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Sample records for 2-km horizontal grid

  1. Magnetic Anomalies of the Fennoscandian Shield on a 2km resolution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Juha V.; Aaro, Sven; Reidar Skilbrei, Jan; All, Tarmo

    2010-05-01

    Joint magnetic anomaly grid of the Fennoscandian Shield was released 2002, smoothed and used as data for the WDMAM2007. In comparison with MF5 this grid showed superior characteristics to other sets. The data will be released as a 2 km resolution grid for the WDMAM2011 with eventual updates of anomaly levels.

  2. EXAMINATION OF MODEL PREDICTIONS AT DIFFERENT HORIZONTAL GRID RESOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While fluctuations in meteorological and air quality variables occur on a continuum of spatial scales, the horizontal grid spacing of coupled meteorological and photochemical models sets a lower limit on the spatial scales that they can resolve. However, both computational costs ...

  3. Assessment of the effects of horizontal grid resolution on long ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. WRF-CMAQ simulations over the continental United State are performed over the 2001 to 2010 time period at two different horizontal resolutions of 12 and 36 km. Both simulations used the same emission inventory and model configurations. Model results are compared both in space and time to assess the potential weaknesses and strengths of using coarse resolution in long-term air quality applications. The results show that the 36 km and 12 km simulations are comparable in terms of trends analysis for both pollutant concentrations and radiation variables. The advantage of using the coarser 36 km resolution is a significant reduction of computational cost, time and storage requirement which are key considerations when performing multiple years of simulations for trend analysis. However, if such simulations are to be used for local air quality analysis, finer horizontal resolution may be beneficial since it can provide information on local gradients. In particular, divergences between the two simulations are noticeable in urban, complex terrain and coastal regions. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s Atmospheric Modeling Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment.

  4. A Comprehensive Study of Gridding Methods for GPS Horizontal Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanqiang; Jiang, Zaisen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wei, Wenxin; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Long; Zou, Zhenyu; Xiong, Xiaohui; Wang, Qixin; Du, Jiliang

    2017-03-01

    Four gridding methods for GPS velocities are compared in terms of their precision, applicability and robustness by analyzing simulated data with uncertainties from 0.0 to ±3.0 mm/a. When the input data are 1° × 1° grid sampled and the uncertainty of the additional error is greater than ±1.0 mm/a, the gridding results show that the least-squares collocation method is highly robust while the robustness of the Kriging method is low. In contrast, the spherical harmonics and the multi-surface function are moderately robust, and the regional singular values for the multi-surface function method and the edge effects for the spherical harmonics method become more significant with increasing uncertainty of the input data. When the input data (with additional errors of ±2.0 mm/a) are decimated by 50% from the 1° × 1° grid data and then erased in three 6° × 12° regions, the gridding results in these three regions indicate that the least-squares collocation and the spherical harmonics methods have good performances, while the multi-surface function and the Kriging methods may lead to singular values. The gridding techniques are also applied to GPS horizontal velocities with an average error of ±0.8 mm/a over the Chinese mainland and the surrounding areas, and the results show that the least-squares collocation method has the best performance, followed by the Kriging and multi-surface function methods. Furthermore, the edge effects of the spherical harmonics method are significantly affected by the sparseness and geometric distribution of the input data. In general, the least-squares collocation method is superior in terms of its robustness, edge effect, error distribution and stability, while the other methods have several positive features.

  5. A Comprehensive Study of Gridding Methods for GPS Horizontal Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanqiang; Jiang, Zaisen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wei, Wenxin; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Long; Zou, Zhenyu; Xiong, Xiaohui; Wang, Qixin; Du, Jiliang

    2016-12-01

    Four gridding methods for GPS velocities are compared in terms of their precision, applicability and robustness by analyzing simulated data with uncertainties from 0.0 to ±3.0 mm/a. When the input data are 1° × 1° grid sampled and the uncertainty of the additional error is greater than ±1.0 mm/a, the gridding results show that the least-squares collocation method is highly robust while the robustness of the Kriging method is low. In contrast, the spherical harmonics and the multi-surface function are moderately robust, and the regional singular values for the multi-surface function method and the edge effects for the spherical harmonics method become more significant with increasing uncertainty of the input data. When the input data (with additional errors of ±2.0 mm/a) are decimated by 50% from the 1° × 1° grid data and then erased in three 6° × 12° regions, the gridding results in these three regions indicate that the least-squares collocation and the spherical harmonics methods have good performances, while the multi-surface function and the Kriging methods may lead to singular values. The gridding techniques are also applied to GPS horizontal velocities with an average error of ±0.8 mm/a over the Chinese mainland and the surrounding areas, and the results show that the least-squares collocation method has the best performance, followed by the Kriging and multi-surface function methods. Furthermore, the edge effects of the spherical harmonics method are significantly affected by the sparseness and geometric distribution of the input data. In general, the least-squares collocation method is superior in terms of its robustness, edge effect, error distribution and stability, while the other methods have several positive features.

  6. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  7. Correlations of control variables for horizontal background error covariance modeling on cubed-sphere grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwun, Jihye; Song, Hyo-Jong; Park, Jong-Im

    2013-04-01

    Background error covariance matrix is very important for variational data assimilation system, determining how the information from observed variables is spread to unobserved variables and spatial points. The full representation of the matrix is impossible because of the huge size so the matrix is constructed implicitly by means of a variable transformation. It is assumed that the forecast errors in the control variables chosen are statistically independent. We used the cubed-sphere geometry based on the spectral element method which is better for parallel application. In cubed-sphere grids, the grid points are located at Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto points on each local element of 6 faces on the sphere. The two stages of the transformation were used in this study. The first is the variable transformation from model to a set of control variables whose errors are assumed to be uncorrelated, which was developed on the cubed sphere-using Galerkin method. Winds are decomposed into rotational part and divergent part by introducing stream function and velocity potential as control variables. The dynamical constraint for balance between mass and wind were made by applying linear balance operator. The second is spectral transformation which is to remove the remaining spatial correlation. The bases for the spectral transform were generated for the cubed-sphere grid. 6-hr difference fields of shallow water equation (SWE) model run initialized by variational data assimilation system were used to obtain forecast error statistics. In the horizontal background error covariance modeling, the regression analysis of the control variables was performed to define the unbalanced variables as the difference between full and correlated part. Regression coefficient was used to remove the remaining correlations between variables.

  8. Effect of horizontal grid resolution on simulations of the subtropical mode water in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Yeop Kim, Sang; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how the Subtopical Mode Water (STMW) can be simulated differently in the North Pacific using a global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) with non-eddying and eddy permitting resolution. The OGCM used in this study is the MOM version 4.1 and has a total of 50 levels along the vertical direction with enhanced resolution near the surface. The CORE version 2 (normal year forcing) data derived from the air-sea flux climatology averaged over 60 years (1948-2007) are used to calculate heat, salt and momentum fluxes with a bulk formula at the sea surface. The sea surface salinity is restored to the climatological monthly mean surface salinity of the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology on a 60-day timescale, to make up the fresh water flux at the sea surface. Two models that have horizontal resolutions of 1° and 1/4 °, respectively, are integrated during 50 years. The inter-annual variation of the STMW volume was well reproduced with the eddy-permitting grid resolution although the model was forced by a climatological atmospheric forcing. The annual formation and erosion volume of STMW varies by 7% and 9% of the mean volume, respectively.

