Science.gov

Sample records for 2-his-1-glu metal center

  1. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  2. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  3. Metals Processing Laboratory User Center (MPLUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Metals Processing Laboratory User (MPLUS) Center was officially designated as a DOE User Facility in February, 1996. It`s primary purpose is to assist researchers in key U.S. industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency and enhancing U.S. competitiveness in the world market. The MPLUS Center provides users the unique opportunity to address technology-related issues to solve metals-processing problems from a fully integrated approach. DOE facilitates the process and catalyzes industrial interactions that enables technical synergy and financial leveraging to take place between the industrial sector identifying and prioritizing their technological needs, and MPLUS, which provides access to the technical expertise and specialized facilities to address these needs. MPLUS is designed to provide U.S. industries with access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals-processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals-processing technologies. As originated, MPLUS includes the following four primary user centers: Metals Processing, Metals Joining, Metals Characterization, and Metals Process Modeling. These centers are devoted to assisting U.S. industries in adjusting to rapid changes in the marketplace and in improving products and processes. This approach optimizes the complementary strengths of industry and government. Tremendous industrial response, has resulted in MPLUS expanding to meet the ever-growing technical needs and requests initiated by U.S. industry.

  4. Metallicity of the Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A recent study suggests that the stars in the central parsec of our galaxy are not a single, roughly solar-metallicity population, as previously thought. Instead, these stars have a large variation in metallicities which has interesting implications for the formation history of the Milky Ways nuclear star cluster.Clues from AbundancesWhy do we care about the metallicity of stars and stellar populations? Metallicity measurements can help us to separate multiple populations of stars and figure out when and where they were formed.Measurements of the chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way have demonstrated that theres a metallicity gradient in the galaxy: on average, its below solar metallicity at the outer edges of the disk and increases to above solar metallicity within the central 5 kpc of the galaxy.So far, measurements of stars in the very center of the galaxy are consistent with this galactic trend: theyre all slightly above solar metallicity, with little variation between them. But these measurements exist for only about a dozen stars within the central 10 pc of the galaxy! Due to the high stellar density in this region, a larger sample is needed to get a complete picture of the abundances and thats what this study set out to find.Different PopulationsLed by Tuan Do (Dunlap Fellow at the University of Toronto and member of the Galactic Center Group at UCLA), the authors of this study determined the metallicities of 83 late-type giant stars within the central parsec of the galaxy. The metallicities were found by fitting the stars K-band spectra from observations by the NIFS instrument on the Gemini North telescope.In contrast to the previous studies, the authors found that the 83 stars exhibited a wide range of metallicities, from a tenth of solar metallicity all the way to super-solar metallicities.The abundances of the low-metallicity stars they found are consistent with globular cluster metallicities, suggesting that these stars (about 6% of the sample

  5. Self-assembly of the binuclear metal center of phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed

    Shim, H; Raushel, F M

    2000-06-27

    The active site of the bacterial phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta contains two divalent metal ions and a carboxylated lysine residue. The native enzyme contains two Zn(2+) ions, which can be replaced with Co(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), or Mn(2+) without loss of catalytic activity. Carbon dioxide reacts with the side chain of lysine-169 to form a carbamate functional group within the active site, which then serves as a bridging ligand to the two metal ions. The activation of apo-PTE using variable concentrations of divalent metal ions and bicarbonate was measured in order to establish the mechanism by which the active site of PTE is self-assembled. The time courses for the activation of apo-PTE are pseudo-first-order, and the observed rate constants are directly proportional to the concentration of bicarbonate. In contrast, the apparent rate constants for the activation of apo-PTE decrease as the concentrations of the divalent cations are increased and then become constant at higher concentrations of the divalent metal ions. These results are consistent with a largely ordered kinetic mechanism for the assembly of the binuclear metal center where CO(2)/bicarbonate reacts with the apo-PTE prior to the binding of the two metal ions. When apo-PTE is titrated with 0-8 equiv of Co(2+), Cd(2+), or Zn(2+), the concentration of activated enzyme increases linearly until 2 equiv of metal ion is added and then remains constant at elevated levels of the divalent cations. These results are consistent with the synergistic binding of the two metal ions to the active site, and thus the second metal ion binds more tightly to the protein than does the first metal ion. Measurement of the mean dissociation constant indicates that metal binding to the binuclear metal center is strong [(K(alpha)K(beta))(1/2) = 6.0 x 10(-)(11) M and k(off) = 1.5 x 10(-)(3) min(-)(1) for Zn(2+)]. The removal of the carbamate bridge through the mutagenesis of Lys-169 demonstrates that the

  6. 75 FR 76037 - General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating Division Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21356). At the request of the State agency, the... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation Grand Rapids Metal Center Metal Fabricating..., applicable to workers of General Motors Corporation, Grand Rapids Metal Center, Metal Fabricating...

  7. Emission properties of body-centered cubic elemental metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tuo; Rickman, Benjamin L. Schroeder, W. Andreas

    2015-04-07

    A first principles analysis of photoemission is developed to explain the lower than expected rms transverse electron momentum measured using the solenoid scan technique for the body-centered cubic Group Vb (V, Nb, and Ta) and Group VIb (Cr, Mo, and W) metallic photocathodes. The density functional theory based analysis elucidates the fundamental role that the electronic band structure (and its dispersion) plays in determining the emission properties of solid-state photocathodes and includes evaluation of work function anisotropy using a thin-slab method.

  8. Theory for plasticity of face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Minho; Koo, Yang Mo; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente; Kwon, Se Kyun

    2014-01-01

    The activation of plastic deformation mechanisms determines the mechanical behavior of crystalline materials. However, the complexity of plastic deformation and the lack of a unified theory of plasticity have seriously limited the exploration of the full capacity of metals. Current efforts to design high-strength structural materials in terms of stacking fault energy have not significantly reduced the laborious trial and error works on basic deformation properties. To remedy this situation, here we put forward a comprehensive and transparent theory for plastic deformation of face-centered cubic metals. This is based on a microscopic analysis that, without ambiguity, reveals the various deformation phenomena and elucidates the physical fundaments of the currently used phenomenological correlations. We identify an easily accessible single parameter derived from the intrinsic energy barriers, which fully specifies the potential diversity of metals. Based entirely on this parameter, a simple deformation mode diagram is shown to delineate a series of convenient design criteria, which clarifies a wide area of material functionality by texture control. PMID:24753563

  9. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  10. 5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

  11. Chemical bonding topology of ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides: from molecules to metals.

    PubMed

    King, R Bruce

    2003-12-29

    The bismuth polyhedra in ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides may form discrete molecules or ions, infinite chains, and/or infinite layers. The chemical bonding in many of these diverse structures is related to that in deltahedral boranes exhibiting three-dimensional aromaticity by replacing the multicenter core bond in the boranes with two-center two-electron (2c-2e) bonds from the central transition metal to the nearest neighbor bismuth vertices. Examples of discrete molecules or ions include octahedral MBi(6)(micro-X)(12)(z)()(-) (X = Br, I; M = Rh, Ir, z = 3; M = Ru, z = 4) with exclusively 2c-2e bonds and pentagonal bipyramidal RhBi(7)Br(8) with a 5c-4e bond in the equatorial pentagonal plane indicative of Möbius aromaticity. The compound Ru(3)Bi(24)Br(20) contains a more complicated discrete bismuth cluster ion Ru(2)Bi(17)(micro-Br)(4)(5+), which can be dissected into a RuBi(5) closo octahedron and a RuBi(8) nido capped square antiprism bridged by a Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit. In RuBi(4)X(2) (X = Br, I), the same Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit bridges Bi(4) squares similar to those found in the known Zintl ion Bi(4)(2)(-) to give infinite chains of Ru(2)Bi(4) octahedra. The electron counts of the RuBi(5), RuBi(8), and Ru(2)Bi(4) polyhedra in these structures follow the Wade-Mingos rules. A different infinite chain structure is constructed from fused RhBi(7/2)Bi bicapped trigonal prisms in Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3). This Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3) structure can alternatively be derived from alternating Rh(2/2)Bi(4) octahedra and Rh(2/)(2)Bi(5) pentagonal bipyramids with electron counts obeying the Wade-Mingos rules. Related chemical bonding principles appear to apply to more complicated layer structures such as Pt(3)Bi(13)I(7) containing Kagomé nets of PtBi(8/2) cubes and Ni(4)Bi(12)X(3) containing linked chains of NiBi(6/3)Bi capped trigonal prisms.

  12. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  13. Orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Manuel A; Vidossich, Pietro; Conejero, Salvador; Lledós, Agustí

    2014-12-15

    Hydrogen atoms in the coordination sphere of a transition metal are highly mobile ligands. Here, a new type of dynamic process involving hydrides has been characterized by computational means. This dynamic event consists of an orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers containing N-heterocyclic carbenes. The hydride movement around the carbene-metal-carbene axis is the lowest energy mode connecting energy equivalent isomers. This understanding provides crucial information for the interpretation of NMR spectra.

  14. Layer-by-layer synthesis of metal-containing conducting polymers: caged metal centers for interlayer charge transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Huang, Weijie; Pink, Maren; Lee, Dongwhan

    2010-09-01

    Metal-templated [2 + 3]-type cocondensation of a pi-extended boronic acid and nioxime furnished a series of cage molecules, which were electropolymerized to prepare metal-containing conducting polymers (MCPs). Despite sharing essentially isostructural organic scaffolds, these materials display metal-dependent electrochemical properties as evidenced by different redox windows observed for M = Co, Fe, Ru. Consecutive electropolymerization using two different monomers furnished bilayer MCPs having different metals in each layer. In addition to functioning as heavy atom markers in cross-sectional analysis by FIB and EDX, redox-active metal centers participate in voltage-dependent interlayer electron transport to give rise to cyclic voltammograms that are distinctively different from those of each layer alone or random copolymers. A simple electrochemical technique can thus be used as a straightforward diagnostic tool to investigate the structural ordering of electrically conductive layered materials. PMID:20690667

  15. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  16. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors II: Noble metal active centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The structure and stability of polymer-metal nanoreactors is detailed, including a complete characterization of the first successful synthesis of stable, dispersible, atomically thin gold nanosheets. Further developments in the synthesis of monodisperse, ∼2.5 nm platinum nanoclusters in aqueous solution and ambient conditions are described and pH stability of the composite material is established. The facile nanoreactor synthesis, environmentally friendly reaction conditions, and structural stability makes these biomimetic systems attractive for applications ranging from chemical detoxification to nanoelectronics.

  17. The mononuclear metal center of type-I dihydroorotase from aquifex aeolicus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dihydroorotase (DHO) is a zinc metalloenzyme, although the number of active site zinc ions has been controversial. E. coli DHO was initially thought to have a mononuclear metal center, but the subsequent X-ray structure clearly showed two zinc ions, α and β, at the catalytic site. Aquifex aeolicus DHO, is a dodecamer comprised of six DHO and six aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC) subunits. The isolated DHO monomer, which lacks catalytic activity, has an intact α-site and conserved β-site ligands, but the geometry of the second metal binding site is completely disrupted. However, the putative β-site is restored when the complex with ATC is formed and DHO activity is regained. Nevertheless, the X-ray structure of the complex revealed a single zinc ion at the active site. The structure of DHO from the pathogenic organism, S. aureus showed that it also has a single active site metal ion. Results Zinc analysis showed that the enzyme has one zinc/DHO subunit and the addition of excess metal ion did not stimulate catalytic activity, nor alter the kinetic parameters. The metal free apoenzyme was inactive, but the full activity was restored upon the addition of one equivalent of Zn2+ or Co2+. Moreover, deletion of the β-site by replacing the His180 and His232 with alanine had no effect on catalysis in the presence or absence of excess zinc. The 2.2 Å structure of the double mutant confirmed that the β-site was eliminated but that the active site remained otherwise intact. Conclusions Thus, kinetically competent A. aeolicus DHO has a mononuclear metal center. In contrast, elimination of the putative second metal binding site in amidohydrolyases with a binuclear metal center, resulted in the abolition of catalytic activity. The number of active site metal ions may be a consideration in the design of inhibitors that selectively target either the mononuclear or binuclear enzymes. PMID:24314009

  18. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; Lu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, whilemore » engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.« less

  19. Detailed Abundance Analysis of a Metal-poor Giant in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Fritz, T. K.; Rich, R. M.; Thorsbro, B.; Schultheis, M.; Origlia, L.; Chatzopoulos, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to Sgr A*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high-resolution (R ∼ 24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K = 10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about {26}-16+54 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar/bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new line list in the K band, finds [Fe/H] ∼ ‑1.0 and [α/Fe] ∼ +0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude that this star is most likely to be a representative of the ∼10 Gyr old population. This is also the most metal-poor-confirmed red giant yet discovered in the vicinity of the nuclear cluster of the Galactic center. We consider recent reports in the literature of a surprisingly large number of metal-poor giants in the Galactic center, but the reported gravity of {log}g∼ 4 for these stars calls into question their reported metallicities.

  20. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  1. Role of the coordination center in photocurrent behavior of a tetrathiafulvalene and metal complex dyad.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Gang; Ji, Shu-Fang; Huo, Peng; Yin, Jing-Xue; Huang, Yu-De; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2014-03-17

    Small organic molecule-based compounds are considered to be promising materials in photoelectronics and high-performance optoelectronic devices. However, photoelectron conversion research based on functional organic molecule and metal complex dyads is very scarce. We design and prepare a series of compounds containing a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) moiety substituted with pyridylmethylamide groups of formulas [Ni(acac)2L]·2CH3OH (1), [Cu2I2L2]·THF·2CH3CN (2), and [MnCl2L2]n·2nCH3CH2OH (3) (L = 4,5-bis(3-pyridylmethylamide)-4',5'-bimethylthio-tetrathiafulvalene, acac = acetylacetone) to study the role of the coordination center in photocurrent behavior. Complex 1 is a mononuclear species, and complex 2 is a dimeric species. Complex 3 is a two-dimensional (2-D) coordination polymer. Spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these complexes indicate that they are electrochemically active materials. The tetrathiafulvalene ligand L is a photoelectron donor in the presence of electron acceptor methylviologen. The effect of metal coordination centers on photocurrent response behavior is examined. The redox-active metal coordination centers should play an important role in improvement of the photocurrent response property. The different morphologies of the electrode films reflect the dimensions in molecular structures of the coordination compounds.

  2. Development of Li-Metal Battery Cell Chemistries at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-Art lithium-ion battery technology is limited by specific energy and thus not sufficiently advanced to support the energy storage necessary for aerospace needs, such as all-electric aircraft and many deep space NASA exploration missions. In response to this technological gap, our research team at NASA Glenn Research Center has been active in formulating concepts and developing testing hardware and components for Li-metal battery cell chemistries. Lithium metal anodes combined with advanced cathode materials could provide up to five times the specific energy versus state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells (1000 Whkg versus 200 Whkg). Although Lithium metal anodes offer very high theoretical capacity, they have not been shown to successfully operate reversibly.

  3. Structure of Diethyl Phosphate Bound to the Binuclear Metal Center of Phosphotriesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Tsai, P.; Chen, S.; Himo, F.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate esters at rates close to the diffusion limit. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that a binuclear metal center is positioned in the active site of PTE and that this complex is responsible for the activation of the nucleophilic water from solvent. In this paper, the three-dimensional structure of PTE was determined in the presence of the hydrolysis product, diethyl phosphate (DEP), and a product analogue, cacodylate. In the structure of the PTE-diethyl phosphate complex, the DEP product is found symmetrically bridging the two divalent cations. The DEP displaces the hydroxide from solvent that normally bridges the two divalent cations in structures determined in the presence or absence of substrate analogues. One of the phosphoryl oxygen atoms in the PTE-DEP complex is 2.0 Angstroms from the a-metal ion, while the other oxygen is 2.2 Angstroms from the {beta}-metal ion. The two metal ions are separated by a distance of 4.0 Angstroms. A similar structure is observed in the presence of cacodylate. Analogous complexes have previously been observed for the product complexes of isoaspartyl dipeptidase, d-aminoacylase, and dihydroorotase from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The experimentally determined structure of the PTE-diethyl phosphate product complex is inconsistent with a recent proposal based upon quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations which postulated the formation of an asymmetrical product complex bound exclusively to the {beta}-metal ion with a metal-metal separation of 5.3 Angstroms. This structure is also inconsistent with a chemical mechanism for substrate hydrolysis that utilizes the bridging hydroxide as a base to abstract a proton from a water molecule loosely associated with the a-metal ion. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support a reaction mechanism that utilizes the bridging hydroxide as the direct

  4. Beyond Metal-Hydrides: Non-Transition-Metal and Metal-Free Ligand-Centered Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Andrew Z; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M; Buchanan, Robert M; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2016-06-29

    A new pathway for homogeneous electrocatalytic H2 evolution and H2 oxidation has been developed using a redox active thiosemicarbazone and its zinc complex as seminal metal-free and transition-metal-free examples. Diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) and zinc diacetyl-bis(N-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazide) display the highest reported TOFs of any homogeneous ligand-centered H2 evolution catalyst, 1320 and 1170 s(-1), respectively, while the zinc complex also displays one of the highest reported TOF values for H2 oxidation, 72 s(-1), of any homogeneous catalyst. Catalysis proceeds via ligand-centered proton-transfer and electron-transfer events while avoiding traditional metal-hydride intermediates. The unique mechanism is consistent with electrochemical results and is further supported by density functional theory. The results identify a new direction for the design of electrocatalysts for H2 evolution and H2 oxidation that are not reliant on metal-hydride intermediates. PMID:27326672

  5. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  6. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  7. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors.

  8. Transition Metal Impurities on the Bond-Centered Site in Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Decoster, S.; Vries, B. de; Vantomme, A.; Cottenier, S.; Emmerich, H.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.

    2009-02-13

    We report on the lattice location of ion implanted Fe, Cu, and Ag impurities in germanium from a combined approach of emission channeling experiments and ab initio total energy calculations. Following common expectation, a fraction of these transition metals (TMs) was found on the substitutional Ge position. Less expected is the observation of a second fraction on the sixfold coordinated bond-centered site. Ab initio calculated heats of formation suggest this is the result of the trapping of a vacancy by a substitutional TM impurity, spontaneously forming an impurity-vacancy complex in the split-vacancy configuration. We also present an approach to displace the TM impurities from the electrically active substitutional site to the bond-centered site.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of the binuclear metal center of phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed

    Benning, M M; Kuo, J M; Raushel, F M; Holden, H M

    1995-06-27

    Phosphotriesterase, as isolated from Pseudomonas diminuta, is capable of detoxifying widely used pesticides such as paraoxon and parathion and various mammalian acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The enzyme requires a binuclear metal center for activity. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the apoenzyme was solved (Benning et al., 1994) and shown to consist of an alpha/beta-barrel. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of the holoenzyme, reconstituted with cadmium, as determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis to 2.0-A resolution. Crystals employed in the investigation belonged to the space group C2 with unit cell dimensions of a = 129.5 A, b = 91.4 A, c = 69.4 A, beta = 91.9 degrees, and two subunits in the asymmetric unit. There are significant differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the apo and holo forms of the enzyme such that their alpha-carbon positions superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 3.4 A. The binuclear metal center is located at the C-terminus of the beta-barrel with the cadmiums separated by 3.8 A. There are two bridging ligands to the metals: a water molecule (or possibly a hydroxide ion) and a carbamylated lysine residue (Lys 169). The more buried cadmium is surrounded by His 55, His 57, Lys 169, Asp 301, and the bridging water in a trigonal bipyramidal arrangement. The second metal is coordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry by His 201, His 230, Lys 169, the bridging water molecule, and two additional solvents. PMID:7794910

  10. Metal-center exchange of tetrahedral cages: single crystal to single crystal and spin-crossover properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Li; Chen, Jia-Qian; Qin, Long-Fang; Tian, Lei; Li, Zaijun; Ren, Xuehong; Gu, Zhi-Guo

    2016-04-01

    An effective single crystal to single crystal transformation from a tetrahedral Ni cage to an FeNi cage was demonstrated. The iron(ii) centers of the FeNi cage can be induced to display spin crossover behaviors with an increasing amount of Fe(II) ions. The SCSC metal-center exchange provides a powerful approach to modify solid magnetic properties.

  11. Metal-centered polymers: Using controlled polymerization methodologies for the generation of responsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Matthew

    Controlled polymerization methods were used to prepare highly modular polymeric metal complexes via convergent and divergent strategies. In these materials, the metal center provides a versatile hub for preparing diverse architectures through coordinative bonds. Moreover, the metal complex introduces various properties to the polymer such as luminescence, magnetism, or electroactivity. Suitably functionalized metal complexes have been used for the atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylate and methacrylate monomers by metalloinitiation to generate luminescent biocompatible materials through a divergent synthesis. By cleaving the tert-butyl groups from poly(tert -butyl acrylate), water soluble [Ru(bpyPAA2)3] 2+ has been prepared as well as the amphiphilic star block copolymer [Ru{bpy(PLA-PAA)2}3]2+ (PLA = poly(lactic acid), PAA = poly(acrylic acid) Bipyridine-centered polymeric macroligands may be chelated to a variety of metal salts. The polymer size greatly influences the formation of [Fe(bpy) 3]2+ centered polymers. As the molecular weight increases (> ˜25 kDa) tris complex formation decreases. Tris(bpy) synthesis is also impacted by chemical composition. BpyPtBA2 (PtBA = poly(tert-butyl acrylate) generates an iron mono(bpy) complex before giving rise to the bis(bpy) iron complex; no tris complex is observed. In contrast, the combination of bpyPEG2 (3 equiv) (PEG = (poly(ethylene glycol)) results in the formation of some iron tris(bpy) compound; however, complete tris(bpy) product formation is suppressed, presumably because of the chelating ability of the PEG chains. These examples contrast with other polymeric macroligands such as bpyPS2, bpyPMMA2, bpyPCL2 and bpyPLA 2 (PS = polystyrene; PMMA = poly(methyl methacrylate); PCL = poly(epsilon-caprolactone); PLA = poly(DL-lactic acid)) for which chelation reactions are facile for low molecular weight macroligands (<15 kDa), with chelation efficiencies (defined as (epsilonPMC/epsilonbpy) x 100%) only declining

  12. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed Central

    Sainna, Mala A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)2(μ2-H)(μ2-NHCH3)(μ3-C)PtCH3(P(CH3)3)2](CO)n+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH3)5, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  13. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed

    Sainna, Mala A; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-09-28

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)₂(μ²-H) (μ²-NHCH₃)(μ³-C)PtCH₃(P(CH₃)₃)₂](CO)n⁺ with n=0, 2 and Cp=η⁵-C₅(CH₃)₅, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes.

  14. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    PubMed

    Sainna, Mala A; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)₂(μ²-H) (μ²-NHCH₃)(μ³-C)PtCH₃(P(CH₃)₃)₂](CO)n⁺ with n=0, 2 and Cp=η⁵-C₅(CH₃)₅, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  15. Ab Initio Study of the Adsorption of Small Molecules on Metal-Organic Frameworks with Oxo-centered Trimetallic Building Units: The Role of the Undercoordinated Metal Ion.

    PubMed

    Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Boese, A Daniel; Fink, Karin; Heine, Thomas; Klopper, Wim

    2015-09-01

    The interactions of H2, CO, CO2, and H2O with the undercoordinated metal centers of the trimetallic oxo-centered M3(III)(μ3-O)(X) (COO)6 moiety are studied by means of wave function and density functional theory. This trimetallic oxo-centered cluster is a common building unit in several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as MIL-100, MIL-101, and MIL-127 (also referred to as soc-MOF). A combinatorial computational screening is performed for a large variety of trimetallic oxo-centered units M3(III)O (M = Al(3+), Sc(3+), V(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Rh(3+), In(3+), Ir(3+)) interacting with H2O, H2, CO, and CO2. The screening addresses interaction energies, adsorption enthalpies, and vibrational properties. The results show that the Rh and Ir analogues are very promising materials for gas storage and separations.

  16. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A.; Darty, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO2, for harnessing ‘green’ energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO2 into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO2 and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO2, we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO2 and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe4S4 clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO2 during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron–sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B12 and a Fe4S4 cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co3+ intermediate. Studies of CO and CO2 enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C–C and C–S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  17. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2.

    PubMed

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A; Darty, Joseph E; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2011-08-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO(2), for harnessing 'green' energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO(2) into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO(2) and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO(2), we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO(2) and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe(4)S(4) clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO(2) during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B(12) and a Fe(4)S(4) cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co(3+) intermediate. Studies of CO and CO(2) enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C-C and C-S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  18. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the 'pseudo-interfacial energy' that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches. PMID:27484794

  19. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the 'pseudo-interfacial energy' that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

  20. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the ‘pseudo-interfacial energy’ that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

  1. Grain-boundary strengthening in nanocrystalline chromium and the Hall- Petch coefficient of body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Junyan, Zhang; Huang, J C; Bei, Hongbin; Nieh, Tai-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cr (nc-Cr) was synthesized by electrodeposition. Samples with various grain sizes (19 57 nm) were prepared by annealing the as-deposited sample. Microstructures were examined using X-ray and electron microscopy, and the mechanical prop- erties were evaluated using nanoindentation. The strength of nc-Cr samples apparently obeyed the classical Hall Petch relationship. It was found that hardening potency caused by grain refinement was generally higher in body-centered cubic metals than that in face-centered cubic and hexagonal close-packed metals. A possible explanation was offered.

