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Sample records for 2-hour urokinase regime

  1. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  2. Development of immunoassays for human urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair

    1988-01-01

    Radioimmune assays (RIA) and enzyme linked immune assays for measurement of pro-urokinase and the two active forms of the enzyme were developed. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, with desired specificities against preselected synthetic regions of urokinase (UK), were obtained by immunization with the respective synthetic peptides and used to develop RIA for zymogen and the two activated forms of UK.

  3. Human Trials of a 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.; Vann, R. D.; Nishi, Ronald Y.; Gerth, W. A.; Beltran, E.; Conkin, J.; Schneider, Suzanne; Loftin, K. C.; Sullivan, Pat A.; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We evaluate 2-hour prebreathe protocols combining simulated microgravity and exercise during prebreathe with the objective of validating a protocol for use on International Space Station (ISS). The protocol was tested with four different exercise doses during prebreathe in a multi-center trial involving three laboratories. Subject selection, Doppler monitoring techniques for venous gas emboli (VGE), test termination criteria, and definitions of decompression sickness (DCS) were standardized in all laboratories. The Phase II protocol met the accept criteria for a prebreathe procedure for use by astronauts during assembly and maintenance of the ISS Dual-cycle ergometry or light exercise individually was not sufficient to protect against DCS at acceptable levels. The combination of both was successful.

  4. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  5. Adsorption properties for urokinase on local diatomite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Zhang, Jianbo; Yang, Weimin; Wu, Jieda; Chen, Rongsan

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, adsorption isotherm of urokinase on two typical local diatomites were determined at 25 °C and their surface electrical potentials (ζ), isoelectrical point values (IEP) were determined. The properties of diatomites, the relationship among diatomite structure, pore-size distribution, surface ζ and adsorption isotherm were discussed. The adsorption equation of urokinase was calculated from the adsorption isotherm. The adsorption mode of urokinase on diatomite surface was judged by the configuration function α. The relationship between the amount of adsorbed urokinase and IEP value was also discussed.

  6. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  7. Inflight Exercise Regimen for the 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Philip P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Woodruff, Kristin K.; Schneider, Susan M.; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A 10 min aerobic prebreathe exercise up to 75% V-O2(sub max) on a dual-cycle ergometer, included in the 2-hour prebreathe protocol, has been shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) at altitude. In-flight only leg ergometry will be available. A balanced exercise was developed using surgical tubing with the ergometer on-orbit. We hypothesize that a 75% V02max workload, individually prescribed, would be achieved using a target heart rate to regulate the intensity of the arm exercise. VO2, heart rate (HR) / ECG, V-CO2 /V-O2, V(sub E), and V(sub T), and rate of perceived exertion (Borg scale) were measured in eleven healthy subjects who passed a US Air Force Class III Physical examination. A V-O2 peak test was performed to assess the sub-maximal exercise prescription. Two series of sub-maximal tests were performed: (1) leg ergometer/hand ergometer and (2) leg ergometer/surgical tubes. We found no significant differences (P > 0.05) in comparing the means for V-O2 and HR between the predicted and measured values during the final 4 minute-stage at "75% V-O2 workload" or between the two types of sub-maximal tests. The prescribed prebreathe sub-maximal exercise performed with flight certified surgical tubes was achieved using the target HR.

  8. Inflight Exercise Regimen for the 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Philip P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Woodruff, Kristin K.; Schneider, Susan M.; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A 10 min aerobic prebreathe exercise up to 75% V-O2(sub max) on a dual-cycle ergometer, included in the 2-hour prebreathe protocol, has been shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) at altitude. In-flight only leg ergometry will be available. A balanced exercise was developed using surgical tubing with the ergometer on-orbit. We hypothesize that a 75% V02max workload, individually prescribed, would be achieved using a target heart rate to regulate the intensity of the arm exercise. VO2, heart rate (HR) / ECG, V-CO2 /V-O2, V(sub E), and V(sub T), and rate of perceived exertion (Borg scale) were measured in eleven healthy subjects who passed a US Air Force Class III Physical examination. A V-O2 peak test was performed to assess the sub-maximal exercise prescription. Two series of sub-maximal tests were performed: (1) leg ergometer/hand ergometer and (2) leg ergometer/surgical tubes. We found no significant differences (P > 0.05) in comparing the means for V-O2 and HR between the predicted and measured values during the final 4 minute-stage at "75% V-O2 workload" or between the two types of sub-maximal tests. The prescribed prebreathe sub-maximal exercise performed with flight certified surgical tubes was achieved using the target HR.

  9. Characterization of a specific anti-human urokinase antibody: Development of a sensitive competition radioimmunoassay for urokinase antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, K.; Kirchheimer, J.; Binder, B.R.

    1984-05-01

    Specific inhibiting IgG antibodies were raised in a rabbit using purified human high molecular weight urokinase as antigen. The antibodies reacted with both high molecular weight and low molecular weight human urokinase using an Ouchterlony double-immunodiffusion technique in such a way that one line of complete identity was obtained. Neither precipitation nor functional inhibition was observed for the tissue-type plasminogen activator. Kinetic studies with plasminogen as a natural high molecular weight substrate or the synthetic low molecular weight p-nitroanilide substrate pyro-Glu-Gly-Arg-pNA revealed, for both substrates, mainly a competitive type of inhibition for the Fab fragments of the specific anti-urokinase antibodies. This characterized anti-urokinase IgG was employed to develop a competitive radioimmunoassay, for human urokinase with /sup 125/I-labeled urokinase as tracer. In this radioimmunoassay, the lower detection limit for urokinase antigen was 10 pg/ml sample; the intrassay variation was 2.8%, and the interassay variation was 5.3%. Applying this radioimmunoassay to plasma samples obtained from healthy young volunteers, urokinase antigen could be measured in a concentration of 7.82 +/- 3.97 ng/ml for mean and 6.66 +/- 2.39 ng/ml for women (mean +/- SD).

  10. Regulatory Effects of Urokinase on Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Secretion.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, I B; Zubkova, E S; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Stafeev, Yu S; Dergilev, K V; Ratner, E I; Shestakova, M V; Sukhareva, O Yu; Parfenova, E V; Men'shikov, M Yu

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of urokinase, its recombinant forms, and domain fragments on migration and proliferation of adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and MMP secretion by these cells. Urokinase, but not its recombinant forms, slightly induced directed migration of MSCs. Spontaneous migration of MSCs increased under the action of urokinase or its isolated kringle domain. Migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor was inhibited by proteolytically inactive form of urokinase, the kringle domain, and blocking antibody to urokinase receptor. Urokinase, its proteolytically inactive form, and kringle domain produced no effect on MSC proliferation. In contrast to platelet-derived growth factor, all urokinase forms induced secretion of MMP-9 by MSCs.

  11. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  12. Production and purification of urokinase: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vibha; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2006-01-01

    An increased emphasis on prevention of fatalities due to thrombovascular disorders is broadening opportunities for several cardiovascular agents, especially plasminogen activators, for preventing strokes and heart attacks. Hence, urokinase, as one of the most potent plasminogen activators is attracting a great deal of attention. Developments in cell lines and bioprocess technology have made it possible to produce urokinase from in vitro cell culture. Attempts are now underway to enhance urokinase production from cell culture through media manipulation, bioreactor cultivation, and innovative purification techniques. Downstream processing also poses an intricate problem due to the complexity of cell culture extracts, susceptibility of urokinase to autocatalytic and proteolytic degradation and due to the presence of plasminogen activator inhibitors in the culture media. Hence, enhancing cellular productivity and downstream product recovery continue to be major challenges as discussed in this review. Furthermore, an approach for integrated upstream and downstream processing is needed to develop an economically viable technology. In the present review the emerging trends in urokinase production and purification have been discussed in detail.

  13. Regulation of urokinase by cellular receptors and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Several cell types display binding sites for {sup 125}I-urokinase which in certain cases are occupied with endogenous urokinase. These sites appear to focus urokinase at cell surfaces and hence may participate in tissue matrix destruction and cell invasion. Using immunofluorescence double labeling, the author shows that the receptor-bound urokinase present on human foreskin fibroblasts and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells is colocalized with vinculin, an intracellular actin-binding protein that is deposited at cell to substratum focal adhesion sites. Thus, this indicates linkage of the plasminogen/plasmin system both to sites of cell adhesion and to the cytoskeleton. He furthermore reports that neither EGF, TGF{beta} or PDGF significantly altered the shape or intensity of the receptor-bound urokinase clusters but that thrombin, at mitogenic doses, caused a disappearance of the urokinase strands and a loss or gross alteration of the underlying focal adhesion plaques, as indicated by immunofluorescence staining for vinculin and talin, and by interference reflection microscopy. These observations suggest that thrombin may be a unique effector of cell adhesion, shape and movement. He used a quantitative in vitro invasion assay to study the role of plasminogen activator inhibitors type 1 and 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2) and protease nexin (PN1) in basement membrane (BM) invasion by {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine-labeled HT 1080 cells. The results obtained showed that 5 {mu}g/ml of PAI-1, PAI-2 and PN1 preadsorbed to the BM completely blocked HT1080 invasion. On the contrary an anti-PAI-1 monoclonal antibody induced an approximately two-fold increase in invasion. {sup 125}I-fibrinogen was polymerized on the amnion BM and the fibrinolytic activity of the cells was measured under the invasion assay conditions by measuring the radioactivity in the culture medium at different time points.

  14. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  15. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  16. Analysis of compliance and outcomes in a trauma system with a 2-hour transfer rule.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Marie L; Esposito, Thomas J; Reed, R Lawrence; Gamelli, Richard L; Luchette, Frederick A

    2010-12-01

    Minimizing time to definitive care in an effort to optimize outcomes is the goal of trauma systems. Toward this end, some systems have imposed standards on time to interfacility transfer. This study evaluates compliance and outcome in a system with a 2-hour transfer rule. Retrospective review. State trauma registry data from 1999 to 2003. Trauma patients who underwent interfacility transfer and those who did not. Time to transfer; Injury Severity Score; mortality; and time to operating room at second facility. These variables were then stratified by time to transfer. During the study period, there were 22 447 interfacility transfers. Overall transfer rate was 10.4%. Of the transfers, 4502 (20%) occurred within 2 hours. Median transfer time was 2 hours 21 minutes. Injury Severity Score, mortality, and number of patients with operation performed on same day of transfer were all higher for the group transferred within 2 hours in comparison with patients transferred on the same day of injury at greater than 2 hours. While the majority of transfers occur at greater than the mandated 2-hour interval, the most seriously injured patients are reaching definitive care within 2 hours. Markers of acuity for patients transferred at greater than 2 hours parallel those of the general trauma patient population. These data suggest that, in this system, provider-determined transfer time that exceeds 2 hours has no adverse effect on patient outcome. It appears to accomplish recognition and rapid transport of the most seriously ill. This may obviate the need for onerous system mandates that are not feasible or have poor compliance.

  17. [The fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase of acute arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ballester, A; Donato di Paola, M; Saccà, A; Cappello, I; D'Addato, M

    1993-01-01

    We present our experiences on 86 patients with acute arterial thrombosis of the legs, undergoing a fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase. Results from the treatment are analyzed according to: the administration way (systemic, locoregional, intrathrombotic), the level of thrombosis (upper or lower legs), the associated morbidity and mortality.

  18. Urokinase therapy in neonates with catheter related central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wever, M L; Liem, K D; Geven, W B; Tanke, R B

    1995-02-01

    The results of fibrinolytic therapy with urokinase were evaluated in 26 neonates with catheter related central venous thrombosis. Complete thrombolysis could be achieved in 13 patients (50%), partial thrombolysis in 3 patients (12%). No effect was seen in 10 patients (38%). Therapy success was influenced by age, size and location of the thrombus. Coincidence of infection occurred in 16 patients (62%). Mild hemorrhagic complications were seen in 2 patients (8%), no other significant side effects were observed. Nine patients with residual thrombosis were treated with oral anticoagulants following urokinase resulting in resolution of the thrombus in 6 patients within 3 months (67%). The incidence of asymptomatic recurrent thrombosis was high (28%). Urokinase might be an effective and safe treatment for central venous thrombosis in neonates. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy during the infusion of urokinase and long-term treatment with oral anticoagulants after thrombosis are advisable. Early detection of thrombosis might enhance the success rate of fibrinolytic therapy. Therefore, we strongly recommend routine echocardiographic screening of central venous catheters.

  19. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  20. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  1. Reprogramming urokinase into an antibody-recruiting anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jakobsche, Charles E; McEnaney, Patrick J; Zhang, Andrew X; Spiegel, David A

    2012-02-17

    Synthetic compounds for controlling or creating human immunity have the potential to revolutionize disease treatment. Motivated by challenges in this arena, we report herein a strategy to target metastatic cancer cells for immune-mediated destruction by targeting the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPAR are overexpressed on the surfaces of a wide range of invasive cancer cells and are believed to contribute substantially to the migratory propensities of these cells. The key component of our approach is an antibody-recruiting molecule that targets the urokinase receptor (ARM-U). This bifunctional construct is formed by selectively, covalently attaching an antibody-binding small molecule to the active site of the urokinase enzyme. We demonstrate that ARM-U is capable of directing antibodies to the surfaces of target cancer cells and mediating both antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against multiple human cancer cell lines. We believe that the reported strategy has the potential to inform novel treatment options for a variety of deadly, invasive cancers.

  2. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  3. Correlation of 2 Hours and 24 Hours Creatinine Clearance in Renal Donors After Unilateral Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Devanand, Viji; Chithrapavai, S.U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The kidney performs numerous specialised functions in an effort to maintain constancy of the internal composition of body fluids. Aim: This study was done to ascertain the feasibility of estimating creatinine clearance as an outpatient procedure over a 2 hours period instead of doing the study over a 24 hours period. Material and Methods: Eighteen renal donors, Twelve females and Six males, who were closely related to recipients, were chosen. This study was done on renal donors who attended the Nephrology Department of Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, Madras Medical College, Chennai–03 India. To estimate creatinine clearance in 24 hours urine, 24 hours urine sample was collected from 9 am on the first day to 9 am on the next day, after first emptying the bladder. Then, creatinine clearance was calculated by using standard formula, CC=UV/ Pt X 1.73m2/BSA of the individual. Results: There was no significant differences in mean creatinine clearance values by collecting 2 hours and 24 hours urine samples from renal donors in different stages of post nephrectomy period. It has been shown that 2 hours collection of urine sample is as good as 24 hours urine sample for estimating creatinine clearance. Conclusion: Hence it was proved that measurement of creatinine clearance could be done as an outpatient procedure, as the patient needed only 2 hours of hospital stay. PMID:24298453

  4. [Intrathoracic washing with urokinase was effective for empyema with atelectasis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kiyohiro; Kobayashi, Shinya; Fujioka, Nobuhiro; Teramoto, Kanako; Itoh, Takefumi; Sugimura, Hiroko; Takezawa, Yuichi

    2013-05-01

    A 60-year-old man had a medical examination because of fever in the emergency hospital and had a diagnosis of pneumonia and was treated, but he was admitted to our hospital 2 days later because there was not the improvement of his symptom. The chest computed tomography(CT)image showed multilocular pleural effusions and lower lobe atelectasis with the air bronchogram on the left side. We diagnosed the case as empyema and inserted a catheter, but drainage was very few and injected 60,000 urokinase units for 3 days from the next day. We removed a drain 2 days after the 3rd infusion, and the pleural thickening became mild, and atelectasis was gradually improved in the chest CT image, and the inflammatory reaction was reduced, too. The intrathoracic washing with urokinase was thought to be effective for empyema with atelectasis.

  5. Urokinase has direct catalytic activity against fibrinogen and renders it less clottable by thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, J I; Leslie, B

    1990-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator directly releases fibrinopeptides A and B (FPA and FPB) from fibrinogen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urokinase has similar activity. Incubation of urokinase with fibrinogen or heparinized plasma results in concentration-dependent FPB release unaccompanied by FPA cleavage. For equivalent amidolytic activity, high molecular weight urokinase releases twofold more FPB than the low molecular weight species. In contrast, prourokinase does not release FPB until activated to urokinase. Contaminating thrombin or plasma is not responsible for urokinase-mediated FPB release because this activity is unaccompanied by FPA or B beta 1-42 cleavage, and is unaffected by heparin, hirudin, a monospecific antibody against thrombin, aprotinin, or alpha 2-antiplasmin. FPB release reflects a direct action of urokinase on fibrinogen because release is completely inhibited by a monospecific antibody against the enzyme. Further, urokinase releases FPB from the FPB-containing substrate B beta 1-42, thus confirming its specificity for the B beta 14 (Arg)-B beta 15 (Gly) bond. In addition to FPB release, SDS-PAGE analysis of the time course of urokinase-mediated fibrinogenolysis indicates progressive proteolysis of both the A alpha- and B beta-chains of fibrinogen that occurs after FPB release is completed. As a consequence of urokinase-mediated fibrinogenolysis, there is progressive prolongation of the thrombin clotting time. These studies indicate that urokinase has direct catalytic activity against fibrinogen. By releasing FPB, a potent chemoattractant, and by rendering fibrinogen less clottable by thrombin, urokinase may participate in processes extending beyond fibrinolysis. Images PMID:2365816

  6. Dissecting the Urokinase Activation Pathway Using Urokinase-Activated Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Bugge, Thomas H.; Frankel, Arthur E.; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a three-part toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis, consisting of protective antigen (PrAg), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). To intoxicate host mammalian cells, PrAg, the cell-binding moiety of the toxin, binds to cells and is then proteolytically activated by furin on the cell surface, resulting in the active heptameric form of PrAg. This heptamer serves as a protein-conducting channel that translocates EF and LF, the two enzymatic moieties of the toxin, into the cytosol of the cells where they exert cytotoxic effects. The anthrax toxin delivery system has been well characterized. The amino-terminal PrAg-binding domain of LF (residues 1–254, LFn) is sufficient to allow translocation of fused “passenger” polypeptides, such as the ADP-ribosylation domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A, to the cytosol of the cells in a PrAg-dependent process. The protease specificity of the anthrax toxin delivery system can also be reengineered by replacing the furin cleavage target sequence of PrAg with other protease substrate sequences. PrAg-U2 is such a PrAg variant, one that is selectively activated by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The uPA-dependent proteolytic activation of PrAg-U2 on the cell surface is readily detected by Western blotting analysis of cell lysates in vitro, or cell or animal death in vivo. Here we describe the use of PrAg-U2 as a molecular reporter tool to test the controversial question of what components are required for uPAR-mediated cell surface pro-uPA activation. The results demonstrate that both uPAR and plasminogen play critical roles in pro-uPA activation both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19377974

  7. Human urokinase gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 10.

    PubMed Central

    Tripputi, P; Blasi, F; Verde, P; Cannizzaro, L A; Emanuel, B S; Croce, C M

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is one of the two plasminogen activators that catalyze the conversion of inactive plasminogen to plasmin. By combining somatic cell genetics, in situ hybridization, and Southern hybridization, we localized the human urokinase gene on the distal third of the long arm (q24-qter) of chromosome 10. Images PMID:2989821

  8. Urokinase immobilized on medical polymeric materials: fundamental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, T; Kosaki, G

    1980-02-01

    One of the methods of preparing an antithrombogenic material is to immobilize a fibrinolytic enzyme on the surface of a carrier. The clinical trial of such a material must be subject to not only a basic study on the quality of a carrier, the technique of immobilization, and the method of disinfection, but also an in vivo study on its antithrombotic effect. Reported herein is the evaluation of the fibrinolytic ability, at fundamental and clinical levels, of the urokinase that was immobilized on the surface of various polymeric materials. The results were favorable.

  9. Urokinase treatment for arteriovenous fistulae declotting in dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Canavese, C; Thea, A; Segoloni, G P; Stratta, P; Salomone, M; Vercellone, A

    1984-01-01

    Urokinase treatment, previously employed with success in the declotting of deep venous thrombosis and arteriovenous shunts in patients undergoing regular dialytic treatment (RDT), was used in 23 cases of arteriovenous fistula thrombotic occlusion in 18 RDT patients. The treatment was successful in 65.2% of the cases without any negative side effects, except 1 case which may have developed a pulmonary embolism. Patients with severe hypofibrinolysis may need larger doses or may have a recurrence of the thrombotic episode. All therapeutic failures correlated with the presence of fibrosis or sclerosis.

  10. Reduced pulmonary blood flow in regions of injury 2 hours after acid aspiration in rats.

    PubMed

    Richter, Torsten; Bergmann, Ralf; Musch, Guido; Pietzsch, Jens; Koch, Thea

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration-induced lung injury can decrease gas exchange and increase mortality. Acute lung injury following acid aspiration is characterized by elevated pulmonary blood flow (PBF) in damaged lung areas in the early inflammation stage. Knowledge of PBF patterns after acid aspiration is important for targeting intravenous treatments. We examined PBF in an experimental model at a later stage (2 hours after injury). Anesthetized Wistar-Unilever rats (n = 5) underwent unilateral endobronchial instillation of hydrochloric acid. The PBF distribution was compared between injured and uninjured sides and with that of untreated control animals (n = 6). Changes in lung density after injury were measured using computed tomography (CT). Regional PBF distribution was determined quantitatively in vivo 2 hours after acid instillation by measuring the concentration of [(68)Ga]-radiolabeled microspheres using positron emission tomography. CT scans revealed increased lung density in areas of acid aspiration. Lung injury was accompanied by impaired gas exchange. Acid aspiration decreased the arterial pressure of oxygen from 157 mmHg [139;165] to 74 mmHg [67;86] at 20 minutes and tended toward restoration to 109 mmHg [69;114] at 110 minutes (P < 0.001). The PBF ratio of the middle region of the injured versus uninjured lungs of the aspiration group (0.86 [0.7;0.9], median [25%;75%]) was significantly lower than the PBF ratio in the left versus right lung of the control group (1.02 [1.0;1.05]; P = 0.016). The PBF pattern 2 hours after aspiration-induced lung injury showed a redistribution of PBF away from injured regions that was likely responsible for the partial recovery from hypoxemia over time. Treatments given intravenously 2 hours after acid-induced lung injury may not preferentially reach the injured lung regions, contrary to what occurs during the first hour of inflammation. Please see related article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12871-015-0014-z.

  11. How Biomechanical Improvements in Running Economy Could Break the 2-hour Marathon Barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kram, Rodger; Arellano, Christopher J

    2017-03-03

    A sub-2-hour marathon requires an average velocity (5.86 m/s) that is 2.5% faster than the current world record of 02:02:57 (5.72 m/s) and could be accomplished with a 2.7% reduction in the metabolic cost of running. Although supporting body weight comprises the majority of the metabolic cost of running, targeting the costs of forward propulsion and leg swing are the most promising strategies for reducing the metabolic cost of running and thus improving marathon running performance. Here, we calculate how much time could be saved by taking advantage of unconventional drafting strategies, a consistent tailwind, a downhill course, and specific running shoe design features while staying within the current International Association of Athletic Federations regulations for record purposes. Specifically, running in shoes that are 100 g lighter along with second-half scenarios of four runners alternately leading and drafting, or a tailwind of 6.0 m/s, combined with a 42-m elevation drop could result in a time well below the 2-hour marathon barrier.

  12. [Test for urokinase-type plasminogen activator inhibitor of edible plants in vitro].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuan-Jing; Ohara, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Tsugio

    2004-07-01

    To study the effect of anti-progression activity of edible plants using urokinase as the biomarker. Based on the assay of urokinase activity with peptide of Glu-Gly-Arg as the reaction substrate, extract of 25 fruits and 37 vegetables and water extract of tea were reacted against urokinase activity after Spectrozyme UK [carbobenzyl-1-gamma-Glu(alpha-t-BuO)-Gly-Arg-rho-nitroanilide. 2C2H5OH] was added and the residual urokinase activity was measured by the microplate photometer. About half of the fruit and vegetable samples showed urokinase inhibitory activity (UIA) at 20% or more and among them lemon, kiwi-fruit, peas, spinach and pumpkin showed effects over 80%, while garlic, radish, Japanese butterbur, garland chrysanthemum, celery, plum, pineapple and grape ranged between 50% and 79%. Average UIA of 51 kinds of tea was 83.2% and among them 28 kinds showed UIA over 90% and other 20 kinds of tea ranged from 70% to 89%. Green tea showed inhibitory effects on urokinase activity more powerful than black tea and Oolong tea. On the other hand, vegetable showed various UIA with different ways of processing. Comparing the effects of various solvents, garlic extracted with methanol, spinach with ethyl acetate, and pumpkin and radish with water showed highest UIA. Popular fruits, vegetables and tea in daily life could inhibit urokinase activity and may be helpful in the prevention of malignant tumor formation.

  13. Nuclear translocation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Tatiana; Kuo, Alice; Yarovoi, Serge; Tkachuk, Sergei; Zaitsev, Sergei; Bdeir, Khalil; Dumler, Inna; Marks, Michael S.; Parfyonova, Yelena; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof; Cines, Douglas B.

    2008-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) participates in diverse (patho)physiological processes through intracellular signaling events that affect cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, although the mechanisms by which these occur are only partially understood. Here we report that upon cell binding and internalization, single-chain uPA (scuPA) translocates to the nucleus within minutes. Nuclear translocation does not involve proteolytic activation or degradation of scuPA. Neither the urokinase receptor (uPAR) nor the low-density lipoprotein-related receptor (LRP) is required for nuclear targeting. Rather, translocation involves the binding of scuPA to the nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein nucleolin through a region containing the kringle domain. RNA interference and mutational analysis demonstrate that nucleolin is required for the nuclear transport of scuPA. Furthermore, nucleolin is required for the induction smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) by scuPA. These data reveal a novel pathway by which uPA is rapidly translocated to the nucleus where it might participate in regulating gene expression. PMID:18337556

  14. Operational Implementation of a 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, James M.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Schneider, S.; Loftin, Karin C.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Vann, R.

    2000-01-01

    Procedures, equipment, and analytical techniques were developed to implement the ground tested 2-hour protocol in-flight operations. The methods are: 1) The flight protocol incorporates additional safety margin over the ground tested protocol. This includes up to 20 min of additional time on enriched O2 during suit purge and pressure check, increased duration of extravehicular activity (EVA) preparation exercise during O2 prebreathing (up to 90 min vs; the tested 24 min), and reduced rates of depressurization. The ground test observations were combined with model projections of the conservative measures (using statistical models from Duke University and NASA JSQ to bound the risk of Type I and Type II decompression sickness (DCS). 2) An inflight exercise device using the in-flight ergometer and elastic tubes for upper body exercise was developed to replicate the dual cycle exercise in the ground trials. 3) A new in-flight breathing system was developed and man-tested. 4) A process to monitor inflight experience with the protocol, including the use of an in-suit Doppler bubble monitor when available, was developed. The results are: 1) The model projections of the conservative factors of the operational protocol were shown to reduce the risk of DCS to levels consistent with the observations of no DCS to date in the shuttle program. 2) Cross over trials of the dual cycle ergometer used in ground tests and the in-flight exercise system verified that02consumption and the % division of work between upper and lower body was not significantly different at the p= 0.05 level. 3) The in-flight breathing system was demonstrated to support work rates generating 75% O2(max) in 95 percentile subjects. 4) An in-flight monitoring plan with acceptance criteria was put in place for the 2-hour prebreathe protocol. And the conclusions are: The 2-hour protocol has been approved for flight, and all implementation efforts are in place to allow use of the protocol as early as flight ISS 7A

  15. Dialysis Access Graft Thrombolysis: Randomized Study of Pulse-Spray Versus Continuous Urokinase Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Scott C.; Arora, Lokesh C.; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Sayre, James; McNamara, Thomas O.; Yoon, Chun

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To compare pulse-spray to continuous-infusion thrombolysis with high-dose urokinase in thrombosed dialysis access grafts. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed. From August 1992 to September 1993, 30 thrombosed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in 24 patients were included, 15 grafts in each group. The success of thrombolysis, mean time to thrombolysis, mean urokinase dose, and 60-day patency rate were evaluated. Results: In the pulse-spray group, the mean time to thrombolysis was 72 min with a mean urokinase dose of 560,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 71%. In the continuous-infusion group, the mean infusion time to thrombolysis was 55 min with a mean dose of 479,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 73%. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between the two techniques in the mean time to thrombolysis, the mean urokinase dose used, or the 60-day patency rate.

  16. Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor expression in colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S; Hayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Nakamura, T; Morita, Y; Kawasaki, K; Ohta, K; Aoyama, N; Kim, S; Itoh, H; Kuroda, Y; Doe, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—The urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. 
Aims—To study the involvement of uPAR in colorectal carcinogenesis. 
Methods—The cellular expression and localisation of uPAR were investigated in colorectal adenomas and invasive carcinomas by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, and northern and western blot analyses. 
Results—uPAR mRNA expression was found mainly in the cytoplasm of dysplastic epithelial cells of 30% of adenomas with mild (19%), moderate (21%), and severe (47%) dysplasia, and in that of carcinomatous cells of 85% of invasive carcinomas: Dukes' stages A (72%), B (93%), and C (91%). Some stromal cells in the adjacent neoplastic epithelium were faintly positive. Immunoreactivity for uPAR was detected in dysplastic epithelial cells of 14% of adenomas and in carcinomatous cells of 49% of invasive carcinomas. uPAR mRNA and protein concentrations were significantly higher in severe than in mild or moderate dysplasia (p<0.05); they were notably higher in Dukes' stage A than in severe dysplasia (p<0.05), and significantly higher in Dukes' stage B than in stage A (p<0.05), but those in stage B were not different from those in stage C or in metastatic colorectal carcinomas of the liver. 
Conclusions—Colorectal adenoma uPAR, expressed essentially in dysplastic epithelial cells, was upregulated with increasing severity of atypia, and increased notably during the critical transition from severe dysplasic adenoma to invasive carcinoma. These findings implicate uPAR expression in the invasive and metastatic processes of colorectal cancer. 

 Keywords: urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor; colorectal adenoma; colorectal cancer; adenoma-carcinoma sequence PMID:9824607

  17. Potent antitumor activity of a urokinase-activated engineered anthrax toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shihui; Aaronson, Hannah; Mitola, David J.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The acquisition of cell-surface urokinase plasminogen activator activity is a hallmark of malignancy. We generated an engineered anthrax toxin that is activated by cell-surface urokinase in vivo and displays limited toxicity to normal tissue but broad and potent tumoricidal activity. Native anthrax toxin protective antigen, when administered with a chimeric anthrax toxin lethal factor, Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein, was extremely toxic to mice, causing rapid and fatal organ damage. Replacing the furin activation sequence in anthrax toxin protective antigen with an artificial peptide sequence efficiently activated by urokinase greatly attenuated toxicity to mice. In addition, the mutation conferred cell-surface urokinase-dependent toxin activation in vivo, as determined by using a panel of plasminogen, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator receptor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-deficient mice. Surprisingly, toxin activation critically depended on both urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and plasminogen in vivo, showing that both proteins are essential cofactors for the generation of cell-surface urokinase. The engineered toxin displayed potent tumor cell cytotoxicity to a spectrum of transplanted tumors of diverse origin and could eradicate established solid tumors. This tumoricidal activity depended strictly on tumor cell-surface plasminogen activation. The data show that a simple change of protease activation specificity converts anthrax toxin from a highly lethal to a potent tumoricidal agent.

  18. Effects of a 2-hour cheerleading practice on dynamic postural stability, knee laxity, and hamstring extensibility.

    PubMed

    Rowe, A; Wright, S; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Kling, R

    1999-08-01

    One group; pretest, posttest design. To assess the effect of a 2-hour cheerleading practice on the anterior knee laxity, hamstring extensibility, and dynamic postural stability (preferred stance leg during vision-denied unilateral stance) of 17 nonimpaired members of a college cheerleading team (8 females, 9 males; 18-25 years old). Anterior knee laxity and hamstring extensibility increase following exercise. The relationship between exercise induced anterior knee laxity, hamstring extensibility, and dynamic postural stability, however, has not been examined. Pre- and postpractice measurements were compared using paired t tests and Bonferroni's correction for multiple comparisons. A 3 x 2 analysis of variance (force level applied to the arthrometer by condition) and Tukey honest significant difference post hoc test were used to evaluate specific arthrometer force level by condition effects (P < .05). Mean laxity at 133 N and hamstring extensibility increased (mean +/- SD) 1.5 +/- 1 mm and 3 +/- 4 degrees, respectively, following practice. Mean medial-lateral stabiliometer platform angulation (frontal plane position) moved medially following practice (2.9 +/- 3 degrees) and produced a weak correlation with increased knee laxity (r = 0.58). Hamstring extensibility did not significantly relate to stabiliometry or knee laxity variables. The relationship between the medially directed platform angulation and the increase in anterior knee laxity following cheerleading practice suggests a relationship between subtalar joint position and anterior cruciate ligament strain.

  19. Randomised Controlled Trial of Urokinase versus Placebo for Non-draining Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Eleanor K; Clive, Amelia O; Wills, Genevieve H; Davies, Helen E; Stanton, Andrew E; Al-Aloul, Mohamed; Hart-Thomas, Alan; Pepperell, Justin; Evison, Matthew; Saba, Tarek; Harrison, Richard Neil; Guhan, Anur; Callister, Matthew E; Sathyamurthy, Ramamurthy; Rehal, Sunita; Corcoran, John P; Hallifax, Robert; Psallidas, Ioannis; Russell, Nicky; Shaw, Rachel; Dobson, Melissa; Wrightson, John M; West, Alex; Lee, Y C Gary; Nunn, Andrew J; Miller, Robert F; Maskell, Nick A; Rahman, Najib M

    2017-09-19

    Patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE) experience breathlessness, which is treated by drainage and pleurodesis. Incomplete drainage results in residual dyspnea and pleurodesis failure. Intrapleural fibrinolytics lyse septations within pleural fluid, improving drainage. To assess the effects of intrapleural urokinase on dyspnea and pleurodesis success in patients with non-draining malignant effusion. Prospective double blind randomised trial; patients with non-draining effusion were randomly allocated 1:1 to intrapleural urokinase (100,000 IU three doses 12 hourly) or matched placebo. Co-primary outcome measures: dyspnea (average daily 100mm visual analogue scores over 28 days) and time to pleurodesis failure to 12 months. survival, time in hospital and radiographic change. 71 subjects randomised (36 received urokinase, 35 placebo) from 12 UK Centres. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. There was no difference in mean dyspnea between groups (mean difference 3·8mm, 95% CI -12 to 4·4mm, p=0·36). Pleurodesis failure rates were similar (urokinase 13/35 (37%), placebo 11/34 (32%), adjusted hazard ratio 1·2, p=0·65). Urokinase was associated with a decreased effusion size on chest radiograph (adjusted relative improvement -19% (95% CI -28 to -11%, p<0·001), reduced hospital stay (1·6 days (95% CI 1·0 to 2·6), p=0·049) and improved survival (69 days versus 48 days, p=0.026). Use of intrapleural urokinase does not reduce dyspnea or improve pleurodesis success compared with placebo, and cannot be recommended as an adjunct to pleurodesis. Other palliative treatments should be used. Improvements in hospital stay, radiographic appearance and survival associated with urokinase require further evaluation. Clinical trial registration available at www.isrctn.com, ID 12852177.

  20. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  1. "An Imminent Sub 2-Hours Marathon is Unlikely: historical Trends of the Gender Gap in Running Events".

    PubMed

    Tucker, Ross; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2016-12-14

    The aim of the present study was to analyse men's and women's world records across the full range of running disciplines to contextualise the recent debate about the possibility of a sub-2 hour marathon. The average male-female gap is currently 11.2 ± 1.0% for all running events. However, reducing the marathon time to below two hours would produce a performance 12.9% (+1.7 SD) faster than the women's marathon record. This gap would be greater than all current World Record differences, and would also require a reversal of medium and long-term historical trends in the men's and women's record differences. We therefore conclude that on the basis of historical trends and known differences between men's and women's performances, the current women's World Record is not yet the equivalent of a sub-2 hour marathon and therefore, that an imminent sub-2 hour marathon is implausible.

  2. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2012-04-15

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5-/-) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (Fbln(RGE/RGE) MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+-binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility.

  3. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B.; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2015-01-01

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5−/−) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (FblnRGE/RGE MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+ -binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility. PMID:22280367

  4. Assessment of Fibrinolysis in Sepsis Patients with Urokinase Modified Thromboelastography

    PubMed Central

    Panigada, Mauro; Zacchetti, Lucia; L’Acqua, Camilla; Cressoni, Massimo; Anzoletti, Massimo Boscolo; Bader, Rossella; Protti, Alessandro; Consonni, Dario; D’Angelo, Armando; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impairment of fibrinolysis during sepsis is associated with worse outcome. Early identification of this condition could be of interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a modified point-of-care viscoelastic hemostatic assay can detect sepsis-induced impairment of fibrinolysis and to correlate impaired fibrinolysis with morbidity and mortality. Methods This single center observational prospective pilot study was performed in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary academic hospital. Forty consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Forty healthy individuals served as controls. We modified conventional kaolin activated thromboelastography (TEG) adding urokinase to improve assessment of fibrinolysis in real time (UK-TEG). TEG, UK-TEG, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), d-dimer, DIC scores and morbidity (rated with the SOFA score) were measured upon ICU admission. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of mortality at ICU discharge. Results UK-TEG revealed a greater impairment of fibrinolysis in sepsis patients compared to healthy individuals confirmed by PAI-1. TAFI was not different between sepsis patients and healthy individuals. 18/40 sepsis patients had fibrinolysis impaired according to UK-TEG and showed higher SOFA score (8 (6–13) vs 5 (4–7), p = 0.03), higher mortality (39% vs 5%, p = 0.01) and greater markers of cellular damage (lactate levels, LDH and bilirubin). Mortality at ICU discharge was predicted by the degree of fibrinolysis impairment measured by UK-TEG Ly30 (%) parameter (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.93–0.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions Sepsis-induced impairment of fibrinolysis detected at UK-TEG was associated with increased markers of cellular damage, morbidity and mortality. PMID:26308340

  5. Urokinase, a promising candidate for fibrinolytic therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiang; Chen, Qianwei; Niu, Yin; Feng, Zhou; Li, Lin; Tao, Yihao; Tang, Jun; Yang, Liming; Guo, Jing; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with a high rate of mortality and severe disability, while fibrinolysis for ICH evacuation is a possible treatment. However, reported adverse effects can counteract the benefits of fibrinolysis and limit the use of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Identifying appropriate fibrinolytics is still needed. Therefore, the authors here compared the use of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), an alternate thrombolytic, with that of tPA in a preclinical study. METHODS Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting autologous blood into the caudate, followed by intraclot fibrinolysis without drainage. Rats were randomized to receive uPA, tPA, or saline within the clot. Hematoma and perihematomal edema, brain water content, Evans blue fluorescence and neurological scores, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP mRNA, blood-brain barrier (BBB) tight junction proteins, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were measured to evaluate the effects of these 2 drugs in ICH. RESULTS In comparison with tPA, uPA better ameliorated brain edema and promoted an improved outcome after ICH. In addition, uPA therapy more effectively upregulated BBB tight junction protein expression, which was partly attributed to the different effects of uPA and tPA on the regulation of MMPs and its related mRNA expression following ICH. CONCLUSIONS This study provided evidence supporting the use of uPA for fibrinolytic therapy after ICH. Large animal experiments and clinical trials are required to further explore the efficacy and safety of uPA in ICH fibrinolysis.

  6. Urokinase induces activation of STAT3 in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama; Rao, Gadiparthi N; Cines, Douglas B; Bdeir, Khalil

    2006-10-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that plays a major role in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Studies from our laboratory have shown that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to uPA induces proliferation. To understand uPA mitogenic signaling events, we sought to elucidate its effects on tyrosine phosphorylation in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas2B). uPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in a time-dependent manner. One of these proteins was identified as the 91-kDa signal transduction activator transcription (Stat)3 moiety. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 by uPA was time dependent. uPA induced Stat3-DNA binding activity in a time-dependent manner. uPA-induced Stat3 activation does not require uPA catalytic activity, as the uPA amino-terminal fragment alone was as potent as active two-chain uPA (tcuPA) in causing this effect. Single-chain uPA likewise induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 to a similar extent as intact tcuPA. Plasmin did not alter uPA-induced Stat3 activation. Furthermore, transfection of Beas2B cells with dominant-negative Stat3 blocked uPA-induced DNA synthesis. These results reveal for the first time that the uPA-uPAR interaction leads to activation of Stat3, independent of its catalytic activity but dependent on its interaction with its receptor, uPAR, leading to DNA synthesis in lung epithelial cells.

  7. Randomized clinical trial between hourly titrated and 2 hourly static oral misoprostol solution for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Alsahly, Nora; Alamoudi, Rana; Almansouri, Nisma; Alsinani, Nawal; Alkafy, Souzan; Rozzah, Rayyan; Abduljabbar, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Misoprostol is an effective agent for the induction of labor. Existing guidelines recommend oral misoprostol solution 25 μg every 2 hours. However, more research is required to optimize the use of oral misoprostol solution for the induction of labor. The purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety of hourly titrated-dose oral misoprostol solution with static-dose oral misoprostol solution every 2 hours for labor induction. In this randomized controlled study, oral misoprostol solution was administered as (1) 20 μg hourly (≤4 doses) that was increased in the absence of regular uterine contractions to 40 μg hourly (≤4 doses) and then to 60 μg hourly (≤16 doses) or (2) 25 μg every 2 hours until active labor began (≤12 doses). A sample size of 146 women was planned with the use of a projected 95% rate for the primary endpoint (vaginal delivery within 24 hours) for hourly titrated-dose misoprostol and 80% rate for static-dose misoprostol every 2 hours. Safety outcomes included maternal morbidity and adverse neonatal outcomes. From December 2013 to July 2015, 146 women were assigned randomly to treatment. Demographic and clinical factors were similar between groups, except for age. Vaginal delivery was achieved within 24 hours in 47 women (64.4%) who received hourly titrated-doses of misoprostol solution and 48 women (65.8%) who received 2-hourly static-dose misoprostol solution (P=1.00). Rates of vaginal delivery within 24 hours did not differ significantly between treatment groups for women who were nulliparous (P=1.00) or who had postterm pregnancies (P=.66), a Bishop score of ≤3 (P=.84), or oxytocin augmentation (P=.83). Cesarean deliveries were performed within 24 hours in 9 women who received hourly titrated-dose misoprostol solution and 2 women who received 2-hourly static-dose misoprostol solution (P=.056). Pyrexia and meconium-stained liquor occurred more frequently with the hourly titrated-dose regimen. The static-dose oral

  8. Comparative Evaluation of 2-Hour Rapid Diagnostic Algorithms for Acute Myocardial Infarction Using High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T.

    PubMed

    McRae, Andrew D; Innes, Grant; Graham, Michelle; Lang, Eddy; Andruchow, James E; Yang, Hong; Ji, Yunqi; Vatanpour, Shabnam; Southern, Danielle A; Wang, Dongmei; Seiden-Long, Isolde; DeKoning, Lawrence; Kavsak, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Symptoms of acute coronary syndrome account for a large proportion of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. High-sensitivity troponin can rapidly rule out or rule in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within a short time of ED arrival. We sought to validate test characteristics and classification performance of 2-hour high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) algorithms for the rapid diagnosis of AMI. We included consecutive patients from 4 academic EDs with suspected cardiac chest pain who had hsTnT assays performed 2 hours apart (± 30 minutes) as part of routine care. The primary outcome was AMI at 7 days. Secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiac events (mortality, AMI, and revascularization). Test characteristics and classification performance for multiple 2-hour algorithms were quantified. Seven hundred twenty-two patients met inclusion criteria. Seven-day AMI incidence was 10.9% and major adverse cardiac event incidence was 13.7%. A 2-hour rule-out algorithm proposed by Reichlin and colleagues ruled out AMI in 59.4% of patients with 98.7% sensitivity and 99.8% negative predictive value (NPV). The 2-hour rule-out algorithm proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Excellence ruled out AMI in 50.3% of patients with similar sensitivity and NPV. Other exploratory algorithms had similar sensitivity but marginally better classification performance. According to Reichlin et al., the 2-hour rule-in algorithm ruled in AMI in 16.5% of patients with 92.4% specificity and 58.5% positive predictive value. Two-hour hsTnT algorithms can rule out AMI with very high sensitivity and NPV. The algorithm developed by Reichlin et al. had superior classification performance. Reichlin and colleagues' 2-hour rule-in algorithm had poor positive predictive value and might not be suitable for early rule-in decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Urokinase/Urokinase Receptor System in Mast Cells: Effects of its Functional Interaction with fMLF Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Prevete, Nella; Rivellese, Felice; Napolitano, Filomena; Montuori, Nunzia; Postiglione, Loredana; Selleri, Carmine; de Paulis, Amato

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell and basophils express the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI) and are primary effector cells of allergic disorders. The urokinase (uPA)-mediated plasminogen activation system is involved in physiological and pathological events based on cell migration and tissue remodelling, such as inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis and metastasis. uPA is a serine protease that binds uPAR, a high affinity glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored receptor. uPAR focuses uPA activity at the cell surface and activates intracellular signaling through lateral interactions with integrins, receptor tyrosine kinases and the G-protein-coupled family of fMLF chemotaxis receptors (FPRs). We investigated the expression of the uPA-uPAR system and its functional interaction with FPRs in human mast cells (MCs). Differently from basophils, MCs produced uPA that was able to induce their chemotaxis. Indeed, MCs also expressed uPAR, both in the intact and in a cleaved form (DII-DIII-uPAR) that can expose, at the N-terminus, the SRSRY sequence, able to interact with FPRs and to mediate cell chemotaxis. MCs also expressed mRNAs for FPRs that were functionally active; indeed, uPA and a soluble peptide (uPAR84–95), containing the SRSRY chemotactic sequence of uPAR and able to interact with FPRs, were able to induce MCs chemotaxis. Thus, uPA is a potent chemoattractant for MCs acting through the exposure of the chemotactic epitope of uPAR, that is an endogenous ligand for FPRs. The same mechanism could be involved in VEGF-A secretion by human MCs, also induced by uPA and uPAR84–95 stimulation. PMID:27896225

  10. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  11. Effect of metformin by employing 2-hour postload insulin for measuring insulin resistance in Taiwanese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ou, Huang-Tz; Chen, Pei-Chi; Wu, Meng-Hsing

    2017-02-01

    Evidence on clinical effectiveness of metformin in ethnic Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remains scarce. Standard diagnostic approaches to identify insulin resistance (IR) cases in PCOS patients might be invasive, labor intensive, and stressful for patients (i.e., euglycemic clamp), or somewhat complicated for clinicians to calculate and monitor in routine practice [i.e., the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI)]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of metformin in Taiwanese women with PCOS and identify the feasible diagnostic measures of IR for Taiwanese women with PCOS. A total of 114 women from a medical center in Taiwan were studied. All were aged between 18 years and 45 years, diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria, and treated with metformin. Outcome end points were body mass index (BMI) and 2-hour postload glucose and insulin levels from a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. BMI in overweight patients were significantly improved with metformin treatment duration (p < 0.001). The 2-hour insulin level statistically improved after treatment (before: 80.7 ± 63.9 μIU/mL vs. after: 65.0 ± 60.4 μIU/mL; p = 0.009). The improved 2-hour insulin level was significantly greater in IR patients than in non-IR patients. Compared with the 2-hour postload insulin level, the fasting insulin level provided 18.15% sensitivity and 94.12% specificity, the HOMA yielded 40% sensitivity and 70.58% specificity, and the QUICKI achieved 63.63% sensitivity and 11.76% specificity. Clinical outcomes in Taiwanese PCOS women were improved with metformin treatment, especially in overweight and IR patients. The 2-hour postload insulin level appears to be a convenient tool for screening IR in Taiwanese patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Urokinase receptor modulates cellular and angiogenic responses in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Kim, Heungsoo; Cai, Xiaohe; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus M; Carmeliet, Peter; Eddy, Allison A

    2003-05-01

    Interstitial cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. Given that the urokinase receptor (uPAR) is known to play a role in cell adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis, the present study was designed to evaluate the role of uPAR in the regulation of the phenotypic composition of interstitial cells (macrophages, myofibroblasts, capillaries) in response to chronic renal injury. Groups of uPAR wild-type (+/+) and knockout (-/-) mice were investigated between 3 and 14 d after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) or sham surgery (n = 8 mice per group). The density of F4/80+ interstitial macrophages (Mphi) was significantly lower in the -/- mice (3.3 +/- 0.4 versus 6.9 +/- 1.7% area at day 3 UUO; 10.8 +/- 1.6 versus 15.7 +/- 1.0% at day 14 UUO; -/- versus +/+). In contrast, in the -/- mice there were significantly more alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA)-positive cells (12.9 +/- 3.2 versus 7.8 +/- 1.5% area at day 3 UUO; 21.0 +/- 4.7 versus 9.7 +/- 1.9% at day 14 UUO) and CD34-positive endothelial cells (8.4 +/- 1.9 versus 4.0 +/- 1.1% area at day 14 UUO). These differences were associated with significantly more interstitial fibrosis in the -/- mice based on Sirius red staining (4.6 +/- 0.9 versus 2.3 +/- 0.9% area at 14 d UUO). Absence of the uPAR scavenger receptor was associated with significantly greater accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein (PAI-1) (20.5 +/- 3.5 versus 9.1 +/- 2.9% area, day 14 UUO) and vitronectin protein (2.4 +/- 1.1 versus 0.9 +/- 0.4% area, day 14 UUO). By immunostaining alphaSMA+ cells, CD34+ cells, vitronectin and PAI-1 co-localized to the same tubulointerstitial area. The number of apoptotic cells increased in response to UUO but was significantly higher in the -/- mice (2.0 +/- 0.2 versus 1.2 +/- 0.2 per 100 tubulointerstitial cells, day 14 UUO) while the number of proliferating cells was significantly lower in the uPAR-/- mice. These data suggest that uPAR deficiency suppresses renal Mphi

  13. Activity of urokinase diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection and stored in glass or plastic syringes.

    PubMed

    Patel, J P; Tran, L T; Sinai, W J; Carr, L J

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the diluent, the container, the i.v. set, and the drug concentration on the adsorption of urokinase to i.v. administration systems were studied, along with the compatibility of urokinase with plastic and glass syringes. Solutions of urokinase 1500 and 5000 IU/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and 5% dextrose injection in glass and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) containers were sampled at 2 and 30 minutes. Administration sets were attached to PVC containers containing the urokinase-5% dextrose injection solutions, and samples were collected at 90 and 150 minutes. Glass and polypropylene syringes containing urokinase 5000 IU/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection were sampled at 0, 4, 8, and 24 hours. Urokinase activity was measured by an in vitro clot lysis assay. No urokinase diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection adsorbed to glass or PVC containers. For urokinase 1500 IU/mL in 5% dextrose injection, a loss of 15% to 20% occurred almost instantaneously in PVC containers; additional losses to the infusion sets were minimal. However, for urokinase 5000 IU/mL in 5% dextrose injection, no losses were observed in the PVC systems. No drug loss to glass bottles was seen for urokinase 1500 or 5000 IU/mL in 5% dextrose injection. Urokinase potency remained constant in polypropylene and glass syringes for 24 hours. To minimize urokinase sorption to PVC containers, higher concentrations of urokinase diluted in 5% dextrose injection should be used, provided that clinical safety and efficacy are not compromised. The use of 0.9% sodium chloride injection as a diluent also prevents sorption losses.

  14. Virtual Screening Targeting the Urokinase Receptor, Biochemical and Cell-Based Studies, Synthesis, Pharmacokinetic Characterization, and Effect on Breast Tumor Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Li, Jing; Sinn, Anthony L.; Knabe, William Eric; Khanna, May; Jo, Inha; Silver, Jayne M.; Oh, Kyungsoo; Li, Liwei; Sandusky, George E.; Sledge, George W.; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Jones, David R.; Pollok, Karen E.; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual screening targeting the urokinase receptor (uPAR) led to (3R)-4-cyclohexyl-3-(hexahydrobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-N-((hexahydrobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)methyl)butan-1-aminium 1 (IPR-1) and 4-(4-((3,5-dimethylcyclohexyl)carbamoyl)-2-(4-isopropylcyclohexyl)pyrazolidin-3-yl)piperidin-1-ium 3 (IPR-69). Synthesis of an analog of 1, namely 2 (IPR-9), and 3 led to breast MDA-MB-231 invasion, migration and adhesion assays with IC50 near 30 μM. Both compounds blocked angiogenesis with IC50 of 3 μM. Compounds 2 and 3 inhibited cell growth with IC50 of 6 and 18 μM and induced apoptosis. Biochemical assays revealed lead-like properties for 3, but not 2. Compound 3 administered orally reached peak concentration of nearly 40 μM with a half-life of about 2 hours. In NOD-SCID mice inoculated with breast TMD-231 cells in their mammary fat pads, compound 3 showed a 20% reduction in tumor volumes and less extensive metastasis was observed for the treated mice. The suitable pharmacokinetic properties of 3 and the encouraging preliminary results in metastasis make it an ideal starting point for next generation compounds. PMID:21851064

  15. Induction of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cell Urokinase Expression by Cryptococcus neoformans Facilitates Blood-Brain Barrier Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stie, Jamal; Fox, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The invasive ability of the blood-borne fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans can be enhanced through interactions with host plasma components, such as plasminogen. Previously we showed by in vitro studies that plasminogen coats the surface of C. neoformans and is converted to the active serine protease, plasmin, by host plasminogen activators. Viable, but not formaldehyde- or sodium azide-killed, cryptococcal strains undergo brain microvascular endothelial cell-dependent plasminogen-to-plasmin activation, which results in enhanced, plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion of primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and fungal ability to degrade plasmin substrates. In the present work, brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, cryptococcal strains led to significant increases in both urokinase mRNA transcription and cell-associated urokinase protein expression. Soluble urokinase was also detected in conditioned medium from brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, C. neoformans. Exposure of plasminogen pre-coated viable C. neoformans to conditioned medium from strain-matched brain microvascular endothelial cell-fungal co-cultures resulted in plasminogen-to-plasmin activation and plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion. siRNA-mediated silencing of urokinase gene expression or the use of specific inhibitors of urokinase activity abrogated both plasminogen-to-plasmin activation on C. neoformans and cryptococcal-brain microvascular endothelial cell invasion. Our results suggest that pathogen exploitation of the host urokinase-plasmin(ogen) system may contribute to C. neoformans virulence during invasive cryptococcosis. PMID:23145170

  16. Urokinase receptor (uPAR) ligand based recombinant toxins for human cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Silvestris, Franco

    2011-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) exerts essential functions in the pathophysiology of cancers and therefore constitutes an important drug target. In order to generate efficient drugs against uPAR, a new approach includes chimeric proteins associating one molecular address to specifically target uPAR and one bacterial or plant toxin that will eventually kill the tumoural cell. Using this frame, several recombinant toxins have been designed namely DTAT, DTAT13, EGFATFKDEL 7 mut, and ATF-SAP. As molecular address, all of these fusion proteins use the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase that binds with high affinity to uPAR through its growth factor domain (GFD). The various toxin moieties were derived from either diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38), or saporin. In this review, we describe the rational, design, production and therapeutic anti-cancer potential of these chimeric toxins.

  17. [Distribution of recombinant pro-urokinase in the rabbit blocked carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Matveev, M Iu; Mukhina, S A; Golubykh, V L; Domogatskiĭ, S P

    1999-07-01

    Distribution of recombinant pro-urokinase (PRU) in segments of blocked carotid arteries of rabbits was measured in 10, 20 and 30 minutes after i.v. administration of the RPU. Concentration of the latter in the bloodstream taken as 100% on the 3rd minute, after the infusion decreased to 42% in 10 min., 24% in 20 min., and 13% in 30 min. The RPU concentration decreased to 2% at the artery clamp point, to 20% at 10-15 cm from the clamp point, and remained constant for 10-30 min. A thrombolytic agent accumulated at the dead-end of the blocked artery, was not subject to rapid clearance in contrast to circulating pro-urokinase.