  9. Developing a 3D constrained variational analysis method to obtain accurate gridded atmospheric vertical velocity and horizontal advections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the constrained variational analysis (CVA) algorithm developed by Zhang and Lin (1997), a 3-dimensional (3D) version of CVA is developed. The new algorithm used gridded surface and TOA observations as constraints to adjust atmospheric state variables in each grid point to satisfy column-integrated mass, moisture and static energy conservation. From the process of adjustment a set of high-quality 3D large-scale forcing data (vertical velocity and horizontal advections) can be derived to drive Single-Column models (SCM), Cloud-Resolving Models (CRM) and Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to evaluate and improve parameterizations. Since the 3D CVA can adjust gridded state variables from any data source with observed precipitation, radiation and surface fluxes, it also gives a potential possibility to use this algorithm in data assimilation system to assimilate precipitation and radiation data.

  10. Response of Winter Forecasts Made with the GLA Fourth Order GCM to Changes in the Horizontal Grid Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaendtner, J.

    1985-01-01

    The GLA Fourth Order General Circulation Model was modified in 1984 to allow it to be run at a finer horizontal grid resolution. Previously the standard model versions integrated the primitive equations on a 4 degree latitude by 5 degree longitude grid. Forecasts made at this resolution are compared to others which were made using the finer 2 degree latitude by 2 1/2 degree longitude grid resolution. Three winter cases are included with initial conditions from 15 December 1978, 5 January 1979 and 21 January 1979. The 21 January 1979 initial conditions were taken from a GLAS analysis (experiment 2728) which incorporated the GLAS temperature retrievals. The other two cases used European Center Analysis for initial conditions. The forecasts were all verified against European Center Analysis.

  11. On the sensitivity of convective system structure and propagation in convection-allowing runs to horizontal grid spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, William; Lawson, John; Squitieri, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), particularly those with bowing lines of convection that often are associated with damaging wind, are often poorly simulated in numerical weather prediction models. Although the use of convection-allowing grid spacings results in simulated structures, propagation, and evolution that usually resemble those observed much better than what happens when convection is parameterized, numerous problems remain that typically keep skill scores low for precipitation verification. Among these problems are the failure of models to produce bowing structures within convective systems, and displacement errors in positioning of the simulated convection. We will show results that suggest that both the amount of bowing in severe bow echo convective systems and the propagation speed of convective systems in general is very sensitive to changes in horizontal grid spacing when the typically used 3 or 4 km is refined down to around 1 km. Results will focus on both an 11 member Weather Research and Forecasting model ensemble making use of the Stochastic Kinetic Energy Backscatter scheme that was run using both a single 3 km horizontal grid, and with a 1 km refined nest embedded within it for two bow echo events, and on a much larger set of general MCS cases simulated with single deterministic runs of the NMMB (Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model on the B-grid) using both 4 and 1.33 km grid spacing. In the bow echo events, the use of a two-way nested 1 km grid significantly increases the propagation speed of the system and results in much more organized bow structures that better resemble observations. However, the increased speed results in too rapid propagation of the system compared to observations, making the 1 km ensemble less skillful than the 3 km ensemble. In addition, ensemble spread was generally less in the 1 km ensemble than in the 3 km ensemble. The increased organization and propagation of the bow echoes appears to be due to a much stronger rear

  12. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomski, W.; Palasz, E.; Skupinska, M.; Zylinski, M.; Steczkowska, M.; Gasiorowska, A.; Niewiadomska, G.; Riedel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders. PMID:27982134

  13. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, W; Palasz, E; Skupinska, M; Zylinski, M; Steczkowska, M; Gasiorowska, A; Niewiadomska, G; Riedel, G

    2016-12-16

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders.

  14. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. II. Horizontal and temporal averaging and spectral line formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the implications of averaging methods with different reference depth scales for 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres computed with the Stagger-code. The temporally and spatially averaged (hereafter denoted as ⟨3D⟩) models are explored in the light of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation by comparing spectrum calculations using full 3D atmosphere structures with those from ⟨3D⟩ averages. Methods: We explored methods for computing mean ⟨3D⟩ stratifications from the Stagger-grid time-dependent 3D radiative hydrodynamical atmosphere models by considering four different reference depth scales (geometrical depth, column-mass density, and two optical depth scales). Furthermore, we investigated the influence of alternative averages (logarithmic, enforced hydrostatic equilibrium, flux-weighted temperatures). For the line formation we computed curves of growth for Fe i and Fe ii lines in LTE. Results: The resulting ⟨3D⟩ stratifications for the four reference depth scales can be very different. We typically find that in the upper atmosphere and in the superadiabatic region just below the optical surface, where the temperature and density fluctuations are highest, the differences become considerable and increase for higher Teff, lower log g, and lower [Fe / H]. The differential comparison of spectral line formation shows distinctive differences depending on which ⟨3D⟩ model is applied. The averages over layers of constant column-mass density yield the best mean ⟨3D⟩ representation of the full 3D models for LTE line formation, while the averages on layers at constant geometrical height are the least appropriate. Unexpectedly, the usually preferred averages over layers of constant optical depth are prone to increasing interference by reversed granulation towards higher effective temperature, in particular at low metallicity. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgMean ⟨3D⟩ models are

  15. Assessment of the effects of horizontal grid resolution on long-term air quality trends using coupled WRF-CMAQ simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. WRF-CMAQ simulations over the continental Uni...

  16. Assessment of the effects of horizontal grid resolution on long-term air quality trends using coupled WRF-CMAQ simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen-Meei; Hogrefe, Christian; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Xing, Jia; Wong, David; Gilliam, Robert; Pouliot, George; Wei, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. WRF-CMAQ simulations over the continental United State are performed over the 2001 to 2010 time period at two different horizontal resolutions of 12 and 36 km. Both simulations used the same emission inventory and model configurations. Model results are compared both in space and time to assess the potential weaknesses and strengths of using coarse resolution in long-term air quality applications. The results show that the 36 km and 12 km simulations are comparable in terms of trends analysis for both pollutant concentrations and radiation variables. The advantage of using the coarser 36 km resolution is a significant reduction of computational cost, time and storage requirement which are key considerations when performing multiple years of simulations for trend analysis. However, if such simulations are to be used for local air quality analysis, finer horizontal resolution may be beneficial since it can provide information on local gradients. In particular, divergences between the two simulations are noticeable in urban, complex terrain and coastal regions.

  17. Demonstration of Femtosecond-Phase Stabilization in 2 km OpticalFiber

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.W.; Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J.M.

    2007-06-01

    Long-term phase drifts of less than a femtosecond per hour have been demonstrated in a 2 km length of single-mode optical fiber, stabilized interferometrically at 1530 nm. Recent improvements include a wide-band phase detector that reduces the possibility of fringe jumping due to fast external perturbations of the fiber and locking of the master CW laser wavelength to an atomic absorption line. Mode-locked lasers may be synchronized using two wavelengths of the comb, multiplexed over one fiber, each wavelength individually interferometrically stabilized.

  18. Horizontal Variability of Water and Its Relationship to Cloud Fraction near the Tropical Tropopause: Using Aircraft Observations of Water Vapor to Improve the Representation of Grid-scale Cloud Formation in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale models such as GEOS-5 typically calculate grid-scale fractional cloudiness through a PDF parameterization of the sub-gridscale distribution of specific humidity. The GEOS-5 moisture routine uses a simple rectangular PDF varying in height that follows a tanh profile. While below 10 km this profile is informed by moisture information from the AIRS instrument, there is relatively little empirical basis for the profile above that level. ATTREX provides an opportunity to refine the profile using estimates of the horizontal variability of measurements of water vapor, total water and ice particles from the Global Hawk aircraft at or near the tropopause. These measurements will be compared with estimates of large-scale cloud fraction from CALIPSO and lidar retrievals from the CPL on the aircraft. We will use the variability measurements to perform studies of the sensitivity of the GEOS-5 cloud-fraction to various modifications to the PDF shape and to its vertical profile.

