial approach can be reliably achieved using an irrigated catheter. In addition, ablation of these structures in patients with vagal-mediated AF is insufficient to prevent its acute reinduction with high-frequency atrial stimulation. PMID:18721515

  3. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  4. New-generation radiofrequency technology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) technology has become a standard treatment in aesthetic medicine with many indications due to its versatility, efficacy, and safety. It is used worldwide for cellulite reduction; acne scar revision; and treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids, rosacea, and inflammatory acne in all skin types. However, the most common indication for RF technology is the nonablative tightening of tissue to improve skin laxity and reduce wrinkles. Radiofrequency devices are classified as unipolar, bipolar, or multipolar depending on the number of electrodes used. Additional modalities include fractional RF; sublative RF; phase-controlled RF; and combination RF therapies that apply light, massage, or pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs). This article reviews studies and case series on these devices. Radiofrequency technology for aesthetic medicine has seen rapid advancements since it was used for skin tightening in 2003. Future developments will continue to keep RF technology at the forefront of the dermatologist's armamentarium for skin tightening and rejuvenation. PMID:23461058

  5. Urinary Retention: Catheter Drainage Bag or Catheter Valve?

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Gurnam; Hendry, David

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with intractable urinary incontinence presents as a challenging priority in the ageing population. To preserve the antibacterial mechanisms of the bladder, a urine collection that enables the bladder to fill and empty regularly and completely, should be used. This mimics the action of the healthy bladder. We compared the success rates of two widely used urinary-collection systems (catheter with drainage bag or a catheter valve) at our institution for those patients undergoing a trial of void. PMID:26989368

  6. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  7. Architecture of the pulmonary veins: relevance to radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Cabrera, J; Tran, V; Farre, J; Anderson, R; Sanchez-Quintana, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Radiofrequency ablation of tissues in pulmonary veins can eliminate paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.
OBJECTIVE—To explore the characteristics of normal pulmonary veins so as to provide more information relevant to radiofrequency ablation.
METHODS—20 structurally normal heart specimens were examined grossly. Histological sections were made from 65 pulmonary veins.
RESULTS—The longest myocardial sleeves were found in the superior veins. The sleeves were thickest at the venoatrial junction in the left superior pulmonary veins. For the superior veins, the sleeves were thickest along the inferior walls and thinnest superiorly. The sleeves were composed mainly of circularly or spirally oriented bundles of myocytes with additional bundles that were longitudinally or obliquely oriented, sometimes forming mesh-like arrangements. Fibrotic changes estimated at between 5% and 70% across three transverse sections were seen in 17 veins that were from individuals aged 30 to 72 years.
CONCLUSIONS—The myocardial architecture in normal pulmonary veins is highly variable. The complex arrangement, stretch, and increase in fibrosis may produce greater non-uniform anisotropic properties.


Keywords: arrhythmias; catheter ablation; fibrillation; cardiac veins PMID:11514476

  8. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  9. [RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Satoru; Miyade, Yoshio; Inaki, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Significant advances in the endovenous technique for treating incompetent saphenous veins could change the surgical strategy in patients with varicose veins. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was approved as a new technique for the treatment of varicose veins in Japan in June 2014. In RFA, the ablation temperature is controlled by a sensor at the upper end of the catheter. The vein wall is heated with stable conductive power of 120 degrees C, resulting in endothelial denudation. The RFA method was approved in 1998 in Europe and in 1999 in the USA. The ClosurePLUS catheter was developed in 2003 and ClosureFAST in 2006. High occlusion rates and lower postoperative complication rates were reported with ClosureFAST than with ClosurePLUS. It is expected that this new ablation technique will control saphenous vein reflux with less pain and less ecchymosis after surgery. The treatment of varicose veins is less invasive with RFA devices and will become widely accepted as an alternative to conventional surgery for varicose veins in Japan.

  10. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-11-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  11. Precision test apparatus for evaluating the heating pattern of radiofrequency ablation devices.

    PubMed

    Chang, I; Beard, B

    2002-11-01

    Radiofrequency has established itself as a useful technique for managing cardiac arrhythmias and treating soft tissue tumors. However, despite its pervasive use, many of the biophysical principals needed to fully understand and optimize the radiofrequency ablation technique have not been explored. We have designed a test rig that is useful for studying the heat transfer mechanisms that affect the outcome of radiofrequency ablation devices. Using both solid and liquid phantom materials, which simulate body tissues and blood, the test rig is designed for systematic testing of the effects of predictable flow patterns on the temperature profiles generated within the solid phantom. The test rig consists of a custom built thermistor array, a linear test chamber, and a radiofrequency generator. We calibrate the flow of a liquid phantom material to demonstrate that predictable laminar flow profiles are generated. To demonstrate the performance of the ablation system, we present preliminary data attained using a commercially available cardiac ablation catheter. The advantages of this test system are its flexibility, its reproducibility, its precision, and its low cost. Thus, it is ideally suited for studying a variety of complex ablation problems involving multiple tissues types and complex blood flow geometries.

  12. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  13. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  14. Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Huang, T; Jing, J; Jin, J; Wang, P; Yang, M; Cui, W; Zheng, Y; Shen, H

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of various catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection and to evaluate whether specific catheters are superior to others for reducing catheter-related infections. We identified randomised, controlled trials that compared different types of central venous catheter (CVC), evaluating catheter-related infections in a systematic search of articles published from January 1996 to November 2009 via Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to combine direct within-trial, between-treatment comparisons with indirect trial evidence. Forty-eight clinical trials (12 828 CVCs) investigating 10 intervention catheters contributed to the analyses. For prevention of CVC colonisation, adjusted silver iontophoretic catheters (odds ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.95), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine catheters (0.49; 0.36-0.64), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine blue plus catheters (0.37; 0.17-0.69), minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.28; 0.17-0.43) and miconazole-rifampicin catheters (0.11; 0.02-0.33) were associated with a significantly lower rate of catheter colonisation compared with standard catheters. For prevention of CRBSI, adjusted heparin-bonded catheters (0.20; 0.06-0.44) and minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.18; 0.08-0.34) were associated with a significantly lower rate of CRBSI with standard catheters. Rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seem to be better for prevention of catheter-related infection compared with the other catheters.

  15. Catheter ablation of a monofocal premature ventricular complex triggering idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, S; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    2001-07-01

    A 62 year old man was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. A surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular complexes of right ventricular outflow tract origin. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible by programmed electrical stimulation but otherwise cardiac evaluation was unremarkable. A diagnosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation was made and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was installed. However, spontaneous ventricular fibrillation recurred, requiring repeated ICD discharges. The ventricular fibrillation was reproducibly triggered by a single premature ventricular complex with a specific QRS morphology. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was carried out to eradicate this complex. No ventricular fibrillation has developed after this procedure, and the patient does not require drug treatment.

  16. Catheter ablation of a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia inducing monofocal premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takashi; Yamabe, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Morihisa, Kenji; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kaikita, Koichi; Sumida, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Ogawa, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia originating from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is considered benign, but sometimes it causes polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, resulting in sudden cardiac death. A 58-year-old woman without structural heart disease was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. Surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular contraction (PVC) of RVOT origin. Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia triggered by the same PVC was documented by Holter ECG during an episode of syncope. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed to eradicate this PVC. No polymorphic ventricular tachycardia has developed after the procedure, and the patient has had no recurrence of syncope.

  17. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kenichiro; Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-08-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  18. Successful non-operative management of left atrioesophageal fistula following catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Morita, Hideki; Muramatsu, Kenichi; Sato, Akira; Nitta, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a potentially lethal complication of catheter radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. A 49-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation around the pulmonary vein was admitted 31 days after the procedure, suffering seizures and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed ischemia and multiple lesions of acute infarction in the right occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a small accumulation of air between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus, suggesting an AEF. Endoscopic snaring of the esophageal mucosa, repeated a few times, supported by nil by mouth and antibiotic therapy, resulted in improvement of his condition with no recurrence of symptoms. Subsequent chest CT scans confirmed disappearance of the leaked air and the patient was discharged home 45 days after admission with no neurological compromise.

  19. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures.

  20. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  1. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  2. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the PICC through the needle into a larger (central) vein, putting its tip near (but not in) the heart. Take an x-ray to place the needle. Remove the needle after the catheter is placed. WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF HAVING ...

  3. Aging of silastic peritoneal catheters.

    PubMed

    Poisetti, P; Bergonzi, G; Ballocchi, S; Fontana, F; Scarpioni, L

    1991-12-01

    Increasing the survival of patients on CAPD is related to the long-term reliability of the peritoneal access. Six silicone Tenckhoff catheters (with strip or diffuse barium sulphate inclusion) removed after 39-69 months because of the appearance of external segment fissures, were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infra-red spectroscopy with attenuated total refractance (ATR). The extracorporeal portion of the catheters showed (by ATR) a more prominent oxidation peak on the external than the internal surface; SEM showed marks and cracks on the external surface and exfoliation and flattening of the silastic reticle on the intraluminal surface. No evidence of oxidation was found in the intra-abdominal portion of the catheters but biofilm was found. We suggest that barium sulphate may render the silastic brittle and physiological and environmental long-term factors (such as uv-rays, temperature, sweat and disinfectants) could cause oxidation and loss of physico-chemical properties, with critical aging of the silastic and loss of catheter resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:1783450

  4. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  5. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  6. Cardiac ablation catheter guidance by means of a single equivalent moving dipole inverse algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kichang; Lv, Wener; Ter-Ovanesyan, Evgeny; Barley, Maya E.; Voysey, Graham E.; Galea, Anna; Hirschman, Gordon; LeRoy, Kristen; Marini, Robert P.; Barrett, Conor; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Cohen, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a novel system for guiding radio-frequency catheter ablation therapy of ventricular tachycardia. This guidance system employs an Inverse Solution Guidance Algorithm (ISGA) utilizing a single equivalent moving dipole (SEMD) localization method. The method and system were evaluated in both a saline-tank phantom model and in-vivo animal (swine) experiments. A catheter with two platinum electrodes spaced 3 mm apart was used as the dipole source in the phantom study. A 40 Hz sinusoidal signal was applied to the electrode pair. In the animal study, four to eight electrodes were sutured onto the right ventricle. These electrodes were connected to a stimulus generator delivering one millisecond duration pacing pulses. Signals were recorded from 64 electrodes, located either on the inner surface of the saline-tank or the body surface of the pig, and then processed by the ISGA to localize the physical or bioelectrical SEMD. In the phantom studies, the guidance algorithm was used to advance a catheter tip to the location of the source dipole. The distance from the final position of the catheter tip to the position of the target dipole was 2.22 ± 0.78 mm in real space and 1.38± 0.78 mm in image space (computational space). The ISGA successfully tracked the locations of electrodes sutured on the ventricular myocardium and the movement of an endocardial catheter placed in the animal’s right ventricle. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a SEMD inverse algorithm to guide a cardiac ablation catheter. PMID:23448231

  7. Respiratory motion influence on catheter contact force during radio frequency ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation is a common treatment option for atrial fibrillation. A common treatment strategy is pulmonary vein isolation. In this case, individual ablation points need to be placed around the ostia of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium to generate transmural lesions and thereby block electric signals. To achieve a durable transmural lesion, the tip of the catheter has to be stable with a sufficient tissue contact during radio-frequency ablation. Besides the steerable interface operated by the physician, the movement of the catheter is also influenced by the heart and breathing motion - particularly during ablation. In this paper we investigate the influence of breathing motion on different areas of the endocardium during radio frequency ablation. To this end, we analyze the frequency spectrum of the continuous catheter contact force to identify areas with increased breathing motion using a classification method. This approach has been applied to clinical patient data acquired during three pulmonary vein isolation procedures. Initial findings show that motion due to respiration is more pronounced at the roof and around the right pulmonary veins.

  8. Catheter related infections in Damas Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lugo, L J; Zapata, N J; Ramírez Ronda, C H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent of catheter-related infections in our Institution. We examined retrospectively 89 medical records of patients in whom an intravascular catheter tip culture were obtained during January through December 1991. Forty-seven catheter related infections were identified in 43 patients. There were 33 multiple lumen infected catheters and 14 single lumen. Catheters for hemodialysis were infected in 38.3% of the patients. Twenty catheters were inserted into the subclavian vein. Fifty percent of the reinserted catheters were placed in the same site, of which 28.6% became infected. Staphylococcus epidermis was isolated in 28.1% of the patients, while in 50% of the patients with Staphylococcus aureus, bacteremia was identified. Staphylococci and Enterococci were more sensitive to Vancomycin than to any other antibiotic. PMID:7916776

  9. Efficacy comparison between cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-He; Lin, Hui; Xie, Cheng-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    We perform this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of cryoablation versus radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. By searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane electronic databases from March 1986 to September 2014, 7 randomized clinical trials were included. Acute (risk ratio[RR]: 0.93; P = 0.14) and long-term (RR: 0.94; P = 0.08) success rate were slightly lower in cryoablation group than in radiofrequency ablation group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, the fluoroscopy time was nonsignificantly reduced (weighted mean difference[WMD]: -2.83 P = 0.29), whereas procedure time was significantly longer (WMD: 25.95; P = 0.01) in cryoablation group compared with radiofrequency ablation group. Furthermore, Pain perception during the catheter ablation was substantially less in cryoabaltion group than in radiofrequency ablation group (standardized mean difference[SMD]: -2.36 P < 0.00001). Thus, our meta-analysis demonstrated that cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation produce comparable acute and long-term success rate for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. Meanwhile, cryoablation ablation tends to reduce the fluoroscopy time and significantly reduce pain perception in cost of significantly prolonged procedure time.

  10. Radiofrequency treatment of cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Peñarrocha, Maria; Calvo, Ana; Jiménez, Alejandro; March, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In the clinical management of facial pain, a possible cervical origin must be considered. A clinical exploration is therefore essential. The disorder originates in the intimate connections between the cranial portion of the spinal cord and the trigeminal system. Although solid evidence supporting the use of radiofrequency (RF) treatment is lacking, it remains one of the management options to be taken into account. The present study evaluates the efficacy of RF in application to cervicogenic headache. Study design: We present three cases of severe facial pain arising from different cervical structures. Results: In two cases the pain originated in cervical roots C2 and C3, while in the third patient the trigger point was located at the level of the atlantoaxial joint. Pulsed RF was applied for 4 minutes at the dorsal ganglion of C2 and C3 in the first two cases, and for 8 minutes at intraarticular level in the third patient. The pain gradually subsided during the first month in all cases. The first two patients reported 70% improvement after one month, 60% improvement after 6 months, and 30-50% after one year, versus baseline. The third patient reported complete pain resolution lasting approximately 5 months, after which the pain reappeared with the same intensity as before. Conclusions: Radiofrequency is a satisfactory treatment option, affording adequate analgesia, though the effects are sometimes temporary. Key words:Cervicogenic headache, pulsed radiofrequency, analgesia. PMID:23229235

  11. [Clinical analysis of pediatric shunt catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Morishita, Akitsugu; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Kurata, Hiromitsu; Eguchi, Takahiro; Tamaki, Norihiko

    2002-08-01

    Between 1985 and 1998, 415 shunt dysfunctions occurred at Kobe Children's Hospital. The main reasons for shunt revision were obstruction of the catheter, shunt infection, and shunt disconnection. This report presents an analysis of 35 patients (36 cases) who underwent a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt revision because of shunt catheter fracture. All patients were less than 18 years old. We researched their age at the time of revision, site of disruption, postoperative period, shunt system, clinical symptoms, and other factors. The mechanical aspects of shunt catheter fracture are also discussed in this report. The peak time of shunt catheter fracture was the time when children were growing up and were entering elementary school. In other words, when their height was increasing rapidly. At that time, the distal catheter is subjected to traction between the valve and the abdomen at the site of insertion in either the upper or lower direction. However, physical examination of the shunt catheter showed normal range. Additional contributory factors were chronic stimulation at the occipital bone, clavium bone, and costal arch, while movement of the neck and body rotation also caused shunt catheter fracture. These factors all originated from shearing strain at the shunt catheter. We look forward to the introduction of a stronger shunt catheter, because surgical repair time must be minimized to protect the child's mental development. In addition, shearing strain at the shunt catheter needs special attention.

  12. Evaluation of left ventricular scar identification from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Lehmann, H. I.; Johnson, S. B.; Packer, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Patients with ventricular arrhythmias typically exhibit myocardial scarring, which is believed to be an important anatomic substrate for reentrant circuits, thereby making these regions a key target in catheter ablation therapy. In ablation therapy, a catheter is guided into the left ventricle and radiofrequency energy is delivered into the tissue to interrupt arrhythmic electrical pathways. Low bipolar voltage regions are typically localized during the procedure through point-by-point construction of an electroanatomic map by sampling the endocardial surface with the ablation catheter and are used as a surrogate for myocardial scar. This process is time consuming, requires significant skill, and has the potential to miss low voltage sites. This has led to efforts to quantify myocardial scar preoperatively using delayed, contrast-enhanced MRI. In this paper, we evaluate the utility of left ventricular scar identification from delayed contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias. Myocardial infarcts were created in three canines followed by a delayed, contrast enhanced MRI scan and electroanatomic mapping. The left ventricle and myocardial scar is segmented from preoperative MRI images and sampled points from the procedural electroanatomical map are registered to the segmented endocardial surface. Sampled points with low bipolar voltage points visually align with the segmented scar regions. This work demonstrates the potential utility of using preoperative delayed, enhanced MRI to identify myocardial scarring for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy.

  13. A MODIFIED OPEN SURGERY TECHNIQUE FOR PERITONEAL DIALYSIS CATHETER PLACEMENT DECREASES CATHETER MALFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunming; Xu, Linfeng; Chen, Yun; Yan, Xiang; Zhang, Miao; Sun, Cheng

    2013-06-01

    BACKGROUND: This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a new, modified open surgery technique on catheter-related malfunction. METHODS: During the period from January 1997 to June 2009, 216 patients received initial peritoneal catheters. For the present study, patients were divided into four groups according to the catheter types and the surgery techniques: • TO-S: traditional open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter • TO-C: traditional open surgery, coiled Tenckhoff catheter • TO-SN: traditional open surgery, swan-neck catheter • MO-S: modified open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter The modified surgery was characterized by a low incision site, a short intra-abdominal catheter segment and an additional upward straight subcutaneous tunnel. All patients were followed up for 2 years or until death. Survival rates, complications caused by catheter placement, and the probability of malfunction-free catheter survival were compared between the groups. RESULTS: Catheter malfunction was the most frequent mechanical complication, found in 31 patients (14.4%), who experienced 38 malfunctions. Only 2 episodes of catheter malfunction were found in the MO-S group, representing a rate significantly less than those in the TO-S and TO-C groups (both p < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier curves for malfunction-free PD catheter survival showed a significantly different malfunction-free probability for the various groups (p = 0.009). After 2 years of follow-up, 136 patients (63.0%) survived with their initial PD catheter. The initial catheter survival rate was 76.8% in the MO-S group. Kaplan-Meier curves for initial catheter survival showed that the highest survival rate was found in the MO-S group (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The modified open surgery technique is a reliable method for catheter placement. PMID:23733661

  14. Temporary hemodialysis catheters: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward G; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    The insertion of non-tunneled temporary hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) is a core procedure of nephrology practice. While urgent dialysis may be life-saving, mechanical and infectious complications related to the insertion of NTHCs can be fatal. In recent years, various techniques that reduce mechanical and infectious complications related to NTHCs have been described. Evidence now suggests that ultrasound guidance should be used for internal jugular and femoral vein NTHC insertions. The implementation of evidence-based infection-control 'bundles' for central venous catheter insertions has significantly reduced the incidence of bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit setting with important implications for how nephrologists should insert NTHCs. In addition, the Cathedia Study has provided the first high-level evidence about the optimal site of NTHC insertion, as it relates to the risk of infection and catheter dysfunction. Incorporating these evidence-based techniques into a simulation-based program for training nephrologists in NTHC insertion has been shown to be an effective way to improve the procedural skills of nephrology trainees. Nonetheless, there are some data suggesting nephrologists have been slow to adopt evidence-based practices surrounding NTHC insertion. This mini review focuses on techniques that reduce the complications of NTHCs and are relevant to the practice and training of nephrologists.

  15. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  16. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted.

  17. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency linear ablation of the atria guided by a realtime position management system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ichiro; Min, Nuo; Okumura, Yasuo; Ohkubo, Kimie; Kofune, Masayoshi; Ashino, Sonoko; Nagashima, Koichi; Nakai, Toshiko; Kasamaki, Yuji; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Due to the difficulty in producing a transmural linear lesion and the possibility of complications such as thrombus formation leading to thromboembolism, the catheter-based maze procedure remains problematic. We tested, in pigs, the possibility of using a temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency (RF) ablation system together with a realtime position management (RPM) system to create a transmural linear lesion uncomplicated by thrombus formation.Nine pigs underwent insertion of two electrode catheters (each with two ultrasound electrodes), one into the coronary sinus (CS) and one into the right ventricular apex (references for ultrasound-based non-fluoroscopic three-dimensional mapping). A cooled-tip catheter (with two ultrasound electrodes) was introduced into the right atrium. Linear right atrial ablation was performed with a custom radiofrequency (RF) generator. The catheter was perfused with 0.66 mL/second of saline. RF was delivered for 60 seconds at a target temperature of 40°C. A linear ablation line was created between the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava. Three-dimensional isochronal maps were created during CS pacing before and after ablation. In 4 of the 9 pigs, a transmural linear ablation line was confirmed by three-dimensional mapping and postmortem macroscopic examination. No endocardial thrombus formation was noted. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip RF linear ablation guided by an RPM system appears to have potential for creating linear lesions in the atria. Further studies are needed to determine whether such an ablation technique and the parameters used will facilitate successful completion of the catheter-based maze procedure.