  18. Design of a 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol for Space Walks (EVAs) from the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Fife, C.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; Dervay, J.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The majority of extravehicular activities (EVAs) performed from the shuttle use a 10.2 psi staged decompression. The International Space Station (ISS) will operate at 14.7 psi, requiring crews to "campout" in the airlock at 10.2 psi. The constraints associated with campout (crew isolation, oxygen usage, and waste management), provided the rationale to develop a 2-hour prebreathe protocol from 14.7 psi. Previous studies on the affect of microgravity and exercise during prebreathe suggested the feasibility of this approach. Various combinations of adynamia (nonwalking subjects), prebreathe exercise doses, and space suit donning options (10.2 vs. 14.7 psi) were analyzed against timeline and consumable constraints. Prospective decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) accept/reject criteria were defined from statistical analysis of historical DCS data, combined with risk management of DCS under ISS mission circumstances. Maximum operational DCS levels were defined based on protecting for EVA capability with two crew members at 95% confidence, throughout ISS lifetime (within the constraints of NASA DCS disposition policy JPG 1800.3). The accept / reject limits were adjusted for greater safety (including Grade IV VGE criteria) based on analysis of related medical factors. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to design a closed sequential, multi-center laboratory trial, including the capability of rejecting the primary protocol and testing at least one alternate exercise dose, within the 2-hour prebreathe. The 2-hour protocol incorporates 0, breathing for 5 0 min at 14.7 psi, including 10 min dual cycle ergometry at 75%VO(2max). It requires an additional 30 minO2breathing during depress from 14.7 to 10.2 psi, followed by a 30-60 min suit donning break at 10.2 psi/26.5% O2. It concludes with a 40 min in-suit O2 prebreathe. The protocol would be accepted for operations, if the incidence of DCS was less than 15% and Grade IV VGE less than 20%, both at 95

  19. Design of a 2-Hour Prebreathe Protocol for Space Walks (EVAs) from the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Fife, C.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; Dervay, J.; Waligora, J. M.; Powell, M. R.; Homick, Jerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The majority of extravehicular activities (EVAs) performed from the shuttle use a 10.2 psi staged decompression. The International Space Station (ISS) will operate at 14.7 psi, requiring crews to "campout" in the airlock at 10.2 psi. The constraints associated with campout (crew isolation, oxygen usage, and waste management), provided the rationale to develop a 2-hour prebreathe protocol from 14.7 psi. Previous studies on the affect of microgravity and exercise during prebreathe suggested the feasibility of this approach. Various combinations of adynamia (nonwalking subjects), prebreathe exercise doses, and space suit donning options (10.2 vs. 14.7 psi) were analyzed against timeline and consumable constraints. Prospective decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) accept/reject criteria were defined from statistical analysis of historical DCS data, combined with risk management of DCS under ISS mission circumstances. Maximum operational DCS levels were defined based on protecting for EVA capability with two crew members at 95% confidence, throughout ISS lifetime (within the constraints of NASA DCS disposition policy JPG 1800.3). The accept / reject limits were adjusted for greater safety (including Grade IV VGE criteria) based on analysis of related medical factors. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to design a closed sequential, multi-center laboratory trial, including the capability of rejecting the primary protocol and testing at least one alternate exercise dose, within the 2-hour prebreathe. The 2-hour protocol incorporates 0, breathing for 5 0 min at 14.7 psi, including 10 min dual cycle ergometry at 75%VO(2max). It requires an additional 30 minO2breathing during depress from 14.7 to 10.2 psi, followed by a 30-60 min suit donning break at 10.2 psi/26.5% O2. It concludes with a 40 min in-suit O2 prebreathe. The protocol would be accepted for operations, if the incidence of DCS was less than 15% and Grade IV VGE less than 20%, both at 95

  20. Anterograde Intra-Arterial Urokinase Injection for Salvaging Fibular Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Jung, Sun-Il; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old male patient who presented with squamous cell carcinoma on his mouth floor with cervical and mandibular metastases. Wide glossectomy with intergonial mandibular ostectomy, and sequential reconstruction using fibular osteomyocutaneous free flap were planned. When the anastomosis between the peroneal artery of the fibular free flap and the right lingual artery was performed, no venous flow was observed at the vena comitans. Then re-anastomosis followed by topical application of papaverine and lidocaine was attempted. However, the blood supply was not recovered. Warm saline irrigation over 30 minutes was also useless. Microvascular thromboses of donor vessels were clinically suspected, so a solution of 100,000 units of urokinase was infused once through a 26-gauge angiocatheter inserted into the recipient artery just at the arterial anastomotic site, until the solution gushed out through the flap vena comitans. Immediately after the application of urokinase, arterial flow and venous return were restored. There were no complications during the follow-up period of 11 months. We believe that vibrating injuries from the reciprocating saw during osteotomies and flap insetting might be the cause of microvascular thromboses. The use of urokinase may provide a viable option for the treatment of suspicious intraoperative arterial thrombosis. PMID:23730603

  1. Anterograde intra-arterial urokinase injection for salvaging fibular free flap.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Jung, Sun-Il; Kim, Deok-Woo; Dhong, Eun-Sang

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old male patient who presented with squamous cell carcinoma on his mouth floor with cervical and mandibular metastases. Wide glossectomy with intergonial mandibular ostectomy, and sequential reconstruction using fibular osteomyocutaneous free flap were planned. When the anastomosis between the peroneal artery of the fibular free flap and the right lingual artery was performed, no venous flow was observed at the vena comitans. Then re-anastomosis followed by topical application of papaverine and lidocaine was attempted. However, the blood supply was not recovered. Warm saline irrigation over 30 minutes was also useless. Microvascular thromboses of donor vessels were clinically suspected, so a solution of 100,000 units of urokinase was infused once through a 26-gauge angiocatheter inserted into the recipient artery just at the arterial anastomotic site, until the solution gushed out through the flap vena comitans. Immediately after the application of urokinase, arterial flow and venous return were restored. There were no complications during the follow-up period of 11 months. We believe that vibrating injuries from the reciprocating saw during osteotomies and flap insetting might be the cause of microvascular thromboses. The use of urokinase may provide a viable option for the treatment of suspicious intraoperative arterial thrombosis.

  2. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  3. A cleavage-resistant urokinase plasminogen activator receptor exhibits dysregulated cell-surface clearance.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Evelyn C; Manchanda, Naveen

    2010-04-23

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) binds urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and participates in plasminogen activation in addition to modulating several cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and migration. u-PAR is susceptible to proteolysis by its cognate ligand and several other proteases. To elucidate the biological significance of receptor cleavage by u-PA, we engineered and expressed a two-chain urokinase plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) cleavage-resistant u-PAR (cr-u-PAR). This mutated receptor was similar to wild-type u-PAR in binding u-PA and initiating plasminogen activation. However, cr-u-PAR exhibited accelerated internalization and resurfacing due to direct association with the endocytic receptor alpha(2)-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in the absence of the enzyme x inhibitor complex of tcu-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tcu-PA.PAI-1). cr-u-PAR-expressing cells had enhanced migration compared with wild-type u-PAR-expressing cells, and cr-u-PAR was less sensitive to chymotrypsin cleavage as compared with wt u-PAR. Our studies suggest that these mutations in the linker region result in a rearrangement within the cr-u-PAR structure that makes it resemble its ligand-bound form. This constitutively active variant may mimic highly glycosylated cleavage-resistant u-PAR expressed in certain highly malignant cancer-cells.

  4. Prophylaxis with urokinase in pediatric oncology patients with central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kalmanti, Maria; Germanakis, John; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Syfridaki, Cathrin; Christidou, Athanasia; Tsetis, Dimitris; Vardas, Panagiotis; Charisis, George

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of urokinase in the prevention of central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with malignancy. Fifteen patients with 16 CVCs (study group A) received an intraluminal application of urokinase (10,000 IU in each catheter lumen for 4 h) once a week. They were monitored prospectively with quantitative blood cultures and ultrasonography (color Doppler ultrasound of the great veins and echocardiography). The rate of complications was compared with that of 15 children with 19 CVCs without thromboprophylaxis, treated the previous significantly lower incidence of CVC dysfunction year (control group B). The authors found a wer incidence of CVC dysfunction (3/16 versus 13/19), no major thrombosis, fewer CVC-related bacteremias (2/16 versus 8/19), and a higher salvage of CVCs (1/16 versus 5/19 CVC removals due to persistent bacteremia) in the thromboprophylaxis group. Asymptomatic thrombosis rate was also lower (7/16 cases in group A versus 9/11 in group B when sonography was performed). No hemorrhagic complications were noted. Thromboprophylaxis with urokinase seems a safe and effective measure for reducing the rate of CVC-related complications.

  5. Urokinase Separation from Cell Culture Broth of a Human Kidney Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vibha; Roychoudhury, Pradip K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    A single step ion-exchange chromatography on a sulfo-propyl (SP)- Sepharose column was performed to separate both the high molecular weight (HMW)- and low molecular weight (LMW)- forms of enzymatically active urokinase type plasminogen activator from human kidney (HT1080) cell culture media. The level of urokinase secreted by the cell line reached to about 145 Plough units/ml culture broth within 48 h of cultivation. The conditioned cell culture media was applied directly to the column without any prior concentration steps. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the column eluates in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate showed that the cell line secretes three forms of two-chain high molecular weight (HMW) urokinase of molecular weights (Mr) 64,000, 60,900 and 55,000. In addition, two low molecular weight (LMW) forms of Mr 22,000 and 20,000; proteolytic cleavage products of HMW, were also found. The HMW and LMW forms had intrinsic plasminogen dependent proteolytic activity as judged by zymographic analysis. The specific activity of the pooled peak fractions increased (approximately 93-fold) to values as high as 1481 Plough units/ mg protein. Both HMW as well as LMW forms were obtained in significantly high yields. PMID:17200693

  6. Design and Testing of a 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Protocol for Space Walks from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; hide

    2000-01-01

    To develop and test a 2-hour prebreathe protocol for performing extravehicular activities (EVAs) from the International Space Station (ISS). Combinations of adynamia (non-walking), prebreathe exercise, and space suit donning options (10.2 vs. 14.7 psi) were evaluated, against timeline and consumable contraints to develop an operational 2- hour prebreathe protocol. Prospective accept/reject criteria were defined for decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) from analysis of historical DCS data, combined with risk management of DCS under ISS mission circumstances. Maximum operational DCS levels were defined based on protecting for EVA capability with two crew-members at 95% confidence, throughout ISS lifetime (within the constraints of NASA DCS disposition policy JPG 1800.3). The accept/reject limits were adjusted for greater safety based on analysis of related medical factors. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to design a closed sequential, multi-center human trial. Protocols were tested with 4 different prebreathe exercises (Phases I-IV), prior to exposure to 4.3 psi for 4 hrs. Subject selection, Doppler monitoring for VGE, test termination criteria, and DCS definitions were standardized. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase II: ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise (simulating space-suit preparations). Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. A prebreathe procedure was accepted if, at 95% confidence, the incidence of DCS was less than 15% (with no Type II DCS), and Grade IV VGE was less than 20%.

  7. Design and Testing of a 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Protocol for Space Walks from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To develop and test a 2-hour prebreathe protocol for performing extravehicular activities (EVAs) from the International Space Station (ISS). Combinations of adynamia (non-walking), prebreathe exercise, and space suit donning options (10.2 vs. 14.7 psi) were evaluated, against timeline and consumable contraints to develop an operational 2- hour prebreathe protocol. Prospective accept/reject criteria were defined for decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) from analysis of historical DCS data, combined with risk management of DCS under ISS mission circumstances. Maximum operational DCS levels were defined based on protecting for EVA capability with two crew-members at 95% confidence, throughout ISS lifetime (within the constraints of NASA DCS disposition policy JPG 1800.3). The accept/reject limits were adjusted for greater safety based on analysis of related medical factors. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to design a closed sequential, multi-center human trial. Protocols were tested with 4 different prebreathe exercises (Phases I-IV), prior to exposure to 4.3 psi for 4 hrs. Subject selection, Doppler monitoring for VGE, test termination criteria, and DCS definitions were standardized. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase II: ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise (simulating space-suit preparations). Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. A prebreathe procedure was accepted if, at 95% confidence, the incidence of DCS was less than 15% (with no Type II DCS), and Grade IV VGE was less than 20%.

  8. Binocular Rivalry Measured 2 Hours After Occlusion Therapy Predicts the Recovery Rate of the Amblyopic Eye in Anisometropic Children

    PubMed Central

    Lunghi, Claudia; Morrone, Maria Concetta; Secci, Jacopo; Caputo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies on adults have shown that short-term monocular deprivation boosts the deprived eye signal in binocular rivalry, reflecting homeostatic plasticity. Here we investigate whether homeostatic plasticity is present also during occlusion therapy for moderate amblyopia. Methods Binocular rivalry and visual acuity (using Snellen charts for children) were measured in 10 children (mean age 6.2 ± 1 years) with moderate anisometropic amblyopia before the beginning of treatment and at four intervals during occlusion therapy (2 hours, 1, 2, and 5 months). Visual stimuli were orthogonal gratings presented dichoptically through ferromagnetic goggles and children reported verbally visual rivalrous perception. Bangerter filters were applied on the spectacle lens over the best eye for occlusion therapy. Results Two hours of occlusion therapy increased the nonamblyopic eye predominance over the amblyopic eye compared with pretreatment measurements, consistent with the results in adults. The boost of the nonamblyopic eye was still present after 1 month of treatment, steadily decreasing afterward to reach pretreatment levels after 2 months of continuous occlusion. Across subjects, the increase in nonamblyopic eye predominance observed after 2 hours of occlusion correlated (rho = −0.65, P = 0.04) with the visual acuity improvement of the amblyopic eye measured after 2 months of treatment. Conclusions Homeostatic plasticity operates during occlusion therapy for moderate amblyopia and the increase in nonamblyopic eye dominance observed at the beginning of treatment correlates with the amblyopic eye recovery rate. These results suggest that binocular rivalry might be used to monitor visual cortical plasticity during occlusion therapy, although further investigations on larger clinical populations are needed to validate the predictive power of the technique. PMID:27046118

  9. Tirofiban combined with urokinase selective intra-arterial thrombolysis for the treatment of middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    FENG, LEI; LIU, JUN; LIU, YUNZHEN; CHEN, JIAN; SU, CHUNHAI; LV, CHUANFENG; WEI, YUZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish a model of embolic stroke in rabbits and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intra-arterially administered tirofiban combined with urokinase thrombolysis. The middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAO) of embolic stroke was established in New Zealand rabbits via an autologous clot. The model rabbits were allocated at random into four groups: Tirofiban group (T group), urokinase group (UK group), tirofiban and urokinase group (T + UK group) and the control group (C group). The recanalization rate, relative-apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC) and neurological function deficit score (NFDS) values were compared among the four groups. The recanalization rate, rADC and NFDS values were improved in the T + UK group compared with the other groups. In summary, the intra-arterial administration of tirofiban combined with urokinase thrombolysis was a more effective intervention in an MCAO model compared with intra-arterial urokinase alone, and may promote reperfusion and reduce infarct volume. PMID:26998029

  10. Intrapleural Fibrinolysis with Urokinase Versus Alteplase in Complicated Parapneumonic Pleural Effusions and Empyemas: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Carmen; Porcel, José M; Alegre, José; Ruiz, Eva; Bielsa, Silvia; Andreu, Jordi; Deu, Maria; Suñé, Pilar; Martínez-Sogués, Mireia; López, Iker; Pallisa, Esther; Schoenenberger, Joan Antoni; Bruno Montoro, J; de Sevilla, Tomás Fernández

    2015-12-01

    Pleurofibrinolysis has been reported to be potentially beneficial in the management of complicated parapneumonic effusions (CPPE) and empyemas in the adult population. Prospective, controlled, randomized, and double-blind study, to evaluate intrapleural alteplase 10 mg (initially 20 mg was considered but bleeding events forced dose reduction) versus 100,000 UI urokinase every 24 h for a maximum of 6 days in patients with CPPE or empyemas. The primary aim was to evaluate the success rate of each fibrinolytic agent at 3 and 6 days. Success of therapy was defined as the presence of both clinical and radiological improvement, making additional fibrinolytic doses unnecessary, and eventually leading to resolution. Secondary outcomes included the safety profile of intrapleural fibrinolytics, referral for surgery, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A total of 99 patients were included, of whom 51 received alteplase and 48 urokinase. Success rates for urokinase and alteplase at 3 and 6 days were not significantly different, but when only the subgroup of CPPE was considered, urokinase resulted in a high proportion of cures. There were no differences in mortality or surgical need (overall, 3 %). Five (28 %) patients receiving 20 mg of alteplase and 4 (12 %) receiving 10 mg presented serious bleeding events. If intrapleural fibrinolytics are intended to be used, urokinase may be more effective than alteplase in patients with non-purulent CPPE and have a lower rate of adverse events.

  11. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in the Self-Reported Number of Drinks in 2 Hours Before Driving Becomes Impaired.

    PubMed

    Kerr, William C; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2015-07-01

    We used data on self-reported impaired driving and the number of drinks the person states he or she can have in 2 hours before impairment to evaluate predictors of individuals' impairment thresholds by race/ethnicity. Data come from the 2000, 2005, and 2010 US National Alcohol Surveys, with oversamples of Black and Hispanic populations. We estimated negative binomial models overall, by gender, and for those who reported impaired driving. Analyses focused primarily on 8553 respondents who drank alcohol and drove a car in the past year. In models that controlled for relevant available measures including body weight, sociodemographics, and drinking patterns, we found perceived impairment thresholds to be 30.3% (95% confidence interval = 23%, 38%) higher for Black drinkers and 26.3% (95% confidence interval = 18%, 35%) higher for Hispanic drinkers compared with White drinkers. The greater number of standard drinks before perceived impairment reported by Black and Hispanic drivers implies a likely relative underreport of impaired driving and potentially higher severity of impairment when driving relative to White drivers.

  12. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in the Self-Reported Number of Drinks in 2 Hours Before Driving Becomes Impaired

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We used data on self-reported impaired driving and the number of drinks the person states he or she can have in 2 hours before impairment to evaluate predictors of individuals’ impairment thresholds by race/ethnicity. Methods. Data come from the 2000, 2005, and 2010 US National Alcohol Surveys, with oversamples of Black and Hispanic populations. We estimated negative binomial models overall, by gender, and for those who reported impaired driving. Analyses focused primarily on 8553 respondents who drank alcohol and drove a car in the past year. Results. In models that controlled for relevant available measures including body weight, sociodemographics, and drinking patterns, we found perceived impairment thresholds to be 30.3% (95% confidence interval = 23%, 38%) higher for Black drinkers and 26.3% (95% confidence interval = 18%, 35%) higher for Hispanic drinkers compared with White drinkers. Conclusions. The greater number of standard drinks before perceived impairment reported by Black and Hispanic drivers implies a likely relative underreport of impaired driving and potentially higher severity of impairment when driving relative to White drivers. PMID:25602892

  13. Combined Low-Frequency Ultrasound and Urokinase-Containing Microbubbles in Treatment of Femoral Artery Thrombosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to study the thrombolytic effect of low-frequency ultrasound combined with targeted urokinase-containing microbubble contrast agents on treatment of thrombosis in rabbit femoral artery; and to determine the optimal combination of parameters for achieving thrombolysis in this model. A biotinylated-avidin method was used to prepare microbubble contrast agents carrying urokinase and Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptides. Following femoral artery thrombosis in New Zealand white rabbits, microbubble contrast agents were injected intravenously, and ultrasonic exposure was applied. A 3 × 2 × 2 factorial table was applied to categorize the experimental animals based on different levels of combination of ultrasonic frequencies (Factor A: 1.6 MHz, 2.2 MHz, 2.8 MHz), doses of urokinase (Factor B: 90,000 IU/Kg, 180,000 IU/Kg) and ultrasound exposure time (Factor C: 30 min, 60 min). A total of 72 experimental animals were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 6/group). Doppler techniques were used to assess blood flow in the distal end of the thrombotic femoral artery during the 120 minutes thrombolysis experiment. The rate of recanalization following thrombolysis was calculated, and thrombolytic efficacy was evaluated and compared. The thrombolytic recanalization rate for all experimental subjects after thrombolytic therapy was 68.1%. The optimal parameters for thrombolysis were determined to be 1) an ultrasound frequency of 2.2 MHz and 2) a 90,000 IU/kg dose of urokinase. Ultrasound exposure time (30 min vs. 60 min) had no significant effect on the thrombolytic effects. The combination of local low-frequency ultrasound radiation, targeted microbubbles, and thrombolytic urokinase induced thrombolysis of femoral artery thrombosis in a rabbit model. The ultrasonic frequency of 2.2 MHz and urokinase dose of 90,000 IU/kg induced optimal thrombolytic effects, while the application of either 30 min or 60 min of ultrasound exposure had similar effects. PMID:28033371

  14. Combined Low-Frequency Ultrasound and Urokinase-Containing Microbubbles in Treatment of Femoral Artery Thrombosis in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Guan, Lina; Mu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to study the thrombolytic effect of low-frequency ultrasound combined with targeted urokinase-containing microbubble contrast agents on treatment of thrombosis in rabbit femoral artery; and to determine the optimal combination of parameters for achieving thrombolysis in this model. A biotinylated-avidin method was used to prepare microbubble contrast agents carrying urokinase and Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptides. Following femoral artery thrombosis in New Zealand white rabbits, microbubble contrast agents were injected intravenously, and ultrasonic exposure was applied. A 3 × 2 × 2 factorial table was applied to categorize the experimental animals based on different levels of combination of ultrasonic frequencies (Factor A: 1.6 MHz, 2.2 MHz, 2.8 MHz), doses of urokinase (Factor B: 90,000 IU/Kg, 180,000 IU/Kg) and ultrasound exposure time (Factor C: 30 min, 60 min). A total of 72 experimental animals were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 6/group). Doppler techniques were used to assess blood flow in the distal end of the thrombotic femoral artery during the 120 minutes thrombolysis experiment. The rate of recanalization following thrombolysis was calculated, and thrombolytic efficacy was evaluated and compared. The thrombolytic recanalization rate for all experimental subjects after thrombolytic therapy was 68.1%. The optimal parameters for thrombolysis were determined to be 1) an ultrasound frequency of 2.2 MHz and 2) a 90,000 IU/kg dose of urokinase. Ultrasound exposure time (30 min vs. 60 min) had no significant effect on the thrombolytic effects. The combination of local low-frequency ultrasound radiation, targeted microbubbles, and thrombolytic urokinase induced thrombolysis of femoral artery thrombosis in a rabbit model. The ultrasonic frequency of 2.2 MHz and urokinase dose of 90,000 IU/kg induced optimal thrombolytic effects, while the application of either 30 min or 60 min of ultrasound exposure had similar effects.

  15. Hyperglycemia is associated with lower levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in wound fluid.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Baris; Terzi, Cem; Sevindik, Gokmen; Yuksel, Faize; Tunc, Ulku Aybuke; Tunali, Sunay; Yesil, Sena

    2014-01-01

    Wounds in patients with hyperglycemia show impaired healing. Plasminogen activation is crucial in several overlapping phases of wound healing process. In this study, we aimed i) to compare acute wound fluid in patients with hyperglycemia and normoglycemia, ii) to focus on the elements of plasminogen activation in the wound fluid, and iii) to determine if the acute wound fluid characteristics are associated with surgical site infections. In a cohort of 54 patients, a closed suction drain was placed in the wound above the anterior abdominal wall fascia under the skin in order to collect postoperative acute wound fluid samples for 3 following days after colorectal surgery. Patients were classified as normoglycemic (n=25) or hyperglycemic (n=29; 17 with type 2 diabetes and 12 with stress induced hyperglycemia). Surgical site infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. The levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAr), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) were measured in the wound fluid. Compared to normoglycemic subjects, patients with hyperglycemia had significantly lower levels of uPA and uPAr in the wound fluid despite similar or even higher circulating levels. There was no significant difference in IL-1β, TNF-α, PAI-1 and FGF-1 levels. In the whole study population, the wound fluid levels of uPA and uPAr were negatively correlated with circulating glucose levels. No difference was detected in the wound fluid characteristics of patients with and without surgical site infection. Patients with hyperglycemia exhibit decreased levels of uPA and uPAr in the wound fluid, suggesting a local failure in plasminogen activation at the wound site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteopontin induces soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor production and release.

    PubMed

    Vaschetto, R; Navalesi, P; Clemente, N; Boggio, E; Valsecchi, S; Olivieri, C; Soluri, M F; Kroumova, V; Fonio, P; Dinatale, C; Borrè, S; Fortina, G; Umberto, D; Della Corte, F; Chiocchetti, A

    2015-02-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been proposed as markers of disease severity and risk-stratification in infection and inflammation. In breast cancer, OPN and the membrane bound form of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) are functionally related, as OPN-induced cell migration depends on uPAR triggering by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the kinetic of OPN and suPAR blood levels in patients developing septic shock (SS) compared to those not developing SS, and to investigate the relationships between these two biomarkers in immune cells in vitro. We measured the levels of OPN and suPAR for 15 days in forty-three patients, defined a priory as at risk to develop septic shock. Moreover, we investigated in vitro the effect of recombinant OPN on uPAR and suPAR expression in monocytes. We found that OPN and suPAR levels were directly correlated to each other both at intensive care unit admission and on the day patients met SIRS/sepsis or septic shock criteria. In patients developing septic shock, OPN increased prior to suPAR and was already detectable up to 4 days before the shock development. In vitro, OPN induced suPAR production in monocytes by increasing both uPAR gene expression, and suPAR release from the cell surface. These data suggest that OPN is partly responsible for the increased plasma levels of suPAR and might be a valuable tool to predict the occurrence of septic shock.

  17. Intra-arterial urokinase for treatment of retrograde thrombosis following resection of an arteriovenous malformation. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sipos, E P; Kirsch, J R; Nauta, H J; Debrun, G; Ulatowski, J A; Bell, W R

    1992-06-01

    Retrograde thrombosis of feeding arteries is a potentially catastrophic complication occasionally reported following resection of arteriovenous malformations (AVM's). No successful therapy for this condition, which causes postoperative stroke, has previously been reported. A case of retrograde thrombosis of the left middle cerebral artery immediately following resection of a parietal AVM is reported in a patient with a retained intra-arterial catheter from preoperative embolization. The administration of urokinase within 4 hours of surgery resulted in dramatic clinical and angiographic improvement without hemorrhagic complications. While urokinase is considered highly experimental in this setting, this case demonstrates that thrombolytic agents should be viewed as therapeutic options worthy of further investigation.

  18. Geometry of GPPE binding to picrate and to the urokinase type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Zesławska, Ewa; Stürzebecher, Jörg; Oleksyn, Barbara J

    2007-11-15

    Crystal structure of 2-(4-guanidynephenyl)-1-phenyl-ethanone (GPPE) in two different environments was determined in order to compare the binding geometry of these compound to a simple picrate anion and to protein, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), which may be treated as a target for anti-cancer drugs. It was shown that the conformation and the hydrogen-bonding formation by GPPE molecule are similar in both environments, but several important differences were discovered and described.

  19. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c < 6.5% were more likely to be older (64 ± 15 versus 60 ± 15 years old, P = 0.01, mean ± STD), female (53.2% versus 38.2%, P = 0.008), leaner (29.7 ± 6.1 versus 33.0 ± 6.6 kg/m2, P = 0.000005), and less likely to be current smokers (18.1% versus 29.1%, P = 0.02) as compared to those with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  20. Urokinase Receptor Cleavage: A Crucial Step in Fibroblast-to-Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Twining, Sally S.; Warejcka, Debra J.; Tall, Edward; Masur, Sandra K.

    2007-01-01

    Fibroblasts migrate into and repopulate connective tissue wounds. At the wound edge, fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts, and they promote wound closure. Regulated fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation is critical for regenerative healing. Previous studies have focused on the role in fibroblasts of urokinase plasmingen activator/urokinase plasmingen activator receptor (uPA/uPAR), an extracellular protease system that promotes matrix remodeling, growth factor activation, and cell migration. Whereas fibroblasts have substantial uPA activity and uPAR expression, we discovered that cultured myofibroblasts eventually lost cell surface uPA/uPAR. This led us to investigate the relevance of uPA/uPAR activity to myofibroblast differentiation. We found that fibroblasts expressed increased amounts of full-length cell surface uPAR (D1D2D3) compared with myofibroblasts, which had reduced expression of D1D2D3 but increased expression of the truncated form of uPAR (D2D3) on their cell surface. Retaining full-length uPAR was found to be essential for regulating myofibroblast differentiation, because 1) protease inhibitors that prevented uPAR cleavage also prevented myofibroblast differentiation, and 2) overexpression of cDNA for a noncleavable form of uPAR inhibited myofibroblast differentiation. These data support a novel hypothesis that maintaining full-length uPAR on the cell surface regulates the fibroblast to myofibroblast transition and that down-regulation of uPAR is necessary for myofibroblast differentiation. PMID:17507651

  1. [Urokinase as a blood and urine plasminogen activator in chronic glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Andreenko, G V; Poliantseva, L R; Podorol'skaia, L V; Bumblite, I D

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the individual role of the plasminogen activators (PA) urokinase (u-PA) and tissue (t-PA) in the development of two renal diseases (the nephrotic forms of chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and amyloidosis, the baseline plasma and urine levels of u-PA and t-PA antigens, their functional activity (FPAA), and changes in these parameters were determined after protein loading test (0.7 g/kg). In healthy individuals and patients with amyloidosis, the baseline FPAA changes from 0 to the maximum were caused only by the alterations of u-PA levels, in those with CGN, they were induced by the changes in the content of u-PA and t-AP antigens. The functional loading test revealed PA reserves solely in patients having a high baseline FPAA for both nephropathies: u-PA in amyloidosis and t-PA in CGN. In all the patients, the urine levels of u-PA antigens were 20-40 times more than those of t-PA antigens and 5-6 times less than those plasma u-PA. The findings suggest that urokinase may be regarded as the major plasminogen activator involved in CGN and amyloidosis.

  2. Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) as a new therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montuori, Nunzia; Pesapane, Ada; Rossi, Francesca W; Giudice, Valentina; De Paulis, Amato; Selleri, Carmine; Ragno, Pia

    2016-01-01

    The urokinase (uPA)-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored receptor that focuses urokinase (uPA) proteolytic activity on the cell surface. uPAR also regulates cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, protects from apoptosis and contributes to epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), independently of uPA enzymatic activity. Indeed, uPAR interacts with beta1, beta2 and beta3 integrins, thus regulating their activities. uPAR cross-talks with receptor tyrosine kinases through integrins and regulates cancer cell dormancy, proliferation and angiogenesis. Moreover, uPAR mediates uPA-dependent cell migration and chemotaxis induced by fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF), through its association with fMLF-receptors (fMLF-Rs). Further, uPAR is an adhesion receptor because it binds vitronectin (VN), a component of provisional extracellular matrix. High uPAR expression predicts for more aggressive disease in several cancer types for its ability to increase invasion and metastasis. In fact, uPAR has been hypothesized to be the link between tumor cell dormancy and proliferation that usually precedes the onset of metastasis. Thus, inhibiting uPAR could be a feasible approach to affect tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we review the more recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted anti-cancer therapeutic agents suitable for further optimization or ready for the evaluation in early clinical trials. PMID:27896223

  3. The Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis Syndrome: Treatment with Intraarterial Urokinase and Systemic Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Kenneth D.; McCrohan, Gerard; DeMarta, Deborah A.; Shirodkar, Nitin B.; Kwon, Oun J.; Chopra, Paramjit S.

    1996-03-15

    We report a case of the heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome presenting with acute ischemia of a lower limb. The patient was successfully treated by withdrawal of heparin products, intraarterial urokinase, and platelet anti-aggregation therapy consisting of Dextran and aspirin.

  4. Monocyte-expressed urokinase inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating Stat1.

    PubMed

    Kunigal, Sateesh; Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2003-12-15

    After vascular injury, a remodeling process occurs that features leukocyte migration and infiltration. Loss of endothelial integrity allows the leukocytes to interact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elicit "marching orders"; however, the signaling processes are poorly understood. We found that human monocytes inhibit VSMC proliferation and induce a migratory potential. The monocytes signal the VSMCs through the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The VSMC uPA receptor (uPAR) receives the signal and activates the transcription factor Stat1 that, in turn, mediates the antiproliferative effects. These results provide the first evidence that monocytes signal VSMCs by mechanisms involving the fibrinolytic system, and they imply an important link between the uPA/uPAR-related signaling machinery and human vascular disease.

  5. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor: a functional integrator of extracellular proteolysis, cell adhesion, and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2013-06-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a cell surface receptor involved in a multitude of physiologic and pathologic processes. uPAR regulates simultaneously a branch of the plasminogen activator system and modulates cell adhesion and intracellular signaling by interacting with extracellular matrix components and signaling receptors. The multiple uPAR functions are deeply interconnected, and their integration determines the effects that uPAR expression triggers in different contexts. The proteolytic function of uPAR affects both the signaling and the adhesive functions of the receptor, whereas these latter two are closely interconnected. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that connect and mutually regulate the different uPAR functions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. [Thrombolytic efficacy of a Lys-plasminogen-urokinase combination: studies in experimental animals and humans].

    PubMed

    Latorre, J; Foncuberta, J; Rosendo, A; Elez, J

    1990-01-01

    During animal experimental phase, lis-pg combined with UK produced a thrombolysis of about a 62.5%. This effect is accompanied by an important fibrinolytic system activation, a decrease in fibrinogen levels (0.37 +/- 0.2 gr/l) and an increase PDF/Fg (120.5 +/- 30 ng/ml). Such thrombolytic stage produced diverse hemorrhagic complications in experimental animals. During human clinical trial stage, then patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) at proximal lower limbs level were submitted to diverse treatment protocols with Lis-Plasminogen (Lis-plg) and Urokinase (UK). After preliminary outcomes we can conclude that administration of Lis-plg followed by UK increases the fibrinolytic activity but also increases the risk of hemorrhagic complications. This second effect is not probably caused by an specific absorption on the thrombo surface, but by an increase of circulating plasminogen levels Lis-plg exogenous-induced.

  7. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Cellular migration is an essential component of invasive biological processes, many of which have been correlated with an increase in plasminogen activator production. Endothelial cell migration occurs in vivo during repair of vascular lesions and angiogenesis, and can be induced in vitro by wounding a confluent monolayer of cells. By combining the wounded monolayer model with a substrate overlay technique, we show that cells migrating from the edges of an experimental wound display an increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity, and that this activity reverts to background levels upon cessation of movement, when the wound has closed. Our results demonstrate a direct temporal relationship between endothelial cell migration and uPA activity, and suggest that induction of uPA activity is a component of the migratory process. PMID:3121633

  8. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) Targeted Nuclear Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Liu, Shuanglong; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter; Li, Zibo

    2013-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein. Besides regulating proteolysis, uPAR could also activate many intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival through cooperating with transmembrane receptors. uPAR is overexpressed across a variety of tumors and is associated with cancer invasion and metastasis. In order to meet the demand for a rapid development and potential clinical application of anti-cancer therapy based on uPA/uPAR system, it is desirable to develop non-invasive imaging methods to visualize and quantify uPAR expression in vivo. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted nuclear imaging and radionuclide therapy agents. The successful development of molecular imaging probes to visualize uPAR expression in vivo would not only assist preclinical researches on uPAR function, but also eventually impact patient management. PMID:23843898

  9. Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and soluble factor urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) may be due to genetic or acquired etiologies and is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome with high morbidity that often leads to end-stage renal failure. The different available therapeutic approaches are unsuccessful, in part due to partially deciphered heterogeneous and complex pathophysiological mechanisms. Moreover, the term FSGS, even in its primary form, comprises a histological description shared by a number of different causes with completely different molecular pathways of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments regarding the pathophysiology of primary acquired FSGS caused by soluble factor urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating permeability factor involved in proteinuria and edema formation, and describes recent advances with potential success in therapy. PMID:24255893

  10. Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor PET.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) overexpression is an important biomarker for aggressiveness in cancer including prostate cancer (PC) and provides independent clinical information in addition to prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score. This article focuses on uPAR PET as a new diagnostic and prognostic imaging biomarker in PC. Many preclinical uPAR-targeted PET imaging studies using AE105 in cancer models have been undertaken with promising results. A major breakthrough was obtained with the recent human translation of uPAR PET in using (64)Cu- and (68)Ga-labelled versions of AE105, respectively. Clinical results from patients with PC included in these studies are encouraging and support continuation with large-scale clinical trials.

  11. The fibrogenic actions of lung fibroblast-derived urokinase: a potential drug target in IPF

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael; Jaffar, Jade; Harris, Trudi; Knight, Darryl A; Westall, Glen; Stewart, Alastair G

    2017-01-01

    The role of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unclear. uPA-generated plasmin has potent fibrogenic actions involving protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Here we characterize uPA distribution or levels in lung tissue and sera from IPF patients to establish the mechanism of its fibrogenic actions on lung fibroblasts (LFs). uPA immunoreactivity was detected in regions of fibrosis including fibroblasts of lung tissue from IPF patients (n = 7). Serum uPA levels and activity were also higher in IPF patients (n = 18) than controls (n = 18) (P < 0.05), being negatively correlated with lung function as measured by forced vital capacity (FVC) %predicted (P < 0.05). The culture supernatants of LFs from IPF patients, as compared to controls, showed an increase in plasmin activity after plasminogen incubation (5–15 μg/mL), corresponding with increased levels of uPA and IL-6 (n = 5–6, P < 0.05). Plasminogen-induced increases in plasmin activity and IL-6 levels were attenuated by reducing uPA and/or PAR-1 expression by RNAi. Plasmin(ogen)-induced mitogenesis was also attenuated by targeting uPA, PAR-1 or IL-6. Our data shows uPA is formed in active regions of fibrosis in IPF lung and contributes to LF plasmin generation, IL-6 production and proliferation. Urokinase is a potential target for the treatment of lung fibrosis. PMID:28139758

  12. Expression and activity of the urokinase plasminogen activator system in canine primary brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John H; Hall-Manning, Kelli; Robertson, John L; King, Jamie N; Davalos, Rafael V; Debinski, Waldemar; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2017-01-01

    Background The expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein family member, and the activity of its ligand, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), have been associated with the invasive and metastatic potentials of a variety of human brain tumors through their regulation of extracellular matrix degradation. Domesticated dogs develop naturally occurring brain tumors that share many clinical, phenotypic, molecular, and genetic features with their human counterparts, which has prompted the use of the dogs with spontaneous brain tumors as models to expedite the translation of novel brain tumor therapeutics to humans. There is currently little known regarding the role of the uPA system in canine brain tumorigenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression of uPAR and the activity of uPA in canine brain tumors as justification for the development of uPAR-targeted brain tumor therapeutics in dogs. Methods We investigated the expression of uPAR in 37 primary canine brain tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses, and by the assay of the activity of uPA using casein–plasminogen zymography. Results Expression of uPAR was observed in multiple tumoral microenvironmental niches, including neoplastic cells, stroma, and the vasculature of canine brain tumors. Relative to normal brain tissues, uPAR protein and mRNA expression were significantly greater in canine meningiomas, gliomas, and choroid plexus tumors. Increased activity of uPA was documented in all tumor types. Conclusions uPAR is overexpressed and uPA activity increased in canine meningiomas, gliomas, and choroid plexus tumors. This study illustrates the potential of uPAR/uPA molecularly targeted approaches for canine brain tumor therapeutics and reinforces the translational significance of canines with spontaneous brain tumors as models for human disease

  13. Intraventricular administration of urokinase as a novel therapeutic approach for communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Tang, Jun; Li, Lin; Tao, Yihao; Chen, Yujie; Yang, Yunfeng; Luo, Chunxia; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Qianwei; Chen, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Fibrosis of the subarachnoid space (SAS) after infection, inflammation, or hemorrhage can impair cerebrospinal fluid absorption and circulation, causing diffuse ventricular dilatation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that urokinase (also known as urokinase-type plasminogen activator [uPA]), a fibrinolytic agent, attenuates fibrosis and ventriculomegaly in a rat model of kaolin-induced communicating hydrocephalus and thus may have potential as a therapy for these conditions. Thirty microliters of sterile 25% kaolin suspension was injected into the basal cisterns of adult Sprague-Dawley rats to induce hydrocephalus, and 2 intraventricular injections of either uPA or vehicle (saline) were administered immediately and 3 days thereafter. Ventricular volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on days 3, 14, and 28 after kaolin injection. Fibrosis and reactive astrogliosis were evaluated on day 28 by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Neurocognitive features were tested using the Morris water maze from days 23 to 28. MRI analysis demonstrated that kaolin administration successfully induced hydrocephalus in rats and that uPA treatment significantly attenuated ventricular enlargement. In addition, uPA inhibited the deposition of laminin and fibronectin, extracellular matrix molecules, in the SAS, attenuated gliosis, and improved learning and memory in kaolin-treated rats. Therefore, we concluded that uPA prevents the development of kaolin-induced communicating hydrocephalus by preventing the development of subarachnoid fibrosis and by eliciting improvements in neurocognition. The results of this study indicate that uPA may be a novel clinical therapy for communicating hydrocephalus.

  14. Participation of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in neutrophil transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pliyev, Boris K; Antonova, Olga A; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying migration of neutrophils across endothelium are not completely understood. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays a key role in neutrophil adhesion and migration. In the present study, we addressed whether uPAR regulates neutrophil transendothelial migration. We first showed that siRNA-mediated knockdown of uPAR in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) did not affect neutrophil migration across HUVEC monolayers indicating that endothelial uPAR does not regulate neutrophil transmigration. In contrast, the transmigration was significantly inhibited by Fab' fragment of anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody and proteolytically inactive urokinase (uPA), whereas inhibition of proteolytical activity of endogenous uPA (with amiloride or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) did not affect the transmigration. Both the anti-uPAR Fab' fragment and proteolytically inactive uPA did not exert significant effects upon the transmigration conducted in the presence of F(ab')(2) fragment of blocking antibody to integrin Mac-1 indicating that uPAR regulates Mac-1-dependent transmigration. Mac-1-dependent, but not Mac-1-independent, transmigration was significantly reduced in the presence of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and d-mannose, the saccharides that disrupt uPAR/Mac-1 association, but was unaffected in the presence of control saccharides (d-sorbitol and sucrose). We conclude that physical association of uPAR with Mac-1 mediates the regulatory effect of uPAR over the transmigration. Finally, we provide evidence that the functional cooperation between uPAR and Mac-1 is essential at both adhesion and diapedesis steps of neutrophil migration across endothelium. Thus, uPAR expressed on neutrophil plasma membrane regulates transendothelial migration independently of uPA proteolytical activity and acting as a cofactor for integrin Mac-1.

  15. Herbal compound triptolide synergistically enhanced antitumor activity of amino-terminal fragment of urokinase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urokinase (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) play an important role in tumour growth and metastasis, and overexpression of these molecules is strongly correlated with poor prognosis in a variety of malignant tumours. Targeting the excessive activation of this system as well as the proliferation of the tumour vascular endothelial cell would be expected to prevent tumour neovasculature and halt tumour development. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase has been confirmed effective to inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasiveness of cancer cells via interrupting the interaction of uPA and uPAR. Triptolide (TPL) is a purified diterpenoid isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F that has shown antitumor activities in various cancer cell types. However, its therapeutic application is limited by its toxicity in normal tissues and complications caused in patients. In this study, we attempted to investigate the synergistic anticancer activity of TPL and ATF in various solid tumour cells. Methods Using in vitro and in vivo experiments, we investigated the combined effect of TPL and ATF at a low dosage on cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, cell migration, signalling pathways, xenograft tumour growth and angiogenesis. Results Our data showed that the sensitivity of a combined therapy using TPL and ATF was higher than that of TPL or ATF alone. Suppression of NF-κB transcriptional activity, activation of caspase-9/caspase-3, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of uPAR-mediated signalling pathway contributed to the synergistic effects of this combination therapy. Furthermore, using a mouse xenograft model, we demonstrated that the combined treatment completely suppressed tumour growth by inhibiting angiogenesis as compared with ATF or TPL treatment alone. Conclusions Our study suggests that lower concentration of ATF and TPL used in combination may produce a synergistic anticancer efficacy that warrants further

  16. Mis-trafficking of endosomal urokinase proteins triggers drug-induced glioma nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Grodzki, Ana Cristina; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-04-01

    5-Benzylglycinyl-amiloride (UCD38B) is the parent molecule of a class of anticancer small molecules that kill proliferative and nonproliferative high-grade glioma cells by programmed necrosis. UCD38B intracellularly triggers endocytosis, causing 40-50% of endosomes containing proteins of the urokinase plasminogen activator system (uPAS) to relocate to perinuclear mitochondrial regions. Endosomal "mis-trafficking" caused by UCD38B in human glioma cells corresponds to mitochondrial depolarization with the release and nuclear translocation of apoptotis-inducing factor (AIF) followed by irreversible caspase-independent cell demise. High-content quantification of immunocytochemical colocalization studies identified that UCD38B treatment increased endocytosis of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) into the early and late endosomes by 4- to 5-fold prior to AIF nuclear translocation and subsequent glioma demise. PAI-1 was found to comparably relocate with a subset of early and late endosomes in four different human glioma cell lines after UCD38B treatment, followed by caspase-independent, nonapoptotic cell death. Following UCD38B treatment, the receptor guidance protein LRP-1, which is required for endosomal recycling of the uPA receptor to the plasmalemma, remained abnormally associated with PAI-1 in early and late endosomes. The resultant aberrant endosomal recycling increased the total cellular content of the uPA-PAI-1 protein complex. Reversible inhibition of cellular endocytosis demonstrated that UCD38B bypasses the plasmalemmal uPAS complex and directly acts intracellularly to alter uPAS endocytotic trafficking. UCD38B represents a class of small molecules whose anticancer cytotoxicity is a consequence of causing the mis-trafficking of early and late endosomes containing uPAS cargo and leading to AIF-mediated necrotic cell death. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  17. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improves Neurological Outcome Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Catano, Marcela; Echeverry, Ramiro; Torre, Enrique; Haile, Woldeab B.; An, Jie; Chen, Changhua; Cheng, Lihong; Nicholson, Andrew; Tong, Frank C.; Park, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Spines are dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. Early after the onset of cerebral ischemia dendritic spines in the peri-infarct cortex are replaced by areas of focal swelling, and their re-emergence from these varicosities is associated with neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine proteinase that plays a central role in tissue remodeling via binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report that cerebral cortical neurons release uPA during the recovery phase from ischemic stroke in vivo or hypoxia in vitro. Although uPA does not have an effect on ischemia- or hypoxia-induced neuronal death, genetic deficiency of uPA (uPA−/−) or uPAR (uPAR−/−) abrogates functional recovery after AIS. Treatment with recombinant uPA after ischemic stroke induces neurological recovery in wild-type and uPA−/− but not in uPAR−/− mice. Diffusion tensor imaging studies indicate that uPA−/− mice have increased water diffusivity and decreased anisotropy associated with impaired dendritic spine recovery and decreased length of distal neurites in the peri-infarct cortex. We found that the excitotoxic injury induces the clustering of uPAR in dendritic varicosities, and that the binding of uPA to uPAR promotes the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and re-emergence of dendritic filopodia from uPAR-enriched varicosities. This effect is independent of uPA's proteolytic properties and instead is mediated by Rac-regulated profilin expression and cofilin phosphorylation. Our data indicate that binding of uPA to uPAR promotes dendritic spine recovery and improves functional outcome following AIS. PMID:25339736

  18. The urokinase receptor is required for human monocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gyetko, M R; Todd, R F; Wilkinson, C C; Sitrin, R G

    1994-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (Mphi) produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and also express a specific cell-surface receptor for urokinase, uPAR. The concomitant expression of these proteins provides a mechanism by which Mphi can degrade extracellular matrix proteins during directed cell migration. In this study, we sought to determine if uPAR plays a role in Mphi chemotaxis that is distinct from its role in matrix proteolysis. Exposing adherent monocytes to a chemotactic gradient causes plasma membrane uPAR to localize strongly to the leading edge of cell migration. Adherence alone or exposure to FMLP had no effect on uPAR expression. Using Boyden chamber chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that treating mononuclear cells with an anti-uPAR mAb (either as an intact mAb or F[ab']2) ablates chemotaxis induced by FMLP and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (P < 0.001). Inactivating the catalytic activity of uPAR-bound uPA had no effect on chemotaxis. Similarly, blocking uPAR expression with an antisense oligonucleotide to uPAR completely ablates chemotaxis, but blocking uPA expression with an antisense oligonucleotide to uPA has a minimal effect. We therefore demonstrate that expression and unimpeded function of uPAR plays an obligate role in M phi chemotaxis by mechanisms that are largely independent of its ligand, uPA. Combined with its known role in mediating pericellular proteolysis, these observations demonstrate that uPAR is essential for both locomotion and traversing tissue barriers during M phi migration. Images PMID:8163642

  19. Proteolytic cleavage of the urokinase receptor substitutes for the agonist-induced chemotactic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, M; Guttinger, M; Valcamonica, S; Sidenius, N; Blasi, F; Fazioli, F

    1996-01-01

    Physiological concentrations of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulated a chemotactic response in human monocytic THP-1 through binding to the urokinase receptor (uPAR). The effect did not require the protease moiety of uPA, as stimulation was achieved also with the N-terminal fragment (ATF), while the 33 kDa low molecular weight uPA was ineffective. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed association of uPAR with intracellular kinase(s), as demonstrated by in vitro kinase assays. Use of specific antibodies identified p56/p59hck as a kinase associated with uPAR in THP-1 cell extracts. Upon addition of ATF, p56/p59hck activity was stimulated within 2 min and returned to normal after 30 min. Since uPAR lacks an intracellular domain capable of interacting with intracellular kinase, activation of p56/p59hck must require a transmembrane adaptor. Evidence for this was strongly supported by the finding that a soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) was capable of inducing chemotaxis not only in THP-1 cells but also in cells lacking endogenous uPAR (IC50, 5 pM). However, activity of suPAR require chymotrypsin cleavage between the N-terminal domain D1 and D2 + D3. Chymotrypsin-cleaved suPAR also induced activation of p56/p59hck in THP-1 cells, with a time course comparable with ATF. Our data show that uPA-induced signal transduction takes place via uPAR, involves activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase(s) and requires an as yet undefined adaptor capable of connecting the extracellular ligand binding uPAR to intracellular transducer(s). Images PMID:8612581

  20. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor: a risk factor for carotid plaque, stroke, and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Persson, Margaretha; Östling, Gerd; Smith, Gustav; Hamrefors, Viktor; Melander, Olle; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the urokinase system could have an important role in atherogenesis and plaque rupture. The relationships among the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), carotid plaque, and incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD) events were studied in a prospective cohort. Occurrence of carotid plaque and plasma levels of suPAR were assessed in 5166 men and women, aged 45 to 68 years, participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study. Incidences of ischemic stroke and CAD were monitored during a mean follow-up of 15 years. Subjects with carotid plaque had significantly higher levels of suPAR compared with those without carotid plaque. suPAR was associated with increased incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] for third versus first tertile, 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.11) and CAD (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.13-2.13) after adjustment for risk factors. The risk factor-adjusted HR for ischemic stroke was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.52-3.22) in subjects with carotid plaque and high suPAR (ie, third tertile) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.05-2.17) in subjects with carotid plaque and low suPAR compared with those without carotid plaque and low suPAR (reference). High levels of suPAR significantly increased the risk of ischemic stroke and CAD in subjects with carotid plaque. suPAR is associated with increased occurrence of carotid plaque and increased incidence of ischemic stroke and CAD. Presence of both elevated levels of suPAR and carotid plaque increases the risk of ischemic stroke in an additive way.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor and α2-antiplasmin in human corneal perforation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corneal ulceration leading to perforation is associated with infectious and non-infectious destructive conditions in the cornea. The fibrinolytic (plasminogen/plasmin) system is considered to contribute to tissue remodeling in the wound healing process and it is believed to play an important role in proteolysis and fibrosis. To determine the localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), u-PA receptor (u-PAR) and α2-antiplasmin (α2AP) in the tissue of a corneal perforation, we investigated immunohistochemical expressions of u-PA, u-PAR, α2AP, CD68, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in a patient with corneal perforation that developed from an ulcer of no clear cause. Case presentation The patient was a 77-year-old woman who presented with a perforated corneal ulcer in her right eye. The cause of her corneal ulcer was unknown. Double immunohistochemistry was performed for the combinations of u-PA with u-PAR, CD68 or α-SMA and α2AP with CD68 or α-SMA to detect the localization of u-PA and α2AP. u-PA and u-PAR co-localization was seen in the corneal ulceration area. u-PA was mainly observed in CD68-positive cells and in some α-SMA positive cells. On the other hand, α2AP was not expressed in CD68-positive cells, but was expressed in α-SMA positive cells. Conclusion We identified expression of the u-PA/u-PAR complex and α2AP in a patient with a corneal ulcer. These two molecules are believed to play a crucial role in inflammatory cell recruitment, ECM synthesis and degradation during corneal wound healing. PMID:23190581

  2. The grading effect of abnormal glucose status on arterial stiffness and a new threshold of 2-hour post-load glucose based on a Chinese community study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Ke; Wu, Ke-Ye; Dai, Xiao-Tong; Che, Qian-Zi; Chen, Si; Jia, Jia; Li, Jian-Ping; Huo, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Da-Fang

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the relation between various glucose metabolic status and arterial stiffness, and further explore the threshold of blood glucose indices for the risk of arterial stiffness. The cross-sectional study included 4851 individuals from a Chinese community. Overnight fasting blood glucose and 2-hour post-load glucose sampled. Arterial stiffness measured as brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. The association examined using generalized linear regression models. The threshold effect explored using two piecewise linear regression model by the smoothing plot. After adjustment for covariates, isolated impaired fasting glucose, isolated impaired glucose tolerance, combined glucose intolerance, newly diabetes mellitus associated with greater risk of arterial stiffness compared with normal glucose tolerance (B = 18.09, 95%CI: 0.42 ~ 35.76, P = 0.045; B = 28.51, 95%CI: 3.40 ~ 53.62, P = 0.026; B =60.70, 95%CI: 38.37 ~ 83.04, P < 0.001; B = 95.06, 95%CI: 71.88 ~ 118.25, P < 0.001; respectively). Moreover, there was a nonlinear relation between 2-hour post-load glucose and arterial stiffness. A threshold for 2-hour post-load glucose of 6.14 mmol/L observed for risk of arterial stiffness. Impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, combined glucose intolerance, and newly diabetes mellitus related to greater risk of arterial stiffness compared with normal glucose levels. A threshold for 2-hour post-load glucose of 6.14 mmol/L probably exists for risk of arterial stiffness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Arctic circulation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  4. Arctic circulation regimes.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Steady States and Dynamics of Urokinase-Mediated Plasmin Activation In Silico and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Li, Huipeng; Dewey, C. Forbes; White, Jacob K.; Bhowmick, Sourav S.; Yu, Hanry; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Plasmin (PLS) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA) are ubiquitous proteases that regulate the extracellular environment. Although they are secreted in inactive forms, they can activate each other through proteolytic cleavage. This mutual interplay creates the potential for complex dynamics, which we investigated using mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments. We constructed ordinary differential equations to model the conversion of precursor plasminogen into active PLS, and precursor urokinase (scUPA) into active urokinase (tcUPA). Although neither PLS nor UPA exhibits allosteric cooperativity, modeling showed that cooperativity occurred at the system level because of substrate competition. Computational simulations and bifurcation analysis predicted that the system would be bistable over a range of parameters for cooperativity and positive feedback. Cell-free experiments with recombinant proteins tested key predictions of the model. PLS activation in response to scUPA stimulus was found to be cooperative in vitro. Finally, bistability was demonstrated in vitro by the presence of two significantly different steady-state levels of PLS activation for the same levels of stimulus. We conclude that ultrasensitive, bistable activation of UPA-PLS is possible in the presence of substrate competition. An ultrasensitive threshold for activation of PLS and UPA would have ramifications for normal and disease processes, including angiogenesis, metastasis, wound healing, and fibrosis. PMID:22004735

  6. Two-color cytofluorometry and cellular properties of the urokinase receptor associated with a human metastatic carcinomatous cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Gojobori, T.; Tanifuji, M. )

    1991-02-01

    Purified human urokinase was labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate or iodine-125 and used as a probe for binding to the human metastatic carcinomatous cell line, Detroit 562. Cytofluorometry showed that the ligand bound preferentially to cells that had been exposed to acidic pH. The binding was competitive and decreased after mild tryptic digestion. The bound ligand could be removed by restoration of the cells to a low pH. Therefore, the cells had specific binding sites. The bound urokinase was involved in the breakdown of fibrin. Two-color cytofluorometric maps were constructed by counterstaining with propidium iodide. Results suggested that there were different cell populations that had different numbers of receptors and amounts of DNA. We cloned cells and found that single clones had homogeneous levels of receptors with different dissociation constants (from 10(-13) to 10(-11) mol/mg protein) for different clones. Cells of one clone, C5, which had high levels of receptor production, moved characteristically on a glass substratum coated with gold particles and reacted with wheat germ agglutinin, but not with concanavalin A. The receptors were found together with adhesion proteins at the sites where the cells adhered to the substrate. These results and the data obtained by zymography of the cellular proteins suggested that the urokinase-type plasminogen activators were bound to the receptors. The membrane-associated activator may stimulate local proteolysis, facilitating the migration of the tumor cell across the substrate.