  19. Sensitivity of WRF simulations of Hurricane Ivan to horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Megan Suzanne

    As finer resolutions become possible in numerical modeling, it has become increasingly common to turn off the cumulus parameterization scheme in favor of explicit simulation of convection. To the author's knowledge, the grid spacing at which it is appropriate to do so in a tropical cyclone (TC) case has not been systematically investigated. Therefore, this study examines the sensitivity of explicit model simulations of Hurricane Ivan (2004) to changes in horizontal grid spacing, when grid spacing between 12 and 2 km is used. As grid spacing decreases, the minimum central pressure of Ivan deepens, droping by approximately 20 hPa as grid spacing decreases from 4 to 2 km. However, the 8-, 6-, and 4-km simulations have intensity differences of only around 10 hPa between them. The structure shown by model-simulated radar, as well as model-simulated satellite infra-red (IR) temperatures, shows that the eyewall of the coarser resolution simulations (12- to 6-km) is highly asymmetrical and elliptically-shaped, with two large maxima (minima) in reflectivity (cloud top temperature) rotating about the TC center. The 4- and 2- km runs have more circular eyewalls, with more numerous and larger maxima (minima) in reflectivity (cloud top temperature) embedded within the eyewall, as well as better developed spiral bands. Temporal and spatial averaging, done at a given radius over azimuth, show the system-averaged quanitites in cross-section and reveal differences in the structure of the TC core and eyewall. The finer resolution simulations have larger updrafts and more subsidence within the eye. However, the warming of the eye, relative to the other runs, is confined to the upper levels of the troposphere. The eyewall of the TC in the finer resolution runs slopes radially outward less with height, as the horizontal temperature gradient changes little with height, compared with the coarser simulations. This lack of warming in the lower- and mid-levels of the TC eye indicates a

  20. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom-photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  1. The cytotoxic mechanism of karlotoxin 2 (KmTx 2) from Karlodinium veneficum (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Deeds, Jonathan R.; Hoesch, Robert E.; Place, Allen R.; Kao, Joseph P.Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the polyketide toxin karlotoxin 2 (KmTx 2) produced by Karlodinium veneficum, a dinoflagellate associated with fish kills in temperate estuaries worldwide, alters vertebrate cell membrane permeability. Microfluorimetric and electrophysiological measurements were used to determine that vertebrate cellular toxicity occurs through non-selective permeabilization of plasma membranes, leading to osmotic cell lysis. Previous studies showed that KmTx 2 is lethal to fish at naturally-occurring concentrations measured during fish kills, while sub-lethal doses severely damage gill epithelia. This study provides a mechanistic explanation for the association between K. veneficum blooms and fish kills that has long been observed in temperate estuaries worldwide. PMID:25546005

  2. 142.2km BOTDA based on ultra-long fiber laser with a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Rao, Yunjiang; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Wei-Li; Yuan, Cheng-Xu; Yan, Xiao-Dong; Li, Jin; Wu, Han; Zhu, Ye-Yu; Peng, Fei

    2013-09-01

    A novel distributed Raman amplification (DRA) scheme based on ultra-long fiber laser (UL-FL) pumping with a ring cavity rather than a linear cavity is proposed and demonstrated, for the first time. As a typical application of the proposed configuration, ultra-long-distance distributed sensing with Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) over 142.2km fiber with 5m spatial resolution and +/- 1.5° temperature uncertainty is achieved, without any repeater, for the first time. The key point for the significant performance improvement is the system could offer both of uniform gain distribution and considerably suppressed pump-probe relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer, by optimized design of system structure and parameters.

  3. Response of Organic Materials to Hypervelocity Impacts (up to 11.2 km/sec)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, D. S.; Murphy, W. M.; Miller, G. P.; Grosch, D. J.; Walker, J. D.; Mullin, A.; Waite, J. H.

    1998-09-01

    It is speculated that organic-rich planetesimals played a role in the origin of life on Earth. However, the mechanism by which organics could have been delivered from space to a planetary surface is difficult to determine. Particularly problematic is the question of the stability of organic material under hypervelocity impact conditions. Although some evidence suggests organic molecules cannot survive impacts from projectile velocities greater than about 10 km/sec [1], other investigators have found that impacts create a favorable environment for post-shock recombination of organic molecules in the plume phase [2, 3]. Understanding the mechanisms involved in delivering organics to a planetary surface remains difficult to assess due to the lack of experimental results of hypervelocity impacts, particularly in the velocity range of tens of km/sec. Organic material preservation and destruction from impact shocks, the synthesis of organics in the post-impact plume environment, and implications of these processes for Earth and Mars can be investigated by launching an inorganic projectile into an analog planetesimal-and-bolide organic-rich target. We explored the pressure and temperature ranges of hypervelocity impacts (11.2 km/sec) through simulations with CTH impact physics computer code. Using an inhibited shaped-charge launcher, we also experimentally determined the response of organic material to hypervelocity impacts. Initial work focused on saturating well-characterized zeolitic tuff with an aqueous solution containing dissolved naphthalene, a common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Porosity measurements, thin section, and x-ray diffraction analyses were performed to determine that the tuff is primarily fine-grained clinoptilolite. In order to distinguish between contaminants and compounds generated or destroyed in the impact, we tagged the aqueous component of our target with deuterium. Experimental tests revealed that to first order, naphthalene survived

  4. Cultivation of methanogenic community from 2-km deep subseafloor coalbeds using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imachi, H.; Tasumi, E.; Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subseafloor environments associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs have been least explored by previous scientific drilling and hence the nature of deep subseafloor life and its ecological roles in the carbon cycle remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed cultivation of subseafloor methanogenic communities using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. The sample used for the reactor cultivation was obtained from 2 km-deep coalbeds off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the northwestern Pacific, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 using a riser drilling technology of the drilling vessel Chikyu. The coalbed samples were incubated anaerobically in the DHS reactor at the in-situ temperature of 40°C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with a tiny amount of yeast extract, acetate, propionate and butyrate was provided into the DHS reactor. After 34 days of the bioreactor operation, a small production of methane was observed. The methane concentration was gradually increased and the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane was consistency 13C-depleted during the bioreactor operation, indicating the occurrence of microbial methanogenesis. Microscopic observation showed that the enrichment culture contained a variety of microorganisms, including methanogen-like rod-shaped cells with F420 auto-fluorescence. Interestingly, many spore-like particles were observed in the bioreactor enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed the growth of phylogenetically diverse bacteria and archaea in the DHS reactor. Predominant archaeal components were closely related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the genus Methanobacterium. Some predominant bacteria were related to the spore-formers within the class Clostridia, which are overall in good agreement with microscopic observations. By analyzing ion images using a nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano

  5. Which grids are Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Hedetniemi, S. M.; Hedetniemi, S. T.; Slater, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    A complete grid G/sub m,n/ is a graph having m x n pertices that are connected to form a rectangular lattice in the plane, i.e., all edges of G/sub m,n/ connect vertices along horizontal or vertical lines. A grid is a subgraph of a complete grid. As an illustration, complete grids describe the basic pattern of streets in most cities. This paper examines the existence of Hamiltonian cycles in complete grids and complete grids with one or two vertices removed. It is determined for most values of m,n greater than or equal to 1, which grids G/sub m,n/ - (u) and G/sub m,n/ - (u,v) are Hamiltonian. 12 figures. (RWR)

  6. Observations of earthquake source parameters at 2 km depth in the Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate seismic source parameter scaling and seismic efficiency in the Long Valley caldera, California, we measured source parameters for 41 earthquakes (M 0.5 to M 5) recorded at 2 km depth in the Long Valley Exploratory Well. Borehole recordings provide a wide frequency bandwidth, typically 1 to 200–300 Hz, and greatly reduce seismic noise and path effects compared to surface recordings. We calculated source parameters in both the time and frequency domains for P and S waves. At frequencies above the corner frequency, spectra decay faster than ω3, indicating that attenuation plays an important role in shaping the spectra (path averaged Qp = 100–400, Qs = 200–800). Source parameters are corrected for attenuation and radiation pattern. Both static stress drops and apparent stresses range from approximately 0.01 to 30 MPa. Although static stress drops do not vary with seismic moment for these data, our analyses are consistent with apparent stress increasing with increasing moment. To estimate tectonic driving stress and seismic efficiencies in the region, we combined source parameter measurements with knowledge of the stress field and a Coulomb failure criterion to infer a driving stress of 40–70 MPa. Subsequent seismic efficiencies are consistent with McGarr's (1999) hypothesis of a maximum seismic efficiency of 6%.