  2. Driving forces of heavy metal changes in agricultural soils in a typical manufacturing center.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Menglong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Qi; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in 2002 and 2012 in agricultural soils in Dongguan, a manufacturing center in southern China, were analyzed to determine the impact of rapid economic development on soil pollution. The level of pollution was assessed using the Nemerow synthetic pollution index (NPI), and its changing characteristics and driving forces were analyzed using multivariate statistical and geostatistical methods. The results indicate that the mean NPI was 0.79 in 2002 and 0.84 in 2012, which indicates aggravated heavy metal contamination in the agricultural soils. The concentrations of Cd and Zn increased 54.7 and 20.8 %, respectively, whereas Hg and Pb decreased 35.3 and 24.5 %, respectively. Cr, As, Cu, and Ni remained relatively stable. The Hg and Cd concentrations were highly correlated with soil types (P < 0.01), the secondary industrial output per unit of land (P < 0.01), proportion of cereal fields (P < 0.01), proportion of vegetable fields (P < 0.01), population density (P < 0.05), and road density (P < 0.05). The Pb and As concentrations were greatly influenced by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), fertilizer rate (P < 0.01), and road density (P < 0.05). Cr, Zn, Cu, and Ni concentrations were primarily driven by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), and fertilizer rate (P < 0.05).

  3. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  4. Size Effects in Thin Face-Centered Cubic Metals for Different Complex Forming Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubos, Pierre-Antoine; Hug, Eric; Thibault, Simon; Ben Bettaieb, Mohamed; Keller, Clément

    2013-12-01

    Influence of the size effects on the mechanical behavior of face-centered cubic metals was studied for complex loadings close to microforming ones. The effect of a reduction in thickness ( t) over grain size ( d) ratio on the mechanical behavior for high-purity nickel and copper is investigated for three different loadings by tensile and Nakazima tests (plane strain conditions and balanced biaxial expansion). Experimental results highlight a strong degradation of the mechanical properties of Cu and Ni when the t/ d ratio is reduced below a critical value, independently of the strain path. However, this effect occurs if the equivalent plastic strain is larger than a critical level which is strain path dependent and related to the stress triaxiality. The current study reveals that plastic anisotropy is also affected by size effects. An excellent correlation is obtained between the t/ d ratio and the thickness reduction, through the mean normal plastic anisotropy parameter which is widely used to estimate sheet formability. A size effect map based on forming limit diagrams is proposed to depict the optimal conditions of microforming.

  5. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  6. (BB)-Carboryne Complex of Ruthenium: Synthesis by Double B-H Activation at a Single Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Eleazer, Bennett J; Smith, Mark D; Popov, Alexey A; Peryshkov, Dmitry V

    2016-08-24

    The first example of a transition metal (BB)-carboryne complex containing two boron atoms of the icosahedral cage connected to a single exohedral metal center (POBBOP)Ru(CO)2 (POBBOP = 1,7-OP(i-Pr)2-2,6-dehydro-m-carborane) was synthesized by double B-H activation within the strained m-carboranyl pincer framework. Theoretical calculations revealed that the unique three-membered (BB)>Ru metalacycle is formed by two bent B-Ru σ-bonds with the concomitant increase of the bond order between the two metalated boron atoms. The reactivity of the highly strained electron-rich (BB)-carboryne fragment with small molecules was probed by reactions with electrophiles. The carboryne-carboranyl transformations reported herein represent a new mode of cooperative metal-ligand reactivity of boron-based complexes. PMID:27526855

  7. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  8. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  9. (BB)-Carboryne Complex of Ruthenium: Synthesis by Double B–H Activation at a Single Metal Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The first example of a transition metal (BB)-carboryne complex containing two boron atoms of the icosahedral cage connected to a single exohedral metal center (POBBOP)Ru(CO)2 (POBBOP = 1,7-OP(i-Pr)2-2,6-dehydro-m-carborane) was synthesized by double B–H activation within the strained m-carboranyl pincer framework. Theoretical calculations revealed that the unique three-membered (BB)>Ru metalacycle is formed by two bent B–Ru σ-bonds with the concomitant increase of the bond order between the two metalated boron atoms. The reactivity of the highly strained electron-rich (BB)-carboryne fragment with small molecules was probed by reactions with electrophiles. The carboryne–carboranyl transformations reported herein represent a new mode of cooperative metal–ligand reactivity of boron-based complexes. PMID:27526855

  10. Incoherent Bi off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O': Insulator versus metal

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Seshadri, Ram; Tachibana, Makoto; Hector, Andrew L.

    2011-08-24

    In the cubic, stoichiometric oxide compounds Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ti₂O₇) and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ru₂O₇) Bi³⁺ ions on the pyrochlore A site display a propensity to off-center. Unlike Bi₂Ti₂O₆O', Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' is a metal, so it is of interest to ask whether conduction electrons and/or involvement of Bi 6s states at the Fermi energy influence Bi³⁺ displacements. The Bi³⁺ off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has previously been revealed to be incoherent from detailed reverse Monte Carlo analysis of total neutron scattering. Similar analysis of Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' reveals incoherent off-centering as well, but of smaller magnitude and with distinctly different orientational preference. Analysis of the distributions of metal to oxygen distances presented suggests that Bi in both compounds is entirely Bi³⁺. Disorder in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has the effect of stabilizing valence while simultaneously satisfying the steric constraint imposed by the presence of the lone pair of electrons. In Bi₂Ru₂O₆O', off-centering is not required to satisfy valence and seems to be driven by the lone pair. Decreased volume of the lone pair may be a result of partial screening by conduction electrons.

  11. Incoherent Bi off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O': Insulator versus metal

    DOE PAGES

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Seshadri, Ram; Tachibana, Makoto; Hector, Andrew L.

    2011-08-24

    In the cubic, stoichiometric oxide compounds Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ti₂O₇) and Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' (also written as Bi₂Ru₂O₇) Bi³⁺ ions on the pyrochlore A site display a propensity to off-center. Unlike Bi₂Ti₂O₆O', Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' is a metal, so it is of interest to ask whether conduction electrons and/or involvement of Bi 6s states at the Fermi energy influence Bi³⁺ displacements. The Bi³⁺ off-centering in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has previously been revealed to be incoherent from detailed reverse Monte Carlo analysis of total neutron scattering. Similar analysis of Bi₂Ru₂O₆O' reveals incoherent off-centering as well, but of smaller magnitude and with distinctly different orientational preference. Analysismore » of the distributions of metal to oxygen distances presented suggests that Bi in both compounds is entirely Bi³⁺. Disorder in Bi₂Ti₂O₆O' has the effect of stabilizing valence while simultaneously satisfying the steric constraint imposed by the presence of the lone pair of electrons. In Bi₂Ru₂O₆O', off-centering is not required to satisfy valence and seems to be driven by the lone pair. Decreased volume of the lone pair may be a result of partial screening by conduction electrons.« less

  12. Electronic structure analysis of the dinuclear metal center in the bioremediator glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Mitić, Natasa; Yip, Sylvia Hsu-Chen; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Schenk, Gerhard; Larrabee, James A

    2010-03-15

    The glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a promiscuous, dinuclear metallohydrolase that has potential application in the remediation of organophosphate nerve agents and pesticides. GpdQ employs an unusual reaction mechanism in which the enzyme is predominantly mononuclear in the resting state, and substrate binding induces the formation of the catalytically competent dinuclear center (Hadler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 14129). Reactivity is further modulated by the coordination flexibility of Asn80, a ligand that binds to the second, loosely bound metal ion (Hadler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 11900). It is proposed that hydrolysis is initiated by a terminal, metal-bound hydroxide molecule which is activated at unusually low pH by electrostatic/hydrogen bonding interactions with a bridging hydroxide species. In this study, electronic structure analysis of the dinuclear center is employed to study the coordination environment of the dinuclear center at the resting and product-bound stage of catalysis. This is achieved through the use of variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism experiments involving the Co(II)-substituted wild type enzyme and its Asn80Asp variant. The data support the above model for the catalytic mechanism whereby the metal ion-bridging hydroxide molecule activates a terminally bound hydroxide nucleophile. Replacement of Asn80 by an aspartate residue does prevent coordination flexibility but also leads to cleavage of the mu-hydroxide bridge and reduced reactivity. This is the first study to investigate the electronic structure of an enzyme with a mu-1,1-carboxylate bridged dicobalt(II) center.

  13. A New Approach to Non-Coordinating Anions: Lewis Acid Enhancement of Porphyrin Metal Centers in a Zwitterionic Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacob A; Petersen, Brenna M; Kormos, Attila; Echeverría, Elena; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-17

    We describe a new strategy to generate non-coordinating anions using zwitterionic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). By assembly of anionic inorganic secondary building blocks (SBUs) ([In(CO2)4](-)) with cationic metalloporphyrin-based organic linkers, we prepared zwitterionic MOFs in which the complete internal charge separation effectively prevents the potential binding of the counteranion to the cationic metal center. We demonstrate the enhanced Lewis acidity of Mn(III)- and Fe(III)-porphyrins in the zwitterionic MOFs in three representative electrocyclization reactions: [2 + 1] cycloisomerization of enynes, [3 + 2] cycloaddition of aziridines and alkenes, and [4 + 2] hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of aldehydes with dienes. This work paves a new way to design functional MOFs for tunable chemical catalysis. PMID:27435751

  14. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  15. Binding and activation of N2O at transition-metal centers: recent mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Tolman, William B

    2010-02-01

    No laughing matter, nitrous oxide's role in stratospheric ozone depletion and as a greenhouse gas has stimulated great interest in developing and understanding its decomposition, particularly through the use of transition-metal promoters. Recent advances in our understanding of the reaction pathways for N(2)O reduction by metal ions in the gas phase and in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and biological catalytic systems have provided provocative ideas about the structure and properties of metal N(2)O adducts and derived intermediates. These ideas are likely to inform efforts to design more effective catalysts for N(2)O remediation. PMID:20058284

  16. (110) Orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with face-centered cubic structure using template synthesis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuewei; Yuan Zhihao; Li Jushan

    2011-06-15

    A template-assisted assembly technique has been used to synthesize magnetic metal nanowire arrays. Fe, Co, Ni nanowires are fabricated using direct-current electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. The morphology and the crystal structure of the samples are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. The results indicate that Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires all have face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and a preferred orientation along the [110] direction. The ability to prepare well-defined orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with FCC structure opens up new opportunities for both fundamental studies and nanodevice applications. - Research Highlights: {yields} Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires are fabricated in the AAM templates by electrodeposition. {yields} Well-defined orientation growth of the nanowires with FCC structure were investigated. {yields} The electrodeposition parameters affect the crystal structure and growth orientation.

  17. Metal-ion-center assembly of ferredoxin and plastocyanin in isolated chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hsoumin; Theg, S.M.; Bauerle, C.M.; Keegstra, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Most chloroplastic proteins are cytosolically synthesized andposttranslationally transported to their proper locations. Two examples of this group of proteins are ferredoxin and plastocyanin, both of which are metal-containing components of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. The import process for these two proteins includes the insertion of the metal ions to produce the holo forms of the proteins. The authors show here that in vitro translated precursor proteins of ferredoxin and plastocyanin are synthesized as apo forms and are assembled into their respective holo forms after being imported into isolated chloroplasts. They also provide evidence that only mature-sized proteins are competent to be assembled into holo forms.

  18. Proposed Ligand-Centered Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation at a Noninnocent Mononuclear Metal-Thiolate.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Andrew Z; Kumar, Davinder; Ouch Sampson, Kagna; Matzner, Anna M; Mashuta, Mark S; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2015-07-29

    The noninnocent coordinatively saturated mononuclear metal-thiolate complex ReL3 (L = diphenylphosphinobenzenethiolate) serves as an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution or hydrogen oxidation dependent on the presence of acid or base and the applied potential. ReL3 reduces acids to H2 in dichloromethane with an overpotential of 380 mV and a turnover frequency of 32 ± 3 s(-1). The rate law displays a second-order dependence on acid concentration and a first-order dependence on catalyst concentration with an overall third-order rate constant (k) of 184 ± 2 M(-2) s(-1). Reactions with deuterated acid display a kinetic isotope effect of 9 ± 1. In the presence of base, ReL3 oxidizes H2 with a turnover frequency of 4 ± 1 s(-1). The X-ray crystal structure of the monoprotonated species [Re(LH)L2](+), an intermediate in both catalytic H2 evolution and oxidation, has been determined. A ligand-centered mechanism, which does not require metal hydride intermediates, is suggested based on similarities to the redox-regulated, ligand-centered binding of ethylene to ReL3. PMID:26161802

  19. Inorganic–organic hybrids presenting high basic center content: SBA-15 incorporation, toxic metals sorption and energetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Fernando J.V.E.; Melo, Maurício A.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Mesoporous SBA-15 silicas were organofunctionalized with new silylant agents. ► Thiocarbamate was used to enhance the silylating agent chains and basic centers. ► The synthesized pendant chains contain nitrogen and sulfur basic centers. ► The new hybrids sorb toxic cations from aqueous solutions with high efficiency. ► The thermodynamic data demonstrated favorable cation/basic center interactions. - Abstract: Mesoporous SBA-15 samples were organofunctionalized with mono, di- and tri-aminosilanes that previously reacted with thiocarbamide to enhance the organic chains and attach nitrogen and sulfur basic centers to the surface of the solids. These new organosilanes were synthesized through a non-solvent approach to reduce both cost and hazardous wastes. The high affinities for both hard and soft Lewis acids due to the combination of nitrogen and sulfur atoms attached to the same pendant chain enabled favorable sorption capacities for Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} cations, with maximum capacities of 1.90, 3.48 and 5.30 mmol g{sup −1}, respectively, for the most efficient mesoporous silica. Microcalorimetric investigations allowed the calculation of the thermodynamic data at the solid/liquid interface. All Gibbs energy are negative as expected for spontaneous cation/basic center interactions and the positive entropic values from 49 ± 3 to 108 ± 5 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}, also reinforced this favorable interactive process in heterogeneous system. The designed organosilanes covalently bonded to the inorganic siliceous skeleton can be suggested as new materials for toxic metal removal from a wastewater with high efficiency.

  20. Photophysical properties of ortho-metalated monomeric and dimeric complexes containing rhodium(III) and iridium(III) metal centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jason Alexander

    Photophysical properties of dichloro-bridged dimers and monomeric tris complexes of the type [M(NC)2Cl]2 and M(NC)3, where NC refers to the ortho-metalating ligands 2-phenylpyridine (ppy), benzo[h]quinoline (bzq), or 2-(p-tolyl)pyridine (ptpy) and M is Rh(III) or Ir(III), were investigated. Excited-state emission of Rh(III) complexes are highly structured and independent of temperature from 4--100 K in glassy media, with long lifetimes (102 mus to ms). Emission is not observed from the pale yellow, fluid solutions of Rh(III) complexes at room temperature. Below 7K, decay kinetics are sensitive to temperature and are complicated, requiring multi-exponential fits in 4:1 EtOH/MeOH. The spectroscopic properties are consistent with the assignment of a lowest 3pipi* excited-state manifold perturbed by an admixture of higher-lying states possessing strong spin-orbit interactions. The complicated decays are attributed to spin-relaxation-limited behavior between spin-levels in the 3pipi* manifold. Deep yellow solutions of Ir(III) complexes in 4:1 EtOH/MeOH are observed to emit in both glassy media and in fluid solution, displaying severe changes in spectral shape as the glass softens which are not attributable to rigidochromic shifts. Low-temperature spectra are structured with emission origins in the range 496--520 nm whereas room-temperature emission of complexes in fluid solution are characteristically broad structureless bands with maxima redshifted from spectra measured in rigid media. Both the emission and the excited-state lifetimes display temperature dependence, with lifetimes in the microsecond to tens of microseconds range at 77 K, increasing by more than an order of magnitude as the temperature is decreased to 4 K. Each of these characteristic band shapes arises from separate components of the emission which have been time-resolved from the low-temperature spectrum. A long-lived, structured component of the emission, only observed in rigid media, has been

  1. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline PdxAu1− x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin–twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  2. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  3. Diffusion of adatoms on face-centered cubic transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.

    1994-05-10

    Mechanisms and associated energetics for adatom diffusion on the (100) and (110) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag are investigated. Self-diffusion was studied on (100) and (I 10) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Pd and Ag using corrected effective medium method (CEM) and approximation to CEM used for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies (MD/MC-CEM). Self-diffusion on Pd(100), Ag(100), Ni(110), Cu(110), Pd(110), and Ag(110) is accomplished by classical diffusion: the adatom hops from its equilibrium adsorption site over an intervening bridge site to an adjacent equilibrium site. Self-diffusion on Ni(100) and Cu(100) proceeds by atomic-exchange diffusion: the adatom on the surface displaces an atom in the first surface layer. Aside from explicit inclusion of the kinetic-exchange-correlation energy, it is critical to include enough movable atoms in the calculation to insure correct energetics. Distortions induced by these diffusion mechanisms, especially atomic exchange, are long ranged in surface plane, owing to small distortions of many atoms being energetically favored over large distortions of few atoms. Energetics and rates of heterogeneous adatom diffusion on the (100) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag show that the final state energies differ due to variation of metallic bonding with coordination for different types of metal atoms. The surface energies of the 2 metals can be used to correlate the amount of energy gained or released when the adatom displaces a surface atom. This difference in energetic stability of final configurations determines whether bridge hopping diffusion or atomic displacement is the dominant kinetic process in these heterogeneous systems.

  4. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  5. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  6. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature.

  7. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  8. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  9. Cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster: a model for the in vitro assembly of metalloprotein metal centers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Shiigi, Stacey A; Swartz, James R

    2014-01-01

    Many organometallic cofactors are highly complex and require multiple accessory proteins for both their assembly and transfer to a target protein. A cell-free system in which the biosynthetic pathway for a prosthetic group has been fully or even partially reconstructed enables investigations of the reaction sequence as well as the cofactor itself. As a model for the in vitro assembly of protein-bound metal centers, we describe a procedure for the cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster in the context of producing purified and active [FeFe] hydrogenase samples for spectroscopic studies. In general terms, this in vitro system is a combination of non-purified accessory proteins, exogenous substrates, and purified hydrogenase apoprotein. We also describe methods for making the required components used in the cell-free system. Specifically, these procedures include anaerobic expression of heterologous metalloproteins in Escherichia coli, anaerobic cell lysate production, and anaerobic metalloprotein purification using Strep-Tactin(®) chromatography.

  10. Fatigue damage in cross-ply titanium metal matrix composites containing center holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of fatigue damage in (0/90) sub SCS-6/TI-15-3 laminates containing center holes was studied. Stress levels required for crack initiation in the matrix were predicted using an effective strain parameter and compared to experimental results. Damage progression was monitored at various stages of fatigue loading. In general, a saturated state of damage consisting of matrix cracks and fiber matrix debonding was obtained which reduced the composite modulus. Matrix cracks were bridged by the 0 deg fibers. The fatigue limit (stress causing catastrophic fracture of the laminates) was also determined. The static and post fatigue residual strengths were accurately predicted using a three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The matrix damage that occurred during fatigue loading significantly reduced the notched strength.

  11. Magnetism of iron in face-centered cubic 4d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzain, M.; Rawas, A. Al; Yousif, A.; Gismelseed, A.; Rais, A.; Omari, I. Al; Widatallah, H.

    2004-05-01

    The magnetic moments and hyperfine fields at iron sites embedded in Rh, Pd and Ag face centered cubic structures were calculated using the first principle discrete variational method (DVM) and the full-potential linear-augment plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. In DVM the systems were represented by, clusters of atoms, while in FP-LAPW supercells were used. The objectives of this work are to compare and contrast results from the two different computational methods in addition to comparison to experimental data. Large magnetic moments were obtained for iron in Pd, relatively smaller moments for iron in Ag and smaller moments for iron in Rh. Iron atoms were found to couple ferromagnetically to Pd atoms and antiferromagnetically to Rh. No moment is induced on the Ag atom.

  12. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  13. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer involving Os-centered radicals: evidence for tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Grills, David C; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os(•) and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•) radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons are in the range 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.8 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 °C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies (E(D) - E(H)) and the pre-exponential factor ratio (A(H)/A(D)). For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•), the (E(D) - E(H)) = 3.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) and A(H)/A(D) = 0.06 ± 0.02 values suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism.

  14. Mechanism-based crystal plasticity modeling of twin boundary migration in nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhani, Hamidreza; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2014-08-01

    Nanotwinned (nt) metals are an important subset of nanostructured materials because they exhibit impressive strength and ductility. Several recent investigations on nt face-centered-cubic (FCC) metals indicate that their macroscopic responses emerge from complex microscopic mechanisms that are dominated by dislocation-TB interactions. Under applied stimulus, nt microstructures evolve through migration of twin boundaries (TBs) that may have implications on the material strength and stability. This work focuses on modeling TB migration within finite element framework in an explicit manner and studying its effects on the micromechanics of twinned FCC metals under quasi-static loading conditions. The theoretical setting is developed using three-dimensional single crystal plasticity as a basis wherein the plastic slip on the {111}<1bar10> slip systems in an FCC crystal structure is modeled as visco-plastic behavior. Owing to their governing role, twins are modeled as discrete lamellas with full crystallographic anisotropy. To model TB migration, an additional visco-plastic slip-law for twinning partial systems ({111}<112bar>) based on the nucleation and motion of twin partial dislocations is introduced. This size-dependent constitutive law is presumed to prevail in the vicinity of the TB and naturally facilitates TB migration when combined with a twinning condition that is based on the accrual of the necessary shear strain. The constitutive development is implemented within a finite element framework through a User Material (UMAT) facility within ABAQUS/STANDARD®. Detailed micromechanics simulations on model microstructures involving single-grained and polycrystalline topologies are presented.

  15. Multifunctional, defect-engineered metal-organic frameworks with ruthenium centers: sorption and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Kozachuk, Olesia; Luz, Ignacio; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X; Noei, Heshmat; Kauer, Max; Albada, H Bauke; Bloch, Eric D; Marler, Bernd; Wang, Yuemin; Muhler, Martin; Fischer, Roland A

    2014-07-01

    A mixed-linker solid-solution approach was employed to modify the metal sites and introduce structural defects into the mixed-valence Ru(II/III) structural analogue of the well-known MOF family [M3(II,II)(btc)2] (M=Cu, Mo, Cr, Ni, Zn; btc=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate), with partly missing carboxylate ligators at the Ru2 paddle-wheels. Incorporation of pyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (pydc), which is the same size as btc but carries lower charge, as a second, defective linker has led to the mixed-linker isoreticular derivatives of Ru-MOF, which display characteristics unlike those of the defect-free framework. Along with the creation of additional coordinatively unsaturated sites, the incorporation of pydc induces the partial reduction of ruthenium. Accordingly, the modified Ru sites are responsible for the activity of the "defective" variants in the dissociative chemisorption of CO2, the enhanced performance in CO sorption, the formation of hydride species, and the catalytic hydrogenation of olefins. PMID:24838592

  16. Molecular anatomy of tyrosinase and its related proteins: beyond the histidine-bound metal catalytic center.

    PubMed

    García-Borrón, José C; Solano, Francisco

    2002-06-01

    The structure of tyrosinase (Tyr) is reviewed from a double point of view. On the one hand, by comparison of all Tyr found throughout nature, from prokaryotic organisms to mammals and on the other, by comparison with the tyrosinase related proteins (Tyrps) that appeared late in evolution, and are only found in higher animals. Their structures are reviewed as a whole rather than focused on the histidine (His)-bound metal active site, which is the part of the molecule common to all these proteins. The availability of crystallographic data of hemocyanins and recently of sweet potato catechol oxidase has improved the model of the three-dimensional structure of the Tyr family. Accordingly, Tyr has a higher structural disorder than hemocyanins, particularly at the CuA site. The active site seems to be characterized by the formation of a hydrophobic pocket with a number of conserved aromatic residues sited close to the well-known His. Other regions specific of the mammalian enzymes, such as the cytosolic C-terminal tail, the cysteine clusters, and the N-glycosylation sequons, are also discussed. The complete understanding of the Tyr copper-binding domain and the characterization of the residues determinant of the relative substrate affinities of the Tyrps will improve the design of targeted mutagenesis experiments to understand the different catalytic capabilities of Tyr and Tyrps. This may assist future aims, from the design of more efficient bacterial Tyr for biotechnological applications to the design of inhibitors of undesirable fruit browning in vegetables or of color skin modulators in animals. PMID:12028580

  17. Ultrafast and ultraslow oxygen atom transfer reactions between late metal centers.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Kevin C; Laitar, David S; Muldoon, John; Pu, Lihung; Braun-Sand, Sonja B; Wiest, Olaf; Brown, Seth N

    2007-01-24

    Oxotrimesityliridium(V), (mes)3Ir=O (mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), and trimesityliridium(III), (mes)3Ir, undergo extremely rapid degenerate intermetal oxygen atom transfer at room temperature. At low temperatures, the two complexes conproportionate to form (mes)3Ir-O-Ir(mes)3, the 2,6-dimethylphenyl analogue of which has been characterized crystallographically. Variable-temperature NMR measurements of the rate of dissociation of the mu-oxo dimer combined with measurements of the conproportionation equilibrium by low-temperature optical spectroscopy indicate that oxygen atom exchange between iridium(V) and iridium(III) occurs with a rate constant, extrapolated to 20 degrees C, of 5 x 107 M-1 s-1. The oxotris(imido)osmium(VIII) complex (ArN)3Os=O (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) also undergoes degenerate intermetal atom transfer to its deoxy partner, (ArN)3Os. However, despite the fact that its metal-oxygen bond strength and reactivity toward triphenylphosphine are nearly identical to those of (mes)3Ir=O, the osmium complex (ArN)3Os=O transfers its oxygen atom 12 orders of magnitude more slowly to (ArN)3Os than (mes)3Ir=O does to (mes)3Ir (kOsOs = 1.8 x 10-5 M-1 s-1 at 20 degrees C). Iridium-osmium cross-exchange takes place at an intermediate rate, in quantitative agreement with a Marcus-type cross relation. The enormous difference between the iridium-iridium and osmium-osmium exchange rates can be rationalized by an analogue of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. Both Ir(III) and Ir(V) are pyramidal and can form pyramidal iridium(IV) with little energetic cost in an orbitally allowed linear approach. Conversely, pyramidalization of the planar tris(imido)osmium(VI) fragment requires placing a pair of electrons in an antibonding orbital. The unique propensity of (mes)3Ir=O to undergo intermetal oxygen atom transfer allows it to serve as an activator of dioxygen in cocatalyzed oxidations, for example, acting with osmium tetroxide to catalyze the aerobic

  18. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source.