  7. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery.Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific

  8. Sensitive Troponin I and Stress Testing in the Emergency Department for the Early Management of Chest Pain Using 2-Hour Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah, Shahriar; Almuwaqqat, Zakaria; Sulaiman, Samian; Husein, Husein; Nguyen, Quang; Ali, Saad; Taskesen, Tuncay

    2017-09-01

    Despite improvements in identifying high-risk patients with non-ST segment ACS (acute coronary syndrome), low risk patients presenting with atypical chest pain and non-diagnostic Electrocardiogram (ECG) continued to undergo unnecessary admissions and testing. Since 1992, our chest pain protocol included using 4-hour serial biomarkers from ED admission in combination with stress testing to evaluate these patients. Our study aimed at determining whether a new accelerated diagnostic protocol using sensitive cardiac troponin I (cTnI) 2 hours after admission to the ED followed by stress testing is safe and effective in emergency settings, allowing for appropriate triage, earlier discharge and reducing costs. We conducted a single center randomized trial at Presence St. Francis Hospital Chest pain center in Evanston, Illinois enrolling sixty-four consecutive patients with atypical chest pain and non-diagnostic ECG, participants were randomized to accelerated 2 hrs protocol or our pre-existing 4-hrs protocol. Sixty patients completed the protocol and were randomized to either a 2-hour (29 patients) or 4-hour protocol using both I-STAT and PATHFAST cTnI (31 Patients). Troponin I was evaluated at 0 and at 2 hours from ED presentation with and additional draw for patients in the 4-hour rule out-group. Patients with normal serial biomarkers were then evaluated with stress testing and qualified for earlier discharge if the stress test was negative, while those with a positive biomarker at any time were admitted. Thirty-six patients had exercise treadmill stress test and 24 patients had either nuclear or Echo stress test. Fifty-three patients had a normal stress test and were discharged home. One patient in the 4-hour group with normal serial troponins developed ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during the recovery period of a regular stress test. Six patients had a positive PATHFAST cTnI and a normal I-STAT cTnI at 2-hours. Two out of these six patients evaluated by

  9. Regimes of Helium Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Döring (ZND) detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of ~108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below ~107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~5×104 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction.

  10. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  11. Comparison of lipid and calorie loss from donor human milk among 3 methods of simulated gavage feeding: one-hour, 2-hour, and intermittent gravity feedings.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christine; Vickers, Amy Manning; Aryal, Subhash

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the differences in lipid loss from 24 samples of banked donor human milk (DHM) among 3 feeding methods: DHM given by syringe pump over 1 hour, 2 hours, and by bolus/gravity gavage. Comparative, descriptive. There were no human subjects. Twenty-four samples of 8 oz of DHM were divided into four 60-mL aliquots. Timed feedings were given by Medfusion 2001 syringe pumps with syringes connected to narrow-lumened extension sets designed for enteral feedings and connected to standard silastic enteral feeding tubes. Gravity feedings were given using the identical syringes connected to the same silastic feeding tubes. All aliquots were analyzed with the York Dairy Analyzer. Univariate repeated-measures analyses of variance were used for the omnibus testing for overall differences between the feeding methods. Lipid content expressed as grams per deciliter at the end of each feeding method was compared with the prefed control samples using the Dunnett's test. The Tukey correction was used for other pairwise multiple comparisons. The univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance conducted to test for overall differences between feeding methods showed a significant difference between the methods (F = 58.57, df = 3, 69, P < .0001). Post hoc analysis using the Dunnett's approach revealed that there was a significant difference in fat content between the control sample and the 1-hour and 2-hours feeding methods (P < .0001), but we did not find any significant difference in fat content between the control and the gravity feeding methods (P = .3296). Pairwise comparison using the Tukey correction revealed a significant difference between both gravity and 1-hour feeding methods (P < .0001), and gravity and 2-hour feeding method (P < .0001). There was no significant difference in lipid content between the 1-hour and 2-hour feeding methods (P = .2729). Unlike gravity feedings, the timed feedings resulted in a statistically significant loss

  12. [The effect of hypoxia on the urokinase and adenylate cyclase systems in the culture of endothelial cells of the human umbilical vein].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Tishchenko, E P; Torosian, N A; Panina, O B; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Ratner, E I; Savel'eva, G M; Parfenova, E V

    2005-06-01

    Hypoxia induces angiogenesis in ischemized tissues by means of pro-angiogenic factor expression. The key role in the growth processes and blood vessel functioning belongs to the matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen, and its activator systems. Effect of hypoxia on expression of the urokinase activating agent plasminogen and its receptor in endothelium was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cell model. Incubation of the endothelial cells under the conditions of hypoxia proved to reduce both urokinase formation in these cells and its secreting into the culture medium. The hypoxia-induced reduction of urokinase contents was accompanied by enhancement of expression of the urokinase receptor. The hypoxia also entailed reduction of the adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP contents in the endothelial cells. The data obtained suggest that reduction of the adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP contents under the conditions of hypoxia provide basis for suppression of the urokinase expression by the endothelial cells and, consequently, inhibition of blood vessel formation in the ischemized tissue.

  13. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator: a new target for male contraception?

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ying; Han, Yan; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Li, Hong-Gang; Hu, Lian; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is closely related to male reproduction. With the aim of investigating the possibility for uPA as a potential contraceptive target, in the present work, Kunming male mice were immunized by human uPA subcutaneous injection at three separate doses for 3 times. Then the potency of the anti-human uPA antibody in serum was analyzed, and mouse fertility was evaluated. Serum antibody titers for human uPA in immunized groups all reached 1:10,240 or higher levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and mating experiments revealed that pregnancy rates and the mean number of embryos implanted after mating declined obviously (P < 0.05) when compared with control groups. However, the mating capacity and reproductive organ weights had no obvious change, and histological analysis of the testes and epididymides also showed normal morphology for immunized male mice. Sperm function tests suggested that the sperm concentration, sperm viability, sperm motility, and in vitro fertilization rate for the cauda epididymis sperm in uPA-immunized groups were lower than those in the controls (P < 0.05). Together, these observations indicated that subcutaneous injection human uPA to the male mice could effectively reduce their fertility, and uPA could become a new target for immunocontraception in male contraceptive development. PMID:25578931

  14. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  15. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    PubMed

    Patecki, Margret; von Schaewen, Markus; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  16. Computer-assisted mutagenesis of ecotin to engineer its secondary binding site for urokinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Laboissière, Martha C A; Young, Malin M; Pinho, Rilva G; Todd, Stephen; Fletterick, Robert J; Kuntz, Irwin; Craik, Charles S

    2002-07-19

    Inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were selected in vitro from two ecotin phage-display libraries to study the effect on binding of amino acid substitutions at critical positions 108, 110, 112, and 113 within the 100s loop (RNKL, respectively, in wild type ecotin). The first, a focused library, was the result of a computation-assisted approach using the three-dimensional structure of the ecotin-trypsin complex to guide the modeling of amino acid substitutions predicted to increase affinity for uPA. The second, a complete library, allowed for all substitutions at the above identified positions. The consensus sequences selected from the focused, and complete libraries were RRWS and R(R/N)QL, respectively. Inhibition constant determinations showed ecotin variants containing these sequences to be similarly potent (K(i) = 1-2 nm). These substitutions were combined with previously identified substitutions in another critical region of ecotin. One of these combinations (D70R/M84R/RRQL) is the tightest (K(i) = 50 pm) ecotin variant inhibitor of uPA. The blending of combinatorial methods and computer algorithms designed to predict stronger binders has allowed us to obtain protein derivatives that exhibit greatly increased affinity for a predetermined target. This technology can be applied to select for enhanced binding interactions at protein-protein interfaces and accelerate the process of protease inhibitor development.

  17. The structure of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Casey, J R; Petranka, J G; Kottra, J; Fleenor, D E; Rosse, W F

    1994-08-15

    The cellular receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that plays a central role in pericellular plasminogen activation. It contains 313 amino acid residues, including 28 cysteine residues in a pattern of three homologous repeats. The cysteine residue pattern suggests that uPAR belongs to a superfamily of proteins including CD59, murine Ly-6, and a variety of elapid snake venom toxins. A novel 1.7-kb uPAR cDNA was isolated that is missing exon 5 and that contains 380 bp not previously reported at the 5' end. This cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which three clones were isolated and analyzed. The uPAR gene consists of 7 exons spread over 23 kb of genomic DNA. Exons 2, 4, and 6 code for homologous domains within the mature protein, as do exons 3, 5, and 7; CD59-like homologous pairs are encoded by exons 2-3, 4-5, and 6-7, respectively. The structure of the gene for uPAR further confirms the relationship of this molecule to the superfamily containing CD59, Ly-6, and the elapid snake venom toxins.

  18. Elevation of serum urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and liver stiffness in postoperative biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Udomsinprasert, Wanvisa; Honsawek, Sittisak; Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate serum urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and liver stiffness in biliary atresia (BA) and examine the correlation of circulating uPAR, liver stiffness, and clinical outcomes in postoperative BA children. METHODS Eighty-five postKasai BA children and 24 control subjects were registered. Circulating uPAR was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent essay. Liver stiffness was analyzed using transient elastography. RESULTS BA children had significantly greater circulating uPAR and liver stiffness scores than control subjects (P < 0.001). Circulating uPAR and liver stiffness were substantially higher in jaundiced BA children than non-jaundiced BA children (P < 0.001). In addition, circulating uPAR was positively associated with serum aspartate aminotransferase (r = 0.507, P < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (r = 0.364, P < 0.001), total bilirubin (r = 0.559, P < 0.001), alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.325, P < 0.001), and liver stiffness scores (r = 0.508, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Circulating uPAR and liver stiffness values were greater in BA children than healthy controls. The increased circulating uPAR was associated with liver dysfunction in BA. As a consequence, serum uPAR and liver stiffness may be used as noninvasive biomarkers indicating the progression of liver fibrosis in postKasai BA. PMID:27957246

  19. Pyelonephritis: renal urokinase activity in rats on essential fatty acid diets.

    PubMed

    du Toit, P J; van Aswegen, C H; Nel, J D; Strasheim, B; Becker, P J; du Plessis, D J

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether additions of different oils to the diets of male rats would affect the renal urokinase (UK) activity of healthy and pyelonephritic kidneys. Four groups of fatty acid diets were studied: fat-free, coconut oil, fish oil and evening primrose oil (EPO). Pyelonephritis was obtained by unilateral extrarenal urinary obstruction and subcutaneous injection of Escherichia coli. The UK activity of the non-obstructed kidneys did not differ statistically between rats infected and not infected with bacteria (P > 0.056), except within the coconut oil group. A statistically decreased UK activity was obtained with bacteria injected animals on a coconut oil diet (P < 0.0001). This phenomenon, namely a decrease in UK activity, was also seen with pyelonephritic kidneys of rats on fat-free, coconut and fish oil diets (P < 0.0065). However, the UK activity of the obstructed kidneys with and without infection in the EPO group remained similar (P = 0.8477). These results suggest that the UK activity in infection-induced renal stones may be restored by EPO containing diets and may be of high relevance in the prevention and treatment of infection-induced renal stones. This revelation now needs to be more fully investigated.

  20. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  1. Involvement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Morris, David L

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are several studies supporting the role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system in cancer. The association of uPA to its receptor triggers the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. This process is regulated by the uPA inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Plasmin promotes degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM) components as well as activation of ECM latent matrix metalloproteases. Degradation and remodeling of the surrounding tissues is crucial in the early steps of tumor progression by facilitating expansion of the tumor mass, release of tumor growth factors, activation of cytokines as well as induction of tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Hence, many tumors showed a correlation between uPA system component levels and tumor aggressiveness and survival. Therefore, this review summarizes the structure of the uPA system, its contribution to cancer progression, and the clinical relevance of uPA family members in cancer diagnosis. In addition, the review evaluates the significance of uPA system in the development of cancer-targeted therapies.

  2. Retro-inverso Urokinase Receptor Antagonists for the Treatment of Metastatic Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Bifulco, Katia; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Costantini, Susan; Botti, Giovanni; Ragone, Concetta; Minopoli, Michele; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Botti, Gerardo; Arra, Claudio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Pessi, Antonello

    2017-05-02

    The development of metastases is a multistep process that requires the activation of physiological and biochemical processes that govern migration, invasion and entry of metastatic cells into blood vessels. The urokinase receptor (uPAR) promotes cell migration by interacting with the Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Since both uPAR and FPR1 are involved in tumor progression, the uPAR-FPR1 interaction is an attractive therapeutic target. We previously described peptide antagonists of the uPAR-FPR1 interaction that inhibited cell migration and angiogenesis. To develop enzyme-resistant analogues, we applied here the Retro-Inverso (RI) approach, whereby the topology of the side chains is maintained by inverting the sequence of the peptide and the chirality of all residues. Molecular dynamics suggests that peptide RI-3 adopts the turn structure typical of uPAR-FPR1 antagonists. Accordingly, RI-3 is a nanomolar competitor of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe for binding to FPR1 and inhibits migration, invasion, trans-endothelial migration of sarcoma cells and VEGF-triggered endothelial tube formation. When sarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density, circulating tumor cells and pulmonary metastases were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with 6 mg/Kg RI-3 as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Thus, RI-3 represents a promising lead for anti-metastatic drugs.

  3. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by ATF-Fc, an engineered antibody targeting urokinase receptor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xian-Wen; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Li, Yong-Mei; Xi, Yongyi; Zhao, Su-Rong; Yin, Liang; Li, Jin-Feng; Chen, Hui-Peng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-05-01

    Urokinase (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) play an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, and overexpression of these molecules is strongly correlated with poor prognosis in a variety of malignant tumors. In this study, ATF-Fc, an antibody-like molecule comprising the amino-terminal fragment of human uPA (ATF) linked to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 via a flexible linker was developed. Its antitumor activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ATF-Fc had obvious cytotoxic effect on several types of tumor cells, which is dependent on cellular expression of uPAR and its Fc fragment. Treatment with ATF-Fc caused a significant suppression on tumor growth and metastasis of xenograft human tumors (MCF-7 breast cancer and BGC-823 gastric cancer) in athymic nude mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ATF-Fc had an anti-angiogenesis activity both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we provided a novel therapeutic antibody-like molecule in the management of a variety of solid tumors by disrupting the uPA/uPAR interaction.

  4. Urokinase Receptor Promotes Skin Tumor Formation by Preventing Epithelial Cell Activation of Notch1.

    PubMed

    Mazzieri, Roberta; Pietrogrande, Giovanni; Gerasi, Laura; Gandelli, Alessandro; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Moi, Davide; Brombin, Chiara; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Danese, Silvio; Mignatti, Paolo; Blasi, Francesco; D'Alessio, Silvia

    2015-11-15

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has a well-established role in cancer progression, but it has been little studied at earlier stages of cancer initiation. Here, we show that uPAR deficiency in the mouse dramatically reduces susceptibility to the classical two-stage protocol of inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. uPAR genetic deficiency decreased papilloma formation and accelerated keratinocyte differentiation, effects mediated by Notch1 hyperactivation. Notably, Notch1 inhibition in uPAR-deficient mice rescued their susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis. Clinically, we found that human differentiated keratoacanthomas expressed low levels of uPAR and high levels of activated Notch1, with opposite effects in proliferating tumors, confirming the relevance of the observations in mice. Furthermore, we found that TACE-dependent activation of Notch1 in basal kerantinocytes was modulated by uPAR. Mechanistically, uPAR sequestered TACE within lipid rafts to prevent Notch1 activation, thereby promoting cell proliferation and tumor formation. Given that uPAR signaling is nonessential for normal epidermal homeostasis, our results argue that uPAR may present a promising disease-specific target for preventing skin cancer development.

  5. Construction of Urokinase Mutant Glu154-mtcu-PA and Characterization of Its Properties.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gui-Hong; Ma, Zhong; Xue, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Hong; Zhu, De-Xu

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant single chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (rscu-PA) and a mutant constructed by in vitro site-specific mutagenesis of Argl54 in rscu-PA to Glul54 (Glul54-mscu-PA) were both expressed in E. coli. The expressed products were both purified to homogeneity by in vitro denaturation and renaturation, followed by Zn(2+) selective precipitation and immuno-affinity chromatography. The plasmin sensitivity assay indicated that the activation of this single chain Glul54-mscu-PA by plasmin was essentially identical to that of rscu-PA. After activation by plasmin, the kinetic constants against synthetic substrate S2444 of the resulted two chain form of Glul54-mscu-PA (Glul54-mtcu-PA) and that of rscu-PA (rtcu-PA) were 87 &mgr;M and 80 &mgr;M, respectively, which indicated that the catalytic active site of the Glul54-mtcu-PA was not changed by the mutation. Whereas, both (125)I-fibrin plasma-clot lysis and fibrinogenolysis in plasma showed that the Glul54-mtcu-PA possessed a better affinity and selectivity for fibrin than rtcu-PA, even better than rscu-PA.

  6. Mutation of Arg154 to Gly154 in urokinase augments its fibrin-specificity.

    PubMed

    Peng, G; Ma, Z; Kuai, L; Zhu, D

    1997-04-01

    Rscu-PA and its mutant constructed by in vitro site specific mutagenesis of Arg154 in rscu-PA to Gly154 (mscu-PA) were both expressed in Escherichia coli. After in vitro denaturation and renaturation, the rscu-PA and mscu-PA were purified to homogeneity by Zn2+ selective precipitation, anti-u-PA IgG-sepharose CL 4B affinity chromatography. After activation by plasmin, the kinetic constants for the resultant mtcu-PA against synthetic substrate S2444 hydrolysis were found to be essentially identical to rtcu-PA, suggesting that no impairment had been exerted on the catalytic active site of mtcu-PA. However, both 125I-fibrin plasma-clot lysis and fibrinogenolysis showed that mtcu-PA possessed a higher fibrinolytic activity but hardly any degradation of fibrinogen in plasma compared to rtcu-PA and rscu-PA. It was concluded that the substitution of Arg154 by Gly154 in tcu-PA promoted the fibrin-specificity of urokinase.

  7. Homocysteine and its thiolactone impair plasmin activity induced by urokinase or streptokinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Talar, Beata; Nowak, Pawel; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2012-04-01

    Mechanisms of homocysteine (Hcy) contribution to thrombosis are complex and only partly recognized. The available data suggest that the prothrombotic activity of homocysteine may be not only a result of the changes in coagulation process and endothelial dysfunction, but also the dysfunction of fibrinolysis. The aim of the present work was to assess the effects of homocysteine (10-100 μM mM) and its thiolactone (HTL, 0.1-1 μM) on plasminogen and plasmin functions in vitro. The amidolytic activity of generated plasmin in Hcy or HTL-treated plasminogen and plasma samples was measured by the hydrolysis of chromogenic substrate. Effects of Hcy and HTL on proteolytic activity of plasmin were monitored electrophoretically, by using of fibrinogen as a substrate. The exposure of human plasma and purified plasminogen to Hcy or HTL resulted in the decrease of urokinase-induced plasmin activity. In plasminogen samples treated with the highest concentration of homocysteine (100 μM) or thiolactone (1 μM), the activity of plasmin was inhibited by about 50%. In plasma samples, a reduction of amidolytic activity by about 30% (for 100 μM Hcy) and 40% (for 1 μM HTL), was observed. Both Hcy and HTL were also able to diminish the streptokinase-induced proteolytic activity of plasmin. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study demonstrate that Hcy and HTL may affect fibrinolytic properties of plasminogen and plasma, leading to the decrease of plasmin activity.

  8. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  9. Mice Deficient in Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Have Delayed Healing of Tympanic Membrane Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chun; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Hellström, Sten; Ny, Tor

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient in plasminogen, the precursor of plasmin, show completely arrested healing of tympanic membrane (TM) perforations, indicating that plasmin plays an essential role in TM healing. The activation of plasminogen to plasmin is performed by two plasminogen activators (PAs), urokinase-type PA (uPA) and tissue-type PA (tPA). To elucidate the functional roles of PAs in the healing of TM perforations, we investigated the phenotypes of single gene-deficient mice lacking uPA (uPA−/−) or tPA (tPA−/−) after TM perforation. Delayed healing of TM perforations was observed in uPA−/− mice but not tPA−/− mice. The migration of keratinocytes was clearly delayed and seemed to be misoriented in uPA−/− mice. Furthermore, fibrin deposition and the inflammatory response were persistent in these mice. Our findings demonstrate that uPA plays a role in the healing of TM perforations. The observed phenotypes in uPA−/− mice are most likely due to the reduced generation of plasmin. PMID:23236466

  10. Urokinase gene transfer augments angiogenesis in ischemic skeletal and myocardial muscle.

    PubMed

    Traktuev, Dmitry O; Tsokolaeva, Zoya I; Shevelev, Alexander A; Talitskiy, Konstantin A; Stepanova, Victoria V; Johnstone, Brian H; Rahmat-Zade, Tahmina M; Kapustin, Alexander N; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; March, Keith L; Parfyonova, Yelena V

    2007-11-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is required for both endogenous and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-augmented angiogenesis in normal tissues, leading us to hypothesize that uPA augmentation by gene transfer might promote angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Overexpression of uPA was studied in rat myocardial infarction (MI) and mouse hind limb ischemia models and compared with VEGF overexpression effects. Animals were divided into control and three experimental groups (n = 6), receiving intramuscular injections of plasmids as follows: (i) control (empty vector or expressing beta-galactosidase); (ii) uPA; (iii) VEGF(165); (iv) a 1:1 mixture of uPA and VEGF(165). The capillary densities in both ischemic models were greater (P < 0.05) in tissues treated with uPA, VEGF, or a combination of both than in controls. Infarct size was reduced in hearts from uPA and VEGF experimental groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Local overexpression of uPA induced a marked increase in the number of macrophages and myofibroblasts present within infarcts. Hind limb blood flow was greater in all experimental groups by day 10 (P < 0.05). Overall, the effects of uPA and VEGF were uniformly comparable. Additional analysis revealed association of local edema with VEGF but not with uPA treatment. This study established that uPA gene therapy effectively induces functionally significant angiogenesis in models of acute MI and hind limb ischemia.

  11. Loss of Urokinase Receptor Sensitizes Cells to DNA Damage and Delays DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B.; Hodjat, Mahshid; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage induced by numerous exogenous or endogenous factors may have irreversible consequences on the cell leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and cell death. The DNA damage response (DDR) is powerful signaling machinery triggered in response to DNA damage, to provide DNA damage recognition, signaling and repair. Most anticancer drugs induce DNA damage, and DNA repair in turn attenuates therapeutic efficiency of those drugs. Approaches delaying DNA repair are often used to increase efficiency of treatment. Recent data show that ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, mechanisms providing regulation of proteasome intracellular localization, activity, and recruitment to DNA damage sites are elusive. Even less investigated are the roles of extranuclear signaling proteins in these processes. In this study, we report the involvement of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in DDR-associated regulation of proteasome. We show that in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) uPAR activates DNA single strand break repair signaling pathway. We provide evidence that uPAR is essential for functional assembly of the 26S proteasome. We further demonstrate that uPAR mediates DNA damage-induced phosphorylation, nuclear import, and recruitment of the regulatory subunit PSMD6 to proteasome. We found that deficiency of uPAR and PSMD6 delays DNA repair and leads to decreased cell survival. These data may offer new therapeutic approaches for diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24987841

  12. Expression and localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Miceli, Dora C; Rizo, Gabriela; García, Elina V; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease involved in extracellular matrix remodeling through plasmin generation. uPA usually binds to its receptor, uPAR, which is anchored to the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. uPA/uPAR binding increases proteolytic activity in the neighborhood of the cells containing uPAR and activates intracellular signaling pathways involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, cell migration and proliferation. The aim of this work was to study the expression of uPA, uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in immature and in vitro matured bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). uPA is only expressed in the cumulus cells of immature and in vitro matured COCs, while uPAR and PAI-1 are expressed in both the cumulus cells and the immature and in vitro matured oocytes. In addition, uPAR protein was localized by confocal microscopy in the plasma membrane of oocytes and cumulus cells of immature COCs. Results from this research led us to hypothesize that the uPA/uPAR interaction could cause the local production of uPA-mediated plasmin over oocyte and cumulus cell surface; plasmin formation could also be regulated by PAI-1.

  13. A reassessment of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Spinale, Joann M; Mariani, Laura H; Kapoor, Shiv; Zhang, Jidong; Weyant, Robert; Song, Peter X; Wong, Hetty N; Troost, Jonathan P; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Gipson, Debbie S; Kretzler, Matthias; Nihalani, Deepak; Holzman, Lawrence B

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) is a causative circulating factor for and a biomarker of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here we undertook validation of these assumptions in both mouse and human models. Injection of recombinant suPAR in wild-type mice did not induce proteinuria within 24 h. Moreover, a disease phenotype was not seen in an inducible transgenic mouse model that maintained elevated suPAR concentrations for 6 weeks. Plasma and urine suPAR concentrations were evaluated as clinical biomarkers in 241 patients with glomerular disease from the prospective, longitudinal multicenter observational NEPTUNE cohort. The serum suPAR concentration at baseline inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the urine suPAR/creatinine ratio positively correlated with the urine protein/creatinine ratio. After adjusting for eGFR and urine protein, neither the serum nor urine suPAR level was an independent predictor of FSGS histopathology. A multivariable mixed-effects model of longitudinal data evaluated the association between the change in serum suPAR concentration from baseline with eGFR. After adjusting for baseline suPAR concentration, age, gender, proteinuria, and time, the change in suPAR from baseline was associated with eGFR, but this association was not different for patients with FSGS as compared with other diagnoses. Thus these results do not support a pathological role for suPAR in FSGS.

  14. Soluble Urokinase Receptors in Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis: A Review on the Scientific Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Moin A.; Meijers, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the primary glomerular disorders in both children and adults which can progress to end-stage renal failure. Although there are genetic and secondary causes, circulating factors have also been regarded as an important factor in the pathogenesis of FSGS, because about 40% of the patients with FSGS have recurrence after renal transplantation. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a soluble form of uPAR, which is a membrane-bound protein linked to GPI in various immunologically active cells, including podocytes. It has recently been suggested as a potential circulating factor in FSGS by in vitro podocyte experiments, in vivo mice models, and human studies. However, there have also been controversies on this issue, because subsequent studies showed conflicting results. suPAR levels were also increased in patients with other glomerular diseases and were inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, there has been no balanced review on this issue. In this review, we compare the conflicting data on the involvement of suPAR in the pathogenesis of FSGS and shed light on interpretation by taking into account many points and the potential variables and confounders influencing serum suPAR levels. PMID:27504461

  15. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor as a Marker for Use of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Haastrup, Eva; Grau, Katrine; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Thorball, Christian; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of depression. A few cross-sectional population-based studies have found that depression is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR) is known to be a stable marker for inflammation. We investigated the bidirectional association between suPAR levels and use of antidepressants. Methods suPAR level was measured in 9305 blood donors and analysed in relation to 5-years follow-up data on purchase of antidepressants and hospital diagnoses of depression from a nationwide Danish register. Results For men and women without prior use of antidepressants we found a significantly higher risk for incident use of antidepressants with higher suPAR values. For men, the risk of first use of antidepressants increased by 72% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.11–2.69). For women, it increased by 108% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.45–2.98). Previous use of antidepressants was also significantly associated with higher suPAR levels (p = 0.002). Conclusions High suPAR levels are associated with an increased risk for both previous and future use of antidepressants in healthy men and women. High suPAR are also associated with increased risk for a hospital diagnosis of depression. PMID:25329298

  16. Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor as a new inflammatory marker in adolescent obesity.

    PubMed

    Can, Ummugulsum; Buyukinan, Muammer; Yerlikaya, Fatma Humeyra

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is known for low-grade inflammatory state with enhanced production of inflammatory mediators in children and adolescents. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) can be generated as a pro-inflammatory marker. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of suPAR, and its association with leptin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and fibrinogen in adolescent obesity. A total of 98 participants, 55 obese individuals and 43 healthy controls, aged between 10 and 17 yr, were included in the study. Serum suPAR, IL-6, leptin and adiponectin were measured using ELISA method. Serum suPAR, IL-6, fibrinogen, hsCRP and leptin levels in obese individuals were significantly higher than those of controls (P<0.05 & P<0.001). Serum adiponectin levels in obese individuals were significantly lower than those of controls (P<0.01). Our findings showed that suPAR, IL-6, fibrinogen, hsCRP and leptin were significantly higher in the obese individuals than those of controls. suPAR may be a good novel biomarker for systemic subclinical inflammation and immune activation linked to adolescent obesity.

  17. Plasminogen activators, their inhibitors, and urokinase receptor emerge in late stages of melanocytic tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, T. J.; Quax, P. H.; Denijn, M.; Verrijp, K. N.; Verheijen, J. H.; Verspaget, H. W.; Weidle, U. H.; Ruiter, D. J.; van Muijen, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix and other tissue barriers by proteases like plasminogen activators (PAs) is a prerequisite for neoplastic growth and metastasis. Recently, we reported that highly metastatic behavior of human melanoma cells in nude mice correlates with urokinase-type PA (u-PA) expression and activity and with PA inhibitor type 1 and 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2) expression. Here we report on the occurrence of components of the PA system in the various stages of human melanoma tumor progression in situ. We studied the protein distribution on freshly frozen lesions of common nevocellular nevi (n = 25), dysplastic (= atypical) nevi (n = 16), early primary melanomas (n = 8), advanced primary melanomas (n = 11), and melanoma metastases (n = 17). Tissue-type PA was present in endothelial cells in all lesions, whereas in metastases it could be detected in tumor cells in a minority of the lesions. u-PA, its receptor, PAI-1, and PAI-2 could not be detected in benign and in early stages but appeared frequently in advanced primary melanoma and melanoma metastasis lesions. u-PA was detected in stromal cells and in tumor cells at the invasive front, the u-PA receptor and PAI-2 in tumor cells, and PAI-1 in the extracellular matrix surrounding tumor cells. Localization of the corresponding messenger RNAs and enzyme activities revealed a similar distribution. We conclude that plasminogen activation is a late event in melanoma tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291613

  18. Fibrin sheaths in central venous port catheters: treatment with low-dose, single injection of urokinase on an outpatient basis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Hua; Mammadov, Kamal; Hickethier, Tilman; Borggrefe, Jan; Hellmich, Martin; Maintz, David; Kabbasch, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of the efficacy of single-shot, low-dose urokinase administration for the treatment of port catheter-associated fibrin sheaths. Methods Forty-six patients were retrospectively evaluated for 54 episodes of port catheter dysfunction. The presence of a fibrin sheath was detected by angiographic contrast examinations. On an outpatient basis, patients subsequently received thrombolysis consisting of a single injection of urokinase (15.000 IU in 1.5 mL normal saline) through the port system. A second attempt was made in cases of treatment failure. Patients were followed up for technical success, complications and long-term outcome. Results Port dysfunction occurred at a median of 117 days after implantation (range: 7–825 days). The technical success after first port dysfunction by thrombolysis was 87% (40/46); thereof, initial thrombolysis was effective in 78% (36/46). Nine patients (20%) received a second dose of urokinase after previous treatment failure. Follow-up was available for 26 of 40 patients after successful thrombolysis. In 8 of these, rethrombosis occurred after a median of 98 days (range: 21–354 days), whereby rethrombolysis was effective in 5 of 7 (63%) patients. The overall success of all thrombolyses performed was 70% (45/64). No procedure-related technical or clinical complications occurred. After first favorable thrombolysis, a Kaplan–Meier analysis yielded a 30-, 90- and 180-day probability of patency of 96%, 87% and 81%. Conclusion Thrombolytic therapy on an outpatient basis appears to be a safe and efficient. Three-month patency rates are comparable to more invasive treatment options, including catheter exchange over a guide wire and percutaneous fibrin sheath stripping. PMID:28182117

  19. Beta-catenin up-regulates the expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Regus, Susanne; Wassermann, Stella; Hlubek, Falk; Haynl, Angela; Dimmler, Arno; Koch, Claudia; Knoll, Claudia; van Beest, Moniek; Reuning, Ute; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2004-02-15

    Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) increases during the progression of colorectal tumors from adenomas to carcinomas. The highest amounts of uPA are found at the invasion front of carcinomas, which also displays a strong expression of nuclear beta-catenin and is therefore a region expressing beta-catenin target genes at high levels. Here we show that beta-catenin contributes to the transactivation of uPA. Therefore, beta-catenin might have an impact on the capacity of colorectal tumors for invasion and metastasis, as well as dormancy, which are hallmarks of cancer.

  20. Benefits of maltodextrin intake 2 hours before cholecystectomy by laparotomy in respiratory function and functional capacity: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Fabiana Vieira Breijão; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Diana Borges Dock; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Caporossi, Fernanda Stephan; Caporossi, Cervantes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the change in respiratory function and functional capacity according to the type of preoperative fasting. Methods: Randomized prospective clinical trial, with 92 female patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy with conventional or 2 hours shortened fasting. The variables measured were the peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, dominant handgrip strength, and non-dominant handgrip strength. Evaluations were performed 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 24 hours after the operation. Results: The two groups were similar in preoperative evaluations regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as for all variables. However, postoperatively the group with shortened fasting had higher values than the group with conventional fasting for lung function tests peak expiratory flow (128.7±62.5 versus 115.7±59.9; p=0.040), forced expiratory volume in the first second (1.5±0.6 versus 1.2±0.5; p=0.040), forced vital capacity (2.3±1.1 versus 1.8±0.9; p=0.021), and for muscle function tests dominant handgrip strength (24.9±6.8 versus 18.4±7.7; p=0.001) and non-dominant handgrip strength (22.9±6.3 versus 17.0±7.8; p=0.0002). In the intragroup evaluation, there was a decrease in preoperative compared with postoperative values, except for dominant handgrip strength (25.2±6.7 versus 24.9±6.8; p=0.692), in the shortened fasting group. Conclusion: Abbreviation of preoperative fasting time with ingestion of maltodextrin solution is beneficial to pulmonary function and preserves dominant handgrip strength. PMID:26154547

  1. Benefits of maltodextrin intake 2 hours before cholecystectomy by laparotomy in respiratory function and functional capacity: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zani, Fabiana Vieira Breijão; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Diana Borges Dock; Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido da; Caporossi, Fernanda Stephan; Caporossi, Cervantes

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the change in respiratory function and functional capacity according to the type of preoperative fasting. Randomized prospective clinical trial, with 92 female patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy with conventional or 2 hours shortened fasting. The variables measured were the peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, dominant handgrip strength, and non-dominant handgrip strength. Evaluations were performed 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 24 hours after the operation. The two groups were similar in preoperative evaluations regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as for all variables. However, postoperatively the group with shortened fasting had higher values than the group with conventional fasting for lung function tests peak expiratory flow (128.7±62.5 versus 115.7±59.9; p=0.040), forced expiratory volume in the first second (1.5±0.6 versus 1.2±0.5; p=0.040), forced vital capacity (2.3±1.1 versus 1.8±0.9; p=0.021), and for muscle function tests dominant handgrip strength (24.9±6.8 versus 18.4±7.7; p=0.001) and non-dominant handgrip strength (22.9±6.3 versus 17.0±7.8; p=0.0002). In the intragroup evaluation, there was a decrease in preoperative compared with postoperative values, except for dominant handgrip strength (25.2±6.7 versus 24.9±6.8; p=0.692), in the shortened fasting group. Abbreviation of preoperative fasting time with ingestion of maltodextrin solution is beneficial to pulmonary function and preserves dominant handgrip strength.

  2. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  3. Probing Binding and Cellular Activity of Pyrrolidinone and Piperidinone Small Molecules Targeting the Urokinase Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Timmy; Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Li, Liwei; Knabe, William Eric; Wang, Fang; Oh, Kyungsoo; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a cell-surface protein that is part of an intricate web of transient and tight protein interactions that promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Here we evaluate the binding and biological activity of a new class of pyrrolidinone (3) and piperidinone (4) compounds, along with derivatives of previously-identified pyrazole (1) and propylamine (2) compounds. Competition assays revealed that the compounds displaced a fluorescently-labeled peptide (AE147-FAM) with inhibition constant Ki ranging from 6 to 63 μM. Structure-based computational pharmacophore analysis followed by extensive explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggested pyrazole-based 1a and piperidinone-based 4 adopt different binding modes, despite their similar two-dimensional structures. In cells, compounds 1b and 1f showed significant inhibition of breast MDA-MB-231 and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell proliferation, but 4b exhibited no cytotoxicity even at concentrations of 100 μM. 1f impaired MDA-MB-231 invasion, adhesion, and migration in a concentration-dependent manner, while 4b inhibited only invasion. 1f inhibited gelatinase (MMP-9) activity in a concentration-dependent manner, while 4b showed no effect suggesting different mechanisms for inhibition of cell invasion. Signaling studies further highlighted these differences, showing that pyrazole compounds completely inhibited ERK phosphorylation and impaired HIF1α and NF-κB signaling, while pyrrolidinone and piperidinone (3 and 4b) had no effect. Annexin V staining suggested that the effect of pyrazole-based 1f on proliferation was due to cell killing through an apoptotic mechanism. PMID:24115356

  4. Hepatic Microenvironment Affects Oval Cell Localization in Albumin-Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kristin M.; Thompson, Anne W.; Sandgren, Eric P.

    2003-01-01

    Mice carrying an albumin-urokinase type plasminogen activator transgene (AL-uPA) develop liver disease secondary to uPA expression in hepatocytes. Transgene-expressing parenchyma is replaced gradually by clones of cells that have deleted transgene DNA and therefore are not subject to uPA-mediated damage. Diseased liver displays several abnormalities, including hepatocyte vacuolation and changes in nonparenchymal tissue. The latter includes increases in laminin protein within parenchyma and the appearance of cytokeratin 19-positive bile ductule-like cells (oval cells) both in portal regions and extending into the hepatic parenchyma. In this study, we subjected AL-uPA mice to two-thirds partial hepatectomy to identify the response of these livers to additional growth stimulation. We observed several changes in hepatic morphology. First, the oval cells increased in number and often formed ductules in the parenchyma. Second, this cellular change was accompanied by a further increase in laminin associated with single or clusters of oval cells. Third, desmin-positive Ito cells increased in number and maintained close association with oval cells. Fourth, these changes were localized precisely to uPA-expressing areas of liver. Regenerating clones of uPA-deficient cells appeared to be unaffected both by stromal and cellular alterations. Thus, additional growth stimulation of diseased uPA-expressing liver induces an oval cell-like response, as observed in other models of severe hepatic injury, but the localization of this response seems to be highly regulated by the hepatic microenvironment. PMID:12507902

  5. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yushu; Gong, Li; Gao, Ning; Liao, Jichun; Sun, Jiayu; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Pengjin; Fan, Qing; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Zeng, Wen; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs) into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys. Methods We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP) or without a PEG (ATF-IONP) coating. Results The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin level, and platelets remained normal during the 3 months of the study. Conclusion All of the results suggest that a transient injury in terms of normal organ functions, but no microscopic necrotic lesions, was observed at a systemic delivery dose of 5 mg/kg of iron equivalent concentration in the acute phase, and that no chronic toxicity was found 3 months after the injection. Therefore, we conclude that uPAR-targeted IONPs have the potential to be used as receptor-targeted MRI contrasts as well as theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of

  6. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor levels reflect organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Enocsson, Helena; Wetterö, Jonas; Skogh, Thomas; Sjöwall, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Assessments of disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain challenging because of the lack of reliable biomarkers and disease heterogeneity. Ongoing inflammation can be difficult to distinguish from permanent organ damage caused by previous flare-ups or medication side effects. Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has emerged as a potential marker of inflammation and disease severity, and an outcome predictor in several disparate conditions. This study was done to evaluate suPAR as a marker of disease activity and organ damage in SLE. Sera from 100 healthy donors and 198 patients with SLE fulfilling the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria and/or the Fries criteria were analyzed for suPAR by enzyme immunoassay. Eighteen patients with varying degree of disease activity were monitored longitudinally. Disease activity was assessed by the SLE disease activity index 2000 and the physician's global assessment. Organ damage was evaluated by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI). Compared with healthy control subjects, serum suPAR levels were elevated significantly in patients with SLE. No association was recorded regarding suPAR levels and SLE disease activity in cross-sectional or consecutive samples. However, a strong association was observed between suPAR and SDI (P < 0.0005). Considering distinct SDI domains, renal, neuropsychiatric, ocular, skin, and peripheral vascular damage had a significant effect on suPAR levels. This study is the first to demonstrate an association between serum suPAR and irreversible organ damage in SLE. Further studies are warranted to evaluate suPAR and other biomarkers as predictors of evolving organ damage.

  7. Cell associated urokinase activity and colonic epithelial cells in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Doe, W F

    1991-01-01

    It is not known if urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is associated with normal colonic epithelial cells. The aims of this study were to determine if normal colonic epithelial cells have uPA activity and whether this is concentrated at the cell membrane. In addition, the contribution of colonic epithelial cell associated uPA activity to disease related pertubations of mucosal uPA activity were examined. A highly enriched population of colonic epithelial cells was isolated from resected colon or biopsy specimens by an enzymatic technique. uPA activity was measured in cell homogenates by a specific and sensitive colorimetric method and expressed relative to cellular DNA. In two experiments subcellular fractionation of colonic epithelial cells was performed by nitrogen cavitation followed by ultracentrifugation over a linear sucrose gradient. The fractions collected were analysed for uPA and organelle-specific enzyme activities. Normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity (mean (SEM) 5.6 (1.1) IU/mg, n = 18). This colocalised with fractions enriched for leucine-beta-naphthylamidase and 5'-nucleotidase, markers of plasma membrane. uPA activities in epithelial cells from cancerous colons (9.8 (3.1) n = 7) or from mucosa affected by inflammatory bowel disease (3.8 (0.7) n = 15) were not significantly different from normal (paired t test), while that in epithelial cells from greatly inflamed mucosa was similar to that from autologous normal or mildly inflamed areas (4.4 (1.2) v 5.9 (3.6), n = 9). Thus normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity which is concentrated on the plasma membranes, suggesting the presence of uPA receptors. Increased mucosal levels of uPA previously reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are not due to increased colonic epithelial cell associated uPA. PMID:1650741

  8. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor as a putative marker of male accessory gland inflammation.

    PubMed

    Autilio, C; Morelli, R; Milardi, D; Grande, G; Marana, R; Pontecorvi, A; Zuppi, C; Baroni, S

    2015-11-01

    The association between male accessory gland infection/inflammation (MAGI) and infertility is well-known in clinical practice. Standard semen analysis, leukocytospermia, and microbiological tests are often not enough accurate for a diagnosis. A large amount of biochemical parameters in seminal plasma have been suggested as inflammation markers, however, there is not yet a sensitive and specific biomarker that accurately identifies MAGI. We investigated the presence of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), known marker of systemic inflammation, in the seminal plasma to evaluate its possible involvement in urogenital tract inflammation. On the basis of andrological evaluation, including spermiogram and ultrasound findings, we selected 76 patients with MAGI and 30 healthy men as control group. Patients were classified according to the results of the semen culture in group A (n = 28) presenting a bacterial MAGI and group B (n = 48) with abacterial MAGI. C-reactive protein (CRP), total protein (TP), procalcitonin (PCT), leukocytes peroxidase (LP), and suPAR concentrations were assayed on seminal plasma. Spermiogram parameters were significantly lower in the patients with MAGI than in controls. CRP, TP, PCT, and LP did not differ in MAGI vs. suPAR was detectable in all semen samples; it was significantly increased in A and B groups (86.6 ± 30.7 ng/mL vs. 39.7 ± 17.2 ng/mL) with an inverse correlation with sperm parameters. We selected by receiver operating characteristic curve a suPAR cut-off value of 55.3 ng/mL as a diagnostic threshold for the diagnosis of MAGI. We report in this study the first evidence of suPAR presence in seminal plasma, focusing on its interesting role as reliable and sensitive marker of inflammation for the differential diagnosis of MAGI. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. High molecular weight kininogen binds phosphatidylserine and opsonizes urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-mediated efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aizhen; Dai, Jihong; Xie, Zhanli; Colman, Robert W.; Wu, Qingyu; Birge, Raymond B.; Wu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) is essential for regulation of immune responses and tissue homeostasis, and is mediated by phagocytic receptors. In this study we found that urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays an important role in internalization of apoptotic cells, and also characterized the underlying mechanisms. In a flow cytometry-based phagocytic assay, uPAR-deficient (uPAR−/−) macrophages displayed significant defect in internalization but not tethering of apoptotic cells. When uPAR−/− mice were challenged with apoptotic cells, they exhibited pronounced splenomegaly resulting from accumulation of abundant apoptotic cells in spleen. Overexpression of uPAR in HEK-293 cells enhanced efferocytosis, which was inhibited by annexin V and phosphatidylserine (PS) liposome, suggesting that uPAR-mediated efferocytosis is dependent on PS. In serum lacking high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), a uPAR ligand, uPAR-mediated efferocytosis was significantly attenuated, which was rescued by replenishment of HK. As detected by flow cytometry, HK selectively bound to apoptotic cells, but not viable cells. In purified systems, HK was specifically associated with PS liposome. HK binding to apoptotic cells induced its rapid cleavage to two-chain HKa and bradykinin. Both heavy chain and light chain of HKa were associated with PS liposome and apoptotic cells. HKa has higher binding affinity than HK to uPAR. Overexpression of Rac1/N17 cDNA inhibited uPAR-mediated efferocytosis. HK plus PS liposome stimulated a complex formation of CrkII with p130Cas and Dock-180, and Rac1 activation in uPAR-293 cells, but not in control HEK-293 cells. Thus, uPAR mediates efferocytosis through HK interaction with PS on apoptotic cells and activation of Rac1 pathway. PMID:24688027

  10. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Røge, Rasmus; Pristed, Sofie Gry; Viuff, Anne Grethe; Ullum, Henrik; Thørner, Lise Wegner; Werge, Thomas; Vang, Torkel

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiology of schizophrenia remains largely unknown but alterations in the immune system may be involved. In addition to the psychiatric symptoms, schizophrenia is also associated with up to 20 years reduction in life span. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a protein that can be measured in blood samples and reflects the levels of inflammatory activity. It has been associated with mortality and the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia were compared to healthy controls from the Danish Blood Donor Study. SuPAR levels were dichotomized at >4.0 ng/ml, which is considered the threshold for low grade inflammation. A multiple logistic regression model was used and adjusted for age, sex, and current smoking. Results: In total we included 1009 subjects, 105 cases with schizophrenia (10.4%) and 904 controls (89.6%). The mean suPAR values were 4.01 ng/ml (SD = 1.43) for the cases vs 1.91 ng/ml (SD = 1.35) for the controls (P < .001). Multiple logistic regression with odds ratio (OR) for suPAR levels >4.0 ng/ml yielded: schizophrenia, OR: 46.15 95% CI 22.69–93.87, P < .001; age, OR: 1.02 95% CI 0.99–1.02, P = .15; male sex, OR: 0.70 95% CI 0.35–1.36, P = .29; and current smoking, OR: 3.51 95% CI 1.78–6.94, P < .001. Conclusions: Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher suPAR levels than healthy controls. Further studies are warranted to clarify if elevated suPAR levels are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and/or the increased mortality found in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25154621

  11. Regulation of urokinase receptor proteolytic function by the tetraspanin CD82.

    PubMed

    Bass, Rosemary; Werner, Finn; Odintsova, Elena; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Berditchevski, Fedor; Ellis, Vincent

    2005-04-15

    The high affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored cellular receptor (uPAR) promotes plasminogen activation and the efficient generation of pericellular proteolytic activity. We demonstrate here that expression of the tetraspanin CD82/KAI1 (a tumor metastasis suppressor) leads to a profound effect on uPAR function. Pericellular plasminogen activation was reduced by approximately 50-fold in the presence of CD82, although levels of components of the plasminogen activation system were unchanged. uPAR was present on the cell surface and molecularly intact, but radioligand binding analysis with uPA and anti-uPAR antibodies revealed that it was in a previously undetected cryptic form unable to bind uPA. This was not due to direct interactions between uPAR and CD82, as they neither co-localized on the cell surface nor could be co-immunoprecipitated. However, expression of CD82 led to a redistribution of uPAR to focal adhesions, where it was shown by double immunofluorescence labeling to co-localize with the integrin alpha(5)beta(1), which was also redistributed in the presence of CD82. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that, in the presence of CD82, uPAR preferentially formed stable associations with alpha(5)beta(1), but not with a variety of other integrins, including alpha(3)beta(1). These data suggest that CD82 inhibits the proteolytic function of uPAR indirectly, directing uPAR and alpha(5)beta(1) to focal adhesions and promoting their association with a resultant loss of uPA binding. This represents a novel mechanism whereby tetraspanins, integrins, and uPAR, systems involved in cell adhesion and migration, cooperate to regulate pericellular proteolytic activity and may suggest a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive effects of CD82/KAI1.

  12. Gelsolin Induces Colorectal Tumor Cell Invasion via Modulation of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jingli; Tan, Ee Hong; Yan, Benedict; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Jayapal, Manikandan; Koh, Shiuan; Tay, Hwee Kee; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Kumar, Alan Prem; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yap, Celestial T.

    2012-01-01

    Gelsolin is a cytoskeletal protein which participates in actin filament dynamics and promotes cell motility and plasticity. Although initially regarded as a tumor suppressor, gelsolin expression in certain tumors correlates with poor prognosis and therapy-resistance. In vitro, gelsolin has anti-apoptotic and pro-migratory functions and is critical for invasion of some types of tumor cells. We found that gelsolin was highly expressed at tumor borders infiltrating into adjacent liver tissues, as examined by immunohistochemistry. Although gelsolin contributes to lamellipodia formation in migrating cells, the mechanisms by which it induces tumor invasion are unclear. Gelsolin’s influence on the invasive activity of colorectal cancer cells was investigated using overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown. We show that gelsolin is required for invasion of colorectal cancer cells through matrigel. Microarray analysis and quantitative PCR indicate that gelsolin overexpression induces the upregulation of invasion-promoting genes in colorectal cancer cells, including the matrix-degrading urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Conversely, gelsolin knockdown reduces uPA levels, as well as uPA secretion. The enhanced invasiveness of gelsolin-overexpressing cells was attenuated by treatment with function-blocking antibodies to either uPA or its receptor uPAR, indicating that uPA/uPAR activity is crucial for gelsolin-dependent invasion. In summary, our data reveals novel functions of gelsolin in colorectal tumor cell invasion through its modulation of the uPA/uPAR cascade, with potentially important roles in colorectal tumor dissemination to metastatic sites. PMID:22927998

  13. Serum cathepsin B and plasma urokinase-type plasminogen activator levels in gastrointestinal tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; István, Gábor; Cardin, Romilda; De Paoli, Massimo; Plebani, Mario; Tulassay, Zsolt; Farinati, Fabio

    2008-10-01

    Cathepsin B (CATB) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA) play an important part in cancer invasion and metastasis. The behavior of CATB and UPA has not been evaluated in the same experimental setting in different gastrointestinal tumors and in precancerous lesions. Serum CATB and plasma UPA levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay and their sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy have been calculated in patients with colorectal (n=72), gastric (n=30), hepatocellular (n=28), and pancreatic cancer (n=15) as well as in gastric epithelial dysplasia (n=25), colorectal adenomas (n=30), and tumor-free control patients (n=44). Serum CATB and plasma UPA antigen concentrations were significantly higher in patients with cancer than in controls. When all tumors were considered, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of CATB (89, 86, and 89%) were higher than that of UPA (76, 70, and 74%). CATB demonstrated in all types of tumors a better diagnostic accuracy than UPA. The positive predictive values of CATB (95%) and UPA (89%) may suggest their use in the evaluation of patients with a suspicion of malignancy. CATB and UPA were significantly higher in patients with gastric epithelial dysplasia and colorectal adenomas than in controls. Antigen levels of CATB and UPA were significantly correlated in both cancers and precancerous lesions. At the time of clinical presentation, serum CATB and plasma UPA antigen levels are sensitive indicators of gastrointestinal malignancies. Determination of serum CATB and plasma UPA levels may be useful to identify patients at a higher risk for progression to cancer, who could be subjected to a more strict follow-up protocol.