  7. Monitoring massive fracture growth at 2-km depths using surface tiltmeter arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Tilt due to massive hydraulic fractures induced in sedimentary rocks at depths of up to 2.2 km have been recorded by surface tiltmeters. Injection of fluid volumes up to 4 ?? 105 liters and masses of propping agent up to 5 ?? 105 kg is designed to produce fractures approximately 1 km long, 50-100 m high and about 1 cm wide. The surface tilt data adequately fit a dislocation model of a tensional fault in a half-space. Theoretical and observational results indicate that maximum tilt occurs at a distance off the strike of the fracture equivalent to 0.4 of the depth to the fracture. Azimuth and extent of the fracture deduced from the geometry of the tilt field agree with other kinds of geophysical measurements. Detailed correlation of the tilt signatures with pumping parameters (pressure, rate, volume, mass) have provided details on asymmetry in geometry and growth rate. Whereas amplitude variations in tilt vary inversely with the square of the depth, changes in flow rate or pressure gradient can produce a cubic change in width. These studies offer a large-scale experimental approach to the study of problems involving fracturing, mass transport, and dilatancy processes. ?? 1979.

  8. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  9. Resolution dependence of deep convections in a global simulation from over 10-kilometer to sub-kilometer grid spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yamaura, Tsuyoshi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Tomita, Hirofumi

    2016-12-01

    The success of sub-kilometer global atmospheric simulation opens the door for resolving deep convections, which are fundamental elements of cloudy disturbances that drive global circulation. A previous study found that the essential change in the simulated convection properties occurred at a grid spacing of about 2 km as a global mean. In grid-refinement experiments, we conducted further comprehensive analysis of the global-mean state and the characteristics of deep convection, to clarify the difference of the essential change by location and environment. We found that the essential change in convection properties was different in the location and environment for each cloudy disturbance. The convections over the tropics show larger resolution dependence than convections over mid-latitudes, whereas no significant difference was found in convections over land or ocean. Furthermore, convections over cloudy disturbances [(i.e., Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), tropical cyclones (TCs)] show essential change of convection properties at about 1 km grid spacing, suggesting resolution dependence. As a result, convections not categorized as cloudy disturbances make a large contribution to the global-mean convection properties. This implies that convections in disturbances are largely affected organization processes and hence have more horizontal resolution dependence. In contrast, other categorized convections that are not involved in major cloudy disturbances show the essential change at about 2 km grid spacing. This affects the latitude difference of the resolution dependence of convection properties and hence the zonal-mean outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Despite the diversity of convection properties, most convections are resolved at less than 1 km grid spacing. In the future, longer integration of global atmosphere, to 0.87 km grid spacing, will stimulate significant discussion about the interaction between the convections and cloudy disturbances.

  10. Grid Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pointwise Inc.'s, Gridgen Software is a system for the generation of 3D (three dimensional) multiple block, structured grids. Gridgen is a visually-oriented, graphics-based interactive code used to decompose a 3D domain into blocks, distribute grid points on curves, initialize and refine grid points on surfaces and initialize volume grid points. Gridgen is available to U.S. citizens and American-owned companies by license.

  11. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  12. Extension of the operating parameters of the two stage light gas gun to velocities below 2 km/sec.

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R S

    2007-08-28

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) located in area 27 at the Nevada Test Site Has been tasked with providing high accuracy information on the Equation Of State (EOS) and other dynamic properties of weapons grade plutonium and other actinides important to the stockpile stewardship program. In the past 5 years this facility has provided dozens of experimental data points for the accurate determination of pressure density relationship for these materials over a broad pressure range. In order to complete this survey it is necessary to extend the low pressure region to include projectile velocities below 2 km/s. For most gas gun facilities this would present not too great a difficulty, one could simply decrease the amount of propellant along with a decrease in the strength of the petal valve, However JASPER requires that the piston be securely embedded in the Acceleration Reservoir (AR) as part of the containment system. The projectile must remain flat and undistorted. This requirement makes the attainment of slow velocities problematic. This talk will discuss the JASPER Facility, A finite difference code developed to give predictive capability for two stage gas guns, and a set of experiments performed to demonstrate this capability.

  13. 2 cm spatial-resolution and 2 km range Brillouin optical fiber sensor using a transient differential pulse pair.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Hongying; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-03-20

    We report a high-spatial-resolution and long-range distributed temperature sensor through optimizing differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA). In DPP-BOTDA, the differential signal suffers from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction with respect to the original signals, and for a fixed pulse-width difference the SNR reduction increases with the pulse width. Through reducing the pulse width to a transient regime (near to or less than the phonon lifetime) to decrease the SNR reduction after the differential process, the optimized 8/8.2 ns pulse pair is applied to realize a 2 cm spatial resolution, where a pulse generator with a 150 ps fall-time is used to ensure the effective resolution of DPP-BOTDA. In the experiment, a 2 cm spatial-resolution hot-spot detection with a 2 °C temperature accuracy is demonstrated over a 2 km sensing fiber.

  14. Overture: The grid classes

    SciTech Connect

    Brislawn, K.; Brown, D.; Chesshire, G.; Henshaw, W.

    1997-01-01

    Overture is a library containing classes for grids, overlapping grid generation and the discretization and solution of PDEs on overlapping grids. This document describes the Overture grid classes, including classes for single grids and classes for collections of grids.

  15. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  16. Grids = Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrington, Linda; Carter, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that narrow columns provide a flexible system of organization for designers. Notes that grids serve the content on the pages, help to develop a layout that will clearly direct the reader to information; and prevent visual monotony. Concludes when grid layouts are used, school publications look as good as professional ones. (PM)

  17. Perfluorocarbon Tracer Experiments on a 2 km Scale in Manchester Showing Ingress of Pollutants into a Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James; Wright, Matthew; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have been used to measure the passage of air in urban and rural settings as they are chemically inert, non-toxic and have low background concentrations. The use of pre-concentrators and chemical ionisation gas chromatography enables concentrations of a few parts per quadrillion (ppq) to be measured in bag samples. Three PFC tracers were used in Manchester, UK in the summer of 2015 to map airflow in the city and ingress into buildings: perfluomethylcyclohexane (PMCH), perfluoro-2-4-dimethylcyclohexane (mPDMCH) and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-ethylpentene (PMEP). A known quantity of each PFC was released for 15 minutes from steel canisters using pre-prepared PFC mixtures. Release points were chosen to be upwind of the central sampling location (Simon Building, University of Manchester) and varied in distance up to 2.2 km. Six releases using one or three tracers in different configurations and under different conditions were undertaken in the summer. Three further experiments were conducted in the Autumn, to more closely investigate the rate of ingress and decay of tracer indoors. In each experiment, 10 litre samples were made over 30 minutes into Tedlar bags, starting at the same time the as PFC release. Samples were taken in 11 locations chosen from 15 identified areas including three in public parks, three outside within the University of Manchester area, seven inside and five outside of the Simon building and two outside a building nearby. For building measurements, receptors were placed inside the buildings on different floors; outside measurements were achieved through a sample line out of the window. Three of the sample positions inside the Simon building were paired with samplers outside to allow indoor-outdoor comparisons. PFC concentrations varied depending on location and height. The highest measured concentrations occurred when the tracer was released at sunrise; up to 330 ppq above background (11 ppq) of PMCH was measured at the 6

  18. Horizontal drilling developments

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.