  18. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  19. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  20. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  1. Impact of different catheter lock strategies on bacterial colonization of permanent central venous hemodialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Erb, Stefan; Widmer, Andreas F; Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Neff, Ursula; Fischer, Manuela; Dickenmann, Michael; Grosse, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Thirty-nine hemodialysis patients with permanent central venous catheters were analyzed for bacterial catheter colonization comparing different catheter-lock strategies. The closed needleless Tego connector with sodium chloride lock solution was significantly more frequently colonized with bacteria than the standard catheter caps with antimicrobially active citrate lock solution (odds ratio, 0.22 [95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.71]; P = .011).

  2. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  3. Orthogonal electrode catheter array for mapping of endocardial focal site of ventricular activation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, J.M.; Nyo, H.; Vera, Z.; Seibert, J.A.; Vogelsang, P.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Precise location of the endocardial site of origin of ventricular tachycardia may facilitate surgical and catheter ablation of this arrhythmia. The endocardial catheter mapping technique can locate the site of ventricular tachycardia within 4-8 cm2 of the earliest site recorded by the catheter. This report describes an orthogonal electrode catheter array (OECA) for mapping and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of endocardial focal site of origin of a plunge electrode paced model of ventricular activation in dogs. The OECA is an 8 F five pole catheter with four peripheral electrodes and one central electrode (total surface area 0.8 cm{sup 2}). In eight mongrel dogs, mapping was performed by arbitrarily dividing the left ventricle (LV) into four segments. Each segment was mapped with OECA to find the earliest segment. Bipolar and unipolar electrograms were obtained. The plunge electrode (not visible on fluoroscopy) site was identified by the earliest wave front arrival times of -30 msec or earlier at two or more electrodes (unipolar electrograms) with reference to the earliest recorded surface ECG (I, AVF, and V1). Validation of the proximity of the five electrodes of the OECA to the plunge electrode was performed by digital radiography and RFA. Pathological examination was performed to document the proximity of the OECA to the plunge electrode and also for the width, depth, and microscopic changes of the ablation. To find the segment with the earliest LV activation a total of 10 {plus minus} 3 (mean {plus minus} SD) positions were mapped. Mean arrival times at the two earlier electrodes were -39 {plus minus} 4 msec and -35 {plus minus} 3 msec. Digital radiography showed the plunge electrode to be within the area covered by all five electrodes in all eight dogs. The plunge electrode was within 1 cm2 area of the region of RFA in all eight dogs.

  4. Type of peritoneal dialysis catheter and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Pinerolo, Cristina; Cariati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In peritoneal dialysis (PD), a well-functioning catheter is of great importance, because a dysfunctional catheter may be associated with incidence of peritonitis, efficiency of dialysis, and to the overall quality of treatment, representing one of the main barriers to optimal use of PD. When considering the relationship between PD catheter type and outcomes, we should keep in mind the different types of available PD catheters, those that are most commonly used in clinical practice, and the available head-to-head comparisons in the literature. The main differences in PD catheter design include the number of cuffs, the shape of subcutaneous tract (straight vs. swan neck), and the shape of intraperitoneal tract (straight vs. coiled). The availability of the best catheter design and materials, along with a skillful management of PD access, may have the greatest impact on long-term patient outcome on PD. It is now established that the use of straight catheters may improve outcomes and technique survival, but further advances in PD catheter technology can potentially improve technique survival. The self-locating PD catheter is a well established device that has not been fully studied and it may represent, based on the available observational evidence and on the clinical experience, an already existing technological advance deserving further studies. PMID:25751555

  5. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  6. Radiofrequency Physics for Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Levy, Adam S; Grant, Robert T; Rothaus, Kenneth O

    2016-07-01

    Radiofrequency energy has a wide range of medical applications, including noninvasive treatment of wrinkles and body contouring. This technology works by differential heating of skin and soft tissue layers causing dermal remodeling or adipolysis, ultimately leading to observable effects. This article reviews the physics of radiofrequency as applied clinically.

  7. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... catheter securement device is a device with an adhesive backing that is placed over a needle or catheter and is used to keep the hub of the needle or the catheter flat and securely anchored to the skin....

  13. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... catheter securement device is a device with an adhesive backing that is placed over a needle or catheter and is used to keep the hub of the needle or the catheter flat and securely anchored to the skin....

  14. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... catheter securement device is a device with an adhesive backing that is placed over a needle or catheter and is used to keep the hub of the needle or the catheter flat and securely anchored to the skin....

  15. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... catheter securement device is a device with an adhesive backing that is placed over a needle or catheter and is used to keep the hub of the needle or the catheter flat and securely anchored to the skin....

  16. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... catheter securement device is a device with an adhesive backing that is placed over a needle or catheter and is used to keep the hub of the needle or the catheter flat and securely anchored to the skin....

  17. Integrated RFA/OCT catheter for real-time guidance of cardiac RFA therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Blumenthal, Colin; Dosluoglu, Deniz; Wang, Yves T.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Souza, Rakesh; Snyder, Christopher; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, cardiac radiofrequency ablation is guided by indirect signals. We demonstrate an integrated radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe for directly monitoring of the RFA procedure with OCT images in real time. The integrated RFA/OCT probe is modified from a standard commercial RFA catheter, and a newly designed and fabricated miniature forward-viewing cone-scanning OCT probe is integrated into the modified probe. The OCT system is verified with the human finger images, and the results show the integrated RFA/OCT probe can acquire high quality OCT images. The radiofrequency energy delivering function of the integrated probe is verified by comparing the RFA lesion sizes with standard commercial RFA probe. For the standard commercial probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.5 mm and 1.8 mm respectively. For the integrated RFA/OCT probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.6 mm and 1.7 mm respectively. The lesions created by the two probes are indistinguishable in size. This demonstrates that our glass window in the integrated probe has little effect on the RF energy delivery. And the integrated probe is used to monitoring the cardiac RFA procedure in real time. The results show that the RFA lesion formation can be confirmed by the loss of birefringence in the heart tissue. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid RFA therapy for cardiac arrhythmias.

  18. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  19. Central venous catheter malposition due to dialysis catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neha; Samson, Sumanth

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man on maintenance hemodialysis was admitted to the intensive care unit with septic shock and coagulopathy. As there was a dialysis catheter in the right internal jugular vein, the left internal jugular vein was cannulated with a central venous catheter to initiate vasopressor therapy. A chest X-ray showed formation of a catheter loop inside the left brachiocephalic vein, probably due to hindrance by the dialysis catheter. This report describes the hurdles encountered, repeated cannulation attempts, and serial chest X-ray findings required to obtain acceptable placement of the catheter tip. PMID:27703638

  20. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion probe. 882.4725 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4725 Radiofrequency lesion probe. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion probe. 882.4725 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4725 Radiofrequency lesion probe. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency...

  2. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  3. Alternatives to Indwelling Catheters Cause Unintended Complications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jessica; Harvey, Ellen M; Lollar, Daniel I; Bradburn, Eric H; Hamill, Mark E; Collier, Bryan R; Love, Katie M

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), limiting use of indwelling catheters is encouraged with alternative collection methods and early removal. Adverse effects associated with such practices have not been described. We also determined if CAUTI preventative measures increase the risk of catheter-related complications. We hypothesized that there are complications associated with early removal of indwelling catheters. We described complications associated with indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization, and compared complication rates before and after policy updates changed catheterization practices. We performed retrospective cohort analysis of trauma patients admitted between August 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013 who required indwelling catheter. Associations between catheter days and adverse outcomes such as infection, bladder overdistention injury, recatheterization, urinary retention, and patients discharged with indwelling catheter were evaluated. The incidence of CAUTI and the total number of catheter days pre and post policy change were similar. The incidence rate of urinary retention and associated complications has increased since the policy changed. Practices intended to reduce the CAUTI rate are associated with unintended complications, such as urinary retention. Patient safety and quality improvement programs should monitor all complications associated with urinary catheterization practices, not just those that represent financial penalties. PMID:27657581

  4. Robust pigtail catheter tip detection in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    The pigtail catheter is a type of catheter inserted into the human body during interventional surgeries such as the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The catheter is characterized by a tightly curled end in order to remain attached to a valve pocket during the intervention, and it is used to inject contrast agent for the visualization of the vessel in fluoroscopy. Image-based detection of this catheter is used during TAVI, in order to overlay a model of the aorta and enhance visibility during the surgery. Due to the different possible projection angles in fluoroscopy, the pigtail tip can appear in a variety of different shapes spanning from pure circular to ellipsoid or even line. Furthermore, the appearance of the catheter tip is radically altered when the contrast agent is injected during the intervention or when it is occluded by other devices. All these factors make the robust real-time detection and tracking of the pigtail catheter a challenging task. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a new tree-structured, hierarchical detection scheme, based on a shape categorization of the pigtail catheter tip, and a combination of novel Haar features. The proposed framework demonstrates improved detection performance, through a validation on a data set consisting of 272 sequences with more than 20,000 images. The detection framework presented in this paper is not limited to pigtail catheter detection, but it can also be applied successfully to any other shape-varying object with similar characteristics.

  5. Catheter ablation of parahisian premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-12-01

    Catheter ablation is performed in selected patients with a symptomatic premature ventricular complex (PVC) or PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Ablation of PVC from the His region has a high risk of inducing a complete atrioventricular block. Here we report successful catheter ablation of a parahisian PVC in a 63-year-old man.

  6. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  7. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  8. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  9. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  10. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control.

  11. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  12. Impact of computed tomography image and contact force technology on catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Marai, Ibrahim; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Blich, Miry; Lessick, Jonathan; Abadi, Sobhi; Boulos, Monther

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of using computed tomography (CT) and contact force (CF) technology on recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmia after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: This non-randomized study included 2 groups of patients. All patients had symptomatic recurrent paroxysmal or persistent AF and were treated with at least 1 anti arrhythmic medication or intolerant to medication. The first group included 33 patients who underwent circumferential pulmonary veins isolation (PVI) for AF during 2012 and 2013 guided by CT image integration (Cartomerge, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) of left atrium and pulmonary veins into an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system (CT group) using standard irrigated radiofrequency catheter (ThermoCool, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) or irrigated catheter with integrated CF sensor (Smart Touch, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States). The second group included immediately preceding 32 patients who had circumferential PVI by standard irrigated catheter (ThermoCool) using only EAM (Carto) system (EAM group). Linear lesions were performed according to the discretion of operator. RESULTS: Sex, age, and persistent AF were not different between groups. PVI was achieved in all patients in both groups. Linear ablations including cavo-tricuspid isthmus and or roof line ablation were not different between groups. Free of atrial tachyarrhythmia during follow-up of 24 mo was significantly higher among CT group compared to EAM group (81% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.027). When 11 patients from CT group who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter were excluded, the difference between CT group and EAM became non significant (73% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.16). Sub analysis of CT group showed that patients who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter tend to be more free of atrial tachyarrhythmia compared to patients who had ablation using standard irrigated catheter during

  13. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  14. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  15. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  16. Toward guidance of epicardial cardiac radiofrequency ablation therapy using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the standard of care to cure many cardiac arrhythmias. Epicardial ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia has limited success rates due in part to the presence of epicardial fat, which prevents proper rf energy delivery, inadequate contact of ablation catheter with tissue, and increased likelihood of complications with energy delivery in close proximity to coronary vessels. A method to directly visualize the epicardial surface during RFA could potentially provide feedback to reduce complications and titrate rf energy dose by detecting critical structures, assessing probe contact, and confirming energy delivery by visualizing lesion formation. Currently, there is no technology available for direct visualization of the heart surface during epicardial RFA therapy. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to fill this unmet need. Spectral domain OCT at 1310 nm is employed to image the epicardial surface of freshly excised swine hearts using a microscope integrated bench-top scanner and a forward imaging catheter probe. OCT image features are observed that clearly distinguish untreated myocardium, ablation lesions, epicardial fat, and coronary vessels, and assess tissue contact with catheter-based imaging. These results support the potential for real-time guidance of epicardial RFA therapy using OCT imaging. PMID:20799788

  17. Toward guidance of epicardial cardiac radiofrequency ablation therapy using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Christine P.; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the standard of care to cure many cardiac arrhythmias. Epicardial ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia has limited success rates due in part to the presence of epicardial fat, which prevents proper rf energy delivery, inadequate contact of ablation catheter with tissue, and increased likelihood of complications with energy delivery in close proximity to coronary vessels. A method to directly visualize the epicardial surface during RFA could potentially provide feedback to reduce complications and titrate rf energy dose by detecting critical structures, assessing probe contact, and confirming energy delivery by visualizing lesion formation. Currently, there is no technology available for direct visualization of the heart surface during epicardial RFA therapy. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to fill this unmet need. Spectral domain OCT at 1310 nm is employed to image the epicardial surface of freshly excised swine hearts using a microscope integrated bench-top scanner and a forward imaging catheter probe. OCT image features are observed that clearly distinguish untreated myocardium, ablation lesions, epicardial fat, and coronary vessels, and assess tissue contact with catheter-based imaging. These results support the potential for real-time guidance of epicardial RFA therapy using OCT imaging.

  18. Whole shaft visibility and mechanical performance for active MR catheters using copper-nitinol braided polymer tubes

    PubMed Central

    Kocaturk, Ozgur; Saikus, Christina E; Guttman, Michael A; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R; Lederman, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Background Catheter visualization and tracking remains a challenge in interventional MR. Active guidewires can be made conspicuous in "profile" along their whole shaft exploiting metallic core wire and hypotube components that are intrinsic to their mechanical performance. Polymer-based catheters, on the other hand, offer no conductive medium to carry radio frequency waves. We developed a new "active" catheter design for interventional MR with mechanical performance resembling braided X-ray devices. Our 75 cm long hybrid catheter shaft incorporates a wire lattice in a polymer matrix, and contains three distal loop coils in a flexible and torquable 7Fr device. We explored the impact of braid material designs on radiofrequency and mechanical performance. Results The incorporation of copper wire into in a superelastic nitinol braided loopless antenna allowed good visualization of the whole shaft (70 cm) in vitro and in vivo in swine during real-time MR with 1.5 T scanner. Additional distal tip coils enhanced tip visibility. Increasing the copper:nitinol ratio in braiding configurations improved flexibility at the expense of torquability. We found a 16-wire braid of 1:1 copper:nitinol to have the optimum balance of mechanical (trackability, flexibility, torquability) and antenna (signal attenuation) properties. With this configuration, the temperature increase remained less than 2°C during real-time MR within 10 cm horizontal from the isocenter. The design was conspicuous in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion We have engineered a new loopless antenna configuration that imparts interventional MR catheters with satisfactory mechanical and imaging characteristics. This compact loopless antenna design can be generalized to visualize the whole shaft of any general-purpose polymer catheter to perform safe interventional procedures. PMID:19674464

  19. Refinements in the coating of urethral catheters reduces the incidence of catheter-associated bacteriuria. An experimental and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Liedberg, H; Lundeberg, T; Ekman, P

    1990-01-01

    The tendency to develop bacteriuria during the use of various forms of indwelling catheters was evaluated in a randomized trial in 90 patients. A silver alloy and hydrogel-coated Foley catheter (SHC) was compared to a non-coated catheter (NC) and a catheter coated only with hydrogel (HC). Three patients (10%) with SHC catheters, 10 (33%) patients with HC catheters, and 15 (50%) patients with NC catheters developed bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) organisms/ml). The difference in the rate of bacteriuria after 5 days of catheterization was statistically significant between the SHC catheter and the NC catheter (p less than 0.002). There was no significant difference between the SHC catheter and the HC catheter, nor was there a significant difference between the HC catheter and the NC catheter. The toxic effects, as estimated by the IC50 value, of the urinary catheter material used was elucidated in an experimental fibroblast model. The IC50 value for the NC catheter was 33.9%, HC catheter 72.2% and for the SHC catheter 98.1%.

  20. [Multifunctional testing of PTCA balloon catheters].

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Schmitz, H; Schulte, R; Boenick, U

    2000-06-01

    New in vitro measuring methods for balloon catheters used for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and their verification in a complex test device are presented. This system can mimic all relevant application situations. The central element of the test device is a coronary vessel model matching the physiological situation in terms of geometrical structure and frictional properties. Reactive force sensors are used to measure the application-relevant forces exerted by the catheter on the model vessel walls and accessories, such as guide wire and guiding catheter. To generate a kink-free advancement of the catheter and permit measurement of the active forces, an alternating drive unit has been specially developed. The testing and application of the newly developed methods revealed statistically significant differences between various types of catheter. The test device closes a gap between complex but subjective clinical tests, and individual objective, but application-removed in vitro test setups for PTCA catheters. While the initial prototype had shortcomings with regard to the reproducibility of measurements, successor systems developed for industrial use are now in production. The properties of these measuring systems developed for the benefit of manufacturer and reprocessor of PTCA catheters are discussed. PMID:10925517

  1. Catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Suzan; Ghods, Ahad; Afshar, Reza

    2007-03-01

    Hemodialysis catheter related infections (HCRI) are one of the major causes of increasing mortality, morbidity and cost of therapy in hemodialysis patients. Prevention of HCRI requires the identification of predisposing risk factors. To determine the frequency of HCRI risk factors, we studied 116 patients (54% male, mean age of 49.5+/-16 years) patients with HCRI between 2003-2004. Forty one percent of the patients were diabetic. There was a history of previous catheter placement and infection in 41% and 32% of patients, respectively. Pathogenic organisms isolated from blood cultures included Staphylococcus-aureus 42%, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci 20%, E. Coli 19%, Enterococci 7%, Streptococcus D 7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4%, and Klebsiella 1%. Bacterial resistance to vancomycin and amikacin was present in 7% and 4% of the cases, respectively. Hemodialysis catheter related blood borne infections comprised 67% of the total blood-borne infections in our hospital. No significant statistical association was found between HCRI and age, gender, diabetes mellitus, serum albumin level <30 g/L, leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anatomical location of catheter, mean duration of antibiotic therapy, mean catheter duration, frequency of hemodialysis sessions, pathogenic organisms, and history of previous catheter infection. We conclude that the prevalence of pathogenic organisms of HCRI were similar to previous studies. However, bacterial resistance to antibiotics was low. The mean duration of catheter usage was longer than previously reported. PMID:17237890

  2. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  3. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  4. RF HEATING OF MRI-ASSISTED CATHETER STEERING COILS FOR INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Settecase, Fabio; Hetts, Steven W.; Martin, Alastair J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Kucharzyk, Walter; Wilson, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiofrequency (RF) related heating of conductive wire coils used in magnetically steerable endovascular catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 3-axis microcoil was fabricated onto a 1.8 Fr catheter tip. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MRI system using an agarose gel filled vessel phantom, a transmit/receive body RF coil and a steady state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence, and a fluoroptic thermometry system. Temperature was measured without simulated blood flow at varying distances from magnet isocenter and varying flip angles. Additional experiments were performed with laser-lithographed single-axis microcoil-tipped microcatheters in air and in a saline bath with varied grounding of the microcoil wires. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of RF heating was performed in pigs at 1.5 T with coil-tipped catheters in various positions in the common carotid arteries with SSFP pulse sequence on and off, and under physiologic flow and zero flow conditions. RESULTS In tissue-mimicking agarose gel, RF heating resulted in a maximal temperature increase of 0.35°C after 15 minutes of imaging, 15 cm from magnet isocenter. For a single axis microcoil, maximal temperature increases were 0.73-1.91°C in air and 0.45-0.55°C in saline. In vivo, delayed contrast enhanced MRI revealed no evidence of vascular injury and histopathological sections from the common carotid arteries confirmed the lack of vascular damage. CONCLUSIONS Microcatheter tip microcoils for endovascular catheter steering in MRI experience minimal RF heating under the conditions tested. These data provide the basis for further in vivo testing of this promising technology for endovascular interventional MRI. PMID:21075019

  5. Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Acute Superior Vena Cava Syndrome Caused by Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Kawai, Tasuo; Irani, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters have been reported to increase the risk of superior venous cava (SVC) syndrome. This case report describes the development of acute SVC syndrome in a 28-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease implanted with a left-side hemodialysis reliable outflow graft and a right-side double lumen hemodialysis catheter via internal jugular veins. Her symptoms were not alleviated after catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation therapy. She was eventually treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and a predischarge computer tomographic venogram on postthrombolytic procedure day 7 showed patent central veins and patient remained asymptomatic. This case demonstrates that catheter-directed thrombolysis can be safely employed to treat refractory catheter-induced acute SVC syndrome in end-stage renal disease patients.