  14. Role of the urokinase-fibrinolytic system in epithelial-mesenchymal transition during lung injury.

    PubMed

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath Satheesh; Bhandary, Yashodhar Prabhakar; Shetty, Shwetha Kumari; Fu, Jian; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Prakash, Ys; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell injury precedes development of pulmonary fibrosis. Mice lacking urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are highly susceptible, whereas those deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) are resistant to lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been considered, at least in part, as a source of myofibroblast formation during fibrogenesis. However, the contribution of altered expression of major components of the uPA system on ATII cell EMT during lung injury is not well understood. To investigate whether changes in uPA and PAI-1 by ATII cells contribute to EMT, ATII cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and mice with bleomycin-, transforming growth factor β-, or passive cigarette smoke-induced lung injury were analyzed for uPA, PAI-1, and EMT markers. We found reduced expression of E-cadherin and zona occludens-1, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were increased in ATII cells isolated from injured lungs. These changes were associated with a parallel increase in PAI-1 and reduced uPA expression. Further, inhibition of Src kinase activity using caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide suppressed bleomycin-, transforming growth factor β-, or passive cigarette smoke-induced EMT and restored uPA expression while suppressing PAI-1. These studies show that induction of PAI-1 and inhibition of uPA during fibrosing lung injury lead to EMT in ATII cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the Urokinase-Fibrinolytic System in Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition during Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath Satheesh; Bhandary, Yashodhar Prabhakar; Shetty, Shwetha Kumari; Fu, Jian; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Prakash, YS; Shetty, Sreerama

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell injury precedes development of pulmonary fibrosis. Mice lacking urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are highly susceptible, whereas those deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) are resistant to lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been considered, at least in part, as a source of myofibroblast formation during fibrogenesis. However, the contribution of altered expression of major components of the uPA system on ATII cell EMT during lung injury is not well understood. To investigate whether changes in uPA and PAI-1 by ATII cells contribute to EMT, ATII cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and mice with bleomycin-, transforming growth factor β–, or passive cigarette smoke–induced lung injury were analyzed for uPA, PAI-1, and EMT markers. We found reduced expression of E-cadherin and zona occludens-1, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were increased in ATII cells isolated from injured lungs. These changes were associated with a parallel increase in PAI-1 and reduced uPA expression. Further, inhibition of Src kinase activity using caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide suppressed bleomycin-, transforming growth factor β–, or passive cigarette smoke–induced EMT and restored uPA expression while suppressing PAI-1. These studies show that induction of PAI-1 and inhibition of uPA during fibrosing lung injury lead to EMT in ATII cells. PMID:25447049

  16. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor modulates epileptogenesis in mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

    2013-06-01

    Mutation in Plaur gene encoding urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) results in epilepsy and autistic phenotype in mice. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism in PLAUR gene represents a risk for autism spectrum disorders. Importantly, the expression of uPAR is elevated in the brain after various epileptogenic insults like traumatic brain injury and status epilepticus. So far, the consequences of altered uPAR expression on brain networks are poorly known. We tested a hypothesis that uPAR regulates post-injury neuronal reorganization and consequent functional outcome, particularly epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis was induced by intrahippocampal injection of kainate in adult male wild type (Wt) or uPAR knockout (uPAR-/-) mice, and animals were monitored with continuous (24/7) video-electroencephalogram for 30 days. The severity of status epilepticus did not differ between the genotypes. The spontaneous electrographic seizures which developed were, however, longer and their behavioral manifestations were more severe in uPAR-/- than Wt mice. The more severe epilepsy phenotype in uPAR-/- mice was associated with delayed but augmented inflammatory response and more severe neurodegeneration in the hippocampus. Also, the distribution of newly born cells in the dentate gyrus was more scattered, and the recovery of hippocampal blood vessel length from status epilepticus-induced damage was compromised in uPAR-/- mice as compared to Wt mice. Our data demonstrate that a deficiency in uPAR represents a mechanisms which results in the development of a more severe epilepsy phenotype and progressive brain pathology after status epilepticus. We suggest that uPAR represents a rational target for disease-modifying treatments after epileptogenic brain insults.

  17. Uncharged isocoumarin-based inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Heynekamp, Justin J; Hunsaker, Lucy A; Vander Jagt, Thomas A; Deck, Lorraine M; Vander Jagt, David L

    2006-01-01

    Background Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays a major role in extracellular proteolytic events associated with tumor cell growth, migration and angiogenesis. Consequently, uPA is an attractive target for the development of small molecule active site inhibitors. Most of the recent drug development programs aimed at nonpeptidic inhibitors targeted at uPA have focused on arginino mimetics containing amidine or guanidine functional groups attached to aromatic or heterocyclic scaffolds. There is a general problem of limited bioavailability of these charged inhibitors. In the present study, uPA inhibitors were designed on an isocoumarin scaffold containing uncharged substituents. Results 4-Chloro-3-alkoxyisocoumarins were synthesized in which the 3-alkoxy group contained a terminal bromine; these were compared with similar inhibitors that contained a charged terminal functional group. Additional variations included functional groups attached to the seven position of the isocoumarin scaffold. N- [3-(3-Bromopropoxy)-4-chloro-1-oxo-1H-isochromen-7-yl]benzamide was identified as an uncharged lead inhibitor of uPA, Ki = 0.034 μM. Molecular modeling of human uPA with these uncharged inhibitors suggests that the bromine occupies the same position as positively charged arginino mimetic groups. Conclusion This study demonstrates that potent uncharged inhibitors of uPA can be developed based upon the isocoumarin scaffold. A tethered bromine in the three position and an aromatic group in the seven position are important contributors to binding. Although the aim was to develop compounds that act as mechanism-based inactivators, these inhibitors are competitive reversible inhibitors. PMID:16466576

  18. Binding site of amiloride to urokinase plasminogen activator depends on species.

    PubMed

    Jankun, J; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E

    2001-10-01

    A novel drug candidate is checked on its potency on animal models before it can advance to human phase of the research. Usually negative results on animal phase disqualify it. Targeting specific enzymes by small chemicals raises the question about the appropriateness of this approach. As an example, the urokinase (uPA) is recognized as an important enzyme responsible for cancer metastasis and angiogenesis. It is therefore important to ask the question if a small chemical will inhibit uPA of different species with the same or different potency. Using DNA sequence and known structure of uPA we have modeled 3D structures of uPAs for several different species. By theoretical calculations we have determined most probable structure of amiloride/uPAs complexes. Catalytic triad (B57, B102, B195) and specificity pocket (B187-B197, B212-B229) are highly conserved in all cases, and are the regions responsible for proteolytic activity and recognition of the substrate. Significant differences were observed in a different region (loop B93-B101), that we identified as binding site of amiloride to the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Although tPA shares the same function of activating plasminogen and it is structurally similar to uPA. Amiloride is a specific inhibitor of uPA but does not inhibit tPA. Our study shows that predicted position of amiloride depends on species and in some cases was located, as expected, in the specificity pocket, but in the other cases close to the loop B93-B101. This location could weaken affinity of binding or prevent inhibition of uPA. Therefore, drug screening and elimination process based solely on animal study, without careful structural analysis, could lead to the elimination of potential drugs for humans.

  19. Interleukin-33 induces urokinase in human endothelial cells--possible impact on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, S; Kaun, C; Heinz, M; Krychtiuk, K A; Rauscher, S; Lemberger, C E; de Martin, R; Gröger, M; Petzelbauer, P; Huk, I; Huber, K; Wojta, J; Demyanets, S

    2014-06-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) plays a pivotal role in extracellular proteolysis and is thought to be critically involved in the modulation of angiogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, which is thought to act as danger signal that is released from cells after injury. IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases and previously was shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells. We investigated the impact of IL-33 on u-PA in endothelial cells as a new possible function for IL-33. We could demonstrate that IL-33 upregulated u-PA mRNA expression and protein production in human coronary artery and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner via interaction with its receptor ST2 and activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway but independent of autocrine IL-1-induced effects. The hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor simvastatin abrogated the IL-33-induced increase in u-PA, thus providing further evidence for pleiotropic effects of statins. IL-33 induced u-PA-dependent capillary-like tube formation and vessel sprouting. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 16), u-PA mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.780, P < 0.001). Furthermore, IL-33 and u-PA protein were detected in endothelial cells in these samples using fluorescence immunohistochemistry. We hypothesize that IL-33, representing a danger signal that is released after tissue damage, in addition to its role in the inflammatory activation of endothelial cells, is involved in u-PA-driven angiogenesis, a process that has been shown before to be linked to inflammation in various pathologies. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Altered expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor in high-risk soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M S; Ponticelli, F; Azzoni, E; Gamberi, G; Pazzaglia, L; Chiechi, A; Conti, A; Spessotto, P; Scapolan, M; Pignotti, E; Bacchini, P; Picci, P

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, classification of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) has improved with cytogenetic analyses, but their clinical behavior is still not easily predictable. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in the urokinase-type plasminogen system, involved in tumor growth and invasion, by comparing mRNA levels of its components with those of paired normal tissues, and relating them with patient clinical course. Real-time PCR was performed on human STS cell lines and tissues from highly malignant STS, including leiomyosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas, to evaluate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Immunohistochemistry of gene products was also performed. Median mRNA values of all genes studied were higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues. In agreement with data on STS cell lines, significant up-regulation for uPA and PAI-1 genes compared to reference values was seen. Moreover, different levels of expression were related to histotype and metastatic phenotype. There was accordance between uPA mRNA and protein expression, while immunodetection of PAI-1 product was weak and scattered. Clearly, the controversial role of PAI-1 protein requires further biological analyses, but evident involvement of uPA/PAI-1 gene overexpression in STS malignancy may highlight a molecular defect useful in discriminating STS high-risk patients.

  1. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  2. Plasmin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promote cellular motility by regulating the interaction between the urokinase receptor and vitronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, D A; Natkin, L R; Fujita, R M; Wei, Y; Chapman, H A

    1997-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) coordinates plasmin-mediated cell-surface proteolysis and promotes cellular adhesion via a binding site for vitronectin on uPAR. Because vitronectin also binds plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), and plasmin cleavage of vitronectin reduces PAI-1 binding, we explored the effects of plasmin and PAI-1 on the interaction between uPAR and vitronectin. PAI-1 blocked cellular binding of and adhesion to vitronectin by over 80% (IC50 approximately 5 nM), promoted detachment of uPAR-bearing cells from vitronectin, and increased cellular migration on vitronectin. Limited cleavage of vitronectin by plasmin also abolished cellular binding and adhesion and induced cellular detachment. A series of peptides surrounding a plasmin cleavage site (arginine 361) near the carboxy-terminal end of vitronectin were synthesized. Two peptides spanning res 364-380 blocked binding of uPAR to vitronectin (IC50 approximately 8-25 microM) identifying this region as an important site of uPAR-vitronectin interaction. These data illuminate a complex regulatory scheme for uPAR-dependent cellular adhesion to vitronectin: Active urokinase promotes adhesion and also subsequent detachment through activation of plasmin or complex formation with PAI-1. Excess PAI-1 may also promote migration by blocking cellular adhesion and/or promoting detachment, possibly accounting in part for the strong correlation between PAI-1 expression and tumor cell metastasis. PMID:9202057

  3. Genetic Association Analysis of Fasting and 1- and 2-Hour Glucose Tolerance Test Data Using a Generalized Index of Dissimilarity Measure for the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jaeyong; Kim, Yongkang; Park, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Glucose tolerance tests have been devised to determine the speed of blood glucose clearance. Diabetes is often tested with the standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), along with fasting glucose level. However, no single test may be sufficient for the diagnosis, and the World Health Organization (WHO)/International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has suggested composite criteria. Accordingly, a single multi-class trait was constructed with three of the fasting phenotypes and 1- and 2-hour OGTT phenotypes from the Korean Association Resource (KARE) project, and the genetic association was investigated. All of the 18 possible combinations made out of the 3 sets of classification for the individual phenotypes were taken into our analysis. These were possible due to a method that was recently developed by us for estimating genomic associations using a generalized index of dissimilarity. Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were found to have the strongest main effect are reported with the corresponding genes. Four of them conform to previous reports, located in the CDKAL1 gene, while the other 4 SNPs are new findings. Two-order interacting SNP pairs of are also presented. One pair (rs2328549 and rs6486740) has a prominent association, where the two single-nucleotide polymorphism locations are CDKAL1 and GLT1D1. The latter has not been found to have a strong main effect. New findings may result from the proper construction and analysis of a composite trait. PMID:28154509

  4. The “Lipid Accumulation Product” Is Associated with 2-Hour Postload Glucose Outcomes in Overweight/Obese Subjects with Nondiabetic Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Malavazos, Alexis Elias; Cereda, Emanuele; Ermetici, Federica; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Briganti, Silvia; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Morricone, Lelio

    2015-01-01

    “Lipid accumulation product” (LAP) is a continuous variable based on waist circumference and triglyceride concentration previously associated with insulin resistance. We investigated the accuracy of LAP in identifying oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) abnormalities and compared it to the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in a population of overweight/obese outpatients presenting with nondiabetic fasting glucose. We studied 381 (male: 23%) adult (age: 18–70 years) overweight/obese Caucasians (body mass index: 36.9 ± 5.4 Kg/m2) having fasting plasma glucose < 7.0 mmol/L. OGTT was used to diagnose unknown glucose tolerance abnormalities: impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). According to OGTT 92, subjects had an IGT and 33 were diagnosed T2-DM. Logistic regression analysis detected a significant association for both LAP and HOMA-IR with single (IGT and T2-DM) and composite (IGT + T2-DM) abnormal glucose tolerance conditions. However, while the association with diabetes was similar between LAP and HOMA-IR, the relationship with IGT and composite outcomes by models including LAP was significantly superior to those including HOMA-IR (P = 0.006 and P = 0.007, resp.). LAP seems to be an accurate index, performing better than HOMA-IR, for identifying 2-hour postload OGTT outcomes in overweight/obese patients with nondiabetic fasting glucose. PMID:25792981

  5. Inhibition of establishment of primary and micrometastatic tumors by a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ignar, D M; Andrews, J L; Witherspoon, S M; Leray, J D; Clay, W C; Kilpatrick, K; Onori, J; Kost, T; Emerson, D L

    1998-01-01

    Tumor establishment and metastasis are dependent on extracellular matrix proteolysis, tumor cell migration, and angiogenesis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor are essential mediators of these processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a recombinant human uPAR antagonist on growth, establishment, and metastasis of tumors derived from human cancer cell lines. A noncatalytic recombinant protein, consisting of amino acids 1-137 of human uPA and the CH2 and CH3 regions of mouse IgG1 (uPA-IgG), was expressed, purified, and shown to bind specifically to human uPAR and to saturate the surface of human tumor cells which express uPAR. Daily i.p. administration of uPA-IgG to nude mice extended latencies of unstaged tumors derived from Lox melanoma and SW48 colon carcinoma cells by 7.7 and 5.5 days, respectively. uPA-IgG treatment did not affect the growth of Lox or KB tumors staged to 200 mg before antagonist treatment commenced. The effect of uPA-IgG on the establishment of micrometastases was assessed in SCID mice. KB head/neck tumor cells were injected in the tail vein and allowed to seed for 48 h before initiation of daily i.p. injections of uPA-IgG for 24 days. The number of lung colonies ranged between 5 and 30% of vehicle-treated mice in two separate experiments. Furthermore, a single 800 microg dose of uPA-IgG administered 1 h prior to tail vein injection of KB cells reduced lung colony formation to just 3.5% of vehicle-treated SCID mice. These data demonstrate that antagonism of uPAR arrested metastasis and inhibited the establishment of primary tumors and micrometastases. Thus, small molecule uPAR antagonists may serve as useful adjuvant agents in combination with existing cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and arthritis progression: role in systemic disease with immune complex involvement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) has been implicated in fibrinolysis, cell migration, latent cytokine activation, cell activation, T-cell activation, and tissue remodeling, all of which are involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Previously, u-PA has been reported to play a protective role in monoarticular arthritis models involving mBSA as the antigen, but a deleterious role in the systemic polyarticular collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The aim of the current study is to determine how u-PA might be acting in systemic arthritis models. Methods The CIA model and bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular source of u-PA required for the arthritis development. Gene expression of inflammatory and destructive mediators was measured in joint tissue by quantitiative PCR and protein levels by ELISA. The requirement for u-PA in the type II collagen mAb-induced arthritis (CAIA) and K/BxN serum transfer arthritis models was determined using u-PA-/- mice. Neutrophilia was induced in the peritoneal cavity using either ovalbumin/anti-ovalbumin or the complement component C5a. Results u-PA from a bone marrow-derived cell was required for the full development of CIA. The disease in u-PA-/- mice reconstituted with bone marrrow from C57BL/6 mice was indistinguishable from that in C57BL/6 mice, in terms of clincal score, histologic features, and protein and gene expression of key mediators. u-PA-/- mice were resistant to both CAIA and K/BxN serum transfer arthritis development. u-PA-/- mice developed a reduced neutrophilia and chemokine production in the peritoneal cavity following ovalbumin/anti-ovalbumin injection; in contrast, the peritoneal neutrophilia in response to C5a was u-PA independent. Conclusions u-PA is required for the full development of systemic arthritis models involving immune complex formation and deposition. The cellular source of u-PA required for CIA is bone marrow derived and likely to be of myeloid

  7. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and arthritis progression: role in systemic disease with immune complex involvement.

    PubMed

    Cook, Andrew D; De Nardo, Christine M; Braine, Emma L; Turner, Amanda L; Vlahos, Ross; Way, Kerrie J; Beckman, S Kaye; Lenzo, Jason C; Hamilton, John A

    2010-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) has been implicated in fibrinolysis, cell migration, latent cytokine activation, cell activation, T-cell activation, and tissue remodeling, all of which are involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Previously, u-PA has been reported to play a protective role in monoarticular arthritis models involving mBSA as the antigen, but a deleterious role in the systemic polyarticular collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The aim of the current study is to determine how u-PA might be acting in systemic arthritis models. The CIA model and bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular source of u-PA required for the arthritis development. Gene expression of inflammatory and destructive mediators was measured in joint tissue by quantitiative PCR and protein levels by ELISA. The requirement for u-PA in the type II collagen mAb-induced arthritis (CAIA) and K/BxN serum transfer arthritis models was determined using u-PA(-/-) mice. Neutrophilia was induced in the peritoneal cavity using either ovalbumin/anti-ovalbumin or the complement component C5a. u-PA from a bone marrow-derived cell was required for the full development of CIA. The disease in u-PA(-/-) mice reconstituted with bone marrow from C57BL/6 mice was indistinguishable from that in C57BL/6 mice, in terms of clinical score, histologic features, and protein and gene expression of key mediators. u-PA(-/-) mice were resistant to both CAIA and K/BxN serum transfer arthritis development. u-PA(-/-) mice developed a reduced neutrophilia and chemokine production in the peritoneal cavity following ovalbumin/anti-ovalbumin injection; in contrast, the peritoneal neutrophilia in response to C5a was u-PA independent. u-PA is required for the full development of systemic arthritis models involving immune complex formation and deposition. The cellular source of u-PA required for CIA is bone marrow derived and likely to be of myeloid origin. For immune complex

  8. Urine soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels correlate with proteinuria in Puumala hantavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Outinen, Tuula K.; Mäkelä, Satu; Huttunen, Reetta; Mäenpää, Niina; Libraty, Daniel; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka; Aittoniemi, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is upregulated during inflammation and known to bind to β3-integrins, receptors used by pathogenic hantaviruses to enter endothelial cells. It has been proposed that soluble uPAR (suPAR) is a circulating factor that causes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria by activating β3-integrin in kidney podocytes. Proteinuria is also a characteristic feature of hantavirus infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between urine suPAR levels and disease severity in acute Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. Design A single-centre, prospective cohort study. Subjects and methods Urinary suPAR levels were measured twice during the acute phase and once during convalescence in 36 patients with serologically confirmed PUUV infection. Fractional excretion of suPAR (FE suPAR) and of albumin (FE alb) were calculated. Results The FE suPAR was significantly elevated during the acute phase of PUUV infection compared to the convalescent phase (median 3.2%, range 0.8–52.0%, vs. median 1.9%, range 1.0–5.8%, P = 0.005). Maximum FE suPAR was correlated markedly with maximum FE alb (r = 0.812, P < 0.001), and with several other variables that reflect disease severity. There was a positive correlation with the length of hospitalization (r = 0.455, P = 0.009) and maximum plasma creatinine level (r = 0.780, P < 0.001), and an inverse correlation with minimum urinary output (r = −0.411, P = 0.030). There was no correlation between FE suPAR and plasma suPAR (r = 0.180, P = 0.324). Conclusion Urinary suPAR is markedly increased during acute PUUV infection and is correlated with proteinuria. High urine suPAR level may reflect local production of suPAR in the kidney during the acute infection. PMID:24717117

  9. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  10. Cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of the urokinase mRNA binding protein regulates message stability.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama

    2002-08-01

    Treatment of small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells or lung epithelial (Beas2B) cells with TNF-alpha or PMA induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression. Treatment of these cells with TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide but not TGF-beta increased steady-state expression of uPAmRNA. TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide caused 8-10 fold extensions of the uPAmRNA half-life in SAEC or Beas2B cells treated with DRB, a transcriptional inhibitor. These findings suggest that uPA gene expression involves a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 30 kDa uPA mRNA binding protein (uPA mRNABp) that selectively binds to a 66 nt protein binding fragment of uPA mRNA containing regulatory information for message stabilization. Binding of cytoplasmic uPA mRNABp to uPA mRNA was abolished after treatment with TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta. In addition, we found the accumulation of 30 kDa uPAmRNABp in the nuclear extracts of TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta treated cells. The uPA mRNABp starts moving to the nucleus from the cytoplasmic compartment as early as three hours after TNF-alpha treatment. Complete translocation is achieved between 12-24 h, which coincides with the maximal expression of uPA protein effected by cytokine stimulation. Treatment of Beas2B cells with NaF inhibited TNF-alpha-mediated translocation of uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and concomitant inhibition of uPA expression. TNF-alpha stabilizes uPA mRNA by translocating the uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism governing uPA mRNA stability through shuttling of uPA mRNABp between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This newly identified pathway may have evolved to regulate uPA-mediated functions of the lung epithelium in inflamation or neoplasia.

  11. Analysis of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in multiple myeloma for predicting prognosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wang, Juan; Su, Guo-Hong; Wang, Juan; Guo, Sheng-Hu; Liu, Y A; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Rong-Feng; Li, Xing; Guo, Xiao-Jin; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Yue-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Multiple myeloma is a type of malignancy, which affects the plasma cells of the bone marrow. Recent studies have found that malignant plasma cells may express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR), and that initiation of proteolytic events by this system contributes to the process of invasion and destruction of the bone marrow. Studies have also suggested that the level of the soluble form of uPAR (suPAR) may act as a marker for prognosis in patients with multiple myeloma, and that there is an association between uPAR/suPAR expression, and clinical characteristics, efficacy of treatment in disease control and patient survival. In order to investigate this, the present study used flow cytometry to detect the monoclonal antibodies associated with multiple myeloma, specifically, uPAR (CD87), CD56 and CD38. Patients with multiple myeloma were divided into the following groups: The effective groups (remission and stable disease) and the ineffective group (progressive disease). suPAR expression in the effective groups was 257.6±32.47 pg/ml and 331.0±99.80 pg/ml respectively, which was not significantly different from that of the normal control group (P>0.05). By contrast, the suPAR level in the invalid group was 562.2±291.0 pg/ml, which was significantly different from the levels in the normal control group (P<0.01) and the effective groups (P<0.05). suPAR levels were positively correlated with disease stage (P<0.01), renal function (P<0.05), C-reactive protein (P<0.005), β2-microglobulin (P<0.001), extramedullary involvement (P<0.001), chromosome 13 deletion (P<0.01) and survival >2 years (P<0.01). They were was negatively correlated with hemoglobin concentration. No correlation was observed between uPAR expression and suPAR levels. The present study also indicated that the stage of disease and suPAR expression were independent factors, which predicted survival of <2 years. In conclusion, high suPAR expression appears to predict disease

  12. Human retinal pigment epithelial lysis of extracellular matrix: functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, collagenase, and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Susan G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show (1) human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) expression of functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR; CD87), (2) HRPE secretion of collagenase and elastase, (3) uPAR-dependent HRPE migration, and (4) uPAR expression in diseased human retinal tissue. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for uPAR was performed on cultured HRPE cells and in sections of human retina. Double-immunofluorescent staining of live human RPE cells with anti-CR3 antibody (CD11b) was performed to demonstrate the physical proximity of this beta 2 integrin with uPAR and determine whether associations were dependent on RPE confluence and polarity. Extracellular proteolysis by HRPE uPAR was evaluated using fluorescent bodipy-BSA and assessed for specificity by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inhibition. The effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on uPAR expression was assessed. Collagenase and elastase secretion by unstimulated and IL-1-stimulated HRPE cells was measured by 3H-labelled collagen and elastin cleavage. HRPE-associated collagenase was also assessed by cleavage of fluorescent DQ-collagen and inhibited by phenanthroline. Using an extracellular matrix assay, the roles of uPAR and collagenase in HRPE migration were assessed. RESULTS: Immunoreactive uPAR was detected on cultured HRPE cells and increased by IL-1. On elongated, live HRPE cells, uPAR dissociated from CD11b (CR3) and translocated to anterior poles of migrating cells. Extracellular proteolysis was concentrated at sites of uPAR expression and specifically inhibited by PAI-1. Cultured HRPE cells secreted substantial, functional collagenase and elastase. IL-1 upregulated uPAR, collagenase, and elastase activities. Specific inhibition of uPAR, and to a lesser degree collagenase, reduced HRPE migration in matrix/gel assays. Immunoreactive uPAR was present along the HRPE basolateral membrane in retinal sections and in sections of diseased retinal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: HRPE cells express functional u

  13. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Røge, Rasmus; Pristed, Sofie Gry; Viuff, Anne Grethe; Ullum, Henrik; Thørner, Lise Wegner; Werge, Thomas; Vang, Torkel

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia remains largely unknown but alterations in the immune system may be involved. In addition to the psychiatric symptoms, schizophrenia is also associated with up to 20 years reduction in life span. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a protein that can be measured in blood samples and reflects the levels of inflammatory activity. It has been associated with mortality and the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia were compared to healthy controls from the Danish Blood Donor Study. SuPAR levels were dichotomized at >4.0 ng/ml, which is considered the threshold for low grade inflammation. A multiple logistic regression model was used and adjusted for age, sex, and current smoking. In total we included 1009 subjects, 105 cases with schizophrenia (10.4%) and 904 controls (89.6%). The mean suPAR values were 4.01 ng/ml (SD = 1.43) for the cases vs 1.91 ng/ml (SD = 1.35) for the controls (P < .001). Multiple logistic regression with odds ratio (OR) for suPAR levels >4.0 ng/ml yielded: schizophrenia, OR: 46.15 95% CI 22.69-93.87, P < .001; age, OR: 1.02 95% CI 0.99-1.02, P = .15; male sex, OR: 0.70 95% CI 0.35-1.36, P = .29; and current smoking, OR: 3.51 95% CI 1.78-6.94, P < .001. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher suPAR levels than healthy controls. Further studies are warranted to clarify if elevated suPAR levels are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and/or the increased mortality found in patients with schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and MRJ cooperatively regulate cell adhesion and migration through urokinase receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuli; Peng, Nana; Zhuang, Hongqin; Zhang, Di; Wang, Yao; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-08-30

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is an important regulator of ECM proteolysis, cell-ECM interactions and cell signaling. uPAR and heat shock proteins HSP70 and MRJ (DNAJB6) have been implicated in tumor growth and metastasis. We have reported recently that MRJ (DNAJB6, a heat shock protein) can interact with uPAR and enhance cell adhesion. Here, we identified another heat shock protein HSP70 as a novel uPAR-interacting protein. We performed co-immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and colon cancer HCT116 cells as well as immunofluorence assays in HEK293 cells stably transfected with uPAR to investigate the association of suPAR with HSP70/MRJ. To understand the biological functions of the triple complex of suPAR/HSP70/MRJ, we determined whether HSP70 and/or MRJ regulated uPAR-mediated cell invasion, migration, adhesion to vitronectin and MAPK pathway in two pair of human tumor cells (uPAR negative HEK293 cells vs HEK293 cells stably transfected with uPAR and HCT116 cells stably transfected with antisense-uPAR vs HCT116 mock cells transfected with vector only) using transwell assay, wound healing assay, quantitative RT-PCR analyzing mmp2 and mmp9 transcription levels, cell adhesion assay and Western blotting assay. HSP70 and MRJ formed a triple complex with uPAR and over-expression of MRJ enhanced the interaction between HSP70 and uPAR, while knockdown of MRJ decreased soluble uPAR in HCT116 cells (P < 0.05) and reduced the formation of the triple complex, suggesting that MRJ may act as an uPAR-specific adaptor protein to link uPAR to HSP70. Further experiments showed that knockdown of HSP70 and/or MRJ by siRNA inhibited uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin as well as suppressed cell invasion and migration. Knockdown of HSP70 and/or MRJ inhibited expression of invasion related genes mmp2 and mmp9. Finally, HSP70 and/or MRJ up-regulated phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and FAK suggesting MAPK pathway was involved

  15. Comparison of dose regimens for the administration of recombinant pro-urokinase in a canine thrombosis model.

    PubMed

    Burke, S E; Lubbers, N L; Nelson, R A; Henkin, J

    1997-05-01

    Pro-urokinase represents an important addition to the array of thrombolytic drugs currently available for clinical use because of its high clot specificity but distinctly different mechanism compared with that of t-PA. Recombinant pro-urokinase (r-proUK) is a single-chain precursor of high molecular weight urokinase which has been expressed in a mouse myeloma cell line. The present study was conducted to determine the dosing regimen which would produce optimal clot lysis and restoration of blood flow 2 h after treatment with r-proUK, using a dog model of arterial thrombosis. Efficacy was indicated by lysis of a radio-labelled clot which was formed in the heat-damaged femoral arteries of 39 male beagle dogs. The animals were divided into six heparinized treatment groups, each receiving one of five dosing regimens or the vehicle for r-proUK. The total dose (80,000 U/kg) was divided into an initial loading bolus, followed by either a second bolus or by infusions for various time periods, as shown below: Group Treatment Regimen % Lysis 1 r-proUK Bolus/bolus, 50%/50% at 0 and 15 min 52 +/- 7 2 r-proUK Bolus/bolus, 50%/50% at 0 and 30 min 62 +/- 7 3 r-proUK Bolus/infusion, 20%/80% infused to 30 min 41 +/- 8 4 r-proUK Bolus/infusion, 20%/80% infused to 60 min 66 +/- 5 5 r-proUK Bolus/infusion, 50%/50% infused to 30 min 73 +/- 4 6 Vehicle Bolus/infusion, 50%/50% infused to 30 min 12 +/- 6 It was concluded that optimal clot lysis and restoration of femoral flow was accomplished using a regimen in which 50% of the dose was given as a bolus, followed immediately by the remaining 50% given as a 30 min intravenous infusion (Group 5). At the dose used in this study, r-proUK did not produce degradation of fibrinolytic or hemostatic plasma proteins.

  16. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  17. Chapter 5. Borderlands fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Margot Wilkinson-Kaye; Thomas Swetnam; Christopher R. Baisan

    2006-01-01

    Fire is a keystone process in most natural, terrestrial ecosystems. The vital role that fire plays in controlling the structure of an ecosystem underscores the need for us to increase our knowledge of past and current fire regimes (Morgan and others 1994). Dendrochronological reconstructions of fire histories provide descriptions of past fire regimes across a range of...

  18. Re-engineering the Immune Response to Metastatic Cancer: Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules Targeting the Urokinase Receptor.

    PubMed

    Rullo, Anthony F; Fitzgerald, Kelly J; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; Liu, Min; Yuan, Cai; Huang, Mingdong; Kim, Minsup; Cho, Art E; Spiegel, David A

    2016-03-07

    Developing selective strategies to treat metastatic cancers remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report the first antibody-recruiting small molecule (ARM) that is capable of recognizing the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a uniquely overexpressed cancer cell-surface marker, and facilitating the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. A co-crystal structure of the ARM-U2/uPAR complex was obtained, representing the first crystal structure of uPAR complexed with a non-peptide ligand. Finally, we demonstrated that ARM-U2 substantially suppresses tumor growth in vivo with no evidence of weight loss, unlike the standard-of-care agent doxorubicin. This work underscores the promise of antibody-recruiting molecules as immunotherapeutics for treating cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels in male patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Genc, Abdullah; Kalelioglu, Tevfik; Karamustafalioglu, Nesrin; Tasdemir, Akif; Genc, Esra Sena; Akkus, Mustafa; Emul, Murat

    2016-02-28

    Inflammatory abnormalities have been shown in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a protein that is measurable in the circulating blood and reflects the inflammation in the body. We aimed to investigate serum suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia who were in acute state and to compare with healthy controls. Forty five patients and 43 healthy controls were included in the study. We found no significant difference in suPAR levels between patients and controls, suggesting that suPAR as an inflammatory marker does not have a role in the inflammatory process of acute schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The crystal structures of 3-TAPAP in complexes with the urokinase-type plasminogen activator and picrate.

    PubMed

    Zesławska, Ewa; Jacob, Uwe; Stürzebecher, Jörg; Oleksyn, Barbara J

    2006-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a protein involved in tissue remodeling and other biological processes. The inhibitors of uPA have been shown to prevent the spread of metastasis and tumor growth, and accordingly this enzyme is widely accepted as a promising anticancer target. In this work, we have investigated the conformation of the uPA inhibitor 3-TAPAP in two different crystalline environments of a picrate and a uPA complex. These structures were compared to the known structure of the 3-TAPAP in the complex with trypsin. In the complexes with the proteins, trypsin, and uPA, the binding mode of 3-TAPAP is similar. A larger difference in the conformation, in the comparison to these structures, has been observed by us in the 3-TAPAP picrate crystal. This observation contradicts the hypothesis that 3-TAPAP derivatives inhibit serine proteinases in preformed stable conformations.

  1. Association of calcium urolithiasis with urokinase P141L and 3'-UTR C>T polymorphisms in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Hagikura, Shoichi; Wakai, Kenji; Kawai, Sayo; Goto, Yasuyuki; Naito, Mariko; Hagikura, Minako; Gotoh, Momokazu; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2013-02-01

    This was a case-control study to analyze the associations between calcium urolithiasis and the urokinase polymorphisms, P141L (rs2227564) and 3'-UTR C>T (rs4065), in a Japanese population. Cases consisted of 232 patients with urinary calcium stones (174 men and 58 women) who presented to a general hospital between April 2009 and June 2011. Among these cases, 115 (49.6 %) patients had calcium oxalate stones alone, and 113 (48.7 %) patients had calcium oxalate stones mixed with calcium phosphate stones. Controls consisted of 454 subjects who had a routine health check-up in the same prefecture. The two polymorphisms were genotyped via polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers. In the control group, the genotype frequencies of P141L were 0.573 for PP, 0.375 for PL, and 0.052 for LL, and those of 3'-UTR C>T were 0.835 for CC, 0.165 for CT, and TT was not identified. Neither of the polymorphisms was significantly associated with urolithiasis. The age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios of urolithiasis were 0.96 [95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.66-1.41] for PL and 1.22 (0.58-2.57) for LL as compared with PP genotype of P141L, and 1.01 (0.62-1.64) for CT as compared with CC genotype of 3'-UTR C>T. When compared with the PP genotype of P141L, the frequency of PL was significantly lower in female cases with a family history of urolithiasis than in females without such family history (p = 0.028). P141L and 3'-UTR polymorphisms of the urokinase gene are not associated with urolithiasis in a Japanese population.

  2. Significantly increased concentration of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in the blood of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yuan-Hung; Wang, Po-Hui; Lin, Long-Yau; Tee, Yi-Torng; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting

    2013-01-16

    To determine expression levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in plasma and to identify gene polymorphisms specific to patients with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and healthy controls. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism were used to measure plasma levels and polymorphisms in uPA, suPAR, and PAI-1 among seventy healthy controls and 64 PID patients before and after they received routine treatment protocols. The levels of plasma uPA (ng/ml) and soluble suPAR (pg/ml) were significantly increased in PID patients (uPA: 0.57±0.03; suPAR: 1372.04±68.20) when compared to that in normal controls (uPA: 0.55±0.06, p=0.002; suPAR: 1192.46±51.98, p=0.04); moreover, suPAR decreased significantly after treatment when compared to levels noted in the same patients (1220.06±58.14; p=0.003) after they received treatment. The increased expression of suPAR was significantly correlated with WBC counts (r=0.382, p=0.002, n=64) in blood as well as the plasma levels of CRP (r=0.441, p<0.0001, n=64) and uPA (r=0.426, p<0.0001, n=64) of PID patients prior to receiving treatment. Increased plasma suPAR could be a biological marker for the diagnosis of PID and may reflect a new focus in targeted therapy for pelvic inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Relationship of Exercise, Age, and Gender on Decompression Sickness and Venous Gas Emboli During 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Prior to Hypobaric Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated four 2-hour oxygen prebreathe protocols combining adynamia (non-walking) and 4 different amounts of exercise for potential use with extravehicular activity (EVA) on the International Space Station. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase 11: same ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise that simulated space suit preparations. Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. After 80 min on 100% O2, the subjects breathed 26.5% O2 - 73.5% N2 for 30 min at 10.2 psi. All subjects performed a series of upper body exercises from a recumbent position for 4 hrs at 4.3 psi to simulate EVA work. Venous gas emboli (VGE) were monitored every 12 min using precordial Doppler ultrasound. The 39 female and 126 male exposures were analyzed for correlations between decompression sickness (DCS) or VGE, and risk variables. The duration and quantity of exercise during prebreathe inversely relates to DCS and VGE incidence. The type and distribution of the 19 cases of DCS were similar to historical cases. There was no correlation of age, gender, body mass index, or fitness level with greater incidence of DCS or all VGE. However there were more Grade IV VGE in males > 40 years (10 of 19) than in those =< 40 years (3 of 107), with p<0.01 from Fisher's Exact Chi square The latency time for VGE was longer (103 min +/- 56 SD, n = 15 versus 53 min +/- 31, n =13) when the ergometry occurred about 15 min into the prebreathe than when performed at the start of the prebreathe, but the order of the ergometry did not influence the overall DCS and VGE incidence. An increasing amount of exercise during prebreathes reduced the risk of DCS during subsequent exposures to 4.3 psi. Age, gender, or fitness level did not correlate with the incidence of DCS or VGE (combination of Grades I-IV). However males greater than 40 years had a higher incidence of Grade IV VGE.

  4. Evaluation of a neck mounted 2-hourly activity meter system for detecting cows about to ovulate in two paddock-based Australian dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Hockey, Cd; Morton, Jm; Norman, St; McGowan, Mr

    2010-10-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess the performance of a commercially available neck-mounted activity meter to detect cows about to ovulate in two paddock-based Holstein-Friesian dairy herds. The activity monitoring system recorded cow activity count in 2-hourly periods. Study I investigated the ability of the system to detect cow ovulatory periods in dairy herds managed in two different Australian environments and breeding systems using five activity alert algorithms. Herd 1 consisted of approximately 130 milking cows calving year-round in a sub-tropical environment and kept in a single dry lot paddock. Herd 2 consisted of approximately 400 milking cows calving seasonally in a temperate climate and fed pasture by rotation through multiple grazing paddocks. Ovulatory periods and non-ovulatory days were identified using milk progesterone monitoring alone or in combination with ovarian ultrasonography; using these 'gold standards' 141 and 135 ovulatory periods were identified in 64 and 135 cows in Herds 1 and 2 respectively. Sensitivity of the activity monitoring system for detecting cow ovulatory periods ranged from 79.4% to 94.1%, specificity from 90.0% to 98.2% and positive predictive value from 35.8% to 75.8%. Study II investigated the ability of the activity meter system to predict the timing of ovulations in paddock-based pasture-fed dairy cattle (Herd 2). The time of ovulation was estimated by repeat trans-rectal ovarian ultrasonography at approximately 0, 12, 24 and 36 h after artificial insemination (AI). The mean times (± SD) from onset and end of increased activity to ovulation were 33.4 ± 12.4 and 17.3 ± 12.8 h respectively (n = 94). Fifty per cent of cows (n = 47) ovulated within the 8-h period between 30 to 38 hs after the onset of increased activity, 76.6% (n = 72) within the 16 h between 24 to 40 h, 85.1% (n = 80) within the 24 h between 18 and 42 h and 90.4% (n = 85) within the 32 h from 19 to 51 h after the onset of increased activity. Results

  5. Relationship of Exercise, Age, and Gender on Decompression Sickness and Venous Gas Emboli During 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Prior to Hypobaric Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated four 2-hour oxygen prebreathe protocols combining adynamia (non-walking) and 4 different amounts of exercise for potential use with extravehicular activity (EVA) on the International Space Station. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase 11: same ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise that simulated space suit preparations. Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. After 80 min on 100% O2, the subjects breathed 26.5% O2 - 73.5% N2 for 30 min at 10.2 psi. All subjects performed a series of upper body exercises from a recumbent position for 4 hrs at 4.3 psi to simulate EVA work. Venous gas emboli (VGE) were monitored every 12 min using precordial Doppler ultrasound. The 39 female and 126 male exposures were analyzed for correlations between decompression sickness (DCS) or VGE, and risk variables. The duration and quantity of exercise during prebreathe inversely relates to DCS and VGE incidence. The type and distribution of the 19 cases of DCS were similar to historical cases. There was no correlation of age, gender, body mass index, or fitness level with greater incidence of DCS or all VGE. However there were more Grade IV VGE in males > 40 years (10 of 19) than in those =< 40 years (3 of 107), with p<0.01 from Fisher's Exact Chi square The latency time for VGE was longer (103 min +/- 56 SD, n = 15 versus 53 min +/- 31, n =13) when the ergometry occurred about 15 min into the prebreathe than when performed at the start of the prebreathe, but the order of the ergometry did not influence the overall DCS and VGE incidence. An increasing amount of exercise during prebreathes reduced the risk of DCS during subsequent exposures to 4.3 psi. Age, gender, or fitness level did not correlate with the incidence of DCS or VGE (combination of Grades I-IV). However males greater than 40 years had a higher incidence of Grade IV VGE.

  6. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  7. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  8. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  9. Feasibility of continuous, catheter-directed thrombolysis using low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular-weight heparin for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients at risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Shi, Wangyin; He, Xu; Lou, Wensheng; Chen, Liang; Gu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the feasibility of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. This retrospective analysis included patients with symptomatic acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis who received CDT using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with LMWH within the past four years. Urokinase was administered at 1×104 U/h and 2×104 U/h in patients at high-risk and low-risk of bleeding, respectively. Measurements included urokinase dosage, duration, clinical outcomes and CDT-related complications. A total of 46 patients were included (high-risk, n=17; low-risk, n=29). In the high-risk patients, 64.7% experienced dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 8 days (range, 6–10 days) and median total urokinase dose of 1.92×106 units (range, 1.44–2.4×106 units). In the low-risk patients, 82.8% achieved dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 7 days (range, 4–10 days) and a median total urokinase dose of 3.36×106 units (range, 1.92–4.80×106 units). Remission of clinical symptoms after CDT was achieved in 15 (88.2%) and 28 (96.6%) cases in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively. No treatment-associated pulmonary embolism or major bleeding was observed. Three (6.5%) subjects (high-risk, n=1; low-risk, n=2) experienced minor bleeding. In conclusion, continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase via CDT in combination with LMWH is effective and safe for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients with one or more risk factor for bleeding. PMID:28352362

  10. Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Sergey; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Roebber, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We simulate the seasonal cycle of the Great Lakes' water temperature and lake ice using an idealized coupled lake-atmosphere-ice model. Under identical seasonally varying boundary conditions, this model exhibits more than one seasonally varying equilibrium solutions, which we associate with distinct regional climate regimes. Colder/warmer regimes are characterized by abundant/scarce amounts of wintertime ice and cooler/warmer summer temperatures, respectively. These regimes are also evident in the observations of the Great Lakes' climate variability over recent few decades, and are found to be most pronounced for Lake Superior, the deepest of the Great Lakes, consistent with model predictions. Multiple climate regimes of the Great Lakes also play a crucial role in the accelerated warming of the lakes relative to the surrounding land regions in response to larger-scale global warming. We discuss the physical origin and characteristics of multiple climate regimes over the lakes, as well as their implications for a longer-term regional climate variability.

  11. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  12. Land degradation and property regimes

    Treesearch

    Paul M. Beaumont; Robert T. Walker

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between property regimes and land degradation outcomes, in the context of peasant agriculture. We consider explicitly whether private property provides for superior soil resource conservation, as compared to common property and open access. To assess this we implement optimization algorithms on a supercomputer to address resource...

  13. Ab initio molecular simulations for proposing novel peptide inhibitors blocking the ligand-binding pocket of urokinase receptor.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Tatsuroh; Sugimoto, Takuya; Kasumi, Tomoyo; Araki, Kohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Recent biochemical experiments have revealed that a variety of proteases play important roles in cancer invasion and metastasis. Among these proteases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is particularly important, since its specific binding to the receptor (uPAR) existing on the surface of a cancer cell is considered to be a trigger for cancer invasion. It is thus expected that the blocking of the binding can inhibit cancer invasion in the cancer patients and improve their prognosis dramatically. To develop a potent inhibitor for the binding, many types of peptides of amino acids were produced and their effect on the cancer invasion was investigated in the previous biochemical experiments. On the other hand, our previous ab initio molecular simulations have clarified that some amino acid residues of uPA play important roles in the specific binding between uPA and uPAR. In the present study, we propose some peptides composed of these important residues and investigate the specific interactions and the binding affinity between uPAR and the peptides at an electronic level, using ab initio molecular simulations. Base on the results simulated, we elucidate which peptide can bind more strongly to uPAR and propose a novel potent peptide which can inhibit the binding between uPAR and uPA efficiently.

  14. Structure-based Engineering of Species Selectivity in the Interaction Between Urokinase and its Receptor: Implication for Preclinical Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Gardsvoll, H; Huai, Q; Huang, M; Ploug, M

    2010-01-01

    The high affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR) is decisive for cell surface-associated plasminogen activation. Because plasmin activity controls fibrinolysis in a variety of pathological conditions, including cancer and wound healing, several intervention studies have focused on targeting the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction in vivo. Evaluations of such studies in xenotransplanted tumor models are, however, complicated by the pronounced species selectivity in this interaction. We now report the molecular basis underlying this difference by solving the crystal structure for the murine uPA {center_dot} uPAR complex and demonstrate by extensive surface plasmon resonance studies that the kinetic rate constants for this interaction can be swapped completely between these orthologs by exchanging only two residues. This study not only discloses the structural basis required for a successful rational design of the species selectivity in the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction, which is highly relevant for functional studies in mouse models, but it also suggests the possible development of general inhibitors that will target the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction across species barriers.

  15. The urokinase receptor-derived cyclic peptide [SRSRY] suppresses neovascularization and intravasation of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ingangi, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Katia; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Ragone, Concetta; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Minopoli, Michele; Botti, Giovanni; Scognamiglio, Giuseppe; Fazioli, Flavio; Gallo, Michele; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Arra, Claudio; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88–92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility and angiogenesis by interacting with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1). In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the uPAR88–92 sequence generates a new potent inhibitor of migration, and extracellular matrix invasion of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells expressing comparable levels of FPR1 on cell surface. In vitro, the cyclized peptide [SRSRY] prevents formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells co-cultured with chondrosarcoma cells and trans-endothelial migration of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells. When chondrosarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density and circulating tumor cells in blood samples collected before the sacrifice, were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with i.p-administration of 6 mg/Kg [SRSRY] as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] prevents three key events occurring during the metastatic process of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells: the extracellular matrix invasion, the formation of a capillary network and the entry into bloodstream. PMID:27323409

  16. Elevated Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor and Proenkephalin Serum Levels Predict the Development of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mossanen, Jana C.; Pracht, Jessica; Jansen, Tobias U.; Buendgens, Lukas; Stoppe, Christian; Goetzenich, Andreas; Struck, Joachim; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Gernot; Tacke, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) develops in up to 40% of patients after cardiac surgery. The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been identified as a biomarker for incident chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proenkephalin (proENK) also has been shown to be a biomarker for renal dysfunction. We hypothesized that pre-surgery suPAR and proENK levels might predict AKI in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Consecutive patients (n = 107) undergoing elective cardiac surgery were studied prospectively. Clinical data, laboratory parameters, suPAR and proENK serum levels were assessed before operation, after operation and days one and four post-operatively. A total of 21 (19.6%) patients developed AKI within the first four days after elective surgery. Serum levels of suPAR and proENK, but not of creatinine, were significantly higher before surgery in these patients compared to those patients without AKI. This difference remained significant for suPAR, if patients with or without AKI were matched for risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, CKD). If cardiac surgery patients with pre-existing CKD (n = 10) were excluded, only pre-operative suPAR but not proENK serum levels remained significantly elevated in patients with subsequent AKI. Thus, our findings indicate that suPAR may be a predictive biomarker for AKI in the context of cardiac surgery, even in patients without underlying CKD. PMID:28758975

  17. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) as a promising new imaging target: potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been shown to be of special importance during cancer invasion and metastasis. However, currently, tissue samples are needed for measurement of uPAR expression limiting the potential as a clinical routine. Therefore, non-invasive methods are needed. In line with this, uPAR has recently been identified as a very promising imaging target candidate. uPAR consists of three domains attached to the cell membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor and binds it natural ligand uPA with high affinity to localize plasminogen activation at the cell surface. Due to the importance of uPAR in cancer invasion and metastasis, a number of high-affinity ligands have been identified during the last decades. These ligands have recently been used as starting point for the development of a number of ligands for imaging of uPAR using various imaging modalities such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission topography (PET). In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted imaging ligands according to imaging modality. In addition, we will discuss the potential future clinical application for uPAR imaging as a new imaging biomarker. PMID:23701192

  18. In vivo invasion of modified chorioallantoic membrane by tumor cells: the role of cell surface-bound urokinase

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) to withstand invasion by tumor cells can be intentionally compromised by altering its morphological integrity. Using a newly developed quantitative assay of invasion we showed that intact CAMs were completely resistant to invasion by tumor cells, wounded CAMs did not pose a barrier to penetration, and CAMs that were wounded and then allowed to reseal displayed partial susceptibility to invasion. The invasion of resealed CAMs required catalytically active plasminogen activator (PA) of the urokinase type (uPA); the invasive efficiency of tumor cells was reduced by 75% when tumor uPA activity or tumor uPA production was inhibited. The invasive ability of human tumor cells, which have surface uPA receptors but which do not produce the enzyme, could be augmented by saturating their receptors with exogenous uPA. The mere stimulation of either uPA or tissue plasminogen activator production, in absence of binding to cell receptors, did not result in an enhancement of invasiveness. These findings suggest that the increased invasive potential of tumor cells is correlated with cell surface-associated proteolytic activity stemming from the interaction between uPA and its surface receptor. PMID:2848851

  19. Spontaneous lung and lymph node metastasis in transgenic breast cancer is independent of the urokinase receptor uPAR.

    PubMed

    Almholt, Kasper; Lærum, Ole Didrik; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Lund, Ida Katrine; Lund, Leif Røge; Rømer, John; Jögi, Annika

    2015-08-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is an extracellular protease that plays a pivotal role in tumor progression. uPA activity is spatially restricted by its anchorage to high-affinity uPA receptors (uPAR) at the cell surface. High tumor tissue expression of uPA and uPAR is associated with poor prognosis in lung, breast, and colon cancer patients in clinical studies. Genetic deficiency of uPA leads to a significant reduction in metastases in the murine transgenic MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model, demonstrating a causal role for uPA in cancer dissemination. To investigate the role of uPAR in cancer progression, we analyze the effect of uPAR deficiency in the same cancer model. uPAR is predominantly expressed in stromal cells in the mouse primary tumors, similar to human breast cancer. In a cohort of MMTV-PyMT mice [uPAR-deficient (n = 31) or wild type controls (n = 33)], tumorigenesis, tumor growth, and tumor histopathology were not significantly affected by uPAR deficiency. Lung and lymph node metastases were also not significantly affected by uPAR deficiency, in contrast to the significant reduction seen in uPA-deficient mice. Taken together, our data show that the genetic absence of uPAR does not influence the outcome of the MMTV-PyMT cancer model.

  20. Urokinase-mediated recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and their suppressive mechanisms are blocked by MUC1/sec

    PubMed Central

    Ilkovitch, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane isoform of mucin 1 (MUC1/TM) is a well-recognized tumor antigen, contributing to tumorigenesis and immune evasion. Although MUC1/TM has been correlated with malignancy, we have previously reported on antitumor properties and prevention of tumor development by a secreted splice variant of MUC1 (MUC1/sec). Because myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a critical role in tumor-induced immunosuppression, we investigated their recruitment by tumor cells expressing either MUC1/TM or MUC1/sec. DA-3 tumor cells expressing MUC1/sec recruit dramatically lower levels of MDSCs, relative to MUC1/TM-expressing DA-3 cells. Because MUC1/sec was previously shown to down-regulate tumor expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a protease linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis, the potential role of uPA in MDSC recruitment was investigated. Tumor-derived uPA is capable of recruiting MDSCs, and correlates with tumor development. In addition to diminishing recruitment of MDSCs, the effect of MUC1/sec on MDSC-suppressive mechanisms was investigated. MUC1/sec, or its unique immunoenhancing peptide, is capable of blocking expression of arginase 1 and production of reactive oxygen species in MDSCs, implicated in the suppression of T cells. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of MDSC recruitment, and provide evidence that MUC1/sec has antitumor properties affecting MDSCs. PMID:19196663

  1. Urokinase-mediated recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and their suppressive mechanisms are blocked by MUC1/sec.

    PubMed

    Ilkovitch, Dan; Lopez, Diana M

    2009-05-07

    The transmembrane isoform of mucin 1 (MUC1/TM) is a well-recognized tumor antigen, contributing to tumorigenesis and immune evasion. Although MUC1/TM has been correlated with malignancy, we have previously reported on antitumor properties and prevention of tumor development by a secreted splice variant of MUC1 (MUC1/sec). Because myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a critical role in tumor-induced immunosuppression, we investigated their recruitment by tumor cells expressing either MUC1/TM or MUC1/sec. DA-3 tumor cells expressing MUC1/sec recruit dramatically lower levels of MDSCs, relative to MUC1/TM-expressing DA-3 cells. Because MUC1/sec was previously shown to down-regulate tumor expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a protease linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis, the potential role of uPA in MDSC recruitment was investigated. Tumor-derived uPA is capable of recruiting MDSCs, and correlates with tumor development. In addition to diminishing recruitment of MDSCs, the effect of MUC1/sec on MDSC-suppressive mechanisms was investigated. MUC1/sec, or its unique immunoenhancing peptide, is capable of blocking expression of arginase 1 and production of reactive oxygen species in MDSCs, implicated in the suppression of T cells. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of MDSC recruitment, and provide evidence that MUC1/sec has antitumor properties affecting MDSCs.

  2. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-16

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1-25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria.

  3. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: Dangerous Partners in Tumorigenesis—Implications in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor, with several different roles in health and disease. TGF-β has been postulated as a dual factor in tumor progression, since it represses epithelial tumor development in early stages, whereas it stimulates tumor progression in advanced stages. During tumorigenesis, cancer cells acquire the capacity to migrate and invade surrounding tissues and to metastasize different organs. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system, comprising uPA, the uPA cell surface receptor, and plasminogen-plasmin, is involved in the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and regulates key cellular events by activating intracellular signal pathways, which together allow cancer cells to survive, thus, enhancing cell malignance during tumor progression. Due to their importance, uPA and its receptor are tightly transcriptionally regulated in normal development, but are deregulated in cancer, when their activity and expression are related to further development of cancer. TGF-β regulates uPA expression in cancer cells, while uPA, by plasminogen activation, may activate the secreted latent TGF-β, thus, producing a pernicious cycle which contributes to the enhancement of tumor progression. Here we review the specific roles and the interplay between TGF-β and uPA system in cancer cells and their implication in skin cancer. PMID:23984088

  4. Risk Factors Associated with Serum Levels of the Inflammatory Biomarker Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen; Rasmussen, Line JH; Thorball, Christian W; Andersen, Ove; Pisinger, Charlotta; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers. PMID:25574132

  5. The influence of opioid peptides on matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator expression in three cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gach, K; Wyrebska, A; Szemraj, J; Janecka, A

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulate proteolysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and as a consequence are involved in a number of physiological and pathological states, including cancer. A crucial feature of cancer progression and metastasis is the disruption of the ECM and spreading of proliferating cancer cells. Over-expression of MMPs and uPA is common for most types of cancers and correlates well with the adverse prognosis. Compounds able to modulate the activity of these proteolytic enzymes may become important agents in cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined the effect of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptide, morphiceptin, and its two synthetic analogs on mRNA and protein levels of MMP-9 and uPA in three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7, HT-29, and SH-SY5Y. Our findings indicate that in all three cell lines morphiceptin and its analogs attenuated MMP-9 expression and secretion and that this effect is not mediated by opioid receptors but is under control of the nitric oxide system. On the other hand, tested opioids up-regulated uPA levels through a mechanism that involved opioid-receptors. Different pathways by which opioid peptides exert their actionin cancer cells can explain their contradictory influence on the level of cancer markers.