    1997-05-01

    The advantages of horizontal drilling are discussed. Use of horizontal drilling has climbed in the past half decade as technology and familiarity offset higher costs with higher production rates and greater recoveries from new and existing wells. In essence, all types of horizontal wells expose a larger section of the reservoir to the wellbore with a resulting increase in flow rates. (A horizontal well may also be drilled to provide coning control or to intersect vertical fractures.) Thus, drilling horizontally, both onshore and offshore, reduces the number of wells necessary to develop a field.

  19. Development of Gridded Fields of Urban Canopy Parameters for Advanced Urban Meteorological and Air Quality Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban dispersion and air quality simulation models applied at various horizontal scales require different levels of fidelity for specifying the characteristics of the underlying surfaces. As the modeling scales approach the neighborhood level (~1 km horizontal grid spacing), the...

  20. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  1. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  2. Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid

    SciTech Connect

    Dipankar, Anurag; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-02-07

    During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

  3. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  4. Safe Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote

  5. Estimating worldwide solar radiation resources on a 40km grid

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; George, R.L.; Brady, E.H.

    1996-11-01

    During 1995, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), initiated the Data Grid Task under the auspices of DOE`s Resource Assessment Program. A data grid is a framework of uniformly spaced locations (grid points) for which data are available. Estimates of monthly averages of direct normal, diffuse horizontal, and global horizontal daily-total solar radiation energy (kWh/m{sup 2}) are being made for each point on a grid covering the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and southern Canada. The grid points are separated by approximately 40 km. Using interpolation methods, the digital data grid can be used to estimate solar resources at any location. The most encouraging result to date has been the location of sources providing worldwide data for most of the input parameters required for modeling daily total solar radiation. This is a multiyear task expected to continue through the rest of this century.

  6. Datums, Ellipsoids, Grids, and Grid Reference Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Tunisie Grid, Sud Algerie Grid, Sud Maroc Grid, and Sud Tunisie Grid. 4-1.1.8 The...REFERENCES ON THE SUD ALGERIE AND SUD TUNISIE GRIDS 6-8.5.2 When oil reference boxes cannot be accommodated in the margin, the excess is shown in expanses...GIVING REFERENCES ON THE SUD ALGERIE AND SUD TUNISIE GRIDS 6-21 DMA TM 8358.1 I CHAPTER 7 GRIDS ON MAPS AT 1:250,000 AND 1:500,000 SCALE 7.1 GENERAL.

  7. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  8. GridMan: A grid manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Wang, Zhu

    1992-01-01

    GridMan is an interactive grid manipulation system. It operates on grids to produce new grids which conform to user demands. The input grids are not constrained to come from any particular source. They may be generated by algebraic methods, elliptic methods, hyperbolic methods, parabolic methods, or some combination of methods. The methods are included in the various available structured grid generation codes. These codes perform the basic assembly function for the various elements of the initial grid. For block structured grids, the assembly can be quite complex due to a large number of clock corners, edges, and faces for which various connections and orientations must be properly identified. The grid generation codes are distinguished among themselves by their balance between interactive and automatic actions and by their modest variations in control. The basic form of GridMan provides a much more substantial level of grid control and will take its input from any of the structured grid generation codes. The communication link to the outside codes is a data file which contains the grid or section of grid.

  9. MESH2D GRID GENERATOR DESIGN AND USE

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.

    2012-01-20

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j{sub 0}) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations. The overall mesh is constructed from grid zones that are typically then subdivided into a collection of smaller grid cells. The grid zones usually correspond to distinct materials or larger-scale geometric shapes. The structured grid zones are identified through uppercase indices (I,J). Subdivision of zonal regions into grid cells can be done uniformly, or nonuniformly using either a polynomial or geometric skewing algorithm. Grid cells may be concentrated backward, forward, or toward both ends. Figure 1 illustrates the above concepts in the context of a simple four zone grid.

  10. Grid Data Management and Customer Demands at MeteoSwiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigo, G.; Lukasczyk, Ch.

    2010-09-01

    Data grids constitute the required input form for a variety of applications. Therefore, customers increasingly expect climate services to not only provide measured data, but also grids of these with the required configurations on an operational basis. Currently, MeteoSwiss is establishing a production chain for delivering data grids by subscription directly from the data warehouse in order to meet the demand for precipitation data grids by governmental, business and science customers. The MeteoSwiss data warehouse runs on an Oracle database linked with an ArcGIS Standard edition geodatabase. The grids are produced by Unix-based software written in R called GRIDMCH which extracts the station data from the data warehouse and stores the files in the file system. By scripts, the netcdf-v4 files are imported via an FME interface into the database. Currently daily and monthly deliveries of daily precipitation grids are available from MeteoSwiss with a spatial resolution of 2.2km x 2.2km. These daily delivered grids are a preliminary based on 100 measuring sites whilst the grid of the monthly delivery of daily sums is calculated out of about 430 stations. Crucial for the absorption by the customers is the understanding of and the trust into the new grid product. Clearly stating needs which can be covered by grid products, the customers require a certain lead time to develop applications making use of the particular grid. Therefore, early contacts and a continuous attendance as well as flexibility in adjusting the production process to fulfill emerging customer needs are important during the introduction period. Gridding over complex terrain can lead to temporally elevated uncertainties in certain areas depending on the weather situation and coverage of measurements. Therefore, careful instructions on the quality and use and the possibility to communicate the uncertainties of gridded data proofed to be essential especially to the business and science customers who require

  11. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  12. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  13. Occurrence of microbial acetate-oxidation in ~2 km-deep coal-bearing sediments off the Shimokita Peninsula, Japan (IODP Expedition 337)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, A.; Inagaki, F.

    2015-12-01

    During the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 in 2012, the riser-drilling vessel Chikyu extended the previous world depth record of scientific ocean drilling and made one of the deepest scientific borehole down to 2466 m below the seafloor (mbsf) at Site C0020 Hole A off the Shimokita Peninsula, Japan. The sedimentary sequence consists of 17 lignite layers below 1.5 km bellow the seafloor. Microbiological and geochemical data consistently showed evidence for the existence of microbial communities associated with lignite coal beds in the coal-bearing sediments (Inagaki and Hinrichs et al., Science, 2015). Since lignite coals produce substantial dissolved organic compounds during the burial alternation process, volatile fatty acids may play important roles for microbial life and its activity in the deep sedimentary environment. To address this hypothesis, we measured methanogenic and acetate-oxidation activities by radiotracer incubation experiments using 14C-labelled substrate ([2-14C]-acetate) immediately after core recovery. Activity of aceticlastic methanogenesis was observed in the sediment above the coal-baring layers (>1990 mbsf), ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 pmol cm-3 d-1. The highest activity was observed in a coal-bed horizon at 1990 mbsf. However, aceticlastic methanogenesis was below the detection limit in sediment samples below the 2 km-coal layers. Activity of acetate oxidation to CO2 was measured by 14CO2 production rate from [2-14C]-acetate. Interestingly, the acetate-oxidation activity was observed in sediments above the coal beds, which values were generally higher than those of methanogenesis with the maximum value of 33 pmol cm-3 d-1 at 1800 mbsf. The rates gradually decreased with increasing depth from 1800 mbsf and reached below the detection limit (i.e., 0.05 pmol cm-3 d-1) in 2 km-deep coal-bed samples. The occurrence of relatively high acetate oxidation at ~1800 mbsf above the coal formation suggests that microbes respire

  14. Horizontal baffle for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rylatt, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal baffle disposed in the annulus defined between the core barrel and the thermal liner of a nuclear reactor thereby physically separating the outlet region of the core from the annular area below the horizontal baffle. The horizontal baffle prevents hot coolant that has passed through the reactor core from thermally damaging apparatus located in the annulus below the horizontal baffle by utilizing the thermally induced bowing of the horizontal baffle to enhance sealing while accommodating lateral motion of the baffle base plate.