  6. Guidewire catheter change in central venous catheter biofilm formation in a burn population.

    PubMed

    Kowalewska-Grochowska, K; Richards, R; Moysa, G L; Lam, K; Costerton, J W; King, E G

    1991-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the risk of colonization and biofilm formation of central venous catheters left in situ for seven days vs those changed over a guidewire at three days and removed at seven days. Colonization was determined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and compared to a special scraping/sonication culture method. Thirty-one catheters were examined, and no difference was found between catheters left in situ (9 of 16 colonized) and those changed over a guidewire (11 of 15 colonized). Colonization rates rose significantly from 4 of 15 catheters at the time of guidewire change to 11 of 15 at 7 days (p less than 0.001). Of the catheters defined as colonized by SEM, the special culture technique showed bacterial growth in only 35 percent, making a negative culture result of dubious value in ruling out catheter colonization. No beneficial effect of guidewire changes in reducing colonization could be demonstrated.

  7. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Thomas B; Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter.

  8. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  9. Using urokinase to restore patency in double lumen catheters.

    PubMed

    Northsea, C

    1994-08-01

    All hemodialysis patients with temporary or permanent double lumen catheters are at risk for catheter occlusion. Clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of using urokinase, a thrombolytic agent, to declot occluded double lumen dialysis catheters were evaluated for 2 years. Patency was restored in 95 of 102 catheters. These data support the use of urokinase to safely and effectively restore patency, thereby extending the length of time a catheter can be used for dialysis.

  10. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  15. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  16. Something's missing: peripheral intravenous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Glassberg, Elon; Lending, Gadi; Abbou, Benyamine; Lipsky, Ari M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of peripheral intravenous catheter fracture occurring during a routine training exercise. The supervising instructor immediately placed a venous tourniquet proximal to the insertion site and urgently transported the patient to the hospital. The missing catheter segment was identified within the median cubital vein under ultrasonography and was removed by venous cutdown under local anesthesia. An investigation determined that reinsertion of the needle into the advanced catheter likely caused the fracture and that application of a tourniquet may have prevented embolism of the fractured segment. Our literature review suggested that peripheral intravenous catheter fracture is likely vastly underreported, with only one prior case identified in the English literature. Action was taken following the event to educate all Israeli Defense Force medical providers regarding both proper preventive measures and recognition and treatment of catheter fracture should it occur. This case highlights the importance of health care providers being aware of the possibility of catheter fracture, as well as steps to take to prevent and mitigate its occurrence.

  17. Determination of urethral catheter surface lubricity.

    PubMed

    Kazmierska, Katarzyna; Szwast, Maciej; Ciach, Tomasz

    2008-06-01

    Device for in-vitro measurement of static and kinetic friction coefficient of catheter surface was developed. Tribometer was designed and constructed to work with exchangeable counter-faces (polymers, tissue) and various types of tubes, in wet conditions in order to mimic in-vivo process. Thus seven commercially available urethral catheters, made from vinyl polymers, natural latex with silicone coating, all-silicone or hydrogel coated, and one made from polyvinylchloride with polyurethane/polyvinylpyrrolidone hydrogel coating obtained in our laboratory, were tested against three various counter faces: polymethacrylate (organic glass), inner part of porcine aorta and porcine bladder mucosa. Additionally, the hydrophility/hydrophobity of tested catheters was stated via water wetting contact angle measurement. Super-hydrophilic biomaterials revealed low friction on tissue and hydrophobic counter-face; slightly hydrophobic showed higher friction in both cases, while more hydrophobic manifested low friction on tissue but high on hydrophobic polymer. The smoothest friction characteristic was achieved in all cases on tissue counter-faces. The measured values of the static coefficient of friction of catheters on bladder mucosa counter-face were as follows: the highest (0.15) for vinyl and siliconised latex catheters and 3 folds lower (0.05) for all-silicone ones. Hydrogel coated catheters exhibited the lowest static and kinetic friction factors. PMID:18071872

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  19. The radiofrequency magnetic dipole discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Marcante, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Fassina, A.; Spolaore, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a novel and simple concept of plasma source, which is able to produce a radiofrequency magnetized discharge with minimal power requirements. The source is based on the magnetron concept and uses a permanent magnet as an active electrode. The dipolar field produced by the magnet confines the electrons, which cause further ionization, thus producing a toroidally shaped plasma in the equatorial region around the electrode. A plasma can be ignited with such scheme with power levels as low as 5 W. Paschen curves have been built for four different working gases, showing that in Helium or Neon, plasma breakdown is easily obtained also at atmospheric pressure. The plasma properties have been measured using a balanced Langmuir probe, showing that the electron temperature is around 3-4 eV and higher in the cathode proximity. Plasma densities of the order of 1016 m-3 have been obtained, with a good positive scaling with applied power. Overall, the electron pressure appears to be strongly correlated with the magnetic field magnitude in the measurement point.

  20. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost.

  1. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated. PMID:25978469

  2. Audit of catheter-associated UTI using silver alloy-coated Foley catheters.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Coral

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common and most costly healthcare-associated infection, and possibly the most preventable (Salgado et al, 2003). The Cochrane Review of silver alloy-coated Foley catheters concluded that they are successful at reducing the rate of this healthcare-associated infection, which can be potentially fatal (Brosnahan et al, 2004). This article discusses the merits of using the silver alloy-coated Foley catheter in reducing the risk of CAUTI in an acute general hospital. A pre- and post-intervention design was used to audit CAUTI rates. During the pre-intervention period of 10 weeks, the Trust's standard catheters were used and CAUTI rates captured. Silver alloy-coated Foley catheters were introduced and their use monitored for a further period of 10 weeks. A total of 117 newly catheterized patients were actively monitored for signs and symptoms of CAUTI. The audit met and exceeded its aim of reducing the CAUTI rate by 20&. The CAUTI risk rate and device rate fell during the evaluation period. The use of the silver alloy-coated Foley catheters proved to be cost-effective given the recognized additional costs of CAUTI and prolonged in-patient stay (Plowman et al, 1999). Given the results of this audit it is recommended that the silver alloy-coated Foley catheter be the catheter of choice for use with acute patient admissions requiring short-term catheterization.

  3. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  4. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. (a) Specific absorption rate (SAR) shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b) within...

  5. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. (a) Specific absorption rate (SAR) shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b) within...

  6. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation... exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except in the case of...

  7. [Radiofrequency ablation of an unresectable abdominal tumor].

    PubMed

    Sézeur, Alain; Fritsch, Sylvie; Louvet, Christophe; Kujas, Albert; Mosnier, Henri; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Grimberg, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    Remnant malignant tissue is left behind after conventional surgery for an unresectable intraperitoneal malignant tumor. Standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy rarely enables good tumor control. We report the case of a 74-year-old man who developed a local recurrence of a sigmoid tumor located 5 to 6 cm from the anus. The tumor was fixed to the pelvic wall and could not be totally eradicated with conventional surgery. Preoperative peroperative assessment confirmed the absence of metastatic spread. Radiotherapy could not be performed due to risk of bowel injury. Peroperative radiofrequency ablation was followed by surgical colorectal resection without restoration of intestinal continuity, leaving only tumor tissue destroyed by radiofrequency. No adjuvant treatment was proposed because of intolerance to chemotherapy. Clinical assessment and thoracic and abdominal CT scan confirmed the absence of recurrence 26 months after radiofrequency ablation. Serum markers remained normal.

  8. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  9. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  10. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  11. [The radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways. The initial experience in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Molina, L; Morales, A; Alvarez, L M; Avila, L

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to an accessory pathway were submitted to an electrophysiological study and radiofrequency ablation of the Kent bundle. There were 9 males and 4 females. The mean age was 22 years. Other than their SVT, none had any structural heart disease. Ten of them had Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and three had concealed accessory pathways. Two different types of radiofrequency devices were used: one generating damped sinusoid waves, and two other generators producing pure continuous sinusoid waves. With the first type, two attempts were made: one patient with a concealed pathway and one with overt preexcitation. The successful ablation was not achieved because this wave type is 100 times more powerful, it desiccates the tissue, and thus does not produce the right kind of lesion. The other eleven patients were divided in three groups: I) With left overt preexcitation (7 pts) II) Concealed left Kent bundles (2 pts) III) Right Kent bundles. Ablation was 100% successful in group I, while in the other two groups, only one patient of each was successfully ablated. The overall successful rate of these 3 groups was 81.8%. Of the two patients that could not be treated, one had an anterior septal Kent bundle and the other had a concealed left Kent bundle. We believe that catheter ablation is a very promising therapeutic procedure for patients with SVT, besides being a extraordinary instrument that will enable us to be able to understand further clinical electrophysiology. PMID:8466363

  12. Six-year experience with swan neck catheters.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Z J; Prowant, B F; Nichols, W K; Nolph, K D; Khanna, R

    1992-01-01

    From the beginning of our continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) program in January 1977 until June 1985, we used Tenckhoff and Toronto Western Hospital catheters. Throughout these years catheter survival probabilities of about 30% at three years persisted unchanged and were similar to survival probabilities reported by the National CAPD Registry special survey for these catheters. The first improvement in catheter results regarding leaks was noted after the adoption of lateral catheter insertion. Malfunction was less using swan neck prototypes from August 1985 to April 1986. The latter catheters were made of 80 degrees arc angle tubing between 8.5 cm spaced cuffs and were inserted in a reversed U-shape tunnel with the incision at the top of the tunnel. The use of these catheters was abandoned because of high cuff extrusion and exit infection rates. The next generation of swan neck catheters, the swan neck Missouri 2 and 3 catheters with straight intraperitoneal segments, improved the results dramatically. These catheters were made of 180 degrees arc angle tubing between 5 or 3 cm spaced cuffs. The estimated survival probability of 61% at three years more than doubled compared to previously used catheters. Recently we modified the intraperitoneal segment of the catheters, replacing the straight segment with a coiled one. These modified catheters, the swan neck Missouri coiled catheters, have been used exclusively since February 1990. In addition to an acceptable survival probability of 88% at one year, there are two major advantages of these catheters, the same as for other coiled catheters: elimination of infusion pain due to a jet effect and pain related to straight catheter tip pressure on the peritoneum experienced by some patients.

  13. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  14. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  15. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use.

  16. Risk of Ionizing Radiation in Women of Childbearing Age undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Gomes, Daniel Garcia; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus N.; Pires, Leonardo Martins; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Commission of Radiology recommends a pregnancy screening test to all female patients of childbearing age who will undergo a radiological study. Radiation is known to be teratogenic and its effect is cumulative. The teratogenic potential starts at doses close to those used during these procedures. The prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in patients undergoing electrophysiological studies and/or catheter ablation in our midst is unknown. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in female patients referred for electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Methods Cross-sectional study analyzing 2,966 patients undergoing electrophysiological study and/or catheter ablation, from June 1997 to February 2013, in the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 1490 procedures were performed in women, of whom 769 were of childbearing age. All patients were screened with a pregnancy test on the day before the procedure. Results Three patients tested positive, and were therefore unable to undergo the procedure. The prevalence observed was 3.9 cases per 1,000 women of childbearing age. Conclusion Because of their safety and low cost, pregnancy screening tests are indicated for all women of childbearing age undergoing radiological studies, since the degree of ionizing radiation needed for these procedures is very close to the threshold for teratogenicity, especially in the first trimester, when the signs of pregnancy are not evident. PMID:24061686

  17. Adjunctive radiofrequency ablation for the endoscopic treatment of ampullary lesions with intraductal extension (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Alejandro L.; Coté, Gregory A.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Catheter-based radiofrequency ablation (RFA) delivered during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may represent a viable treatment option for intraductal extension of ampullary neoplasms, however, clinical experience with this modality is limited. After ampullary resection, 4 patients with intraductal extension underwent adjunctive RFA of the distal bile duct. All patients received a temporary pancreatic stent to reduce the risk of pancreatitis, as well as a plastic biliary stent to prevent biliary obstruction. Three patients were treated for adenoma and 1 for adenoma with a focus of adenocarcinoma. During a short follow-up period, 3 patients experienced complete eradication of the target lesion, whereas the patient with a focus of adenocarcinoma had progression to overt invasive cancer. There were no immediate adverse events. One patient developed a post-RFA bile duct stricture, which has required additional endoscopic therapy. Catheter-based RFA of ampullary lesions that extend up the bile duct is technically feasible. Additional research is necessary to understand the risks and long-term benefits of this technique. PMID:27556089

  18. Data fusion for catheter tracking using Kalman filtering: applications in robot-assisted catheter insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Patel, Rajni

    2011-03-01

    X-ray image guided angioplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the insertion of a catheter into a blood vessel to remove blockages to blood flow. There are several issues associated with conventional angioplasty which cause risks for the patient (damage to blood vessels, dislodging plaques, etc.) and difficulties for the clinician (X-ray exposure, fatigue, etc.). Autonomous or semi-autonomous robot-assisted catheter insertion is a solution that can reduce these problems substantially. To perform autonomous catheter insertion, closed-loop position control of the distal tip of the catheter is required during insertion. Therefore accurate real-time position feedback is needed for this purpose. We have developed a real-time image processing algorithm for catheter tip position tracking which has an acceptable performance but is sensitive to X-ray image artifacts caused by bones and dense tissues. A magnetic tracking system (MTS) is another modality that has also been used for catheter tip position tracking, but it is sensitive to external electromagnetic interferences and ferromagnetic material. Combining the measurement data provided by both imaging and magnetic sensors can compensate for the deficiencies of each and can also improve the robustness of catheter tip position tracking. We have developed a Kalman filter based sensor fusion scheme to overcome deficiencies of both of these methods and create a reliable real-time tracking of a catheter tip. Experiments have been performed by inserting a guide catheter into a model of the vasculature. The method has been tested in presence of occlusion in the images and also electromagnetic interference.

  19. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon to help direct the catheter to the desired position. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon to help direct the catheter to the desired position. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. Catheter ablation of accessory pathways near the coronary sinus: Value of defining coronary arterial anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jessica; Moriarty, John M.; Mandapati, Ravi; Boyle, Noel G.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Vaseghi, Marmar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Accessory pathways can lie near or within the coronary sinus (CS). Radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways is a well-established treatment option, but this procedure can cause damage to adjacent coronary arteries. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomic relationship between the coronary arteries and the CS. METHODS Retrospective data of patients who underwent catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia between June 2011 and August 2013 was reviewed. In addition, detailed analysis of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) data from 50 patients was performed. RESULTS Between June 2011 and August 2013, 427 patients underwent catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia, of whom 105 (age 28 ± 17 years, 60% male) had accessory pathway–mediated tachycardia. Of these, 23 patients had accessory pathways near the CS, and 60% (N = 14) underwent concurrent coronary angiography. In 4 patients, the posterolateral (inferolateral) branch (PLA) of the right coronary artery was in close proximity to the CS, and 2 patients (18%) had stenosis of the PLA at the site of ablation. On CTA at their closest proximity, the PLA was 1.9 ± 1.3 mm and the left circumflex artery (LCx) was 2.0 ± 0.8 mm from the body of the CS, in right and left coronary artery–dominant patients, respectively. CS ostium and PLA were 3.6 ± 1.9 mm apart. In left-dominant patients, LCx and CS ostium were 3.8 ± 1.2 mm apart. CONCLUSION The PLA and LCx are in close proximity to the anteroinferior aspect of the CS ostium and proximal CS. The relationship of the CS and coronary arteries should be evaluated before ablation at these sites. PMID:25485779

  2. Optimization of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Insights Gained from Clinically-Derived Computer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Hansen, Brian J.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  3. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System -The First Feasibility Study in Pigs-

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Yuhi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Koji; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Hanawa, Kenichiro; Shindo, Tomohiko; Kondo, Masateru; Nakano, Makoto; Wakayama, Yuji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) using Joule heat has two fundamental weaknesses: the limited depth of treatment and the risk of thrombus formation. In contrast, focused shock wave (SW) therapy could damage tissues at arbitrary depths without heat generation. Thus, we aimed to develop a SW catheter ablation (SWCA) system that could compensate for the weaknesses of RFCA therapy. Methods and Results We developed a SWCA system where the SW generated by a Q-switched Holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser beam was reflected by a reflector attached to 14-Fr catheter tip and then was converged onto the focus. We examined the feasibility of our system on pigs in vivo. When applied using the epicardial approach, the SWCA caused persistent spheroidal lesions with mild superficial injury than the RFCA. The lesions were created to a depth based on the focal length (2.0 mm) [2.36 ± 0.45 (SD) mm immediately after procedure, n = 16]. When applied to the atrioventricular (AV) node using the endocardial approach, the SWCA caused junctional escape rhythms in 2 pigs and AV block in 12 pigs (complete AV block in 9) in acute phase (n = 14). Nine of the 14 pigs survived with pacemakers for the long-term study, and the AV block persisted for 12.6 ± 3.9 (SD) days in all surviving pigs. Histological examination showed AV nodal cell body atrophy in the acute phase and fibrotic lesions in the chronic phase. Importantly, no acute or chronic fatal complications were noted. Conclusions Our novel SWCA system could be a promising modality as a non-thermal ablation method to compensate for the weaknesses of RFCA therapy. However, further research and development will be necessary as the current prototype still exhibited the presence of micro-thrombus formation in the animal studies. PMID:25633373

  4. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  5. Echinocandin and ethanol lock therapy treatment of fungal catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Kevin P; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A; Berquist, William E

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy has been implemented to prevent infections of central venous catheters as well as to treat infections. Fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections are historically more difficult to treat and have required removal of central venous catheters. We report the largest case series to date, successfully treating 5 of 7 fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections with ethanol lock therapy and systemic echinocandin administration.

  6. Novel uses of the Proxis embolic protection catheter.

    PubMed

    Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Banerjee, Subhash

    2009-09-01

    The Proxis catheter has been designed for proximal embolic protection during saphenous vein graft interventions. The Proxis catheter's flexible and kink-resistant design, lubricity, and atraumatic tip allow deep seating in target vessels. We describe six challenging percutaneous coronary intervention cases, in which the Proxis catheter was used in arterial grafts, sequential saphenous vein grafts, and native coronary arteries. Deep seating of the Proxis catheter enabled vessel visualization and equipment delivery, allowing successful completion of each case.

  7. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80 °C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research.

  8. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  9. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80 °C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  10. Managing turbinate hypertrophy: coblation vs. radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Loglisci, M; Politi, L; Passali, G C; Kern, E

    2016-06-01

    The role of inferior turbinate hypertrophy in the reduction of nasal airflow is well established. Although chronic nasal obstruction is not life- threatening, it significantly impairs patients' quality of life, affecting many aspects of daily activities; therefore, patients seek medical intervention. 40 patients were selected (27 males and 13 females) between 27 and 64 years of age with a symptom of nasal obstruction. The patients were divided in two groups: Group 1: coblation, 25 patients (18 males and 7 females); Group 2: radiofrequency, 15 patients (7 males and 6 females). These 40 patients were followed for 3 years. Patients were analyzed using both subjective and objective methods. The visual analog scale (VAS) subjective data and objective data including both active anterior rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry were recorded and analyzed. Data were collected pre-operatively and at 1 and 3 years post-operatively. According to our data, both coblation and radiofrequency turbinate reduction benefit patients with good results. The complications, found during the follow-up, are limited to minimal bleeding and crusting. Coblation and radiofrequency were significantly less painful than others procedures during the early post-operative period. In our study, both coblation and radiofrequency provide an improvement in nasal airflow with a reduction in nasal obstructive symptoms in the short term, but their efficacy tended to decrease within 3 years.

  11. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  12. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  13. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic oximeter catheter. 870.1230 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1230 Fiberoptic oximeter catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic oximeter catheter. 870.1230 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1230 Fiberoptic oximeter catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  11. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  12. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  13. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  14. Ultrasound assessment of caudal catheter position in infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen A; Galvez, Ignacio

    2005-05-01

    The positioning of caudally inserted epidural catheters is crucial to their effectiveness. However, level assessment can be difficult and time consuming. We report the use of ultrasound to assess the catheter position in three patients aged between 1 and 10 months. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed in relation to other methods of assessing caudal catheter placement. PMID:15828997

  15. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a...

  19. Prophylaxis of indwelling urethral catheter infection: clinical experience with a modified Foley catheter and drainage system.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Okamoto, S

    1979-01-01

    With the application of the oligodynamic bactericidal property of silver ions, modification of the urinary catheter and drainage system has been found effective in the prevention of urinary tract infections owing to prolonged bladder catheterization. The newly devised catheter and open drainage system were used in 102 patients for bladder catheterization postoperatively or in those with urinary retention for periods ranging from 4 to 77 days. During the period of indwelling catheterization usually no antibiotics were administered and no patient had overt bacteriuria (more than 10(5) bacteria per ml.) or symptoms of urethritis. In contrast, all 20 patients in the control group who had the conventional type of indwelling catheters had bacteriuria within 4 days of catheterization. The data obtained indicate that effective prevention of urinary tract infection, which frequently is associated with indwelling urethral catheterization, can be achieved by the use of the modified catheter and drainage system.