  6. Multifunctional roles of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cancer stemness and chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Holterman, Aixuan L; Estes, Norman; Cines, Douglas B; Rao, Jasti S; Gondi, Christopher S

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost always lethal. One of the underlying reasons for this lethality is believed to be the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC), which impart chemoresistance and promote recurrence, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Recently the poor prognosis of PDAC has been correlated with increased expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In the present study we examine the role of uPA in the generation of PDAC CSC. We observe a subset of cells identifiable as a side population (SP) when sorted by flow cytometry of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells that possess the properties of CSC. A large fraction of these SP cells are CD44 and CD24 positive, are gemcitabine resistant, possess sphere-forming ability, and exhibit increased tumorigenicity, known characteristics of cancer stemness. Increased tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance decrease after suppression of uPA. We observe that uPA interacts directly with transcription factors LIM homeobox-2 (Lhx2), homeobox transcription factor A5 (HOXA5), and Hey to possibly promote cancer stemness. uPA regulates Lhx2 expression by suppressing expression of miR-124 and p53 expression by repressing its promoter by inactivating HOXA5. These results demonstrate that regulation of gene transcription by uPA contributes to cancer stemness and clinical lethality.

  7. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1–25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria. PMID:28091558

  8. The Clinical Value of Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toldi, Gergely; Balog, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of the general inflammatory condition of patients with autoimmune connective tissue disorders (ACTD) is a major challenge. The use of traditional inflammatory markers including CRP-levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited by several preanalytical factors and their low specificities. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is one of the novel candidate markers that is increasingly used in immune mediated disorders. In our studies we compared suPAR levels of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and ankylosing spondylitis with those of healthy controls. suPAR provided valuable clinical information on disease activity in RA, SLE and SSc. We identified a subgroup of remitted RA patients, who presented still clinical symptoms of inflammatory activity which correlated to high plasma suPAR (while ESR and CRP were normal). In SLE we established specific suPAR cut-off values that support the discrimination between patients with high and those with moderate SLE activity. In patients with SSc suPAR correlated with objective measures of lung and other complications. In the majority of ACTDs including SLE, SSc or RA, suPAR is seemingly a good biomarker that would provide valuable clinical information. However, before the introduction of this novel parameter in laboratory repertoire important issues should be elucidated. These include the establishment of appropriate and disease specific cutoff values, clarification of interfering preanalytical values and underlying conditions and declaration of age- and gender-specific reference ranges. PMID:27683525

  9. Proximity oscillations of complement type 4 (alphaX beta2) and urokinase receptors on migrating neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kindzelskii, A L; Eszes, M M; Todd, R F; Petty, H R

    1997-01-01

    Migrating neutrophils utilize beta2 integrins for substrate attachment and urokinase receptors (uPAR) to focus pericellular proteolysis. Our studies show that CR3 associates with uPAR on resting cells, whereas uPAR associates with CR4 at lamellipodia of migrating cells. Using resonance energy transfer (RET) microscopy, we show that the molecular proximity between CR4 and uPAR oscillates on migrating cells, thus suggesting that CR4 molecules periodically bind/release uPAR. Cell contact with fibrinogen, endothelial cells, chemotactic factors and indomethacin, and treatment with sub-optimal doses of signal transduction inhibitors, affect the oscillations' period, amplitude, and/or waveform. The oscillations were indistinguishable in period and 180 degrees out-of-phase with cytosolic NAD(P)H autofluorescence oscillations. Thus, CR4 and CR3 identify a neutrophil's axis of migration and CR4 may restrain uPAR at lamellipodia. Oscillations in signal transduction and energy metabolism may coordinate cell adherence, local proteolysis, oxidant release, actin assembly, and cell extension. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9336173

  10. CHK1 and RAD51 activation after DNA damage is regulated via urokinase receptor/TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B; Tkachuk, Sergey; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of DNA damage and repair signaling are not completely understood that hinder the efficiency of cancer therapy. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (PLAUR) is highly expressed in most solid cancers and serves as a marker of poor prognosis. We show that PLAUR actively promotes DNA repair in cancer cells. On the contrary, downregulation of PLAUR expression results in delayed DNA repair. We found PLAUR to be essential for activation of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1); maintenance of cell cycle arrest after DNA damage in a TP53-dependent manner; expression, nuclear import and recruitment to DNA-damage foci of RAD51 recombinase, the principal protein involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway. Underlying mechanism implies auto-/paracrine signaling of PLAUR/TLR4 receptor complex leading to activation of CHK1 and DNA repair. The signaling is induced by a danger molecule released by DNA-damaged cells and mediates, at least partially, activation of DNA-damage response. This study describes a new mechanism of DNA repair activation initiated by auto-/paracrine signaling of membrane receptors PLAUR/TLR4. It adds to the understanding of role of PLAUR in cancer and provides a rationale for therapeutic targeting of PLAUR/TLR4 interaction in TP53-positive cancers. PMID:27685627

  11. Zinc phthalocyanine conjugated with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase for tumor-targeting photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Chen, Jincan; Chen, Hongwei; Hu, Ping; Chen, Xueyuan; Lin, Lin; Huang, Yunmei; Zheng, Ke; Zhou, Shanyong; Li, Rui; Chen, Song; Liu, Jianyong; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has attracted much interest for the treatment of cancer due to the increased incidence of multidrug resistance and systemic toxicity in conventional chemotherapy. Phthalocyanine (Pc) is one of main classes of photosensitizers for PDT and possesses optimal photophysical and photochemical properties. A higher specificity can ideally be achieved when Pcs are targeted towards tumor-specific receptors, which may also facilitate specific drug delivery. Herein, we develop a simple and unique strategy to prepare a hydrophilic tumor-targeting photosensitizer ATF-ZnPc by covalently coupling zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a fragment responsible for uPA receptor (uPAR, a biomarker overexpressed in cancer cells), through the carboxyl groups of ATF. We demonstrate the high efficacy of this tumor-targeting PDT agent for the inhibition of tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our in vivo optical imaging results using H22 tumor-bearing mice show clearly the selective accumulation of ATF-ZnPc in tumor region, thereby revealing the great potential of ATF-ZnPc for clinical applications such as cancer detection and guidance of tumor resection in addition to photodynamic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Urokinase type plasminogen activator mediates Interleukin-17-induced peripheral blood mesenchymal stem cell motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Jelena; Obradović, Hristina; Jauković, Aleksandra; Okić-Đorđević, Ivana; Trivanović, Drenka; Kukolj, Tamara; Mojsilović, Slavko; Ilić, Vesna; Santibañez, Juan F; Bugarski, Diana

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to migrate toward damaged tissues increasing tissue regeneration. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects associated with many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17 can modulate MSC functions, its capacity to regulate MSC migration is not well elucidated so far. Here, we studied the role of IL-17 on peripheral blood (PB) derived MSC migration and transmigration across endothelial cells. IL-17 increased PB-MSC migration in a wound healing assay as well as cell mobilization from collagen gel. Concomitantly IL-17 induced the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) without affecting matrix metalloproteinase expression. The incremented uPA expression mediated the capacity of IL-17 to enhance PB-MSC migration in a ERK1,2 MAPK dependent way. Also, IL-17 induced PB-MSC migration alongside with changes in cell polarization and uPA localization in cell protrusions. Moreover, IL-17 increased PB-MSC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration, as well as increased the capacity of PB-MSC adhesion to fibronectin, in an uPA-dependent fashion. Therefore, our data suggested that IL-17 may act as chemotropic factor for PB-MSCs by incrementing cell motility and uPA expression during inflammation development.

  13. Circulating Levels of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor and D-Dimer in Patients With Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Jurado, Benjamín; Tello-González, Alejandra; Bustamante-Chávez, Lili; de la Peña, Aurora; Riebeling-Navarro, Carlos; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cancer exhibit changes in their hemostatic mechanisms. The D-dimer (D-D) is the most important subproduct of fibrinolysis, and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is related to invasiveness and metastases, and is overexpressed in neoplastic cells. The objective of this study was to identify in patients with hematological neoplasia, the serum levels of uPAR and D-D, and to determine their effects on outcome. A cross-sectional study was performed. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from the clinical chart. Determination of uPAR in serum (pg/L) was performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and D-D (μg/dL) using nephelometry. We included 42 patients (35 with lymphomas). Statistically significant differences were found in D-D (P < .001) and uPAR (P < .01) between patients and control participants. Response was an accumulated clinical outcome. We observed statistical differences between groups (P < .001). D-D was positive in 70% of cases. We found differences in D-D serum levels and soluble uPAR between control participants and patients with lymphoma. These results indicate that D-D serum levels and soluble uPAR should be considered biomarkers of response and survival in patients with lymphoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The urokinase receptor-derived cyclic peptide [SRSRY] suppresses neovascularization and intravasation of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ingangi, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Katia; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Ragone, Concetta; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Minopoli, Michele; Botti, Giovanni; Scognamiglio, Giuseppe; Fazioli, Flavio; Gallo, Michele; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Arra, Claudio; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2016-08-23

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88-92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility and angiogenesis by interacting with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1). In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the uPAR88-92 sequence generates a new potent inhibitor of migration, and extracellular matrix invasion of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells expressing comparable levels of FPR1 on cell surface. In vitro, the cyclized peptide [SRSRY] prevents formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells co-cultured with chondrosarcoma cells and trans-endothelial migration of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells. When chondrosarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density and circulating tumor cells in blood samples collected before the sacrifice, were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with i.p-administration of 6 mg/Kg [SRSRY] as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] prevents three key events occurring during the metastatic process of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells: the extracellular matrix invasion, the formation of a capillary network and the entry into bloodstream.

  15. Increased Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Plasma of Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Ventorp, Filip; Gustafsson, Anna; Träskman-Bendz, Lil; Westrin, Åsa; Ljunggren, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    The soluble form of the urokinase receptor, suPAR, has been suggested as a novel biomarker of low-grade inflammation. Activation of the immune system has been proposed to contribute to the development of depression and suicidal behavior. In order to identify depressed and suicidal individuals who could benefit from an anti-inflammatory treatment, a reliable biomarker of low-grade inflammation is vital. This study evaluates plasma suPAR levels as a biomarker of low-grade inflammation in patients with major depressive disorder and in patients who recently attempted suicide. The plasma suPAR and an established biomarker, C reactive protein (CRP) of suicide attempters (n = 54), depressed patients (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 19) was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The biomarker attributes of sensitivity and sensibility were evaluated using ROC curve analysis. Both the depressed patients and suicide attempters had increased plasma suPAR. The levels of suPAR discriminated better between controls and suicide attempters than did CRP. In the future, plasma suPAR might be a superior prognosticator regarding outcome of treatment applying conventional antidepressants in conjunction with anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:26451727

  16. Multifunctional roles of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cancer stemness and chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Holterman, AiXuan L.; Estes, Norman; Cines, Douglas B.; Rao, Jasti S.; Gondi, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost always lethal. One of the underlying reasons for this lethality is believed to be the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC), which impart chemoresistance and promote recurrence, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Recently the poor prognosis of PDAC has been correlated with increased expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In the present study we examine the role of uPA in the generation of PDAC CSC. We observe a subset of cells identifiable as a side population (SP) when sorted by flow cytometry of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells that possess the properties of CSC. A large fraction of these SP cells are CD44 and CD24 positive, are gemcitabine resistant, possess sphere-forming ability, and exhibit increased tumorigenicity, known characteristics of cancer stemness. Increased tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance decrease after suppression of uPA. We observe that uPA interacts directly with transcription factors LIM homeobox-2 (Lhx2), homeobox transcription factor A5 (HOXA5), and Hey to possibly promote cancer stemness. uPA regulates Lhx2 expression by suppressing expression of miR-124 and p53 expression by repressing its promoter by inactivating HOXA5. These results demonstrate that regulation of gene transcription by uPA contributes to cancer stemness and clinical lethality. PMID:23864708

  17. Administration of Recombinant Soluble Urokinase Receptor Per Se Is Not Sufficient to Induce Podocyte Alterations and Proteinuria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cathelin, Dominique; Placier, Sandrine; Ploug, Michael; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Luque, Yosu; Hertig, Alexandre; Rondeau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Circulating levels of soluble forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are generally elevated in sera from children and adults with FSGS compared with levels in healthy persons or those with other types of kidney disease. In mice lacking the gene encoding uPAR, forced increases in suPAR concentration result in FSGS-like glomerular lesions and proteinuria. However, whether overexpression of suPAR, per se, contributes to the pathogenesis of FSGS in humans remains controversial. We conducted an independent set of animal experiments in which two different and well characterized forms of recombinant suPAR produced by eukaryotic cells were administered over the short or long term to wild-type (WT) mice. In accordance with the previous study, the delivered suPARs are deposited in the glomeruli. However, such deposition of either form of suPAR in the kidney did not result in increased glomerular proteinuria or altered podocyte architecture. Our findings suggest that glomerular deposits of suPAR caused by elevated plasma levels are not sufficient to engender albuminuria. PMID:24790179

  18. Effects of Acute Exercise on Circulating Soluble Form of the Urokinase Receptor in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna; Ventorp, Filip; Wisén, Anita Gm; Ohlsson, Lars; Ljunggren, Lennart; Westrin, Åsa

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to play a role in the generation of depressive symptoms. Previously, we demonstrated that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have increased plasma levels of the soluble form of the urokinase receptor (suPAR), a marker for low-grade inflammation. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that acute exercise would induce inflammatory response characterized by increased suPAR and elucidate whether patients with MDD display altered levels of suPAR in response to acute exercise. A total of 17 patients with MDD and 17 controls were subjected to an exercise challenge. Plasma suPAR (P-suPAR) was analyzed before, during, and after exercise. There was a significantly higher baseline P-suPAR in the patients with MDD, and the dynamic changes of P-suPAR during the exercise were significantly lower in the patients with MDD, compared with the controls. This study supports the hypothesis that an activation of systemic inflammatory processes, measured as elevated P-suPAR, is involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The study concludes that P-suPAR is influenced by acute exercise, most likely due to release from activated neutrophils.

  19. Tumor therapy with a urokinase plasminogen activator-activated anthrax lethal toxin alone and in combination with paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Alexander N.; Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; McKenzie, Andrew T.; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    PA-U2, an engineered anthrax protective antigen that is activated by urokinase was combined with wild-type lethal factor in the treatment of Colo205 colon adenocarcinoma in vitro and B16-BL6 mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. This therapy was also tested in combination with the small molecule paclitaxel, based on prior reports suggesting synergy between ERK1/2 inhibition and chemotherapeutics. Colo205 was sensitive to PA-U2/LF while B16-BL6 was not. For the combination treatment of B16-BL6, paclitaxel showed a dose response in vitro, but cells remained resistant to PA-U2/LF even in the presence of paclitaxel. In vivo, each therapy slowed tumor progression, and an additive effect between the two was observed. Since LF targets tumor vasculature while paclitaxel is an anti-mitotic, it is possible the agents were acting against different cells in the stroma, precluding a synergistic effect. The engineered anthrax toxin PA-U2/LF warrants further development and testing, possibly in combination with an anti-angiogenesis therapy such as sunitinib or sorafinib. PMID:22843210

  20. A Regime Diagram for Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R.; Capitanio, F. A.; Schellart, W. P.

    2009-12-01

    Regime diagrams and associated scaling relations have profoundly influenced our understanding of planetary dynamics. Previous regime diagrams characterized the regimes of stagnant-lid, small viscosity contrast, transitional, and no-convection for temperature-dependent (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995), and non-linear power law rheologies (Solomatov and Moresi, 1997) as well as stagnant-lid, sluggish-lid, and mobile-lid regimes once the finite strength of rock was considered (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998). Scalings derived from such models have been the cornerstone for parameterized models of thermal evolution of rocky planets and icy moons for the past decade. While such a theory can predict the tectonic state of a planetary body, it is still rather incomplete in regards to predicting tectonics. For example, the mobile-lid regime is unspecific as to how continuous lithospheric recycling should occur on a terrestrial planet. Towards this goal, Gerya et al., (2008) advanced a new regime diagram aiming to characterize when subduction would manifest itself as a one-sided or two-sided downwelling and either symmetric or asymmetric. Here, we present a regime diagram for the case of a single-sided, asymmetric type of subduction (most Earth-like type). Using a 3-D numerical model of a free subduction, we describe a total of 5 different styles of subduction that can possibly occur. Each style is distinguished by its upper mantle slab morphology resulting from the sinking kinematics. We provide movies to illustrate the different styles and their progressive time-evolution. In each regime, subduction is accommodated by a combination of plate advance and slab rollback, with associated motions of forward plate velocity and trench retreat, respectively. We demonstrate that the preferred subduction mode depends upon two essential controlling factors: 1) buoyancy of the downgoing plate and 2) strength of plate in resisting bending at the hinge. We propose that a variety of subduction

  1. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation.

  2. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  3. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Eason, Tarsha; Nelson, R. John; Angeler, David G.; Barichievy, Chris; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Graham, Nicholas A.J.; Granholm, Dean; Gunderson, Lance; Knutson, Melinda; Nash, Kirsty L.; Spanbauer, Trisha; Stow, Craig A.; Allen, Craig R.

    2017-01-01

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory-based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (U.S. Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps and multivariate analyses such as nMDS and cluster analysis. We successfully detected spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change.

  4. The reciprocal effects of epsilon-aminohexanoic acid and chloride ion on the activation of human [Glu1]plasminogen by human urokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Urano, T; Chibber, B A; Castellino, F J

    1987-01-01

    The activation of human [Glu1]plasminogen [( Glu1]Pg) by high-molecular-weight two-chain human urinary urokinase [EC 3.4.21.31) and low-molecular-weight two-chain human urinary urokinase is inhibited by Cl- at physiological concentrations and stimulated by epsilon-aminohexanoic acid (epsilon Ahx; epsilon-aminocaproic acid). The inhibition by Cl- does not occur in the presence of concentrations of epsilon Ahx that saturate the acid's weak binding sites on [Glu1]Pg, and the stimulation by epsilon Ahx is maximally exhibited in the presence of Cl-. We have used intrinsic fluorescence measurements with [Glu1]Pg to show that the conformational alteration and the concomitant increase in activation rate that accompanies epsilon Ahx-binding to [Glu1]Pg in the presence of Cl- does not occur in the same manner without Cl-. Further, the decrease in the intrinsic fluorescence that is attendant to Cl- binding to [Glu1]Pg in the absence of epsilon Ahx is not observed in the presence of this effector molecule. Analyses of the results of this manuscript strongly indicate that a conformation of [Glu1]Pg that is not optimal for its activation by urokinase is adopted in the presence of Cl-, and this is relieved by epsilon Ahx. This has important implications in the inhibition of [Glu1]Pg activation in the solution phase of blood plasma and in the large acceleration of this process when plasminogen is bound to physiological positive effectors via its epsilon Ahx-binding site(s). PMID:3473492

  5. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency has little effect on seizure susceptibility and acquired epilepsy phenotype but reduces spontaneous exploration in mice.

    PubMed

    Rantala, J; Kemppainen, S; Ndode-Ekane, X E; Lahtinen, L; Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Gurevicius, K; Tanila, H; Pitkänen, A

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a serine protease, converts plasminogen to plasmin. Activation of plasmin leads to degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is critical for tissue recovery, angiogenesis, cell migration, and axonal and synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that uPA deficiency would cause an abnormal neurophenotype and would lead to exacerbated epileptogenesis after brain injury. Wild-type (Wt) and uPA-/- mice underwent a battery of neurologic behavioral tests evaluating general reactivity, spontaneous exploratory activity, motor coordination, pain threshold, fear and anxiety, and memory. We placed particular emphasis on the effect of uPA deficiency on seizure susceptibility, including the response to convulsants (pentylenetetrazol, kainate, or pilocarpine) and kainate-induced epileptogenesis and epilepsy. The uPA-/- mice showed no motor or sensory impairment compared with the Wt mice. Hippocampus-dependent spatial memory also remained intact. The uPA-/- mice, however, exhibited reduced exploratory activity and an enhanced response to a tone stimulus (p<0.05 compared with the Wt mice). The urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficient mice showed no increase in spontaneous or evoked epileptiform electrographic activity. Rather, the response to pilocarpine administration was reduced compared with the Wt mice (p<0.05). Also, the epileptogenesis and the epilepsy phenotype after intrahippocampal kainate injection were similar to those in the Wt mice. Taken together, uPA deficiency led to diminished interest in the environmental surroundings and enhanced emotional reactivity to unexpected aversive stimuli. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator deficiency was not associated with enhanced seizure susceptibility or worsened poststatus epilepticus epilepsy phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor-PET with (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105: First Clinical Experience with a Novel PET Ligand.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a key component in proteolysis and extracellular matrix degradation during cancer invasion and metastasis. uPAR overexpression is an important biomarker for aggressiveness in several solid tumors and provides independent clinical information. A recent major breakthrough was obtained with human translation of uPAR PET using (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105. Clinical results are encouraging and several large-scale clinical trials are now ongoing. This review focuses on uPAR PET with (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 as a new broadly applicable diagnostic and prognostic imaging biomarker in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels and Idiopathic FSGS in Children: A Single-Center Report

    PubMed Central

    Price, Heather E.; Gallon, Lorenzo; Langman, Craig B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives FSGS is the primary cause of childhood nephrotic syndrome leading to ESRD. Permeability factors, including circulating serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), have been postulated as putative causes in adults with primary FSGS. Similar results have yet to be proven in children. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This cross-sectional single-center study assessed the association of serum suPAR in children with FSGS or other glomerular and nonglomerular kidney diseases. Results This study examined 110 samples retrieved from 99 individuals (between January 2011 and April 2012), aged 1–21 years; of these individuals, 20 had primary FSGS, 24 had non-FSGS glomerular disease, 26 had nonglomerular kidney disease, and 29 were healthy controls. suPAR levels were not significantly different in children with FSGS, non-FSGS glomerular disease, and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, suPAR levels (median [25%–75%]) were higher in children with nonglomerular kidney disease (3385 pg/ml [2695–4392]) versus FSGS (2487 pg/ml [2191–3351]; P<0.05). Female patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria (U-Pr/Cr >2) had lower suPAR levels than those without proteinuria (2380 pg/ml [2116–2571] versus 3125 pg/ml [2516–4198], respectively; P<0.001). This trend was not seen among male participants; suPAR levels in all female participants were lower than in male participants (P=0.03). Thirty-four patients studied were kidney transplant recipients; transplant status was not associated with suPAR levels in patients with FSGS or non-FSGS diagnoses, independent of proteinuria, race, or sex (P>0.05). Conclusions On the basis of these results, circulating suPAR is unlikely the leading cause for childhood idiopathic FSGS. PMID:23620441

  8. Urokinase-Targeted Fusion by Oncolytic Sendai Virus Eradicates Orthotopic Glioblastomas by Pronounced Synergy With Interferon-β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Iwadate, Yasuo; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Ueda, Yasuji; Harada, Yui; Saito, Satoru; Furuya, Aki; Saegusa, Takashi; Morodomi, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Aoki, Ichio; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GM), the most frequent primary malignant brain tumor, is highly invasive due to the expression of proteases, including urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Here, we show the potential of our new and powerful recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) showing uPA-specific cell-to-cell fusion activity [rSeV/dMFct14 (uPA2), named “BioKnife”] for GM treatment, an effect that was synergistically enhanced by arming BioKnife with the interferon-β (IFN-β) gene. BioKnife killed human GM cell lines efficiently in a uPA-dependent fashion, and this killing was prevented by PA inhibitor-1. Rat gliosarcoma 9L cells expressing both uPA and its functional receptor uPAR (9L-L/R) exhibited high uPA activity on the cellular surface and were highly susceptible to BioKnife. Although parent 9L cells (9L-P) were resistant to BioKnife and to BioKnife expressing IFN-β (BioKnife-IFNβ), cell–cell fusion of 9L-L/R strongly facilitated the expression of IFN-β, and in turn, IFN-β significantly accelerated the fusion activity of BioKnife. A similar synergy was seen in a rat orthotopic brain GM model with 9L-L/R in vivo; therefore, these results suggest that BioKnife-IFNβ may have significant potential to improve the survival of GM patients in a clinical setting. PMID:20606645

  9. Inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator “uPA” activity alters ethanol consumption and conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Bahi, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator, uPA, is a serine protease implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Using its specific inhibitor, B428, we and others have characterized the role of uPA in the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including cocaine and amphetamine, but none have examined the role of uPA in ethanol use disorders. Therefore, in the current study, we extended our observations to the role of uPA in ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference. The general aim of the present series of experiments was to investigate the effects of the administration of the B428 on voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol conditioned reward. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol intake between vehicle- and 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg B428-administered mice. For this purpose, the mice were presented with an ethanol solution (2.5%–20%) and water, at each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was also measured. Systemic administration of B428 dose-dependently decreased ethanol intake and preference. Additionally, B428 mice did not differ from vehicle mice in their intake of graded solutions of tastants, suggesting that the uPA inhibition did not alter taste function. Also, ethanol metabolism was not affected following B428 injection. More importantly, 1.5 g/kg ethanol-induced conditioned place preference acquisition was blocked following B428 administration. Taken together, our results are the first to implicate uPA inhibition in the regulation of ethanol consumption and preference, and suggest that uPA may be considered as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence. PMID:25258509

  10. Urokinase redistribution from the secreted to the cell-bound fraction in granulosa cells of rat preovulatory follicles.

    PubMed

    Macchione, E; Epifano, O; Stefanini, M; Belin, D; Canipari, R

    2000-04-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs) have been shown to be synthesized in ovarian follicles of several mammalian species, where they contribute to the ovulation process. The type of PA secreted by granulosa cells is species-specific. In fact, whereas in the rat, gonadotropins stimulate tissue-type PA (tPA) production, the same hormonal stimulation induces urokinase PA (uPA) secretion in mouse cells. To investigate in more detail the hormonal regulation of this system, we used the rat ovary as a model in which we analyzed the production of PAs by theca-interstitial (TI) and granulosa cells obtained from preovulatory follicles after gonadotropin stimulation. In untreated rats, uPA was the predominant enzyme in both TI and granulosa cells. After hormonal stimulation, an increase in uPA and tPA activity was observed in both cell types. Surprisingly, only tPA mRNA increased in a time-dependent manner in both cell types, while uPA mRNA increased only in TI cells and actually decreased in granulosa cells. These divergent results between uPA enzyme activity and mRNA levels in granulosa cells were explained by studying the localization of the enzyme. Analysis of granulosa cell lysates showed that after hormonal stimulation, 60-70% of the uPA behaved as a cell-associated protein, suggesting that uPA, already present in the follicle, accumulates on the granulosa cell surface through binding to specific uPA receptors. The redistribution of uPA in granulosa cells and the differing regulation of the two PAs by gonadotropins in the rat ovary suggest that the two enzymes might have different functions during the ovulation process. Moreover, the ability of antibodies anti-tPA and anti-uPA to significantly inhibit ovulation only when coinjected with hCG confirmed that the PA contribution to ovulation occurs at the initial steps.

  11. Bone Marrow Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels are Associated with the Progress of Multiple Myeloma(△).

    PubMed

    Shou, Li-Hong; Cao, Dan; Dong, Xiao-Hui; Fang, Qiu; Xu, Bao-Lian; Fei, Ju-Ping

    2016-09-20

    Objective To determine the mRNA and protein levels of urokinase plasminogen activator receptors (uPAR) in bone marrow fluid and bone marrow tissue from multiple myeloma (MM) patients and assess association of uPAR level with prognosis of MM. Methods uPAR levels in bone marrow fluid of 22 MM patients at the stable and progressive stages and 18 iron deficiency anemia patients with normal bone marrow (control) were examined by ELISA. Furthermore, uPAR expression in bone marrow tissue was investigated by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The distribution of uPAR in MM cells was examined using immunofluorescence staining. The pathological changes in different stages of MM patients were studied by HE staining. Results uPAR level in bone marrow fluid of MM patients (1.52±0.32 μg/ml) was found to be higher than that in the control group (0.98±0.15 μg/ml). Interestingly, uPAR protein (0.686±0.075 vs. 0.372±0.043, P<0.05) and mRNA (2.51±0.46 vs. 4.46±1.15, P<0.05) expression levels of MM patients at the progressive stage were significantly higher than those at the stable stage. The expression of uPAR in MM bone marrow was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, HE staining revealed a great increased number of nucleated cells and severe impairment of hematopoietic function in the bone marrow of patients with progressive-stage myeloma. Conclusion Our study reveals that uPAR expression is positively correlated with the development and progress of MM.

  12. Clinical relevance and cellular source of elevated soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Koch, Alexander; Zimmermann, Henning W; Gassler, Nikolaus; Jochum, Christoph; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Bruensing, Jan; Buendgens, Lukas; Dückers, Hanna; Bruns, Tony; Gerken, Guido; Neumann, Ulf P; Adams, David H; Trautwein, Christian; Canbay, Ali; Tacke, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening condition with a high mortality rate. The expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, CD87) and release of its shedded receptor into serum as soluble uPAR (suPAR) have been closely related to immune activation and prognosis in systemic inflammation and cirrhosis. We now aimed at investigating the clinical relevance and cellular source of uPAR and circulating suPAR in ALF. Serum suPAR concentrations were measured in 48 ALF patients and 62 healthy controls from a German liver transplantation centre. Hepatic immune cell subsets and uPAR expression were studied by FACS, qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Circulating suPAR levels were significantly increased in ALF patients, independent from the underlying aetiology, in comparison to controls. Serum suPAR concentrations were closely correlated with parameters reflecting liver cell injury, decreased liver function and the model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score in ALF patients. By immunohistochemistry from explanted livers, ALF was associated with distinct immune cell accumulation and strong up-regulation of intrahepatic uPAR mRNA expression. CD87 (uPAR) expression was specifically detected on intrahepatic 'non-classical' monocytes (CD14(+) CD16(+) ), NKT and CD56(dim) NK cells isolated from human liver, but not on parenchymal or other non-parenchymal hepatic cell types. Membrane-bound uPAR was rapidly cleaved from monocytes upon inflammatory stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and partially by co-cultured lymphocytes. Similar to its prognostic properties in patients with sepsis or cirrhosis, intrahepatic uPAR activation and serum suPAR concentrations might serve as an interesting biomarker in ALF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cadmium exposure is associated with soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating marker of inflammation and future cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Björn; Borné, Yan; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Forsgard, Niklas; Hedblad, Bo; Persson, Margaretha; Engström, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Diet and smoking are the main sources of cadmium exposure in the general population. Cadmium increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and experimental studies show that it induces inflammation. Blood cadmium levels are associated with macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an emerging biomarker for cardiovascular events related to inflammation and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim was to examine whether blood cadmium levels are associated with circulating suPAR and other markers of inflammation. A population sample of 4648 Swedish middle-aged women and men was examined cross-sectionally in 1991-1994. Plasma suPAR was assessed by ELISA, leukocytes were measured by standard methods, and blood cadmium was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Prevalent cardiovascular disease, ultrasound-assessed carotid plaque occurrence, and several possible confounding factors were recorded. After full adjustment for risk factors and confounding variables, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with an 10.9% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.001). In never-smokers, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with a 3.7% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.01) after full adjustment. Blood cadmium was not associated with C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and Lp-PLA2 but with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in one of two statistical models. Exposure to cadmium was associated with increased plasma suPAR in the general population, independently of smoking and cardiovascular disease. These results imply that cadmium is a possible cause for raised levels of this inflammatory marker. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Involvement of the serine protease inhibitor, SERPINE2, and the urokinase plasminogen activator in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chung-Hao; Lee, Robert Kuo-Kuang; Hwu, Yuh-Ming; Lin, Ming-Huei; Yeh, Ling-Yu; Chen, Ying-Jie; Lin, Shau-Ping; Li, Sheng-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    The serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 2 (SERPINE2) inhibits urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU) and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Higher SERPINE2 expression levels were detected in cumulus cells of human immature oocytes than in those of mature oocytes. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether high SERPINE2 levels in cumulus cells are associated with oocyte immaturity. Using the mouse cumulus-oocyte complex as an experimental model, the effects of elimination and overexpression of SERPINE2 in cumulus cells on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation were assayed by in vitro maturation. Serpine2 and PLAU transcripts were the most highly expressed serpins and plasminogen activators, respectively. Their expression was coordinately regulated in cumulus cells during gonadotropin-induced oocyte maturation. Silencing of Serpine2 expression using small interfering RNAs or blockage of SERPINE2 protein using a specific antibody had no effect on oocyte maturation. However, overexpression of Serpine2 or exogenous supplementation with high levels of SERPINE2 impaired cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation, probably by decreasing hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2) and versican (Vcan) mRNA expression. Amiloride, a specific PLAU inhibitor, also suppressed these processes. PLAU supplementation of the oocyte in vitro maturation medium caused earlier and more extensive expansion of cumulus cells and oocyte maturation that may be mediated by increased Has2 mRNA expression. However, these effects were neutralized by coincubation with SERPINE2 or amiloride and PLAU. In conclusion, SERPINE2 and PLAU are involved in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation. High SERPINE2 levels impair these processes, probably by decreasing cumulus matrix gene expression as well as reducing cumulus hyaluronan contents and inhibiting PLAU activity. These findings may explain why cumulus cells surrounding immature human oocytes express high SERPINE2 levels.

  15. Cambodian Phellinus linteus inhibits experimental metastasis of melanoma cells in mice via regulation of urokinase type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Lim, Eu-Soo; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Shim, Beom-Sang; Kim, Hyung-Min; Gong, Soo-Ja; Kim, Dae-Keun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Phellinus linteus (PL) is a fungus mainly found in tropical America, Africa and Asian countries including Korea, Japan and China. PL has been traditionally used for the treatment of arthritis, liver damage and cancer. However, little was known on the biological activity and characterization of Phellinus species in Cambodia. Thus, in the present study, the anti-metastatic mechanism of aqueous extract of Cambodian Phellinus linteus (CPL) was evaluated. Cambodian mushroom was identified as a Phellinus species with 99% homology of Phellinus linteus by DNA sequence analysis and comparison by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. CPL did not exhibit any significant cytotoxicity against B16BL6 cells, invasive melanoma cells at 1 mg/ml. However, CPL inhibited platelet aggregation induced by B16BL6 cells and also disrupted the adhesion to gelatin and invasion of B16BL6 cells in a concentration dependent manner. Similarly, CPL dose-dependently inhibited the pulmonary metastatic colonies in C57BL/6 mice intravenously injected by B16BL6 cells up to 55.5% at a dose of 50 mg/kg compared with untreated control. CPL also down-regulated the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA), one of key proteins associated with invasion and metastasis of tumor cells in a concentration dependent fashion, while CPL didn't significantly affect the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Taken together, these findings indicate that Cambodian Phellinus linteus may inhibit metastasis at least partly via regulation of uPA associated with tumor cell induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) and also suggest a further study for isolation of active ingredients and the involvement of adhesion molecule signaling pathway.

  16. Discovery of new small molecules targeting the vitronectin-binding site of the urokinase receptor that block cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Rea, Vincenza Elena Anna; Lavecchia, Antonio; Di Giovanni, Carmen; Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Gorrasi, Anna; Pesapane, Ada; de Paulis, Amato; Ragno, Pia; Montuori, Nunzia

    2013-08-01

    Besides focusing urokinase (uPA) proteolytic activity on the cell membrane, the uPA receptor (uPAR) is able to bind vitronectin, via a direct binding site. Furthermore, uPAR interacts with other cell surface receptors, such as integrins, receptor tyrosine kinases, and chemotaxis receptors, triggering cell-signaling pathways that promote tumor progression. The ability of uPAR to coordinate binding and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell signaling makes it an attractive therapeutic target in cancer. We used structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) to search for small molecules targeting the uPAR-binding site for vitronectin. Forty-one compounds were identified and tested on uPAR-negative HEK-293 epithelial cells transfected with uPAR (uPAR-293 cells), using the parental cell line transfected with the empty vector (V-293 cells) as a control. Compounds 6 and 37 selectively inhibited uPAR-293 cell adhesion to vitronectin and the resulting changes in cell morphology and signal transduction, without exerting any effect on V-293 cells. Compounds 6 and 37 inhibited uPAR-293 cell binding to vitronectin with IC50 values of 3.6 and 1.2 μmol/L, respectively. Compounds 6 and 37 targeted S88 and R91, key residues for uPAR binding to vitronectin but also for uPAR interaction with the fMLF family of chemotaxis receptors (fMLF-Rs). As a consequence, compounds 6 and 37 impaired uPAR-293 cell migration toward fetal calf serum (FCS), uPA, and fMLF, likely by inhibiting the interaction between uPAR and FPR1, the high affinity fMLF-R. Both compounds blocked in vitro ECM invasion of several cancer cell types, thus representing new promising leads for pharmaceuticals in cancer.

  17. PET imaging of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in prostate cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptors (uPAR) represents an important biomarker for aggressiveness in most common malignant diseases, including prostate cancer (PC). Accordingly, uPAR expression either assessed directly in malignant PC tissue or assessed directly in plasma (intact/cleaved forms)-provides independent additional clinical information to that contributed by PSA, Gleason score, and other relevant pathological and clinical parameters. In this respect, non-invasive molecular imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) offers a very attractive technology platform, which can provide the required quantitative information on the uPAR expression profile, without the need for invasive procedures and the risk of missing the target due to tumor heterogeneity. These observations support non-invasive PET imaging of uPAR in PC as a clinically relevant diagnostic and prognostic imaging method. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of uPAR PET and the relevance within prostate cancer imaging. Novel antibody and small-molecule radiotracers-targeting uPAR, including a series of uPAR-targeting PET ligands, based on the high affinity peptide ligand AE105, have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo in preclinical murine xenograft models and, recently, in a first-ever clinical uPAR PET study in cancer patients, including patients with PC. In this phase I study, a high and specific uptake of the tracer (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 was found in both primary tumors and lymph node metastases. The results are encouraging and support large-scale clinical trials to determine the utility of uPAR PET in the management of patients with PC with the goal of improving outcome.

  18. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Salvati, Annamaria; Serio, Bianca; Pesapane, Ada; Ricci, Patrizia; Gorrasi, Anna; Santi, Anna Li; Hoyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Ragno, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM microenvironment. uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88-92). We previously reported the involvement of soluble uPAR in HSC mobilization. We now investigate its possible role in HSC homing and engraftment. We show similar levels of circulating full-length suPAR in healthy donors and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before and after the pre-transplant conditioning regimen. By contrast, levels of circulating DIIDIII-suPAR in AML patients are higher as compared to controls and significantly decrease after the conditioning. We found that suPAR and uPAR84-95, a uPAR-derived peptide which mimics active DIIDIII-suPAR, induce a significant increase in Long Term Culture (LTC)-Initiating Cells (ICs) and in the release of clonogenic progenitors from LTCs of CD34+ HSCs. Further, suPAR increases adhesion and survival of CD34+ KG1 AML cells, whereas uPAR84-95 increases their proliferation. Thus, circulating DIIDIII-suPAR, strongly increased in HSC mobilization, is indeed down-regulated by pre-transplant conditioning, probably to favour HSC homing. BM full-length suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR may be involved in HSC lodgement within the BM by contributing to a suitable microenvironment. PMID:27517491

  19. Expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, stromelysin 1, stromelysin 3, and matrilysin genes in lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Bolon, I.; Devouassoux, M.; Robert, C.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, C.; Brambilla, E.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extracellular-matrix-degrading enzymes, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), stromelysin 1, stromelysin 3, and matrilysin, may play an important role in the transition from lung preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we analyzed serial frozen sections for the expression of these enzymes in 89 lung carcinomas including 25 neuroendocrine (NE) carcinomas (10 small-cell lung carcinomas, 7 large-cell NE carcinomas, 1 atypical, and 7 typical carcinoids) and 64 non-small-cell, non-NE carcinomas (29 squamous and 7 basaloid carcinomas, 23 adenocarcinomas, and 5 large-cell carcinomas). Proteases, except matrilysin, were more often expressed in stromal than cancer cells. In non-small-cell, non-NE carcinomas, stromal co-expression of u-PA and stromelysin 3 was seen in 80 to 90% of the tumors and was highly correlated (P < 0.0001). Stromal u-PA and stromelysin 3 expression was linked to tumor size (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively) and lymph node involvement (P = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). Epithelial expression of u-PA was correlated to tumor size (P = 0.04). Epithelial expression of stromelysin 3 predominated in squamous and basaloid carcinomas (P = 0.0005) and was inversely correlated to squamous differentiation (P = 0.018). Epithelial expression of matrilysin predominated in adenocarcinomas and large-cell carcinomas (P = 0.07). In NE carcinomas including small-cell lung carcinomas, stromal expression of u-PA was correlated to lymph node metastasis (P = 0.017). Epithelial expression of all enzymes were significantly less frequent in NE than in non-NE tumors. We conclude that 1) epithelial expression of matrix proteases in lung cancer is linked to cell phenotype (NE versus non-NE, squamous versus glandular) and 2) their stromal, rather than epithelial, expression influences local metastasis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9137088

  20. Flow regimes during immiscible displacement

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Fractional ow of immiscible phases occurs at the pore scale where grain surfaces and phases interfaces obstruct phase mobility. However, the larger scale behavior is described by a saturation-dependent phenomenological relationship called relative permeability. As a consequence, pore-scale parameters, such as phase topology and/ or geometry, and details of the flow regime cannot be directly related to Darcy-scale flow parameters. It is well understood that relative permeability is not a unique relationship of wetting-phase saturation and rather depends on the experimental conditions at which it is measured. Herein we use fast X-ray microcomputed tomography to image pore-scale phase arrangements duringmore » fractional flow and then forward simulate the flow regimes using the lattice-Boltzmann method to better understand the underlying pore-scale flow regimes and their influence on Darcy-scale parameters. We find that relative permeability is highly dependent on capillary number and that the Corey model fits the observed trends. At the pore scale, while phase topologies are continuously changing on the scale of individual pores, the Euler characteristic of the nonwetting phase (NWP) averaged over a sufficiently large field of view can describe the bulk topological characteristics; the Euler characteristic decreases with increasing capillary number resulting in an increase in relative permeability. Lastly, we quantify the fraction of NWP that flows through disconnected ganglion dynamics and demonstrate that this can be a significant fraction of the NWP flux for intermediate wetting-phase saturation. Furthermore, rate dependencies occur in our homogenous sample (without capillary end effect) and the underlying cause is attributed to ganglion flow that can significantly influence phase topology during the fractional flow of immiscible phases.« less

  1. Overview of the regimes: CWC

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Chemical Weapons Convention`s (CWC) seeks to eradicate an entire category of catastrophic weapons and to ensure their continued non-production. Unlike the Non-Proliferation Treaty`s (NPT), the CWC requires disarmament. States Parties having chemical weapons (CW) must destroy them. The CWC has not adopted the NPT distinction between weapons and non-weapons states; the CWC`s prohibitions and obligations will apply identically to all States parties. In most other respects, the two treaties establish similar regimes with similar approaches. Included are objectives and primary obligations, legal bases, institutional oversight, trade restrictions, protection of information, penal consequences, and role of the United Nations.

  2. The New English Quality Assurance Regime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2011-01-01

    England is developing a new quality assurance regime that will come into effect in October 2011. A new funding regime will operate from the following year, together with new rules to ease the participation of private higher education providers. This article describes and analyses the new quality and funding regimes. It argues that the greater…

  3. The New English Quality Assurance Regime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2011-01-01

    England is developing a new quality assurance regime that will come into effect in October 2011. A new funding regime will operate from the following year, together with new rules to ease the participation of private higher education providers. This article describes and analyses the new quality and funding regimes. It argues that the greater…

  4. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  5. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  6. Construction and Characterization of a Mutant of Single-chain Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Ser(175)-His(187)-mscu-PA

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Hui; Shi, Wei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Jian-Ning; Ma, Zhong

    2000-01-01

    Single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator scu-PA is the precursor of double-chain urokinase tcu-PA , which has a much higher intrinsic catalytic activity than other zymogens of the serine protease family. To restore the "zymogen triad" of Asp-His-Ser in the serine protease family, the mutant gene of scu-PA mscu-PA, Ala(175)right curved arrow Ser(175), Tyr(187)right curved arrow His(187) was constructed by the method of oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis in order to reduce its intrinsic catalytic activity. mscu-PA was expressed in E. coli BL21. After denaturation and renaturation in vitro, the mscu-PA was purified to homogeneity by SP-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, Sephacryl S-200 chromatography and Benzamidine-Sepharose affinity adsorption. mscu-PA had the same activity to plasmin as scu-PA. The catalytic efficiency measured by k(cat)/K(m) to synthetic substrate S(2444) was 2.5-fold lower than that of scu-PA, and the activity against Glu-plasminogen was also reduced. After activation by plasmin, mtcu-PA and tcu-PA had similar catalytic efficiency against S(2444) and Glu-plasminogen. The results suggest that the intrinsic catalytic activity of mscu-PA be really reduced after restoring the "zymogen triad".

  7. Urokinase Plasminogen Receptor and the Fibrinolytic Complex Play a Role in Nerve Repair after Nerve Crush in Mice, and in Human Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Rivellini, Cristina; Dina, Giorgia; Porrello, Emanuela; Cerri, Federica; Scarlato, Marina; Domi, Teuta; Ungaro, Daniela; Carro, Ubaldo Del; Bolino, Alessandra; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Previtali, Stefano C.

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step in peripheral nerve regeneration. In fact, in human neuropathies, endoneurial ECM enriched in fibrin and vitronectin associates with poor regeneration and worse clinical prognosis. Accordingly in animal models, modification of the fibrinolytic complex activity has profound effects on nerve regeneration: high fibrinolytic activity and low levels of fibrin correlate with better nerve regeneration. The urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) is a major component of the fibrinolytic complex, and binding to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) promotes fibrinolysis and cell movement. uPAR is expressed in peripheral nerves, however, little is known on its potential function on nerve development and regeneration. Thus, we investigated uPAR null mice and observed that uPAR is dispensable for nerve development, whereas, loss of uPAR affects nerve regeneration. uPAR null mice showed reduced nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. This was a consequence of reduced fibrinolytic activity and increased deposition of endoneurial fibrin and vitronectin. Exogenous fibrinolysis in uPAR null mice rescued nerve repair after sciatic nerve crush. Finally, we measured the fibrinolytic activity in sural nerve biopsies from patients with peripheral neuropathies. We showed that neuropathies with defective regeneration had reduced fibrinolytic activity. On the contrary, neuropathies with signs of active regeneration displayed higher fibrinolytic activity. Overall, our results suggest that enforced fibrinolysis may facilitate regeneration and outcome of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22363796

  8. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P. . E-mail: fpchou@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-07-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-{kappa}B, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment.

  9. Small molecule antagonists of the urokinase (uPA): urokinase receptor (uPAR) interaction with high reported potencies show only weak effects in cell-based competition assays employing the native uPAR ligand.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Melissa; Matthews, Hayden; Lee, Jodi A; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael J

    2011-04-15

    Binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its cell-surface-bound receptor uPAR and upregulation of the plasminogen activation system (PAS) correlates with increased metastasis and poor prognosis in several tumour types. Disruptors of the uPA:uPAR interaction represent promising anti-tumour/metastasis agents and several approaches have been explored for this purpose, including the use of small molecule antagonists. Two highly potent non-peptidic antagonists 1 and 2 (IC(50)1=0.8 nM, IC(50)2=33 nM) from the patent literature were reportedly identified using competition assays employing radiolabelled uPAR-binding uPA fragments and appeared as useful pharmacological tools for studying the PAS. Before proceeding to such studies, confirmation was sought that 1 and 2 retained their potencies in physiologically relevant cell-based competition assays employing uPAR's native binding partner high molecular weight uPA (HMW-uPA). This study describes a new solution phase synthesis of 1, a mixed solid/solution phase synthesis of 2 and reports the activities of 1 and 2 in semi-quantitative competition flow cytometry assays and quantitative cell-based uPA activity assays that employed HMW-uPA as the competing ligand. The flow cytometry experiments revealed that high concentrations of 2 (10-100 μM) are required to compete with HMW-uPA for uPAR binding and that 1 shows no antagonist effects at 100 μM. The cell-based enzyme activity assays similarly revealed that 1 and 2 are poor inhibitors of cell surface-bound HMW-uPA activity (IC(50) >100 μM for 1 and 2). The report highlights the dangers of identifying false-positive lead uPAR antagonists from competition assays employing labelled competing ligands other than the native HMW-uPA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensitivity to spatial and temporal scale and fire regime inputs in deriving fire regime condition class

    Treesearch

    Linda Tedrow; Wendel J. Hann

    2015-01-01

    The Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) is a composite departure measure that compares current vegetation structure and fire regime to historical reference conditions. FRCC is computed as the average of: 1) Vegetation departure (VDEP) and 2) Regime (frequency and severity) departure (RDEP). In addition to the FRCC rating, the Vegetation Condition Class (VCC) and Regime...

  11. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of burnt areas time series in Mediterranean regions suggests that ecosystems characterising this area consist primarily of species highly vulnerable to the fire but highly resilient, as characterized by a significant regenerative capacity after the fire spreading. In a few years the area burnt may once again be covered by the same vegetation present before the fire. Similarly, Mediterranean conifer forests, which often refers to plantations made in order to reforest the areas most severely degraded with high erosion risk, regenerate from seed after the fire resulting in high resilience to the fire as well. Only rarely, and usually with negligible damages, fire affects the areas covered by climax species in relation with altitude and soil types (i.e, quercus, fagus, abies). On the basis of these results, this paper shows how the simple Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model is able to reproduce the forest fire regime in terms of number of fires and burned area, describing whit good accuracy the actual fire perimeters. The original Drossel-Schwabl model has been slightly modified in this work by introducing two parameters (probability of propagation and regrowth) specific for each different class of vegetation cover. Using model selection methods based on AIC, the model with the optimal number of classes with different fire behaviour was selected. Two different case studies are presented in this work: Regione Liguria and Regione Sardegna (Italy). Both regions are situated in the center of the Mediterranean and are characterized by a high number of fires and burned area. However, the two regions have very different fire regimes. Sardinia is affected by the fire phenomenon only in summer whilst Liguria is affected by fires also in winter, with higher number of fires and larger burned area. In addition, the two region are very different in vegetation cover. The presence of Mediterranean conifers, (Pinus Pinaster, Pinus Nigra, Pinus halepensis) is quite spread in

  12. Boundary-layer moisture regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1991-01-01

    Boundary-layer moisture fluctuations are estimated by analyzing HAPEX and FIFE data collected on 52 aircraft flight legs. Moisture fluctuations were given considerable attention in the HAPEX flights, which were 120 km long, and flew 150 m over one area of homogeneous terrain. The repetitions permit statistical consideration of motion characteristics on horizontal scales. Two prototypical boundary layer regimes are discovered: the entrainment-drying boundary layer, and the moistening boundary layer. The latter demonstrates positive moisture skewness close to the surface related to high surface evaporation. The former is characterized by boundary-layer instability, weak surface evaporation, and drier air aloft, leading to unexpected negative moisture skewness. It is noted that 10 km moisture variations with horizontal gradients are often found in narrow zones of horizontal convergence, called mesoscale moisture fronts. A negative moisture to temperature correlation, due to surface energy budget inhomogeneity, is shown to incur large mesoscale variations of relative humidity.