  19. Examination of metals from aerospace-related activity in surface water samples from sites surrounding the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Scheidt, Douglas M; Lowers, Russell H; Nocito, Brian A; Young, Vaneica Y; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-01

    Metal contamination from Space Shuttle launch activity was examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in a two-tier study sampling surface water collected from several sites at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in east central Florida. The primary study examined both temporal changes in baseline metal concentrations (19 metals) in surface water (1996 to 2009, 11 sites) samples collected at specific long-term monitoring sites and metal deposition directly associated with Space Shuttle launch activity at two Launch Complexes (LC39A and LC39B). A secondary study examined metal concentrations at additional sites and increased the amount of elements measured to 48 elements. Our examination places a heavy focus on those metals commonly associated with launch operations (e.g., Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn), but a brief discussion of other metals (As, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb) is also included. While no observable accumulation of metals occurred during the time period of the study, the data obtained postlaunch demonstrated a dramatic increase for Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Comparing overall trends between the primary and secondary baseline surface water concentrations, elevated concentrations were generally observed at sampling stations located near the launch complexes and from sites isolated from major water systems. While there could be several natural and anthropogenic sources for metal deposition at KSC, the data in this report indicate that shuttle launch events are a significant source. PMID:24738662

  20. A cage-based cationic body-centered tetragonal metal-organic framework: single-crystal to single-crystal transformation and selective uptake of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-ming; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A cage-based cationic body-centered metal-organic framework was successfully synthesized using a custom-designed bifunctional triazolcarboxylate ligand. It shows interesting single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation upon solvent exchange process and selective uptake of organic dyes.

  1. Are dangling bond centers important interface traps in 4H-SiC metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, M. A.; Lenahan, P. M.; Lelis, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) have great promise in high power and high temperature applications. Unfortunately, effective channel mobilities remain disappointingly low, typically about 30 cm2/Vs. A major contributor to the disappointing effective channel mobilities is the presence of substantial densities of interface traps at the SiC/SiO2 interface. Many investigators have invoked silicon or carbon dangling bonds to be the dominating source of these interface defects, but very little, if any, direct experimental evidence exists to support this assumption in the SiC/SiO2 system. Cantin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 1 (2004)] have used conventional electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on porous oxidized SiC structures to measure the g tensor for the SiC/SiO2 interface carbon dangling bond. These results provide a particularly straightforward means to search for the presence of carbon dangling bonds in fully processed SiC MOSFETs using electrically detected magnetic resonance. Additionally, simple theory provides guidance to search for silicon dangling bond defects. In this study, we utilize K band electrically detected magnetic resonance via spin dependent charge pumping measurements in which almost all of the SiC band gap at the SiC/SiO2 interface is accessed. Although quite high signal to noise measurements are achieved, we are unable to detect any trace of the carbon dangling bond spectra. However, in very poor quality p-channel devices, we observe a spectrum which could be consistent with silicon dangling bonds. Other defect centers are clearly present and we conclude that these other centers dominate the interface trap density of states.

  2. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Multifrequency EPR Spectroscopy: A Toolkit for the Characterization of Mono- and Di-nuclear Metal Ion Centers in Complex Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Graeme R.

    Metalloenzymes are ubiquitous in nature containing complex metal ion cofactors intimately involved in the enzymes' biological function. The application of multifrequency continuous wave and orientation selective pulsed EPR in conjunction with computer simulation and density functional theory calculations has proven to be a powerful toolkit for the geometric and electronic structural characterization of these metal ion cofactors in the resting enzyme, enzyme-substrate and -product complexes, which in turn provides a detailed understanding of the enzymes' catalytic mechanism. In this chapter, a brief description of the multifrequency EPR toolkit used to structurally (geometric and electronic) characterize metal ion binding sites in complex biological systems and its application in the structural characterization of (i) molybdenum containing enzymes and model complexes, (ii) mono- and di-nuclear copper(II) cyclic peptide complexes (marine and synthetic analogues) and (iii) dinuclear metal ion centers in purple acid phosphatases will be presented.

  4. Final Technical Report on DE-SC00002460 [Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Esther Sans; Takeuchi, Kenneth James; Marschilok, Amy Catherine

    2013-07-26

    Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V were investigated under this project. These metal centers are the focus of this research as they have high earth abundance and have each shown success as cathode materials in lithium batteries. Silver ion, Ag{sup +}, was initially selected as the displacement material as reduction of this center should result in increased conductivity as Ag{sup 0} metal particles are formed in-situ upon electrochemical reduction. The in-situ formation of metal nanoparticles upon electrochemical reduction has been previously noted, and more recently, we have investigated the resulting increase in conductivity. Layered materials as well as materials with tunnel or channel type structures were selected. Layered materials are of interest as they can provide 2-dimensional ion mobility. Tunnel or channel structures are also of interest as they provide a rigid framework that should remain stable over many discharge/charge cycles. We describe some examples of materials we have synthesized that demonstrate promising electrochemistry.

  5. Purification, substrate range, and metal center of AtzC: the N-isopropylammelide aminohydrolase involved in bacterial atrazine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shapir, Nir; Osborne, Jeffrey P; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2002-10-01

    N-Isopropylammelide isopropylaminohydrolase, AtzC, the third enzyme in the atrazine degradation pathway in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, catalyzes the stoichiometric hydrolysis of N-isopropylammelide to cyanuric acid and isopropylamine. The atzC gene was cloned downstream of the tac promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli, where the expressed enzyme comprised 36% of the soluble protein. AtzC was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and phenyl column chromatography. It has a subunit size of 44,938 kDa and a holoenzyme molecular weight of 174,000. The K(m) and k(cat) values for AtzC with N-isopropylammelide were 406 micro M and 13.3 s(-1), respectively. AtzC hydrolyzed other N-substituted amino dihydroxy-s-triazines, and those with linear N-alkyl groups had higher k(cat) values than those with branched alkyl groups. Native AtzC contained 0.50 eq of Zn per subunit. The activity of metal-depleted AtzC was restored with Zn(II), Fe(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) salts. Cobalt-substituted AtzC had a visible absorbance band at 540 nm (Delta epsilon = 84 M(-1) cm(-1)) and exhibited an axial electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal with the following effective values: g((x)) = 5.18, g((y)) = 3.93, and g((z)) = 2.24. Incubating cobalt-AtzC with the competitive inhibitor 5-azacytosine altered the effective EPR signal values to g((x)) = 5.11, g((y)) = 4.02, and g((z)) = 2.25 and increased the microwave power at half saturation at 10 K from 31 to 103 mW. Under the growth conditions examined, our data suggest that AtzC has a catalytically essential, five-coordinate Zn(II) metal center in the active site and specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of intermediates generated during the metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. PMID:12218024

  6. Purification, Substrate Range, and Metal Center of AtzC: the N-Isopropylammelide Aminohydrolase Involved in Bacterial Atrazine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shapir, Nir; Osborne, Jeffrey P.; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2002-01-01

    N-Isopropylammelide isopropylaminohydrolase, AtzC, the third enzyme in the atrazine degradation pathway in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, catalyzes the stoichiometric hydrolysis of N-isopropylammelide to cyanuric acid and isopropylamine. The atzC gene was cloned downstream of the tac promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli, where the expressed enzyme comprised 36% of the soluble protein. AtzC was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and phenyl column chromatography. It has a subunit size of 44,938 kDa and a holoenzyme molecular weight of 174,000. The Km and kcat values for AtzC with N-isopropylammelide were 406 μM and 13.3 s−1, respectively. AtzC hydrolyzed other N-substituted amino dihydroxy-s-triazines, and those with linear N-alkyl groups had higher kcat values than those with branched alkyl groups. Native AtzC contained 0.50 eq of Zn per subunit. The activity of metal-depleted AtzC was restored with Zn(II), Fe(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) salts. Cobalt-substituted AtzC had a visible absorbance band at 540 nm (Δɛ = 84 M−1 cm−1) and exhibited an axial electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal with the following effective values: g(x) = 5.18, g(y) = 3.93, and g(z) = 2.24. Incubating cobalt-AtzC with the competitive inhibitor 5-azacytosine altered the effective EPR signal values to g(x) = 5.11, g(y) = 4.02, and g(z) = 2.25 and increased the microwave power at half saturation at 10 K from 31 to 103 mW. Under the growth conditions examined, our data suggest that AtzC has a catalytically essential, five-coordinate Zn(II) metal center in the active site and specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of intermediates generated during the metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. PMID:12218024

  7. Novel oxygen chirality induced by asymmetric coordination of an ether oxygen atom to a metal center in a series of sugar-pendant dipicolylamine copperII complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikata, Yuji; Sugai, Yuko; Obata, Makoto; Harada, Masafumi; Yano, Shigenobu

    2006-02-20

    Six sugar-pendant 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA) ligands (L1-3 and L'1-3) have been prepared. OH-protected and unprotected D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-xylose were attached to a DPA moiety via an O-glycoside linkage. X-ray crystallography of the copper(II) complexes (1-5) with these ligands revealed that the anomeric oxygen atom is coordinated to the metal center in the solid state, generating a chiral center at the oxygen atom. The CD spectra of these copper complexes in methanol or aqueous solution exhibit Cotton effects in the d-d transition region, which indicates that the ether oxygen atoms remain coordinated to the metal center and the oxygen-atom chirality is preserved even in solution. For complexes 1 and 2, the inverted oxygen-atom chirality and chelate-ring conformation in the solid state are well correlated with the mirror-image CD spectra in methanol solution. The concomitant inversion of the asymmetric configuration around the copper center was also observed in a methanol solution of complex 3 and a pyridine solution of complex 2. The square-pyramidal/octahedral copper(II) centers also exhibited characteristic absorption and CD spectra.

  8. A semi-empirical analysis of ZFS parameters for transition metal (TM) ions (Cr3+ and Mn2+) centers in K2MgF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkgöz, Muhammed

    2016-11-01

    The local structure around the transition metal (TM) ions (Cr3+ and Mn2+) centers in K2MgF4, namely tetragonal (TE) center I, monoclinic (MO) center II and orthorhombic (OR) centers III, have been explored by semi-empirical calculations in the frame of superposition model (SPM). We proposed the most appropriate structural model for each center by matching the theoretically predicted zero-field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) with the experimental ones obtained by EPR spectroscopy. It is shown that the tetragonality of MgF6 octahedra increases with the substitution of both Cr3+ and Mn2+ for Mg2+ sites as well as with a rather higher value for the latter one. A tilt angle of 12.51° is found for MO Cr3+ center, which is comparatively small, as compared to the other A2BF4 crystals such as K2ZnF4 and Tl2ZnF4. Almost three times larger relaxation of intervening F-ligand than that of other equatorial F-ligands is also indicated for OR Cr3+ center.

  9. Transition-Metal-Free Cyclopropanation of 2-Aminoacrylates with N-Tosylhydrazones: A General Route to Cyclopropane α-Amino Acid with Contiguous Quaternary Carbon Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuanle; Li, Jiawei; Chen, Pengquan; Wu, Wanqing; Ren, Yanwei; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-03-18

    Cyclopropanation of 2-aminoacrylates with N-tosylhydrazones could proceed smoothly under transition-metal-free conditions via a [3 + 2] cycloaddition process. This robust protocol exhibits excellent generality, delivering a wide spectrum of cyclopropane α-amino acid esters bearing contiguous quaternary carbon centers in high yields and diastereoselectivities. With these readily available products, the steric convergence of cyclopropane α-amino acids could be readily obtained.

  10. Double aromaticity in transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8).

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Cheng, Longjiu; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-09-28

    It is well known that double-ring boron clusters have got the special double aromaticity with delocalized π orbitals in two directions (tangential and radial), which are potential ligands centered by a transition metal. In this article, the transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8) are theoretically investigated by density functional theory calculations. These endohedral compounds have also got double aromaticity in both tangential and radial directions. Interestingly, the tangential delocalized π orbitals of boron ligands following the Huckle's (4n + 2) rule do not interact with the central metal, while the radial π orbitals of boron ligands are bonded with the central mental to form spd-π endohedral bonding. The spd-π endohedral bonding follows the 18e-principle in Ni@B14 and Fe@B16. However, due to the flat shape of the compounds, 14e (Cr@B14) and 16e (Ni@B12) can also be electronically very stable where the energy levels of the spd-π orbitals delocalized in z-direction rise up. This intriguing bonding model makes sense in further study of the boron chemistry.

  11. Squeezing and Heating Rock to Scope Out How Metallic Iron Dribbled to the Center of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2005-07-01

    Formation of Earth's metallic core was one of the most important events in the history of the planet. Metallic iron is much denser than rock, so it sank to the middle, taking other elements that concentrate in metal rather than silicate (rock) with it. However, we do not understand everything about core formation. One particularly niggling puzzle is why cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) have the same concentration (relative to primitive carbonaceous chondrites) as one another in Earth's mantle. At low pressure these elements concentrate in metallic iron to different extents. Calculations show that if metal segregated from silicate at low pressure, nickel ought to be 100 times less abundant (normalized to chondrites) than cobalt, not equal. Cosmochemists have tackled this problem by doing experiments at high pressure and temperature to map out how cobalt and nickel partitioning between metal and silicate differs compared to low pressure. However, the studies differ in their predictions of the behavior because of differences in the assumed pressure, temperature, and oxidation state during core formation. Nancy Chabot (Case Western Reserve University, now at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory), and David Draper and Carl Agee from the University of New Mexico addressed the discrepancies by designing a series of experiments over a wide range in temperature. Their results plot out the conditions under which metal can sink to the core while leading to the observed cobalt and nickel concentrations in the mantle. While the results do not lead to a unique solution, they point the way for further studies of other elements that tend to concentrate in metallic iron, and they show clearly that the equal nickel and cobalt concentrations in the mantle can be the product of core formation in the early Earth.

  12. Investigation of electron relaxation in the metal proteins containing the single paramagnetic centers of integer spin by nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. A.; Yanvarev, Eugene A.; Bashkirov, Sh. S.; Kouznetsov, V. I.

    2001-11-01

    Nuclear forward scattering (NFS) of synchrotron radiation (SR) is being modeled in metal proteins containing the single paramagnetic centers of integer spin (Fe2+). It is known the spin fluctuations in the electron environment of Moessbauer ion Fe2+ will be manifested itself in NFS if a sample undergoes the influence of applied magnetic field of a few Tesla. Under the condition we are analyzing how the resonant response (RR) of a sample to SR pulse will be changed due to the both spin-lattice and spin-spin interactions.

  13. [CrF(O2 C(t) Bu)2 ]9 : Synthesis and Characterization of a Regular Homometallic Ring with an Odd Number of Metal Centers and Electrons.

    PubMed

    Woolfson, Robert J; Timco, Grigore A; Chiesa, Alessandro; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Inigo J; Tuna, Floriana; Guidi, Tatiana; Pavarini, Eva; Santini, Paolo; Carretta, Stefano; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-07-25

    The first regular homometallic ring containing an odd number of metal centers is reported. The ring was synthesized by means of amine-templated self-assembly. Extensive physical characterization studies, including magnetic measurements, powder inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and DFT calculations, show that the molecule has a near perfect match to the expected behavior for a frustrated system with the lowest energy pair of S=1/2 spin states separated by only 0.1 meV (0.8 cm(-1) ). PMID:27294807

  14. Broadband and high-efficiency metal-multilayer dielectric grating centered at 800 nm based on non-quarter wave coatings as reflective mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuhua; Kong, Weijin; Yun, Maojin; Zhang, Wenfei; You, Chenglong; Wang, Zhao; Pan, Guoqing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Xiaohong; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-01

    This article deals with designing broadband and high efficiency metal multi-layer dielectric grating (MMDG) used to compress and stretch ultra-short laser pulse. The diffraction characteristics of MMDG are analyzed with the method of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Taking the diffraction efficiency of the -1 order as the value of merit function, the parameters such as groove depth, residual thickness, duty cycle are optimized to obtain broadband and high diffraction efficiency. The optimized MMDG shows an ultra-broadband working spectrum with the average efficiency exceeding 97% over 135nm wavelength centered at 800nm and TE polarization. The optimized MMDG should be useful for chirped pulse amplification.

  15. High-temperature fatigue in metals - A brief review of life prediction methods developed at the Lewis Research Center of NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation focuses primarily on the progress we at NASA Lewis Research Center have made. The understanding of the phenomenological processes of high temperature fatigue of metals for the purpose of calculating lives of turbine engine hot section components is discussed. Improved understanding resulted in the development of accurate and physically correct life prediction methods such as Strain-Range partitioning for calculating creep fatigue interactions and the Double Linear Damage Rule for predicting potentially severe interactions between high and low cycle fatigue. Examples of other life prediction methods are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as A83-12159

  16. Structure of a Novel Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. TCM1: A Familiar Binuclear Metal Center Embedded in a Seven-Bladed β-Propeller Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Xiang, Dao Feng; Bigley, Andrew N; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-07-19

    A novel phosphotriesterase was recently discovered and purified from Sphingobium sp. TCM1 (Sb-PTE) and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of organophosphate esters with a catalytic efficiency that exceeds 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydrolysis of triphenyl phosphate. The enzyme was crystallized and the three-dimensional structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (Protein Data Bank entry 5HRM ). The enzyme adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller protein fold, and three disulfide bonds were identified between Cys-146 and Cys-242, Cys-411 and Cys-443, and Cys-542 and Cys-559. The active site of Sb-PTE contains a binuclear manganese center that is nearly identical to that of the structurally unrelated phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta (Pd-PTE). The two metal ions in the active site are bridged to one another by Glu-201 and a water molecule. The α-metal ion is further coordinated to the protein by interactions with His-389, His-475, and Glu-407, whereas the β-metal ion is further liganded to His-317 and His-258. Computational docking of mimics of the proposed pentavalent reaction intermediates for the hydrolysis of organophosphates was used to provide a model for the binding of chiral substrates in the active site of Sb-PTE. The most striking difference in the catalytic properties of Sb-PTE, relative to those of Pd-PTE, is the enhanced rate of hydrolysis of organophosphate esters with substantially weaker leaving groups. The structural basis for this difference in the catalytic properties between Sb-PTE and Pd-PTE, despite the nearly identical binuclear metal centers for the activation of the substrate and nucleophilic water molecule, is at present unclear. PMID:27353520

  17. Structure of a Novel Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. TCM1: A Familiar Binuclear Metal Center Embedded in a Seven-Bladed β-Propeller Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Mabanglo, Mark F; Xiang, Dao Feng; Bigley, Andrew N; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-07-19

    A novel phosphotriesterase was recently discovered and purified from Sphingobium sp. TCM1 (Sb-PTE) and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of organophosphate esters with a catalytic efficiency that exceeds 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydrolysis of triphenyl phosphate. The enzyme was crystallized and the three-dimensional structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (Protein Data Bank entry 5HRM ). The enzyme adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller protein fold, and three disulfide bonds were identified between Cys-146 and Cys-242, Cys-411 and Cys-443, and Cys-542 and Cys-559. The active site of Sb-PTE contains a binuclear manganese center that is nearly identical to that of the structurally unrelated phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta (Pd-PTE). The two metal ions in the active site are bridged to one another by Glu-201 and a water molecule. The α-metal ion is further coordinated to the protein by interactions with His-389, His-475, and Glu-407, whereas the β-metal ion is further liganded to His-317 and His-258. Computational docking of mimics of the proposed pentavalent reaction intermediates for the hydrolysis of organophosphates was used to provide a model for the binding of chiral substrates in the active site of Sb-PTE. The most striking difference in the catalytic properties of Sb-PTE, relative to those of Pd-PTE, is the enhanced rate of hydrolysis of organophosphate esters with substantially weaker leaving groups. The structural basis for this difference in the catalytic properties between Sb-PTE and Pd-PTE, despite the nearly identical binuclear metal centers for the activation of the substrate and nucleophilic water molecule, is at present unclear.

  18. Synthesis of marine polyacetylenes callyberynes A-C by transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions to sp centers.

    PubMed

    López, Susana; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Midón, Pilar; Castedo, Luis; Saa, Carlos

    2006-03-31

    Efficient total syntheses of the sponge-derived hydrocarbon polyacetylenes callyberynes A-C have been achieved using metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of highly unsaturated 1,3-diyne fragments as the key steps, namely: Cadiot-Chodkiewicz reaction under Alami's optimized conditions (sp-sp), sequential Sonogashira reaction of a cis,cis-divinyl dihalide (sp2-sp), and Kumada-Corriu reaction of an unactivated alkyl iodide (sp3-sp). This last approach constitutes the first application of a metal-catalyzed sp3-sp Kumada-Corriu cross-coupling reaction to the synthesis of a natural product.

  19. Analysis of the twin spacing and grain size effects on mechanical properties in hierarchically nanotwinned face-centered cubic metals based on a mechanism-based plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linli; Qu, Shaoxing; Guo, Xiang; Lu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical twin lamellae in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (fcc) metals possess a possibility to achieve higher strength with keeping an acceptable elongation. The present work is concerned with the analysis of twin spacing and grain size-dependent plastic performance in hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals using a generalized strain-gradient plasticity model. The dislocation density-based physical model for constitutive description of nanotwinned fcc metals is expanded for the hierarchical structures of nanotwins. The strengthening mechanism and the failure behavior in these hierarchical nanostructures are studied to evaluate the strength and ductility. Moreover, the transition twin spacing between the strengthening and softening is obtained in different order of twin lamellae. A dislocation-based model on nucleating deformation twins is presented to predict the critical twin spacing in the lowest twin lamellae for generating the subordinate twin lamellae. Our simulation results demonstrate that the existence of the hierarchical nanotwins gives rise to a significant enhancement in the strength, and the resulting global flow stresses are sensitive to the twin spacings of the hierarchical twin lamellae and the grain size. Two softening stages are observed with variation of twin spacing, and the relevant transition twin spacing depends on the microstructural size in hierarchically nanotwinned metals. We further find that the predicted failure strain decreases with decreasing the twin spacing, which is quite different from the case of the individually nanotwinned fcc metals. The critical twin spacing for generating subordinate twins also depends on the twin spacing of superordinate twin lamellae and the grain size. These findings suggest that the high yield strength and good ductility can be achieved by optimizing the grain size and the twin spacings in the hierarchical twins.

  20. Metal-Centered 17-Electron Radicals CpM(CO)3• (M = Cr, Mo, W): A Combined Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    van der Eide, Edwin F.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Deng, Shihu; Wen, Hui; Yang, Ping; Bullock, R. Morris; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-04-08

    Despite the importance of group VI metal-centered 17-electron radicals CpM(CO)3 (Cp = 5-C5H5, M = Cr, Mo, W) in establishing many of the fundamental reactions now known for metal-centered radicals, spectroscopic characterization of their electronic properties and structures has been very challenging due to their high reactivity. Here we report a gas-phase study of these species by means of photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of their corresponding 18-electron anions and theoretical electronic structure calculations. Three well-separated spectral features are observed by PES for each anionic species. Electron affinities (EAs) of CpM(CO)3 were experimentally measured from the threshold of each spectrum to be 2.38 ± 0.02 (M = Cr), 2.63 ± 0.02 (Mo), and 2.63 ± 0.01 eV for (W), well correlated with the reported redox potentials measured in solution. Theoretical calculations for all anionic and neutral (radical) species gave calculated EAs and band gaps that are in good agreement with the experimental data. Molecular orbital (MO) analyses for each anion indicate that the top three occupied MOs are mainly metal-based and contribute to the first spectral feature, whereas the next two MOs are largely from C5H5 moiety and contribute to the second spectral feature. The calculations further exhibit appreciable anion-to-neutral structural changes for all three species but with the change for the W species being the smallest, consistent with the W spectra being better resolved than the other two.