  20. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization with blood flow control of an arterioportal shunt that developed after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kishi, Kazushi; Ikoma, Akira; Sanda, Hiroki; Nakata, Kouhei; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Hosokawa, Seiki; Tamai, Hideyuki; Sato, Morio

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with rapid deterioration of esophageal varices caused by portal hypertension accompanied by a large arterioportal shunt that developed after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. We used n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) as an embolic material to achieve pinpoint embolization of the shunt, because the microcatheter tip was 2 cm away from the shunt site. Under hepatic arterial flow control using a balloon catheter, the arterioportal shunt was successfully embolized with NBCA, which caused an improvement in the esophageal varices.

  1. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Ding-Kwo; Chang, Cheng-Ang; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Ou-Yang, Fu; Chuang, Chien-Han; Tsai, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Jui-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010), a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days). The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days). All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  2. Ocular effects of radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy has been reported to cause a variety of ocular effects, primarily cataracts but also effects on the retina, cornea, and other ocular systems. Cataracts have been observed in experimental animals when one eye was exposed to a localized, very high RF field and the other eye was the unexposed control. The results show that 2450 MHz exposures for >or=30 min at power densities causing extremely high dose rates (>or=150 W/kg) and temperatures (>or=41 degrees C) in or near the lens caused cataracts in the rabbit eye. However, cataracts were not observed in the monkey eye exposed to similar exposure conditions, reflecting the different patterns of energy absorption (SAR, specific absorption rate) distribution, due to their different facial structure. Since the monkey head is similar in structure to the human head, the nonhuman primate study showed that the incident power density levels causing cataracts in rabbits and other laboratory animals cannot be directly extrapolated to primates, including human beings. It is reasonable to assume that an SAR that would induce temperatures >or=41 degrees C in or near the lens in the human eye would produce cataracts by the same mechanism (heating) that caused cataracts in the rabbit lens; however, such an exposure would greatly exceed the currently allowable limits for human exposure and would be expected to cause unacceptable effects in other parts of the eye and face. Other ocular effects including corneal lesions, retinal effects, and changes in vascular permeability, have been observed after localized exposure of the eye of laboratory animals to both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed wave (PW) exposures, but the inconsistencies in these results, the failure to independently confirm corneal lesions after CW exposure, the failure to independently confirm retinal effects after PW exposure, and the absence of functional changes in vision are reasons why these ocular effects are not useful in defining an

  3. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly.

  4. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  5. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  11. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  12. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  13. Considerations in Catheter Retrieval From the Arterial System

    SciTech Connect

    Best, Irwin M Butler, Karin L; Bumpers, Harvey L

    2005-01-15

    Catheter-based techniques have become commonplace in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Despite the significant improvements in materials and techniques, catheter separation or fracture may occur and result in catheter embolization or intravascular retention. We present such an occurrence during antegrade access to the common femoral artery. Although the sheared catheter was visualized fluoroscopically, attempts at percutaneous recovery were futile. Our findings at exploration confirmed total intravascular retention and impaction of the catheter. Practitioners should recognize this problem and avoid the dangers associated with percutaneous recovery.

  14. Catheter microwave ablation therapy for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C

    1999-01-01

    This article describes three microwave catheter antennas for percutaneous cardiac ablation. A particular design feature of these antennas is that there is no reflected microwave current from the antenna flowing up the transmission line. Thus, it minimizes heating of the coaxial cable. The power reflection coefficients are very low (4% or less) in phantom equivalent materials. These antennas can also serve as bipolar electrodes for sensing endocardiac electrograms. Our studies in dogs, during both cardiopulmonary bypass and closed-chest operations via the femoral vein, have shown microwave energy greater than 200 joules (J) delivered to the heart through a split-tip dipole catheter antenna can produce irreversible block of the heart rhythms. This energy was achieved either by increasing the delivered power from 20 to 40 watts or by increasing the treatment duration from 7 to 11 s (210 to 330 J per application). It produced an endocardium temperature of about 65 degrees C. We found that the percutaneous, transcatheter microwave system is capable of inducing AV blocks consistently in dogs using the flexible, curved tip, split-tip catheter antenna. In addition, our studies have shown that the width and height of SAR distributions for cap-choke and split-tip catheter antennas are similar for the same antenna length. The cap-slot design had a much longer SAR distribution compared to the others. Moreover, a longer (4 mm) split-tip antenna can also induce larger lesions. These results suggest that it could be possible to ablate a ventricular tachycardia focus using the 4 mm split-tip as well as the cap-slot microwave catheter antennas. PMID:10334721

  15. Distal end of the atrioventricular nodal artery predicts the risk of atrioventricular block during slow pathway catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J; Huang, S; Lai, L; Lin, L; Chen, J; Tseng, Y; Lien, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To search for a reliable anatomical landmark within Koch's triangle to predict the risk of atrioventricular (AV) block during radiofrequency slow pathway catheter ablation of AV nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—To test the hypothesis that the distal end of the AV nodal artery represents the anatomical location of the AV node, and thus could be a useful landmark for predicting the risk of AV block, 128 consecutive patients with AVNRT receiving slow pathway catheter ablation were prospectively studied in two phases. In phase I (77 patients), angiographic demonstration of the AV nodal artery and its ending was performed at the end of the ablation procedure, whereas in the subsequent phase II study (51 patients), the angiography was performed immediately before catheter ablation to assess the value of identifying this new landmark in reducing the risk of AV block. Multiple electrophysiologic and anatomical parameters were analysed. The former included the atrial activation sequence between the His bundle recording site (HBE) and the coronary sinus orifice or the catheter ablation site, either during AVNRT or during sinus rhythm. The latter included the spatial distances between the distal end of the AV nodal artery and the HBE and the final catheter ablation site, and the distance between the HBE and the tricuspid border at the coronary sinus orifice floor.
RESULTS—In phase I, nine of the 77 patients had complications of transient (seven patients) or permanent (two patients) complete AV block during stepwise, anatomy guided slow pathway catheter ablation. These nine patients had a wider distance between the HBE and the distal end of the AV nodal artery, and a closer approximation of the catheter ablation site to the distal end of the AV nodal artery, which independently predicted the risk of AV block. In contrast, none of the available electrophysiologic parameters were shown to be reliable. When the distance between

  16. Chronic peritoneal dialysis catheters: challenges and design solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, S R

    2006-01-01

    Although highly successful as transcutaneous access devices, today's peritoneal dialysis catheters still have imperfect hydraulic function, biocompatibility and resistance to infection. Success of Tenckhoff catheters is greatly improved by the proper positioning of deep and subcutaneous cuffs and intraperitoneal segment. Newer peritoneal catheter designs are intended to improve hydraulic function, avoid outflow failure, and diminish exit site infection. These catheter designs serve as excellent alternatives for patients with various types of failure of Tenckhoff catheters. Catheters have been designed for Continuous Flow Peritoneal Dialysis, and have generally been successful in providing high peritoneal dialysis flow rate, but not always successful in optimally distributing flow of peritoneal fluid. Improvements in catheter design may expand the use of peritoneal dialysis as a successful home dialysis therapy. PMID:16485243

  17. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  18. The optimal radiofrequency temperature in radiofrequency thermocoagulation for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuan-Zhang; Yang, Li-Qiang; Yue, Jian-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Ping; HE, Liang-Liang; NI, Jia-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Our previous study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) of trigeminal gasserian ganglion for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal radiofrequency temperature of computed tomography (CT)-guided RFT for treatment of ITN. Methods: A retrospective study of patients with ITN treated with a single CT-guided RFT procedure between January 2002 and December 2013. Patients were divided into ≤75 °C, 75 °C, and ≥80 °C groups according to the highest radiofrequency temperature used. Pain relief was graded from poor to excellent, and facial numbness/dysesthesia from I (absent) to IV (most severe). Results: A total of 1161 RFT procedures were undertaken in the 1137 patients. The mean follow-up time was 46 ± 31 months. There were no significant differences in the rate of excellent pain relief according to the radiofrequency temperature used. However, more patients experienced with no facial numbness or facial numbness gradually resolved and those patients treated at 75 °C had a lower rate of grade IV facial numbness/dysesthesia than other groups. Conclusions: The optimal radiofrequency temperature to maximize pain relief and minimize facial numbness or dysesthesia may be 75 °C, but this requires confirmation. PMID:27428194

  19. Bilateral vision loss associated with radiofrequency exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dianna; Cruz, Franz Marie; Subramanian, Prem S

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with painless binocular vision loss 1 week after direct application of radiofrequency energy to her orbits. She had no light perception bilaterally. Pupils were dilated and not reactive to light. Fundoscopic exam initially showed optic disc swelling in the right eye and a normal-appearing disc in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits showed gadolinium enhancement of both intraorbital optic nerves. She underwent a course of high-dose steroid treatment without recovery of vision. Optic discs were pale 11 weeks after injury. With exclusion of other possible causes, this represents a unique case of irreversible binocular optic nerve damage and blindness secondary to radiofrequency exposure. PMID:23271888

  20. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence. PMID:25766072

  1. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  2. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  3. Radiofrequency-oxidation treatment of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Young, Chris; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal-chemical treatment technology using radiofrequency heating and oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, ozone and a combination of both) was used for the treatment of sewage sludge. This was to evaluate the process effectiveness on cell disintegration and nutrient release of sludge, physical property changes such as particle size distribution, dewaterability and settleability, and their inter-relationships. The effectiveness of treatment processes was in the following order, from the most to least: thermal-oxidation process, oxidation process and thermal process. The thermal-oxidation process greatly increased cell disintegration and nutrient release, improved settleability, and decreased particle sizes. The treatment scheme involving ozone addition followed by hydrogen peroxide and radiofrequency heating yielded the highest soluble chemical oxygen demand, volatile fatty acids, ammonia and metals, while proffering the shortest capillary suction time and excellent settling properties. PMID:26233925

  4. Radiofrequency tonsillotomy in Sweden 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Sunnergren, Ola; Hemlin, Claes; Ericsson, Elisabeth; Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte; Hultcrantz, Elisabeth; Odhagen, Erik; Stalfors, Joacim

    2014-06-01

    The Swedish National Registry for Tonsil Surgery has been operational since 1997. All ENT clinics in Sweden are encouraged to submit data for all patients scheduled for tonsil surgery. Preoperatively, age, gender and indication are recorded. Postoperatively, method (tonsillectomy or tonsillotomy), technique, and perioperative complications are recorded. Postoperative bleedings, pain, infections, and symptom relief are assessed through questionnaires. An earlier report from this registry showed that tonsillotomy had become more common than tonsillectomy in children with tonsil-related upper airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to categorize which instruments were used for tonsillotomy in Sweden and to compare their outcome and complication rate. All children 2-18 years, reported to the registry from March 2009 until September 2012, who underwent tonsillotomy on the indication upper airway obstruction, were included in the study. 1,676 patients were identified. In 1,602 cases (96%), a radiofrequency instrument was used. The postoperative bleeding rate was low (1.2%) and the degree of symptom relief was high (95.1%). Three different radiofrequency instruments (ArthroCare Coblation(®), Ellman Surgitron(®), and Sutter CURIS(®)) were used in 96% of the patients. There were no significant differences in the number of postoperative bleedings, postoperative infections or symptom relief between the instruments. The only difference found was in the number of days on analgesics, where more days were registered after use of Coblation(®). In Sweden, radiofrequency tonsillotomy is the dominant surgical technique used for tonsil hypertrophy causing upper airway obstruction in children. There are no significant differences in outcome between the different radiofrequency instruments except for number of days on analgesics after surgery.

  5. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  6. Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Elbow Epicondylitis: Midterm Results.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P; Richmond, John M; Cummings, Jeffrey R; Hardesty, Renee; Amiel, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency probe to treat chronic tendinosis of the elbow. All patients had failed conservative treatment for 6 months. The radiofrequency-based microtenotomy was performed using the Topaz Microdebrider (ArthroCare). Patients were followed annually for up to 9 years postoperatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure. Eighty consecutive patients with tendinosis of the elbow were enrolled; 69 patients were treated for lateral epicondylitis and 11 for medial epicondylitis. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 9 years (mean, 2.5 years). Ninety-one percent of the patients reported a successful outcome. Within the lateral epicondylitis group, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.9 to 1.3 postoperatively and demonstrated an 81% improvement (P ≤ .01). For the medial epicondylitis patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.1 to 1.3 after surgery, a 79% improvement (P ≤ .01). No complications were reported. Radiofrequency-based microtenotomy is a safe and effective procedure for elbow epicondylitis. The results are durable with successful outcomes observed at 9 years after surgery.

  7. Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Elbow Epicondylitis: Midterm Results.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P; Richmond, John M; Cummings, Jeffrey R; Hardesty, Renee; Amiel, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency probe to treat chronic tendinosis of the elbow. All patients had failed conservative treatment for 6 months. The radiofrequency-based microtenotomy was performed using the Topaz Microdebrider (ArthroCare). Patients were followed annually for up to 9 years postoperatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure. Eighty consecutive patients with tendinosis of the elbow were enrolled; 69 patients were treated for lateral epicondylitis and 11 for medial epicondylitis. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 9 years (mean, 2.5 years). Ninety-one percent of the patients reported a successful outcome. Within the lateral epicondylitis group, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.9 to 1.3 postoperatively and demonstrated an 81% improvement (P ≤ .01). For the medial epicondylitis patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.1 to 1.3 after surgery, a 79% improvement (P ≤ .01). No complications were reported. Radiofrequency-based microtenotomy is a safe and effective procedure for elbow epicondylitis. The results are durable with successful outcomes observed at 9 years after surgery. PMID:26761915

  8. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  9. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  10. Soft Robotic Concepts in Catheter Design: an On-demand Fouling-release Urinary Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Leveri, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; L00F3;pez, Gabriel P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices, and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously-inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation was used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters were constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  11. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    PubMed Central

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Peixoto, Cibelle Grassmann; May, Tássia Amanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC) and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis) in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective. PMID:27508916

  12. Soft robotic concepts in catheter design: an on-demand fouling-release urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Levering, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2014-10-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation is used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters are constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  13. Enteral alimentation using fluoroscopically placed catheters.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, R; Buckwalter, J A

    1983-09-01

    Proximal gastrointestinal disease or injury that prevents adequate enteral alimentation is a difficult management problem. Recently, total parenteral nutrition has been shown to be important in maintaining these patients and the management of these problems. However, central intravenous hyperalimentation is associated with well-described problems and has other advantages. This article describes a technique for catheterizing a distal portion of the gastrointestinal tract for the provision of adequate enteral alimentation using an angiographic catheter and fluoroscopy.

  14. Flow Structure Associated with Hemodialysis Catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason

    2005-11-01

    Insertion of a hemodialysis catheter into the superior vena cava (SVC) gives rise to complex flow patterns, which arise from the simultaneous injection and extraction of blood through different holes (ports) of the catheter. Techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed in a scaled-up water facility. This approach allows characterization of both the instantaneous and time-averaged flow structure due to generic classes of side hole geometries. The trajectory of the injection jet is related to the ratio of the initial jet velocity to the mainstream velocity through the SVC, and to the type of distortion of the jet cross-section. Furthermore, the mean and fluctuating velocity and vorticity fields are determined. Significant turbulent stresses develop rapidly in the injection jet, which can impinge upon the wall of the simulated SVC. Immediately downstream of the injection hole, a recirculation cell of low velocity exists adjacent to the catheter surface. These and other representations of the flow structure are first evaluated for a steady throughflow, then for the case of a pulsatile waveform in the SVC, which matches that of a normal adult.

  15. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  16. Catheter ablation of recurrent polymorphic tachycardia: Use of sodium channel blockade to organize the tachycardia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Daljeet Kaur; Nair, Sandeep G.; Shelke, Abhijeet; Yalagudri, Sachin; Narasimhan, Calambur

    2015-01-01

    A 55 year old male presented with recurrent implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT). He had undergone prior catheter ablation for VT three years ago. During the prior attempt he underwent voltage guided substrate ablation. With programmed ventricular extrastimulation (PVES), PMVT was repeatedly induced requiring DC shock. Intravenous procainamide was administered and PVES was repeated which induced sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (MMVT). This VT had pseudo delta waves with maximum deflection index of 0.68, suggestive of epicardial origin. Activation mapping was performed epicardially. Presystolic potentials were recorded in mid anterolateral wall of left ventricular epicardial region. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation at this site terminated the VT. Post ablation there was no inducible tachycardia and patient is free of arrhythmias during 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27479202

  17. Comparison between qualitative and semiquantitative catheter-tip cultures: laboratory diagnosis of catheter-related infection in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Camila; de Lourdes RS Cunha, Maria; Lyra, João C; Bentlin, Maria R; Batalha, Jackson EN; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Rugolo, Lígia MSS

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and submitted to agent susceptibility test. The gold standard was the certain CRI diagnosis when same microorganism (specie and profile of susceptibility to agents) was isolated from both catheter tips and peripheral blood culture. A total of 85 catheters from 63 newborns were included in the study. The semiquantitative culture method, despite presenting lower sensitivity (90%), showed higher specificity (71%) when compared to 100% of sensitivity and 60% of specificity in the qualitative method. The identification of the microorganisms obtained from the catheter cultures showed a prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species. The specie Staphylococcus epidermidis (77.5%) was the prevalent in the catheters with positive semiquantitative cultures. Among 11 episodes with CRI diagnosis, 8 (72.7%) were associated with CNS species, of which 6 were S. epidermidis. Two episodes of CRI by S. aureus and one by Candida parapsilosis were also detected. The semiquantitative catheter-culture method showed advantages for CRI diagnosis in newborns when compared to the conservative qualitative method. PMID:24031213

  18. A comparison of the microbiologic profile of indwelling versus external urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Larissa; Abers, Michael S; Kizilbash, Quratulain F; Petersen, Nancy J; Trautner, Barbara W

    2014-06-01

    We studied the microbiology reports of urine cultures collected from external (condom catheters) versus indwelling (Foley) catheters. The equal prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococci in samples from both catheter types calls into question the practice of switching from indwelling to external catheters to decrease catheter-associated bacteriuria.

  19. Does Heparin Coating Improve Patency or Reduce Infection of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Gaurav; Allon, Michael; Saddekni, Souheil; Barker, Jill-Finkel

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Tunneled dialysis catheters are prone to frequent malfunction and infection. Catheter thrombosis occurs despite prophylactic anticoagulant locks. Catheter thrombi may also serve as a nidus for catheter infection, thereby increasing the risk of bacteremia. Thus, heparin coating of catheters may reduce thrombosis and infection. This study evaluated whether heparin-coated hemodialysis catheters have fewer infections or greater cumulative survival than noncoated catheters. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We retrospectively queried a prospective access database to analyze the outcomes of 175 tunneled dialysis catheters placed in the internal jugular vein, including 89 heparin-coated catheters and 86 noncoated catheters. The primary outcome was cumulative catheter survival, and the secondary outcome was infection-free catheter survival. Results: The two patient groups were similar in demographics and clinical and catheter features. Catheter-related bacteremia occurred less frequently with heparin-coated catheters than with noncoated catheters (34 versus 60%, P < 0.001). Cumulative catheter survival was similar in heparin-coated and noncoated catheters (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.55 to 1.36; P = 0.53). On multiple variable survival analysis including catheter type, age, sex, diabetes, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, catheter location, and previous catheter, only catheter location predicted cumulative catheter survival (hazard ratio, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.27 to 3.25, with the right internal jugular location being the reference group, P = 0.003). The frequency of thrombolytic instillation was 1.8 per 1000 catheter-days in both groups. Conclusions: Heparin coating decreases the frequency of catheter-related bacteremia but does not reduce the frequency of catheter malfunction. PMID:19729425

  20. Protein adsorption to hydrocephalus shunt catheters: CSF protein adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, H.; Keir, G.; Thompson, E.; Bayston, R.; Hayward, R.; Harkness, W.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the quantity and nature of the proteins that adsorb to hydrocephalus shunt catheters after implantation, and to determine whether sufficient could accumulate to obstruct the catheter.
DESIGN—Elution of proteins from 102 explanted shunt catheters, with protein assay and electrophoresis of the eluate, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the catheters.
RESULTS—The amount of protein elutable was extremely low, and significant protein, apart from a thin film, was not found on SEM. Qualitative analysis disclosed that most of the adsorbed protein was albumin.
CONCLUSIONS—Protein deposition on hydrocephalus catheters does not occur in sufficient quantities to cause catheter obstruction.

 PMID:9598681

  1. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required.