  13. Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streepey, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2001-12-01

    Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes M. Streepey and C. Lithgow-Bertelloni Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Studies have shown that faults generally tend to reactivate over long histories of deformation, often in spite of less favorable orientations or changing stress regimes in the region. Reactivation of faults suggests that rheology is a key determining factor in the localization of intense deformation in orogenic belts. It is evident in these studies that stresses are preferentially partitioned into pre-existing weak zones of the crust. This is shown commonly in orogenic belts, where thrust faults reactivate as normal faults during syn- to post-orogenic extension. Therefore, the interaction of faults might be an important element in the deformation of the lithosphere during pre- and post-orogenic tectonics. On shorter timescales, it has been suggested that fault interactions are commonplace in areas of active seismicity, and that those interactions can be related to earthquake triggering and therefore may be critically important in assessing the behavior of the lithosphere during deformation. We investigate this problem concentrating on the time evolution of faults in extensional regimes. Geologic evidence in ancient orogenic belts shows periods of protracted normal fault motion over timescales of hundreds of millions of years after orogenesis. This motion is likely episodic rather than continuous; however, this is not constrained by field and geochronological studies. Fault evolution on these timescales is modeled using the finite element code ABAQUS. Our elastic results show, as expected from dislocation theory, that stress shadows produced by motion along faults can be linearly superposed and that faults do not have a high degree of interaction. We have constructed new models of two-dimensional finite elements that represent a block of crust under extensional stresses. Sited in these blocks are weak zones

  14. Preparation and antitumor effect of a toxin-linked conjugate targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and urokinase plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ying; Li, Qiying; Huang, Dehong; Tang, Xianjun; Wang, Li; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Yang, Tao; Xiao, Chunyan; Wang, Jianghong

    2015-02-01

    The aberrant signaling activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a common characteristic of many tumors, including lung cancer. Accordingly, VEGFR and uPA have emerged as attractive targets for tumor. KDR (Flk-1/VEGFR-2), a member of the VEGFR family, has been recognized as an important target for antiangiogenesis in tumor. In this study, a recombinant immunotoxin was produced to specifically target KDR-expressing tumor vascular endothelial cells and uPA-expressing tumor cells and mediate antitumor angiogenesis and antitumor effect. Based on its potent inhibitory effect on protein synthesis, Luffin-beta (Lβ) ribosome-inactivating protein was selected as part of a recombinant fusion protein, a single-chain variable fragment against KDR (KDRscFv)-uPA cleavage site (uPAcs)-Lβ-KDEL (named as KPLK). The KDRscFv-uPAcs-Lβ-KDEL (KPLK) contained a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against KDR, uPAcs, Lβ, and the retention signal for endoplasmic reticulum proteins KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu). The KPLK-expressing vector was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the KPLK protein was isolated with nickel affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis test demonstrated KPLK was effectively expressed. Result of in vitro cell viability assay on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cell line (uPA-positive cell) revealed that KPLK significantly inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and accumulated cells in S and G2/M phases, but the normal cell line (human submandibular gland cell) was unaffected. These effects were enhanced when uPA was added to digest KPLK to release Lβ. For in vivo assay of KPLK, subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of nude mice were established with H460 cells. Growth of solid tumors was significantly inhibited in animals treated with KPLK up to 21 days, tumor weights were decreased, and the expression of

  15. Urokinase Receptor Mediates Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Vascular Calcification via the Complement C5a Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Anaraki, Parnian Kalbasi; Patecki, Margret; Larmann, Jan; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jurk, Kerstin; Haller, Hermann; Theilmeier, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a severe consequence of several pathological processes with a lack of effective therapy. Recent studies suggest that circulating and resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) contribute to the osteogenic program of vascular calcification. Molecular mechanisms underlying MSC osteogenic potential and differentiation remain, however, sparsely explored. We investigated a role for the complement receptor C5aR in these processes. We found that expression of C5aR was upregulated upon differentiation of human MSC to osteoblasts. C5aR inhibition by silencing and specific antagonist impaired osteogenic differentiation. We demonstrate that C5aR expression upon MSC differentiation was regulated by the multifunctional urokinase receptor (uPAR). uPAR targeting by siRNA resulted in complete abrogation of C5aR expression and consequently in the inhibition of MSC-osteoblast differentiation. We elucidated the NFκB pathway as the mechanism utilized by the uPAR-C5aR axis. MSC treatment with the NFκB inhibitor completely blocked the differentiation process. Nuclear translocation of the p65 RelA component of the NFκB complex was induced under osteogenic conditions and impaired by the inhibition of uPAR or C5aR. Dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated enhanced NFκB signaling upon MSC differentiation, whereas uPAR and C5aR downregulation lead to inhibition of the NFκB activity. We show involvement of the Erk1/2 kinase in this cascade. In vivo studies in a uPAR/LDLR double knockout mouse model of diet-induced atherosclerosis revealed impaired C5aR expression and calcification in aortic sinus plaques in uPAR−/−/LDLR−/− versus uPAR+/+/LDLR−/− control animals. These results suggest that uPAR-C5aR axis via the underlying NFκB transcriptional program controls osteogenic differentiation with functional impact on vascular calcification in vivo. PMID:24192237

  16. [The effect of low molecular heparin and urokinase on MCP-1 of acute experimental pulmonary embolism in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongzhi; Wu, Qi; Wu, Junping; Sun, Xin; Du, Zhongzhen; Li, Li; Wu, Qian

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate effect the of thrombolytic (urokinase, UK) and anticoagulant agent (low-molecular-weight heparin, LMWH) on the pulmonary injury of rabbits with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) by assaying monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Rabbit models with PE were established by transfusing autologous blood clots on 60 healthy male Japanese white rabbits. Experimental PE rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups:normal saline (NS) group (n = 18) , LMWH group (n = 18) and UK group (n = 18), and other 18 rabbits underwent sham operations as SHAM group (n = 18). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups based on 2 days (day 2), 4 days (day 4), and 14 days (day 14) after therapies. Arterial blood gas analysis was measured. MCP-1 levels in lung tissue and blood were assayed with ELISA at various times (day 2, day 4 and day 14 ). Fixed sections were stained with trichrome for intimal hyperplasia determination. The overall rate of success for making PE rabbit models was 90% (54/60), which was not affected by treatment. Compared with NS group, P(A-a)O2 significantly decreased in UK group. Compared with NS group, MCP-1 levels in lung tissue significantly decreased in LMWH group on day 4 [(33 ± 9) ng/L vs (48 ± 5) ng/L, P < 0.05] and day 14 [(30 ± 11) ng/L vs (41 ± 4) ng/L, P < 0.05]; MCP-1 levels in serum on day 14 also significantly decreased in LMWH group [(36 ± 10) ng/L vs (51 ± 5) ng/L, P < 0.05]. Compared with NS group, MCP-1 levels in lung tissue significantly decreased in UK group on day 2 and 4 [Day 2: (34 ± 8) ng/L vs (50 ± 4) ng/L, P < 0.05; Day 4: (29 ± 7) ng/L vs (48 ± 5) ng/L, P < 0.05]; MCP-1 levels in serum on day 2 and day 4 also significantly decreased in UK group [Day 2: (44 ± 3) ng/L vs (48 ± 3) ng/L, P < 0.05; Day 4: (44 ± 4) ng/L vs (53 ± 1)ng/L, P < 0.05]. UK treatment may rapidly improve V/Q ratio and decrease MCP-1 levels in lung tissue or serum, but it can not inhibit persistent inflammation. LMWH can decrease MCP-1 levels in lung

  17. Tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators instigate the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in a mouse model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Shravan K

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) promotes the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during the progression of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (POAG). However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs remain unclear. Therefore, by employing a mouse model of POAG, this study examined whether elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of RGCs by up-regulating tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in the retina. IOP was elevated in mouse eyes by injecting fluorescent-microbeads into the anterior chamber. Once a week, for eight weeks, IOP in mouse eyes was measured by using Tono-Pen XL. At various time periods after injecting microbeads, proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in retinal protein extracts was determined by fibrinogen/plasminogen zymography assays. Localization of tPA and uPA, and their receptor LRP-1 (low-density receptor-related protein-1) in the retina was determined by immunohistochemistry. RGCs’ degeneration was assessed by immunostaining with antibodies against Brn3a. Injection of microbeads into the anterior chamber led to a progressive elevation in IOP, increased the proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in the retina, activated plasminogen into plasmin, and promoted a significant degeneration of RGCs. Elevated IOP up-regulated tPA and LRP-1 in RGCs, and uPA in astrocytes. At four weeks after injecting microbeads, RAP (receptor associated protein; 0.5 and 1.0 μM) or tPA-Stop (1.0 and 4.0 μM) was injected into the vitreous humor. Treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with RAP led to a significant decrease in proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and a significant decrease in IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Also, treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with tPA-Stop decreased the proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and, in turn, significantly attenuated IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Results presented in this study provide evidence that elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of

  18. Structural analysis and tissue localization of human C4.4A: a protein homologue of the urokinase receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Line V; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Nielsen, Boye S; Lund, Leif R; Danø, Keld; Jensen, Ole N; Ploug, Michael

    2004-01-01

    C4.4A, a structural homologue of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), was originally identified as a metastasis-associated membrane protein, but little is known about its structural and functional properties. Therefore, we expressed, purified and characterized a soluble truncated form of human C4.4A, and used this protein to produce specific polyclonal anti-C4.4A antibodies. By immunohistochemistry we observed a pronounced surface staining for C4.4A in suprabasal keratinocytes of chronic human wounds and found C4.4A expression markedly upregulated in migrating keratinocytes during re-epithelisation of incisional skin wounds. Phorbol-ester-induced hyperplasia of mouse skin is also accompanied by a significant induction of C4.4A expression in the multilayered, suprabasal keratinocytes. C4.4A contains two Ly-6 (leucocyte antigen 6)/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin modules. Our recombinant human C4.4A is extensively modified by post-translational glycosylation, which include 5-6 N-linked carbohydrates primarily located in or close to its second Ly-6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin module and approximately 15 O-linked carbohydrates clustered in a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich region at the C-terminus. A highly protease-sensitive region (Tyr200-Arg204) is located between these two clusters of N- and O-linked carbohydrates. The natural, glycolipid-anchored C4.4A from amnion membranes of human term placenta exhibits similar properties. Using recombinant, soluble C4.4A or MCF 7 cells, which express significant amounts of GPI-anchored C4.4A, we find no evidence for an interaction between C4.4A and uPA, a property suggested previously for rat C4.4A. Collectively these data indicate that C4.4A, although being a structural homologue of uPAR, is unlikely to have a functional overlap with uPAR. PMID:15012588

  19. Tumour Microenvironments Induce Expression of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Concomitant Activation of Gelatinolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Latysheva, Nadezhda; Pirila, Emma; Steigen, Sonja E.; Hanes, Robert; Salo, Tuula; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Background The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells’ expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Methods The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography. Results We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes. Conclusions Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the

  20. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  1. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  2. Purification of c-phycocyanin from Spirulina fusiformis and its effect on the induction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator from calf pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Sugiki, M; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2006-09-01

    c-Phycocyanin (c-pc), a blue coloured, fluorescent protein was purified from blue-green alga, Spirulina fusiformis and its effect on fibrinolytic system in vascular endothelial cells was investigated. The c-pc consisted of two subunits, alpha and beta, whose molecular masses were 16 and 17 kDa, respectively. N-terminal sequences of both subunits were well conserved compared with other blue green algal phycobiliproteins. Fibrinolytic activity in the medium conditioned by calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells was measured by the fibrin plate method. The c-pc increased the fibrinolytic activity in dose- and time-dependent manners. Fibrin zymographic studies indicated that c-pc-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the cells. These in vitro results suggest that c-pc from S. fusiformis is a potent profibrinolytic protein in the vascular endothelial system.

  3. The Role of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator and Plasmin Activator Inhibitor-1 on Vein Wall Remodeling in Experimental Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Joe F.; Sood, Vikram; Elfline, Megan A.; Luke, Cathy E.; Dewyer, Nicholas A.; Diaz, Jose A.; Myers, Dan D.; Wakefield, Thomas; Henke, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) resolution instigates an inflammatory response, resulting in vessel wall damage and scarring. Urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are integral components of the fibrinolytic system, essential for VT resolution. This study determined the vein wall response when exposed to increased and decreased plasmin activity. Methods A mouse inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation model in uPA −/− or PAI-1 −/− and their genetic wild types (B6/SvEv and C57/BL6, respectively) was used to create stasis thrombi, with tissue harvest at either 8 or 21d. Tissue analysis included gene expression of vascular smooth muscle cells (alpha SMA [αSMA], SM22) and endothelial marker (CD31), by real time PCR, ELISA, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2 and 9 activity by zymography and vein wall collagen by picrosirius red histological analysis. A P < .05 was considered significant. RESULTS Thrombi were significantly larger in both 8d and 21d uPA −/− as compared to WT, and were significantly smaller in both 8 and 21d PAI-1 −/− as compared to WT. Correspondingly, 8d plasmin levels were reduced in half in uPA −/− and increased 3 fold in PAI-1 −/− when compared to respective WT thrombi (P < .05, N = 5 – 6). The endothelial marker CD31 was elevated 2 fold in PAI-1 −/− mice at 8d, but reduced 2.5 fold at 21d in uPA −/− as compared with WT (P = .02, N = 5 – 6), suggesting less endothelial preservation. Vein wall VSMC gene expression showed that 8d and 21d PAI-1 −/− mice had 2.3 and 3.8 fold more SM22 and 1.8 and 2.3 fold more αSMA expression than respective WT (P < .05, N = 5 – 7), as well as 1.8 fold increased αSMA (+) cells (N = 3 – 5, P ≤ .05). No significant difference in MMP2 or 9 activity was found in the PAI-1 −/− mice compared with WT, while 5.4 fold more MMP9 was present in 21d WT than 21d uPA −/− (P = .03, N = 5). Lastly, collagen was ~2 fold

  4. The construction and expression of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator genes containing kringle domains of human plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Boutaud, A; Castellino, F J

    1993-06-01

    A series of chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) genes, which contain combinations of kringle domains of human plasminogen (HPg) in place of the uPA kringle (KuPA), has been constructed and expressed. Some of the resulting recombinant (r) variant uPA chimeras contain modules that potentially mediate the macroscopic binding of HPg to its activation effectors, fibrin(ogen) and 6-aminohexanoic acid (EACA). Such binding sites are not possessed by KuPA, but are present in certain of the HPg kringles, viz., kringle 1 (K1HPg), kringle 4 (K4HPg), and kringle 5 (K5HPg). The recombinant (r) chimeras constructed included molecules with replacements of KuPA with K1HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA), and with KuPA replaced by double kringle combinations of K1HPgK4HPg (r-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA), K2HPgK3HPg (r-[KuPA-->K2HPgK3HPg]uPA), and K4HPgK5HPg (r-[KuPA-->K4HPgK5HPg]uPA). All of these variant genes, along with their wild-type (wt) r-uPA counterparts, were expressed in human kidney 293 cells. In cases wherein EACA-binding kringles from HPg have been placed in uPA, this property has been retained in the chimeric molecule and employed as an essential part of the purification procedures for the variants. The steady state amidolytic activity of two-chain (tc) wtr-uPA toward the chromogenic substrate, H-D-pyroglutamyl-Gly-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (S2444), is characterized by a kcat/KM (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) of 120 s-1 mM-1. This value ranges from 92 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPg]uPA) to 166 s-1 mM-1 (tcr-[KuPA-->K1HPgK4HPg]uPA) for each of the variants, demonstrating that the catalytic efficiency of the active site is altered only in a small way by changes in the noncatalytic domain of uPA. Small differences are also observed in the abilities of these tcr variants to interact with the fast-acting plasma inhibitor of uPA, viz., plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The second-order rate constant for the interaction of PAI-1 with tcr-uPA, 0.46 x 10(7) M-1s-1 (pH 7.4, 10 degrees

  5. Superfluid regimes in degenerate atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2005-05-05

    We give a brief overview of recent studies of quantum degenerate regimes in ultracold Fermi gases. The attention is focused on the regime of Bose-Einstein condensation of weakly bound molecules of fermionic atoms, formed at a large positive scattering length for the interspecies atom-atom interaction. We analyze remarkable collisional stability of these molecules and draw prospects for future studies.

  6. Regimes of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Scaling regimes for polymers confined to tubular channels are well established when the channel cross-sectional dimension is either very small (Odjik regime) or large (classic de Gennes regime) relative to the polymer Kuhn length. In the literature, there is no clear consensus regarding the intermediate region and if subregimes even exist to connect these two classic bounding regimes. The confluence of emerging single DNA mapping technologies and a resurged interest in the fundamental properties of confined polymers has led to extensive research in this area using DNA as a model system. Due to the DNA molecule's properties and limitations of nanofabrication, most experiments are performed in this intermediate regime with channel dimensions of a few Kuhn lengths. Here we use simulations and theory to reconcile conflicting theories and show that there are indeed extended de Gennes, partial alignment and hairpin regimes located between the two classic regimes. Simulations results for both chain extension and free energy support the existence of these regimes. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (CBET-1335938).

  7. FISHER INFORMATION AND ECOSYSTEM REGIME CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following Fisher’s work, we propose two different expressions for the Fisher Information along with Shannon Information as a means of detecting and assessing shifts between alternative ecosystem regimes. Regime shifts are a consequence of bifurcations in the dynamics of an ecosys...

  8. FISHER INFORMATION AND ECOSYSTEM REGIME CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following Fisher’s work, we propose two different expressions for the Fisher Information along with Shannon Information as a means of detecting and assessing shifts between alternative ecosystem regimes. Regime shifts are a consequence of bifurcations in the dynamics of an ecosys...

  9. Randomized comparison of intracoronary tirofiban versus urokinase as an adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: results of the ICTUS-AMI trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tian-qi; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Feng-hua; Qiu, Jian-ping; Jin, Hui-geng; Jiang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Rui-yan; Hu, Jian; Yang, Zhen-kun; Shen, Ying; Shen, Wei-feng

    2013-08-01

    No randomized trial has been performed to compare the efficacy of an intracoronary bolus of tirofiban versus urokinase during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We investigated whether the effects of adjunctive therapy with an intracoronary bolus of urokinase was noninferior to the effects of an intracoronary bolus of tirofiban in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing PCI. A total of 490 patients with acute STEMI undergoing primary PCI were randomized to an intracoronary bolus of tirofiban (10 µg/kg; n = 247) or urokinase (250 kU/20 ml; n = 243). Serum levels of P-selectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD40 ligand (CD40L), and serum amyloid A (SAA) in the coronary sinus were measured before and after intracoronary drug administration. The primary endpoint was the rate of complete ( ≥ 70%) ST-segment resolution (STR) at 90 minutes after intervention, and the noninferiority margin was set to 15%. In the intention-to-treat analysis, complete STR was achieved in 54.4% of patients treated with an intracoronary bolus of urokinase and in 60.6% of those treated with an intracoronary bolus of tirofiban (adjusted difference: -7.0%; 95% confidence interval: -15.7% to 1.8%). The corrected TIMI frame count of the infarct-related artery was lower, left ventricular ejection fraction was higher, and the 6-month major adverse cardiac event-free survival tended to be better in the intracoronary tirofiban group. An intracoronary bolus of tirofiban resulted in lower levels of P-selectin, vWF, CD40L, and SAA in the coronary sinus compared with an intracoronary bolus of urokinase after primary PCI (P < 0.05). An intracoronary bolus of urokinase as an adjunct to primary PCI for acute STEMI is not equally effective to an intracoronary bolus of tirofiban with respect to improvement in myocardial reperfusion assessed by STR. This may be caused by less reduction in coronary circulatory platelet activation and inflammation.

  10. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-01

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?ωpe: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  11. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-21

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  12. Abrupt climate-independent fire regime changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires have played a determining role in distribution, composition and structure of many ecosystems worldwide and climatic changes are widely considered to be a major driver of future fire regime changes. However, forecasting future climatic change induced impacts on fire regimes will require a clearer understanding of other drivers of abrupt fire regime changes. Here, we focus on evidence from different environmental and temporal settings of fire regimes changes that are not directly attributed to climatic changes. We review key cases of these abrupt fire regime changes at different spatial and temporal scales, including those directly driven (i) by fauna, (ii) by invasive plant species, and (iii) by socio-economic and policy changes. All these drivers might generate non-linear effects of landscape changes in fuel structure; that is, they generate fuel changes that can cross thresholds of landscape continuity, and thus drastically change fire activity. Although climatic changes might contribute to some of these changes, there are also many instances that are not primarily linked to climatic shifts. Understanding the mechanism driving fire regime changes should contribute to our ability to better assess future fire regimes.

  13. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF 2-HOURLY 20 MCG ORAL MISOPROSTOL SOLUTION COMPARED TO STANDARD INTRAVENOUS OXYTOCIN IN LABOUR INDUCTION DUE TO PRE-LABOUR RUPTURE OF MEMBRANES AT TERM: A RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    Mbaluka, C M; Kamau, K; Karanja, J G; Mugo, N

    2014-09-01

    Pre-labour rupture of membranes (PROM) at term is a common event whose management varies from centre to centre. The practice at the Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) for patients with PROM at term is to initiate delivery of the patient soon on admission with intravenous oxytocin, if there are no contraindications to vaginal delivery. However, in PROM at term, if the cervix is not ripe, vaginal administration of prostaglandin pessaries for cervical ripening is not possible when there is active draining of liquor, thus use of intravenous oxytocin may take a very long time or fail all together. Oral misoprostol at low doses has been found to be a safe and effective agent for labour induction in numerous studies carried out in the developed world, where there are better resources for monitoring of labour. None of the studies has been carried out in Kenya, a limited resource country. Therefore, there is a need to determine the effectiveness and safety of oral misoprostol solution at the KNH, a limited resource set up. To determine the effectiveness and safety of 2-hourly 20 mcg oral misoprostol solution compared to the standard intravenous oxytocin in labour induction in mothers with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term at the Kenyatta National Hospital. An unblinded randomised clinical trial. Kenyatta National Hospital Labour Ward Unit. Eighty three pregnant women with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term without an indication for Caeserian section were consented and randomised for labour induction with either oral misoprostol at a dose of 20mcg 2-hourly up to a maximum of 4-doses, or with intravenous oxytocin according to the WHO protocol. Induction to delivery interval; maternal complications and early neonatal outcomes. The overall induction success rates in the misoprostol arm was 81% versus 83% in the oxytocin arm (P = 0.447). The mean induction to vaginal delivery interval in the misoprostol arm was 8.4 hours as compared to 9.45 hours in the oxytocin arm (P

  14. Distinct Turbulence Saturation Regimes in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the complex 3D magnetic fields of stellarators, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence is shown to have two distinct saturation regimes, as revealed by petascale numerical simulations and explained by a simple turbulence theory. The first regime is marked by strong zonal flows and matches previous observations in tokamaks. The newly observed second regime, in contrast, exhibits small-scale quasi-two-dimensional turbulence, negligible zonal flows, and, surprisingly, a weaker heat flux scaling. Our findings suggest that key details of the magnetic geometry control turbulence in stellarators.

  15. Earth Regime Network Evolution Study (ERNESt)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  16. Prolonged instability prior to a regime shift.

    PubMed

    Spanbauer, Trisha L; Allen, Craig R; Angeler, David G; Eason, Tarsha; Fritz, Sherilyn C; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Nash, Kirsty L; Stone, Jeffery R

    2014-01-01

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of 'abrupt' change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia.

  17. Prediction Rules for Regime Changes and Length in a New Regime for the Lorenz Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Yadav, Rama; Dwivedi, Suneet; Mittal, Ashok Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Lorenz model as a conceptual model for predictability studies in meteorology, only Evans et al. seem to have studied the prediction of occurrence of regime changes and their duration. In this paper, simpler rules are presented for forecasting regime changes and their lengths, with near-perfect forecasting accuracy. It is found that when |x(t)| is greater than a critical value xc, the current regime will end after it completes the current orbit. Moreover, the length n of the new regime increases monotonically with the maximum value xm of |x(t)| in the previous regime. A best-fit cubic expression provides a very good estimate of n for the next regime, given xm for the previous regime.Similar forecasting rules are also obtained for regime changes in the forced Lorenz model. This model was introduced by Palmer and used as a conceptual model to explore the effects of sea surface temperature on seasonal mean rainfall. It was found that for the forced Lorenz model, the critical value xc changed linearly with the forcing parameter providing bias to one of the regimes. Similar regime prediction rules have been found in some other two-regime attractors. It seems these forecasting rules are a generic property of a large class of two-regime attractors. Although as a conceptual model, the Lorenz model cannot be taken very literally, these results suggest a relationship between magnitudes of maximum anomaly in one regime, for example, the active spell, and duration of the subsequent break spell.

  18. Iranian Regime Reform: Opportunities and Consequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    formal political access to mitigate the adverse effects of . . . the deterioration of quality of life .”70 Three broad sets of factors outlined by...demanding changes in the Iranian regime that mesh with U.S.. national interests. However, the Green Movement may not be successful in effecting change...viable threat to the Iranian regime. This thesis used game theory as a tool because game theory outcomes very often reflect real- life outcomes

  19. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Photosynthesis, Carbohydrate Metabolism, and Export in Beta vulgaris L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. during Square and Sinusoidal Light Regimes.

    PubMed

    Fondy, B R; Geiger, D R; Servaites, J C

    1989-02-01

    Rates of photosynthesis, sucrose synthesis, starch accumulation and degradation were measured in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants under a square-wave light regime and under a sinusoidal regime that simulated the natural daylight period. Photosynthesis rate increased in a measured manner in direct proportion to the increasing light level. In contrast to this close correspondence between photosynthesis and light, a lag in photosynthesis rate was seen during the initial hour under square-wave illumination. The leaf appeared to be responding to limits set by carbon metabolism rather than by gas exchange or light reactions. Under the sinusoidal regime starch degradation occurred during the first and last 2 hours of the photoperiod, likely in response to photosynthesis rate rather than directly to light level. Starch broke down when photosynthesis was below a threshold rate and accumulated above this rate. Under square-wave illumination, accumulation of starch did not begin until irradiance was at full level for an hour or more and photosynthesis was at or near its maximum. Under a sinusoidal light regime, sucrose synthesis rate comprised carbon that was newly fixed throughout the day plus that from starch degradation at the beginning and end of the day. Synthesis of sucrose from recently fixed carbon increased with increasing net carbon fixation rate while its formation from degradation of starch decreased correspondingly. The complementary sources of carbon maintained a relatively steady rate of sucrose synthesis under the changing daytime irradiance.

  1. Piping Regimes in Cohesive Mud Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Piping is commonly encountered in the highly saturated cohesive muds of estuarine and coastal environments, where tidal and wave action builds up excess pore water pressure. Once the built-up pressure is released, the upwelling pore water locally fluidizes and forms pipes through the mud layer. These pipes propagate through the mud layer and erupt at its surface. Herein, we investigate the mechanisms and conditions that promote piping in cohesive mud layers, which to date remain largely unknown, in parts because of the inherent difficulty in collecting field data. A fluidization column was carefully designed for replicating pipe formation in the laboratory by injecting pressurized water at the base of an overlaying kaolin mud layer through a nozzle. The kaolin mud concentration, C, and flow rate, q, through the nozzle were varied systematically to elucidate their effects on pipe formation. Localized pore water pressure measurements revealed that the pipe formation is accompanied by a pressure wave with magnitude comparable to the kaolin mud yield strength. Pressure measurements across the mud layer combined with visual observations indicated the presence of two fluidization regimes, dubbed advective and diffusive. Under the advective regime, a single vertical channel formed above the nozzle. In contrast, under the diffusive regime, a channel network formed within the mud layer and multiple channels erupted on the mud layer surface. The C and q conditions corresponding to each regime were delineated in a fluidization regime diagram. In parallel to the experiments, a numerical model was developed from a quasi-steady form of the 1D momentum equation, for predicting the flow velocity in the vertical pipe for the advective regime. Future work is focused on developing a probabilistic numerical model for predicting the pipe network configuration and hydraulics under the diffusive regime.

  2. Greenland Meltwater and Arctic Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Timmermans, M. L.; Myers, P. G.; Platov, G.

    2015-12-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, wind-driven components of ice drift and surface ocean currents experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability alternating between anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation regimes. During cyclonic regimes, low sea level atmospheric pressure dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean toward the sub-Arctic seas was intensified. During anticylonic circulation regimes, high sea level pressure dominated over the Arctic driving sea ice and ocean counter-clockwise; the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the sub-Arctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been dominated by an anticyclonic circulation regime with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for these regimes. Of essential importance is to discern the causes and consequences of the apparent break-down in the natural decadal variability of the Arctic climate system, and specifically: Why has the well-pronounced decadal variability observed in the 20th century been replaced by relatively weak interannual changes under anticyclonic circulation regime conditions in the 21st century? We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. In order to test this hypothesis, numerical experiments with several FAMOS (Forum for Arctic Modeling & Observational Synthesis) ice-ocean coupled models have been conducted. In these experiments, Greenland melt freshwater is tracked by passive tracers being constantly released along the Greenland coast. Propagation pathways and time scales of Greenland meltwater within the sub-Arctic seas are discussed.

  3. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  4. A holistic view of marine regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    Conversi, Alessandra; Dakos, Vasilis; Gårdmark, Anna; Ling, Scott; Folke, Carl; Mumby, Peter J.; Greene, Charles; Edwards, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten; Casini, Michele; Pershing, Andrew; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding marine regime shifts is important not only for ecology but also for developing marine management that assures the provision of ecosystem services to humanity. While regime shift theory is well developed, there is still no common understanding on drivers, mechanisms and characteristic of abrupt changes in real marine ecosystems. Based on contributions to the present theme issue, we highlight some general issues that need to be overcome for developing a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystem regime shifts. We find a great divide between benthic reef and pelagic ocean systems in how regime shift theory is linked to observed abrupt changes. Furthermore, we suggest that the long-lasting discussion on the prevalence of top-down trophic or bottom-up physical drivers in inducing regime shifts may be overcome by taking into consideration the synergistic interactions of multiple stressors, and the special characteristics of different ecosystem types. We present a framework for the holistic investigation of marine regime shifts that considers multiple exogenous drivers that interact with endogenous mechanisms to cause abrupt, catastrophic change. This framework takes into account the time-delayed synergies of these stressors, which erode the resilience of the ecosystem and eventually enable the crossing of ecological thresholds. Finally, considering that increased pressures in the marine environment are predicted by the current climate change assessments, in order to avoid major losses of ecosystem services, we suggest that marine management approaches should incorporate knowledge on environmental thresholds and develop tools that consider regime shift dynamics and characteristics. This grand challenge can only be achieved through a holistic view of marine ecosystem dynamics as evidenced by this theme issue.

  5. Dynamic treatment regimes: technical challenges and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Daniel J.; Qian, Min; Pelham, William E.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are of growing interest across the clinical sciences because these regimes provide one way to operationalize and thus inform sequential personalized clinical decision making. Formally, a dynamic treatment regime is a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of clinical intervention. Each decision rule maps up-to-date patient information to a recommended treatment. We briefly review a variety of approaches for using data to construct the decision rules. We then review a critical inferential challenge that results from nonregularity, which often arises in this area. In particular, nonregularity arises in inference for parameters in the optimal dynamic treatment regime; the asymptotic, limiting, distribution of estimators are sensitive to local perturbations. We propose and evaluate a locally consistent Adaptive Confidence Interval (ACI) for the parameters of the optimal dynamic treatment regime. We use data from the Adaptive Pharmacological and Behavioral Treatments for Children with ADHD Trial as an illustrative example. We conclude by highlighting and discussing emerging theoretical problems in this area. PMID:25356091

  6. Dispersive Regimes of the Dicke Model.

    PubMed

    Barberena, Diego; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2017-08-18

    We study two dispersive regimes of the Dicke model in the dynamics of N two-level atoms interacting with a bosonic mode for long interaction times. Firstly, we analyze the model for the regime in which the qubit frequencies are equal and smaller than the mode frequency, and for values of the coupling strength similar or larger than the mode frequency, namely, the deep strong coupling regime. Secondly, we address an interaction that is dependent on the photon number, where the coupling strength is comparable to the geometric mean of the qubit and mode frequencies. We show that the associated dynamics is analytically tractable and provide useful frameworks with which to analyze the system behavior. In the deep strong coupling regime, we unveil the structure of unexpected resonances for specific values of the coupling, present for N ≥ 2, and in the photon-number-dependent regime we demonstrate that all the nontrivial dynamical behavior occurs in the atomic degrees of freedom for a given Fock state. We verify these assertions with numerical simulations of the qubit population and photon-statistic dynamics.

  7. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-09

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile.

  8. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    SciTech Connect

    He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi

    2011-03-15

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  9. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-06

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts.

  10. Multiscale regime shifts and planetary boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Carpenter, Stephen; Rockström, Johan; Scheffer, Marten; Walker, Brian

    2013-07-01

    Life on Earth has repeatedly displayed abrupt and massive changes in the past, and there is no reason to expect that comparable planetary-scale regime shifts will not continue in the future. Different lines of evidence indicate that regime shifts occur when the climate or biosphere transgresses a tipping point. Whether human activities will trigger such a global event in the near future is uncertain, due to critical knowledge gaps. In particular, we lack understanding of how regime shifts propagate across scales, and whether local or regional tipping points can lead to global transitions. The ongoing disruption of ecosystems and climate, combined with unprecedented breakdown of isolation by human migration and trade, highlights the need to operate within safe planetary boundaries.

  11. The diagnostic value of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor compared with C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in children with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sirinoglu, Melis; Soysal, Ahmet; Karaaslan, Ayşe; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Cinel, Ismail; Koç, Ahmet; Tokuç, Gülnur; Yaman, Ali; Haklar, Goncagül; Şirikçi, Önder; Turan, Serap; Altınkanat Gelmez, Gülşen; Söyletir, Güner; Bakır, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic value of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia. A prospective case-control study was performed. Patients included 29 children with febrile neutropenia (FN) and 27 control subjects without any infection or immunosuppressive condition. Blood samples were obtained on the day of admission and on the 4th to 7th days of the hospital stay. The median (minimum-maximum) serum levels of suPAR obtained on the first day of the admission were 2.08 (0.93-9.42) and 2.22 (1.08-5.13) ng/mL for the FN group and the control group, respectively. The median serum levels of suPAR in the FN and control groups were not significantly different (P = .053). The mean serum suPAR level was significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the FN group (P < .05). In the FN group, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUCROC) for suPAR was 0.546, but no optimum cutoff value, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), or positive predictive value (PPV) was obtained. We conclude that suPAR is not useful as a diagnostic biomarker in children with febrile neutropenia; however, persistent high serum suPAR level may predict mortality in FN in children.

  12. Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) in brain tissues of human immunodeficiency virus patients with opportunistic cerebral diseases.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Cinque, Paola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Ferri, Angelita; Lauri, Eleonora; Omodeo-Zorini, Elisabetta; Zerbi, Pietro; Vago, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) play an important role in cell migration and extracellular proteolysis. We previously described uPAR/uPA overexpression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related cerebral diseases. In this study, we examined uPAR/uPA expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in brains of HIV patients with opportunistic cerebral lesions and in HIV-positive/negative controls. uPAR was found in macrophages/microglia with the highest levels in cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis, toxoplasmosis, and lymphomas; in cryptococcosis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases, only a few positive cells were found and no positivity was observed in controls. uPA expression was demonstrated only in a few macrophages/microglia and lymphocytes in all the cases and HIV-positive controls without different pattern of distribution; no uPA immunostaining was found in cryptococcosis and HIV-negative controls. The higher expression of uPAR/uPA in most of the opportunistic cerebral lesions supports their role in these diseases, suggesting their contribution to tissue injury.

  13. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR) is preferentially induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and is required for NGF-driven differentiation.

    PubMed

    Farias-Eisner, R; Vician, L; Silver, A; Reddy, S; Rabbani, S A; Herschman, H R

    2000-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-driven differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells is a well studied model used both to identify molecular, biochemical, and physiological correlates of neurotrophin-driven neuronal differentiation and to determine the causal nature of specific events in this differentiation process. Although epidermal growth factor (EGF) elicits many of the same early biochemical and molecular changes in PC12 cells observed in response to NGF, EGF does not induce molecular or morphological differentiation of PC12 cells. The identification of genes whose expression is differentially regulated by NGF versus EGF in PC12 cells has, therefore, been considered a source of potential insight into the molecular specificity of neurotrophin-driven neuronal differentiation. A "second generation" representational difference analysis procedure now identifies the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR) as a gene that is much more extensively induced by NGF than by EGF in PC12 cells. Both an antisense oligonucleotide for the UPAR mRNA and an antibody directed against UPAR protein block NGF-induced morphological and biochemical differentiation of PC12 cells; NGF-induced UPAR expression is required for subsequent NGF-driven differentiation.

  14. ROS-NFkappaB mediates TGF-beta1-induced expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Nicolas; Villar, Victor; Santibanez, Juan F

    2010-07-01

    TGF-beta1 has been postulated as a pro-oncogenic factor in the late step of the tumoral progression. In transformed cells, TGF-beta1 enhances the capacity to degrade the extracellular matrix, cell invasiveness and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which are crucial steps for metastasis. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are critical components in cell migration and invasion induced by TGF-beta1, however, the exact mechanism by which TGF-beta1 regulates uPA and MMP-9 is not well elucidated so far. In the present study, we analyzed the role of ROS-NFkappaB, signal as mediator in the cell malignity enhancement by TGF-beta1. We found that TGF-beta1 activates NFkappaB, through Rac1-NOXs-ROS-dependent mechanism. Our results shows that TGF-beta1 stimulation of uPA and MMP-9 expression involve NOXs-dependent ROS and NFkappaB, activation, demonstrated by using DPI, NOXs inhibitor, ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine and SN50, an NFkb inhibitor. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of ROS and NFkappaB, abrogates TGF-beta1 stimulation of EMT, cell motility and invasion. Thus, ROS-NFkappaB acts as the crucial signal in TGF-beta1-induced uPA and MMP-9 expression thereby mediating the enhancement of cellular malignity by TGF-beta1.

  15. Transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinases, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator interaction in the cancer epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Santibanez, Juan F; Obradović, Hristina; Kukolj, Tamara; Krstić, Jelena

    2017-07-19

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor that acts as a tumor suppressor in the early stages, while it exerts tumor promoting activities in advanced stages of cancer development. One of the hallmarks of cancer progression is the capacity of cancer cells to migrate and invade surrounding tissues with subsequent metastasis to different organs. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) together with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR), whose main original function described is the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix, play key cellular roles in the enhancement of cell malignancy during cancer progression. TGF-β tightly regulates the expression of several MMPs and uPA/uPAR in cancer cells, which in return can participate in TGF-β activation, thus contributing to tumor malignancy. TGF-β is one of the master factors in the induction of cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and recently both MMPs and uPA/uPAR have also been shown to be implicated in the cancer-associated EMT process. In this review, we analyze the main molecular mechanisms underlying MMPs and uPA/uPAR regulation by TGF-β, as well as their mutual implication in the development of EMT in cancer cells. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Protein Kinase C-α–Mediated Regulation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein and Urokinase Increases Astrocytoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Samson; Mut, Melike; diPierro, Charles G.; Carpenter, Joan E.; Xiao, Aizhen; Kohutek, Zachary A.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Zhao, Yunge; Wang, Jiahu; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive and infiltrative invasion is one of the hallmarks of glioblastoma. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) is expressed by glioblastoma, but the role of this receptor in astrocytic tumor invasion remains poorly understood. We show that activation of protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) phosphorylated and down-regulated LRP expression. Pretreatment of tumor cells with PKC inhibitors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, PKC-α small interfering RNA (siRNA), and short hairpin RNA abrogated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate–induced down-regulation of LRP and inhibited astrocytic tumor invasion in vitro. In xenograft glioblastoma mouse model and in vitro transmembrane invasion assay, LRP-deficient cells, which secreted high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), invaded extensively the surrounding normal brain tissue, whereas the LRP-overexpressing and uPA-deficient cells did not invade into the surrounding normal brain. siRNA, targeted against uPA in LRP-deficient clones, attenuated their invasive potential. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of PKC-α/PI3K signaling pathways in the regulation of LRP-mediated astrocytoma invasion. Thus, a strategy of combining small molecule inhibitors of PKC-α and PI3K could provide a new treatment paradigm for glioblastomas. PMID:17974965

  17. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  18. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Photon Counting Histogram on membrane proteins: Functional dynamics of the GPI-anchored Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Gratton, Enrico; Zamai, Moreno; Caiolfa, Valeria R

    2009-01-01

    The oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins is thought to regulate their association with membrane microdomains, sub-cellular sorting and activity. However, these mechanisms need to be comprehensively explored in living, unperturbed cells, without artificial clustering agents, and using fluorescent protein-tagged chimeras that are fully biologically active. We expressed in HEK293 cells a biologically active chimera of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), the uPAR-mEGFP-GPI. We also produced HEK293/D2D3-mEGFP-GPI cells expressing the truncated form of the receptor, lacking biological activity. We studied the dynamics and oligomerization of the two proteins, combining FCS and PCH analyses, and using subclones with homogenously low expression levels. Overall, the mobile fractions of the two proteins, constituted by monomers and dimers, had comparable diffusion coefficients. However, only for the active receptor the diffusion coefficient decreased in monomer-enriched fractions, suggesting that uPAR monomers might be preferentially engaged in multi-protein transmembrane signaling complexes. Our approach helps in limiting the alteration of the data due to out-of-focus, and minimizing the overestimation of the molecular brightness. Joint to a careful design of the cellular model, it gives reliable estimates of diffusion coefficients and oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins, in steady state conditions, at low expression levels, and in live, unperturbed cells. PMID:18601539

  19. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Resulting from Endometrial Carcinogenesis Enhances Tumor Invasion and Correlates with Poor Outcome of Endometrial Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Yen; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Yun; Huang, Ching-Ting; Tang, Yu-Chien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dysregulated genes involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC), and their possible mechanisms. Endometrial specimens including normal endometrial tissues, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and EEC were analyzed. The expression profiles were compared using GeneChip Array. The gene expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in the training and testing sets to correlate the clinico-pathological parameters of EEC. Immunoblotting, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays were performed in human endometrial cancer cell lines and their transfectants. In microarray analysis, seven dysregulated genes were identified. Only the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were higher in EEC with deep myometrial invasion, positive lympho-vascular space invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced stages. After multivariate analysis, uPA was the only independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in the EEC patients (hazard ratio: 4.65, p = 0.03). uPA may enhance the migratory and invasive capabilities of endometrial tumor cells by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38 molecules. uPA is a dysregulated gene involved in the tumorigenesis, bio-pathological features and outcomes of EEC. uPA may be a potential molecule and target for the detection and treatment of EEC. PMID:26033187

  20. Cytotoxicity of the Urokinase-Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Carbamimidothioic Acid (4-Boronophenyl) Methyl Ester Hydrobromide (BC-11) on Triple-Negative MDA-MB231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Longo, Alessandra; Librizzi, Mariangela; Chuckowree, Irina S; Baltus, Christine B; Spencer, John; Luparello, Claudio

    2015-05-28

    BC-11 is an easily synthesized simple thiouronium-substituted phenylboronic acid, which has been shown to be cytotoxic on triple negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells by inducing a perturbation of cell cycle when administered at a concentration equal to its ED50 at 72 h (117 μM). Exposure of cells to BC-11, either pre-absorbed with a soluble preparation of the N-terminal fragment of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPa), or in co-treatment with two different EGFR inhibitors, indicated that: (i) BC-11 acts via binding to the N-terminus of the enzyme where uPa- and EGF receptor-recognizing sites are present, thereby abrogating the growth-sustaining effect resulting from receptor binding; and (ii) the co-presence of the EGFR inhibitor PD153035 potentiates BC-11's cytotoxicity. Exposure of cells to a higher concentration of BC-11 corresponding to its ED75 at 72 h (250 μM) caused additional impairment of mitochondrial activity, the production of reactive oxygen species and promotion of apoptosis. Therefore, BC-11 treatment appears to show potential for the development of this class of compounds in the prevention and/or therapy of "aggressive" breast carcinoma.

  1. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and photon counting histogram on membrane proteins: functional dynamics of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored urokinase plasminogen activator receptor.

    PubMed

    Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Gratton, Enrico; Zamai, Moreno; Caiolfa, Valeria R

    2008-01-01

    The oligomerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins is thought to regulate their association with membrane microdomains, subcellular sorting, and activity. However, these mechanisms need to be comprehensively explored in living, unperturbed cells, without artificial clustering agents, and using fluorescent protein-tagged chimeras that are fully biologically active. We expressed in human embryo kidnay 293 (HEK293) cells a biologically active chimera of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), the uPAR-mEGFP-GPI. We also produced HEK293/D2D3-mEGFP-GPI cells expressing the truncated form of the receptor, lacking biological activity. We studied the dynamics and oligomerization of the two proteins, combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and photon counting histogram (PCH) analyses, and using subclones with homogenously low expression levels. Overall, the mobile fractions of the two proteins, constituted by monomers and dimers, had comparable diffusion coefficients. However, the diffusion coefficient decreased in monomer-enriched fractions only for the active receptor, suggesting that uPAR monomers might be preferentially engaged in multiprotein transmembrane signaling complexes. Our approach helps in limiting the alteration of the data due to out-of-focus effects and in minimizing the overestimation of the molecular brightness. In addition to a careful design of the cellular model, it gives reliable estimates of diffusion coefficients and oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins, in steady-state conditions, at low expression levels, and in live, unperturbed cells.

  2. Three-dimensional interplay among the ligand-binding domains of the urokinase-plasminogen-activator-receptor-associated protein, Endo180

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Robertson, David; MacFadyen, John R.; Boskovic, Jasminka; Isacke, Clare M.; Llorca, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    Endo180, also known as the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-associated protein (uPARAP), is one of the four members of the mannose receptor family, and is implicated in extracellular-matrix remodelling through its interactions with collagens, sugars and uPAR. The extracellular portion of Endo180 contains an amino-terminal cysteine-rich domain, a single fibronectin type II domain and eight C-type lectin-like domains. We have purified a soluble version of Endo180 and analysed it by single-particle electron microscopy to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal part of the protein at a resolution of 17 Å and reveal, for the first time, the interactions between non-adjacent domains in the mannose receptor family. We show that for Endo180, the cysteine-rich domain contacts the second C-type lectin-like domain, thus providing structural insight into how modulation of its several ligand interactions may regulate Endo180 receptor function. PMID:12856000

  3. Regulation of proteinases during mouse peri-implantation development: urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and cross talk with matrix metalloproteinase 9.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, M G; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Castillo-Trápala, A; Armant, D Randall

    2011-02-01

    Trophoblast cells express urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU) and may depend on its activity for endometrial invasion and tissue remodeling during peri-implantation development. However, the developmental regulation, tissue distribution, and function of PLAU are not completely understood. In this study, the expression of PLAU and its regulation by extracellular matrix proteins was examined by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and plasminogen-casein zymography in cultured mouse embryos. There was a progressive increase in Plau mRNA expression in blastocysts cultured on gestation days 4-8. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (55 kDa) and PLAU (a triplet of 40, 37, and 31 kDa) were present in conditioned medium and embryo lysates, and were adsorbed to the culture plate surface. The temporal expression pattern of PLAU, according to semi-quantitative gel zymography, was similar in non-adhering embryos and embryos cultured on fibronectin, laminin, or type IV collagen, although type IV collagen and laminin upregulated Plau mRNA expression. Immunofluorescence revealed PLAU on the surface of the mural trophectoderm and in non-spreading giant trophoblast cells. Exogenous human plasminogen was transformed to plasmin by cultured embryos and activated endogenous matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). Indeed, the developmental expression profile of MMP9 was similar to that of PLAU. Our data suggest that the intrinsic developmental program predominantly regulates PLAU expression during implantation, and that PLAU could be responsible for activation of MMP9, leading to localized matrix proteolysis as trophoblast invasion commences.

  4. Serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor as a biological marker of bacterial infection in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wentao; Han, Yuliang; Zhao, Jin; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Kai; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    The serum concentration of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects immune activation. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the usefulness of suPAR for the diagnosis and prognosis of bacterial infections. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies reporting the detection of suPAR in adult patients with bacterial infections. Seventeen studies were selected from 671 studies. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of suPAR for diagnosing infection were 0.73 and 0.79, respectively, and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.82. Subgroup analyses revealed suPAR showed similar AUC values for diagnosing sepsis and bacteremia, but the AUC for differentiating sepsis from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was only 0.68. Elevated suPAR levels were significantly associated with a high risk of death, with a pooled risk ratio of 3.37 (95% confidence interval, 2.60–4.38). The pooled sensitivity and specificity for predicting mortality were 0.70 and 0.72, respectivfely, with an AUC of 0.77. Serum suPAR could be a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of bacterial infection, but it is relatively ineffective for differentiating sepsis from SIRS. Further investigation is required to evaluate whether using of suPAR in combination with other biomarkers can improve diagnostic efficacy. PMID:27991579

  5. Clinical Value of Plasma Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Term Neonates with Infection or Sepsis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Siahanidou, Tania; Margeli, Alexandra; Charoni, Stavroula; Giannaki, Maria; Vavourakis, Eustathios; Charisiadou, Athina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Background. suPAR, the soluble form of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, has been identified as a biomarker of infection in adults but its properties in neonatal infection are not known. Methods. Plasma suPAR levels were determined by ELISA in 47 term neonates with infection (19 bacterial and 28 viral) and in 18 healthy neonates as controls. Thirteen out of 47 infected neonates were septic. In all infected neonates, suPAR levels were repeated at 24 hours, 48 hours, 3–5 days, and 7–10 days following admission. Results. Plasma suPAR levels were significantly increased in infected neonates upon admission, whereas they were highest in septic neonates, in comparison with controls (P < 0.001) and correlated positively with serum CRP levels (P = 0.001). At infection subsidence, suPAR concentrations decreased significantly in comparison with baseline (P < 0.001) but remained higher than in controls (P = 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analysis resulted in significant areas under the curve for detecting either infected or septic neonates, but not for discriminating between bacterial and viral cause of infection. Conclusions. suPAR is a diagnostic biomarker of infection or sepsis in term neonates; however, it cannot discriminate bacterial from viral infections and also its utility for monitoring the response to treatment is questioned. PMID:24882949

  6. Regulation of proteinases during mouse peri-implantation development: urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and cross talk with matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Hernández, M G; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Castillo-Trápala, A; Armant, D Randall

    2011-01-01

    Trophoblast cells express urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU) and may depend on its activity for endometrial invasion and tissue remodeling during peri-implantation development. However, the developmental regulation, tissue distribution, and function of PLAU are not completely understood. In this study, the expression of PLAU and its regulation by extracellular matrix proteins was examined by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and plasminogen–casein zymography in cultured mouse embryos. There was a progressive increase in Plau mRNA expression in blastocysts cultured on gestation days 4–8. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (55 kDa) and PLAU (a triplet of 40, 37, and 31 kDa) were present in conditioned medium and embryo lysates, and were adsorbed to the culture plate surface. The temporal expression pattern of PLAU, according to semi-quantitative gel zymography, was similar in non-adhering embryos and embryos cultured on fibronectin, laminin, or type IV collagen, although type IV collagen and laminin upregulated Plau mRNA expression. Immunofluorescence revealed PLAU on the surface of the mural trophectoderm and in non-spreading giant trophoblast cells. Exogenous human plasminogen was transformed to plasmin by cultured embryos and activated endogenous matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). Indeed, the developmental expression profile of MMP9 was similar to that of PLAU. Our data suggest that the intrinsic developmental program predominantly regulates PLAU expression during implantation, and that PLAU could be responsible for activation of MMP9, leading to localized matrix proteolysis as trophoblast invasion commences. PMID:21075828

  7. NFkappaB-dependent regulation of urokinase plasminogen activator by proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract: effect on invasion by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Ryoji; Madhyastha, Radha; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Dhungana, Sandra; Nakajima, Yuichi; Omura, Sayuri; Maruyama, Masugi

    2010-09-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis present major obstacles to successful control of androgen-independent prostate cancer. Cell migration is a fundamental aspect of cancer cell metastasis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is implicated in cell migration and cancer metastasis and has potential to be developed as therapeutic target. In recent years, efficacy of dietary nutrients in preventing and curing cancer has gained increasing attention. One such promising candidate is proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (GSE). We investigated the efficacy of GSE in regulating uPA expression and cell migration using highly metastatic androgen-independent PC3 prostate cancer cells as a model. GSE down-regulated uPA as a function of concentration. Additional studies showed that GSE inhibited DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), which in turn decreased NFkappaB-dependent uPA transcription. Invasion assays revealed the inhibitory effect of GSE on PC3 cell migration. These in-vitro experiments demonstrate the therapeutic property of GSE as an antimetastatic agent by targeting uPA.

  8. Planning for regime change and its aftermath

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    countries’ governing regimes since 9/11–Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya–and U.S. policy at time of writing supports two more. Despite this experience...Iraq, and Libya–and U.S. policy at time of writing supports two more. Despite this experience, and the likely future need, the U.S. has no...time of writing , U.S. policy publicly supports regime change in Syria and North Korea. President Obama’s decision not to militarily intervene to

  9. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  10. Light focusing in the Anderson regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibres in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation-invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibres allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibres in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation-invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations.

  11. Atmospheric weather regimes over tropical South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Vickie S.; Garstang, Michael; Nolf, Scott R.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared radiance measurements by the GOES-6 satellite during April 1986 through April 1987 were used to characterize and identify distinct regimes of persistent large-scale cloudiness patterns over the Amazon Basin. It is suggested that the energetics of the tropical troposphere over the Amazon Basin can be directly related to the GOES large-scale cloudiness patterns. The geometry and persistence of the cloud patterns are influenced by shifts in general circulation features and are likely modulated by 4- to 5-day and 40- to 60-day waves. Diurnal forcing effects are more pronounced during weather regimes characterized by prominently clear skies over land areas.

  12. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Amet, F; Ke, C T; Borzenets, I V; Wang, J; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Deacon, R S; Yamamoto, M; Bomze, Y; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-05-20

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  13. On the regimes of charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2008-05-07

    Charge reversal of the planar electrical double layer is studied by means of a well known integral equation theory. By a numerical analysis, a diagram is constructed with the onset points of charge reversal in the space of the fundamental variables of the system. Within this diagram, two regimes of charge reversal are identified, which are referred to as oscillatory and nonoscillatory. We found that these two regimes can be distinguished through a simple formula. Furthermore, a symmetry between electrostatic and size correlations in charge reversal is exhibited. Agreement of our results with other theories and molecular simulations data is discussed.

  14. Statistical regimes of random laser fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Cavalieri, Stefano; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2007-06-15

    Statistical fluctuations of the light emitted from amplifying random media are studied theoretically and numerically. The characteristic scales of the diffusive motion of light lead to Gaussian or power-law (Levy) distributed fluctuations depending on external control parameters. In the Levy regime, the output pulse is highly irregular leading to huge deviations from a mean-field description. Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model which includes the population of the medium demonstrate the two statistical regimes and provide a comparison with dynamical rate equations. Different statistics of the fluctuations helps to explain recent experimental observations reported in the literature.

  15. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Borzenets, I. V.; Wang, J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Deacon, R. S.; Yamamoto, M.; Bomze, Y.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-05-01

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  16. Comparative climatology of four marine stratocumulus regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    The climatology of marine stratocumulus (MSc) cloud regimes off the west coasts of California, Peru, Morocco, and Angola are examined. Long-term, annual averages are presented for several quantities of interest in the four MSc regimes. The climatologies were constructed using the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). A 40 year time series of observations was extracted for 32 x 32 deg analysis domains. The data were taken from the monthly-averaged, 2 deg product. The resolution of the analysis is therefore limited to scales of greater than 200 km with submonthly variability not resolved. The averages of total cloud cover, sea surface temperature, and surface pressure are presented.

  17. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  18. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  19. The association between HbA1c, fasting glucose, 1-hour glucose and 2-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Follow-up of clinical trial. 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Relative risk of CVD. Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes.

  20. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  1. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics.

  2. Drag-force regimes in granular impact.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T R Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences.

  3. Cross-scale analysis of fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Falk; Carol Miller; Donald McKenzie; Anne E. Black

    2007-01-01

    Cross-scale spatial and temporal perspectives are important for studying contagious landscape disturbances such as fire, which are controlled by myriad processes operating at different scales. We examine fire regimes in forests of western North America, focusing on how observed patterns of fire frequency change across spatial scales. To quantify changes in fire...

  4. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics. PMID:27761005

  5. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of th...

  6. Ignitability of materials in transitional heating regimes

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2004-01-01

    Piloted ignition behavior of materials, particularly wood products, during transitions between heating regimes is measured and modeled in a cone calorimetry (ISO 5660) heating environment. These include (1) effect of material thickness, density, moisture content, and paint coating variations on thermal response characteristics, (2) effect of fire retardant treatment...

  7. Chapter 3: Plant invasions and fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Matthew L. Brooks

    2008-01-01

    The alteration of fire regimes is one of the most significant ways that plant invasions can affect ecosystems (Brooks and others 2004; D'Antonio 2000; D'Antonio and Vitousek 1992; Vitousek 1990). The suites of changes that can accompany an invasion include both direct effects of invaders on native plants through competitive interference, and indirect effects...

  8. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  9. A Global Classification of Contemporary Fire Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S. P.; Kumar, J.; Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fire regimes provide a sensitive indicator of changes in climate and human use as the concept includes fire extent, season, frequency, and intensity. Fires that occur outside the distribution of one or more aspects of a fire regime may affect ecosystem resilience. However, global scale data related to these varied aspects of fire regimes are highly inconsistent due to incomplete or inconsistent reporting. In this study, we derive a globally applicable approach to characterizing similar fire regimes using long geophysical time series, namely MODIS hotspots since 2000. K-means non-hierarchical clustering was used to generate empirically based groups that minimized within-cluster variability. Satellite-based fire detections are known to have shortcomings, including under-detection from obscuring smoke, clouds or dense canopy cover and rapid spread rates, as often occurs with flashy fuels or during extreme weather. Such regions are free from preconceptions, and the empirical, data-mining approach used on this relatively uniform data source allows the region structures to emerge from the data themselves. Comparing such an empirical classification to expectations from climate, phenology, land use or development-based models can help us interpret the similarities and differences among places and how they provide different indicators of changes of concern. Classifications can help identify where large infrequent mega-fires are likely to occur ahead of time such as in the boreal forest and portions of the Interior US West, and where fire reports are incomplete such as in less industrial countries.