  15. Horizontal Temperature Variability in the Stratosphere: Global Variations Inferred from CRISTA Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidmann, G.; Offermann, D.; Jarisch, M.; Preusse, P.; Eckermann, S. D.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    In two separate orbital campaigns (November, 1994 and August, 1997), the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) instrument acquired global stratospheric data of high accuracy and high spatial resolution. The standard limb-scanned CRISTA measurements resolved atmospheric spatial structures with vertical dimensions greater than or equal to 1.5 - 2 km and horizontal dimensions is greater than or equal to 100 - 200 km. A fluctuation analysis of horizontal temperature distributions derived from these data is presented. This method is somewhat complementary to conventional power-spectral analysis techniques.

  16. 45-km horizontal path optical link demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Wright, Malcolm W.; Sanii, Babak; Page, Norman A.

    2001-06-01

    Observations made during a mountain-top-to-mountain-top horizontal optical link demonstration are described. The optical link spans a range of 46 Km at an average altitude of 2 Km above sea level. A multibeam beacon comprised of eight laser beams emerging from four multimode fiber coupled lasers (780 nm) is launched through a 0.6 m diameter telescope located at the JPL Table Mountain Facility (TMF) in Wrightwood, California. The multibeam beacon is received at Strawberry Peak located in the San Bernardino Mountains of California. The NASA, JPL developed optical communications demonstrator (OCD) receives the beacon, senses the atmospheric turbulence induced motion and using an upgraded fine steering loop actively points a communications laser beam (852 nm, 400 Mbps on-off key modulated, PN7 pseudo random bit sequence) to TMF. The eight-beam beacon allowed a four-fold reduction in normalized irradiance or scintillation index. This in turn was sufficient to eliminate beacon fades sensed by the OCD and enable performance evaluation of the fine steering loop. The residual tracking error was determined to be +/- 1.1 to +/- 1.7 (mu) rad compared to a model prediction of +/- 3.4 (mu) rad. The best link performance observed showed average bit error rates (BER) of 1E-5 over long durations (30 seconds); however, instantaneous BERs of at least 0.8E-6 over durations of 2 ms were observed. The paper also discusses results pertaining to atmospheric effects, link analysis, and overall performance.

  17. Evaluation of the Operational Multi-scale Environment model with Grid Adaptivity (OMEGA) for use in Wind Energy Applications in the Great Basin of Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kristien C.

    characterizing areas of complex terrain. Model sensitivity to horizontal grid resolution, initial conditions, and time of initialization were tested. OMEGA was run over three different horizontal grid resolutions with minimum horizontal edge lengths of: 18 km, 6 km, and 2 km. For each resolution, the model was initialized using both the Global Forecasting System (GFS) and North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) to determine model sensitivity to initial conditions. For both the NARR and GFS initializations, the model was started at both 0000 UTC and 1200 UTC to determine the effect of start time and stability regime on the performance of the model. An additional intensive study into the model's performance was also conducted by a detailed evaluation of model results during two separate 24-hour periods, the first a period where the model performed well and the second a period where the model performed poorly, to determine which atmospheric factors most affect the predictive ability of the OMEGA model. The statistical results were then compared with the results from the MM5 and WRF simulations to determine the most appropriate model for wind energy potential studies in complex terrain.

  18. Measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO over a 2-km Outdoor Path with Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, G. B.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Sinclair, L. C.; Cromer, C.; Baumann, E.; Newbury, N. R.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous sensing of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO over a 2-km outdoor open air path using dual-frequency-comb absorption spectroscopy (DCS). Our implementation of the DCS technique simultaneously offers broad spectral coverage (>8 THz, 267 cm-1) and fine spectral point spacing (100 MHz, 0.0033 cm-1) with a coherent eye-safe beam. The spectrometer, which is adapted from [Zolot et al., 2012], consists of two mutually coherent Erbium-doped fiber frequency-comb lasers which create a broad spectrum of perfectly spaced narrow linewidth frequency elements (';comb teeth') near 1.6 μm. The comb light is transmitted by a telescope and active steering mirrors from the roof of the NIST Boulder laboratory to a 50-cm flat mirror located 1 km away. The return light is received by a second telescope and carried via multimode fiber to a detector. The greenhouse gas absorption attenuates the teeth from the two combs that are coincident with the relevant molecular resonant frequencies. We purposefully offset the frequencies between the two frequency combs in a Vernier-like fashion so that each pair of comb teeth from the two combs results in a unique rf heterodyne beat frequency on the photodiode. The spectral spacing between subsequent comb teeth pairs is 100 MHz, far lower than the ~4 GHz linewidths of small molecule absorption features in the atmosphere. Because of the narrow comb linewidth, there is an essentially negligible instrument lineshape. The measured absorption spectrum can thus resolve neighboring absorption features of different species, and can be compared directly with HITRAN and recent greenhouse gas absorption models developed for satellite- and ground-based carbon observatories to determine the path-integrated concentrations of the absorbing species. Measurements covering the complete 30013←00001 absorption band of CO2 and absorption features of CH4, H2O and HDO between 1.6-1.67 μm were performed under a variety of atmospheric conditions. During

  19. Present-day stress states underneath the Kumano basin to 2 km below seafloor based on borehole wall failures at IODP site C0002, Nankai accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun

    2016-11-01

    We constrain the state of stress to 2 km below seafloor in the Nankai accretionary prism at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) site C0002F, southwest Japan, based on borehole wall failures and rock strengths. The logging-while-drilling resistivity images from 872.5 to 2005.5 m below seafloor show that drilling-mud control in riser drilling worked properly to minimize borehole wall failures. Available breakouts indicate a consistent maximum compression orientation subparallel to the subducting plate margin. Breakout analysis with drill logs suggests that breakouts occurred only when borehole pressure was slightly lowered and time lag between hole cutting and image logging was several hours. This indicates that the observed breakouts are not immediate stress-induced failure but brought up into shape gradually with time due to other mechanisms. Laboratory investigations on deformation and failure of the cores suggest that the time-delayed breakout might be a result of progressive rock spall-out in borehole wall damage zones that occur at a stress level close to failure condition. We constrain stress magnitudes assuming that the stress state is sufficient to bring about the damage zones at the borehole wall. An integrated method utilizing breakouts, drilling-induced tensile fractures, and a leak-off test suggests that the stress states are on the boundary between strike-slip faulting and normal faulting stress regimes, and somewhat variable depending on depth. The stress magnitudes in the accretionary wedge appear to be controlled by frictional strength of the rock, such that the differential stresses are constrained by the laboratory determined frictional coefficients.

  20. Parallel grid population

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  1. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  2. Scientific Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a definition of Grid computing which is adhered to throughout this Theme Issue. We compare the evolution of the World Wide Web with current aspirations for Grid computing and indicate areas that need further research and development before a generally usable Grid infrastructure becomes available. We discuss work that has been done in order to make scientific Grid computing a viable proposition, including the building of Grids, middleware developments, computational steering and visualization. We review science that has been enabled by contemporary computational Grids, and associated progress made through the widening availability of high performance computing.