  1. Insights into the geometric and electronic structure of transition metal centers from valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Christopher J; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-11-17

    A long-standing goal of inorganic chemists is the ability to decipher the geometric and electronic structures of chemical species. This is particularly true for the study of small molecule and biological catalysts, where this knowledge is critical for understanding how these molecules effect chemical transformations. Numerous techniques are available for this task, and collectively they have enabled detailed understanding of many complex chemical systems. Despite this battery of probes, however, challenges still remain, particularly when the structural question involves subtle perturbations of the ligands bound to a metal center, as is often the case during chemical reactions. It is here that, as an emerging probe of chemical structure, valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) holds promise. VtC XES begins with ionization of a 1s electron from a metal ion by high energy X-ray photons. Electrons residing in ligand-localized valence orbitals decay to fill the 1s hole, emitting fluorescent photons in the process; in this manner, VtC XES primarily probes the filled, ligand-based orbitals of a metal complex. This is in contrast to other X-ray based techniques, such as K-edge X-ray absorption and EXAFS, which probe the unoccupied d-manifold orbitals and atomic scatterers surrounding the metal, respectively. As a hard X-ray technique, VtC XES experiments can be performed on a variety of sample states and environments, enabling application to demanding systems, such as high pressure cells and dilute biological samples. VtC XES thus can offer unique insights into the geometric and electronic structures of inorganic complexes. In recent years, we have sought to use VtC XES in the study of inorganic and bioinorganic complexes; doing so, however, first required a thorough and detailed understanding of the information content of these spectra. Extensive experimental surveys of model compounds coupled to the insights provided by DFT calculated spectra of real and

  2. Photoisomerization Mechanism of Ruthenium Sulfoxide Complexes: Role of the Metal-Centered Excited State in the Bond Rupture and Bond Construction Processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Zheng, Lvyin; Li, Xun; Fan, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    Phototriggered intramolecular isomerization in a series of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, [Ru(L)(tpy)(DMSO)](n+) (where tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide; L=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), n=2; N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) n=2; picolinate (pic), n=1; acetylacetonate (acac), n=1; oxalate (ox), n=0; malonate (mal), n=0), was investigated theoretically. It is observed that the metal-centered ligand field ((3) MC) state plays an important role in the excited state S→O isomerization of the coordinated DMSO ligand. If the population of (3) MCS state is thermally accessible and no (3) MCO can be populated from this state, photoisomerization will be turned off because the (3) MCS excited state is expected to lead to fast radiationless decay back to the original (1) GSS ground state or photodecomposition along the Ru(2+) -S stretching coordinate. On the contrary, if the population of (3) MCS (or (3) MCO ) state is inaccessible, photoinduced S→O isomerization can proceed adiabatically on the potential energy surface of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited states ((3) MLCTS →(3) MLCTO ). It is hoped that these results can provide valuable information for the excited state isomerization in photochromic d(6) transition-metal complexes, which is both experimentally and intellectually challenging as a field of study. PMID:27553700

  3. Photoisomerization Mechanism of Ruthenium Sulfoxide Complexes: Role of the Metal-Centered Excited State in the Bond Rupture and Bond Construction Processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Zheng, Lvyin; Li, Xun; Fan, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    Phototriggered intramolecular isomerization in a series of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, [Ru(L)(tpy)(DMSO)](n+) (where tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide; L=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), n=2; N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) n=2; picolinate (pic), n=1; acetylacetonate (acac), n=1; oxalate (ox), n=0; malonate (mal), n=0), was investigated theoretically. It is observed that the metal-centered ligand field ((3) MC) state plays an important role in the excited state S→O isomerization of the coordinated DMSO ligand. If the population of (3) MCS state is thermally accessible and no (3) MCO can be populated from this state, photoisomerization will be turned off because the (3) MCS excited state is expected to lead to fast radiationless decay back to the original (1) GSS ground state or photodecomposition along the Ru(2+) -S stretching coordinate. On the contrary, if the population of (3) MCS (or (3) MCO ) state is inaccessible, photoinduced S→O isomerization can proceed adiabatically on the potential energy surface of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited states ((3) MLCTS →(3) MLCTO ). It is hoped that these results can provide valuable information for the excited state isomerization in photochromic d(6) transition-metal complexes, which is both experimentally and intellectually challenging as a field of study.

  4. Metal-Ion Effects on the Polarization of Metal-Bound Water and Infrared Vibrational Modes of the Coordinated Metal Center of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase via Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrazinamidase (PZAse) is a key enzyme to activate the pro-drug pyrazinamide (PZA). PZAse is a metalloenzyme that coordinates in vitro different divalent metal cofactors in the metal coordination site (MCS). Several metals including Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ are able to reactivate the metal-depleted PZAse in vitro. We use quantum mechanical calculations to investigate the Zn2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ metal cofactor effects on the local MCS structure, metal–ligand or metal–residue binding energy, and charge distribution. Results suggest that the major metal-dependent changes occur in the metal–ligand binding energy and charge distribution. Zn2+ shows the highest binding energy to the ligands (residues). In addition, Zn2+ and Mn2+ within the PZAse MCS highly polarize the O–H bond of coordinated water molecules in comparison with Fe2+. This suggests that the coordination of Zn2+ or Mn2+ to the PZAse protein facilitates the deprotonation of coordinated water to generate a nucleophile for catalysis as in carboxypeptidase A. Because metal ion binding is relevant to enzymatic reaction, identification of the metal binding event is important. The infrared vibrational mode shift of the C=Nε (His) bond from the M. tuberculosis MCS is the best IR probe to metal complexation. PMID:25055049

  5. Simulation of changes in heavy metal contamination in farmland soils of a typical manufacturing center through logistic-based cellular automata modeling.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Menglong; Wang, Qi; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A customized logistic-based cellular automata (CA) model was developed to simulate changes in heavy metal contamination (HMC) in farmland soils of Dongguan, a manufacturing center in Southern China, and to discover the relationship between HMC and related explanatory variables (continuous and categorical). The model was calibrated through the simulation and validation of HMC in 2012. Thereafter, the model was implemented for the scenario simulation of development alternatives for HMC in 2022. The HMC in 2002 and 2012 was determined through soil tests and cokriging. Continuous variables were divided into two groups by odds ratios. Positive variables (odds ratios >1) included the Nemerow synthetic pollution index in 2002, linear drainage density, distance from the city center, distance from the railway, slope, and secondary industrial output per unit of land. Negative variables (odds ratios <1) included elevation, distance from the road, distance from the key polluting enterprises, distance from the town center, soil pH, and distance from bodies of water. Categorical variables, including soil type, parent material type, organic content grade, and land use type, also significantly influenced HMC according to Wald statistics. The relative operating characteristic and kappa coefficients were 0.91 and 0.64, respectively, which proved the validity and accuracy of the model. The scenario simulation shows that the government should not only implement stricter environmental regulation but also strengthen the remediation of the current polluted area to effectively mitigate HMC.

  6. Mössbauer characterization of the Fe-S center in the catalytic metal binding site of alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C.; Dietrich, H.; Maret, W.; Zeppezauer, M.; Montiel-Montoya, R.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1986-02-01

    Iron in its divalent and trivalent form can be substituted in the catalytic zinc site of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver (HLADH). Fe-HLADH in either oxidation state does not show enzymatic activity in the oxidation of ethanol. Nevertheless, Mössbauer studies of this material are of considerable interest, because they elucidate the effect of pH and coenzyme-induced conformational changes of the protein on the metal ion. It is of importance to note that zinc itself due to the lack of suitable chromophoric and magnetic properties does not provide any comparable information.

  7. Influence of the solvent and metal center on supramolecular chirality induction with bisporphyrin tweezer receptors. Strong metal modulation of effective molarity values.

    PubMed

    Pintre, Inmaculada C; Pierrefixe, Simon; Hamilton, Alex; Valderrey, Virginia; Bo, Carles; Ballester, Pablo

    2012-04-16

    We describe the synthesis of a bisporphyrin tweezer receptor 1·H(4) and its metalation with Zn(II) and Rh(III) cations. We report the thermodynamic characterization of the supramolecular chirality induction process that takes place when the metalated bisporphyrin receptors coordinate to enantiopure 1,2-diaminocyclohexane in two different solvents, toluene and dichloromethane. We also performed a thorough study of several simpler systems that were used as models for the thermodynamic characterization of the more complex bisporphyrin systems. The initial complexation of the chiral diamine with the bisporphyrins produces a 1:1 sandwich complex that opens up to yield a simple 1:2 complex in the presence of excess diamine. The CD spectra associated with the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of both metalloporphyrins, 1·Zn(2) and 1·Rh(2), display bisignate Cotton effects when the chirogenesis process is studied in toluene solutions. On the contrary, in dichloromethane solutions, only 1·Zn(2) yields CD-active 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, while the 1:2 complex of 1·Rh(2) is CD-silent. In both solvents, porphyrin 1·Zn(2) features a stoichiometrically controlled chirality inversion process, which is the sign of the Cotton effect of the 1:1 complex is opposite to that of the 1:2 complex. In contrast, porphyrin 1·Rh(2) affords 1:1 and 1:2 complexes in toluene solutions with the same sign for their CD couplets. Interestingly, in both solvents, the signs of the CD couplets associated with the 1:1 sandwich complexes of 1·Zn(2) and 1·Rh(2) are opposite. The amplitudes of the CD couplets are higher for 1·Zn(2) than for 1·Rh(2). This observation is in agreement with 1·Rh(2) having a smaller extinction coefficient than 1·Zn(2). We performed DFT-based calculations and assigned molecular structures to the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes that explain the observed signs for their CD couplets. Unexpectedly, the quantification of the thermodynamic stability of the two metallobisporphyrin/diamine 1

  8. 3d-4f Metal-Organic Framework with Dual Luminescent Centers That Efficiently Discriminates the Isomer and Homologues of Small Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Xing, Shanghua; Wang, Xiuru; Yang, Yulin; Ma, Dingxuan; Liang, Hongwei; Gao, Lu; Hua, Jia; Li, Guanghua; Shi, Zhan; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-02-01

    A 3d-4f luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF), [Tb2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (4), and three analogues {[La2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(C4H8O2)2(H2O)2]·3C4H8O2·2H2O (1), [Ce2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (2), and [Eu2(Cu8I8)(C12H8NO2)6(H2O)4]·5C4H8O2 (3)}, were self-assembled from copper(I) halide clusters and lanthanide metal ions with an organic linker [3-(pyridin-4-yl)benzoic acid] under solvothermal conditions. Compound 4 with high quantum yield (Φ = 68%) exhibits reversible luminescence behavior, accompanying the removal and recovery of guest molecules (1,4-dioxane). Because of the unique porous structure and dual luminescent centers of compound 4, it can efficiently differentiate benzene series with different sizes and provide readouts in corresponding optical signals. Furthermore, it also can unambiguously discriminate the isomers, homologues, and other small molecules with similar structural motifs from one another. The luminescent color of the MOF sensor in different guest solvents has obvious changes that can be clearly distinguished by the naked eye. This multicolor luminescence originates from emissions of the dual luminescent centers, and the emissions have shifted, enhanced, weakened, or quenched to different degrees.

  9. Ames Research Center cryogenic mirror testing program - A comparison of the cryogenic performance of metal and glass mirrors with different types of mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jacob H.; Melugin, Ramsey K.; Augason, Gordon C.; Howard, Steven D.; Pryor, G. Mark

    1989-01-01

    A summary of the cryogenic testing of glass and metal mirrors performed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and two other places is presented. Recent improvements to the ARC Cryogenic Optics Test Facility are described. The purposes of the tests were to determine: (1) how glass mirrors would perform at cryogenic temperatures compared with metal mirrors and (2) how various mirror mounts would affect the cryogenic performance of mirrors. Details of a cryogenic test of a 50 cm 'double arch', fused-silica mirror with a three-point mount and with a radially-compliant, flexured mount are given. Within the accuracy of the measurements, it was determined that the flexured mount did not induce appreciable distortion in the double arch mirror. Results of the cryogenic tests of a number of glass mirrors and two beryllium mirrors are included. The cryogenic distortion of the glass mirrors was found to be less than that for the beryllium mirrors. Within the accuracy of the measurements, no hysteresis was found in the glass mirrors. It was possible to measure hysteresis in one of the beryllium mirrors.

  10. Three-dimensional nonlinear optical chromophores based on metal-to-ligand charge-transfer from ruthenium(II) or iron(II) centers.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Harris, James A; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús

    2005-09-28

    In this article, we describe a series of new complex salts in which electron-rich transition-metal centers are coordinated to three electron-accepting N-methyl/aryl-2,2':4,4' ':4',4' ''-quaterpyridinium ligands. These complexes contain either Ru(II) or Fe(II) ions and have been characterized by using various techniques, including electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Molecular quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) responses beta have been determined by using hyper-Rayleigh scattering at 800 nm and also via Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopic studies on the intense, visible d --> pi* metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands. The latter experiments reveal that these putatively octupolar D(3) chromophores exhibit two substantial components of the beta tensor which are associated with transitions to dipolar excited states. Computations involving time-dependent density-functional theory and the finite field method serve to further illuminate the electronic structures and associated linear and NLO properties of the new chromophoric salts. PMID:16173774

  11. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  12. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  13. Dimethylaminoborane (H2BNMe2) coordination to late transition metal centers: snapshots of the B-H oxidative addition process.

    PubMed

    Bénac-Lestrille, Gaëtan; Helmstedt, Ulrike; Vendier, Laure; Alcaraz, Gilles; Clot, Eric; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane

    2011-11-01

    The reaction of cyclodiborazane [Me(2)N-BH(2)](2) with the chloro(dihydrogen) ruthenium complex RuHCl(η(2)-H(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) led to the formation of the unsymmetricaly coordinated dimethylaminoborane complex RuHCl(H(2)BNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2). The dimethylaminoborane coordination (H(2)BNMe(2)) to the ruthenium center in 2 was carefully studied by combining X-ray, multinuclear NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) techniques, and compared with the recently reported osmium analogue which was originally formulated as a σ-B-H borinium complex [OsH(2)Cl(HBNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2)] (4). All our data are in favor of a bis(σ-B-H) coordination mode at a very activated stage in the case of the ruthenium complex 2, whereas in the osmium complex 4, full oxidative addition is favored leading to a complex better formulated as an osmium(IV) boryl species with an α-agostic B-H interaction. The synthesis and characterization of the symmetrical dihydride complex RuH(2)(H(2)BNMe(2))(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3) from addition of the lithium dimethylaminoborohydride to 1 is reported for comparison. PMID:21954867

  14. Molecular Catalysis of the Electrochemical and Photochemical Reduction of CO2 with Earth-Abundant Metal Complexes. Selective Production of CO vs HCOOH by Switching of the Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingjing; Guo, Zhenguo; Wei, Xi-Guang; Gallenkamp, Charlotte; Bonin, Julien; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu; Robert, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Molecular catalysis of carbon dioxide reduction using earth-abundant metal complexes as catalysts is a key challenge related to the production of useful products--the "solar fuels"--in which solar energy would be stored. A direct approach using sunlight energy as well as an indirect approach where sunlight is first converted into electricity could be used. A Co(II) complex and a Fe(III) complex, both bearing the same pentadentate N5 ligand (2,13-dimethyl-3,6,9,12,18-pentaazabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),2,12,14,16-pentaene), were synthesized, and their catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction was investigated. Carbon monoxide was formed with the cobalt complex, while formic acid was obtained with the iron-based catalyst, thus showing that the catalysis product can be switched by changing the metal center. Selective CO2 reduction occurs under electrochemical conditions as well as photochemical conditions when using a photosensitizer under visible light excitation (λ > 460 nm, solvent acetonitrile) with the Co catalyst. In the case of the Fe catalyst, selective HCOOH production occurs at low overpotential. Sustained catalytic activity over long periods of time and high turnover numbers were observed in both cases. A catalytic mechanism is suggested on the basis of experimental results and preliminary quantum chemistry calculations.

  15. Evaluation of sediment trace metal records as paleoproductivity and paleoxygenation proxies in the upwelling center off Concepción, Chile (36°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Praxedes; Dezileau, Laurent; Lange, Carina; Cardenas, Lissette; Sellanes, Javier; Salamanca, Marco A.; Maldonado, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the records of several trace metals sensitive to redox conditions in continental shelf sediments off Concepción, Chile (36°S). The continental margin off Concepción (36°S; 73°W) lies beneath an important upwelling center characterized by high primary production rates and, consequently, high fluxes of organic matter. In spring and summer, this material settles to the seafloor where it decays, producing periods of very low oxygen content in bottom waters (<1 mL L -1). In addition, an oxygen minimum zone develops at ∼100-400 m water depth, where dissolved oxygen levels are <0.5 mL L -1. This situation changes during strong El Niño events, when dissolved oxygen at the bottom increases drastically (>1 mL L -1). The goals of this study were to determine the input of trace metals to the sediment and to decipher how this information can be used to reveal variations in primary productivity or bottom oxygenation. Gravity cores collected at two stations - VG06-2 over the mid-shelf station (88 m water depth, upper boundary of the oxygen minimum zone) and VG06-3 over the outer shelf (120 m water depth, within the oxygen minimum zone) - were sampled for high resolution profiles (1 cm) of trace metals, biogenic opal, stable isotopes, and total organic carbon. The results suggest that the variability in the trace metal distribution on the continental shelf off Concepción is determined by redox conditions and the organic carbon flux to the bottom. Some sections of the sediment cores from the outer shelf showed appreciable authigenic enrichment of U, Cd, and Mo (EF: 5-10, 2-5, and 10-16 respectively) along with heavier values of δ 15N, suggesting periods of suboxic conditions. During these periods, fluxes of organic material to the bottom were higher, as indicated by elevated TOC and opal contents. Alternating periods of higher and lower trace metal contents were not observed mid-shelf as they were on the outer shelf. Rather, the mid-shelf samples

  16. Determination of magnetic and structural properties in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled metal centers using NMR methods. Magneto-structural correlations in anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G.C.; Haw, J.F.

    1988-10-19

    A new approach to the investigation of magneto-structural correlations in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled transition-metal centers is described that illustrates the potential of NMR spectroscopy in such work. The results of a variable-temperature (VT) /sup 13/C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR investigation of anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate, (Cu(C/sub 3/H/sub 7/COO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/ are reported. Isotropic shifts are found to be primarily contact in origin, and a statistical analysis of their temperature dependence allows the calculation of singlet-triplet energy level separations (-2J), diamagnetic shifts (delta/sub dia/), and electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling constants (A), which are shown to give insight into the mechanisms of electron delocalization along the superexchange pathway. Signal multiplicity can be related to compound structure, which was determined by using x-ray crystallography. The title compound is triclinic and has a space group of P/anti 1/ with a = 9.035 (2) /angstrom/, b = 5.192 (2) /angstrom/, c = 11.695 (3) /angstrom/, ..cap alpha.. = 85.88 (2)/degrees/, ..gamma.. = 109.32 (2)/degrees/, Z = 1, and V = 515.2 (3) /angstrom//sup 3/; the final weighted R value for 2169 reflections was 0.048. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Hydrolysis mechanisms of BNPP mediated by facial copper(II) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants: cooperation between the metal centers and the guanidine pendants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Liu, Xueping; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2016-01-28

    The hydrolysis mechanisms of DNA dinucleotide analogue BNPP(-) (bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed by mononuclear/dinuclear facial copper(ii) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Active catalyst forms have been investigated and four different reaction modes are proposed accordingly. The [Cu2(L(1))2(μ-OH)](3+) (L(1) is 1-(2-guanidinoethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) complex features a strong μ-hydroxo mediated antiferromagnetic coupling between the bimetallic centers and the corresponding more stable open-shell singlet state. Three different reaction modes involving two catalysts and a substrate were proposed for L(1) entries and the mode 1 in which an inter-complex nucleophilic attack by a metal bound hydroxide was found to be more favorable. In the L(3)-involved reactions (L(3) is 1-(4-guanidinobutyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), the reaction mode in which an in-plane intracomplex scissoring-like nucleophilic attack by a Cu(ii)-bound hydroxide was found to be more competitive. The protonated guanidine pendants in each proposed mechanism were found to play crucial roles in stabilizing the reaction structures via hydrogen bonds and in facilitating the departure of the leaving group via electrostatic attraction. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental observations that the Cu(ii)-L(3) complexes are hydrolytically more favorable than their L(1)-involved counterparts. PMID:26688285

  18. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  19. Transition-Metal-Centered Nine-Membered Boron Rings: M©B 9 and M©B 9 (M = Rh, Ir)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Galeev, Timur R.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-01-11

    We report the observation of two transition-metal-centered nine-atom boron rings, Rh©B9 - and Ir©B9-. These two doped-boron clusters are produced in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam and characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Large HOMO-LUMO gaps are observed in the anion photoelectron spectra, suggesting that neutral Rh©B9 and Ir©B9 are highly stable, closed shell species. Theoretical calculations show that Rh©B9 and Ir©B9 are of D9h symmetry. Chemical bonding analyses reveal that these complexes are doubly aromatic, each with six completely delocalized π and σ electrons, which describe the bonding between the central metal atom and the boron ring. This work establishes firmly the metal-doped B rings as a new class of novel aromatic molecular wheels.

  20. Metal-mediated controllable creation of secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers: a powerful strategy for the synthesis of iron, cobalt, and copper complexes with in situ generated substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Lei; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Yonglu; Hu, Hailiang; Chen, Wenqian; Liu, Wei; Li, Yahong; Lei, Tao; Cao, Yanyuan; Kang, Zhenghui; Lin, Miaoshui; Li, Wu

    2012-09-17

    An efficient strategy for the synthesis of a wide variety of coordination complexes has been developed. The synthetic protocol involves a solvothermal in situ metal-ligand reaction of picolinaldehyde, ammonium acetate, and transition-metal ions, leading to the generation of 12 coordination complexes supported by a novel class of substituted 1-pyridineimidazo[1,5-a]pyridine ligands (L1-L5). The ligands L1-L5 were afforded by metal-mediated controllable conversion of the aldehyde group of picolialdehyde into a ketone and secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbon centers, respectively. Complexes of various nuclearities were obtained: from mono-, di-, and tetranuclear to 1D chain polymers. The structures of the in situ formed complexes could be controlled rationally via the choice of appropriate starting materials and tuning of the ratio of the starting materials. The plausible mechanisms for the formation of the ligands L1-L5 were proposed.

  1. VVV SURVEY NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN BULGE RR LYRAE STARS: THE DISTANCE TO THE GALACTIC CENTER AND ABSENCE OF A BARRED DISTRIBUTION OF THE METAL-POOR POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dékány, I.; Minniti, D.; Catelan, M.; Zoccali, M.; Hempel, M.; Saito, R. K.

    2013-10-20

    We have combined optical and near-infrared data of known RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in the bulge in order to study the spatial distribution of its metal-poor component by measuring precise reddening values and distances of 7663 fundamental-mode RRL stars with high-quality photometry. We obtain a distance to the Galactic center of R {sub 0} = 8.33 ± 0.05 ± 0.14 kpc. We find that the spatial distribution of the RRL stars differs from the structures traced by the predominantly metal-rich red clump (RC) stars. Unlike the RC stars, the RRL stars do not trace a strong bar, but have a more spheroidal, centrally concentrated distribution, showing only a slight elongation in its very center. We find a hint of bimodality in the density distribution at high southern latitudes (b < –5°), which needs to be confirmed by extending the areal coverage of the current census. The different spatial distributions of the metal-rich and metal-poor stellar populations suggest that the Milky Way has a composite bulge.

  2. Temperature-dependent transitions between normal and inverse isotope effects pertaining to the interaction of H-H and C-H bonds with transition metal centers.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Gerard

    2009-02-17

    Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) serve as versatile tools to infer details about reaction mechanisms and the nature of transition states, while equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) associated with the site preferences of hydrogen and deuterium enable researchers to study aspects of molecular structure. Researchers typically interpret primary deuterium isotope effects based on two simple guidelines: (i) the KIE for an elementary reaction is normal (k(H)/k(D) > 1) and (ii) the EIE is dictated by deuterium preferring to be located in the site corresponding to the highest frequency oscillator. In this Account, we evaluate the applicability of these rules to the interactions of H-H and C-H bonds with a transition metal center. Significantly, experimental and computational studies question the predictability of primary EIEs in these systems based on the notion that deuterium prefers to occupy the highest frequency oscillator. In particular, the EIEs for (i) formation of sigma-complexes by coordination of H-H and C-H bonds and (ii) oxidative addition of dihydrogen exhibit unusual temperature dependencies, such that the same system may demonstrate both normal (i.e., K(H)/K(D) > 1) and inverse (i.e., K(H)/K(D) < 1) values. The transition between a normal and inverse EIE indicates that these systems do not demonstrate the typical monotonic variation predicted by the van't Hoff relationship. Instead, the calculated EIEs in these systems are 0 at 0 K, increase to a value greater than 1, and then decrease to unity at infinite temperature. This unusual behavior may be rationalized by considering the individual factors that contribute to the EIE. Specifically, the EIE may be expressed in the form EIE = SYM x MMI x EXC x ZPE (where SYM is the symmetry factor, MMI is the mass-moment of inertia term, EXC is the excitation term, and ZPE is the zero-point energy term), and the distinctive temperature profile results from the inverse ZPE (enthalpy) and normal [SYM x MMI x EXC

  3. Electronic Structure of the Metal Center in the Cd[superscript 2+], Zn[superscript 2+], and Cu[superscript 2+] Substituted Forms of KDO8P Synthase: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kona, Fathima; Tao, Peng; Martin, Philip; Xu, Xingjue; Gatti, Domenico L.

    2009-07-31

    Aquifex aeolicus 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthase (KDO8PS) is active with a variety of different divalent metal ions bound in the active site. The Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes display similar values of k{sub cat} and similar dependence of K{sub m}{sup PEP} and K{sub m}{sup A5P} on both substrate and product concentrations. However, the flux-control coefficients for some of the catalytically relevant reaction steps are different in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, suggesting that the type of metal bound in the active site affects the behavior of the enzyme in vivo. The type of metal also affects the rate of product release in the crystal environment. For example, the crystal structure of the Cu{sup 2+} enzyme incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) shows the formed product, 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDO8P), still bound in the active site in its linear conformation. This observation completes our structural studies of the condensation reaction, which altogether have provided high-resolution structures for the reactants, the intermediate, and the product bound forms of KDO8PS. The crystal structures of the Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} substituted enzymes show four residues (Cys-11, His-185, Glu-222, and Asp-233) and a water molecule as possible metal ligands. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimizations reveal that the metal centers have a delocalized electronic structure, and that their true geometry is square pyramidal for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} and distorted octahedral or distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}. These geometries are different from those obtained by QM optimization in the gas phase (tetrahedral for Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}, distorted tetrahedral for Cu{sup 2+}) and may represent conformations of the metal center that minimize the reorganization energy between the substrate-bound and product-bound states

  4. Supramolecular isomerism, framework flexibility, unsaturated metal center, and porous property of Ag(I)/Cu(I) 3,3',5,5'-tetrametyl-4,4'-bipyrazolate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie-Peng; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2008-01-23

    Template-controlled reactions of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole (H2bpz) with [Ag(NH3)2]+ or [Cu(NH3)2]+ give binary metal bipyrazolates [M2(bpz)] (M = Ag, Cu) as two supramolecular isomers (1 and 2). Isomer 1 possesses four-fold interpenetrated (10,3)-a coordination networks, two-fold interpenetrated (10,3)-a channel networks, and guest-accessible coordinatively unsaturated metal clusters. Isomer 2 possesses eight-fold interpenetrated (6(2) x 10)(6 x 10(2)) coordination networks and isolated, small pores. These metal bipyrazolates are chemically stable and thermally stable up to 300-500 degrees C. Their exceptional framework flexibilities have been demonstrated by adsorption measurements and single-crystal diffraction analyses. The guest-accessible Ag(I)/Cu(I) UMC clusters have also been demonstrated to facilitate the accommodation of unsaturated hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, mesitylene, and acetylene via weak metal...pi interactions.