  10. Climatic regimes of tropical convection and rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bin )

    1994-07-01

    Annual distribution and phase propagation of tropical convection are delineated using harmonic and amplitude-phase characteristics analysis of climatological pentad mean outgoing longwave radiation and monthly frequencies of highly reflective cloud. An annual eastward propagation of peak rainy season along the equator from the central Indian Ocean (60[degrees]E) to Arafura Sea (130[degrees]E) is revealed. This indicates a transition from the withdrawal of the Indian summer monsoon to the onset of the Australian summer monsoon. Significant bimodal variations are found around major summer monsoon regions. These variations originate from the interference of two adjacent regimes. The convergence zones over the eastern North Pacific, the South Pacific, and the southwest Indian Ocean are identified as a marine monsoon regime that is characterized by a unimodal variation with a concentrated summer rainfall associated with the development of surface westerlies equatorward of a monsoon trough. Conversely, the central North Pacific and North Atlantic convergence zones between persistent northeast and southeast trades are classified as trade-wind convergence zones; which differ from the marine monsoon regime by their persistent rainy season and characteristic bimodal variation with peak rainy seasons occurring in late spring and fall. The roles of the annual march of sea surface temperature in the phase propagation and formation of various climatic regimes of tropical convection are also discussed. 34 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-25

    1984 OPCW U.N. Conference on Disarmament EAA, 1979 AECA, 1976 Biological Weapons Anti- Terrorism Act Chem- Bio Weapons Control Warfare...Deauville, France. They reaffirmed the goals set out at the 2010 Summit for future Global Partnership activities: nuclear and radiological security, bio ... herbicides and riot control agents. Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status Congressional Research Service 44 Author Contact

  12. Knowledge Regimes and Contradictions in Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Petter; Prøitz, Tine Sophie; Sandberg, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The article outlines a theoretical framework for understanding education policy and education reforms based on the concept of knowledge regimes. The concept refers to understandings and definitions of governance and procedural aspects, manners of governing and curriculum issues, thus it comprises contents, structures, and processes of education…

  13. Scaling Fire Regimes in Space and Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability are important properties of the forest fire regimes of coniferous forests of southwestern North America. We use a variety of analytical techniques to examine scaling in a surface fire regime in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA, based on an original data set collected from Monument Canyon Research Natural Area (MCN). Spatio-temporal scale dependence in the fire regime can be analyzed quantitatively using statistical descriptors of the fire regime, such as fire frequency and mean fire interval. We describe a theory of the event-area (EA) relationship, an extension of the species-area relationship for events distributed in space and time; the interval-area (IA) relationship, is a related form for fire intervals. We use the EA and IA to demonstrate scale dependence in the MCN fire regime. The slope and intercept of these functions are influenced by fire size, frequency, and spatial distribution, and thus are potentially useful metrics of spatio-temporal synchrony of events in the paleofire record. Second, we outline a theory of fire interval probability, working from first principles in fire ecology and statistics. Fires are conditional events resulting from the interaction of multiple contingent factors that must be satisfied for an event to occur. Outcomes of this kind represent a multiplicative process for which a lognormal model is the limiting distribution. We examine the application of this framework to two probability models, the Weibull and lognormal distributions, which can be used to characterize the distribution of fire intervals over time. Lastly, we present a general model for the collector's curve, with application to the theory and effects of sample size in fire history. Sources of uncertainty in fire history can be partitioned into an error typology; analytical methods used in fire history (particularly the formation of composite fire records) are designed to minimize certain types of error in inference

  14. Impacts of different hydrodynamic regimes on flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro; Amoudry, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    A number of activities carried out in coastal zones and estuaries are affected by sediment transport. Therefore, good knowledge of the processes involved is necessary to adequately manage these areas. Flocculation is a key process on fine sediment dynamics, which affects the effective particle size and settling velocity. The process is further complicated under the combined effect of currents and waves. This research seeks to improve our understanding of the flocculation process under the combined effect of currents and waves. The study site is the Dee Estuary located in Liverpool Bay, United Kingdom. Measurements of volume concentration, grain size and current velocities near the sea bed were obtained from a mooring deployed between 12 February 2008 and 9 March 2008. Turbulent properties could also be calculated because of the fast sampling rate used for current velocities. Water samples were taken from a research vessel during the first two days of the study in order to calibrate moored instruments and convert volume to mass concentration. The observations almost covered two fortnightly periods and three different dynamic regimes can be distinguished: currents-only, combined waves and currents, and wave dominated. During the currents-only regime, floc aggregation and breakup coincide with periods of low and high turbulent stress respectively. The combination of waves and spring tide currents makes the second regime and the floc breakup is most dominant when waves are higher than one meter and small flocs are found even with low turbulent stress from both waves and currents. The third regime is identified as wave-dominant during neap tides with current speed less than 0.25 m/s and waves of 1-2 meters height. In this regime the wave effect takes large sediment into suspension at the same time as small particle sizes from floc breakup. In this case the median particle size is strongly related to the wave height which means that a slight particle aggregation is still

  15. Regime Dependant Microphysical Variability in Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, B.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lang, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Of utmost importance for global precipitation estimates from satellites such as TRMM and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is to understand processes that lead to variability in precipitation on sub-seasonal, seasonal, and climatological scales. Many studies have linked differences in rainfall characteristics such as mean diameter (D0) to sub-seasonal regime variability forced by large scale wind shifts, topography, and continental and maritime convection, across various regions of the globe. Several analyses have tied differences between regimes to differing microphysical processes that drive changes in the drop-size distributions occurring in convective rainfall. For example, decreased ice mass aloft and smaller mean diameters are indicative of warm rain processes, while vigorous ice formation leads to large, melting ice to create large drops. If the microphysical variability in different regimes is characterized and understood, the results could be used to improve satellite precipitation algorithms. The polarimetric, Doppler C-band radar, CPOL, located near Darwin, Australia provides a unique platform to study differences in microphysics between land and ocean, as well as variability between monsoon and break periods. The focus of this study is to examine the microphysical processes occurring in four distinct regimes around Darwin (monsoon-land, monsoon-ocean, break-land, break-ocean), using polarimetric data from CPOL. Analyses such as contoured frequency by altitude (CFADs) diagrams, cumulative distribution functions, and mean profiles of precipitation water mass, precipitation ice mass, reflectivity, differential reflectivity and specific differential phase will aide in understanding the physics of precipitation in these regimes. The formation of precipitation ice aloft, warm rain processes, and the contributions of warm rain and cold cloud processes including melting of ice into large drops, will be linked to differences in D0, rain

  16. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  17. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers.

  18. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  19. Photoelectron circular dichroism in different ionization regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenhaupt, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) describes an asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) from photoionization of randomly oriented enantiomers with circularly polarized light. Beaulieu et al present a comprehensive set of measured PADs from multiphoton ionization of limonene and fenchone in different ionization regimes (multiphoton and tunneling) and analyze the resulting PECD (Beaulieu et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 102002). From their observations the authors conclude that the PECD is universal in the sense that the molecular chirality is encoded in the PAD independent of the ionization regime. The analysis is supplemented by a classical model based on electron scattering in a chiral potential. The paper presents beautiful data and is an important step towards a more complete physical picture of PECD. The results and their interpretation stimulate the ongoing vivid debate on the role of resonances in multiphoton PECD.

  20. Steady and transient regimes in hydropower plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajic, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydropower plant that has been in operation for about 30 years has to be reconstructed. They have already installed 12 Kaplan turbines, the largest in the world at that time. The existing CAM relationship was determined based on hydraulic model tests and checked by efficiency on-site tests. It was also tested based on turbine bearing vibrations. In order to discover vibrations and long cracks on stay vanes detailed on-site measurements were performed. Influence of the modification of the trailing edges on the dynamic stresses of the stay vanes is also shown. In order to improve power output transient regimes were analyzed, both experimentally and numerically. Reversible hydropower plant, a pioneer in Europe since it was the first Pump storage power plant constructed with the highest head pump-turbines in the world. Analyses of transient regimes discover some problems with S-shaped characteristics coupled with non-symmetrical penstock.

  1. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  2. Flamelet Regime Diagram for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Lee; Ihme, Matthias; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    The flamelet model has been widely used in numerical combustion investigations, particularly for the closure of large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. In most cases, the simulation results demonstrated good agreements with their experimental counterparts. However, a systematic analysis of the flamelet model's applicability, as well as its potential limitations, is seldom conducted, and the model performance is usually based only on a-posteriori comparisons. The objective of this work is to derive a metric that can formally quantify the suitability of the flamelet model in different flame configurations. For this purpose, a flamelet regime diagram has been developed and studied in the context of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent lifted jet flame. The implementation of the regime diagram in LES has been investigated through explicit filtering of the DNS results.

  3. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) stimulates triglyceride synthesis in Huh7 hepatoma cells via p38-dependent upregulation of DGAT2.

    PubMed

    Paland, Nicole; Gamliel-Lazarovich, Aviva; Coleman, Raymond; Fuhrman, Bianca

    2014-11-01

    The liver is the central organ of fatty acid and triglyceride metabolism. Oxidation and synthesis of fatty acids and triglycerides is under the control of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α. Impairment of these receptors' function contributes to the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver resulting in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) was shown to regulate gene expression in the liver involving PPARγ transcriptional activity. In this study we questioned whether uPA modulates triglyceride metabolism in the liver, and investigated the mechanisms involved in the observed processes. Huh7 hepatoma cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of uPA for 24 h uPA dose-dependently increased the cellular triglyceride mass, and this effect resulted from increased de novo triglyceride synthesis mediated by the enzyme diglyceride acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2). Also, the amount of free fatty acids was highly up regulated by uPA through activation of the transcription factor SREBP-1. Chemical activation of PPARα further increased uPA-stimulated triglyceride synthesis, whereas inhibition of p38, an upstream activator of PPARα, completely abolished the stimulatory effect of uPA on both triglyceride synthesis and DGAT2 upregulation. The effect of uPA on triglyceride synthesis in Huh7 cells was mediated via binding to its receptor, the uPAR. In vivo studies in uPAR(-/-) mice demonstrated that no lipid droplets were observed in their livers compared to C57BL/6 mice and the triglyceride levels were significantly lower. This study presents a new biological function of the uPA/uPAR system in the metabolism of triglycerides and might present a new target for an early therapeutic intervention for NAFLD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Soluble Urokinase Receptor Levels Are Correlated with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Lesions in IgA Nephropathy: A Cohort Study from China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shui-Ming; Han, Min; Chen, Mei-Xue; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guang-Chang; Li, Yue-Qiang; Dai, Wei; Ge, Shu-Wang; Deng, Yuan-Jun; Guo, Yan-Yan; Li, Xiao-Qing; Haller, Hermann; Xu, Gang; Rong, Song

    2015-01-01

    Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) may be involved in the pathological mechanisms of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) changes. However, it remains unclear whether suPAR is correlated with the FSGS-like lesions in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We measured the plasma suPAR levels in 138 patients with IgAN, and then their clinical and pathological relationships were analyzed. We found that the plasma suPAR levels were significantly correlated with age and renal function by both univariate and multivariate analysis in our IgAN patient cohort. Female had higher plasma suPAR levels and no significant correlation was observed between plasma suPAR levels and 24-h urine protein and highly sensitive C-reaction protein with multivariate analysis. In our cohort, sixty of these IgAN patients could be diagnosed with a type of FSGS lesions. The plasma suPAR levels were higher in the IgAN patients with FSGS lesions than in the IgAN patients without FSGS lesions by univariate (P < 0.0001) and multivariate (P < 0.001) analysis adjusting for other predictor variables, which might be helpful to differentiate the pathological changes with and without FSGS lesions. And the optimal cutoff value was 1806 pg/ml in this study. The plasma suPAR concentrations were also associated with the degree of tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis in both univariate and multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the plasma suPAR levels were correlated with the percentage of crescents, not global sclerosis and arterial lesions. Our study suggested that the plasma suPAR levels were associated with age, gender, renal function, the degree of tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis and the percentage of crescent formation. The plasma suPAR might be a potential predictor for the presence of FSGS pathological lesions in Chinese patients with IgAN.

  5. Tissue-specific inhibition of urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression in the testes of mice by inducible lentiviral RNA interference causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Xiong, Zhe; Hu, Lian; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2017-03-16

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is involved in many physiological processes, including male infertility. To explore the effects of uPA in male reproduction, we constructed an inducible uPA short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system expressed by lentiviral vectors. After proving inhibition of uPA expression in the mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 by 1μgmL-1 doxycycline (Dox), two lentivirus (pLenti4-shRNA and pLenti6/TR) were co-microinjected into mouse testes to produce TetR&shuPA mice model. Though oral gavage by 0.75mgmL-1 Dox each day for 1 week, the Plau mRNA expression, uPA protein level and uPA enzyme activity in mice testis decreased significantly in TetR&shuPA mice model. After Dox induction of 1 week, the TetR&shuPA mice mated with female mice. Our results show that the pregnancy rate was reduced by approximately 40% and the sperm motility also decreased significantly. These data indicated that downregulation of uPA could decrease the fertility of male mice, which may be caused by a reduction in sperm motility. To investigate the reversible effect and safety of the inducible uPA shRNA system, we withdraw Dox and found the mating rate and sperm motility gradually recovered after 2 weeks. The histopathology structure of the testis, epididymis, and main organs was not altered significantly. The results of the present study indicating that uPA may be regarded as a novel target for the regulation of male fertility.

  6. Cyclization of the Urokinase Receptor-Derived Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Tyr Peptide Generates a Potent Inhibitor of Trans-Endothelial Migration of Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Katia; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Di Carluccio, Gioconda; Merlino, Francesco; Motti, Maria Letizia; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88-92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility. We and others have previously documented that the uPAR88-92 sequence, even in the form of synthetic linear peptide (SRSRY), interacts with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1), henceforth inducing cell migration of several cell lines, including monocytes. FPR1 is mainly expressed by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and plays a crucial role in chemotaxis. In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the SRSRY sequence generates a new potent and stable inhibitor of monocyte trafficking. In rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-2H3/ETFR cells expressing high levels of constitutively activated FPR1, the cyclic SRSRY peptide ([SRSRY]) blocks FPR1 mediated cell migration by interfering with both internalization and ligand-uptake of FPR1. Similarly to RBL-2H3/ETFR cells, [SRSRY] competes with fMLF for binding to FPR1 and prevents agonist-induced FPR1 internalization in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Unlike scramble [RSSYR], [SRSRY] inhibits fMLF-directed migration of monocytes in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 0.01 nM. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cell exposure to fMLF gradient causes a marked cytoskeletal re-organization with the formation of F-actin rich pseudopodia that are prevented by the addition of [SRSRY]. Furthermore, [SRSRY] prevents migration of human primary monocytes and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] is a new FPR1 inhibitor which may suggest the development of new drugs for treating pathological conditions sustained by increased motility of monocytes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25938482

  7. Expression of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor on Monocytes from Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Effect of Glatiramer Acetate (Copolymer 1)

    PubMed Central

    Balabanov, Roumen; Lisak, Deena; Beaumont, Thomas; Lisak, Robert P.; Dore-Duffy, Paula

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in which peripheral blood monocytes play an important role. We have previously reported that patients with chronic progressive MS (CPMS) have significantly increased numbers of circulating monocytes which express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In the present study, we examined the expression of uPAR on monocytes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) not currently participating in a clinical trial and in patients with RRMS who were enrolled in a double-blind multicenter clinical trial designed to examine the effect of glatiramer acetate (copolymer 1; Copaxone) on relapsing disease. Patients with CPMS have sustained high levels of circulating uPAR-positive (uPAR+) monocytes. In comparison, patients with RRMS displayed variable levels of circulating uPAR+ monocytes. Mean values for uPAR in patients with RRMS were above those seen for controls but were not as high as those observed for patients with secondary progressive MS. Patients with RRMS in the clinical trial also had variable levels of monocyte uPAR. However, patients in the treatment group displayed lower levels following 2 years of treatment. In both placebo-treated and glatiramer acetate-treated patients, the percentage of circulating uPAR+ monocytes, as well as the density of uPAR expressed per cell (mean linear fluorescence intensity), increased just prior to the onset of a clinically documented exacerbation. Values fell dramatically with the development of clinical symptoms. uPAR levels in all groups correlated with both clinical activity and severity. Results indicate that monocyte activation is impatient in MS and that glatiramer acetate may have a significant effect on monocyte activation in patients with RRMS. PMID:11687463

  8. Unchanged plasma levels of the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients and cardiopulmonary bypass use.

    PubMed

    Gozdzik, Waldemar; Adamik, Barbara; Gozdzik, Anna; Rachwalik, Maciej; Kustrzycki, Wojciech; Kübler, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been recently recognized as a potential biological marker of various disease states, but the impact of a major surgical intervention on the suPAR level has not yet been established. The aim of our study was to investigate if the induction of a systemic inflammatory reaction in response to cardiopulmonary bypass would be accompanied by an increase in the plasma suPAR level. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were added. Based on the baseline suPAR level, patients were divided into group 1 (suPAR within normal range) or group 2 (suPAR above range). Blood was collected before the induction of anesthesia and 6 and 24 hours after surgery. Plasma suPAR, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, troponin I, NT-proBNP, and NGAL were quantified to assess the impact of surgical trauma on these markers. The baseline suPAR level was within the normal range in 31 patients (3.3 ng/mL), and elevated in 29 (5.1 ng/mL) (p<0.001). Baseline mediators of systemic inflammatory reaction concentrations (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8) and organ injury indices (troponin I, NT-proBNP, and NGAL) were low and increased after surgery in all patients (p<0.05). The surgery did not cause significant changes in the suPAR level either at 6 or 24 hours after, however the difference between groups observed at baseline remained substantial during the postoperative period. There was no change in the suPAR level observed in patients subjected to elective cardiac coronary artery bypass surgery and CPB, despite activation of a systemic inflammatory reaction.

  9. The relationship between levels of plasma-soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and presence of migraine attack and aura.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Nigar; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Sirin, Burcu; Yılmaztekin, Sureyya; Kutlu, Gülnihal

    2017-10-01

    Migraine is one of the most common types of pain associated with sterile inflammatory conditions. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a potential novel inflammatory marker. We aim to determine the association between serum values of suPAR, procalcitonin, fibrinogen, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and migraine disease characteristics. The study involved a total of 60 migraine patients (33 patients in the interictal period, 27 patients in the attack period) and 30 healthy individuals. The serum values of suPAR were found to be significantly higher in migraine patients in the attack period than in migraine patients in the interictal period, and in healthy individuals (p < .01 for both). In addition, levels of suPAR were determined to be higher in migraine with aura patients than in migraine without aura patients. When we subdivided migraine patients according to frequency of attack (attacks/month), significant differences were found between the suPAR and procalcitonin levels (measured during the attack period) of those in the frequent-attack group (4-5 or more) versus those in the less frequent attack group (less than 4). Serum levels of procalcitonin were shown to be significantly higher in migraine patients during the attack period compared with migraine patients in the interictal period and in control subjects (p = .001 for both). Significant differences were found between plasma levels of fibrinogen in migraine patients versus control subjects (p < .01). No statistically significant difference was found between levels of hs-CRP in migraine patients versus the control group. These findings may show that presenting a high level of suPAR in migraine patients with attack and aura results to predisposition to occurring on the symptoms and that high levels of suPAR, procalcitonin and fibrinogen in patients with migraine result in neurogenic inflammation during migraine headaches.

  10. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso1, Mario Del

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the “path generating” mesenchymal to the “path finding” amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:24681666

  11. The ultrasound contrast imaging properties of lipid microbubbles loaded with urokinase in dog livers and their thrombolytic effects when combined with low-frequency ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shu-Ting; Kang, Xiao-Ning; Liao, Yi-Ran; Wang, Wei; Ai, Hong; Chen, Li-Na; Luo, Hui-Ting; Fu, Rong-Guo; Tan, Li-Fang; Shen, Xin-Liang; Wang, Bing

    2014-04-01

    A new microbubble loaded with urokinase (uPA-MB) was explored in a previous study. However, its zeta potential and ultrasound contrast imaging properties and its thrombolytic effects when combined with low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS) were unclear. The zeta potential and ultrasound contrast imaging property of 5 uPA-MBs loading with 50,000 IU uPA was respectively detected using a Malvern laser particle analyzer and a Logiq 9 digital premium ultrasound system. Its ultrasound contrast imaging property was performed on the livers of two healthy dogs to compare with SonoVue. And the clot mass loss rate, D-dimer concentration and surface morphology of the clot residues were measured to evaluate the thrombolytic effect after treatment with three doses of 5 uPA-MBs combined with LFUS in vitro. The zeta potential of 5 uPA-MBs (-27.0 ± 2.40 mV) was higher than that of normal microbubbles (-36.95 ± 1.77 mV). Contrast-enhanced imaging of the hepatic vessels using 5 uPA-MBs was similar to SonoVue, while the imaging duration of 5 uPA-MBs (10 min) was longer than SonoVue (6 min). The thrombolytic effect of three doses of uPA-MBs combined with LFUS was significantly better than that of the control group and showed dose dependence. The 5 uPA-MBs have a negative charge on their surface and good echogenicity as ultrasound contrast agents. The 5 uPA-MBs combined with LFUS can promote thrombolysis in a dose-dependent manner.

  12. The preparation of a new self-made microbubble-loading urokinase and its thrombolysis combined with low-frequency ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shu-Ting; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Ya-Wen; Jing, Bo-Bin; Li, Ying-Xue; Liao, Yi-Ran; Kang, Xiao-Ning; Zang, Wei-Jin; Wang, Bing

    2011-11-01

    Urokinase (uPA) is used widely for thrombosis therapy in the clinic. However, ways to minimize its adverse effect of hemorrhage are still being studied. As a new technique for the local delivery of genes and drugs, ultrasound (US) contrast agents, microbubbles (MBs), have been mentioned. The purpose of this study is to explore a more efficacious and safer thrombolytic method by preparing three groups of self-made microbubble-loading uPA (uPA-MBs) (1 uPA-MBs, 5 uPA-MBs and 10 uPA-MBs) using freeze-drying methods and measuring their thrombolysis when combined in vitro with low-frequency US. The results showed the mean concentration, mean diameter, pH value and encapsulation efficiency of uPA of the three groups of uPA-MBs were approximately 2.08-2.82 × 10(8)/mL, ∼3.13 μm, 6.89-6.99 and from (78.08% ± 0.57%) to (57.23% ± 0.94%), respectively. Under US exposure, the loaded uPA demonstrated bioactivity by agarose fibrin plate and in vitro thrombolysis of the three uPA-MBs also showed higher effects than in the group of those who received uPA-MBs alone, the control group or the US group. In conclusion, the physiochemical properties of these self-made uPA-MBs are suitable for intravenous administration but 1 uPA-MB and 5 uPA-MBs are better than 10 uPA-MBs. uPA-MBs combined with US can decrease the in vitro dosage of uPA for thrombolysis.

  13. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in acute care: a strong marker of disease presence and severity, readmission and mortality. A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Ladelund, Steen; Haupt, Thomas Huneck; Ellekilde, Gertrude; Poulsen, Jørgen Hjelm; Iversen, Kasper; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Andersen, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Objective Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an inflammatory biomarker associated with presence and progression of disease and with increased risk of mortality. We aimed to evaluate the unspecific biomarker suPAR as a prognostic marker in patients admitted to acute care. Methods This registry-based retrospective cohort study included 4343 consecutively admitted patients from the Acute Medical Unit at a large Danish university hospital. Time to readmission and death were analysed by multiple Cox regression. Results were reported as HRs for 30-day and 90-day follow-up. Results During 30-day follow-up, 782 patients (18.0%) were readmitted and 224 patients (5.2%) died. Comparing 30-day readmission and mortality between patients in the highest and lowest suPAR quartiles yielded HRs of 2.11 (95% CI 1.70 to 2.62) and 4.11 (95% CI 2.46 to 6.85), respectively, when adjusting for age, sex, Charlson score and C reactive protein. Area under the curve for receiver operating characteristics curve analysis of suPAR for 30-day mortality was 0.84 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.86). Furthermore, in the entire cohort, women had slightly higher suPAR compared with men, and suPAR was associated with age, admission time, admission to intensive care unit and Charlson score. Conclusions In this large unselected population of acute medical patients, suPAR is strongly associated with disease severity, readmission and mortality after adjusting for all other risk factors, indicating that suPAR adds information to established prognostic indicators. While patients with low suPAR levels have low risk of readmission and mortality, patients with high suPAR levels have a high risk of adverse events. PMID:27590986

  14. Modulation of Cellular Migration and Survival by c-Myc through the Downregulation of Urokinase (uPA) and uPA Receptor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Daniela; Votta, Giuseppina; Schulze, Almut; Downward, Julian; Caputi, Mario; Stoppelli, Maria Patrizia; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that c-Myc proapoptotic activity accounts for most of its restraint of tumor formation. We established a telomerase-immortalized human epithelial cell line expressing an activatable c-Myc protein. We found that c-Myc activation induces, in addition to increased sensitivity to apoptosis, reductions in cell motility and invasiveness. Transcriptome analysis revealed that urokinase (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR) were strongly downregulated by c-Myc. Evidence is provided that the repression of uPA and uPAR may account for most of the antimigratory and proapoptotic activities of c-Myc. c-Myc is known to cooperate with Ras in cellular transformation. We therefore investigated if this cooperation could converge in the control of uPA/uPAR expression. We found that Ras is able to block the effects of c-Myc activation on apoptosis and cellular motility but not on cell invasiveness. Accordingly, the activation of c-Myc in the context of Ras expression had only minor influence on uPAR expression but still had a profound repressive effect on uPA expression. Thus, the differential regulation of uPA and uPAR by c-Myc and Ras correlates with the effects of these two oncoproteins on cell motility, invasiveness, and survival. In conclusion, we have discovered a novel link between c-Myc and uPA/uPAR. We propose that reductions of cell motility and invasiveness could contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by c-Myc and that the regulation of uPA and uPAR expression may be a component of the ability of c-Myc to reduce motility and invasiveness. PMID:20123981

  15. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shu-ichi; Tanaka, Suguru; Maeda, Daichi; Morita, Hideaki; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Ito, Takahide; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events. Purpose We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) among cardiac inpatients. Methods and Results In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women) admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P<0.001), LVMI (R = 0.16, P = 0.014) and BNP (R = 0.46, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, the highest suPAR tertile (> 3236 pg/mL) was associated with low LVEF (< 50%) and elevated BNP (> 300 pg/mL) with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–12.1) and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32–21.8), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR)), C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR) to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR) and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046) and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029). Conclusions suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis. PMID:28135310

  16. Mouse ovarian granulosa cells produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator, whereas the corresponding rat cells produce tissue-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    It is well established that rat ovarian granulosa cells produce tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The synthesis and secretion of the enzyme are induced by gonadotropins, and correlate well with the time of follicular rupture in vivo. We have found that in contrast, mouse granulosa cells produce a different form of plasminogen activator, the urokinase-type (uPA). As with tPA synthesis in the rat, uPA production by mouse granulosa cells is induced by gonadotropins, dibutyryl cAMP, and prostaglandin E2. However, dexamethasone, a drug which has no effect on tPA synthesis in rat cells inhibits uPA synthesis in the mouse. Results of these determinations made in cell culture were corroborated by examining follicular fluid, which is secreted in vivo predominantly by granulosa cells, from stimulated rat and mouse ovarian follicles. Rat follicular fluid contained only tPA, and mouse follicular fluid only uPA, indicating that in vivo, granulosa cells from the two species are secreting different enzymes. The difference in the type of plasminogen activator produced by the rat and mouse granulosa cells was confirmed at the messenger RNA level. After hormone stimulation, only tPA mRNA was present in rat cells, whereas only uPA mRNA was found in mouse cells. Furthermore, the regulation of uPA levels in mouse cells occurs via transient modulation of steady-state levels of mRNA, a pattern similar to that seen with tPA in rat cells. PMID:3040774

  17. A distinct basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)/FGF receptor interaction distinguishes urokinase-type plasminogen activator induction from mitogenicity in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rusnati, M; Dell'Era, P; Urbinati, C; Tanghetti, E; Massardi, M L; Nagamine, Y; Monti, E; Presta, M

    1996-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) induces cell proliferation and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) production in fetal bovine aortic endothelial GM 7373 cells. In the present paper we investigated the role of the interaction of FGF-2 with tyrosine-kinase (TK) FGF receptors (FGFRs) in mediating uPA up-regulation in these cells. The results show that FGF-2 antagonists suramin, protamine, heparin, the synthetic peptide FGF-2(112-155), and a soluble form of FGFR-1 do not inhibit FGF-2-mediated uPA up-regulation at concentrations that affect growth factor binding to cell surface receptors and mitogenic activity. In contrast, tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitors and overexpression of a dominant negative TK- mutant of FGFR-1 abolish the uPA-inducing activity of FGF-2, indicating that FGFR and its TK activity are essential in mediating uPA induction. Accordingly, FGF-2 induces uPA up-regulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with wild-type FGFR-1, -2, -3, or -4 but not with TK- FGFR-1 mutant. Small unilamellar phosphatidyl choline:cholesterol vesicles loaded with FGF-2 increased uPA production in GM 7373 cells in the absence of a mitogenic response. Liposome-encapsulated FGF-2 showed a limited but significant capacity, relative to free FGF-2, to interact with FGFR both at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C and to be internalized within the cell. uPA up-regulation by liposome-encapsulated FGF-2 was quenched by neutralizing anti-FGF-2 antibodies, indicating that the activity of liposome-delivered FGF-2 is mediated by an extracellular action of the growth factor. Taken together, the data indicate that a distinct interaction of FGF-2 with FGFR, quantitatively and/or qualitatively different from the one that leads to mitogenicity, is responsible for the uPA-inducing activity of the growth factor. Images PMID:8868466

  18. Epithelial and Stromal Cell Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Expression Differentially Correlates with Survival in Rectal Cancer Stages B and C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seong Beom; Chan, Charles; Dent, Owen F.; Mohamedali, Abidali; Kwun, Sun Young; Clarke, Candice; Fletcher, Julie; Chapuis, Pierre H.; Nice, Edouard C.; Baker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been proposed as a potential prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. However, CRC uPAR expression remains controversial, especially regarding cell types where uPAR is overexpressed (e.g., epithelium (uPARE) or stroma-associated cells (uPARS)) and associated prognostic relevance. In this study, two epitope-specific anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could discriminate expression of uPARE from uPARS and were used to examine this association with survival of stages B and C rectal cancer (RC) patients. Using immunohistochemistry, MAbs #3937 and R4 were used to discriminate uPARE from uPARS respectively in the central and invasive frontal regions of 170 stage B and 179 stage C RC specimens. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine association with survival. uPAR expression occurred in both epithelial and stromal compartments with differential expression observed in many cases, indicating uPARE and uPARS have different cellular roles. In the central and invasive frontal regions, uPARE was adversely associated with overall stage B survival (HR = 1.9; p = 0.014 and HR = 1.5; p = 0.031, respectively) reproducing results from previous studies. uPARS at the invasive front was associated with longer stage C survival (HR = 0.6; p = 0.007), reflecting studies demonstrating that macrophage peritumoural accumulation is associated with longer survival. This study demonstrates that different uPAR epitopes should be considered as being expressed on different cell types during tumour progression and at different stages in RC. Understanding how uPARE and uPARS expression affects survival is anticipated to be a useful clinical prognostic marker of stages B and C RC. PMID:25692297

  19. The nuclear non-proliferation treaty regime

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) regime, including national safeguards agreements and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Statute, embodies the international effort to ban illicit transfers of nuclear material and acquisition or transfer of nuclear weaponry. Included are objectives and primary obligations, legal bases, institutional oversight, trade restrictions, protection of information, penal consequences, and role of the United Nations. Regional agreements supplement the NPT.

  20. Maxwellian distribution in non-classical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; L. Helvey, Shannon; McCumber, Jeremy

    2002-12-01

    A molecular dynamics investigation shows that the assumption of molecular chaos remains valid in the non-classical regime. Consequently, the velocity distribution function of an extremely dense system of spinless particles relaxes into Maxwellian, even in the presence of arbitrary interactions between the particles of the system. Systems with densities exceeding 30 times solid densities are investigated using a soft Lennard-Jones interparticle potential energy function.

  1. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  2. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  3. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  4. Electron dynamics in an elliptical bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Atefeh; Sedaghatizadeh, Mahmoud; Kordbacheh, Amir Hossein Ahmadkhan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of the electron in an elliptical bubble regime is investigated. In this regime, a high intensity laser pulse in a plasma creates an electron cavity called the blow-out (bubble or cavitation) regime which is usually considered to be in a spherical shape at rest. Through balancing the ponderomotive potential of a non-plane laser pulse and bubble electrostatic potential, the shape of the bubble is analyzed to be elliptical in contrast to most available theories which indicate the spherical bubble. Thus, the present model introduces a different dynamics for the electron compared with the spherical one. The longitudinal electric field experienced by the electron and also the electron energy gain in the elliptical model is investigated to be more than that in the spherical model. Moreover, it is found that the shape of the bubble will influence the electron trapping range so that the electron is bounded more in the spherical bubble. As a result, it is crucially important to take the shape of the bubble influence on the electron acceleration process into account. The results indicate that the distribution of the electromagnetic fields inside the bubble in the ellipse model is more close to particle-in-cell simulation compared to the spherical one [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(11), 5256 (2004)].

  5. Dynamical Response of Continuum Regime Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, H. L.

    2009-11-01

    Probe dynamic response is sometimes used as a way to increase the amount of information obtained from Langmuir probes [1]. In this poster, the effects of frequency dependent probe capacitance and coupling of probe fields to damped Langmuir waves and damped ion acoustic waves are considered. In the continuum regime, with small Debye length to spherical probe radius ratio, the probe DC current vs. voltage characteristic displays a hard saturation at sufficiently large probe potential [2]. In this regime, the sheath thickness varies little with the applied voltage although the plasma response can still be measured. A goal of the present investigation is to show that the probe dynamical response is richer as a result of modulation of sheath thickness or shielding particularly in the larger Debye length to probe radius ratio regime. Inertia inhibits ion response at sufficiently high frequency and deviation from the DC characteristic is shown.[4pt] [1] D. N. Walker, R.F. Fernsler, D.D. Blackwell, and W.E. Amatucci, Phys. Plasmas 15, 123506 (2008).[0pt] [2] E. Baum and R.L. Chapkis, AIAA J. 8, 1073 (1970).

  6. Identifying Meteorological Regimes Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, N. D.; Norris, J. R.; Weaver, C. P.; Klein, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    We use a k-means clustering algorithm to group meteorological regimes with similar cloud properties retrieved from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES8). We attempt to link each cluster, dictated by cloud properties, to a dynamic regime associated with cool season extratropical cyclones. Meteorological data is then averaged over the times associated with each cloud cluster to ensure that the cloud regimes are physically consistent. The analysis is restricted to a single Global Climate Model-sized box over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program during the months of Jan-Mar, Nov-Dec of 2000. The ARM Continuous Forcing (ACF) Data Set is used to describe the meteorology of the single column over the ARM SGP site for each cluster and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) 40-km, isobaric Numerical Weather Prediction Analysis provides a representative picture of the mesoscale meteorology. We compare simulated cloudiness from a Single-Column Model (SCM) forced by ACF data to determine the sources for GCM parameterization deficiencies in predicting specific cloud types.

  7. Particle optics in the Rayleigh regime.

    PubMed

    Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick

    2009-09-01

    Light scattering and absorption by particles suspended in the atmosphere modifies the transfer of solar energy in the atmosphere, thereby influencing global and regional climate change and atmospheric visibility. Of particular interest are the optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime, where particles are small compared with the wavelength of the scattered or absorbed light, because these particles experience little gravitational settlement and may have long atmospheric lifetimes. Optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime are commonly derived from electromagnetic theory using Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. The size dependence of particle scattering and absorption are derived here from the most basic principles for coherent processes such as Rayleigh scattering (i.e., add amplitudes if in phase) and incoherent processes such as absorption (i.e., add cross sections), at the same time yielding understanding of the upper particle size limit for the Rayleigh regime. The wavelength dependence of Rayleigh scattering and absorption are also obtained by adding a basic scale invariance for particle optics. Simple consequences for particle single-scattering albedo ("whiteness") and the optical measurement of particle mass densities are explained. These alternative derivations complement the conventional understanding obtained from electromagnetic theory.

  8. Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Matthew W.; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    This monograph is the first to survey progress in realistic simulation in a strongly eddying regime made possible by recent increases in computational capability. Its contributors comprise the leading researchers in this important and constantly evolving field. Divided into three parts, • Oceanographic Processes and Regimes: Fundamental Questions • Ocean Dynamics and State: From Regional to Global Scale, and • Modeling at the Mesoscale: State of the Art and Future Directions the volume details important advances in physical oceanography based on eddy resolving ocean modeling. It captures the state of the art and discusses issues that ocean modelers must consider in order to effectively contribute to advancing current knowledge, from subtleties of the underlying fluid dynamical equations to meaningful comparison with oceanographic observations and leading-edge model development. It summarizes many of the important results which have emerged from ocean modeling in an eddying regime, for those interested broadly in the physical science. More technical topics are intended to address the concerns of those actively working in the field.

  9. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  10. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  11. Utilizing Surface Sensors to Identify Wake Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengying; Hemati, Maziar S.

    2016-11-01

    Marine swimmers often exploit external flow structures to reduce locomotive effort. To achieve this advantage, these swimmers utilize mechanosensory organs on the surface of their bodies to detect hydrodynamic signals from the surrounding fluid, which can then be used to inform the control task. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing similar flow sensing systems to achieve enhanced propulsive efficiency and maneuverability in human-engineered underwater vehicles. In particular, much attention has been given to the problem of wake sensing; however, these investigations have concentrated on a restricted class of wakes-i.e., Kármán-type vortex streets-whereas more complicated wake structures can arise in practice. In this talk, we will explore the possibility of identifying wake regimes through the use of surface sensors. Potential flow theory is adopted to simulate the interactions of various wakes with a fish-like body. Wakes in different dynamical regimes impart distinct hydrodynamic signatures on the body, which permits these regimes to be distinguished from one another in an automated fashion. Our results can provide guidance for improving flow sensing capabilities in human-engineered systems and hint at how marine swimmers may sense their hydrodynamic surroundings.

  12. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  13. FISHER INFORMATION OF DYNAMIC REGIME TRANSITIONS IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between multiple dynamic regimes (or steady states). As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or ?flip? into the neighborhood ...

  14. FISHER INFORMATION OF DYNAMIC REGIME TRANSITIONS IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between multiple dynamic regimes (or steady states). As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or ?flip? into the neighborhood ...

  15. Toward a dynamical understanding of planetary-scale flow regimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Molteni, F.

    1993-06-01

    A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting flow regimes that is firmly rooted in dynamical theory is presented and applied to the study of observed and modeled planetary-scale regimes of the wintertime circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. THE DYNAMIC REGIME CONCEPT FOR ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT AND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic regimes of ecosystems are multidimensional basis of attraction, characterized by particular species communities and ecosystems processes. Ecosystem patterns and processes rarely respond linerarly to disturbances, and the nonlinear cynamic regime concept offers a more real...

  17. Delivery of anti-platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule single-chain variable fragment-urokinase fusion protein to the cerebral vasculature lyses arterial clots and attenuates postischemic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Kristina; Ding, Bi-Sen; Gottstein, Claudia; Cines, Douglas B; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2007-06-01

    Efficacy and safety of current means to prevent cerebrovascular thrombosis in patients at high risk of stroke are suboptimal. In theory, anchoring fibrinolytic plasminogen activators to the luminal surface of the cerebral endothelium might arrest formation of occlusive clots in this setting. We tested this approach using the recombinant construct antiplatelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) single-chain variable fragment (scFv)-urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), fusing low-molecular-weight single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a scFv of an antibody directed to the stably expressed endothelial surface determinant PECAM-1, implicated in inflammation and thrombosis. Studies in mice showed that scFv-uPA, but not unconjugated uPA 1) accumulates in the brain after intravascular injection, 2) lyses clots lodged in the cerebral arterial vasculature without hemorrhagic complications, 3) provides rapid and stable cerebral reperfusion, and 4) alleviates post-thrombotic brain edema. Effective and safe thromboprophylaxis in the cerebral arterial circulation by anti-PECAM scFv-uPA represents a prototype of a new paradigm to prevent recurrent cerebrovascular thrombosis.

  18. Potential vorticity regimes over East Asia during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenyu; Chen, Ruyan; Wang, Bin; Wright, Jonathon S.; Yang, Zifan; Ma, Wenqian

    2017-02-01

    Nine potential vorticity (PV) regimes over East Asia are identified by applying a Self-Organizing Map and Hierarchical Ascendant Classification regime analysis to the daily PV reanalysis fields on the 300 K isentropic surface for December-March 1948-2014. According to the surface temperature anomalies over East Asia, these nine regimes are further classified into three classes, i.e., cold class (three regimes), warm class (four regimes), and neutral class (two regimes). The PV-based East Asian winter monsoon index (EAWMI) is used to study the relationship between PV distributions and the temperature anomalies. The magnitude of cold (warm) anomalies over the land areas of East Asia increases (decreases) quasi-linearly with the EAWMI. Regression analysis reveals that cold temperature anomalies preferentially occur when the EAWMI exceeds a threshold at ˜0.2 PVU (where 1 PVU ≡ 10-6 m2 K kg-1 s-1). PV inversion uncovers the mechanisms behind the relationships between the PV regimes and surface temperature anomalies and reveals that cold (warm) PV regimes are associated with significant warming (cooling) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. On average, cold regimes have longer durations than warm regimes. Interclass transition probabilities are much higher for paths from warm/neutral regimes to cold regimes than for paths from cold regimes to warm/neutral regimes. Besides, intraclass transitions are rare within the warm or neutral regimes. The PV regime analysis provides insight into the causes of severe cold spells over East Asia, with blocking circulation patterns identified as the primary factor in initiating and maintaining these cold spells.

  19. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  20. River Flow Regimes and Effective Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, S.; Sprocati, R.; Frascati, A.; Marani, M.; Schirmer, M.; Botter, G.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of effective discharge is widespread in geomorphology and river engineering and restoration. For example, it is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Accordingly, the effective discharge has been the focus of countless empirical, theoretical and numerical studies, which found it to vary among catchments as a function of climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and of streamflow variability. The heterogeneity of the effective discharge values observed in different catchments challenges a thorough understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different geographic areas is still lacking. In the present work, the observed diversity is explained in terms of the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes, by linking effective discharge to attributes of the sediment rating curve and to streamflow variability, as resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. An analytic expression of the effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is provided, which captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States. The framework disentangles hydrologic and landscape controls on effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. Clusters of river catchments characterized by similar streamflow dynamics can be identified. The framework provides an opportunity for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different areas, based on the type of flow regime.

  1. Laboratory Exploration of Multiple Zonal Jet Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. A.; Speer, K. G.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus has classically been used to study wave interactions within a single, baroclinic jet. At high rotation rates, the baroclinic instability of the flow leads to a transition to a turbulent, eddy-dominated regime. In the presence of a topographic beta effect, the flow has been observed to produce multiple, meandering zonal jets that are qualitatively similar to those found in planetary atmospheres and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Our study builds on previous annulus experiments [1] by making observations further within this new regime. We observe with PIV and other techniques how the structure of the flow responds to changes in various parameters such as tank geometry, gradient in the Coriolis parameter, rotation rate, and differential thermal forcing. By not employing the more typical direct forcing of small scales, but by applying a large scale forcing over the annulus gap width, this study allows the varying effects of eddy scale selection, enstrophy cascade, etc. to naturally generate flow that more closely resembles planetary atmospheres and the ACC. We seek nondimensional parameters that significantly control zonation in a real fluid. These observations will provide a metric for the comparison of various theoretical models for multiple zonal jet formation. Other properties of the jets, such as their migration, meandering, bifurcation, and merging, can also be observed in an idealized situation and compared to numerical simulations. Ultimately, this will aid the testing and development of sub-grid-scale parameterizations for the multiple zonal jet regime that remain robust in the face of multiple forcing parameters. [1] Wordsworth, R. D., Read, P. L., & Yamazaki, Y. H. (2008). Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment Physics of Fluids, 20(12), 126602.Streak photograph of suspended particles visualizing the flow representative of multiple zonal jets

  2. Economic Performance and North Korean Regime Legitimacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    hope is lost . The caveat with this claim, however, is that while breaking the cycle is not impossible, it is also not easy. Political economists...clear that the move was political in nature and a way to regain strict control over society the regime had lost in the turmoil of the famine and...borders to trade would benefit the economy, but it would also make it near impossible to continue the façade that North Korea is the socialist paradise

  3. Imperfect relativistic mirrors in the quantum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2014-05-15

    The collective backscattering of intense laser radiation by energetic electron beams is considered in the relativistic quantum regime. Exact solutions for the radiation field are obtained, for arbitrary electron pulse shapes and laser intensities. The electron beams act as imperfect nonlinear mirrors on the incident laser radiation. This collective backscattering process can lead to the development of new sources of ultra-short pulse radiation in the gamma-ray domain. Numerical examples show that, for plausible experimental conditions, intense pulses of gamma-rays, due to the double Doppler shift of the harmonics of the incident laser radiation, can be produced using the available technology, with durations less than 1 as.

  4. Efficiency of Rectification: Reversible vs. Irreversible Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2002-11-01

    Both man-made locomotive devices and molecular motors use gears to transform a reciprocating motion into a directed one. One of the most common gears is a rectifier, a mechanically irreversible appliance. The maximal energetic efficiency of an isothermic gear is bounded by unity, as a consequence of the Second Law. However, approaching this ideal efficiency does not imply approaching reversibility. We discuss what properties of a rectifier mostly influence the transduction efficiency and show that an appliance which locks under backward force is just the one which can approach the ideal efficiency either in the reversible or in the irreversible regime.

  5. Ignition regimes in rapid compression machines

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Kevin p; Goldsborough, S. Scott; ihme, matthias

    2015-08-01

    A rapid compression machine is an experimental apparatus used to study ignition chemistry at conditions that are relevant to internal combustion engines and gas turbines. However, due to the operating characteristics of these devices, heat transfer effects and inhomogeneous ignition events can be encountered. Hence, this paper develops a combustion regime diagram, which incorporates these effects in order to better understand physical in uences on the measurements. This diagram employs familiar Damkohler number and Reynolds number scaling, and seeks to provide an operational guide for rapid compression machine experiments. This diagram is compared to experimental data and good agreement is found.

  6. Ultracold Molecules: Physics in the Quantum Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John

    2014-11-17

    Our research encompasses approaches to the trapping of diatomic molecules at low temperature plus the cooling and detection of polyatomic molecules in the kelvin temperature regime. We have cooled and trapped CaF and/or CaH molecules, loaded directly from a molecular beam. As part of this work, we are continuing to develop an important trapping technique, optical loading from a buffer-gas beam. This method was invented in our lab. We are also studying cold polyatomic molecules and their interactions with cold atoms.

  7. Intensive intravenous regime for acute severe colitis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Philip, Matthew; Bhatia, Shobna

    2014-08-01

    Acute severe exacerbation of ulcerative colitis is a potentially life threatening medical emergency. The management of acute severe ulcerative colitis depends on early recognition and prompt initiation of intensive intravenous treatment along with continuous objective monitoring for possible medical failure. The intensive regime is the accepted standard of care. This includes primarily a) intravenous corticosteroids, b) intravenous supportive management, and d) intravenous antibiotics in instances. This review discusses the timing, duration and dosage of the intensive intravenous treatment including the evidence based protocol for effective monitoring to enable timely escalation to second line therapy & colectomy.

  8. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  9. Global oscillation regime change by gated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Romeo, August; Supèr, Hans

    2016-10-01

    The role of sensory inputs in the modelling of synchrony regimes is exhibited by means of networks of spiking cells where the relative strength of the inhibitory interaction is controlled by the activation of a linear unit working as a gating variable. Adaptation to stimulus size is determined by the value of a changing length scale, modelled by the time-varying radius of a circular receptive field. In this set-up, 'consolidation' time intervals relevant to attentional effects are shown to depend on the dynamics governing the evolution of the introduced length scale.

  10. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  11. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United Kingdom...

  12. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement among the United States, the United Kingdom, the...

  13. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United Kingdom...

  14. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto is one of the scientists recovering experiments found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto is one of the scientists recovering experiments found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dr. Dennis Morrison, NASA Johnson Space Center, processes one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dr. Dennis Morrison, NASA Johnson Space Center, processes one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crystals visible in this laboratory dish were part of an experiment carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crystals visible in this laboratory dish were part of an experiment carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto (foreground), Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., examines one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto (foreground), Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., examines one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Mike Casasanto, also with ITA, looks on. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Mike Casasanto, also with ITA, looks on. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

  1. Managing Disagreement: A Defense of "Regime Bias"

    PubMed

    Sabl, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Stein Ringen's theory of democratic purpose cannot do the work expected of it. Ringen's own criteria oscillate between being too vague to be useful (i.e. "freedom") or, when specified more fully, conflicting, so that almost all democracies will seem to be potentially at cross-purposes with themselves rather than their purposes or sub-purposes being mutually reinforcing. This reflects a bigger and more theoretical problem. Disagreement about the purpose of democracy is built into democracy itself. The whole point of many (perhaps all) of our democratic institutions is to arrive at conditionally legitimate decisions in spite of such disagreement. So-called regime bias, i.e. the tendency to assess democracies according to the form and stability of their institutions rather than their results or their ability to serve certain purposes, does not in fact arise from bias. It arises on the contrary from a determination to avoid the bias inherent in giving some-inevitably partisan-ideals of what democracies should do pride of place over others in a scheme of measurement or evaluation. And even a regime-based definition of democracy must itself make simplifying assumptions that elide possible normative controversies over how the democratic game is best played. Vindicating one's preferred set of democratic ideals against alternatives is a completely legitimate enterprise and lends richness to debates within and across democracies. But it is an inherently ideological and political enterprise, not a neutral or scholarly one.

  2. Revealing the quantum regime in tunnelling plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kevin J; Hawkeye, Matthew M; Esteban, Rubén; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-11-22

    When two metal nanostructures are placed nanometres apart, their optically driven free electrons couple electrically across the gap. The resulting plasmons have enhanced optical fields of a specific colour tightly confined inside the gap. Many emerging nanophotonic technologies depend on the careful control of this plasmonic coupling, including optical nanoantennas for high-sensitivity chemical and biological sensors, nanoscale control of active devices, and improved photovoltaic devices. But for subnanometre gaps, coherent quantum tunnelling becomes possible and the system enters a regime of extreme non-locality in which previous classical treatments fail. Electron correlations across the gap that are driven by quantum tunnelling require a new description of non-local transport, which is crucial in nanoscale optoelectronics and single-molecule electronics. Here, by simultaneously measuring both the electrical and optical properties of two gold nanostructures with controllable subnanometre separation, we reveal the quantum regime of tunnelling plasmonics in unprecedented detail. All observed phenomena are in good agreement with recent quantum-based models of plasmonic systems, which eliminate the singularities predicted by classical theories. These findings imply that tunnelling establishes a quantum limit for plasmonic field confinement of about 10(-8)λ(3) for visible light (of wavelength λ). Our work thus prompts new theoretical and experimental investigations into quantum-domain plasmonic systems, and will affect the future of nanoplasmonic device engineering and nanoscale photochemistry.

  3. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Suykens, J A K

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  4. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10-3-10-4 for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux ( 106 W/cm2), a typical surface temperature ( 3000 K), and a typical pulse duration ( 1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  5. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-15

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10{sup –3}–10{sup –4} for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux (~10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}), a typical surface temperature (~3000 K), and a typical pulse duration (~1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  6. Production of a urokinase plasminogen activator-IgG fusion protein (uPA-IgG) in the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Kost, T A; Ignar, D M; Clay, W C; Andrews, J; Leray, J D; Overton, L; Hoffman, C R; Kilpatrick, K E; Ellis, B; Emerson, D L

    1997-04-29

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor, uPAR, in the processes of tumor progression and metastasis. Thus, the uPA/uPAR interaction may represent an important target for inhibiting metastatic disease. The baculovirus expression system was used to produce high levels of a secreted uPA-Immunoglobulin G fusion protein (uPA-IgG) which could then be used for displacing uPA from the surface of tumor cells. The recombinant uPA-IgG fusion protein was placed under the control of either the viral polyhedrin promoter or a copy of the viral basic protein promoter. Recombinant viruses were then used to infect Sf9 and BTI-Tn-5B1-4 cells. Infection of both cell types resulted in the production of secreted uPA-IgG. The molecular mass of the secreted protein as determined by SDS-PAGE was approximately 40 kDa. The highest level of secreted uPA-IgG, 444 microg/ml, was found in the culture medium of BTI-Tn-5B1-4 cells 72 h post-infection with the basic protein promoter-uPA-IgG virus. In the case of Sf9 cells, the highest level of secreted protein was 195 microg/ml. The amount of cell-associated uPA-IgG in infected BTI-Tn-5B1-4 cells was significantly less than that of infected Sf9 cells, reflecting the superior secretory capability of the BTI-Tn-5B1-4 cells. The uPA-IgG was readily purified using a combination of zinc chelate and sephacryl S-100 column chromatography. Routinely, greater than 100 mg of greater than 95% pure protein could be obtained per liter of culture medium collected at 72 h post-infection of BTI-Tn-5B1-4 cells with the basic protein promoter virus. BIAcore analysis and competition binding assays using LOX human malignant melanoma cells expressing uPAR indicated that the purified recombinant protein possessed similar ligand binding characteristics to that of human uPA.

  7. A combination of desmopressin and docetaxel inhibit cell proliferation and invasion mediated by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Klotz, Laurence H.; Sugar, Linda M.; Kiss, Alexander; Venkateswaran, Vasundara

    2015-08-28

    Background: This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a combination treatment using both desmopressin and docetaxel in prostate cancer treatment. Desmopressin is a well-known synthetic analogue of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. It has recently been demonstrated to inhibit tumor progression and metastasis in in vivo models. Docetaxel is widely used for the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. However, durable responses have been uncommon to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of desmopressin in combination with docetaxel in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Two prostate cancer cells (PC3, LNCaP) were treated with different concentrations of desmopressin alone, docetaxel alone, and a combination of desmopressin and docetaxel. Cell proliferation was determined by MTS assay. The anti-invasive and anti-migration potential of desmopressin and in combination with docetaxel were examined by wound healing assay, migration chamber assay, and matrigel invasion assay. Results: The combination of desmopressin and docetaxel resulted in a significant inhibition of PC3 and LNCaP cell proliferation (p < 0.01). Additionally, cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by the combination when compared to that of either treatment alone in PC3 cells (p < 0.01). The anti-tumor effect of this combination treatment was associated with down-regulation of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in PC3 cells. Conclusions: We are the first to elucidate the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic potential of desmopressin in combination with docetaxel in a prostate cancer model via the uPA-MMP pathway. Our finding could potentially contribute to the therapeutic profile of desmopressin and enhance the efficacy of docetaxel based treatment for CRPC. - Highlights: • Desmopressin inhibits cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. • The expression of cyclin A and CDK2

  8. Active α-macroglobulin is a reservoir for urokinase after fibrinolytic therapy in rabbits with tetracycline-induced pleural injury and in human pleural fluids

    PubMed Central

    Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali; Karandashova, Sophia; Kurdowska, Anna K.; Idell, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Intrapleural processing of prourokinase (scuPA) in tetracycline (TCN)-induced pleural injury in rabbits was evaluated to better understand the mechanisms governing successful scuPA-based intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT), capable of clearing pleural adhesions in this model. Pleural fluid (PF) was withdrawn 0–80 min and 24 h after IPFT with scuPA (0–0.5 mg/kg), and activities of free urokinase (uPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and uPA complexed with α-macroglobulin (αM) were assessed. Similar analyses were performed using PFs from patients with empyema, parapneumonic, and malignant pleural effusions. The peak of uPA activity (5–40 min) reciprocally correlated with the dose of intrapleural scuPA. Endogenous active PAI-1 (10–20 nM) decreased the rate of intrapleural scuPA activation. The slow step of intrapleural inactivation of free uPA (t1/2β = 40 ± 10 min) was dose independent and 6.7-fold slower than in blood. Up to 260 ± 70 nM of αM/uPA formed in vivo [second order association rate (kass) = 580 ± 60 M−1·s−1]. αM/uPA and products of its degradation contributed to durable intrapleural plasminogen activation up to 24 h after IPFT. Active PAI-1, active α2M, and α2M/uPA found in empyema, pneumonia, and malignant PFs demonstrate the capacity to support similar mechanisms in humans. Intrapleural scuPA processing differs from that in the bloodstream and includes 1) dose-dependent control of scuPA activation by endogenous active PAI-1; 2) two-step inactivation of free uPA with simultaneous formation of αM/uPA; and 3) slow intrapleural degradation of αM/uPA releasing active free uPA. This mechanism offers potential clinically relevant advantages that may enhance the bioavailability of intrapleural scuPA and may mitigate the risk of bleeding complications. PMID:23997178

  9. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR)-mediated Regulation of WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Is Enhanced in Irradiated Medulloblastoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Gondi, Christopher S.; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gorantla, Bharathi; Rao, Jasti S.