  3. Horizontal microscopy in square capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Pavel E.

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular protoplasmic movements may, due to gravity, have a vertical component greater or different from the horizontal one. This makes horizontal microscopy indispensable in the search for the cellular sensor of gravity. The possibility of the latter being a cell organelle assigns special significance to high-resolution microscopy. A horizontal suction device for picking up a cell and its high-resolution horizontal microscopy in a rectangular capillary may be helpful for detection of gravity-related shifts of cellular organelles in vivo.

  4. Dynamic Power Grid Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Top, Philip; Woodward, Carol; Smith, Steve; Banks, Lawrence; Kelley, Brian

    2015-09-14

    GridDyn is a part of power grid simulation toolkit. The code is designed using modern object oriented C++ methods utilizing C++11 and recent Boost libraries to ensure compatibility with multiple operating systems and environments.

  5. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  6. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

    1997-01-30

    This report describes progress on Tasks 1 and 4, Correlations for cresting behavior in horizontal wells. Research work on developing coarse grid methods to study cresting in horizontal wells was continued. The previous correlations for optimum grid size, breakthrough time, and post breakthrough behavior (i.e., water-oil ratio) were further tested and optimized. Procedures to derive pseudo-functions either using numerical correlations or coarse grid simulations have been proposed and successfully tested. The results reported here and other calculations show that the correlations developed in this work can be applied to a wide range of conditions for predicting the water break-through time (BT) and the water-oil-ratio (PBB) for horizontal wells. All of the correlations are based on the assumption of two-phase, two-dimensional flow in homogeneous reservoirs.

  7. Parallel unstructured grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, Rainald; Camberos, Jose; Merriam, Marshal

    1991-01-01

    A parallel unstructured grid generation algorithm is presented and implemented on the Hypercube. Different processor hierarchies are discussed, and the appropraite hierarchies for mesh generation and mesh smoothing are selected. A domain-splitting algorithm for unstructured grids which tries to minimize the surface-to-volume ratio of each subdomain is described. This splitting algorithm is employed both for grid generation and grid smoothing. Results obtained on the Hypercube demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithms developed.

  8. IPG Power Grid Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will describe what is meant by grids and then cover the current state of the IPG. This will include an overview of the middleware that is key to the operation of the grid. The presentation will then describe some of the future directions that are planned for the IPG. Finally the presentation will conclude with a brief overview of the Global Grid Forum, which is a key activity that will contribute to the successful availability of grid components.

  9. AstroGrid-PL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowski, Greg; Kundera, Tomasz; Ciecielag, Paweł; AstroGridPL Team

    2016-06-01

    We summarise the achievements AstroGrid-PL project, which aims to provide an infrastructure grid computing, distributed storage and Virtual Observatory services to the Polish astronomical community. It was developed from 2011-2015 as a domain grid component within the large PLGrid Plus project for scientific computing in Poland.

  10. GridKit

    SciTech Connect

    Peles, Slaven

    2016-11-06

    GridKit is a software development kit for interfacing power systems and power grid application software with high performance computing (HPC) libraries developed at National Labs and academia. It is also intended as interoperability layer between different numerical libraries. GridKit is not a standalone application, but comes with a suite of test examples illustrating possible usage.

  11. Chimera Grid Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Buning, Pieter G.; Meakin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) is a software package for performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis utilizing the Chimera-overset-grid method. For modeling flows with viscosity about geometrically complex bodies in relative motion, the Chimera-overset-grid method is among the most computationally cost-effective methods for obtaining accurate aerodynamic results. CGT contains a large collection of tools for generating overset grids, preparing inputs for computer programs that solve equations of flow on the grids, and post-processing of flow-solution data. The tools in CGT include grid editing tools, surface-grid-generation tools, volume-grid-generation tools, utility scripts, configuration scripts, and tools for post-processing (including generation of animated images of flows and calculating forces and moments exerted on affected bodies). One of the tools, denoted OVERGRID, is a graphical user interface (GUI) that serves to visualize the grids and flow solutions and provides central access to many other tools. The GUI facilitates the generation of grids for a new flow-field configuration. Scripts that follow the grid generation process can then be constructed to mostly automate grid generation for similar configurations. CGT is designed for use in conjunction with a computer-aided-design program that provides the geometry description of the bodies, and a flow-solver program.

  12. Inferring Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, Florent; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT) is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages [1]. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric") methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic") approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events. PMID:26020646

  13. Understanding Horizontal Governance. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal governance is an umbrella term that covers a range of approaches to policy development, service delivery issues, and management practices. A horizontal initiative may take place across levels of government, across boundaries between units of a single department or agency or among multiple departments or agencies, or across public,…

  14. High cesium concentrations in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of fractured crystalline rock - Influence of groundwater origin and secondary minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Berger, Tobias; Peltola, Pasi; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Åström, Mats E.

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved and solid phase cesium (Cs) was studied in the upper 1.2 km of a coastal granitoid fracture network on the Baltic Shield (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory and Laxemar area, SE Sweden). There unusually high Cs concentrations (up to 5-6 μg L-1) occur in the low-temperature (<20 °C) groundwater. The material includes water collected in earlier hydrochemical monitoring programs and secondary precipitates (fracture coatings) collected on the fracture walls, as follows: (a) hydraulically pristine fracture groundwater sampled through 23 surface boreholes equipped for the retrieval of representative groundwater at controlled depths (Laxemar area), (b) fracture groundwater affected by artificial drainage collected through 80 boreholes drilled mostly along the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (underground research facility), (c) surface water collected in local streams, a lake and sea bay, and shallow groundwater collected in 8 regolith boreholes, and (d) 84 new specimens of fracture coatings sampled in cores from the Äspö HRL and Laxemar areas. The groundwater in each area is different, which affects Cs concentrations. The highest Cs concentrations occurred in deep-seated saline groundwater (median Äspö HRL: 4.1 μg L-1; median Laxemar: 3.7 μg L-1) and groundwater with marine origin (Äspö HRL: 4.2 μg L-1). Overall lower, but variable, Cs concentrations were found in other types of groundwater. The similar concentrations of Cs in the saline groundwater, which had a residence time in the order of millions of years, and in the marine groundwater, which had residence times in the order of years, shows that duration of water-rock interactions is not the single and primary control of dissolved Cs in these systems. The high Cs concentrations in the saline groundwater is ascribed to long-term weathering of minerals, primarily Cs-enriched fracture coatings dominated by illite and mixed-layer clays and possibly wall rock micaceous minerals. The high Cs concentrations in the

  15. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  16. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  17. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology

  18. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  19. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  20. The Managerial Grid; Key Orientations for Achieving Production through People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert R; Mouton, Jane S.

    The Managerial Grid arranges a concern for production on the horizontal axis and a concern for people on the vertical axis of a coordinate system: 1,1 shows minimum concern for production and people; 9,1 shows major production emphasis and minimum human considerations; 1,9 shows maximum concern for friendly working conditions and minimum…

  1. Grid enabled Service Support Environment - SSE Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goor, Erwin; Paepen, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The SSEGrid project is an ESA/ESRIN project which started in 2009 and is executed by two Belgian companies, Spacebel and VITO, and one Dutch company, Dutch Space. The main project objectives are the introduction of a Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure at the Image Processing Centre for earth observation products at VITO and the inclusion of Grid processing services in the Service Support Environment (SSE) at ESRIN. The Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure is meant to support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators (PI) and allow the design and execution of multi-sensor applications with geographically spread data while minimising the transfer of huge volumes of data. In the first scenario, 'support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators', we aim to provide processing power close to the EO-data at the processing and archiving centres. We will allow a PI (non-Grid expert user) to upload his own algorithm, as a process, and his own auxiliary data from the SSE Portal and use them in an earth observation workflow on the SSEGrid Infrastructure. The PI can design and submit workflows using his own processes, processes made available by VITO/ESRIN and possibly processes from other users that are available on the Grid. These activities must be user-friendly and not requiring detailed knowledge about the underlying Grid middleware. In the second scenario we aim to design, implement and demonstrate a methodology to set up an earth observation processing facility, which uses large volumes of data from various geographically spread sensors. The aim is to provide solutions for problems that we face today, like wasting bandwidth by copying large volumes of data to one location. We will avoid this by processing the data where they are. The multi-mission Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure will allow developing and executing complex and massive multi-sensor data (re-)processing applications more