  5. Self-assembly of 1D mixed-metal tubular network with coordination bonds through the interconnection of organometallic metallamacrocycles by Ag(I) centers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Lin, Yue-Jian; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2011-05-21

    The combination of a ditopic ligand containing a functional "third site" as a bridge and organometallic half-sandwich iridium unit Cp*Ir as the corner leads to the formation of the tetranuclear metallamacrocycle 1, which is reacted with silver compound, resulting in the formation of mixed-metal infinitely tubular coordination network 2.

  6. Assemblies of a new flexible multicarboxylate ligand and d10 metal centers toward the construction of homochiral helical coordination polymers: structures, luminescence, and NLO-active properties.

    PubMed

    Zang, Shuangquan; Su, Yang; Li, Yizhi; Ni, Zhaoping; Meng, Qingjin

    2006-01-01

    Hydro(solvo)thermal reactions between a new flexible multicarboxylate ligand of 2,2',3,3'-oxydiphthalic acid (2,2',3,3'-H(4)ODPA) and M(NO(3))(2).xH(2)O (M = Zn, x = 6; M = Cd, x = 4) in the presence of 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) afford two novel homochiral helical coordination polymers [[Zn(2)(2,2',3,3'-ODPA)(bpy)(H(2)O)(3)].(H(2)O)(2) for 1 and [Cd(2)(2,2',3,3'-ODPA)(bpy)(H(2)O)(3)].(H(2)O)(2) for 2]. Though having almost the same chemical formula, they have different space groups (P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1 and P2(1) for 2) and different bridging modes of the 2,2',3,3'-ODPA ligand. Two kinds of homochiral helices (right-handed) are found in both 1 and 2, each of which discriminates only one kind of crystallographical nonequivalent metal atom. 1 has a 2D metal-organic framework and can be seen as the unity of two parallel homochiral Zn1 and Zn2 helices, in which the nodes are etheric oxygen atoms. In contrast, 2 has a 3D metal-organic framework and consists of two partially overlapped homochiral Cd1 and Cd2 helices in the two dimensions. Moreover, metal-ODPA helices give a 2D chiral herringbone structural motif in both 1 and 2 in the two dimensions, which are further strengthened by the second ligand of bpy. Bulk materials for 1 and 2 all have good second-harmonic generation activity, approximately 1 and 0.8 times that of urea.

  7. METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) and the Value of Collaborative Field-centered Experiences in the Geosciences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) is a field-based, geoscience diversity program developed by a collaborative venture among San Francisco State University, the University of Texas at El Paso, the University of New Orleans, and Purdue University. Since 2010, this program has created meaningful geoscience experiences for underrepresented minorities by engaging 30 high school students in experiential learning opportunities each year. During METALS field trips, the primarily urban students observe natural landforms, measure water quality, conduct beach profiles, and interpret stratigraphic and structural features in locations that have included southern Utah, southern Louisiana, central Wyoming, and northern California. In these geological settings participants are also able to focus on societally relevant, community-related issues. Results from program evaluation suggest that student participants view METALS as: (1) opening up new opportunities for field-based science not normally available to them, (2) engaging in a valuable science-based field experience, (3) an inspirational, but often physically challenging, undertaking that combines high-interest geology content with an exciting outdoor adventure, and (4) a unique social experience that brings together people from various parts of the United States. Further evaluation findings from the four summer trips completed thus far demonstrate that active learning opportunities through direct interaction with the environment is an effective way to engage students in geoscience-related learning. Students also seem to benefit from teaching strategies that include thoughtful reflection, journaling, and teamwork, and mentors are positive about engaging with these approaches. Participants appear motivated to explore geoscience topics further and often discuss having new insights and new perspectives leading to career choices in geosciences. Additionally, students who had a prior and

  8. Asymmetric Desymmetrization via Metal-Free C-F Bond Activation: Synthesis of 3,5-Diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones with Quaternary Carbon Centers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junki; Suzuki, Satoru; Tokunaga, Etsuko; Haufe, Günter; Shibata, Norio

    2016-08-01

    We disclose the first asymmetric activation of a non-activated aliphatic C-F bond in which a conceptually new desymmetrization of 1,3-difluorides by silicon-induced selective C-F bond scission is a key step. The combination of a cinchona alkaloid based chiral ammonium bifluoride catalyst and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetoamide (BSA) as the silicon reagent enabled the efficient catalytic cycle of asymmetric Csp3 -F bond cleavage under mild conditions with high enantioselectivities. The ortho effect of the aryl group at the prostereogenic center is remarkable. This concept was applied for the asymmetric synthesis of promising agrochemical compounds, 3,5-diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones bearing a quaternary carbon center.

  9. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  10. Y-Shaped Bilateral Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction: Data from a Referral Center for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Di Mitri, R.; Mocciaro, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Malignant hilar strictures are a clinical challenge because of the current therapeutic approach and the poor prognosis. In recent years, self-expandable metallic stents have proven more effective than plastic stents for palliation of malignant hilar strictures, with the bilateral stent-in-stent technique registering a high success rate. We report our experience with Y-shaped endoscopic self-expandable metallic stents placement for treatment of advanced malignant hilar strictures. Methods. From April 2009 to August 2012, we prospectively collected data on patients treated with Y-shaped SEMS placement for advanced malignant hilar carcinoma. Data on technical success, clinical success, and complications were collected. Results. Twenty patients (9 males) were treated (mean age 64.2 ± 15.3 years). The grade of malignant hilar strictures according to the Bismuth classification was II in 5 patients (25%), IIIa in 1 (5%), and IV in 14 (70%). The mean bilirubin level was 14.7 ± 4.9 mg/dL. Technical success was achieved in all patients, with a significant reduction in bilirubin levels (2.9 ± 1.7 mg/dL). One patient experienced cholangitis as early complication, while in 2 patients stent ingrowth was observed. No stents migration was recorded. There was no procedure-related mortality. At the end of the follow-up (7.1 ± 3.1 months), 13 of the 20 patients (65%) had died. Conclusions. Our experience confirms endoscopic bilateral self-expandable metallic stents placement with stent-in-stent technique (Y-shaped configuration) as a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar strictures. PMID:24790548

  11. Orange Zinc Germanate with Metallic Ge-Ge Bonds as a Chromophore-Like Center for Visible-Light-Driven Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ling; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Wu, Long; Wang, Hai Feng; Chen, Ai Ping; Hu, P; Zheng, Li Rong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-09-21

    The efficiency of solar-energy-conversion devices depends on the absorption region and intensity of the photon collectors. Organic chromophores, which have been widely stabilized on inorganic semiconductors for light trapping, are limited by the interface between the chromophore and semiconductor. Herein we report a novel orange zinc germanate (Zn-Ge-O) with a chromophore-like structure, by which the absorption region can be dramatically expanded. Structural characterizations and theoretical calculations together reveal that the origin of visible-light response can be attributed to the unusual metallic Ge-Ge bonds which act in a similar way to organic chromophores. Benefiting from the enhanced light harvest, the orange Zn-Ge-O demonstrates superior capacity for solar-driven hydrogen production.

  12. Computer centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Science Foundation has renewed grants to four of its five supercomputer centers. Average annual funding will rise from $10 million to $14 million so facilities can be upgraded and training and education expanded. As cooperative projects, the centers also receive money from states, universities, computer vendors and industry. The centers support research in fluid dynamics, atmospheric modeling, engineering geophysics and many other scientific disciplines.

  13. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way.

  14. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  15. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  16. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  17. Intramolecular coupling of eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl groups at group 4 metal centers: a kinetic study of the carbon-carbon double-bond-forming reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, L.D.; McMullen, A.K.; Rothwell, I.P.

    1988-03-02

    The series of bis(eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl) compounds of general formula M(OAr)/sub 2/(eta/sup 2/-R'NCR)/sub 2/ (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; OAr = 2,6-diisopropyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide; R = CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Ph; R' = various substituted phenyls) undergo intramolecular coupling on thermolysis to produce the corresponding enediamide derivatives M(OAr)/sub 2/(R'NC(R) = C(R)NR'). A kinetic study of the reaction in hydrocarbon solvents has shown it to be first order. The reaction is metal dependent with the rate decreasing in the order Ti > Zr > Hf. The rate of the reaction is also dependent on the steric and electronic nature of the nitrogen substituent (R'). The use of the bulky aryl group 2,6-dimethylphenyl retards the reaction, while the use of various 3- and 4-substituted phenyls (3-F, 3-OMe, 4-OMe, 4-Cl, 4-NMe/sub 2/) shows the reaction to be accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents. A sigma plot based on kinetic data obtained at 67/sup 0/C and 77/sup 0/C yielded rho values of 0.83 (R = 0.97) and 0.84 (R = 0.95), respectively. Both the steric and electronic dependence of the reactivity on the nitrogen substituents is discussed mechanistically and used to rationalize the much more facile intramolecular coupling observed for the related eta/sup 2/-acyl (eta/sup 2/-OCR) functionalities.

  18. Endoscopic treatment of large pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) using self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) – a two-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Dalton Marques; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Carneiro, Fred; Medrado, Bruno; dos Santos, Marcos; Wodak, Stephanie; Reimão, Sílvia; Sakai, Paulo; de Moura, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background/study aim: During the last several years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic fluid collections’ (PFC) drainage has evolved into the preferred drainage technique. Recently, self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) have been used as an alternative to double pigtail stents, with the advantage of providing a larger diameter fistula, thereby decreasing the risk of early obstruction and also allowing for direct endoscopic exploration of the cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success, safety, and outcome of patients undergoing EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS. Patients/materials and methods: The study was conducted at two tertiary hospitals from January 2010 to January 2013. All patients with PFC referred for endoscopic drainage were enrolled in a prospective database. The inclusion criteria were: (1) patients with pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis based on the revised Atlanta classification; (2) symptomatic patients with thick PFC; (3) PFC that persisted more than 6 weeks; and (4) large PFC diameter (≥ 9 cm). The exclusion criteria consisted of coagulation disorders, PFC bleeding or infection, and failure-to-inform written consent. Results: A total of 16 patients (9 females, 7 males; mean age 52.6, range 20 – 82) underwent EUS drainage with SEMS. There were 14 cases of pseudocysts and 2 cases of walled-off necrosis. The etiologies of the PFC were mainly gallstones (8 of 16 patients, 50 %) and alcohol (5 of 16 patients, 31 %). Technical success was achieved in 100 % of the cases. All patients had a complete resolution of the PFC. Conclusion: Transmural EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS is feasible, appears safe, and is efficacious. However, the exchange of the UC (uncovered)-SEMS for plastic stents is mandatory within 1 week. Future prospective studies, preferably multicenter studies, comparing SEMS versus traditional plastic stents for the drainage of PFC are

  19. Site-isolated luminescent europium complexes with polyester macroligands: metal-centered heteroarm stars and nanoscale assemblies with labile block junctions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jessica L; Corbin, Perry S; Fraser, Cassandra L; Metcalf, David H; Richardson, Frederick S; Thomas, Edwin L; Urbas, Augustine M

    2002-07-24

    The synthesis of a series of polymeric Eu(III) complexes with polyester ligands, along with supporting emission spectra, luminescence lifetimes, and, for a Eu block copolymer film, atomic force microscopy (AFM) data, is presented. Dibenzoylmethane was derivatized with a hydroxyl initiator site (dbmOH, 1) for tin octoate catalyzed ring opening polymerization of dl-lactide. The resulting poly(lactic acid) macroligand, dbmPLA (2), was combined with EuCl3 to generate Eu(dbmPLA)3 (3). Chelation of both dbmPLA and a polycaprolactone-functionalized bipyridine ligand (bpyPCL2) led to the Eu(III)-centered heteroarm star Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) (4). Unpolarized emission spectra and luminescence lifetimes were recorded for the Eu polymers in CH2Cl2 and for Eu(dbmPLA)3, as a film. Solution data for Eu(dbm)3 and Eu(dbm)3(bpy) were collected for comparison. For Eu tris(dbm) complexes, data were fit to a double exponential decay, indicating the presence of multiple species. Relative amounts of the longer lifetime component increase in the series Eu(dbm)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 films, perhaps suggesting benefits of the "polymer shell effect" and the diminishment of aquo adducts known to shorten lifetimes. As with the nonpolymeric analogue, data for Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) fit to a single-exponential decay. The sharpness of the feature at 579.7 nm, attributable to the 5D0 --> 7F0 transition in the emission spectrum of 4, lends further support for a homogeneous sample. AFM studies of "as cast" thin films of 4 reveal a lamellar structure with a 17.5 nm repeat. These microstructures, inferred to contain Eu luminophores at the glassy PLA-crystalline PCL domain interfaces, are modified by thermal treatment.

  20. Site-isolated luminescent europium complexes with polyester macroligands: metal-centered heteroarm stars and nanoscale assemblies with labile block junctions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jessica L; Corbin, Perry S; Fraser, Cassandra L; Metcalf, David H; Richardson, Frederick S; Thomas, Edwin L; Urbas, Augustine M

    2002-07-24

    The synthesis of a series of polymeric Eu(III) complexes with polyester ligands, along with supporting emission spectra, luminescence lifetimes, and, for a Eu block copolymer film, atomic force microscopy (AFM) data, is presented. Dibenzoylmethane was derivatized with a hydroxyl initiator site (dbmOH, 1) for tin octoate catalyzed ring opening polymerization of dl-lactide. The resulting poly(lactic acid) macroligand, dbmPLA (2), was combined with EuCl3 to generate Eu(dbmPLA)3 (3). Chelation of both dbmPLA and a polycaprolactone-functionalized bipyridine ligand (bpyPCL2) led to the Eu(III)-centered heteroarm star Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) (4). Unpolarized emission spectra and luminescence lifetimes were recorded for the Eu polymers in CH2Cl2 and for Eu(dbmPLA)3, as a film. Solution data for Eu(dbm)3 and Eu(dbm)3(bpy) were collected for comparison. For Eu tris(dbm) complexes, data were fit to a double exponential decay, indicating the presence of multiple species. Relative amounts of the longer lifetime component increase in the series Eu(dbm)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 films, perhaps suggesting benefits of the "polymer shell effect" and the diminishment of aquo adducts known to shorten lifetimes. As with the nonpolymeric analogue, data for Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) fit to a single-exponential decay. The sharpness of the feature at 579.7 nm, attributable to the 5D0 --> 7F0 transition in the emission spectrum of 4, lends further support for a homogeneous sample. AFM studies of "as cast" thin films of 4 reveal a lamellar structure with a 17.5 nm repeat. These microstructures, inferred to contain Eu luminophores at the glassy PLA-crystalline PCL domain interfaces, are modified by thermal treatment. PMID:12121083

  1. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    SciTech Connect

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric 'lids' that

  2. Senior Centers

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, ... adults who live independently can go to find a variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] ...

  3. Coastal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Geological Survey dedicated its new Center for Coastal Geology June 12 at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. Robert Halley leads the staff of nine USGS scientists studying coastal erosion and pollution and underwater mineral resources in cooperation with the university's Marine Science Department. Current research is on erosion along Lake Michigan and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The number of USGS scientists at the center should increase to 30 over five years.

  4. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Friction Resistance of Titanium, Stainless Steel, Ceramic and Ceramic with Metal Insert Brackets with Varying Dimensions of Stainless Steel Wire: An In vitro Multi-center Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B Sunil; Miryala, Suresh; Kumar, K Kiran; Shameem, K; Regalla, Ravindra Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The orthodontist seeks an archwire–bracket combination that has both good biocompatibility and low friction. Hence, the aim of this multicenter in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance generated between titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SS), ceramic and ceramic with metal insert (CMI) brackets with SS wires of varying dimensions in a specially designed apparatus. Materials and Methods: The material used in this study were Ti, SS, Ceramic and CMI with 0.018″ slot manufactured with zero degree tip and −7° torque premolar brackets (3M, Unitek) and SS wires of varying dimensions (0.016″ round, 0.016 × 0.016″ square, 0.016 × 0.022″ rectangular and 0.017 × 0.025″ rectangular) used. The frictional resistance was measured using Instron Universal testing machine (Model no. 4301). The specimen population in each center composed each of 160 brackets and wires. Differences among the all bracket/wire combinations were tested using (one-way) ANOVA, followed by the student Newman Keuls multiple comparisons of means ranking (at P < 0.05) for the determination of differences among the groups. Results: Ti bracket in combination with 0.017 × 0.025″ SS rectangular wire produced significant force levels for an optimum orthodontic movement with least frictional resistance. Conclusion: Ti brackets have least resistance and rectangular wires produced significant force. These can be used to avoid hazards of Nickel. SS brackets revealed higher static frictional force values as the wire dimension increased and showed lower static friction than Ti brackets for all wires except the thicker wire. Our study recommends the preclusion of brackets with rough surface texture (Ti brackets) with SS ligature wire for ligating bracket and archwire are better to reduce friction. PMID:25395796

  6. Metal-hydrogen bridge bonding of hydrocarbons on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Robert M.; Reutt, Janice; Muetterties, Earl L.

    1981-01-01

    Molecular orbital studies implicate multicenter metal-hydrogen-carbon interactions as contributors to the bonding of chemisorbed hydrocarbons on clean metal surfaces. The most stable geometries appear to be those that achieve the maximum multicenter bonding to the coordinately unsaturated metal atoms in the vicinity of the anchoring metal-carbon interaction. Energy differences between possible surface sites are of the same magnitude as stabilization energies for three-center bonding of hydrogen atoms to the metal surface. Accordingly, secondary interactions of hydrogen with neighboring metal atoms may be significant determining factors in surface structures. The model predictions are compared with known structures and are used to propose a mechanism for hydrocarbon reactions on metal surfaces. These metal-hydrogen-carbon interactions are presumed to be intermediate points or states in C—H bond-breaking processes. PMID:16593041

  7. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  8. Metal aminoboranes

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  9. Bond-Energy and Surface-Energy Calculations in Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, James G.; Horner, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A simple technique appropriate for introductory materials science courses is outlined for the calculation of bond energies in metals from lattice energies. The approach is applied to body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-closest-packed (hcp) metals. The strength of these bonds is tabulated for a variety metals and is…

  10. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  11. Fireworks Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Fireworks Information Center This is an information center on ... Video Put Safety First This Fourth of July Fireworks Information What are consumer fireworks and where are ...

  12. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  13. Casimir repulsion between metallic objects in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis. PMID:20868142

  14. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  15. Design of dinuclear manganese cofactors for bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Olson, Tien L; Espiritu, Eduardo; Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Simmons, Chad R; Williams, JoAnn C; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Allen, James P

    2016-05-01

    A compelling target for the design of electron transfer proteins with novel cofactors is to create a model for the oxygen-evolving complex, a Mn4Ca cluster, of photosystem II. A mononuclear Mn cofactor can be added to the bacterial reaction center, but the addition of multiple metal centers is constrained by the native protein architecture. Alternatively, metal centers can be incorporated into artificial proteins. Designs for the addition of dinuclear metal centers to four-helix bundles resulted in three artificial proteins with ligands for one, two, or three dinuclear metal centers able to bind Mn. The three-dimensional structure determined by X-ray crystallography of one of the Mn-proteins confirmed the design features and revealed details concerning coordination of the Mn center. Electron transfer between these artificial Mn-proteins and bacterial reaction centers was investigated using optical spectroscopy. After formation of a light-induced, charge-separated state, the experiments showed that the Mn-proteins can donate an electron to the oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers, with the Mn-proteins having additional metal centers being more effective at this electron transfer reaction. Modeling of the structure of the Mn-protein docked to the reaction center showed that the artificial protein likely binds on the periplasmic surface similarly to cytochrome c2, the natural secondary donor. Combining reaction centers with exogenous artificial proteins provides the opportunity to create ligands and investigate the influence of inhomogeneous protein environments on multinuclear redox-active metal centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  16. AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE. FACING NORTH. METAL AWNING ALONG LENGTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE. FACING NORTH. METAL AWNING ALONG LENGTH OF BUILDING AND VERTICAL METAL SIDING ARE ALTERATIONS MAD BY THE AFRD. - Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID

  17. Metal inks

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  18. Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Undergraduate students Kristina Wines and Dena Renzo at Rensselaer Poloytech Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87), Nov. 19 - Dec.5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  19. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  20. Women's Centers: The Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Jodi

    1988-01-01

    Presents a typology of women's centers and provides an overview of state, regional, and national networks of women's centers, including the evolution of the Women's Center/Services Caucus of the National Women's Studies Association and the more recently organized National Association of Women's Centers. (NB)

  1. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  2. PRB CHEMISTRY CASE STUDY: DENVER FEDERAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Denver Federal Center permeable reactive barrier is a funnel-and-gate system with four reactive gates, each separated by up to about 120 m of metal sheet pile. In this study, ground water sampling, core collection, and solid phase characterization studies were carried out in...

  3. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  4. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  5. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  6. Metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Greer, A L

    1995-03-31

    Amorphous metallic alloys, relative newcomers to the world of glasses, have properties that are unusual for solid metals. The metallic glasses, which exist in a very wide variety of compositions, combine fundamental interest with practical applications. They also serve as precursors for exciting new nanocrystalline materials. Their magnetic (soft and hard) and mechanical properties are of particular interest.

  7. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  8. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  9. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  10. Taking Center Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Describes Ohio's 390,000 square-foot Perry High School and Community Fitness Center and its ability to accommodate all segments of both school and community group activities. A list of companies that supply the center is included. (GR)

  11. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  12. Evaluating Teacher Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    1977-01-01

    Considers what teacher centers actually are, what they do, what they are supposed to do, and how they are formed. Discusses three types of centers, their organizational structure and function, and the theory underlying them. (Editor/RK)

  13. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP Dietary Guidelines Physical Activity Guidelines Health Literacy and Communication Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Healthy People healthfinder health.gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health ...

  14. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  15. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  16. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  17. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Center Accredited 624 Smith Avenue St. Paul, MN 55107 651-689-3988 Accredited since April 2015 ... Birth Center Accredited 1901 44th Avenue North Minneapolis, MN 55343 612-338-2784 Accredited since November 2015 ...

  18. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  19. Teachers' Centers Exchange Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Jeanne; Kreitzman, Ruth

    This directory has three major sections. The foreword is a brief essay describing the purpose of the Teachers' Centers Exchange, the "network" of teachers' centers, and the reasons for compiling and publishing this directory. The second section gives descriptions of 78 teachers' centers in the Exchange's network. These descriptions highlight each…

  20. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  1. Center of buoyancy definition

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations.

  2. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  3. Data Center Tasking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  4. Language Resource Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate resource centers that serve to improve the nation's capacity to teach and learn foreign languages. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education. Duration of the grant is four years. Center activities…

  5. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  6. THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARTZ, DELPHINE; AND OTHERS

    THIS BULLETIN PRESENTS RECOMMENDATIONS WITH REGARD TO PROGRAM, PERSONNEL, AND FACILITIES FOR AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER. IT INCLUDES UTILIZATION, MATERIALS, FACILITIES, ORGANIZATION AND LAYOUTS FOR AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER. CASE STUDIES AND EXAMPLES ARE PROVIDED FOR MAKING THE MAXIMUM POSSIBLE USAGE OF THE CENTER WITHIN BOTH THE…

  7. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies. PMID:10182518

  8. Metal- and ligand-centered monoelectronic oxidation of mu-nitrido[((tetraphenylporphyrinato)manganese)phthalocyaninatoiron)], [(TPP)Mn-N-FePc]. X-ray crystal structure of the Fe(IV)-containing species [(THF)(TPP)Mn-N-FePc(H(2)O)](I(5))02THF.

    PubMed

    Donzello, M P; Ercolani, C; Russo, U; Chiesi-Villa, A; Rizzoli, C

    2001-06-18

    The reaction of mu-nitrido[((tetraphenylporphyrinato)manganese)(phthalocyaninatoiron)], [(TPP)Mn-N-FePc], with I(2) in THF develops with the formation of two different species, i.e., [(THF)(TPP)Mn-N-FePc(H(2)O)](I(5)).2THF (I) and [(TPP)Mn(IV)-N-Fe(III)Pc](I(3)) (II). On the basis of single-crystal X-ray work and Mössbauer, EPR, Raman, and magnetic susceptibility data, I, found to be isostructural with the corresponding Fe-Fe complex, is shown to contain a low-spin triatomic Mn(IV)=N=Fe(IV) system (metal-centered oxidation). Data at hand for II (Mössbauer, EPR, Raman) show, instead, that oxidation takes place at one of the two macrocycles, very likely TPP (ligand-centered oxidation). The same cationic fragment present in I, and containing the Mn(IV)=N=Fe(IV) bond system, is also obtained when (TPP)Mn-N-FePc is allowed to react in THF with (phen)SbCl(6) (molar ratio 1:1). There are indications that the use of (phen)SbCl(6) in excess (2:1 molar ratio), in benzene, probably determines further oxidation with the formation of a species showing the combined presence of the Mn(IV)-Fe(IV) couple and of a pi-cation radical.

  9. Plasmonic Roche lobe in metal-dielectric-metal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu, Ruei-Cheng; Lan, Yung-Chiang

    2013-07-15

    This study investigates a plasmonic Roche lobe that is based on a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structure using finite-difference time-domain simulations and theoretical analyses. The effective refractive index of the MDM structure has two centers and is inversely proportional to the distance from the position of interest to the centers, in a manner that is analogous to the gravitational potential in a two-star system. The motion of surface plasmons (SPs) strongly depends on the ratio of permittivities at the two centers. The Lagrange point is an unstable equilibrium point for SPs that propagate in the system. After the SPs have passed through the Lagrange point, their spread drastically increases.