  2. Respecting shape memory to optimize peritoneal dialysis catheter outcomes.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Victoria R; Shrestha, Badri M; Wilkie, Martin E

    2014-11-01

    Disruption of the shape memory of a peritoneal dialysis catheter at the time of insertion may be a factor responsible for tip migration and catheter dysfunction. The use of postimplantation radiology to confirm the preservation of both the swan neck angle and the inclination angle may have a role in standardizing insertion technique with the potential to reduce the impact of operator variation on catheter outcomes. PMID:25360492

  3. Complications of Catheter Drainage for Amoebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Navneet; Kaur, Harpreet; Kalra, Naveen; Bhalla, Ashish; Kumar, Susheel; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Per-cutaneously inserted catheter drainage is an accepted treatment modality for a large amoebic liver abscess. Complications that can arise are; secondary infection, bleeding into the abscess cavity, inadvertent catheter misplacement into the IVC and rupture of abscess with spillage into the peritoneal cavity. We report a case of a large amoebic liver abscess that presented with complications related to per-cutaneously inserted catheter drainage. PMID:26628843

  4. Low rate of asymptomatic cerebral embolism and improved procedural efficiency with the novel pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD: results of the PRECISION GOLD trial

    PubMed Central

    De Greef, Yves; Dekker, Lukas; Boersma, Lucas; Murray, Stephen; Wieczorek, Marcus; Spitzer, Stefan G.; Davidson, Neil; Furniss, Steve; Hocini, Mélèze; Geller, J. Christoph; Csanádi, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Aims This prospective, multicentre study (PRECISION GOLD) evaluated the incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism (ACE) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using a new gold multi-electrode radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter, pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) GOLD. Also, procedural efficiency of PVAC GOLD was compared with ERACE. The ERACE study demonstrated that a low incidence of ACE can be achieved with a platinum multi-electrode RF catheter (PVAC) combined with procedural manoeuvres to reduce emboli. Methods and results A total of 51 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) (age 57 ± 9 years, CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.4 ± 1.4) underwent AF ablation with PVAC GOLD. Continuous oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists, submerged catheter introduction, and heparinization (ACT ≥ 350 s prior to ablation) were applied. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed within 48 h before and 16–72 h post-ablation. Cognitive function assessed by the Mini-Mental State Exam at baseline and 30 days post-ablation. New post-procedural ACE occurred in only 1 of 48 patients (2.1%) and was not detectable on MRI after 30 days. The average number of RF applications per patient to achieve PVI was lower in PRECISION GOLD (20.3 ± 10.0) than in ERACE (28.8 ± 16.1; P = 0.001). Further, PVAC GOLD ablations resulted in significantly fewer low-power (<3 W) ablations (15 vs. 23%, 5 vs. 10% and 2 vs. 7% in 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 bipolar:unipolar energy modes, respectively). Mini-Mental State Exam was unchanged in all patients. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation with PVAC GOLD in combination with established embolic lowering manoeuvres results in a low incidence of ACE. Pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD demonstrates improved biophysical efficiency compared with platinum PVAC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01767558. PMID:26826134

  5. Transmission of nosocomial infection by intravenous catheters: preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Peleman, R; Vogelaers, D

    1994-12-01

    Intravascular catheter-related bacteraemia puts a major burden on health care due to its associated morbidity and mortality. Because of difficulties in the diagnosis and the consequences of catheter infections, prevention of infection is of the utmost importance. Depending on the setting, the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors and the patient's personal characteristics, different strategies can be used, but they all focus on catheter care during placement and maintenance of the lines. In this review of the literature, recent data on the aetiology, diagnosis and prevention of catheter-related infections will be discussed.

  6. Risks and complications of peripherally and centrally inserted intravenous catheters.

    PubMed

    Schmid, M W

    2000-06-01

    Increased nursing vigilance is needed while caring for critically ill patients who have i.v. catheters. All i.v. sites should be selected based upon the i.v. therapy needs of the patient, using the shortest catheter and smallest size possible to meet the treatment needs of the patient while avoiding excessive repeated insertions of peripheral IVs. Meticulous handwashing, site preparation, and the use of sterile technique during insertion and maintenance are essential to minimize the risk of infection. Use multilumen catheters only when necessary because these catheters have an increased manipulation and associated infection risk. Observe for signs and symptoms of localized, systemic, mechanical, and metastatic (e.g., vertebral osteomyelitis and endocarditis) foci of infection. Additionally, remove all unnecessary or poorly performing i.v. catheters. I.v. sites that do not yield a blood return but will accept i.v. solutions are in the process of becoming occluded. Most likely, there is a fibrin sheath that is developing along the catheter's inner lumen and opening, decreasing the catheter's effectiveness. Accommodate the need to replace a catheter into the patient's plan of care rather than allowing the catheter to occlude and then replacing it under emergent or rushed conditions.

  7. Multifunctional Catheters Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre T.; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A family of 3 multifunctional intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology (EP) mapping catheters has been in development to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac EP procedures. The catheter tip on the first device includes a 7.5 MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. The second device is a forward-looking catheter with a 24-element 14 MHz phased array. Both of these catheters operate on a commercial imaging system with standard software. Multiple EP mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the arrays for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images and used for unique integration with EP mapping technologies. To help establish the catheters’ ability for integration with EP interventional procedures, tests were performed in vivo in a porcine animal model to demonstrate both useful intracardiac echocardiographic (ICE) visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheters also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. The companion paper of this work discusses the catheter design of the side-looking catheter with special attention to acoustic lens design. The third device in development is a 10 MHz forward-looking ring array that is to be mounted at the distal tip of a 9F catheter to permit use of the available catheter lumen for adjunctive therapy tools. PMID:18986948

  8. Natural history of tunneled dialysis catheters placed for hemodialysis initiation

    PubMed Central

    Shingarev, Roman; Barker-Finkel, Jill; Allon, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Over 80% of US patients initiate HD with a tunneled dialysis catheter (TDC). Published data on TDC outcomes are based on a case-mix of prevalent and incident TDCs. We analyzed factors affecting patency and complications of first TDCs ever placed in a large cohort of incident HD patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively queried a prospective, computerized vascular access database to identify 472 patients receiving a first ever TDC. Multiple variable survival analysis was used to identify clinical parameters affecting TDC patency (from placement to non-elective removal) and infection (from placement to first episode of catheter-related bacteremia). RESULTS The median patency of all TDCs was 202 days. Left-sided placement of TDCs was the only variable associated with inferior TDC patency (hazard ratio 1.98; 95% CI, 1.39–2.81, p<0.0001). The 6-month TDC patency was 37% for left interval jugular (LIJ) vein catheters vs 54% for right internal jugular (RIJ) vein catheters. The one-year patency was 6% for LIJ catheters vs 35% for RIJ catheters. Catheter patency was not associated with patient age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or heart failure. The median time to the first episode of catheter-related bacteremia was 163 days. None of the clinical variables was associated with TDC infection. CONCLUSIONS TDCs are plagued by high rates of infection. Right IJ vein TDC should be used preferentially to maximize catheter patency. PMID:23871694

  9. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion probe. 882.4725 Section 882.4725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4725 Radiofrequency lesion probe. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  11. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  12. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4100 Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus....

  13. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4100 Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus....

  14. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  19. Navigated DENSE strain imaging for post-radiofrequency ablation lesion assessment in the swine left atria

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Fung, Maggie M.; Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Song, Ting; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Holmvang, Godtfred; Gupta, Sandeep N.; Chaput, Miguel; Levine, Robert A.; Ruskin, Jeremy; Reddy, Vivek Y.; D'avila, Andre; Aletras, Anthony H.; Danik, Stephan B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Prior work has demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strain can separate necrotic/stunned myocardium from healthy myocardium in the left ventricle (LV). We surmised that high-resolution MRI strain, using navigator-echo-triggered DENSE, could differentiate radiofrequency ablated tissue around the pulmonary vein (PV) from tissue that had not been damaged by radiofrequency energy, similarly to navigated 3D myocardial delayed enhancement (3D-MDE). Methods and results A respiratory-navigated 2D-DENSE sequence was developed, providing strain encoding in two spatial directions with 1.2 × 1.0 × 4 mm3 resolution. It was tested in the LV of infarcted sheep. In four swine, incomplete circumferential lesions were created around the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV) using ablation catheters, recorded with electro-anatomic mapping, and imaged 1 h later using atrial-diastolic DENSE and 3D-MDE at the left atrium/RSPV junction. DENSE detected ablation gaps (regions with >12% strain) in similar positions to 3D-MDE (2D cross-correlation 0.89 ± 0.05). Low-strain (<8%) areas were, on average, 33% larger than equivalent MDE regions, so they include both injured and necrotic regions. Optimal DENSE orientation was perpendicular to the PV trunk, with high shear strain in adjacent viable tissue appearing as a sensitive marker of ablation lesions. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging strain may be a non-contrast alternative to 3D-MDE in intra-procedural monitoring of atrial ablation lesions. PMID:24014803

  20. Influence of catheter orientation on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Sagerer-Gerhardt, Michaela; Weber, Helmut P

    2016-09-01

    Lesion sizes and quality are crucial for successful catheter ablation procedures. We sought to test the influence of catheter orientation towards the endocardial surface on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter. Continuous wave 1064-nm laser catheter applications at 15 W (4.5 W/mm²)/30 s, (135 J/mm²), irrigation flow 30 mL/min, were aimed at the left ventricular endocardial surface of bovine myocardium. The catheter was kept in vertical, in slanting (67.5°, 45°, 22.5°), and in flat positions; in flat position, also 60 s of radiation times were applied (n = 10, each). Lesions were evaluated morphometrically. Maximum depth of lesion was achieved with the catheter in a vertical orientation. Catheter inclination of <22.5 showed a highly significant decrease of lesion depth from 5.6 ± 1.1 to 3.7 ± 0.5 mm (p = 0.0001). In a flat catheter position, laser radiation of 30 s achieved the smallest lesions. However, after 60 s of radiation, the flat lesions were similar in depth (p = 087) and were larger in width (p = 0.0004) and in volumes (p = 0.0025) as compared to the lesions achieved with the catheter in vertical position after 30 s of radiation. Steam-pop with intramural cavitation or tissue vaporization with crater formation did not occur. Longer radiation times can achieve larger lesions regardless of catheter orientation. Catheter orientation is not a major determinant for laser ablation lesion size and quality, and a steerable support may not be needed when using the open-irrigated electrode-laser mapping and ablation (ELMA) catheter RytmoLas. PMID:27286865

  1. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  2. Effect of Substrate Modification in Catheter Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gi-Byoung; Jin, Eun-Sun; Choi, HyungOh; Song, Hae-Geun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hun; Hwang, Eui-Seock; Park, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Jun; Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation that targets complex fractionated electrogram sites has been widely applied in the management of persistent atrial fibrillation. The clinical outcomes of pulmonary vein isolation alone and pulmonary vein isolation plus the use of complex fractionated electrogram-guided ablation (CFEA) have not been fully compared in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. This prospective study included 70 patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation that remained inducible after pulmonary vein isolation. For radio-frequency catheter ablation, patients were nonrandomly assigned to a control group (pulmonary vein isolation alone, Group 1, n=35) or a CFEA group (pulmonary vein isolation plus additional CFEA, Group 2, n=35). The times to first recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias were compared between the 2 groups. In Group 2, CFEA rendered atrial fibrillation noninducible in 16 patients (45.7%) and converted inducible atrial fibrillation into inducible atrial flutters in 12 patients (34.3%). Atrial fibrillation remained inducible in 7 patients (20%) after the combined ablation procedures. After a mean follow-up of 23 months, freedom from recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P=0.037). In Group 1, all of the recurrent tachyarrhythmias were atrial fibrillation, whereas regular tachycardia was the major mechanism of recurrent arrhythmias in Group 2 (atrial tachycardia or atrial flutter in 5 of 6 patients and atrial fibrillation in 1 patient). We found that CFEA after pulmonary vein isolation significantly reduced recurrent atrial tachyarrhythmia and might modify the pattern of arrhythmia recurrence in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. PMID:22719147

  3. Radiofrequency in Cosmetic Dermatology: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Scott W; Goldberg, David J

    2015-11-01

    Treatment options for cosmetic improvement of the skin and body continue to grow more numerous with each passing year. The decline in utilization of invasive surgical treatments for aging and body contour correlates with the recent rise in laser and light devices. These light based technologies transmit either a single or broad wavelength of amplified light to the skin, resulting in volumetric tissue heating. Depending on the chromophore targeted and wavelength applied, varied applications exist to treat numerous cosmetic concerns. Radiofrequency (RF) devices have become more popular recently as science has advanced and brought new, safer, and better therapies. PMID:26580871

  4. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  5. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter.

  6. Real-time optical monitoring of permanent lesion progression in radiofrequency ablated cardiac tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapies for atrial fibrillation, success rates have been hampered by an inability to intraoperatively characterize the extent of permanent injury. Insufficient lesions can elusively create transient conduction blockages that eventually reconduct. Prior studies suggest significantly greater met-myoglobin (Mmb) concentrations in the lesion core than those in the healthy myocardium and may serve as a marker for irreversible tissue damage. In this work, we present real-time monitoring of permanent injury through spectroscopic assessment of Mmb concentrations at the catheter tip. Atrial wedges (n=6) were excised from four fresh swine hearts and submerged under pulsatile flow of warm (37oC) phosphate buffered saline. A commercial RFA catheter inserted into a fiber optic sheath allowed for simultaneous measurement of tissue diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra (500-650nm) during application of RF energy. Optical measurements were continuously acquired before, during, and post-ablation, in addition to healthy neighboring tissue. Met-myoglobin, oxy-myoglobin, and deoxy-myoglobin concentrations were extracted from each spectrum using an inverse Monte Carlo method. Tissue injury was validated with Masson's trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Time courses revealed a rapid increase in tissue Mmb concentrations at the onset of RFA treatment and a gradual plateauing thereafter. Extracted Mmb concentrations were significantly greater post-ablation (p<0.0001) as compared to healthy tissue and correlated well with histological assessment of severe thermal tissue destruction. On going studies are aimed at integrating these findings with prior work on near infrared spectroscopic lesion depth assessment. These results support the use of spectroscopy-facilitated guidance of RFA therapies for real-time permanent injury estimation.

  7. Does the Heparin Lock Concentration Affect Hemodialysis Catheter Patency?

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, D. Maya; Smith, Tamorie

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Concentrated heparin solutions are instilled into the catheter lumens after each hemodialysis session to prevent catheter thrombosis. The heparin lock concentration at many centers has been decreased recently to reduce the risk of systemic bleeding and contain costs. However, the effect of this change on catheter patency is unknown. We compared catheter patency between two heparin lock solutions: 1000 versus 5000 units/ml. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: With use of a prospective, computerized, vascular access database, 105 patients with newly placed tunneled hemodialysis catheters, including 58 patients receiving a 5000 units/ml heparin lock and 47 patients receiving a 1000 units/ml heparin lock, were retrospectively identified. The primary endpoint was cumulative catheter patency and the secondary endpoint was frequency of thrombolytic instillation. Results: Cumulative catheter survival was similar in the two groups, being 71% versus 73% at 120 days in the low- and high-concentration heparin lock groups (hazard ratio of catheter failure, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.45 to 2.09; P = 0.95). The frequency of tissue plasminogen activator instillation was significantly greater in the low-concentration heparin group (hazard ratio, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.26 to 3.86; P = 0.005). No major bleeding complications were observed in either treatment group. The overall drug cost for maintaining catheter patency was 23% lower with the low-concentration heparin lock ($1418 versus $1917) to maintain catheter patency for 1000 days. Conclusions: Low-concentration heparin lock solutions do not decrease cumulative dialysis catheter patency, but require a twofold increase in thrombolytic instillation to maintain long-term patency. PMID:20498241

  8. Transanal protrusion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Hulya; Is, Merih; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Kucuk, Adem; Dosoglu, Murat

    2012-11-01

    A two years old boy presented with a transanal protrusion of the ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt catheter. A VP shunt was inserted when the boy was six-month-old for congenital hydrocephalus. He was active and neurologically normal, with no signs of meningitis and peritoneal irritation. During laparotomy, the tube was seen entering the sigmoid colon, so the tube was cut at the point where it entered the sigmoid colon. The distal end of the protruding tube was pulled out from the anus. The sigmoid colon was repaired, and a delayed shunt revision was completed. The patient was discharged without abdominal and neurological deterioration.

  9. Transanal protrusion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Hulya; Is, Merih; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Kucuk, Adem; Dosoglu, Murat

    2012-11-01

    A two years old boy presented with a transanal protrusion of the ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt catheter. A VP shunt was inserted when the boy was six-month-old for congenital hydrocephalus. He was active and neurologically normal, with no signs of meningitis and peritoneal irritation. During laparotomy, the tube was seen entering the sigmoid colon, so the tube was cut at the point where it entered the sigmoid colon. The distal end of the protruding tube was pulled out from the anus. The sigmoid colon was repaired, and a delayed shunt revision was completed. The patient was discharged without abdominal and neurological deterioration. PMID:23146859

  10. [Clinical study on efficacy of a Foley catheter coated with silver-protein in prevention of urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, H; Hida, S; Yoshida, O; Ueda, T

    1993-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of a Foley catheter coated with silver-protein (ProAg catheter) in the prevention of catheter-associated bacteriuria. ProAg catheter significantly reduced the incidence of extraluminal catheter-associated bacteriuria compared with usual latex Foley catheter although it did not inhibit intraluminal bacteriuria. There was no difference between ProAg catheter and latex catheter in the side effects such as urethral discharge, catheter-associated pain and allergic reaction. The ProAg catheter may be useful as an indwelling urethral catheter.

  11. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  12. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, A. V. Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  13. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements.

  14. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  15. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  16. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  19. Endovascular removal of long-term hemodialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Foley, Peter T; Carter, Ranjana M; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  20. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  1. Endovascular Removal of Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Peter T.; Carter, Ranjana M.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-09-15

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  2. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter....

  7. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section 870.2870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2870 Catheter...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870... repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace the... effect the repair or replacement. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA...

  10. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Feneley, Roger C L; Hopley, Ian B; Wells, Peter N T

    2015-01-01

    For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0-2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  11. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Feneley, Roger C. L.; Hopley, Ian B.; Wells, Peter N. T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0–2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  12. An overview of suprapubic catheter care in community practice.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Deborah

    2009-07-01

    This paper gives a broad overview of suprapubic catheterization. Community nurses can often feel they lack experience with suprapubic catheter general care and routine changes. This paper sets out the advantages and disadvantages of suprapubic catheters, the procedure for routine change and the golden rules for general care. The paper contains an introduction on trouble shooting. PMID:19597378

  13. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  14. Device for Catheter Placement of External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Jae-Min; Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a new device for catheter placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This device was composed of three portions, T-shaped main body, rectangular pillar having a central hole to insert a catheter and an arm pointing the tragus. The main body has a role to direct a ventricular catheter toward the right or left inner canthus and has a shallow longitudinal opening to connect the rectangular pillar. The arm pointing the tragus is controlled by back and forth movement and turn of the pillar attached to the main body. Between April 2012 and December 2014, 57 emergency EVDs were performed in 52 patients using this device in the operating room. Catheter tip located in the frontal horn in 52 (91.2%), 3rd ventricle in 2 (3.5%) and in the wall of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle in 3 EVDs (5.2%). Small hemorrhage along to catheter tract occurred in 1 EVD. CSF was well drained through the all EVD catheters. The accuracy of the catheter position and direction using this device were 91% and 100%, respectively. This device for EVD guides to provide an accurate position of catheter tip safely and easily. PMID:27226870

  15. A statistical model of catheter motion from interventional x-ray images: application to image-based gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayiotou, M.; King, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Housden, R. J.; Rinaldi, C. A.; Gill, J.; Cooklin, M.; O'Neill, M.; Rhode, K. S.

    2013-11-01

    The motion and deformation of catheters that lie inside cardiac structures can provide valuable information about the motion of the heart. In this paper we describe the formation of a novel statistical model of the motion of a coronary sinus (CS) catheter based on principal component analysis of tracked electrode locations from standard mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy images. We demonstrate the application of our model for the purposes of retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating of x-ray fluoroscopy images in normal dose x-ray fluoroscopy images, and demonstrate how a modification of the technique allows application to very low dose scenarios. We validated our method on ten mono-plane imaging sequences comprising a total of 610 frames from ten different patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. For normal dose images we established systole, end-inspiration and end-expiration gating with success rates of 100%, 92.1% and 86.9%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the method was tested on the same ten mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy sequences without noise and with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of √50, √10, √8, √6, √5, √2 and √1 to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. The method was able to detect the CS catheter even in the lowest SNR images with median errors not exceeding 2.6 mm per electrode. Furthermore, gating success rates of 100%, 71.4% and 85.7% were achieved at the low SNR value of √2, representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times. Thus, the technique has the potential to extract useful information whilst substantially reducing the radiation exposure.