    2012-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is known to promote invasion, migration, and metastasis in cancer cells. In this report, we showed that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced uPAR has a role in WNT-β-catenin signaling and mediates induction of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties in medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and D283. We observed that IR induced the expression of uPAR and CSC markers, such as Musashi-1 and CD44, and activated WNT-7a-β-catenin signaling molecules. Overexpression of uPAR alone or with IR treatment led to increased WNT-7a-β-catenin-TCF/LEF-mediated transactivation, thereby promoting cancer stemness. In contrast, treatment with shRNA specific for uPAR (pU) suppressed WNT-7a-β-catenin-TCF/LEF-mediated transactivation both in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin, a potent WNT/β-catenin inhibitor, suppressed uPAR and uPAR-mediated WNT/β-catenin activation, and furthermore, addition of recombinant human WNT-7a protein induced uPAR, indicating the existence of a mutual regulatory relationship between uPAR and WNT/β-catenin signaling. We showed that uPAR was physically associated with the WNT effector molecule β-catenin on the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of IR-treated cells and CSC. Most interestingly, we demonstrated for the first time that localization of uPAR in the nucleus was associated with transcription factors (TF) and their specific response elements. We observed from uPAR-ChIP, TF protein, and protein/DNA array analyses that uPAR associates with activating enhancer-binding protein 2α (AP2a) and mediates β-catenin gene transcription. Moreover, association of uPAR with the β-catenin·TCF/LEF complex and various other TF involved during embryonic development and cancer indicates that uPAR is a potent activator of stemness, and targeting of uPAR in combination with radiation has significant therapeutic implications. PMID:22511755

  10. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  11. Intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase receptor enhance discrimination of cancer from non-malignant conditions in patients presenting with symptoms related to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lomholt, A F; Høyer-Hansen, G; Nielsen, H J; Christensen, I J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in developed countries. It is known that early detection results in improved survival, and consequently there is a need for improved diagnostic tools in CRC. The plasma level of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was proposed as a marker in CRC patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the individual molecular forms of suPAR as discriminators in a group of patients undergoing endoscopical examination following symptoms related to colorectal cancer. Methods: In a case–control study comprising 308 patients undergoing endoscopical examination following CRC-related symptoms, 77 CRC patients with adenocarcinoma were age and gender matched to: 77 patients with adenomas; 77 with other non-malignant findings, and 77 with no findings. The different uPAR forms were measured in citrate plasma collected before endoscopical examination, using three different Time Resolved – Fluorescence Immuno Assays (TR-FIA's). Results: All soluble uPAR forms were found to be significantly higher in cancer patients than in patients presenting with other non-malignant findings; uPAR(I) P=0.0006, suPAR(I–III) P<0.0001 and suPAR(I–III)+(II–III) P<0.0001, whereas no significant difference was found when performing similar comparisons for patients presenting with adenomas. The odds ratio (OR) for the comparison of uPAR(I) in patients with CRC to subjects with other non-malignant findings was 3.44 (95% CI:1.86–6.37). CRC patients had a mean elevated level of 20.9% (95% CI:10.2–32.6) for suPAR(I–III) and 18.5% (95% CI:9.0–28.8) for suPAR(I–III)+(II–III) compared with subjects with non-malignant findings. Conclusions: The findings confirm reports on increased uPAR expression in cancer patients and in particular elevated levels of suPAR in blood from CRC patients and indicate that suPAR levels in blood are increasing during carcinogenesis. Although none of

  12. Expression of tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators as well as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and type-2 in human and rhesus monkey placenta

    PubMed Central

    HU, ZHAO-YUAN; LIU, YI-XUN; LIU, KUI; BYRNE, SIMON; NY, TOR; FENG, QIANG; OCKLEFORD, COLIN D.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mRNAs and antigens of tissue type (t) and urokinase type (u) plasminogen activators (PA) plus their corresponding inhibitors, type-1 (PAI-1) and type-2 (PAI-2) were studied in human and rhesus monkey placentae by in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry. Specific monkey cRNA and antibodies against human tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 were used as probes. The following results were obtained. (1) All the molecules tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 and their mRNAs were identified in the majority of the extravillous cytotrophoblast cells of the decidual layer between Rohr's and Nitabuch's striae and in cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic plate, basal plate, intercotyledonary septae and cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic villous tree. (2) Expression of uPA and PAI-2 was noted in villous trophoblast whereas tPA and PAI-1 were mainly concentrated where detachment from maternal tissue occurs. (3) No expression of tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 was observed in the basal plate endometrial stromal cells, chorionic plate connective tissue cells, septal endometrial stromal cells or villous core mesenchyme. (4) The distribution of probes observed following in situ hybridisation is generally consistent with the immunofluorescence pattern of the corresponding antigens and no significant interspecies differences were noted. It is possible that both decidual and extravillous trophoblast cells of placentae of human and rhesus monkey are capable of producing tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 to differing extents. Coordinated expression of these genes in the tissue may play an essential role in the maintenance of normal placentation and parturition. The differences in distribution we observed are consistent with the suggestion that coordinated expression of tPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 may play a key role in fibrinolytic activity in the early stages of placentation and separation of placenta from maternal tissue at term. On the other hand, uPA with its inhibitor PAI-2 appears

  13. Prognostic significance of urokinase (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 for survival in advanced ovarian carcinoma stage FIGO IIIc.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, W; Schmalfeldt, B; Reuning, U; Pache, L; Berger, U; Ulm, K; Harbeck, N; Späthe, K; Dettmar, P; Höfler, H; Jänicke, F; Schmitt, M; Graeff, H

    1999-04-01

    Strong evidence has accumulated on the prognostic value of tumour-associated proteolytic factors in patients afflicted with solid malignant tumours, including advanced ovarian cancer. We evaluated the prognostic impact of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 on overall survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO IIIc in order to select patients at risk. uPA and PAI-1 antigen were determined by ELISA in primary tumour tissue extracts of 86 ovarian cancer patients FIGO stage IIIc enrolled in a prospective study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The time-varying coefficient model of Gray was used to assess the time-dependent strength of prognostic factors tumour mass, uPA and PAI-1 on overall survival. In all patients, uPA and PAI-1 (optimized cut-offs of 2.0 and 27.5 ng mg(-1) protein respectively), in addition to the traditional prognostic parameters of residual tumour mass, nodal status, grading and ascites volume, were of prognostic significance in univariate analysis for overall survival. Even in patients with residual tumour mass (n = 43), the statistically independent prognostic impact of PAI-1 persisted, allowing further discrimination between low- and high-risk patients. In multivariate analysis, residual tumour mass (P < 0.001, relative risk (RR) 4.5), PAI-1 (P < 0.001; RR 3.1) and nodal status (P = 0.022, RR 2.6) turned out to be strong, statistically independent prognostic parameters. Evaluation of the time-dependent prognostic impact of residual tumour mass and PAI-1 on overall survival (n = 86, 50 months) revealed that the prognostic power of these factors increased with time. In patients with advanced ovarian cancer, both residual tumour mass and PAI-1 are statistically independent strong prognostic factors. Even within patient subgroups with or without residual tumour mass, PAI-1 allowed selection of patients at risk who might benefit from

  14. CD44 stimulation by fragmented hyaluronic acid induces upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor and subsequently facilitates invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mika; Kanayama, Naohiro; Nishida, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Terao, Toshihiko

    2002-12-01

    It has been established that fragmented hyaluronic acid (HA), but not native high molecular weight HA, can induce angiogenesis, cell proliferation and migration. We have studied the outside-in signal transduction pathways responsible for fragmented HA-mediated cancer cell invasion. In our study, we have studied the effects of CD44 stimulation by ligation with HA upon the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 as well as urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) and the subsequent induction of invasion of human chondrosarcoma cell line HCS-2/8. Our study indicates that (i) CD44 stimulation by fragmented HA upregulates expression of uPA and uPAR mRNA and protein but does not affect MMPs secretion or PAI-1 mRNA expression; (ii) the effects of HA fragments are critically HA size dependent: high molecular weight HA is inactive, but lower molecular weight fragmented HA (Mr 3.5 kDa) is active; (iii) cells can bind avidly Mr 3.5 kDa fragmented HA through a CD44 molecule, whereas cells do not effectively bind higher Mr HA; (iv) a fragmented HA induces phosphorylation of MAP kinase proteins (MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and c-Jun) within 30 min; (v) CD44 is critical for the response (activation of MAP kinase and upregulation of uPA and uPAR expression); and (vi) cell invasion induced by CD44 stimulation with a fragmented HA is inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb, MAP kinase inhibitors, neutralizing anti-uPAR pAb, anti-catalytic anti-uPA mAb or amiloride. Therefore, our study represents the first report that CD44 stimulation induced by a fragmented HA results in activation of MAP kinase and, subsequently, enhances uPA and uPAR expression and facilitates invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells.

  15. [Can mannose-binding lectin and plasma level of soluble urokinase receptor be used in diagnosis and treatment monitorization of brucellosis patients?].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Cesur, Salih; Karaağaç, Leman; Binici, Irfan; Fidan, Yasemin; Oğüş, Elmas; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (SuPAR) levels in monitoring the treatment in patients with brucellosis, by comparing their levels before and after treatment with the values obtained from healthy control group. Thirty brucellosis patients (mean age: 25.8 ± 12.2 years; 15 were male) and 28 healthy controls (mean age: 29.3 ± 12.3 years; 15 were male) were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed with brucellosis according to the characteristic clinical findings and by brucella standard tube agglutination test (SAT) titer ≥ 1/160 and/or blood culture positivity. Serum MBL (Antibodyshop, Denmark) and plasma SuPAR (Virogates, Denmark) levels were investigated with commercial ELISA kits. In our study, no statistical significance was observed between the pre-treatment (13.8 ± 13.4 ng/ml) and post-treatment (12.4 ± 13.1 ng/ml) MBL levels of the patient group and MBL levels of the control group (16.5 ± 14.8 ng/ml) (p> 0.05). Moreover, the mean SuPAR levels measured in pre-treatment and post-treatment plasma samples of the brucellosis patients was 5.1 ± 1.9 ng/ml and 2.9 ± 1.3 ng/ml, respectively, while the mean SuPAR level was 1.8 ± 0.5 ng/ml in the control group. The difference between mean SuPAR levels of patients in pre- and post-treatment samples was found statistically significant (p< 0.001). In addition SuPAR levels were significantly higher in patients before and after treatment than the control group (p> 0.001). In conclusion, plasma SuPAR level would be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment follow up of the patients with brucellosis.

  16. Staurosporine induces ganglion cell differentiation in part by stimulating urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and activation in the developing chick retina

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Chang, Yongmin; Jung, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates stimulation of RGC differentiation in vitro cultured retinal neuroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates uPA activation during RGC differentiation in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of uPA blocks the staurosporine mediated RGC differentiation both in vitro and in ovo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, uPA may play a role in the staurosporine-mediated stimulation of RGC differentiation. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether staurosporine-mediated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activation is involved in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation. Retinal cells were isolated from developing chick retinas at embryonic day 6 (E6). Relatively few control cells grown in serum-free medium started to form processes by 12 h. In contrast, staurosporine-treated cells had processes within 3 h, and processes were evident at 8 h. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Tuj-1-positive cells with shorter neurites could be detected in control cultures at 18 h, whereas numerous Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells with longer neuritic extensions were seen in staurosporine-treated cultures. BrdU-positive proliferating cells were more numerous in control cultures than in staurosporine-treated cultures, and the BrdU staining was not detected in post-mitotic Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells. Western blotting of cell lysates showed that staurosporine induced high levels of the active form of uPA. The staurosporine-induced uPA signal was localized predominantly in the soma, neurites and axons of Tuj-1-positive ganglion cells. Amiloride, an inhibitor of uPA, markedly reduced staurosporine-induced Tuj-1 staining, neurite length, neurite number, and uPA staining versus controls. In developing retinas in ovo, amiloride administration remarkably reduced the staurosporine-induced uPA staining and RGC differentiation. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data collectively indicate that

  17. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  18. Option pricing with regime switching by trinomial tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Fei Lung; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-02-01

    We present a fast and simple tree model to price simple and exotic options in Markov Regime Switching Model (MRSM) with multi-regime. We modify the trinomial tree model of Boyle (1986) [12] by controlling the risk neutral probability measure in different regime states to ensure that the tree model can accommodate the data of all different regimes at the same time preserving its combining tree structure. In MRSM, the market might not be complete, therefore we provide some ideas and discussions on managing the regime switching risk in support of our results.

  19. A randomized, open-label, 5-period, balanced crossover study to evaluate the relative bioavailability of eltrombopag powder for oral suspension (PfOS) and tablet formulations and the effect of a high-calcium meal on eltrombopag pharmacokinetics when administered with or 2 hours before or after PfOS.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary Beth; Bruce, Jennifer; Gauvin, Jennifer; Pendry, Carolyn J; McGuire, Sandra; Qian, Yanwen; Brainsky, Andres

    2012-03-01

    Bioavailability of the tablet formulation of eltrombopag, an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist indicated for the treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenia, is reduced by chelation of polyvalent cations (eg, calcium). A powder for oral suspension (PfOS) formulation has been developed for use in pediatrics. We aimed to assess the bioavailability of eltrombopag PfOS relative to the tablet formulation and the effect of a high-calcium meal on PfOS bioavailability. In this single-dose, open-label, randomized-sequence, crossover study, healthy subjects received 25 mg eltrombopag orally as a tablet fasted and as PfOS fasted or with, 2 hours before, or 2 hours after a high-calcium meal. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from plasma concentration-time data collected over 72 hours post-dose. Tolerability was assessed by laboratory tests, physical examinations, and adverse events (AEs). The 40 enrolled subjects included 22 males and 18 females of white/European (60%) or African-American/African (40%) heritage with mean (SD) (mininum, maximum) age of 34 (12) (19, 62) years, weight of 75 (12) (54, 101) kg, and body mass index of 25.8 (2.9) (19.7, 30) kg/m(2). Plasma eltrombopag AUC(0-∞) was higher for the PfOS than the tablet (geometric least-squares mean ratio [GMR]: 1.22; 90% CI: 1.08-1.38). Plasma eltrombopag AUC(0-∞) was reduced when the PfOS was administered with a high-calcium meal (GMR: 0.25; 90% CI: 0.224-0.287) or 2 hours after a meal (GMR: 0.53; 90% CI: 0.470-0.601), and, to a lesser extent, when administered 2 hours before a meal (GMR: 0.80; 90% CI: 0.711-0.908). The absorption lag time and t(½) did not differ between treatments; T(max) was delayed 1 hour when the PfOS was dosed with a high-calcium meal. AEs were not serious and mild or moderate in intensity. AEs reported in >1 subject included headache (11 subjects; 27.5%), presyncope (3 subjects, 7.5%), and vomiting (2 subjects, 5%). No clinically significant trends in laboratory

  20. Cointegration and causal linkages in fertilizer markets across different regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Cointegration and causal linkages among five different fertilizer markets are investigated during low and high market regimes. The database includes prices of rock phosphate (RP), triple super phosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), urea, and potassium chloride (PC). It is found that fertilizer markets are closely linked to each other during low and high regimes; and, particularly during high regime (after 2007 international financial crisis). In addition, there is no evidence of bidirectional linear relationship between markets during low and high regime time periods. Furthermore, all significant linkages are only unidirectional. Moreover, some causality effects have emerged during high regime. Finally, the effect of an impulse during high regime time period persists longer and is stronger than the effect of an impulse during low regime time period (before 2007 international financial crisis).

  1. Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American land

    Treesearch

    Amanda B. Stan; Peter Z. Fule; Kathryn B. Ireland; Jamie S. Sanderlin

    2014-01-01

    Forests on tribal lands in the western United States have seen the return of low-intensity surface fires for several decades longer than forests on non-tribal lands. We examined the surface fire regime in a ponderosa pinedominated (Pinus ponderosa) forest on the Hualapai tribal lands in the south-western United States. Using fire-scarred trees, we inferred temporal (...

  2. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part I: main content.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are set rules for sequential decision making based on patient covariate history. Observational studies are well suited for the investigation of the effects of dynamic treatment regimes because of the variability in treatment decisions found in them. This variability exists because different physicians make different decisions in the face of similar patient histories. In this article we describe an approach to estimate the optimal dynamic treatment regime among a set of enforceable regimes. This set is comprised by regimes defined by simple rules based on a subset of past information. The regimes in the set are indexed by a Euclidean vector. The optimal regime is the one that maximizes the expected counterfactual utility over all regimes in the set. We discuss assumptions under which it is possible to identify the optimal regime from observational longitudinal data. Murphy et al. (2001) developed efficient augmented inverse probability weighted estimators of the expected utility of one fixed regime. Our methods are based on an extension of the marginal structural mean model of Robins (1998, 1999) which incorporate the estimation ideas of Murphy et al. (2001). Our models, which we call dynamic regime marginal structural mean models, are specially suitable for estimating the optimal treatment regime in a moderately small class of enforceable regimes of interest. We consider both parametric and semiparametric dynamic regime marginal structural models. We discuss locally efficient, double-robust estimation of the model parameters and of the index of the optimal treatment regime in the set. In a companion paper in this issue of the journal we provide proofs of the main results.

  3. Regime Changes in California Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, E. C.; Kessomkiat, W.; Mauget, S.

    2008-12-01

    Annual and seasonal temperature trends are analyzed for California using surface data from the US Historical Climate Network and the larger COOP network. While trends in Tmax and Tmin both show warming over the last 50 years, the temporal and spatial structure of these trends is quite different. An analysis using Mann Whitney U statistics reveals that the patterns of warming and cooling from individual stations have a distinct temporal signature that differs between Tmax and Tmin. Significant cooling trends in Tmin are found between 1920-1958, while significant warming only starts after the 1970s. In contrast, Tmax trends show a more variable pattern of warming and cooling between 1920-1980, with California wide warming only occurring after 1980. These results suggest regime changes in California temperature trends that could only occur through large scale forcing. A discussion of the various forcing mechanisms contributing to California trends and their spatial and temporal variability will be presented.

  4. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-03

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 10(7)) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry-Perot resonator detects these modes' motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to -2.4 dB (-3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry-Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  5. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  6. Ponderomotive scaling in the radiative damping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Rishi R.; Ackad, Edward; d'Humieres, Emmanuel; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    The ponderomotive force for super intense laser matter interactions has been derived by taking into account the higher order terms of radiative damping. The ion acceleration via collisionless shock, generated by both the ponderomotive pressure of the intense laser pulse during the interaction and the electron acceleration, becomes less efficient due to the radiative damping. A new ponderomotive scaling has been derived by applying the force with the radiation reaction to the super intense laser regime, and it is benchmarked by a particle-in-cell simulation with the radiative damping terms included in equations of motion. We find good agreement between theoretical and simulation results in terms of shock velocity and accelerated ion energy.

  7. The Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Noriyuki

    For the last couple of decades, the Great Lakes have undergone rapid surface warming. In particular, the magnitude of the summer surface-warming trends of the Great Lakes have been much greater than those of surrounding land (Austin and Colman, 2007). Among the Great Lakes, the deepest Lake Superior exhibited the strongest warming trend in its annual, as well as summer surface water temperature. We find that many aspects of this behavior can be explained in terms of the tendency of deep lakes to exhibit multiple regimes characterized, under the same seasonally varying forcing, by the warmer and colder seasonal cycles exhibiting different amounts of wintertime lake-ice cover and corresponding changes in the summertime lake-surface temperatures. In this thesis, we address the problem of the Great Lakes' warming using one-dimensional lake modeling to interpret diverse observations of the recent lake behavior. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidtfelt Padkær Nielsen, William; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S.; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-01

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 107) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry–Perot resonator detects these modes’ motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to ‑2.4 dB (‑3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry–Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  9. Evolution of the water regime of Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Fanale, F.P.; Salvail, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    In the present model of Phobos water regime evolution, a time-dependent solar insolation is influenced by both decreasing solar output over geologic time and the Mars and Phobos cycles of eccentricity and obliquity, which vary over 100,000-1,000,000 year time scales. The results presented address model cases which assume (1) a homogeneous distribution of water ice, and (2) a driving of water ice toward the surface by the internal thermal gradient near the poles. A two-dimensional model is used to compute temperatures, heat and vapor fluxes, and ice removal/deposition rates, for the case of uniform ice distribution throughout Phobos. The results obtained indicate that a substantial amount of vapor is produced within 1 km of the surface. 15 refs.

  10. Dynamic Recrystallization: The Dynamic Deformation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Pizaña, C.

    2007-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (PD), especially involving high strain rates (>103 s 1), occurs through solid-state flow, which is accommodated by dynamic recrystallization (DRX), either in a continuous or discontinuous mode. This flow can be localized in shear instability zones (or adiabatic shear bands (ASBs)) with dimensions smaller than 5 μ, or can include large volumes with flow zone dimensions exceeding centimeters. This article illustrates these microstructural features using optical and electron metallography to examine a host of dynamic deformation examples: shaped charge jet formation, high-velocity and hypervelocity impact crater formation, rod penetration into thick targets (which includes rod and target DRX flow and mixing), large projectile-induced target plug formation and failure, explosive welding, and friction-stir welding and processing. The DRX is shown to be a universal mechanism that accommodates solid-state flow in extreme (or severe) PD regimes.

  11. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  12. Diffusive Transport Properties Across Coupling Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharuman, G.; Murillo, M. S.; Verboncoeur, J.; Christlieb, A.

    2014-10-01

    Transport properties are poorly known across coupling regimes, therefore understanding them is of importance for theoretical and practical reasons. A useful tool is an ultracold plasma system because of the experimental capability to tune the system to attain Coulomb coupling Γ ranging from 0.1 to 1 to 10 with the screening parameter κ ranging from 0 to 4 to 8, spanning the regions of the phase diagram from weak to moderate to strongly coupled and screened systems. Strong coupling is possible if Disorder Induced Heating is mitigated which requires a correlated initial ion state. Of particular interest is Rydberg blockaded gas of ultracold atoms where the local blockade effect results in correlations. Predictions of higher coupling in ultracold plasma created from a Rydberg blockaded gas have been reported. In this work we examine the diffusive transport properties of ultracold plasma system using molecular dynamics simulations for experimentally realizable values of Γ and κ as discussed above.

  13. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Measurements of Kanel et. al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. Failure (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study the authors have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  14. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael D.; Chhabildas, Lalit C.

    1998-07-10

    Measurements of Kanel et al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. 'Failure' (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  15. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of Kanel {ital et al.} [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. {open_quotes}Failure{close_quotes} (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Capillary underwater discharges in repetitive pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baerdemaeker, F.; Monte, M.; Leys, C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study a capillary underwater discharge, that is sustained with AC (50 Hz) voltages up to 7.5 kV, is investigated. In a capillary discharge scheme, the current is, at some point along its path between two submerged electrodes, flowing through a narrow elongated bore in a dielectric material. When the current density is sufficiently high, local boiling and subsequent vapour breakdown results in the formation of a plasma within this capillary. At the same time the capillary emits an intense jet of vapour bubbles. Time-dependent electrical current, voltage and light emission curves are recorded for discharges in solutions of NaCl in distilled water and reveal different discharge regimes, depending on the conductivity and the excitation voltage, ranging from repetitive microsecond discharge pulses to a quasi-continuous discharge with a glow-like voltage-current characteristic.

  17. Nonlinear regimes of forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Vekstein, G.; Kusano, K.

    2015-09-15

    This letter presents a self-consistent description of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection in Taylor's model of this process. If external boundary perturbation is strong enough, nonlinearity in the current sheet evolution becomes important before resistive effects come into play. This terminates the current sheet shrinking that takes place at the linear stage and brings about its nonlinear equilibrium with a finite thickness. Then, in theory, this equilibrium is destroyed by a finite plasma resistivity during the skin-time, and further reconnection proceeds in the Rutherford regime. However, realization of such a scenario is unlikely because of the plasmoid instability, which is fast enough to develop before the transition to the Rutherford phase occurs. The suggested analytical theory is entirely different from all previous studies and provides proper interpretation of the presently available numerical simulations of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection.

  18. Anomalous Transport in the Superfluid Fluctuation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Shun; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment in ultracold atoms [S. Krinner et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 113, 8144 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1601812113], we analyze transport of attractively interacting fermions through a one-dimensional wire near the superfluid transition. We show that in a ballistic regime where the conductance is quantized in the absence of interaction, the conductance is renormalized by superfluid fluctuations in reservoirs. In particular, the particle conductance is strongly enhanced, and the conductance plateau is blurred by emergent bosonic pair transport. For spin transport, in addition to the contact resistance, the wire itself is resistive, leading to a suppression of the measured spin conductance. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  19. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tso; Amet, François; Ke, Chung-Ting; Borzenets, Ivan; Wang, Jiyingmei; Watanabe, Keji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russell; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    Combining superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect is a promising route for creating new types of topological excitations. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the quantum Hall regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has so far eluded experimental observation. Here we demonstrate the existence of a novel type of Josephson coupling through a QH region at magnetic fields as high as 2 Tesla. The supercurrent is mediated by states encompassing QH edge channels, which are flowing on opposite sides of the sample. The edges are coupled together by the hybrid electron-hole modes at the interfaces between the QH region and the superconducting contacts. These chiral modes, which share some features with Majorana modes, are formed when electron and hole edge states are mixed by the superconductor.

  20. Simulations of two Arctic winter cloud regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, M. A.; Randall, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent analysis of observations from the Surface Heat Budget Experiment (SHEBA) provides evidence that in winter the Arctic exhibits two preferred and persistent states — a radiatively clear and a radiatively opaque state. These distinct regimes are influenced by the phase of the clouds, and affect the surface radiative fluxes. We explore the radiative and microphysical effects of these Arctic clouds in two present-day climate simulations. We compare simulations performed with a global coupled ocean- atmosphere model [the Community Earth System Model], and its superparameterized counterpart (SP-CESM). We find that the SP-CESM is able to better reproduce both of the preferred winter states, compared to CESM. We present an analysis of the mechanisms and processes behind these findings.

  1. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within Two Different Management Regimes: An Assessment-Based Accountability Regime and Regime without External Pressure on Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management…

  2. Deterministic-random separation in nonstationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Antoni, J.; Sieg-Zieba, S.; Eltabach, M.

    2016-02-01

    In rotating machinery vibration analysis, the synchronous average is perhaps the most widely used technique for extracting periodic components. Periodic components are typically related to gear vibrations, misalignments, unbalances, blade rotations, reciprocating forces, etc. Their separation from other random components is essential in vibration-based diagnosis in order to discriminate useful information from masking noise. However, synchronous averaging theoretically requires the machine to operate under stationary regime (i.e. the related vibration signals are cyclostationary) and is otherwise jeopardized by the presence of amplitude and phase modulations. A first object of this paper is to investigate the nature of the nonstationarity induced by the response of a linear time-invariant system subjected to speed varying excitation. For this purpose, the concept of a cyclo-non-stationary signal is introduced, which extends the class of cyclostationary signals to speed-varying regimes. Next, a "generalized synchronous average'' is designed to extract the deterministic part of a cyclo-non-stationary vibration signal-i.e. the analog of the periodic part of a cyclostationary signal. Two estimators of the GSA have been proposed. The first one returns the synchronous average of the signal at predefined discrete operating speeds. A brief statistical study of it is performed, aiming to provide the user with confidence intervals that reflect the "quality" of the estimator according to the SNR and the estimated speed. The second estimator returns a smoothed version of the former by enforcing continuity over the speed axis. It helps to reconstruct the deterministic component by tracking a specific trajectory dictated by the speed profile (assumed to be known a priori).The proposed method is validated first on synthetic signals and then on actual industrial signals. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on envelope-based diagnosis of bearings in variable

  3. Cavity Optomechanics in the Quantum Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Thierry Claude Marc

    An exciting scientific goal, common to many fields of research, is the development of ever-larger physical systems operating in the quantum regime. Relevant to this dissertation is the objective of preparing and observing a mechanical object in its motional quantum ground state. In order to sense the object's zero-point motion, the probe itself must have quantum-limited sensitivity. Cavity optomechanics, the interactions between light and a mechanical object inside an optical cavity, provides an elegant means to achieve the quantum regime. In this dissertation, I provide context to the successful cavity-based optical detection of the quantum-ground-state motion of atoms-based mechanical elements; mechanical elements, consisting of the collective center-of-mass (CM) motion of ultracold atomic ensembles and prepared inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, were dispersively probed with an average intracavity photon number as small as 0.1. I first show that cavity optomechanics emerges from the theory of cavity quantum electrodynamics when one takes into account the CM motion of one or many atoms within the cavity, and provide a simple theoretical framework to model optomechanical interactions. I then outline details regarding the apparatus and the experimental methods employed, highlighting certain fundamental aspects of optical detection along the way. Finally, I describe background information, both theoretical and experimental, to two published results on quantum cavity optomechanics that form the backbone of this dissertation. The first publication shows the observation of zero-point collective motion of several thousand atoms and quantum-limited measurement backaction on that observed motion. The second publication demonstrates that an array of near-ground-state collective atomic oscillators can be simultaneously prepared and probed, and that the motional state of one oscillator can be selectively addressed while preserving the near-zero-point motion of

  4. Using Decision Lists to Construct Interpretable and Parsimonious Treatment Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Laber, Eric B.; Tsiatis, Anastasios; Davidian, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Summary A treatment regime formalizes personalized medicine as a function from individual patient characteristics to a recommended treatment. A high-quality treatment regime can improve patient outcomes while reducing cost, resource consumption, and treatment burden. Thus, there is tremendous interest in estimating treatment regimes from observational and randomized studies. However, the development of treatment regimes for application in clinical practice requires the long-term, joint effort of statisticians and clinical scientists. In this collaborative process, the statistician must integrate clinical science into the statistical models underlying a treatment regime and the clinician must scrutinize the estimated treatment regime for scientific validity. To facilitate meaningful information exchange, it is important that estimated treatment regimes be interpretable in a subject-matter context. We propose a simple, yet flexible class of treatment regimes whose members are representable as a short list of if-then statements. Regimes in this class are immediately interpretable and are therefore an appealing choice for broad application in practice. We derive a robust estimator of the optimal regime within this class and demonstrate its finite sample performance using simulation experiments. The proposed method is illustrated with data from two clinical trials. PMID:26193819

  5. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  6. Classification of Arctic, Mid-Latitude and Tropical Clouds in the Mixed-Phase Temperature Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anja; Afchine, Armin; Luebke, Anna; Meyer, Jessica; Dorsey, James R.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred; Krämer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    The degree of glaciation and the sizes and habits of ice particles formed in mixed-phase clouds remain not fully understood. However, these properties define the mixed clouds' radiative impact on the Earth's climate and thus a correct representation of this cloud type in global climate models is of importance for an improved certainty of climate predictions. This study focuses on the occurrence and characteristics of two types of clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime (238-275K): coexistence clouds (Coex), in which both liquid drops and ice crystals exist, and fully glaciated clouds that develop in the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen regime (WBF clouds). We present an extensive dataset obtained by the Cloud and Aerosol Particle Spectrometer NIXE-CAPS, covering Arctic, mid-latitude and tropical regions. In total, we spent 45.2 hours within clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime during five field campaigns (Arctic: VERDI, 2012 and RACEPAC, 2014 - Northern Canada; mid-latitude: COALESC, 2011 - UK and ML-Cirrus, 2014 - central Europe; tropics: ACRIDICON, 2014 - Brazil). We show that WBF and Coex clouds can be identified via cloud particle size distributions. The classified datasets are used to analyse temperature dependences of both cloud types as well as range and frequencies of cloud particle concentrations and sizes. One result is that Coex clouds containing supercooled liquid drops are found down to temperatures of -40 deg C only in tropical mixed clouds, while in the Arctic and mid-latitudes no liquid drops are observed below about -20 deg C. In addition, we show that the cloud particles' aspherical fractions - derived from polarization signatures of particles with diameters between 20 and 50 micrometers - differ significantly between WBF and Coex clouds. In Coex clouds, the aspherical fraction of cloud particles is generally very low, but increases with decreasing temperature. In WBF clouds, where all cloud particles are ice, about 20-40% of the cloud

  7. Comparison of primary vaccination regimes for equine influenza: working towards an evidence-based regime.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, A; Gildea, S; Weldon, E

    2014-11-01

    Vaccination is crucial to the control of equine influenza (EI). The study was conducted in an effort to lay the groundwork for achieving international harmonisation of regulatory requirements based on scientific evidence of performance of different vaccination regimes. To evaluate the effectiveness of 3 different primary vaccination regimes: vaccination with the minimal intervals permitted by the racing authorities; vaccination in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and vaccination with the longest intervals permitted by the racing authorities. Randomised, prospective clinical trial. The 55 seronegative unvaccinated horses in this study were subdivided by age and randomly allocated one of the 3 vaccination regimes. All groups were sampled each time a group was vaccinated and 3-5 weeks post vaccination. Horses were vaccinated with a subunit immune stimulating complex-based vaccine (Equip FT). Antibodies against EI were measured by single radial haemolysis. Lengthening the vaccination intervals increased the immunity gaps between first (V1) and second (V2) doses, and V2 and third dose (V3) but did not inhibit the response to V2 and V3. The response to V2 and V3 was similar irrespective of the regime. Poor responders to V1 were identified in all age groups included in this study but the greatest number of poor responders was among the yearlings. The 2- and 3-year-old horses responded better to vaccination than the weanlings or yearlings. Longer vaccination intervals permitted by racing authorities increase the periods of susceptibility to EI but they may facilitate strategic vaccination prior to times of increased risk of exposure to virus. The study provides the type of evidence-based data necessary to commence meaningful discussion of international harmonisation of EI vaccination requirements. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Characterization of fire regime in Sardinia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, V. M.; Salis, M.; Mastinu, S.; Masala, F.; Sirca, C.; Spano, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, a number of Authors highlighted the crucial role of forest fires within Mediterranean ecosystems, with impacts both negative and positive on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In Sardinia (Italy), the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, forest fires are perceived as one of the main environmental and social problems, and data are showing that the situation is worsening especially within the rural-urban peripheries and the increasing number of very large forest fires. The need for information concerning forest fire regime has been pointed out by several Authors (e.g. Rollins et al., 2002), who also emphasized the importance of understanding the factors (such as weather/climate, socio-economic, and land use) that determine spatial and temporal fire patterns. These would be used not only as a baseline to predict the climate change effect on forest fires, but also as a fire management and mitigation strategy. The main aim of this paper is, thus, to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of fire occurrence in Sardinia (Italy) during the last three decades (1980-2010). For the analyzed period, fire statistics were provided by the Sardinian Forest Service (CFVA - Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale), while weather data for eight weather stations were obtained from the web site www.tutiempo.it. For each station, daily series of precipitation, mean, maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity and wind speed were available. The present study firstly analyzed fire statistics (burned area and number of fires) according to the main fire regime characteristics (seasonality, fire return interval, fire incidence, fire size distribution). Then, fire and weather daily values were averaged to obtain monthly, seasonal and annual values, and

  9. New Combustion Regimes and Kinetic Studies of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of plasma assisted combustion Nov.6-7, 2012 MURI Plasma 3rd Yr Review Meeting MURI Topic #11: Chemical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of plasma assisted combustion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Flow reactor Species and kinetics (Ju) 1. New combustion regimes and kinetic studies of in situ plasma discharge in counterflow flames

  10. Evaluating temperature regimes for protection of brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armour, Carl L.

    1994-01-01

    Geographic distribution and population success of brown trout (Salmo trutta) are affected by temperature regimes. Concepts are presented for evaluating alternative temperature regimes for brown trout based on published temperature information and professional judgment. Temperature information from the literature is included for spawning runs, spawning, egg and larval development, growth, and other subjects. The objective is to aid biologists in evaluating alternative temperature regimes so as to select those that will protect and enhance environmental quality for brown trout.

  11. Shearing box simulations in the Rayleigh unstable regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability properties of Rayleigh unstable flows both in the purely hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for two different values of the shear q = 2.1, 4.2 (q = -dln Ω/dln r) and compare it with the Keplerian case q = 1.5. We find that the q > 2 regime is unstable both in the hydrodynamic and in the MHD limit (with an initially weak magnetic field). In this regime, the velocity fluctuations dominate the magnetic fluctuations. In contrast, in the q < 2 (magnetorotational instability (MRI)) regime the magnetic fluctuations dominate. This highlights two different paths to MHD turbulence implied by the two regimes, suggesting that in the q > 2 regime the instability produces primarily velocity fluctuations that cause magnetic fluctuations, with the causality reversed for the q < 2 MRI unstable regime. We also find that the magnetic field correlation is increasingly localized as the shear is increased in the Rayleigh unstable regime. In calculating the time evolution of spatial averages of different terms in the MHD equations, we find that the q > 2 regime is dominated by terms which are nonlinear in the fluctuations, whereas for q < 2, the linear terms play a more significant role.

  12. Film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Film thickness equations are provided for four fluid-film lubrication regimes found in elliptical contacts. These regimes are isoviscous-rigid; viscous-rigid; elastohydrodynamic lubrication of low-elastic-modulus materials (soft EHL), or isoviscous-elastic; and elastohydrodynamic lubrication of high-elastic-modulus materials (hard EHL), or viscous-elastic. The influence or lack of influence of elastic and viscous effects is the factor that distinguishes these regimes. The results are presented as a map of the lubrication regimes, with film thickness contours on a log-log grid of the viscosity and elasticity for three values of the ellipticity parameter.

  13. Evaluation of Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and the Levels of mRNA Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 7, Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor and COX-2 for the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Cosme, Angel; Hijona, Elizabeth; Enríquez-Navascués, José M.; Placer, Carlos; Villarreal, Eloisa; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Giraldez, María D.; Gironella, Meritxell; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women in the majority of developed countries. Molecular tests of blood could potentially provide this ideal screening tool. Aim Our objective was to assess the usefulness of serum markers and mRNA expression levels in the diagnosis of CRC. Methods In a prospective study, we measured mRNA expression levels of 13 markers (carbonic anhydrase, guanylyl cyclase C, plasminogen activator inhibitor, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), urokinase-type plasminogen activator, survivin, tetranectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cytokeratin 20, thymidylate synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and CD44) and three proteins in serum (alpha 1 antitrypsin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and activated C3 in 42 patients with CRC and 33 with normal colonoscopy results. Results Alpha 1-antitrypsin was the serum marker that was most useful for CRC diagnosis (1.79±0.25 in the CRC group vs 1.27±0.25 in the control group, P<0.0005). The area under the ROC curve for alpha 1-antitrypsin was 0.88 (0.79–0.96). The mRNA expression levels of five markers were statistically different between CRC cases and controls: those for which the ROC area was over 75% were MMP7 (0.81) and tetranectin (0.80), COX-2 (0.78), uPAR (0.78) and carbonic anhydrase (0.77). The markers which identified early stage CRC (Stages I and II) were alpha 1-antitrypsin, uPAR, COX-2 and MMP7. Conclusions Serum alpha 1-antitrypsin and the levels of mRNA expression of MMP7, COX-2 and uPAR have good diagnostic accuracy for CRC, even in the early stages. PMID:23300952

  14. TGF-β2 promotes RPE cell invasion into a collagen gel by mediating urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Koji; Kodama, Aya; Okada, Kiyotaka; Iwata, Mihoko; Yoshida, Koji; Kusaka, Shunji; Matsumoto, Chota; Kaji, Hiroshi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is one of the main epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing factors. In general, TGF-β-induced EMT promotes cell migration and invasion. TGF-β also acts as a potent regulator of pericellular proteolysis by regulating the expression and secretion of plasminogen activators. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that binds to its cell surface receptor (uPAR) with high affinity. uPA binding to uPAR stimulates uPAR's interaction with transmembrane proteins, such as integrins, to regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell migration, differentiation and proliferation. However, the influence of TGF-β and the uPA/uPAR system on EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TGF-β2, which is the predominant isoform in the retina, and the uPA/uPAR system on RPE cells. In this study, we first examined the effect of TGF-β2 and/or the inhibitor of uPA (u-PA-STOP(®)) on the proliferation of a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19 cells). Treatment with TGF-β2 or u-PA-STOP(®) suppressed cell proliferation. Combination treatment of TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®) enhanced cell growth suppression. Furthermore, western blot analysis, fibrin zymography and real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that that TGF-β2 induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells and that the expression of uPA and uPAR expression was up-regulated during EMT. The TGF-β inhibitor SB431542 suppressed TGF-β2-stimulated uPA expression and secretion but did not suppress uPAR expression. Furthermore, we seeded ARPE-19 cells onto Transwell chambers and allowed them to invade the collagen matrix in the presence of TGF-β2 alone or with TGF-β2 and u-PA-STOP(®). TGF-β2 treatment induced ARPE-19 cell invasion into the collagen gel. Treatment with a combination of TGF-β2 and the uPA inhibitor strongly inhibited ARPE-19 cell invasion compared with treatment with

  15. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor induced non-small cell lung cancer invasion and metastasis requires NHE1 transporter expression and transport activity.

    PubMed

    Provost, J J; Rastedt, D; Canine, J; Ngyuen, T; Haak, A; Kutz, C; Berthelsen, N; Slusser, A; Anderson, K; Dorsam, G; Wallert, M A

    2012-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-small cell lung cancers (NSLC) are aggressive cancers that are insensitive to chemotherapies and accounts for nearly 33% of all cancer deaths in the United States. Two hallmarks of cancer that allow cells to invade and metastasize are sustained proliferation and enhanced motility. In this study we investigate the relationship between urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) signaling and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) expression and activity. METHODS AND RESULTS: The addition of 10nM uPA increased the carcinogenic potential of three NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H358, NCI-H460, and NCI-H1299. This included an increase in the rate of cell proliferation 1.6 to 1.9 fold; an increase in the percentage of cells displaying stress fibers 3.05 to 3.17 fold; and an increase in anchorage-independent growth from 1.64 to 2.0 fold. In each of these cases the increase was blocked when the experiments were performed with NHE1 inhibited by 10 μM EIPA (ethylisopropyl amiloride). To further evaluate the role of uPA/uPAR and NHE1 in tumor progression we assessed signaling events using full-length uPA compared to the uPA amino terminal fragment (ATF). Comparing uPA and ATF signaling in H460 cells, we found that both uPA and ATF increased stress fiber formation approximately 2 fold, while uPA increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity 5.44 fold compared to 2.81 fold for ATF. To expand this signaling study, two new cell lines were generated, one with reduced NHE1 expression (H460 NHE1 K/D) and one with reduced uPAR expression (H460 uPAR K/D). Using the K/D cell lines we found that neither uPA nor ATF could stimulate stress fiber formation or MMP9 activity in cells with dramatically decreased NHE1 or uPAR expression. Finally, using in vivo tumor formation studies in athymic mice we found that when mice were injected with H460 cells 80% of mice formed tumors with an average volume of 390 mm(3). This was compared to 20% of H460 uPAR K/D injected

  16. Varying Inundation Regimes Differentially Affect Natural and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change is altering sea-level rise rates and precipitation patterns worldwide. Coastal wetlands are vulnerable to these changes. System responses to stressors are important for resource managers and environmental stewards to understand in order to best manage them. Thin layer sand or sediment application to drowning and eroding marshes is one approach to build elevation and resilience. The above- and below-ground structure, soil carbon dioxide emissions, and pore water constituents in vegetated natural marsh sediments and sand-amended sediments were examined at varying inundation regimes between mean sea level and mean high water (0.82 m NAVD88 to 1.49 m NAVD88) in a field experiment at Laws Point, part of the Plum Island Sound Estuary (MA). Significantly lower salinities, pH, sulfides, phosphates, and ammonium were measured in the sand-amended sediments than in the natural sediments. In natural sediments there was a pattern of increasing salinity with increasing elevation while in the sand-amended sediments the trend was reversed, showing decreasing salinity with increasing elevation. Sulfide concentrations generally increased from low to high inundation with highest concentrations at the highest inundation (i.e., at the lowest elevations). High pore water phosphate concentrations were measured at low elevations in the natural sediments, but the sand-amended treatments had mostly low concentrations of phosphate and no consistent pattern with elevation. A

  17. Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul Halim, M.F. )

    1994-07-01

    Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

  18. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous—the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world’s fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  19. TBT causes regime shift in shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Carl D; Hoare, Daniel J; Simpson, Gavin L; Henderson, Andrew C G; Liptrot, Eleanor R; Jackson, Michael J; Appleby, Peter G; Boyle, John F; Jones, I Iwan; Waldock, Mike J

    2006-09-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is an organotin compound used since the early 1960s as a biocide in boat antifouling paints. Its use has been linked to a host of negative effects in marine ecosystems including malformations and imposex in Mollusca and acute toxicity in many other aquatic animals. Yet, the consequences of TBT use in freshwaters are largely unknown. Here, for the first time we reveal that TBT may have caused hitherto unsuspected damage to freshwater ecosystems. Through an analysis of dated sediment cores collected from a system of recreationally boated, shallow lakes, we show that first evidence of TBT is associated with a dramatic loss of submerged vegetation and associated diverse animal communities. Cause and effect are difficult to unravel in our study. However, we hypothesize that TBT, through reducing populations of grazing organisms in lakes already affected by eutrophication, promoted the replacement of macrophytes by phytoplankton, ultimately leading to a regime shift in the ecosystem. Our findings may have parallels in freshwater ecosystems all over the world.

  20. RF Profile Control for Sustained Plasma Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Leblanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-11-01

    For advancing plasma operation regimes for AT tokamaks and steady state concepts, as well as for forming and sustaining alternate concepts, it is necessary to provide control of the spatial profiles for the important plasma parameters - pressure, current, etc.. RF techniques offer considerable promise for providing this control and should be further developed as rapidly as possible within the well established tokamak program for forming a basis for application to all confinement concepts. Notably, IBW promises to provide internal transport barrier control if the coupling physics can be understood and efficient antenna coupling to the Bernstein wave can be developed. We will review the IBW experience and discuss possible explanations and solutions for the coupling problems encountered. In particular, the competing roles of parametric decay instability and surface mode excitation will be examined in order to elucidate the increase in surface power losses for the larger devices DIII-D and TFTR. Also, issues which need to be understood for employing ICRF and LH techniques to best advantage, such as antenna bombardment and energetic electron excitation, respectively, will be outlined.

  1. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1990-05-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 3 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. The past year has been extremely productive especially in the area of interpretation theory, including the following two major break-throughs. One is the derivation of an integral equation for time-dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering (including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single and multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach) and offers more complete and economical solutions to the problems of seismic scattering and attenuation. The other is the new formula for synthetic seismograms for layered media with irregular interfaces, combining the T-matrix method for an arbitrary shaped inclusion and the method of global generalized reflection/transmission coefficients for layered media. Both breakthroughs will enable us to deal with seismic observations in complex earth structures more efficiently and accurately. In the area of experimental studies, we discovered seismic guided waves trapped in the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. 54 refs., 14 figs.

  2. On spinfoam models in large spin regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2014-01-01

    We study the semiclassical behavior of Lorentzian Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) spinfoam model, by taking into account the sum over spins in the large spin regime. We also employ the method of stationary phase analysis with parameters and the so-called, almost analytic machinery, in order to find the asymptotic behavior of the contributions from all possible large spin configurations in the spinfoam model. The spins contributing the sum are written as Jf = λjf, where λ is a large parameter resulting in an asymptotic expansion via stationary phase approximation. The analysis shows that at least for the simplicial Lorentzian geometries (as spinfoam critical configurations), they contribute the leading order approximation of spinfoam amplitude only when their deficit angles satisfy \\gamma \\mathring{\\Theta }_f\\le \\lambda ^{-1/2} mod 4\\pi {Z}. Our analysis results in a curvature expansion of the semiclassical low energy effective action from the spinfoam model, where the UV modifications of Einstein gravity appear as subleading high-curvature corrections.

  3. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  4. Dynamo beyond the regimed of MHD theory

    SciTech Connect

    Raskolnikov, I.; Mattor, N.

    1996-12-31

    Conservation of magnetic helicity K = {integral} dVA {circ} B, requires Ohm`s law to be valid, which can be rather restrictive. More generally, in fluid theory each charged species has its own helicity, where q{sub {alpha}} m{sub {alpha}}, and v{sub {alpha}} are the charge, mass and velocity of species a. The K{sub {alpha}} are conserved in the limit where {del}n{sub {alpha}} x {del}T{sub {alpha}} = 0; if this term does not vanish, then K{sub {alpha}} can be generated. For a neutral two-species plasma with low electron mass and a{Omega}{sub i} > v{sub i} (where a is a characteristic lengthscale of the magnetic field), it can be shown that K{sub e} conservation reduces to the the usual MHD conservation of K, and the difference K{sub i} - K{sub e} reduces to the usual conservation of cross helicity, {integral} dVv{sub i} {circ} B. This suggests that MHD dynamo theory can be generalized to any regime where fluid theory is valid. With K{sub e} {approx_equal} K for small m{sub e}, then the presence of {del}n{sub e} x {del}T{sub e} {ne} 0 can generate K, which can then generate large scale magnetic fields, as in the usual dynamo theory. Cross helicity can also be generated if {del}n{sub e} x {del}T{sub e} {ne} 0, which also affects the cascade dynamics.

  5. The seismology of geothermal regimes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have been developing seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in geothermal areas for a better understanding of the earth`s geothermal regimes. The questions the y have addressed in their research may be summarized as ``What is going on in the earth`s crust under tectonically active regions; what are the structures and processes responsible for such activities as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; and how can one capture their essence effectively by means of seismological studies?`` First, the authors found clear evidence for localization of scattered seismic energy in the deep magmatic system of the volcano on the island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean. The seismic coda of local earthquakes show concentrated energy in the intrusive zones as late as 30 to 40 seconds after the origin time. This offers a very effective method for defining a zone of strong heterogeneity on a regional scale, complementary to the high resolution study using trapped modes as pursued in the past project. Secondly, the authors identified about 700 long-period events with various frequencies and durations from the data collected during the past 5 years which included three episodes of eruption. They are applying a finite-element method to the simplest event with the longest period and the shortest duration in order to find the location, geometry and physical properties of their source deterministically. The preliminary result described here suggests that their sources may be a horizontally lying magma-filled crack at a shallow depth under the summit area. In addition to the above work on the Reunion data, they have continued the theoretical and observational studies of attenuation and scattering of seismic waves.

  6. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF REGIME SHIFTS IN TIME SERIES USING NEIGHBORHOOD STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of alternative dynamic regimes in ecological systems requires several lines of evidence. Previous work on time series analysis of dynamic regimes includes mainly model-fitting methods. We introduce two methods that do not use models. These approaches use state-...

  9. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  10. Spectral classification of coupling regimes in the quantum Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossatto, Daniel Z.; Villas-Bôas, Celso J.; Sanz, Mikel; Solano, Enrique

    2017-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model is in the scientific spotlight due to the recent theoretical and experimental progress. Nevertheless, a full-fledged classification of its coupling regimes remains as a relevant open question. We propose a spectral classification dividing the coupling regimes into three regions based on the validity of perturbative criteria on the quantum Rabi model, which allows us the use of exactly solvable effective Hamiltonians. These coupling regimes are (i) the perturbative ultrastrong coupling regime which comprises the Jaynes-Cummings model, (ii) a region where nonperturbative ultrastrong and nonperturbative deep strong coupling regimes coexist, and (iii) the perturbative deep strong coupling regime. We show that this spectral classification depends not only on the ratio between the coupling strength and the natural frequencies of the unperturbed parts, but also on the energy to which the system can access. These regimes additionally discriminate the completely different behaviors of several static physical properties, namely the total number of excitations, the photon statistics of the field, and the cavity-qubit entanglement. Finally, we explain the dynamical properties which are traditionally associated with the deep strong coupling regime, such as the collapses and revivals of the state population, in the frame of the proposed spectral classification.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF REGIME SHIFTS IN TIME SERIES USING NEIGHBORHOOD STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of alternative dynamic regimes in ecological systems requires several lines of evidence. Previous work on time series analysis of dynamic regimes includes mainly model-fitting methods. We introduce two methods that do not use models. These approaches use state-...

  12. Alternative characterization of forest fire regimes: incorporating spatial patterns

    Treesearch

    Brandon M. Collins; Jens T. Stevens; Jay D. Miller; Scott L. Stephens; Peter M. Brown; Malcolm P. North

    2017-01-01

    ContextThe proportion of fire area that experienced stand-replacing fire effects is an important attribute of individual fires and fire regimes in forests, and this metric has been used to group forest types into characteristic fire regimes. However, relying on proportion alone ignores important spatial characteristics...

  13. Maximizing vegetation response on management burns by identifying fire regimes

    Treesearch

    V. Thomas Parker

    1989-01-01

    Maintenance of vegetation is a central goal of watershed management. When prescribed burning of chaparral is included in management practice, then it is important for managers to understand and use the natural chaparral fire regime to maximize vegetation response. Variations from the natural fire regime in intensity, frequency, season, and environmental conditions at...

  14. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  15. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  16. Conditional heteroscedasticity as a leading indicator of ecological regime shifts.

    PubMed

    Seekell, David A; Carpenter, Stephen R; Pace, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Regime shifts are massive, often irreversible, rearrangements of nonlinear ecological processes that occur when systems pass critical transition points. Ecological regime shifts sometimes have severe consequences for human well-being, including eutrophication in lakes, desertification, and species extinctions. Theoretical and laboratory evidence suggests that statistical anomalies may be detectable leading indicators of regime shifts in ecological time series, making it possible to foresee and potentially avert incipient regime shifts. Conditional heteroscedasticity is persistent variance characteristic of time series with clustered volatility. Here, we analyze conditional heteroscedasticity as a potential leading indicator of regime shifts in ecological time series. We evaluate conditional heteroscedasticity by using ecological models with and without four types of critical transition. On approaching transition points, all time series contain significant conditional heteroscedasticity. This signal is detected hundreds of time steps in advance of the regime shift. Time series without regime shifts do not have significant conditional heteroscedasticity. Because probability values are easily associated with tests for conditional heteroscedasticity, detection of false positives in time series without regime shifts is minimized. This property reduces the need for a reference system to compare with the perturbed system.

  17. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  18. Detection and Assessment of Ecosystem Regime Shifts from Fisher Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem regime shifts, which are long-term system reorganizations, have profound implications for sustainability. There is a great need for indicators of regime shifts, particularly methods that are applicable to data from real systems. We have developed a form of Fisher info...

  19. Extractive Regimes: Toward a Better Understanding of Indonesian Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of an extractive regime to understand Indonesia's developmental trajectory from 1966 to 1998. The concept contributes to world-systems, globalization, and commodity-based approaches to understanding peripheral development. An extractive regime is defined by its reliance on extraction of multiple natural resources…

  20. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dyna