  10. BioMe: biologically relevant metals.

    PubMed

    Tus, Alan; Rakipovic, Alen; Peretin, Goran; Tomic, Sanja; Sikic, Mile

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we introduce BioMe (biologically relevant metals), a web-based platform for calculation of various statistical properties of metal-binding sites. Users can obtain the following statistical properties: presence of selected ligands in metal coordination sphere, distribution of coordination numbers, percentage of metal ions coordinated by the combination of selected ligands, distribution of monodentate and bidentate metal-carboxyl, bindings for ASP and GLU, percentage of particular binuclear metal centers, distribution of coordination geometry, descriptive statistics for a metal ion-donor distance and percentage of the selected metal ions coordinated by each of the selected ligands. Statistics is presented in numerical and graphical forms. The underlying database contains information about all contacts within the range of 3 Å from a metal ion found in the asymmetric crystal unit. The stored information for each metal ion includes Protein Data Bank code, structure determination method, types of metal-binding chains [protein, ribonucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), water and other] and names of the bounded ligands (amino acid residue, RNA nucleotide, DNA nucleotide, water and other) and the coordination number, the coordination geometry and, if applicable, another metal(s). BioMe is on a regular weekly update schedule. It is accessible at http://metals.zesoi.fer.hr.

  11. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  12. A two-center comparative study of plastic and lumen-apposing large diameter self-expandable metallic stents in endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Orkoonsawat, Piyachai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of walled-off pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) (pseudocyst [PC]; walled-off necrosis [WON]) utilizes double pigtail plastic stents (PS) and the newer large diameter fully covered self-expandable stents (FCSEMS) customized for PFC drainage. This study examined the impact of type of stent on clinical outcomes and costs. Patients and Methods: Retrospective two-center study. Outcome variables were technical and clinical success, need for repeat procedures, need for direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN), and procedure-related costs. Results: A total of 49 (PC: 31, WON: 18) patients were analyzed. Initially, PS was used in 37 and FCSEMS in 12. Repeat transmural drainage was required in 14 (PS: 13 [9 treated with PS, 4 treated with FCSEMS]; FCSEMS: 1 [treated with PS]) due to stent migration (PS: 3; FCSEMS: 1) or inadequate drainage (PS: 10). Technical success was 100%. Initial clinical success was 64.9% (25/38) for PS versus 91.7% (11/12) for FCSEMS (P = 0.074). With repeat transmural stenting, final clinical success was achieved in 94.6% and 100%, respectively (P = 0.411). Compared to FCSEMS, PS was associated with greater need for repeat drainage (34.2% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.032). The need for and frequency of DEN was similar between both groups, but PS required more frequent balloon dilatation. PS was significantly cheaper for noninfected PC. Costs were similar for infected PC and WON. Conclusion: PS was associated with a higher need for a second drainage procedure to achieve clinical success. The use of FCSEMS did not increase procedural costs for infected PC and WON. PMID:27803905

  13. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  15. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  16. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  17. Noble metals in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, Karolina; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide research groups are searching for anticancer compounds, many of them are organometalic complexes having platinum group metals as their active centers. Most commonly used cytostatics from this group are cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Cisplatin was used fot the first time in 1978, from this time many platinum derivatives were created. In this review we present biological properties and probable future clinical use of platinum, gold, silver, iridium and ruthenium derivatives. Gold derivative Auranofin has been studied extensively. Action of silver nanoparticles on different cell lines was analysed. Iridium isotopes are commonly used in brachyterapy. Ruthenium compound new anti-tumour metastasis inhibitor (NAMI-A) is used in managing lung cancer metastases. Electroporation of another ruthenium based compound KP1339 was also studied. Most of described complexes have antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties. Further studies need to be made. Nevertheless noble metal based chemotherapheutics and compounds seem to be an interesting direction of research. PMID:26557773

  18. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  19. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  20. Surgery center joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  1. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  2. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  3. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G.; Boensch, F.D.; Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M.

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  4. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is NASA's lead center for the space shuttle and the International Space Station programs and for biomedical research. Areas of study include Earth sciences and solar system exploration, astromaterials and space medicine. About 14 000 people, including 3000 civil servants, work at JSC....

  5. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  6. URBAN STUDIES CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEBOUT, JOHN E.

    THE CENTER WORKS WITH RUTGERS UNIVERSITY TO MAKE USE OF URBAN STUDIES IN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH AND TEACHING PROGRAMS AND IN OTHER INTELLECTUAL SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY. THE FIVE MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CENTER - EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND EDUCATION, LIBRARY SERVICES, OPPORTUNITIES EXPANSION PROJECT, AND THE URBAN FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM - ARE…

  7. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  8. Natural Science Centers: Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natural Science for Youth Foundation, Roswell, GA.

    A nature center is defined as an organized and permanent nonprofit institution which is essentially educational, scientific, and cultural in purpose with professional staff, and open to the public on some regular schedule. A nature center manages and interprets its lands, native plants and animals and facilities to promote an understanding of…

  9. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  10. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  11. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  12. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-07-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  13. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  14. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  15. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  16. Isolation and Structural Characterization of a Mackay 55-Metal-Atom Two-Shell Icosahedron of Pseudo-Ih Symmetry, Pd55L12(μ3-CO)20 (L = PR3, R = Isopropyl): Comparative Analysis with Interior Two-Shell Icosahedral Geometries in Capped Three-Shell Pd145, Pt-Centered Four-Shell Pd-Pt M165, and Four-Shell Au133 Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeremiah D; Mednikov, Evgueni G; Ivanov, Sergei A; Dahl, Lawrence F

    2016-02-10

    We present the first successful isolation and crystallographic characterization of a Mackay 55-metal-atom two-shell icosahedron, Pd55L12(μ3-CO)20 (L = PPr(i)3) (1). Its two-shell icosahedron of pseudo-Ih symmetry (without isopropyl substituents) enables a structural/bonding comparison with interior 55-metal-atom two-shell icosahedral geometries observed within the multi-shell capped 145-metal-atom three-shell Pd145(CO)72(PEt3)30 and 165-metal-atom four-shell Pt-centered (μ12-Pt)Pd164-xPtx(CO)72(PPh3)20 (x ≈ 7) nanoclusters, and within the recently reported four-shell Au133(SC6H4-p-Bu(t))52 nanocluster. DFT calculations carried out on a Pd55(CO)20(PH3)12 model analogue, with triisopropyl phosphine substituents replaced by H atoms, revealed a positive +0.84 e charge for the entire Pd55 core, with a highly positive second-shell Pd42 surface of +1.93 e.

  17. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  18. The MSFC complementary metal oxide semiconductor (including multilevel interconnect metallization) process handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouldin, D. L.; Eastes, R. W.; Feltner, W. R.; Hollis, B. R.; Routh, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    The fabrication techniques for creation of complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuits at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Examples of C-MOS integrated circuits manufactured at MSFC are presented with functional descriptions of each. Typical electrical characteristics of both p-channel metal oxide semiconductor and n-channel metal oxide semiconductor discrete devices under given conditions are provided. Procedures design, mask making, packaging, and testing are included.

  19. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  20. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  1. Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2003-05-06

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  2. Metal nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Leon R; Gobin, Andre M; Lowery, Amanda R; Tam, Felicia; Drezek, Rebekah A; Halas, Naomi J; West, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Metal nanoshells are a new class of nanoparticles with highly tunable optical properties. Metal nanoshells consist of a dielectric core nanoparticle such as silica surrounded by an ultrathin metal shell, often composed of gold for biomedical applications. Depending on the size and composition of each layer of the nanoshell, particles can be designed to either absorb or scatter light over much of the visible and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, including the near infrared region where penetration of light through tissue is maximal. These particles are also effective substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and are easily conjugated to antibodies and other biomolecules. One can envision a myriad of potential applications of such tunable particles. Several potential biomedical applications are under development, including immunoassays, modulated drug delivery, photothermal cancer therapy, and imaging contrast agents. PMID:16528617

  3. A Center for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisner, Hava

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building of Princeton University's $42 million Frist Student Center, which incorporates the original physics building, Palmer Hall, and a new addition. Provides information on the architect, construction manager, and product suppliers. Includes photographs. (EV)

  4. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  5. An Educational Shopping Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bernardis, Amo

    1970-01-01

    A comparison is made between the Portland Community College (Oregon) physical plant and a shopping center. The college planners have arranged the facilities to provide useful, practical, and effective educational opportunities for all of the students. (BB)

  6. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  7. National Farm Medicine Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Seguridad Surveillance Cultural Anthropology Veterans to Farmers WI Infant Study Cohort Prevention Agricultural Safety Consulting Agritourism ... Center Marshfield Clinic 1000 North Oak Avenue Marshfield, WI 54449-5790 Phone: 1.800.662.6900 or ...

  8. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  9. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  10. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center For Clinicians resources, publications Publications for Your Office Resources for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies Mood Disorders ...

  11. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  12. A Money Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Merlene J.

    1981-01-01

    A collection of games and activities that teach the concept of money and the actual use of real money are presented. The center for activities described was originally designed for low to average ability pupils. (MP)

  13. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  14. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school libraries and media centers, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  15. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoxide Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  17. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  18. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.

  19. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  20. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  1. Metallized Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, virtually all NASA spacecraft have used metallized films for a variety of purposes, principally thermal radiation insulation. King Seeley manufactures a broad line of industrial and consumer oriented metallized film, fabric, paper and foam in single layer sheets and multi-layer laminates. A few examples, commercialized by MPI Outdoor Safety Products, are the three ounce Thermos Emergency Blanket which reflects and retains up to 80 percent of the user's body heat helping prevent post accident shock or keeping a person warm for hours under emergency cold weather conditions.

  2. Metal-silica sol-gel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a single phase metal-silica sol-gel glass formed by the co-condensation of a transition metal with silicon atoms where the metal atoms are uniformly distributed within the sol-gel glass as individual metal centers. Any transition metal may be used in the sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to sensor materials where the sensor material is formed using the single phase metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The sensor materials may be in the form of a thin film or may be attached to an optical fiber. The present invention also relates to a method of sensing chemicals using the chemical sensors by monitoring the chromatic change of the metal-silica sol-gel glass when the chemical binds to the sensor. The present invention also relates to oxidation catalysts where a metal-silica sol-gel glass catalyzes the reaction. The present invention also relates to a method of performing oxidation reactions using the metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to organopolymer metal-silica sol-gel composites where the pores of the metal-silica sol-gel glasses are filled with an organic polymer polymerized by the sol-gel glass.

  3. METAL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1959-02-01

    Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

  4. Heavy Metal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, W. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the advantages, both functional and economic, of using a standing-seam metal roof in both new roof installations and reroofing projects of educational facilities. Structural versus non-structural standing-seam roofs are described as are the types of insulation that can be added and roof finishes used. (GR)

  5. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  6. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  7. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, Nathaniel M.; Dye, Robert C.; Snow, Ronny C.; Birdsell, Stephan A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  8. Heavy Metal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2001-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that more than 1 million children ages 5 and under are afflicted with unsafe amounts of lead. Schools can be a source of lead poisoning. Other sources include playgrounds near freeways, playground equipment, contaminated soil, and technology rooms with lead-bearing supplies. Sidebars…

  9. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  10. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  11. High-volume centers.

    PubMed

    Vespa, P; Diringer, Michael N

    2011-09-01

    Outcome from trauma, surgery, and a variety of other medical conditions has been shown to be positively affected by providing treatment at facilities experiencing a high volume of patients with those conditions. An electronic literature search was made to identify English-language articles available through March 2011, addressing the effect of patient treatment volume on outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Limited data were identified, with 16 citations included in the current review. Over 60% of hospitals fall into the lowest case-volume quartile. Outcome is influenced by patient volume, with better outcome occurring in high-volume centers treating >60 cases per year. Patients treated at low-volume hospitals are less likely to experience definitive treatment. Furthermore, transfer to high-volume centers may be inadequately arranged. Several factors may influence the better outcome at high-volume centers, including the availability of neurointensivists and interventional neuroradiologists. PMID:21792754

  12. Survey: National Meteorological Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center (NMC) is comprised of three operational divisions (Development, Automation, and Forecast) and an Administrative Division. The Development Division develops and implements mathematical models for forecasting the weather. The Automation Division provides the software and processing services to accommodate the models used in daily forecasts. The Forecasting Division applies a combination of numerical and manual techniques to produce analyses and prognoses up to 120 hr into the future. This guidance material is combined with severe storm information from the National Hurricane Center and the National Severe Storms Forecasting Center to develop locally tailored forecasts by the Weather Service Forecast Offices and, in turn, by the local Weather Service Offices. A very general flow of this information is shown. A more detailed illustration of data flow into, within, and from the NMC is given. The interrelations are depicted between the various meteorological organizations and activities.

  13. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  14. International Water Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  15. The USC Epigenome Center.

    PubMed

    Laird, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    The University of Southern California (USC, CA, USA) has a long tradition of excellence in epigenetics. With the recent explosive growth and technological maturation of the field of epigenetics, it became clear that a dedicated high-throughput epigenomic data production facility would be needed to remain at the forefront of epigenetic research. To address this need, USC launched the USC Epigenome Center as the first large-scale center in academics dedicated to epigenomic research. The Center is providing high-throughput data production for large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies, and developing novel analysis tools for epigenomic research. This unique facility promises to be a valuable resource for multidisciplinary research, education and training in genomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics, and translational medicine.

  16. Building reactive copper center(s) in human carbonic anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Song, He; Weitz, Andrew C.; Hendrich, Michael P.; Lewis, Edwin A.; Emerson, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Re-engineering metalloproteins to generate new biologically relevant metal centers is an effective a way to test our understanding of the structural and mechanistic features that steer chemical transformations in biological systems. Here we report thermodynamic data characterizing the formation of two type-2 (T2) copper sites in carbonic anhydrase and experimental evidence showing one of these new copper centers has characteristics similar to a variety of well-characterized copper centers in synthetic models and in enzymatic systems. Human CA II is known to bind two Cu2+ ions; herein, these binding events are explored using modern isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) techniques that have become a proven method to accurately measure metal-binding thermodynamic parameters. The two Cu2+-binding events have different affinities (Ka ∼ 5 × 1012 and 1 × 1010) and both are enthalpically driven processes. Reconstituting these Cu2+ sites under a range of conditions has allowed us to assign the Cu2+-binding event to the three-histidine, native, metal binding site. Our initial efforts to characterize these Cu2+ sites have yielded data that show distinctive (and noncoupled) EPR signals associated with each copper-binding site, and that this reconstituted enzyme can activate hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the oxidation of 2-aminophenol. PMID:23744511

  17. The Outer Halo Metallicity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MA, ZHIBO; Morrison, H.; Harding, P.; Xue, X.; Rix, H.; Rockosi, C.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y.; Cudworth, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new determination of the metallicity distribution function in the Milky Way halo, based on an in situ sample of more than 5000 K giants from SDSS/SEGUE. We have also measured the metallicity gradient in the halo, using our sample which stretches from 5 kpc to more than 100 kpc from the galactic center. The halo metallicity gradient has been a controversial topic in recent studies, but our in-situ study overcomes the problems caused in these studies by their extrapolations from local samples to the distant halo. We also describe our extensive checks of the log g and [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters pipeline, using globular and open cluster stars and SEGUE stars with follow-up high-resolution analysis. In addition, we present a new Bayesian estimate of distances to the K giants, which avoids the distance bias introduced by the red giant branch luminosity function.

  18. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  19. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  20. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-11-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  1. Lied Transplant Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  2. Emergency Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinea, Anoushka Z.

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a site from which NASA LaRC Emergency Preparedness Officials exercise control and direction in an emergency. Research was conducted in order to determine what makes an effective EOC. Specifically information concerning the various types of equipment and communication capability that an efficient EOC should contain (i.e., computers, software, telephone systems, radio systems, etc.) was documented. With this information a requirements document was written stating a brief description of the equipment and required quantity to be used in an EOC and then compared to current capabilities at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  3. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  4. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  5. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  6. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions. PMID:26934755

  7. Starting an aphasia center?

    PubMed

    Elman, Roberta J

    2011-08-01

    Starting an aphasia center can be an enormous challenge. This article provides initial issues to review and consider when deciding whether starting a new organization is right for you. Determining the need for the program in your community, the best size and possible affiliation for the organization, and available resources, as well as developing a business plan, marketing the program, and building awareness in the community, are some of the factors that are discussed. Specific examples related to starting the Aphasia Center of California are provided.

  8. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  9. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  10. The Shopping Center. Intermediate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Darrell; And Others

    This teaching guide is designed to develop thinking skills of intermediate elementary school children by using the concept of a shopping center. Thinking skills defined in the guide are observing, recalling, noticing differences and similarities, ordering, grouping, concept labeling, classifying, concept testing, inferring causes and effects,…

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  12. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  13. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  14. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  15. The Pupil Appraisal Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilborn, Bobbie; Gentile, Lance M.

    The primary purpose of the Pupil Appraisal Center (PAC) is to promote teacher education by providing teachers and students direct experience in resolving behavioral disorders and learning problems. PAC provides specialized teacher training in counseling, reading, hearing, speech, and language development and provides service to area schools for…

  16. Research: Hyperactivity, Placement Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A diet that emphasizes the elimination of food containing artificial coloring and flavoring from meals served to hyperactive children has met with success in preliminary studies; college placement centers are advised to shift their emphasis from job research and counseling. (Author/MLF)

  17. General Management Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    A description of the courses and seminars given by the General Management Training Center of the U. S. Civil Service Commission to provide training opportunity for managers working in Washington metropolitan area at all levels of government is given. Categories of courses are: Entry Level Training; Supervisory Training; Management Training;…

  18. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  19. A New Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Meta A.

    A new media center is planned for a K-8 Department of Defense Dependents School (DoDDS) with approximately 850 students in Heilbronn, West Germany. Heilbronn has a U.S. Army community with the majority of the students being military dependents. The faculty and administration are made up of educators from all over the United States. Although at the…

  20. Resource Centers; Some Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzke, Dwight Mark; Starkey, John

    Teachers, Principals, and other public school personnel interested in establishing learning resource centers are provided with guidelines and a framework within which they can structure their efforts. Professional literature, observation, and experimental trials serve as the sources from which observations are drawn. The advantages of the resource…

  1. The Parent Consultation Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Larry; Cook, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    The Parent Consultation Center (PCC) is a win-win project that offers free consultation to families about childhood behavior problems and a supervised practice experience for counselors in training. The PCC can be replicated in any school district where there is a nearby university with a counselor education program. This is a guide to starting…

  2. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  3. Gullo Student Center, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Clifford A.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights a new college student center in California that serves as a physical and social hub for its campus and has helped transform a bland, bunker-like commuter school into a place that engages students, faculty, and visitors. Examines facility planning and design features; includes photographs and site plans. (GR)

  4. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  5. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college libraries/media centers considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  6. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  7. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  8. Media Center: Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide to basic technical procedures recommended in the operation of within-school media centers is intended for all Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) media specialists, clerks, aides, and technicians. The first four sections refer to the general media program functions identified in the related manual, "A is for Apple:…

  9. Organizing a Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.

    The organization and development of instructional materials centers (IMC's) as a part of a program of educational improvement is discussed. Analysis is made of the advantages, disadvantages, and organization of centralized IMC's, decentralized IMC's, and coordinated IMC's, with recommendations being made for their development. The operation of…

  10. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  11. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  12. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  13. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  14. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  15. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  16. 4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note cliff erosion under foundation at left center. Looking 297° W. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Metal Building Insulation System Provides Energy Savings and Noise Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Thermal efficiency increased substantially when an underdeck metal building insulation system was used at the North Valley Occupational Center, an aircraft mechanic's school located at the edge of the Van Nuys, California, airport. (Author)

  18. Blueprint for a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Pat

    1983-01-01

    An approach is outlined for beginning a teacher center: (1) do your homework; (2) generate interest in the center; (3) form a team--establish a teacher center board; and (4) plan a program of action. Five success factors to ensure the center's longevity are listed and a bibliography is included. (JMK)

  19. Teachers' Centers Exchange Directory. 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Barbara

    The 198 teacher centers listed in this directory comprise a network of teacher center practitioners who communicate with the Teachers' Centers Exchange (Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, California). Centers in the United States and Canada are listed alphabetically by state. Information on each center…

  20. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  1. Music Centers: Freedom to Explore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses effective ways to develop and promote educationally sound music programs for preschool children. Covers three types of music learning centers as versatile and inexpensive resources for creating independent learning environments: singing centers, instrument centers, and listening centers. Suggests ideas for group time, and for promoting…

  2. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Truchan, Thomas G.; Miller, Dean J.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Foley, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  3. Metal dusting

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by K. Natesan

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was held soon after the September 11th incident under a climate of sorrow and uncertainty among the people of the world, in particular the Workshop participants and their host organizations. With considerable help from the partiicpants, the Workshop was conducted as planed and we had excellent participation in spite of the circumstances. A good fraction of the attendees in the Workshop were from abroad and from several industries, indicating the importance and relevance of the subject for the chemical process industry. Degradation of structural metallic alloys by metal dusting has been an issue for over 40 years in the chemical, petrochemical, syngas, and iron ore reduction plants. However, the fundamental scientific reasons for the degradation of complex alloys in high carbon activity environments are not clear. one of the major parameters of importance is the variation in gas chemistry in both the laboratory experiments and in the plant-service environments. the industry has questioned the applicability of the laboratory test data, obtained in low steam environments, in assessment and life prediction for the materials in plant service where the environments contain 25-35% steam. Several other variables such as system pressure, gas flow velocity, incubation time, alloy chemistry, surface finish, and weldments, were also identified in the literature as to having an effect on the initiatino and propagation of metal dusting attack. It is the purpose of this Workshop to establish a forum in which the researchers from scientific and industrial laboratories, alloy manufacturers, end users, and research and development sponsors can exchange information, discuss different points of view, prioritize the issues, and to elaborate on the trends in industry for the future. We believe that we accomplished these goals successfully and sincerely thank the participants for their contributions.

  4. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  5. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  6. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  7. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  8. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  9. Seismic Data Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    The effort required to operate and maintain the Seismic Data Analysis Center during the fiscal year of 1981 is described. Statistics concerning the operational effectiveness and the utilization of the systems at the Center are also given. The major activities associated with maintaining the operating systems, providing data services, and performing maintenance are discussed. The development effort and improvements made to the systems supporting the geophysical research include capabilities added to the Regional Event Location System and the Automatic Association program. Other tasks reported include the result of implementing a front end processor (called an intelligent line interface) to do real time signal detection, the effects of altering the configuration of the detection systems, and the status of software developed to do interactive discrimination. A computer study was performed to determine a preferred system to accomplish the on-line data recording and support the data services activity.

  10. The Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, Reinhard; Karas, Vladimír

    2007-04-01

    In the past decade high resolution measurements in the infrared employing adaptive optics imaging on 10m telescopes have allowed determining the three dimensional orbits stars within ten light hours of the compact radio source SgrA* at the Center of the Milky Way. These observations show that SgrA* is a three million solar mass black hole, beyond any reasonable doubt. The Galactic Center thus constitutes the best astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes which have long been postulated, and is also an ideal 'lab' for studying the physics in the vicinity of such an object. Remarkably, young massive stars are present there and probably have formed in the innermost stellar cusp. Variable infrared and X-ray emission from SgrA* are a new probe of the physics and space time just outside the event horizon.

  11. Bahrain's offshore banking center

    SciTech Connect

    Gerakis, A.S.; Roncesvalles, O.

    1983-01-01

    The economic effects of Bahrain's schemes for licensing offshore banking units (OBUs) were the immediate response of major international banks and the financial services the banking center has rendered by improving regional money and exchange markets at a time when a Middle East link was needed to service the increasing demand for oil-wealth banking services. Bahrain's leadership also created a favorable climate. Aggressive competition from banks in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have caused some friction, but informal supervision by the Bahrain Monetary Agency (BMA) should be able to avoid serious difficulty. Bahrain's success required a banking infrastructure, a free-enterprise system, a willingness to maintain banking standards, a country small enough to benefit directly from OBU income, and a gap in nearby competing centers. 39 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (DCK)

  12. Investigation of Selectively-Reinforced Metallic Lugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Abada, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of material and geometric variables on the response of U-shaped band-reinforced metallic lugs was performed. Variables studied were reinforcement, adhesive and metallic lug mechanical properties, hole diameter, reinforcement and adhesive thickness, and the distance from the hole s center to the end of the lug. Generally, U-shaped band reinforced lugs exhibited superior performance than non-reinforced lugs, that is higher load at the conventional lug design criteria of four percent hole elongation. Depending upon the reinforcement configuration the increase in load may be negligible to 15 or 20 percent. U-shaped band reinforcement increases lug load carrying capability primarily through two mechanisms; increasing the slope of the response curve after the initial knee and restraining overall deformation of the metallic portion of the lug facilitating increased yielding of metallic material between the hole and the edge of the metallic portion of the lug.

  13. Reusable Metallic Thermal Protection Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Martin, Carl J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Poteet, Carl C.

    1998-01-01

    Metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) are being developed to help meet the ambitious goals of future reusable launch vehicles. Recent metallic TPS development efforts at NASA Langley Research Center are described. Foil-gage metallic honeycomb coupons, representative of the outer surface of metallic TPS were subjected to low speed impact, hypervelocity impact, rain erosion, and subsequent arcjet exposure. TPS panels were subjected to thermal vacuum, acoustic, and hot gas flow testing. Results of the coupon and panel tests are presented. Experimental and analytical tools are being developed to characterize and improve internal insulations. Masses of metallic TPS and advanced ceramic tile and blanket TPS concepts are compared for a wide range of parameters.

  14. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  15. Geo-heat center

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Fornes, A.O.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Geo-Heat Center from its origin in 1974. The GHC has been involved in a number of studies and projects. A few of these are: construction of a greenhouse based on geothermal applications, an aquaculture project raising freshwater Malaysian prawns, an investigation of ground water characteristics and corrosion problems associated with the use of geothermal waters, and the assessment of the potential utilization of direct-heat applications of geothermal energy for an agribusiness.