  16. Catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias: A 14-year experience with 5330 consecutive patients at the Quebec Heart Institute, Laval Hospital

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Gilles E; Philippon, François; Champagne, Jean; Blier, Louis; Molin, Franck; Côté, Jean-Marc; Nault, Isabelle; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Gilbert, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation is a curative treatment with excellent success and minimal complication rates for patients with supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias. METHODS: The acute outcomes and complications of all catheter ablation procedures for supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias performed at the Quebec Heart Institute (Sainte-Foy, Quebec) during a 14-year period from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 2006, were prospectively assessed. The ablation procedures were classified according to the arrhythmias induced using standard electrophysiological techniques and definitions. Immediate success and complication rates were prospectively included in the database. RESULTS: A total of 5330 patients had catheter ablation performed at the Institute during the period assessed. The mean (± SD) age of patients was 50±18 years (range four to 97 years), and 2340 patients (44%) were men. Most of the patients were younger than 75 years (group 1), and 487 (9%) were 75 years of age and older (group 2). Indications for ablations were as follows: atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) in 2263 patients, accessory pathways in 1147 patients, atrioventricular node ablation in 803 patients, typical atrial flutter in 377 patients and atrial tachycardia in 160 patients; 580 patients had other ablation procedures. The overall success rates were 81% for atrial tachycardia, 92% for accessory pathways or flutter, and 99% for AVNRT or atrioventricular node ablation. There was no difference in the success rates of the younger (group 1) and older (group 2) patients. Seventy-seven patients (1.4%) had complications, including 11 major events (myocardial infarction in one patient, pulmonary embolism in three patients and permanent pacemaker in seven patients). In patients undergoing AVNRT ablation, two had a permanent pacemaker implanted immediately after the procedure and three had a permanent pacemaker implanted at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm that

  17. Scaling of hemolysis in needles and catheters.

    PubMed

    Sharp, M K; Mohammad, S F

    1998-01-01

    Hemolysis in clinical blood samples leads to inaccurate assay results and often to the need for repeated blood draws. In vitro experiments were conducted to determine the influence on hemolysis in phlebotomy needles and catheters of pressure difference, cannula diameter, and cannula material. Fresh blood from five human volunteers was forced from a syringe inside a pressurized chamber through 14, 18, and 22 gauge 304 stainless steel needles and polyurethane and Teflon catheters, all 40 mm long. Hemolysis was measured in the samples by a spectrophotometer. It was found that hemolysis increased with increases in pressure difference and cannula diameter and no consistent trend could be identified with regard to cannula material. The pressure differences required for significant hemolysis were above those typical of clinical venipuncture blood draws. While there was substantial variability among individuals, the hemolysis values scaled with exponent S = (t/t0)[(tau/tau0)-1]2, where t is the characteristic duration of shear, t0 is a time constant, tau is the wall shear stress, and tau0 is the wall shear stress threshold below which no hemolysis occurs. A hemolysis threshold including both time and shear stress was also defined for S = constant. The threshold implies that a threshold shear stress exists below which erythrocytes are not damaged for any length of exposure time, but that red cells may be damaged by an arbitrarily short period of exposure to sufficiently large shear stress.

  18. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  19. Catheter tracking with phase information in a magnetic resonance scanner.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevan J T; Scott, Greig C; Wright, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a new active technique for accurately determining both the position and orientation of the tip of a catheter during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous cardiovascular procedures. The technique utilizes phase information introduced into the MR signal from a small receive coil located on the distal tip of the catheter. Phase patterns around a small receive coil are rich in information that is directly related to position and orientation. This information can be collected over a large spherical volume with a diameter several times that of the receive coil. The high degree of redundancy yields the potential for an accurate and robust method of catheter tracking. A tracking algorithm is presented that performs catheter tip localization using phase images acquired in two orthogonal planes without any a priori knowledge of catheter position. Associated experimentation demonstrating feasibility is also presented.

  20. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  1. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  2. A Rare Central Venous Catheter Malposition: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moeinipour, Ali Asghar; Amouzeshi, Ahmad; Joudi, Marjan; Fathi, Mehdi; Jahanbakhsh, Saeed; Hafez, Saeed; Izanloo, Azra; Khorsand, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is a routine procedure for the management of critically ill patients; however, it is important to ensure its proper placement. A central venous catheter malposition may cause various complications, some of which can be fatal. Case Presentation: We report an unexpected malposition of a catheter in the left internal jugular vein, where it entered into the left internal mammary vein. Conclusions: We think one of the influential factors for leading a guidewire and catheter into a nominated vein may be the left sided bevel of the needle at the time of internal jugular vein needle and catheter insertion. We were required to continue going towards the subclavian vein and accidentally turned into the left internal mammary vein. PMID:24660160

  3. Peritoneal dialysis catheter implantation: avoiding problems and optimizing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, John H

    2015-01-01

    The success of peritoneal dialysis (PD) as renal replacement therapy is dependent upon the patient having a functional long-term peritoneal access. There are a number of identified best practices that must be adhered to during PD catheter placement to achieve a durable and infection-resistant access. The clinical setting, available resources, and the employed catheter insertion method may not always permit complete adherence to these practices; however, an attempt should be made to comply with them as closely as possible. Although omission of any one of the practices can lead to catheter loss, departures from some are committed more frequently, manifesting as commonly occurring clinical problems, such as drain pain, catheter tip migration, omental entrapment, pericatheter leaks and hernias, and poor exit-site location. Understanding the technical pitfalls in PD catheter placement that lead to these problems, enable the provider to modify practice habits to avoid them and optimize outcomes. PMID:25338661

  4. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation.

  5. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  6. Radiofrequency coblation of congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang Yun; Jefferson, Niall; Mohorikar, Alok; Jacobson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital nasopharyngeal teratomas are rare tumours that pose difficulties in diagnosis and surgical management. We report the first use of radiofrequency coblation in the management of such tumours. Case Report. A premature baby with a perinatal diagnosis of a large, obstructing nasooropharyngeal mass was referred to the ENT service for further investigations and management. The initial biopsy was suggestive of a neuroblastoma, but the tumour demonstrated rapid growth despite appropriate chemotherapy. In a novel use of radiofrequency coblation, the nasooropharyngeal mass was completely excised, with the final histopathology revealing a congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma. Conclusion. We report the first use of radiofrequency coblation to excise a congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma and discuss its advantages.

  7. [Catheter malposition in the renal vein--a rare complication related to a peripherally inserted central catheter].

    PubMed

    Josiak, Krystian; Mysiak, Andrzej; Kobusiak-Prokopowicz, Małgorzata; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Kurcz, Jacek

    2007-08-01

    In cardiology intensive care units central venous access is often needed for intravenous infusion of multiple strong acting or hypertonic therapeutic agents such as catecholamines, antibiotics, kalium chloride solutions or parenteral nutrition, as well as for central venous pressure measurements. Currently, access devices include centrally inserted central venous catheters (CVC) and peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). Because of the relative ease of placement, reduced rates of severe complications, such as pneumothorax, great vessel perforation or bleeding, and lower costs in comparison to CVCs, PICCs have been widely used. The PICC has risks, however, with the most frequently occurring complications being catheter malposition followed sometimes by thrombosis, infection or even perforation of the vessel. We present a case of an uncomplicated unsatisfactory location of the catheter tip in the right renal vein, found accidentally during chest angio-CT. Although PICCs are considered to be safe and easy to insert, the proper catheter tip placement is highly unreliable and should be carefully assessed.

  8. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  9. Patient-specific left atrial wall-thickness measurement and visualization for radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jiro; Skanes, Allan C.; White, James A.; Rajchl, Martin; Drangova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: For radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the left atrium, safe and effective dosing of RF energy requires transmural left atrium ablation without injury to extra-cardiac structures. The thickness of the left atrial wall may be a key parameter in determining the appropriate amount of energy to deliver. While left atrial wall-thickness is known to exhibit inter- and intra-patient variation, this is not taken into account in the current clinical workflow. Our goal is to develop a tool for presenting patient-specific left atrial thickness information to the clinician in order to assist in the determination of the proper RF energy dose. METHODS: We use an interactive segmentation method with manual correction to segment the left atrial blood pool and heart wall from contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. We then create a mesh from the segmented blood pool and determine the wall thickness, on a per-vertex basis, orthogonal to the mesh surface. The thickness measurement is visualized by assigning colors to the vertices of the blood pool mesh. We applied our method to 5 contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. RESULTS: Left atrial wall-thickness measurements were generally consistent with published thickness ranges. Variations were found to exist between patients, and between regions within each patient. CONCLUSION: It is possible to visually determine areas of thick vs. thin heart wall with high resolution in a patient-specific manner.

  10. Comparison of Heparin-Coated and Conventional Split-Tip Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W. I. Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W.; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A.

    2009-07-15

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 {+-} 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 {+-} 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 {+-} 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 {+-} 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  11. Optical generation of radio-frequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Meyer, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    An optical technique for high-power radio-frequency (RF) signal generation is described. The technique uses a unique photodetector based on a traveling-wave design driven by an appropriately modulated light source. The traveling-wave photodetector (TWPD) exhibits simultaneously a theoretical quantum efficiency approaching 100 % and a very large electrical bandwidth. Additionally, it is capable of dissipating the high-power levels required for the RF generation technique. The modulated light source is formed by either the beating together of two lasers or by the direct modulation of a light source. A system example is given which predicts RF power levels of 100`s of mW`s at millimeter wave frequencies with a theoretical ``wall-plug`` efficiency approaching 34%.

  12. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  13. Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field Map of Timisoara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefu, N.; Solyom, I.; Arama, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many electromagnetic field (EMF) sources nowadays acting simultaneously, especially in urban areas, making the theoretical estimation of electromagnetic power at ground level very difficult. This paper reports on EMF maps built with measurements collected in Timisoara, at various radiofrequencies. A grid of 15×15 squares was built (approximate resolution 400m x 400m) and measurements of the average and maximum values of the electric field E, magnetic field H and total power density S at 0.9, 1.8 and 2.4 GHz were collected in every node of the grid. Positions of the nodes in terms of latitude and longitude were also collected. Maps were built presenting the spatial distribution of the measured quantities over Timisoara. Potential influences of EMF on public health are discussed.

  14. Emerging indications of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Becq, Aymeric; Camus, Marine; Rahmi, Gabriel; de Parades, Vincent; Marteau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-validated treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Other indications of endoscopic RFA are under evaluation. Results Four prospective studies (total 69 patients) have shown that RFA achieved complete remission of early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia at a rate of 80%, but with a substantial risk of stricture. In the setting of gastric antral vascular ectasia, two prospective monocenter studies, and a retrospective multicenter study, (total 51 patients), suggest that RFA is efficacious in terms of reducing transfusion dependency. In the setting of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy, a prospective monocenter study and a retrospective multicenter study (total 56 patients) suggest that RFA is an efficient treatment. A retrospective comparative study (64 patients) suggests that RFA improves stents patency in malignant biliary strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic RFA is an upcoming treatment modality in early esophageal squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia, as well as in gastric, rectal, and biliary diseases. PMID:26279839

  15. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity. PMID:27526996

  16. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Cloos, Martijn A; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity. PMID:27526996

  17. Radiofrequency identification for inventory in neurointerventional practice.

    PubMed

    Byers, Ernest; Gomez, Max A; Sheridan, Robert M; Orr, Nelson W; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-03-01

    Implementations of radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems within hospital settings are not unique or without controversy. To date, little consideration has been given to use of this technology in clinical interventional radiologic practice. The potential financial advantages coupled with benefits to quality and safety and increases in staff satisfaction are considerable. The authors outline these advantages by enabling readers to broadly consider the systemic perspective of implementing RFID technology with an associated vision toward downstream growth. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the benefits of RFID technology integration in reducing cost and increasing quality assurance and the on-time delivery of services. Implementing RFID requires commitment from frontline technologist staff members to work collaboratively with management and external vendors. Ultimately, the authors believe this technology can positively influence patient care.

  18. Radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stokes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerator concept in which rf electric fields are used to focus, bunch, and accelerate the beam. Because the RFQ can provide strong focusing at low velocities, it can capture a high-current dc ion beam from a low-voltage source and accelerate it to an energy of 1 MeV/nucleon within a distance of a few meters. A recent experimental test at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has confirmed the expected performance of this structure and has stimulated interest in a wide variety of applications. The general properties of the RFQ are reviewed and examples of applications of this new accelerator are presented.

  19. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R E; Sebastian, T

    2013-12-18

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Anthony

    2002-12-04

    Surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation have been the conventional treatments for localized solid cancer. Because certain patients are not candidates for tumor resection and because many tumors are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation, there has been an impetus to develop alternative therapies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy for localized solid cancers that has gained considerable attention in the last 12 years. Advantages of minimally invasive therapies over surgery include less recovery time, lower morbidity and mortality, eligibility of more patients, and lower cost. RFA has been applied most extensively to inoperable hepatic tumors. It is investigational for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, and adrenal gland. This colloquium will review the mechanism, techniques, limitations, and clinical applications of RFA. The ultimate role that RFA will play in cancer therapy will depend on the results of long-term follow-up and prospective randomized trials.

  1. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity.

  2. Radiofrequency interstitial tumor ablation: dry electrode.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Brooke; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2003-10-01

    With the shift in the treatment of small renal tumors from radical extirpative surgery to nephron-sparing approaches, dry-electrode radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as one potential modality. This application of RF energy leads to the production of heat within the treatment zone secondary to the native impedance of living tissue. Animal studies and human clinical series have demonstrated that RFA can create controlled, targeted, reproducible, and lethal lesions. Most clinical series have reported promising results, although some authors question the totality of tumor destruction by RFA. With time, the efficacy of RFA, as measured by patient survival, will be determined. Once this is known, RFA may be compared with other therapeutic modalities for small renal tumors to determine its place.

  3. Radiofrequency ablation of a misdiagnosed Brodie's abscess.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rs; Abdullah, Bjj; Aik, S; Tok, Ch

    2011-04-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy is recognised as a safe and effective treatment option for osteoid osteoma. This case report describes a 27-year-old man who underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous RFA for a femoral osteoid osteoma, which was diagnosed based on his clinical presentation and CT findings. The patient developed worsening symptoms complicated by osteomyelitis after the procedure. His clinical progression and subsequent MRI findings had led to a revised diagnosis of a Brodie's abscess, which was further supported by the eventual resolution of his symptoms following a combination of antibiotics treatment and surgical irrigations. This case report illustrates the unusual MRI features of osteomyelitis mimicking soft tissue tumours following RFA of a misdiagnosed Brodie's abscess and highlights the importance of a confirmatory histopathological diagnosis for an osteoid osteoma prior to treatment.

  4. The successful withdrawal of a migrated central venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Ghaffari, Rahman; Karami, Hossein; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used widely in clinics. These catheters are also recommended for children and infants receiving chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and etc. In this paper, we present migrated fractured control line of the heart of a girl. Case Presentation: A 2.5 year old girl with migrated of the fractured central line into the heart. In the catheterization laboratory, first we placed a long sheath (8 F) into the inferior vena cava via femoral vein and then trapped the foreign body by pigtail catheter and wire 0.035 inch and pulled it down to make its proximal free. After that, we snared the catheter by snare-catheter and pulled it into the femoral vein, and then the cardiac surgeon bridged it out by cut-down successfully. Conclusion: A rare complication in the use of central catheters is fraction and cardiac embolization. We offer gentle bringing out of the catheter lines under fluoroscopy guide in all of the cases, if this is technically possible and safe. PMID:24009933

  5. Protecting short-term intravascular ear catheters in healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Orchard, Rekha N; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Hamilton, Donald L

    2012-01-20

    Researchers may place a catheter in the ear vessel of a rabbit for a short period of time in order to collect repeated blood samples without extensive restraint of the animal. Maintaining such a catheter in a healthy rabbit can be challenging, as the animal may scratch at the ear, removing the catheter or forming a large hematoma that might impede blood sampling. The authors developed a technique for protecting the indwelling catheter by cutting a section of moleskin to the same shape as the ear and gluing it to the surface of the ear and the catheter. They applied this technique to collect multiple blood samples during 12-h periods from nine rabbits in a pharmacokinetics study. Catheters remained patent in five rabbits for 12 h, in two rabbits for 8 h, in one rabbit for 6 h and in one rabbit for 4 h. This technique allowed for collection of repeated blood samples and prevented the rabbits from interfering with the catheter while allowing them to move freely during the sampling period.

  6. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM.

  7. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  8. [Prevention of infections transmitted by intravascular devices (catheters, implanted sites)].

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, G; Blot, F

    2001-04-01

    Infection remains a major complication of central veinous catheters. A clinically or bacteriologically proven infection is identified in 5 to 10% of the cases although the actual risk varies from less than 1 to more than 30 episodes of infection per 1000 catheter-days. Systemic spread follows colonization of the catheter tip via the skin or the connectors, less frequently via hematogenous seeding from a distant focus of infection. Excepting emergency situations, search for proof of catheter-related infection or noninfection without removing the catheter now appears to be acceptable for selected intensive care patients if appropriate safety measures are taken; the reasonable choice is between maintaining the catheter while performing tests susceptible of determining the reality of catheter-related infection (in this case there remains a certain doubt concerning the respective performance of the different methods proposed for early diagnosis) and catheter exchange on a metal or plastic guide-wire. Rigorous application of the rules of hygiene, asepsis, and local care is crucial: systematic and repeated hand washing is by far the best antiinfectious prophylaxis. Three types of future developments susceptible of improving the current situation can be identified: better knowledge of host defense mechanisms against foreign bodies, reduction of hand-transmitted contamination by wider use of hydro-alcohol solutions for decontamination of the hands, and elaboration of new connectors, and most importantly, biomaterials capable of inhibiting colonization by the growing number of increasingly virulent strains. Discussions concerning the real clinical efficiency, ecological risk and the cost-effectiveness of catheters impregnated with antiseptics and/or antibiotics is a perfect illustration of the current debate.

  9. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  10. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  11. Bacteria on Catheters in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, Maria; Davies, Julia R.; Johansson, Ann-Cathrine; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritonitis is the leading cause of morbidity for peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and microbial biofilms have previously been identified on catheters from infected patients. However, few studies of catheters from patients without clinical signs of infection have been undertaken. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which bacteria are present on catheters from PD patients with no symptoms of infection. ♦ Methods: Microbiologic culturing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to determine the distribution of bacteria on PD catheters from 15 patients without clinical signs of infection and on catheters from 2 infected patients. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique was used to identify cultured bacteria. ♦ Results: Bacteria were detected on 12 of the 15 catheters from patients without signs of infection and on the 2 catheters from infected patients. Single-species and mixed-microbial communities containing up to 5 species were present on both the inside and the outside along the whole length of the colonized catheters. The bacterial species most commonly found were the skin commensals Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, followed by S. warneri and S. lugdunensis. The strains of these micro-organisms, particularly those of S. epidermidis, varied in phenotype with respect to their tolerance of the major classes of antibiotics. ♦ Conclusions: Bacteria were common on catheters from patients without symptoms of infection. Up to 4 different bacterial species were found in close association and may represent a risk factor for the future development of peritonitis in patients hosting such micro-organisms. PMID:22855889

  12. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  13. Dynamics Of Ions In A Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Williams, Angelyn P.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Report describes computer-simulation study of motions of various numbers of ions in Paul trap. Study part of continuing effort to understand motions of trapped charged particles (atoms, ions, molecules, or dust particles). Motions characterized in terms of heating by radio-frequency fields, formation of crystallike structures in cold clouds of trapped particles, and other phenomena important in operation of radio-frequency traps in frequency standards.

  14. Percutaneous Untying of a Knot in a Retained Swan-Ganz Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-03-15

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the catheter to be removed without trauma.

  15. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  16. The use of Foley balloon catheters in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Black, J J; Allan, A; Williams, B T

    1993-01-01

    Situations may arise during elective and emergency surgery when vascular control is required but conventional vascular clamps cannot be used. We have found the Foley catheter useful for the control of inadvertent perforation of the heart especially in "redo" operations. We describe the use of the Foley catheter for the control of the difficult aorta and illustrate its potential versatility in a variety of uncommon situations. As Foley catheters are present in every operating theatre we hope that our experience will be of benefit to other surgeons who encounter similar problems.

  17. Structure of the jet from a generic catheter tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2006-10-01

    A generic feature of a wide variety of central venous catheters, which are typically located within the superior vena cava (SVC), is a jet from a side hole of the catheter tip. Particle image velocimetry is employed in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, in order to characterize the structure of the jet as a function of dimensionless hole diameter and jet velocity ratio. Quantitative patterns in the radial and crossflow planes of the catheter-SVC system define the jet evolution. It has distinctive features, relative to the classical jet in a crossflow, which issues from a small opening in a planar surface into a region of large extent.

  18. Spiculated Bladder Calculi: The Culprit for Repeated Catheter Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wek, C.; Fox, T. P.; Muir, G. H.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the case of a frustrated 90-year-old gentleman who was seen in the Accident and Emergency department for the third time in four days with failure of his long-term urethral catheter. He reported that the catheter simply “fell out” with the balloon deflated. On each occasion previously, the catheter had been reinserted in A&E and the patient discharged home. These repeated visits to A&E were understandably a source of much frustration for the patient and his family. On the third presentation, plain abdominal radiography demonstrated a large spiculated bladder calculus. PMID:23984173

  19. Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner. PMID:19514134

  20. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  1. Managing recurrent urinary catheter blockage: problems, promises, and practicalities.

    PubMed

    Getliffe, Kathryn

    2003-05-01

    Long-term urinary catheterization is rarely completely free of complications, and encrustation by mineral salts leading to catheter blockage is common in around 40% to 50% of long-term catheterized patients. Recurrent blockage is a problem, which is both distressing to patients and caregivers and costly to health services in terms of time and resources. This article addresses the causes of recurrent urinary catheter blockage, proactive approaches to care, and the evidence for use of catheter maintenance solutions to reduce buildup of mineral deposits.

  2. Ion beam sputter-etched ventricular catheter for hydrocephalus shunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid shunt in the form of a ventricular catheter for controlling the condition of hydrocephalus by relieving the excessive cerebrospinal fluid pressure is described. A method for fabrication of the catheter and shunting the cerebral fluid from the cerebral ventricles to other areas of the body is also considered. Shunt flow failure occurs if the ventricle collapse due to improper valve function causing overdrainage. The ventricular catheter comprises a multiplicity of inlet microtubules. Each microtubule has both a large openings at its inlet end and a multiplicity of microscopic openings along its lateral surfaces.