  16. Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Christopher Barry

    2007-01-01

    As part of a session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the operations at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was given. Mission support at this site includes the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), Science - ER-2; Science - G3 UAVSAR; Science - Ikhana and Space Operations. In addition, the presentation describes TFAWS related work at Dryden.

  17. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  18. National Cartographic Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1984-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC) exists to help you find maps of all kinds and much of the data and materials used to compile and to print them. NCIC collects, sorts and describes all types of cartographic information from Federal, State and local government agencies and, where possible, from private companies in the mapping business. It is the public's primary source for cartographic information. (See partial list of Federal agencies and their map and other cartographic products.)

  19. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  20. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  3. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  4. Orientation dependence of the dislocation microstructure in compressed body-centered cubic molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Wang, M.P.; Chen, C.; Xiao, Z.; Jia, Y.L.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z.X.

    2014-05-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in commercial pure molybdenum. After deformation, the dislocation boundaries of compressed molybdenum can be classified, similar to that in face-centered cubic metals, into three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries parallel to (Type 1) or not parallel to (Type 3) a (110) trace. However, it shows a reciprocal relationship between face-centered cubic metals and body-centered cubic metals on the orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure. The higher the strain, the finer the microstructure is and the smaller the inclination angle between extended planar boundaries and the compression axis is. - Highlights: • A reciprocal relationship between FCC metals and BCC metals is confirmed. • The dislocation boundaries can be classified into three types in compressed Mo. • The dislocation characteristic of different dislocation boundaries is different.

  5. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  6. A Simple Method for Drawing Chiral Mononuclear Octahedral Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamadou, Aminou; Haudrechy, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Octahedral transition-metal complexes are involved in a number of reactions and octahedral coordination geometry, frequently observed for metallic centers, includes important topographical stereochemistry. Depending on the number and nature of different ligands, octahedral coordination units with at least two different monodentate ligands give…

  7. NATIONAL METAL FINISHING ENVIRONMENTAL R&D PLAN - AN UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an update to the National Metal Finishing Environmental R&D Plan (EPA/600/R-97/095), dated September 1997. The 1997 Plan and Update are available on the National Metal Finishing Resource Center's web site, www.nmfrc.org. The primary purpose in preparing an up...

  8. Overview of Boiler House and Sheet Metal and Electrical Shops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of Boiler House and Sheet Metal and Electrical Shops Building (center - with single large chimney), note the monitor on the original section of the Boiler House Building, view facing north - Kahului Cannery, Plant No. 28, Boiler House, Sheet Metal and Electrical Shops, 120 Kane Street, Kahului, Maui County, HI

  9. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Phelps, Cindy

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  10. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  11. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  13. Pediatric family-centered rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hostler, S L

    1999-08-01

    Family-centered rehabilitation programs are derived from a philosophy of heath care delivery known as family-centered care. The principles of family-centered care are presented with clinical examples. Its origins are reviewed, and the 10-year process of implementation of family-centered care practice and policy at a children's rehabilitation center are described. Profound changes in behavior are required of the health care professionals as meaningful collaboration with families develops. Key elements of a family-centered rehabilitation program include meaningful participation by families in medical decision making and an institutional culture flexible enough to respond to the ongoing collaboration between families and practitioners.

  14. Metals production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Theodore S.

    1992-02-01

    Existing procedures for design of electrochemical plants can be used for design of lunar processes taking into consideration the differences in environmental conditions. These differences include: 1/6 Earth gravity, high vacuum, solar electrical and heat source, space radiation heat sink, long days and nights, and different availability and economics of materials, energy, and labor. Techniques have already been developed for operation of relatively small scale hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems used in the U.S. lunar landing program. Design and operation of lunar aqueous electrolytic process plants appears to be within the state-of-the-art. Finding or developing compatible materials for construction and designing of fused-magma metal winning cells will present a real engineering challenge.

  15. Metals production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Theodore S.

    1992-01-01

    Existing procedures for design of electrochemical plants can be used for design of lunar processes taking into consideration the differences in environmental conditions. These differences include: 1/6 Earth gravity, high vacuum, solar electrical and heat source, space radiation heat sink, long days and nights, and different availability and economics of materials, energy, and labor. Techniques have already been developed for operation of relatively small scale hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems used in the U.S. lunar landing program. Design and operation of lunar aqueous electrolytic process plants appears to be within the state-of-the-art. Finding or developing compatible materials for construction and designing of fused-magma metal winning cells will present a real engineering challenge.

  16. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26563789

  18. 5. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Foundation for ammunition depot noted in photograph no.3 is seen at center rear of mount. Camera position for photograph no. 1 is seen on road at left center distance. Looking 163° S. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

  20. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  1. 3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK TO UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  3. FFTF Work Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity.

  4. Financing a Simulation Center.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shawn; Mohsin, Adnan; Jones, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    As simulation-based training has become established within medical and health professional disciplines, skills training laboratories have become a standard in surgery training programs. In 2008, the American College of Surgeons and Association of Program Directors in Surgery developed a simulation-based surgical skills curriculum; the Residency Review Committee for Surgery of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated access to skills laboratories for all surgery programs. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and adapting the training curriculum requires a significant amount of resources. This article discusses the financial aspects of establishing a training center, from funding opportunities to budgeting considerations.

  5. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  6. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  8. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  9. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness. PMID:543319

  10. Seafloor manifold center installed

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, K.

    1982-07-01

    The Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Center (UMC), designed and tested as a diverless production facility, is a significant step toward really deep water oil and gas production. In May 1982, the 2100 metric ton unit was towed 645 miles from its Dutch fabrication yard and precisely emplaced in 500 ft water in the Cormorant field in only 6 days. When fully installed with all of its wells drilled and testing completed, the UMC will have cost an estimated $700 million. During its anticipated 25 yr operating life, the UMC is expected to produce ca 110 million bbl from the central Cormorant area. Design and operational criteria are described.

  11. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated for the Earth Resources Observation Systems Program of the Department of the Interior by the Topographic Division of the Geological Survey to provide access to Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, USGS aerial photography, and NASA aircraft data for the general public, domestic government agencies at all levels, and foreign government agencies at all levels, and foreign governments. Facilities are available for data storage, retrieval, reproduction, and dissemination, and for user assistance and training.

  12. A center's callosities.

    PubMed

    Adams, B B; Lucky, A W

    2001-02-01

    We present a case report of a 14-year-old white male who developed hyperkeratotic plaques on the distal aspects of 2 toes. He was referred by his primary care physician for the treatment of onychomycosis. With questioning, the patient stated that he played center for his high school basketball team. After physical examination, he was diagnosed with callosities caused by his basketball activities. Proper nail hygiene and wearing of larger footwear resulted in improvement of his callosities. Sports-related cutaneous injuries should be included in the differential diagnosis of nail and toe abnormalities.

  13. Abundant Metals Give Precious Hydrogenation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-11-29

    Homogeneous catalysts based on precious (noble) metals have had a profound influence on modern synthetic methods, enabling highly selective synthesis of organic compounds but typically require precious metal catalysts (Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt, and Pd). Increasing efforts have been devoted to the design and discovery of homogeneous catalysts using base metals (e.g., Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo). Morris et al. report Fe catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=O bonds. Cobalt catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=C bonds are described by Chirik et al., and Beller et al. report new nanoscale iron catalysts for synthesis of functionalized anilines through hydrogenation of nitroarenes. The author’s work in this area is supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  15. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children are ... raise awareness of the current state of child homelessness in the United States, documents the number of ...

  16. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  17. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a treatment center. This article focuses on hemodialysis at a treatment center. ... JT, Blake PG, Ing TS, eds. Handbook of Dialysis . 5th ed. ... TA. Hemodialysis. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, Taal ...

  18. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites Visit other Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services & Health and Human Services Websites section Expand Medicare.gov Link to the ... helpful links for all Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services websites section Expand Web Policies & Important Links Privacy ...

  19. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  20. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  1. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction. PMID:26466190

  2. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  3. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  4. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  5. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  6. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  7. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  8. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  9. Correlates of Senior Center Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssen, Anne M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    To determine the extent to which multiservice centers serve the varied needs of the senior population, this study examined users of a Senior Center and three groups of nonusers: persons only attending a nutrition site, former center participants, and persons who never participated. Differences were found in life styles. (Author)

  10. Guidelines for Engineering Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC.

    This report responds to a National Science Foundation (NSF) request to provide advice on developing Engineering Research Centers, which NSF described as "on-campus centers that would house cross-disciplinary experimental research activities." In addition to conducting such research, the principal purposes of the centers are to provide a means for…

  11. Centers for Enhancement of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Ed

    The Center for Enhancement of Education organizes seven specialized centers within the School of Education and Human Services to provide faculty and students with the opportunity for research, development, and public service activities that complement and supplement classroom teaching. Each of the seven centers stresses one of the following…

  12. Premier Forecasting Center Avoids Ax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Sarah

    2004-03-01

    Last fall, the U.S. Senate proposed eliminating all 2004 funding for NOAA's Space Environment Center (SEC), but fortunately for the world's premier space weather forecasting center and its myriad customers, the Senate did not get its way. When the full Congress passed the final budget on 22 January, the center's budget for the year was at least restored-at least partially.

  13. NASA Glenn Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehra, Arun K.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the NASA Glenn Research Center. The presentation is a broad overview, including the chain of command at the center, its aeronautics facilities, and the factors which shape aerospace product line integration at the center. Special attention is given to the future development of high fidelity probabilistic methods, and NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation).

  14. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  15. Metal-phosphate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Beth Ann; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  16. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  17. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  18. Memory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under contract to NASA during preparations for the space station, Memry Technologies Inc. investigated shape memory effect (SME). SME is a characteristic of certain metal alloys that can change shape in response to temperature variations. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Memry used its NASA-acquired expertise to produce a line of home and industrial safety products, and refined the technology in the mid-1990s. Among the new products they developed are three MemrySafe units which prevent scalding from faucets. Each system contains a small valve that reacts to temperature, not pressure. When the water reaches dangerous temperatures, the unit reduces the flow to a trickle; when the scalding temperature subsides, the unit restores normal flow. Other products are the FIRECHEK 2 and 4, heat-activated shutoff valves for industrial process lines, which sense excessive heat and cut off pneumatic pressure. The newest of these products is Memry's Demand Management Water Heater which shifts the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak demands, conserving energy and money.

  19. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  20. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  1. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  2. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  3. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  4. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Christopher M; Ross, Larry; Lingenfelter, Forrest E; Sokolnikov, Pavel I; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  5. Regional Warning Center Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    RWC-Sweden is operated by the Lund division of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics located at IDEON, a Science Research Technology Park. The Institute of Technology of Lund and Lund University are just adjacent to IDEON. This creates a lot of synergy effects. Copenhagen, with the Danish National Space Center DNSC), and Atmosphere Space Research Division of Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), is 45 min away via the bridge. The new LOIS Space Centre is located two hours away by car, north of Lund and just outside V¨xj¨. The IRF Lund a o division is aiming at becoming a "Solar and Space Weather Center". We focus on solar magnetic activity, its influence on climate and on space weather effects such the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC). Basic research: A PostDoc position on "Solar Magnetic Activity: Topology and Predictions has recently been created. Research is carried on to improve predictions of solar magnetic activity. Preparations for using upcoming SDO vector magnetic fields are ongoing. Predictions: RWC-Sweden offers real-time forecasts of space weather and space weather effects based on neural networks. We participated in the NASA/NOAA Cycle 24 Prediction Panel. We have also participated in several ESA/EU solar-climate projects New observation facilities: Distributed, wide-area radio facility (LOIS) for solar (and other space physics) observations and a guest prof: Radio facility about 200 km distant, outside V¨xj¨ (Sm˚ a o aland), in Ronneby (Blekinge) and Lund (Sk˚ ane) is planned to be used for tracking of CMEs and basic solar physics studies of the corona. The LOIS station outside V¨xj¨ has a o been up and running for the past three years. Bo Thidé has joined the Lund division e as a guest prof. A new magnetometer at Risinge LOIS station has been installed an calibrated and expected to be operational in March, 2008.

  6. Adsorption of two gas molecules at a single metal site in a metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Runčevski, Tomče; Kapelewski, Matthew T.; Torres-Gavosto, Rodolfo M.; Tarver, Jacob D.; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy to markedly increase the gas storage capacity of metal-organic frameworks is to introduce coordinatively-unsaturated metal centers capable of binding multiple gas molecules. Herein, we provide an initial demonstration that a single metal site within a framework can support the terminal coordination of two gas molecules--specifically hydrogen, methane, or carbon dioxide.

  7. Taking the center to market.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Roberts, T

    1985-01-01

    Community mental health centers have seldom been involved in marketing their services. Marketing is defined as responding sensitively to human needs, not hucksterism, and is an appropriate activity for centers. Centers are vulnerable because of declining federal funding and in order to serve the poor, must also service other populations with greater ability to pay for services or face retrenchment. Over the past twenty years, locally controlled centers have broadened their missions to serve many types of personal and family problems, not just the chronically ill. Centers should omit "mental health" for their names because of the stigma. Guidelines for creation of a positive image including name and logo selection, color, open houses, and ad campaigns are given using Madison Center (formerly the Mental Health Center of St. Joseph County) as a case study. Reactions of other providers, creative delivery of services through consultation and education, market segmentation and message levels of advertising are also discussed.

  8. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  9. JSC Metal Finishing Waste Minimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Erica

    2003-01-01

    THe paper discusses the following: Johnson Space Center (JSC) has achieved VPP Star status and is ISO 9001 compliant. The Structural Engineering Division in the Engineering Directorate is responsible for operating the metal finishing facility at JSC. The Engineering Directorate is responsible for $71.4 million of space flight hardware design, fabrication and testing. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility processes flight hardware to support the programs in particular schedule and mission critical flight hardware. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility is operated by Rothe Joint Venture. The Facility provides following processes: anodizing, alodining, passivation, and pickling. JSC Metal Finishing Facility completely rebuilt in 1998. Total cost of $366,000. All new tanks, electrical, plumbing, and ventilation installed. Designed to meet modern safety, environmental, and quality requirements. Designed to minimize contamination and provide the highest quality finishes.

  10. Radial distribution of metallicity in the LMC cluster systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    New determinations of the deprojected distances to the galaxy center for 94 star clusters and their metal abundances are used to investigate the variation of metallicity across the two LMC star cluster systems (Kontizas et al. 1990). A systematic radial trend of metallicity is observed in the extended outer cluster system, the outermost clusters being significantly metal poorer than the more central ones, with the exception of six clusters (which might lie out of the plane of the cluster system) out of 77. A radial metallicity gradient has been found, qualitatively comparable to that of the Milky Way for its system of the old disk clusters. If the six clusters are taken into consideration then the outer cluster system is well mixed up to 8 kpc. The spatial distribution of metallicities for the inner LMC cluster system, consisting of very young globulars does not show a systematic radial trend; they are all metal rich.

  11. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  12. Metallic Rainfall Mechanism and Time Scale of Metal-Silicate Separation in a Magma Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höink, T.; Schmalzl, J.; Hansen, U.

    2006-12-01

    The metal-rainfall mechanism is thought to be responsible for the separation of metallic components from silicate components in a magma ocean on early Earth. This separation marks the first phase of core formation, which, besides delivering iron to the center of the Earth, may have produced today's abundances of siderophile elements. We have performed numerical studies to investigate the metallic rainfall mechanism, which we apply to the scenario of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma ocean. Our results suggest that metallic rainfall is a possible mechanism based on dynamical arguments, which are founded on an extensive parameter study. We find additional support from the partitioning of Nickel between metal droplets and surrounding silicate. We furthermore show that the time scale of metal-silicate separation by metallic rainfall strongly depends on the viscosity of the liquid silicate. For reasonable viscosity assumptions, metal-silicate separation in a magma ocean could have occurred on the time scale of up to a hundred years. This implies that the initiation of core formation was very rapid.

  13. Metallicity evolution, metallicity gradients, and gas fractions at z ~ 3.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, P.; Maiolino, R.; Sommariva, V.; Cresci, G.; Mannucci, F.; Marconi, A.; Meneghetti, M.; Grazian, A.; Cimatti, A.; Fontana, A.; Nagao, T.; Pentericci, L.

    2014-03-01

    We used near-infrared integral field spectroscopic observations from the AMAZE and LSD ESO programs to constrain the metallicity in a sample of 40 star-forming galaxies at 3 < z < 5 (most of which are at z ~ 3.4). We measured metallicities by exploiting strong emission-line diagnostics. We found that a significant fraction of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 3.4 deviate from the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR), with a metallicity of up to a factor of ten lower than expected according to the FMR. This deviation does not correlate with the dynamical properties of the galaxy or with the presence of interactions. To investigate the origin of the metallicity deviation in more detail, we also inferred information on the gas content by inverting the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation, assuming that the latter does not evolve out to z ~ 3.4. In agreement with recent CO observational data, we found that in contrast with the steeply rising trend at 0 < z < 2, the gas fraction in massive galaxies remains constant, with an indication of a marginal decline at 2 < z < 3.5. When combined with the metallicity information, we infer that to explain the low metallicity and gas content in z ~ 3.4 galaxies, both prominent outflows and massive pristine gas inflows are needed. In ten galaxies we can also spatially resolve the metallicity distribution. We found that the metallicity generally anticorrelates with the distribution of star formation and with the gas surface density. We discuss these findings in terms of pristine gas inflows toward the center, and outflows of metal-rich gas from the center toward the external regions. Based on data obtained at the VLT through the ESO programs 178.B-0838, 075.A-0300 and 076.A-0711.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Nanometer-scale exchange interactions between spin centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortan, V. R.; Şahin, C.; Flatté, M. E.

    2016-06-01

    Exchange interactions between isolated pairs of spin centers in diamond have been calculated, based on an accurate atomistic electronic structure for diamond and any impurity atoms, for spin-center separations of up to 2 nm. The exchange interactions exceed dipolar interactions for spin-center separations of less than 3 nm. NV- spin centers, which involve two lattice sites which differ from the host, interact very differently depending on the relative orientations of the symmetry axis of the spin center and the radius vector connecting the pair. Exchange interactions between transition-metal dopants behave similarly to those of NV- centers. The Mn-Mn exchange interaction decays with a much longer length scale than the Cr-Cr and Ni-Ni exchange interactions, exceeding dipolar interactions for Mn-Mn separations of less than 5 nm. Calculations of these highly anisotropic and spin-center-dependent interactions provide the potential for the design of spin-spin interactions for novel nanomagnetic structures.

  15. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  16. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  17. METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1958-03-01

    This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

  18. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  19. Space Operations Learning Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  20. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  1. Fabrication of metal nanoshells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, Jr., James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Metal nanoshells are fabricated by admixing an aqueous solution of metal ions with an aqueous solution of apoferritin protein molecules, followed by admixing an aqueous solution containing an excess of an oxidizing agent for the metal ions. The apoferritin molecules serve as bio-templates for the formation of metal nanoshells, which form on and are bonded to the inside walls of the hollow cores of the individual apoferritin molecules. Control of the number of metal atoms which enter the hollow core of each individual apoferritin molecule provides a hollow metal nonparticle, or nanoshell, instead of a solid spherical metal nanoparticle.

  2. Metals combustion in normal gravity and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Benz, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the combustion characteristics of metallic materials has been an ongoing area of research at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This research has been in support of both government and industrial operations and deals not only with the combustion of specific metallic materials but also with the relative flammabilities of these materials under similar conditions. Since many of the metallic materials that are characterized at WSTF for aerospace applications are to be used in microgravity environments, it was apparent that the testing of these materials needed to proceed in a microgravity environment. It was believed that burning metallic materials in a microgravity environment would allow the evaluation of the validity of applying normal gravity combustion tests to characterize metallic materials to be used in microgravity environments. It was also anticipated that microgravity testing would provide insight into the general combustion process of metallic materials. The availability of the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2.2-second drop tower provided the necessary facility to accomplish the microgravity portion of the testing while the normal gravity testing was conducted at NASA WSTF. The tests, both at LeRC and WSTF, were conducted in the same instrumented system and utilized the standard metal flammability test of upward propagation burning of cylindrical rod samples.

  3. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  4. Metal phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Metal 4, 4', 4", 4"'=tetracarboxylic phthalocyanines (MPTC) are prepared by reaction of trimellitic anhydride, a salt or hydroxide of the desired metal (or the metal in powdered form), urea and a catalyst. A purer form of MPTC is prepared than heretofore. These tetracarboxylic acids are then polymerized by heat to sheet polymers which have superior heat and oxidation resistance. The metal is preferably a divalent metal having an atomic radius close to 1.35A.

  5. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  6. Structural Aspects of Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miracle, Daniel; Egami, Takeshi; Flores, Katharine M; Kelton, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A recent structural model reconciles apparently conflicting features of randomness, short-range order, and medium-range order that coexist in metallic glasses. In this efficient cluster packing model, short-range order can be described by efficiently packed solute-centered clusters, producing more than a dozen established atomic clusters, including icosahedra. The observed preference for icosahedral short-range order in metallic glasses is consistent with the theme of efficient atomic packing and is further favored by solvent-centered clusters. Driven by solute-solute avoidance, medium-range order results from the organization in space of overlapping, percolating (via connected pathways), quasi-equivalent clusters. Cubic-like and icosahedral-like organization of these clusters are consistent with measured medium-range order. New techniques such as fluctuation electron microscopy now provide more detailed experimental studies of medium-range order for comparison with model predictions. Microscopic free volume in the efficient cluster packing model is able to represent experimental and computational results, showing free volume complexes ranging from subatomic to atomic-level sizes. Free volume connects static structural models to dynamic processes such as diffusion and deformation. New approaches dealing with 'free' and 'anti-free' microscopic volume and coordinated atomic motion show promise for modeling the complex dynamics of structural relaxations such as the glass transition. Future work unifying static and dynamic structural views is suggested.

  7. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  8. National Center for Supercomputer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrott, Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Center for Supercomputer Applications are presented. The objective is to develop comprehensive computational research environments through the use of evolving software technology.

  9. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Space Propulsion (CASP) is part of the University of Tennessee-Calspan Center for Aerospace Research (CAR). It was formed in 1985 to take advantage of the extensive research faculty and staff of the University of Tennessee and Calspan Corporation. It is also one of sixteen NASA sponsored Centers established to facilitate the Commercial Development of Space. Based on investigators' qualifications in propulsion system development, and matching industries' strong intent, the Center focused its efforts in the following technical areas: advanced chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, AI/Expert systems, fluids management in microgravity, and propulsion materials processing. This annual report focuses its discussion in these technical areas.

  10. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  11. ROSAT Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen; Pisarski, Ryszard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) ROSAT SCIENCE DATA CENTER (RSDC) activities for the recent years of our contract. Details have already been reported in the monthly reports. The SAO was responsible for the High Resolution Imager (HRI) detector on ROSAT. We also provided and supported the HRI standard analysis software used in the pipeline processing (SASS). Working with our colleagues at the Max Planck in Garching Germany (MPE), we fixed bugs and provided enhancements. The last major effort in this area was the port from VMS/VAX to VMS/ALPHA architecture. In 1998, a timing bug was found in the HRI standard processing system which degraded the positional accuracy because events accessed incorrect aspect solutions. The bug was fixed and we developed off-line correction routines and provided them to the community. The Post Reduction Off-line Software (PROS) package was developed by SAO and runs in the IRAF environment. Although in recent years PROS was not a contractual responsibility of the RSDC, we continued to maintain the system and provided new capabilities such as the ability to deal with simulated AXAF data in preparation for the NASA call for proposals for Chandra. Our most recent activities in this area included the debugging necessary for newer versions of IRAF which broke some of our software. At SAO we have an operating version of PROS and hope to release a patch even though almost all functionality that was lost was subsequently recovered via an IRAF patch (i.e. most of our problems were caused by an IRAF bug).

  12. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  13. Assessment/Advisement Center Handbook for Community College Testing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgendorf, Erik

    Developed by the Assessment/Advisement Center (AAC) at Missouri's Crowder College (CC), this handbook is designed as a model for other community college testing and advisement centers in establishing assessment policies and practices. First, an introduction is provided, describing changes in the role of assessment since the advent of on-line…

  14. 5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), and wood-frame garage (far right). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  15. PACE Center: A Mobile Career Information and Exploration Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham County Career Education, Blackfoot, ID.

    An innovative component of the Federally-sponsored Bingham County career education project is the Programed Activities for Career Exploration (PACE) Center, a mobile unit offering programed student activities to assist individual students in career planning. The mobile center visits each high school in the county; the sophomore year is selected as…

  16. Photobiomolecular deposition of metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2005-02-08

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  17. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1997 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights key projects and technologies at Johnson Space Center for 1997. The report focuses on the commercial potential of the projects and technologies and is arranged by CorpTech Major Products Groups. Emerging technologies in these major disciplines we summarized: solar system sciences, life sciences, technology transfer, computer sciences, space technology, and human support technology. Them NASA advances have a range of potential commercial applications, from a school internet manager for networks to a liquid metal mirror for optical measurements.

  18. 10. Looking northwest at the "community" area at the center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Looking northwest at the "community" area at the center of the store, and beyond at the main sales counters along the west wall; metal sheathing to protect the wood floor from the former heating stove can be seen in the foreground, and a wooden drawer unit for seeds is beyond the chairs - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  19. Predicting dietborne metal toxicity from metal influxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Dietborne metal uptake prevails for many species in nature. However, the links between dietary metal exposure and toxicity are not well understood. Sources of uncertainty include the lack of suitable tracers to quantify exposure for metals such as copper, the difficulty to assess dietary processes such as food ingestion rate, and the complexity to link metal bioaccumulation and effects. We characterized dietborne copper, nickel, and cadmium influxes in a freshwater gastropod exposed to diatoms labeled with enriched stable metal isotopes. Metal influxes in Lymnaea stagnalis correlated linearly with dietborne metal concentrations over a range encompassing most environmental exposures. Dietary Cd and Ni uptake rate constants (kuf) were, respectively, 3.3 and 2.3 times higher than that for Cu. Detoxification rate constants (k detox) were similar among metals and appeared 100 times higher than efflux rate constants (ke). Extremely high Cu concentrations reduced feeding rates, causing the relationship between exposure and influx to deviate from linearity; i.e., Cu uptake rates leveled off between 1500 and 1800 nmol g-1 day-1. L. stagnalis rapidly takes up Cu, Cd, and Ni from food but detoxifies the accumulated metals, instead of reducing uptake or intensifying excretion. Above a threshold uptake rate, however, the detoxification capabilities of L. stagnalis are overwhelmed.