  3. Mechanical complications of long-term Tesio catheters.

    PubMed

    Ndzengue, A; Kessaris, N; Dosani, T; Mustafa, N; Papalois, V; Hakim, N S

    2009-01-01

    Vascular access catheters such as Tesio-Caths are preferentially inserted in the internal jugular vein and serve as access for hemodialysis. Complications related to the removal of these types of lines are uncommon. We report four patients in whom the tip of the Tesio-Cath broke and was left stuck in the superior vena cava. Although there is no defined limit to the maximum length of stay of vascular access catheters for dialysis, the possibility of catheter entrapment should be considered. It remains to be determined whether removing Tesio-Caths every 16- 18 months is beneficial in avoiding this complication.

  4. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P < 0.05). Inflammatory lesions responded better than non-inflammatory lesions (P < 0.05). Adverse effects such as pinpoint bleeding, pain and erythema were noted, but were transient and not severe enough to stop treatment. Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a safe and effective treatment for acne vulgaris.

  5. Prophylaxis against dialysis catheter-related bacteremia with a novel antimicrobial lock solution.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael

    2003-06-15

    Catheter-related bacteremia, a frequent complication in patients who are undergoing hemodialysis, may be prevented by eradication of the catheter biofilm. Catheter lock solution (CLS) is an investigational preparation containing taurolidine, a biocompatible antimicrobial agent, and citrate, an anticoagulant agent. CLS was instilled into the catheter lumens after each dialysis session for 20 catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Catheter outcomes were compared with those observed in 30 concurrent control patients whose catheters were instilled with heparin. Bacteremia-free survival at 90 days was higher among patients who received CLS than among control patients who received heparin (94% vs. 47%; P<.001). Unassisted catheter patency (without tissue plasminogen activator instillation) was lower among patients who received CLS than among control patients (32% vs. 76%; P<.001). CLS dramatically reduces the frequency of catheter-related bacteremia among patients undergoing hemodialysis, although there is an increased requirement for thrombolytic interventions to maintain catheter patency.

  6. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented. PMID:26203277

  7. Automatic rupture of unused intraport catheter. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Paris; Dalianis, Nikolaos; Filippou, Dimitrios K; Condiis, Nicolas; Rizos, Spiros; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Totally Implantable Central Venous Access Devices (Intraports) are commonly used in cancer patients to administer chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition. These devices are placed by Seldinger technique. We report an unusual case of intraport catheter rupture before the use of the device. The ruptured part of the catheter migrated into the left pulmonary vein via right ventricle. The ruptured part was removed by means of interventional radiology before causing any problems to the patient. All the reported ruptures of port catheters refer to port devices that had been used to administer chemotherapy, fluids, or parenteral nutrition. The unique feature of this case is that the catheter had not been used at all. It is of great interest also the removal of the broken part from the pulmonary vein.

  8. Continuous quality improvement: improving hemodialysis catheter patency using urokinase.

    PubMed

    Northsea, C

    1996-12-01

    Opportunities for improvements in patient outcomes through applied continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs are endless and exciting. Improving vascular access outcomes has been a long-standing clinical problem for hemodialysis patients and the nephrology team. During the past few years there has been a dramatic increase in the use of dialysis catheters as permanent accesses for hemodialysis patients. All hemodialysis with dialysis catheters are at risk for catheter occlusion. An innovative, 2-year CQI program was developed, implemented, and designed to improve dialysis catheter patency rates with the use of urokinase. The CQI program resulted in a number of clinical outcomes that were beneficial to the patients and dialysis staff, and were cost-effective to the program.

  9. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  11. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  12. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis.

  13. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  14. Electron microscopic study of an infected Foley catheter.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J C; Gristina, A G; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    A scanning and transmission electron microscopic study was made of material from the surface of a Foley catheter removed from an 87-year-old woman with antibiotic-resistant bacteriuria. A thick, adherent bacterial biofilm was found. The sessile adherent bacteria were surrounded by an extensive exopolysaccharide glycocalyx that appears to be fundamental in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and their resistance to systemic antibiotic therapy.

  15. Colonization of Yankauer suction catheters with pathogenic organisms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa; Willms, David

    2005-10-01

    Oral suction devices may be fomites for nosocomial infections. This study was designed to evaluate the rate of contamination of Yankauer suction catheters. Among the 20 catheters tested, 16 (80%) yielded cultures for pathogens. Seven (35%) were colonized with multiple pathogens. Among the organisms encountered included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). These devices should be handled and stored with appropriate care.

  16. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurina, I.; Nechitailo, G. S.; Svistkov, A. L.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.

    2015-01-01

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface.

  17. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model. PMID:21096567

  18. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian

    Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive modality for mapping electrical activities in the body (brain and heart) in 4-dimensions (space + time). Conventional cardiac mapping technologies for guiding the radiofrequency ablation procedure for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias have certain limitations. UCSDI can potentially overcome these limitations and enhance the electrophysiology mapping of the heart. UCSDI exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity. When an ultrasound beam intersects a current path in a material, the local resistivity of the material is modulated by the ultrasonic pressure, and a change in voltage signal can be detected based on Ohm's Law. The degree of modulation is determined by the AE interaction constant K. K is a fundamental property of any type of material, and directly affects the amplitude of the AE signal detected in UCSDI. UCSDI requires detecting a small AE signal associated with electrocardiogram. So sensitivity becomes a major challenge for transferring UCSDI to the clinic. This dissertation will determine the limits of sensitivity and resolution for UCSDI, balancing the tradeoff between them by finding the optimal parameters for electrical cardiac mapping, and finally test the optimized system in a realistic setting. This work begins by describing a technique for measuring K, the AE interaction constant, in ionic solution and biological tissue, and reporting the value of K in excised rabbit cardiac tissue for the first time. K was found to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart tissue, K was determined to be 0.041 +/- 0.012 %/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiologic saline: 0.034 +/- 0.003 %/MPa. Next, this dissertation investigates the sensitivity limit of UCSDI by quantifying the relation

  19. Needle catheter duodenostomy: a technique for duodenal alimentation of birds.

    PubMed

    Goring, R L; Goldman, A; Kaufman, K J; Roberts, C; Quesenberry, K E; Kollias, G V

    1986-11-01

    A technique for duodenal alimentation (needle catheter duodenostomy) of birds was developed, using the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) as the experimental model. A needle catheter was inserted into the descending duodenum of 5 pigeons and was secured to the body wall and dorsum of each bird. A liquid diet was administered daily (in equal amounts of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hours) for 14 days without adverse effects. On day 15, the catheters were removed, and the birds immediately resumed normal consumption of a pigeon ration and water diet. Although 4 of the 5 birds had minor weight loss, dietary alterations probably could be used on an individual basis to alleviate this problem. After oral alimentation was resumed, the 5 birds exceeded their initial body weight within 7 days. Four weeks after catheter removal, positive-contrast radiographic evaluations indicated that the duodenum of each pigeon appeared normal. Needle catheter duodenostomy was a viable method of alimentation in the domestic pigeon. This technique should be applicable for other avian species requiring bypass of the upper gastrointestinal tract proximal to the region of catheter insertion in the duodenum.

  20. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  1. Digital Subtraction MR Angiography Roadmapping for Magnetic Steerable Catheter Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Saeed, Maythem; Losey, Aaron D.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Lee; Arenson, Ronald L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a high temporal resolution MR imaging technique that could be employed with magnetically-assisted remote control (MARC) endovascular catheters. Materials and Methods A technique is proposed based on selective intra-arterial injections of dilute MR contrast at the beginning of a fluoroscopic MR angiography acquisition. The initial bolus of contrast is used to establish a vascular roadmap upon which MARC catheters can be tracked. The contrast to noise ratio of the achieved roadmap was assessed in phantoms and in a swine animal model. The ability of the technique to permit navigation of activated MARC catheters through arterial branch points was evaluated. Results The roadmapping mode proved effective in phantoms for tracking objects and achieved a contrast to noise ratio of 35.7 between the intra and extra-vascular space. In vivo, the intra-arterial enhancement strategy produced roadmaps with a contrast to noise ratio of 42.0. The artifact produced by MARC catheter activation provided signal enhancement patterns on the roadmap that experienced interventionalists could track through vascular structures. Conclusion A roadmapping approach with intra-arterial CE-MRA is introduced for navigating the MARC catheter. The technique mitigates the artifact produced by the MARC catheter, greatly limits the required SAR, permits regular roadmap updates due to the low contrast agent requirements, and proved effective in the in vivo setting. PMID:24797218

  2. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  3. The prophylactic use of ureteral catheters during colorectal operations.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gordon, P H

    1994-03-01

    The necessity for preoperative ureteral catheter insertion for colorectal operations continues to be controversial. To determine our experience and what complications might be associated with ureteral catheter use, the charts of all patients in our department undergoing ureteral catheterization in combination with colorectal procedures between the years 1978 and 1989 were reviewed. The indications for operation, the presence or absence of urinary tract symptoms, and intravenous pyelogram findings (if performed) were recorded. Time for the procedure, size and number of catheters, and complications were noted. From the operative report, a retrospective grading of necessity for ureteral catheterization was assessed according to a scale from A to D. There were 120 ureteral catheterizations performed, bilaterally in 60 per cent of cases. Complications included renal colic (1), oliguria (1), and anuria (2). Intraoperatively, one ureter was cut and one ureter tied but recognized by palpation and ligature removed. Retrospective grading deemed ureteral catheterization necessary in 27.5 per cent of cases. We conclude that catheters are helpful in selected cases. For patients with bilateral catheter insertion, complications can be reduced by ensuring urine output prior to removal of the second catheter. PMID:8116985

  4. Active catheter driven by a thermo-hydraulic actuation.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Yonatan; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Catheters and flexible endoscopes are usually steered by mechanical wires that are driven from their base. Due to friction and buckling there is a need to place the driving actuator of the catheter at the catheter's tip. Such active catheter's manoeuvrability is much higher than wire-driven ones. A problem with active catheters is the difficulty to create high enough bending using micro-actuators placed at the catheter's tip. Our actuation method is an attempt to overcome this difficulty by using a novel thermo-hydraulic actuation method. The magnitude of the bending torque of our actuator is created by internal hydraulic pressure in the tube and the steering direction is controlled by the thermal micro-actuator embedded in the wall of the tube. In this paper we present the modelling, optimization, design and testing of an initial prototype of such an actuator. We found that a 4 mm OD actuator made of TPU can bend to ±12°. PMID:26738094

  5. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Dorota; Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. PMID:25686950

  6. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  7. New materials and devices for preventing catheter-related infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Catheters are the leading source of bloodstream infections for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Comprehensive unit-based programs have proven to be effective in decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs). ICU rates of CR-BSI higher than 2 per 1,000 catheter-days are no longer acceptable. The locally adapted list of preventive measures should include skin antisepsis with an alcoholic preparation, maximal barrier precautions, a strict catheter maintenance policy, and removal of unnecessary catheters. The development of new technologies capable of further decreasing the now low CR-BSI rate is a major challenge. Recently, new materials that decrease the risk of skin-to-vein bacterial migration, such as new antiseptic dressings, were extensively tested. Antimicrobial-coated catheters can prevent CR-BSI but have a theoretical risk of selecting resistant bacteria. An antimicrobial or antiseptic lock may prevent bacterial migration from the hub to the bloodstream. This review discusses the available knowledge about these new technologies. PMID:21906266

  8. Impact of monopolar radiofrequency energy on subchondral bone viability

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Anke; Weigel, Arwed; Walde, Tim A.; Ferlemann, Keno G.; Stürmer, Klaus M.; Frosch, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of monopolar radiofrequency energy treatment on subchondral bone viability. The femoral grooves of six chinchilla bastard rabbits were exposed bilaterally to monopolar radiofrequency energy for 2, 4 and 8 s, creating a total of 36 defects. An intravital fluorescence bone-labeling technique characterized the process of subchondral bone mineralization within the 3 months following exposure to radiofrequency energy and was analyzed by widefield epifluorescence optical sectioning microscopy using an ApoTome. After 2 s of radiofrequency energy exposure, regular fluorescence staining of the subchondral bone was evident in all samples when compared to untreated areas. The depth of osteonecrosis after 4 and 8 s of radiofrequency energy treatment averaged 126 and 942 µm at 22 days (P < .05; P < .01). The 4 s treatment group showed no osteonecrosis after 44 days whereas the depth of osteonecrosis extended from 519 µm at 44 days (P < .01), to 281 µm at 66 days (P < .01) and to 133 µm at 88 days (P < .05) after 8 s of radiofrequency energy application. Though radiofrequency energy may induce transient osteonecrosis in the superficial zone of the subchondral bone, the results of this study suggest that post-arthroscopic osteonecrosis appears to be of only modest risk given the current clinical application in humans. PMID:19838673

  9. The Tego™ needleless connector for hemodialysis catheters may protect against catheter colonization.

    PubMed

    Guembe, M; Pérez-Granda, M J; Cruces, R; Alcalá, L; Bouza, E

    2016-08-01

    Catheter connectors used in hemodialysis patients are those with open caps to manage high blood flows. However, current guidelines for the prevention of catheter infections recommend closed connectors. Tego™ is a closed connector designed to enable high blood flows. We used an in vitro model to compare the efficacy of Tego™ against contamination with that of standard caps in a real-life practice scenario. The model consisted of 200 blood culture bottles (BCB) with an inserted cannula closed either with Tego™ (100) or with open caps (100). BCB were manipulated using two different methods: under aseptic conditions and with gloves contaminated with a 0.05 McFarland Staphylococcus aureus solution. The BCB were incubated at 37 °C under continuous shaking for up to 7 days or until positive. When a BCB turned positive, 100 μL of the fluid was cultured. The positivity rate and time to positivity of the BCB in each method were compared. Overall, 4.0 % of BCB with Tego™ and 52.0 % of BCB with open caps were positive in the sterile model (p < 0.001), whereas all BCB in the contamination model were positive. We did not find differences regarding the median time (hours) to positivity between Tego™ and the standard cap in the contamination model (19.04 vs. 17.87, p = 0.465). In our model, Tego™ proved to be better than the standard cap for the prevention of contamination when the device was handled under optimal conditions. Moreover, it was as efficient as the standard catheter cap in the contamination model. PMID:27189077

  10. Epidemiology of Health Effects of Radiofrequency Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ahlbom, Anders; Green, Adele; Kheifets, Leeka; Savitz, David; Swerdlow, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    We have undertaken a comprehensive review of epidemiologic studies about the effects of radiofrequency fields (RFs) on human health in order to summarize the current state of knowledge, explain the methodologic issues that are involved, and aid in the planning of future studies. There have been a large number of occupational studies over several decades, particularly on cancer, cardiovascular disease, adverse reproductive outcome, and cataract, in relation to RF exposure. More recently, there have been studies of residential exposure, mainly from radio and television transmitters, and especially focusing on leukemia. There have also been studies of mobile telephone users, particularly on brain tumors and less often on other cancers and on symptoms. Results of these studies to date give no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relation between RF exposure and any adverse health effect. On the other hand, the studies have too many deficiencies to rule out an association. A key concern across all studies is the quality of assessment of RF exposure. Despite the ubiquity of new technologies using RFs, little is known about population exposure from RF sources and even less about the relative importance of different sources. Other cautions are that mobile phone studies to date have been able to address only relatively short lag periods, that almost no data are available on the consequences of childhood exposure, and that published data largely concentrate on a small number of outcomes, especially brain tumor and leukemia. PMID:15579422

  11. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields. PMID:26444190

  12. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Collins, C B; McCoy, R S; Ackerson, B J; Collins, G J; Ackerson, C J

    2014-08-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments.

  13. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afifeh

    2013-12-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm(-2) with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm(-2). Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm(-2). The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm(-2), and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 mW cm(-2) recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age.

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  15. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  16. Evaluation of radiofrequency dielectric heaters workers exposure.

    PubMed

    Benes, M; Del Frate, S; Villalta, R

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency dielectric heaters (RFDH) are widely used in the woodworking industry for gluing laminates by applying pressure and RF heating. The workers operating such equipment remain in the vicinity of the machinery all day and can therefore be exposed to considerable levels of electric and magnetic field at RFs. This work describes the method used to measure the strength of fields generated by this particular machinery. This procedure is based on current methods cited in the literature and introduces the necessary modifications to meet this specific case. In particular, as there is often a scarcity of technical data available relating to such heaters, it is suggested that a spectrum analyser be used for measurements in the frequencies domain. On the basis of the data obtained the norms of reference are established, the instrumentation to be used in successive stages determined as well as the identification of possible sources of interference from spurious signals. Furthermore, a mapping of the field strengths is presented and the means of determining the decay curve as a function of distance. This last type of measurement is done to estimate the effectiveness of grounding the machinery. The report ends with an estimate of the exposure of workers to electromagnetic fields and also some recommendations for reducing risk. PMID:17971347

  17. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  18. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  19. Radiofrequency radiation effects on the common bean

    SciTech Connect

    Thomkins, K.; Griggs, L.; Myles, E.L.

    1995-07-01

    Our environment is bombarded daily with thousands of objects we can visually detect. However, invisible to humans are the electromagnetic waves that penetrate our environment. Electromagnetic waves consist of a large spectrum of waves including the harmful gamma rays, x-rays, and ultraviolet rays. The question that has increased tremendously is: can low energy electromagnetic waves become harmful to living organisms? The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of radiofrequency radiation on protein synthesis of the common bean. Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was surface-sterilized and allowed to germinate on Mushurage and Skoog`s medium for 1 week. Hypocotyls were wounded and placed on media to initiate callus production. Six petri dishes containing 1 g of callus were used in the experiment. Three dishes were exposed to 100kH in a Crawford cell for 24h. The remaining three petri dishes with callus were used as a control. After the exposure period, the protein from callus was extracted and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results show that hypocotyl growth was not different between control and experimental groups after 24 h. The result of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis did not show observable differences in protein synthesized by the control and experimental groups. Analysis of protein synthesis is still ongoing.

  20. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  1. Evaluation of radiofrequency dielectric heaters workers exposure.

    PubMed

    Benes, M; Del Frate, S; Villalta, R

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency dielectric heaters (RFDH) are widely used in the woodworking industry for gluing laminates by applying pressure and RF heating. The workers operating such equipment remain in the vicinity of the machinery all day and can therefore be exposed to considerable levels of electric and magnetic field at RFs. This work describes the method used to measure the strength of fields generated by this particular machinery. This procedure is based on current methods cited in the literature and introduces the necessary modifications to meet this specific case. In particular, as there is often a scarcity of technical data available relating to such heaters, it is suggested that a spectrum analyser be used for measurements in the frequencies domain. On the basis of the data obtained the norms of reference are established, the instrumentation to be used in successive stages determined as well as the identification of possible sources of interference from spurious signals. Furthermore, a mapping of the field strengths is presented and the means of determining the decay curve as a function of distance. This last type of measurement is done to estimate the effectiveness of grounding the machinery. The report ends with an estimate of the exposure of workers to electromagnetic fields and also some recommendations for reducing risk.

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  3. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  4. Complex-plasma manipulation by radiofrequency biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaratone, B. M.; Antonova, T.; Goldbeck, D. D.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the nature, the dimensions and the timescale of the perturbation introduced by radiofrequency (rf) biasing of areas adjacent to the plasma. The analysis of the rf sheath, and of the charging of particles in it, has disclosed a levitation force on particles, which is substantially different from the dc one often used in complex plasmas. Experimentally, the rf heavily loaded sheath presents characteristics completely different from the normal case Vrf <= Vdc. Regions of extra ionization and complex electrostatic structures arise. These have been visualized by nanoparticles grown in the plasma. A variety of equilibrium positions for a controlled number of microparticles (injected) can be achieved by fine balancing of dc and rf on a pixel with the neighbouring sheath kept under control. In certain situations gravity is completely compensated, allowing the study of three-dimensional clusters. The motion of clusters from 4 to about 100 particles is simultaneously monitored by a three-dimensional visualization based on two laser lights modulated in intensity. This method enables the study of time-varying effects, such as transitions and vibrations, as well as the study of static structures and lattice defects. At pressures below 40 Pa in large clusters a poloidal motion appears.

  5. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields.

  6. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Collins, C B; McCoy, R S; Ackerson, B J; Collins, G J; Ackerson, C J

    2014-08-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  7. Radiofrequency treatments: what can we expect?