  20. Predicting dietborne metal toxicity from metal influxes.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Luoma, Samuel N

    2009-07-01

    Dietborne metal uptake prevails for many species in nature. However, the links between dietary metal exposure and toxicity are not well understood. Sources of uncertainty include the lack of suitable tracers to quantify exposure for metals such as copper, the difficulty to assess dietary processes such as food ingestion rate, and the complexity to link metal bioaccumulation and effects. We characterized dietborne copper, nickel, and cadmium influxes in a freshwater gastropod exposed to diatoms labeled with enriched stable metal isotopes. Metal influxes in Lymnaea stagnalis correlated linearly with dietborne metal concentrations over a range encompassing most environmental exposures. Dietary Cd and Ni uptake rate constants (k(uf)) were, respectively, 3.3 and 2.3 times higher than thatfor Cu. Detoxification rate constants (k(detox)) were similar among metals and appeared 100 times higher than efflux rate constants (K(e)). Extremely high Cu concentrations reduced feeding rates, causing the relationship between exposure and influx to deviate from linearity, i.e., Cu uptake rates leveled off between 1500 and 1800 nmol g(-1) day(-1). L. stagnalis rapidly takes up Cu, Cd, and Ni from food but detoxifies the accumulated metals, instead of reducing uptake or intensifying excretion. Above a threshold uptake rate, however, the detoxification capabilities of L. stagnalis are overwhelmed.

  1. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  2. Building reactive copper centers in human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Song, He; Weitz, Andrew C; Hendrich, Michael P; Lewis, Edwin A; Emerson, Joseph P

    2013-08-01

    Reengineering metalloproteins to generate new biologically relevant metal centers is an effective a way to test our understanding of the structural and mechanistic features that steer chemical transformations in biological systems. Here, we report thermodynamic data characterizing the formation of two type-2 copper sites in carbonic anhydrase and experimental evidence showing one of these new, copper centers has characteristics similar to a variety of well-characterized copper centers in synthetic models and enzymatic systems. Human carbonic anhydrase II is known to bind two Cu(2+) ions; these binding events were explored using modern isothermal titration calorimetry techniques that have become a proven method to accurately measure metal-binding thermodynamic parameters. The two Cu(2+)-binding events have different affinities (K a approximately 5 × 10(12) and 1 × 10(10)), and both are enthalpically driven processes. Reconstituting these Cu(2+) sites under a range of conditions has allowed us to assign the Cu(2+)-binding event to the three-histidine, native, metal-binding site. Our initial efforts to characterize these Cu(2+) sites have yielded data that show distinctive (and noncoupled) EPR signals associated with each copper-binding site and that this reconstituted enzyme can activate hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the oxidation of 2-aminophenol. PMID:23744511

  3. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical

  4. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  5. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons Becomes Metallic

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lopez-Benzanilla, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Standard spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been conducted to study the electronic structures and magnetic properties of O and S functionalized zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (zBNNRs). Unlike the semiconducting and nonmagnetic H edge-terminated zBNNRs, the O edge-terminated zBNNRs have two energetically degenerate magnetic ground states with a ferrimagnetic character on the B edge, both of which are metallic. In contrast, the S edge-terminated zBNNRs are nonmagnetic albeit still metallic. An intriguing coexistence of two different Peierls-like distortions is observed for S edge-termination that manifests as a strong S dimerization at the B zigzag edge and a weak S trimerization at the N zigzag edge, dictated by the band fillings at the vicinity of the Fermi level. Nevertheless, metallicity is retained along the S wire on theNedge due to the partial filling of the band derived from the pz orbital of S. A second type of functionalization with O or S atoms embedded in the center of zBNNRs yields semiconducting features. Detailed examination of both types of functionalized zBNNRs reveals that the p orbitals on O or S play a crucial role in mediating the electronic structures of the ribbons.We suggest that O and S functionalization of zBNNRs may open new routes toward practical electronic devices based on boron nitride materials.

  6. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  7. Saving Energy at Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-12

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions essential to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components.

  8. Teachers' Centers Exchange Directory, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Jeanne; Piper, Barbara

    This directory lists those American teacher centers that are in touch with the Teachers' Centers Exchange. All 116 entries in the directory are written in a common format. This is intended to help readers make comparisons and select individual ideas rather than to adopt whole models. Each listing is headed by the name, address, and phone number of…

  9. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 technical report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during 1990. The report lists 130 publications, 226 presentations, and 87 new technology reports and patents.

  10. Spherical Torus Center Stack Design

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-01-18

    The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

  11. Center for space microelectronics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during the past year. The report lists 187 publications, 253 presentations, and 111 new technology reports and patents in the areas of solid-state devices, photonics, advanced computing, and custom microcircuits.

  12. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  13. HRSA: Find a Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... box Or you can try to start a search with any other close or appropriate keyword. HELP: 877-464-4772, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET, weekdays (except federal holidays) HRSA Contact Center Close × Center Name Close ... Filters Select filters to narrow the search results. After filters have been selected, go to ...

  14. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 193 publications, 211 presentations, and 125 new technology reports and patents.

  15. The Validity of Assessment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, George C., III

    This paper summarizes a review of the recent literature in search of evidence for the validity of industrial assessment centers. The topic is divided into two parts: (1) the evidence regarding the validity of several of the individual assessment techniques that are used in industrial assessment centers; and (2) the evidence concerning the validity…

  16. Learning Centers: Development and Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennie, Frances

    There has been in recent years a growing acceptance of individualized learning concepts. Learning Centers have come to be viewed as an economical and viable strategy for accommodating diverse learning styles and needs. This book provides the educator with an understanding of the learning center concept, its origins, present manifestations, and…

  17. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  18. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  19. Nature of Pressure-induced Insulating States in Simple Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Hemley, Russell

    As experimentally established, all the alkali metals and heavy alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr and Ba) become progressively less conductive on compression, at least up to some critical limit over a broad pressure range. Of these metals, Li and Na clearly undergo pressure-induced metal-insulator transitions, which may also be called reverse Mott transitions. Here, using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that such transitions can be understood in terms of band representations introduced by Zak. The valence bands in the insulating states are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of semimetallic phases with flat surface states. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca). This research was supported by EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DESC0001057.

  20. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  1. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  2. 78 FR 14549 - National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  3. Complexed metals in hazardous waste: Limitations of conventional chemical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Diel, B.N.; Kuchynka, D.J.; Borchert, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the management of hazardous waste, more is known regarding the treatment of metals than about the fixation, destruction and/or immobilization of any other hazardous constituent group. Metals are the only hazardous constituents which cannot be destroyed, and so must be converted to their least soluble and/or reactive form to prevent reentry into the environment. The occurrence of complexed metals, e.g., metallocyanides, and/or chelated metals, e.g., M{center_dot}EDTA in hazardous waste streams presents formidable challenges to conventional waste treatment practices. This paper presents the results of extensive research into the destruction (chemical oxidation) of metallocyanides and metal-chelates, defines the utility and limitations of conventional chemical oxidation approaches, illustrates some of the waste management difficulties presented by such species, and presents preliminary data on the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photodecomposition of chelated metals.

  4. Selected results for metals from LDEF experiment A0171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.

    1992-01-01

    Metal specimens in disk type and ribbon configurations of interest to various programs at the Marshall Space Flight Center were exposed to the LEO environment for 5.8 years on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0171. Most of the metals flown were well heat sunk in the LDEF experiment tray which experienced benign temperatures, but a few metals were thermally isolated allowing them to experience greater thermal extremes. All metal specimens whose preflight weights were known showed a weight change as a result of exposure. Optical property and mass changes are attributed principally to atomic oxygen exposures. Silver and copper were grossly affected whereas tantalum, molybdenum, and several preoxidized alloys were the least affected. Metals contained in this experiment are shown. Results including mass, surface morphology, and optical property changes from selected evaluations of these metals are presented.

  5. When are thin films of metals metallic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, E. W.; Dowben, P. A.

    1993-04-01

    There is an increasing body of experimental information suggesting that very thin films of materials, normally considered to be metals, exhibit behavior characteristic of a nonmetal. In almost all cases, there is a nonmetal-to-metal transition as a function of film density or thickness, frequently accompanied by a structural transition. Amazingly, this behavior seems to occur for metal films on metal substrates, as well as for metals on semiconductors. The identification of this phenomena and the subsequent explanation has been slow in developing, due to the inability to directly measure the conductivity of a submonolayer film. This paper will discuss the evidence accumulated from variety of spectroscopic experimental techniques for three systems: a Mott-Hubbard transition, a Peierls-like distortion, and a Wilson transition.

  6. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  7. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  8. Hydrogen storage in microporous metal-organic frameworks with exposed metal sites.

    PubMed

    Dincă, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    Owing to their high uptake capacity at low temperature and excellent reversibility kinetics, metal-organic frameworks have attracted considerable attention as potential solid-state hydrogen storage materials. In the last few years, researchers have also identified several strategies for increasing the affinity of these materials towards hydrogen, among which the binding of H(2) to unsaturated metal centers is one of the most promising. Herein, we review the synthetic approaches employed thus far for producing frameworks with exposed metal sites, and summarize the hydrogen uptake capacities and binding energies in these materials. In addition, results from experiments that were used to probe independently the metal-hydrogen interaction in selected materials will be discussed.

  9. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education.

  10. Computer Center: Setting Up a Microcomputer Center--1 Person's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Collins, Michael, A. J., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Considers eight components to be considered in setting up a microcomputer center for use with college classes. Discussions include hardware, software, physical facility, furniture, technical support, personnel, continuing financial expenditures, and security. (CW)

  11. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River.

  12. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

  13. Prediction of Weather Related Center Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Kulkarni; Banavar, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of an initial study of relations between national delay, center level delays and weather. The results presented in the paper indicate: (a) the methodology used for estimating the delay at the national level can be extended to estimate delays caused by a center and delays experienced by a center, (b)delays caused by a center can be predicted using that center's Weather Impacted Traffic Index (WITI) whereas delays experienced by a center are best predicted using WITI of that center and that of a few prominent centers (c) there is differential impact of weather of different centers on center delays.

  14. "Gloster" metal construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    This report details the methods of construction employed by the Gloster Company in their fabrication of metal aircraft parts. Ribs, spars, wings, and metal treatments to prevent oxidation are all discussed.

  15. Economic Geology (Metals)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gair, Jacob E.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews metalliferous ore-deposit research reported in 1971. Research was dominated by isotopic studies, and worldwide metals exploration was marked by announcements of important new discoveries of base metals, iron ore, nickel, titanium, and uranium. (Author/PR)

  16. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-10-11

    A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  17. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  18. Metal to semiconductor transition in metallic transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tongay, Sefaattin; Yue, Qu; Kang, Jun; Wu, Junqiao; Li, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    We report on tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides (mTMDCs) by 2D to 1D size confinement. The stability of the mTMDC monolayers and nanoribbons is demonstrated by the larger binding energy compared to the experimentally available semiconducting TMDCs. The 2D MX2 (M = Nb, Ta; X = S, Se) monolayers are non-ferromagnetic metals and mechanically softer compared to their semiconducting TMDCs counterparts. Interestingly, mTMDCs undergo metal-to-semiconductor transition when the ribbon width approaches to ˜13 Å and ˜7 Å for zigzag and armchair edge terminations, respectively; then these ribbons convert back to metal when the ribbon widths further decrease. Zigzag terminated nanoribbons are ferromagnetic semiconductors, and their magnetic properties can also be tuned by hydrogen edge passivation, whereas the armchair nanoribbons are non-ferromagnetic semiconductors. Our results display that the mTMDCs offer a broad range of physical properties spanning from metallic to semiconducting and non-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic that is ideal for applications where stable narrow bandgap semiconductors with different magnetic properties are desired.

  19. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  20. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  1. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  2. Nanochemistry of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Gleb B.

    2001-10-01

    The results of studies on the nanochemistry of metals published in recent years are generalised. Primary attention is centred on the methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their chemical reactions. The means of stabilisation of nanoparticles which involve individual metals and incorporate atoms of several metals are considered as well as their physicochemical properties. Self-assembling processes of nanoparticles are described. The prospects of using metal nanoparticles in semiconductor devices, catalysis, biology and medicine are discussed. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  3. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  4. PRODUCTION OF METALS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1961-09-19

    A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

  5. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  6. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  7. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  8. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  9. Metallicity gradients in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schombert, James M.; Hanlan, Patricia C.; Barsony, Mary; Rakos, Karl D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of medium-to-bright early-type galaxies in six bandpasses from 3500 A to 2.2 microns is presented in order to quantify their colors and color gradients and relate these to metallicity and properties of the underlying stellar population. The Stromgren filter system chosen makes it possible to introduce a new calibration to the Mg(2) system from the present narrow-band v - y indices. A comparison is presented of narrow-band colors centered on particular spectral features vs a color dominated by the mean temperature of the giant branch (i.e., J - K) to test the effects of light vs heavy element abundances on knowledge of the total system metallicity, Z, and the effects of reddening. A good correlation is found between v - y and Mg(2); it provides a connection between one light element metallicity indicator (v - y centers on the CN blend) and another, Mg. The color-magnitude relations for all five optical and near-IR colors are shown. The strongest correlation exists for the metallicity colors, v - y and J - K.

  10. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  11. Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humeniuk, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

  12. Human-Centered Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  13. Oceans and Human Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ocean and human health science can help prevent disease outbreaks and improve public health through a deeper understanding of the causes ... our Center and the field of oceans and human health science. More Research Learn about the research ...

  14. National Center on Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Synthesize and disseminate high quality research on elder abuse to encourage the translation of research into practice. ... to further the field for those interested in elder abuse identification and prevention. What’s Happening National Center on ...

  15. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... C., serving more than 2 million students in preschool through 12th grade. Centers usually are inside a ... Help Your Teen Succeed in High School 504 Education Plans Getting Involved at Your Child's School Gifted ...

  16. Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

  17. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  18. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  19. Business management of headache centers.

    PubMed

    Nappi, G; Micieli, G; Cavallini, A; Rossi, G; Rossi, G; Rossi, F

    1998-02-01

    Economic evaluation of the costs and benefits of a headache center or unit has become very important for headache specialists. Many of the problems concerning this "financial" approach to headache derive from the model of organization of the Headache Unit, which is dependent on the various approaches to healthcare practiced in the country considered. So far there are two models of headache center that are generally considered: the hospital-based center and the independent center. An argument favoring hospital-based headache clinics is the lower costs, primarily because of their functional connection with the services of a general hospital, i.e., neuroradiology, neurophysiology, routine laboratory analysis, etc. Another is that the headache specialist has the possibility to visit the patients presenting to the emergency room in the acute phase of headache. Independent clinics have greater costs, but are equally as effective as hospital-based models. PMID:9533678

  20. Ten-Minute Super Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Charlene Howells; Briles, Patricia

    1983-01-01

    Four student minicenters, concerning friendship, good grooming, good housekeeping, and fitness, are described. Reproducible materials to be used in the centers are included as well as instructions and suggestions. (CJ)

  1. Technology Development Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is developing and testing VLBI technologies and conducts observations with this new equipment. This report gives an overview of the Technology Development Center (TDC) at NICT and summarizes recent activities.

  2. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  3. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  4. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  5. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  6. Fiber Metal Laminates Made by the VARTM Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Weiser, Erik S.; Loos, Alfred; Johnson, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates (FMLs) are multi-component materials utilizing metals, fibers and matrix resins. Tailoring their properties is readily achievable by varying one or more of these components. Established FMLs like GLARE utilize aluminum foils, glass fibers and epoxy matrices and are manufactured using an autoclave. Two new processes for manufacturing FMLs using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) have been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A description of these processes and the resulting FMLs are presented.

  7. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  8. Growth and properties of High-quality metal/ yttrium iron garnet/metal sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldosary, Mohammed; Li, Junxue; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Shi, Jing

    Sandwiched structures of magnetic insulators (e.g. yttrium iron garnet or YIG) between two normal metals are potentially useful for spintronics. In this work, we report our approach of growing a single crystalline YIG thin film on a Pt or Cu thin layer using the combination of sputtering and PLD. First, either 5 nm of Pt or Cu is deposited on (110)-oriented gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrate using sputtering and then YIG is grown by PLD at intermediate temperatures followed by rapid thermal annealing at higher temperatures. Surprisingly, YIG films show a well-defined single-crystal reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern, despite that they are grown on polycrystalline Pt or Cu. TEM images show flat, clean and sharp interfaces between YIG/metals and metals/GGG. The magnetic properties show in-plane magnetic anisotropy. However, when thicker metallic layers (20 nm) or amorphous (metals/SiO2) substrate are used, only YIG polycrystalline phase is observed. We will show that by properly controlling the growth conditions the metal/YIG/ metal structures are not only of high structural quality, but also have desired properties for spin current transport. This work was supported as part of the SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # SC0012670.

  9. Germinal Centers without T Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Vinuesa, Carola García; Cook, Matthew C.; Ball, Jennifer; Drew, Marion; Sunners, Yvonne; Cascalho, Marilia; Wabl, Matthias; Klaus, Gerry G.B.; MacLennan, Ian C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Germinal centers are critical for affinity maturation of antibody (Ab) responses. This process allows the production of high-efficiency neutralizing Ab that protects against virus infection and bacterial exotoxins. In germinal centers, responding B cells selectively mutate the genes that encode their receptors for antigen. This process can change Ab affinity and specificity. The mutated cells that produce high-affinity Ab are selected to become Ab-forming or memory B cells, whereas cells that have lost affinity or acquired autoreactivity are eliminated. Normally, T cells are critical for germinal center formation and subsequent B cell selection. Both processes involve engagement of CD40 on B cells by T cells. This report describes how high-affinity B cells can be induced to form large germinal centers in response to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl (NP)-Ficoll in the absence of T cells or signaling through CD40 or CD28. This requires extensive cross-linking of the B cell receptors, and a frequency of antigen-specific B cells of at least 1 in 1,000. These germinal centers abort dramatically at the time when mutated high-affinity B cells are normally selected by T cells. Thus, there is a fail-safe mechanism against autoreactivity, even in the event of thymus-independent germinal center formation. PMID:10662794

  10. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  11. Electrolytic purification of metals

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Kenneth A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of electrolytically separating metal from impurities comprises providing the metal and impurities in a molten state in a container having a porous membrane therein, the membrane having a thickness in the range of about 0.01 to 0.1 inch, being capable of containing the molten metal in the container, and being permeable by a molten electrolyte. The metal is electrolytically transferred through the membrane to a cathode in the presence of the electrolyte for purposes of separating or removing impurities from the metal.

  12. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  13. The Elusive Bose Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Philip; Dalidovich, Denis

    2003-10-01

    The conventional theory of metals is in crisis. In the past 15 years, there has been an unexpected sprouting of metallic states in low-dimensional systems, directly contradicting conventional wisdom. For example, bosons are thought to exist in one of two ground states: condensed in a superconductor or localized in an insulator. However, several experiments on thin metal-alloy films have observed that a metallic phase disrupts the direct transition between the superconductor and the insulator. We analyze the experiments on the insulator-superconductor transition and argue that the intervening metallic phase is bosonic. All relevant theoretical proposals for the Bose metal are discussed, particularly the recent idea that the metallic phase is glassy. The implications for the putative vortex-glass state in the copper oxide superconductors are examined.

  14. The Research Role of a National Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    The functional role of a national center for vocational education depends on the people doing the work; consequently, the center sets its own agenda when it makes personal decisions. A center's role should include two elements: in setting its own research agenda, a center should take a broad perspective on vocational education; and a center should…

  15. E E Centers around the USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Karen

    1980-01-01

    Describes the school programs, teacher workshops and other activities of four environmental education centers: Audubon Center, Greenwich, Connecticut; Whitetail Environmental Center, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania; Junior Museum and Nature Center, Lee County, Florida; and Wave Hill Center for Environmental Studies, Bronx, New York. (WB)

  16. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must... than one control center is located at an LNG Plant, each control center must have more than one means of communication with each other center. (e) Each control center must have a means of communicating...

  17. Molecularly doped metals.

    PubMed

    Avnir, David

    2014-02-18

    The many millions of organic, inorganic, and bioorganic molecules represent a very rich library of chemical, biological, and physical properties that do not show up among the approximately 100 metals. The ability to imbue metals with any of these molecular properties would open up tremendous potential for the development of new materials. In addition to their traditional features and their traditional applications, metals would have new traits, which would merge their classical virtues such as conductivity and catalytic activity with the diverse properties of these molecules. In this Account, we describe a new materials methodology, which enables, for the first time, the incorporation and entrapment of small organic molecules, polymers, and biomolecules within metals. These new materials are denoted dopant@metal. The creation of dopant@metal yields new properties that are more than or different from the sum of the individual properties of the two components. So far we have developed methods for the doping of silver, copper, gold, iron, palladium, platinum, and some of their alloys, as well as Hg-Ag amalgams. We have successfully altered classical metal properties (such as conductivity), induced unorthodox properties (such as rendering a metal acidic or basic), used metals as heterogeneous matrices for homogeneous catalysts, and formed new metallic catalysts such as metals doped with organometallic complexes. In addition, we have created materials that straddle the border between polymers and metals, we have entrapped enzymes to form bioactive metals, we have induced chirality within metals, we have made corrosion-resistant iron, we formed efficient biocidal materials, and we demonstrated a new concept for batteries. We have developed a variety of methods for synthesizing dopant@metals including aqueous homogeneous and heterogeneous reductions of the metal cations, reductions in DMF, electrochemical entrapments, thermal decompositions of zerovalent metal carbonyls

  18. Molecularly doped metals.

    PubMed

    Avnir, David

    2014-02-18

    The many millions of organic, inorganic, and bioorganic molecules represent a very rich library of chemical, biological, and physical properties that do not show up among the approximately 100 metals. The ability to imbue metals with any of these molecular properties would open up tremendous potential for the development of new materials. In addition to their traditional features and their traditional applications, metals would have new traits, which would merge their classical virtues such as conductivity and catalytic activity with the diverse properties of these molecules. In this Account, we describe a new materials methodology, which enables, for the first time, the incorporation and entrapment of small organic molecules, polymers, and biomolecules within metals. These new materials are denoted dopant@metal. The creation of dopant@metal yields new properties that are more than or different from the sum of the individual properties of the two components. So far we have developed methods for the doping of silver, copper, gold, iron, palladium, platinum, and some of their alloys, as well as Hg-Ag amalgams. We have successfully altered classical metal properties (such as conductivity), induced unorthodox properties (such as rendering a metal acidic or basic), used metals as heterogeneous matrices for homogeneous catalysts, and formed new metallic catalysts such as metals doped with organometallic complexes. In addition, we have created materials that straddle the border between polymers and metals, we have entrapped enzymes to form bioactive metals, we have induced chirality within metals, we have made corrosion-resistant iron, we formed efficient biocidal materials, and we demonstrated a new concept for batteries. We have developed a variety of methods for synthesizing dopant@metals including aqueous homogeneous and heterogeneous reductions of the metal cations, reductions in DMF, electrochemical entrapments, thermal decompositions of zerovalent metal carbonyls

  19. Conjugated organometallic materials containing tungsten centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marya

    Our group is interested in the optical and electronic properties of organometallic analogues of conjugated organic compounds. Specifically, in this thesis we will discuss the properties of complexes in which W≡C moieties replace C≡C fragments within the framework of oligo(phenyleneethynylenes) and a C4-polyyne. A family of derivatives of the type Ph(C≡CC6H4 )m(L)4W≡C(C6H 4C≡C)nPh (m = 0, 1; n = 0, 1, 2) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, electronic-absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry. This substitution has allowed us to directly compare the electronic and optical properties of these organometallic complexes with those of their organic analogues. We found that while these systems exhibit redox and spectroscopic properties similar to those of their organic counterparts they also exhibit new characteristics that are due to the incorporation of the metal center. The design of these compounds has also allowed us to address how the position of the metal within the backbone affects the electronic and optical properties of these compounds. We found that the position of the metal is important in controlling the electronic structure of the material, thus suggesting that the properties of these compounds can be further tuned by changing the position of the metal within the conjugated carbon chain. In addition, we have appended sulfur and isocyanide functionalities to oligo(phenyleneethynylene) analogues. A family of compounds of the type Cl(dppe) 2W(≡CC6H4-4-(C≡CC6H 4)m-4'-R) (m = l, 2; R = N≡C, SCH2CH 2Si(CH3)3) have been prepared and characterized by electronic-absorption spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Differences between the sulfur and isocyanide functionalities are examined, along with the effects of extending conjugation along the arylidyne chain. Evidence that the sulfur-containing arylidyne complexes form self-assembled monolayers on Au and Pt electrodes is presented. In addition, the electron-transfer rates for

  20. Explosive Spot Joining of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for wire splicing using an explosive joining process. The apparatus consists of a prebend, U-shaped strap of metal that slides over prepositioned wires. A standoff means separates the wires from the strap before joining. An adhesive means holds two ribbon explosives in position centered over the U-shaped strap. A detonating means connects to the ribbon explosives. The process involves spreading strands of each wire to be joined into a flat plane. The process then requires alternating each strand in alignment to form a mesh-like arrangement with an overlapped area. The strap slides over the strands of the wires. and the standoff means is positioned between the two surfaces. The detonating means then initiates the ribbon explosives that drive the strap to accomplish a high velocity. angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding resulting in electron-sharing linkups.