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, A; Bertuzzi, G; Addonisio, T; Iannucci, G; Vitiello, U; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    Among non-ablative procedures in aesthetic medicine, the radiofrequency (RF) is one of the most popular for the treatment of face and body skin laxity. It can be classified as a physical bio-stimulation that produces a temperature increase on biological structures, using electromagnetic waves. The term encompasses devices having substantial differences in energy, wavelengths, handpieces dimension and structure. Moreover, for some of these, the protocols are only partially defined. The aim of this short review is to clarify some aspecst of the RF therapy starting from the physics, passing through the mechanism of action and finally, with the most suitable protocols. Contrary to mechanic waves, electromagnetic waves, physics are always transversal to the impulse and this leads to the different energy distribution in capacitive (monopolar) or resistive (bi- or multi-polar) applications. The thermal damage as therapeutic effect is a postulate that needs to be discussed and the same is true for the terms “non-surgical” and “non-ablative”, often recurrent in the scientific literature. Protocols must be optimized according to the machine and the patient, keeping in mind the possibilities of biostimulation in terms of immediate improvement and of long lasting investment in skin rejuvenation. It is mandatory to understand the possibilities and limitations of each device to perform useful, safe and correct medical treatments. PMID:27469571

  8. A case of premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and arrhythmic storm induced by right ventricular pacing during cardiac resynchronization therapy: Electrophysiological mechanism and catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Pedretti, Stefano; Vargiu, Sara; Paolucci, Marco; Lunati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy and a cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (CRT-D) device came to our attention due to incessant ventricular tachycardia and multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. An electrocardiogram showed non-sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardias (NSVTs) constantly occurring after each biventricular stimulation. During an electrophysiological study, NSVTs reproducibly recurred only after right ventricular (RV) pacing; LV pacing did not induce any NSVTs. The activation map was consistent with a localized reentry at the interventricular septum, and a double exit; at the LV exit site, a single radiofrequency energy application immediately interrupted the occurrence of the NSVTs. Current evidence supports LV pacing to be pro-arrhythmogenic in few CRT patients. This unusual case shows that RV pacing during CRT could produce frequent ventricular arrhythmias and arrhythmic storm. Catheter ablation can be considered an effective therapeutic option, especially when CRT maintenance is highly advisable. PMID:26702324

  9. Fiber optic pressure catheter for cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuping; Sawatari, Takeo; Hartley, Craig J.

    1998-07-01

    We developed a fiber optic pressure catheter which has the potential to exceed the performance and cost-effectiveness of any currently available pressure measurement system in cardiovascular applications. Our design is based on a movable metallic ribbon, which works as a reflector, to transform the pressure into a light signal. The sensor has a diameter of 0.8 mm and is covered by medical grade polyurethane. In the laboratory tests, our sensors consistently showed high sensitivity and low noise (about 1 mmHg) over the pressure range of 0 to 300 mmHg. The time constant of the sensor, which is limited by the current software is about 20 mseconds (50 Hz). Using a mechanical heart simulator to generate pressure pulses, the pressure reading was independent of temperature change over a 30 degree Celsius range, and the drift was minimal during the 72-hour pressure pulse tests. A preliminary animal test was carried out with our sensors inserted into the artery of a dog. The comparison with an external reference sensor showed basic sensor performance. The sensor can also be used in brain, lung, and bladder pressure measurement applications.

  10. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  11. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  12. Continuous Cavitation Designed for Enhancing Radiofrequency Ablation via a Special Radiofrequency Solidoid Vaporization Process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Pei; Chen, Hangrong; Bo, Xiaowan; Li, Xiaolong; Xu, Huixiong

    2016-02-23

    Lowering power output and radiation time during radiofrequency (RF) ablation is still a challenge. Although it is documented that metal-based magnetothermal conversion and microbubbles-based inertial cavitation have been tried to overcome above issues, disputed toxicity and poor magnetothermal conversion efficiency for metal-based nanoparticles and violent but transient cavitation for microbubbles are inappropriate for enhancing RF ablation. In this report, a strategy, i.e., continuous cavitation, has been proposed, and solid menthol-encapsulated poly lactide-glycolide acid (PLGA) nanocapsules have been constructed, as a proof of concept, to validate the role of such a continuous cavitation principle in continuously enhancing RF ablation. The synthesized PLGA-based nanocapsules can respond to RF to generate menthol bubbles via distinctive radiofrequency solidoid vaporization (RSV) process, meanwhile significantly enhance ultrasound imaging for HeLa solid tumor, and further facilitate RF ablation via the continuous cavitation, as systematically demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this RSV strategy can overcome drawbacks and limitations of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and optical droplet vaporization (ODV), and will probably find broad applications in further cancer theranostics. PMID:26800221

  13. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field.

  14. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozbay, Isa; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  15. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field. PMID:25540238

  16. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Ozbay, Isa; Oghan, Fatih; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic.

  17. Radiofrequency for the treatment of skin laxity: mith or truth.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues de; Soares, Viviane Pinheiro Campos; Silva, Fernanda Souza da; Moreira, Tatiane da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The nonablative radiofrequency is a procedure commonly used for the treatment of skin laxity from an increase in tissue temperature. The goal is to induce thermal damage to thus stimulate neocollagenesis in deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. However, many of these devices haven't been tested and their parameters are still not accepted by the scientific community. Because of this, it is necessary to review the literature regarding the physiological effects and parameters for application of radiofrequency and methodological quality and level of evidence of studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PEDro, SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and CAPES and experimental studies in humans, which used radiofrequency devices as treatment for facial or body laxity, were selected. The results showed that the main physiological effect is to stimulate collagen synthesis. There was no homogeneity between studies in relation to most of the parameters used and the methodological quality of studies and level of evidence for using radiofrequency are low. This fact complicates the determination of effective parameters for clinical use of this device in the treatment of skin laxity. The analyzed studies suggest that radiofrequency is effective, however the physiological mechanisms and the required parameters are not clear in the literature. PMID:26560216

  18. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Ozbay, Isa; Oghan, Fatih; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  19. Radiofrequency for the treatment of skin laxity: mith or truth*

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues; Soares, Viviane Pinheiro Campos; da Silva, Fernanda Souza; Moreira, Tatiane da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The nonablative radiofrequency is a procedure commonly used for the treatment of skin laxity from an increase in tissue temperature. The goal is to induce thermal damage to thus stimulate neocollagenesis in deep layers of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. However, many of these devices haven't been tested and their parameters are still not accepted by the scientific community. Because of this, it is necessary to review the literature regarding the physiological effects and parameters for application of radiofrequency and methodological quality and level of evidence of studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PEDro, SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and CAPES and experimental studies in humans, which used radiofrequency devices as treatment for facial or body laxity, were selected. The results showed that the main physiological effect is to stimulate collagen synthesis. There was no homogeneity between studies in relation to most of the parameters used and the methodological quality of studies and level of evidence for using radiofrequency are low. This fact complicates the determination of effective parameters for clinical use of this device in the treatment of skin laxity. The analyzed studies suggest that radiofrequency is effective, however the physiological mechanisms and the required parameters are not clear in the literature. PMID:26560216

  20. Local Intravascular Drug Delivery: In Vitro Comparison of Three Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfke, Heiko; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Calmer, Christian; Klose, Klaus Jochen

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare different catheter systems for local drug delivery with respect to the penetration depth of a biotin marker solution delivered into the vessel wall. Methods: Post-mortem carotid arteries from pigs were locally infused with a biotin solution using three different catheter systems. With all catheters (microporous balloon catheter, hydrogel-coated balloon catheter, and spiral balloon catheter) we used the same pressure of 405 kPa (4 atm) and infusion times of 60, 90, and 300 sec. After infusion the arteries were histologically prepared and stained using a biotin-specific method. With a light microscope an observer, blinded to the catheter type, scored the amount of biotin within the vessel wall, measured as staining intensity, and the penetration depth of the biotin. Results: Delivery with the hydrogel-coated balloon catheter was limited to the intima and the innermost parts of the media. The spiral balloon and microporous balloon catheter showed both a deeper penetration and a larger amount of delivered biotin compared with the hydrogel catheter, with a slightly deeper penetration using the microporous catheter. The penetration depth showed a correlation with infusion time for the spiral balloon and microporous catheters, but not for the hydrogel-coated catheter. Conclusion: Different catheter designs lead to different patterns of local drug delivery. The differences in penetration depth and amount of the substance delivered to the vessel wall should be known and might be useful for targeting specific areas within the vessel wall.

  1. Non-infected hemodialysis catheters are associated with increased inflammation compared to arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Ikizler, T Alp; Zappitelli, Michael; Silverstein, Douglas M; Ayus, Juan C

    2009-11-01

    Although hemodialysis catheters predispose to infection which, in turn, causes inflammation, we studied whether they induce inflammation independent of infection. We compared the level of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) in maintenance hemodialysis patients, comparing those dialyzed using a non-infected catheter to those using arteriovenous fistulas. All incident patients had catheters and fistula placement at dialysis initiation. In 35 patients the fistulas matured, the catheters were removed and the patients were evaluated at 6 months (catheter-fistula). These results were compared to 15 patients in whom the fistula did not mature and catheter use persisted for 6 months (catheter-catheter). There was a significant 82% reduction in the CRP level in the catheter-fistula group but a 16% increase in the catheter-catheter group at 6 months. The changes in CRP did not differ by gender, diabetes status, or by race, and was not correlated with a change in phosphorus, age, or urea reduction ratio at 1 month following hemodialysis initiation. Decreased CRP was associated with increased hemoglobin and albumin. Patients with persistent fistula use from dialysis initiation through 6 months had consistently low CRP levels over that time period. Our study shows that catheters might contribute to increased inflammation independent of infection, and supports avoidance of catheters and a timely conversion to fistulas with catheter removal. PMID:19675528

  2. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  3. Use of oral gadobenate dimeglumine to visualise the oesophagus during magnetic resonance angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation prior to catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrio-oesophageal fistula was first reported as a fatal complication of surgical endocardial and percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation, with an incidence after catheter ablation between 0.03% and 0.5%. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was usually performed to obtain pre-procedural 3D images, used to merging into an electro-anatomical map, guiding step-by-step ablation strategy of AF. Our aim was to find an easy, safe and cost-effective way to enhance the oesophagus during MRA. Methods In 105 consecutive patients, a right-left phase encoding, free breathing, 3D T1 MRA sequence was performed in the axial plane, >24 hours before catheter ablation, using an intravenous injection of gadobenate dimeglumine contrast medium. The oesophagus was enhanced using an oral gel solution of 0.7 mL gadobenate dimeglumine contrast medium mixed with approximately 40 mg thickened water gel, which was swallowed by the patients on the scanning table, immediately before the MRA sequence acquisition. Results The visualisation of the oesophagus was obtained in 104/105 patients and images were successfully merged, as left atrium and pulmonary veins, into an electro-anatomical map, during percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency ablation. All patients tolerated the study protocol and no immediate or late complication was observed with the oral contrast agent administration. The free-breathing MRA sequence used in our protocol took 7 seconds longer than MRA breath-hold conventional sequence. Conclusion Oesophagus visualization with oral gadobenate dimeglumine is feasible for integration of oesophagus anatomy images into the electro-anatomical map during AF ablation, without undesirable side effects and without significantly increasing cost or examination time. PMID:24927953

  4. Serial surveillance cultures of skin and catheter hub specimens from critically ill patients with central venous catheters: molecular epidemiology of infection and implications for clinical management and research.

    PubMed Central

    Atela, I; Coll, P; Rello, J; Quintana, E; Barrio, J; March, F; Sanchez, F; Barraquer, P; Ballus, J; Cotura, A; Prats, G

    1997-01-01

    A prospective study of 45 central venous catheters was conducted to assess, by strain delineation, the turnover of skin and catheter hub (superficial) colonization and the relative contributions of catheter hub and skin colonization to catheter tip colonization. Serial quantitative cultures of skin and catheter hub were performed. Catheter tip, blood, and specimens for culture from targeted superficial sites (TSSs) were also collected at the time of catheter removal. Strains from 17 tip-positive catheters were delineated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Only 12 (28.6%) of 42 skin strains and 14 (31.1%) of 45 catheter hub strains were found to be present at the time of catheter removal. In addition, only 9 (29.0%) of the 31 tip-colonizing strains were present on TSSs. Moreover, 15 (48.4%) of the 31 tip-colonizing strains had a superficial origin, and the other 16 (51.6%) were of unknown origin. In catheters suspected of infection, cultures of TSSs had a negative predictive value for catheter-related bacteremia of 94.4% but a positive predictive value of 44.4%. When the causative agent was identified (to the strain level) these values dropped to 80.9 and 18.7%, respectively. The study shows that skin and catheter hub colonization is a common, dynamic phenomenon. Strains recovered from TSSs showed a low level of correlation with strains from previous cultures of specimens from superficial sites and catheter tip isolates. Consequently, TSSs cannot be recommended for use in determining the therapy. However, catheter-related bacteremia is uncommon when cultures of TSSs are negative. PMID:9196194

  5. Long-term Urinary Catheter Users Self-Care Practices and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Mary; McDonald, Margaret V.; Brasch, Judith; McMahon, James M.; Fairbanks, Eileen; Shah, Shivani; Tang, Wan; Scheid, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aims were to characterize a sample of 202 adult community-living long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, to describe self-care practices and catheter problems, and to explore relationships among demographics, catheter practices, and problems. Background Long-term urinary catheter users have not been well studied, and persons using the device indefinitely for persistent urinary retention are likely to have different patterns of catheter practices and problems. Design The study was a cross-sectional descriptive and exploratory analysis. Methods Home interviews were conducted with catheter users who provided information by self-reported recall over the previous two months. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and tests of association between demographics, catheter practices, and catheter problems. Results The sample was widely diverse in age (19–96 years), race, and medical diagnosis. Urethral catheters were used slightly more often (56%) than suprapubic (44%), for a mean of 6 yrs. (SD 7 yrs.). Many persons were highly disabled, with 60% having difficulty in bathing, dressing, toileting, and getting out of the bed; 19% also required assistance in eating. A high percentage of catheter problems were reported with: 43% experiencing leakage (bypassing of urine), 31% having had a urinary tract infection, 24% blockage of the catheter, 23% catheter-associated pain, and 12% accidental dislodgment of the catheter. Treatments of catheter-related problems contributed to additional health care utilization including extra nurse or clinic visits, trips to the emergency department, or hospitalization. Symptoms of catheter associated urinary tract infections were most often related to changes in the color or character of urine or generalized symptoms. Conclusions Catheter related problems contribute to excess morbidity and health care utilization and costs. Relevance to clinical practice More research is needed in how to minimize catheter associated problems

  6. Intracranial ventricular catheter placement with a smartphone assisted instrument.

    PubMed

    Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology has recently been introduced for blood pressure measurements or glucose level controls. In surgical disciplines the use of smartphone applications is mostly restricted as training tools or knowledge resources. Simple surgical procedures which are performed often in certain disciplines may be performed with limited accuracy since routine and overwork of medical staff lead to less awareness to possible mistakes. In these cases simple and effective means are necessary to achieve better patient safety.In this context, a surgical instrument for ventricular catheter placement in neurosurgical patients was designed which is assisted by measurements undertaken in a smartphone software application specifically visualizing the use of this instrument and achieving better accuracy for catheter positioning. On theoretical ground, the angulation of the catheter trajectory towards the surface of the skull in a coronal reconstructed CT or MR image is determined as the simplified but the most relevant individual parameter for correct ventricular catheter placement. Transfer of a CT/MRI image onto the smartphone can be performed via mail as anonymous file. Using this image, the trajectory measurement can be performed individually in a few steps by calibration of the image size, definition of the frontal entry point, and virtual placement of the instrument on the surface of the skull. Then the angulation can be adjusted and measured to place the catheter's trajectory towards the ipsilateral ventricle and the catheter length is determined. The parameters are now given by the app and visualized on the image in order to be applied to the surgical site of the patient.The tool represents a widely available and cost-effective solution as navigation technique which is simple to apply in order to achieve better accuracy in ventricular catheter placement for higher safety in a large cohort of neurosurgical patients. PMID:25626554

  7. Tunneled central venous catheters: Experience from a single center.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, K; Ramakrishnan, M; Sah, A K; Sooraj, Y; Mahaldhar, A; Ajeshkumar, R

    2011-04-01

    In the past vascular surgeons were called in to place tunneled central venous catheter (TVC) for hemodialysis patients. Advent of percutaneous technique has resulted in an increasing number of interventional nephrologists inserting it. A single centre three year audit of 100 TVCs with a cumulative follow up of 492 patient months is presented here. From 2007 to 2010, 100 TVCs were placed by nephrologists in a percutaneous fashion in the operative room or the interventional nephrology suite. Those who completed minimum of three months on the catheter were included in analysis. There were 69 males and 31 females with a mean age of 52.3±13.6 years.(range: 25-76). Chronic glomerulonephritis was the commonest cause of CKD (45%) followed by diabetes (39%).Right internal jugular vein was the preferred site (94%). TVC was utilized as the primary access to initiate dialysis in 25% of patients in whom a live donor was available for renal transplant. The blood flow was 250-270 ml/min. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 3 months and 6 months catheter survival rates were 80% and 55%, respectively. The main complications were exit site blood ooze, catheter block and kink. Catheter related bacteremia rate was low at 0.4/1000 patient days. Primary cause of drop out was patient death unrelated to the TVCs. Those under the age of 40 years showed better survival, but there was no bearing of gender, catheter site, and etiology of CKD on survival. Tunneled central venous catheters could find a niche as the primary access of choice for pretransplant live donor renal transplants in view of its immediate usage, high blood flows, low infection rates and adequate patency rates for 3-6 months. PMID:21769173

  8. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Implantable Radiofrequency Transponder System for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Implantable Radiofrequency Transponder System for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification....

  10. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable... recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in “Biological Effects...

  11. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable... recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in “Biological Effects...

  12. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. 2.1091 Section 2.1091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation:...

  13. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. 2.1091 Section 2.1091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation:...

  14. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. 2.1091 Section 2.1091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1091 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation:...

  15. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation... Procedures Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure § 2.1093 Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable.... These criteria for SAR evaluation are similar to those recommended by the National Council on...

  16. Factors influencing the time long-term indwelling Foley catheters can be kept in situ.

    PubMed

    Hedelin, H; Larsson, L; Eddeland, A; Pettersson, S

    1985-01-01

    To study the factors that influence the frequency of unscheduled catheter changes, patients with long-term indwelling Foley catheters were followed up for 48 weeks. A marked interindividual difference in the need for unscheduled changes was noted. The amount and composition of the encrustations precipitated on the catheters and urine osmolality influenced the frequency of unscheduled catheter changes. There was no correlation between the time a catheter had been in situ and the amount of encrustations on catheters changed on schedule after various times in situ. This indicates that time does not govern the amount of encrustations accumulated.

  17. Thrombus on Indwelling Central Venous Catheters: The Histopathology of 'Fibrin Sheaths'

    SciTech Connect

    Suojanen, James Norman; Brophy, David Paul; Nasser, Imad

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: Central venous catheters (CVC) may fail for many reasons, though 'fibrin sheaths' blocking catheter ports are usually implicated. We examined the sheaths removed from dialysis catheters to determine their histopathology.Methods: Ten catheter strippings were performed and the removed material was studied grossly and microscopically.Results: The histologic specimens showed thrombus both with and without a proteinaceous sheath.Conclusion: Dialysis catheters fail because of thrombus formation. This can occur in either the absence or presence of a protein coating on the catheter, the so-called 'fibrin sheath.'.

  18. Conducting polymer based active catheter for minimally invasive interventions inside arteries.

    PubMed

    Shoa, Tina; Madden, John D; Fekri, Niloofar; Munce, Nigel R; Yang, Victor X D

    2008-01-01

    An active catheter intended for controllable intravascular maneuvers is presented and initial experimental results are shown. A commercial catheter is coated with polypyrrole and laser micromachined into electrodes, which are electrochemically activated, leading to bending of the catheter. The catheter's electro-chemo-mechanical properties are theoretically modeled to design the first prototype device, and used to predict an optimal polypyrrole thickness for the desired degree of bending within approximately 30 seconds. We compared the experimental result of catheter bending to the theoretical model with estimated electrochemical strain, showing reasonable agreement. Finally, we used the model to design an encapsulated catheter with polypyrrole actuation for improved intravascular compatibility and performance.

  19. [Infections associated with intra- and extravascular catheters: factors involved in microorganism-biomaterial interactions].

    PubMed

    Baldassarri, L; Gelosia, A; Donelli, G

    1994-01-01

    Infections is one of the most common cause of catheter failure as well as the most difficult to manage, most often requiring catheter removal. Staphylococcus is the etiologic agent of such infections more frequently isolated, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis. Several factors have been suggested to be involved in bacteria-biomaterial interactions such as catheter surface morphology, molecular biofilm and bacterial virulence features. Different strategies have been tried to avoid the development to catheter-associated infections: among them adsorption of antibiotic molecules to the catheter surface might represent a successful tool to improve catheter implant life.

  20. Radiofrequency Coblation of Congenital Nasopharyngeal Teratoma: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sang Yun; Jefferson, Niall; Mohorikar, Alok; Jacobson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital nasopharyngeal teratomas are rare tumours that pose difficulties in diagnosis and surgical management. We report the first use of radiofrequency coblation in the management of such tumours. Case Report. A premature baby with a perinatal diagnosis of a large, obstructing nasooropharyngeal mass was referred to the ENT service for further investigations and management. The initial biopsy was suggestive of a neuroblastoma, but the tumour demonstrated rapid growth despite appropriate chemotherapy. In a novel use of radiofrequency coblation, the nasooropharyngeal mass was completely excised, with the final histopathology revealing a congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma. Conclusion. We report the first use of radiofrequency coblation to excise a congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma and discuss its advantages. PMID:25685579