  2. Securing smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Kosaleswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, M. YogaTeja; Reddy G. M., Sreerama; Madhusudhan, E.; AlMuhteb, Sulaiman

    2013-03-01

    In the developing countries electrical energy is very important for its all-round improvement by saving thousands of dollars and investing them in other sector for development. For Growing needs of power existing hierarchical, centrally controlled grid of the 20th Century is not sufficient. To produce and utilize effective power supply for industries or people we should have Smarter Electrical grids that address the challenges of the existing power grid. The Smart grid can be considered as a modern electric power grid infrastructure for enhanced efficiency and reliability through automated control, high-power converters, modern communications infrastructure along with modern IT services, sensing and metering technologies, and modern energy management techniques based on the optimization of demand, energy and network availability and so on. The main objective of this paper is to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in smart grid communications as well as critical issues on smart grid technologies primarily in terms of information and communication technology (ICT) issues like security, efficiency to communications layer field. In this paper we propose new model for security in Smart Grid Technology that contains Security Module(SM) along with DEM which will enhance security in Grid. It is expected that this paper will provide a better understanding of the technologies, potential advantages and research challenges of the smart grid and provoke interest among the research community to further explore this promising research area.

  3. Understanding the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-14

    The electric power grid has been rightly celebrated as the single most important engineering feat of the 20th century. The grid powers our homes, offices, hospitals, and schools; and, increasingly, it powers our favorite devices from smartphones to HDTVs. With those and other modern innovations and challenges, our grid will need to evolve. Grid modernization efforts will help the grid make full use of today’s advanced technologies and serve our needs in the 21st century. While the vast majority of upgrades are implemented by private sector energy companies that own and operate the grid, DOE has been investing in technologies that are revolutionizing the way we generate, store and transmit power.

  4. Comparison of horizontal difference schemes for the shallow water equations on a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gary L.; Takano, Kenji; Abramopoulos, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of horizontal difference schemes used in the hydrodynamics parts of General Circulation Models are compared by means of numerical experiments for the shallow water equations on a sphere. As expected, the phase lag of moving waves decreases as the order of accuracy of a scheme increases or as the grid resolution increases. Overall, Takano and Wurtele's partial fourth order energy and potential enstrophy conserving scheme on the C grid is most accurate. It is clearly superior to the other schemes for the Rossby-Haurwitz wave number 6 initial conditions for coarse grid resolution.

  5. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  6. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are

  7. Unstructured surface grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on unstructured surface grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: requirements for curves, surfaces, solids, and text; surface approximation; triangulation; advancing; projection; mapping; and parametric curves.

  8. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Annual report for the period, March 10, 1994--March 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Fayers, F.J.

    1995-07-01

    Contents of this annual report include the following: (1) detailed well model for reservoir simulation--task 1; (2) comparative aspects of coning behavior in vertical and horizontal wells--task 1; (3) skin factor calculations for vertical, deviated, and horizontal wells--task 2; (4) a dissipation-based coarse grid system and its application to the scaleup of two phase problems--tasks 2 and 4; (5) analyses of experiments at Marathon Oil Company--task 3; (6) development of mechanistic model for multiphase flow in horizontal wells--task 3; and (7) sensitivity studies of wellbore friction and inflow for a horizontal well--task 8.

  9. Security for grids

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-08-14

    Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities that need to be secured into four categories: naming and authentication; secure communication; trust, policy, and authorization; and enforcement of access control. It examines the current state of the art in securing these processes and introduces new technologies that promise to meet the security requirements of Grids more completely.

  10. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  11. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  12. Optimization Of A Computational Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Daniel G.

    1993-01-01

    In improved method of generation of computational grid, grid-generation process decoupled from definition of geometry. Not necessary to redefine boundary. Instead, continuous boundaries in physical domain specified, and then grid points in computational domain mapped onto continuous boundaries.

  13. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  14. Nuclear fuel spacer grid with improved outer straps

    SciTech Connect

    De Mario, E.E.; Knott, R.P.

    1986-04-29

    A grid is described for the spacing of fuel rods in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly, comprising: a plurality of interleaved grid straps arranged in an egg-crate configuration defining cells therein for the separate enclosure of each of the fuel rods; and four outer straps attached together in a generally square-shaped array surrounding the heightwise edges of the grid straps. The outer straps each has a central portion and a top and a bottom resilient lengthwise border portion, with the heightwise edges of the grid straps attached to the central portions of their associated outer straps and with the border portions extending vertically beyond and projecting horizontally outwardly beyond their associated central portions of their common outer straps.

  15. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  16. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  17. The open science grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE & NSF Laboratories and Universities & Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus.

  18. A New Dynamical Core Based on the Prediction of the Curl of the Horizontal Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konor, C. S.; Randall, D. A.; Heikes, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Vector-Vorticity Dynamical core (VVM) developed by Jung and Arakawa (2008) has important advantages for the use with the anelastic and unified systems of equations. The VVM predicts the horizontal vorticity vector (HVV) at each interface and the vertical vorticity at the top layer of the model. To guarantee that the three-dimensional vorticity is nondivergent, the vertical vorticity at the interior layers is diagnosed from the horizontal divergence of the HVV through a vertical integral from the top to down. To our knowledge, this is the only dynamical core that guarantees the nondivergence of the three-dimensional vorticity. The VVM uses a C-type horizontal grid, which allows a computational mode. While the computational mode does not seem to be serious in the Cartesian grid applications, it may be serious in the icosahedral grid applications because of the extra degree of freedom in such grids. Although there are special filters to minimize the effects of this computational mode, we prefer to eliminate it altogether. We have developed a new dynamical core, which uses a Z-grid to avoid the computational mode mentioned above. The dynamical core predicts the curl of the HVV and diagnoses the horizontal divergence of the HVV from the predicted vertical vorticity. The three-dimensional vorticity is guaranteed to be nondivergent as in the VVM. In this presentation, we will introduce the new dynamical core and show results obtained by using Cartesian and hexagonal grids. We will also compare the solutions to that obtained by the VVM.

  19. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community. PMID:17254294

  20. Grid Connected Functionality

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baker, Kyri; Jin, Xin; Vaidynathan, Deepthi; Jones, Wesley; Christensen, Dane; Sparn, Bethany; Woods, Jason; Sorensen, Harry; Lunacek, Monte

    2016-08-04

    Dataset demonstrating the potential benefits that residential buildings can provide for frequency regulation services in the electric power grid. In a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) implementation, simulated homes along with a physical laboratory home are coordinated via a grid aggregator, and it is shown that their aggregate response has the potential to follow the regulation signal on a timescale of seconds. Connected (communication-enabled), devices in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) received demand response (DR) requests from a grid aggregator, and the devices responded accordingly to meet the signal while satisfying user comfort bounds and physical hardware limitations.

  1. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Uman, M. A.; Johnson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure simultaneously the wideband horizontal and vertical electric fields from lightning return strokes is described. Typical wave shapes of the measured horizontal and vertical fields are presented, and the horizontal fields are characterized. The measured horizontal fields are compared with calculated horizontal fields obtained by applying the wavetilt formula to the vertical fields. The limitations and sources of error in the measurement technique are discussed.

  2. Horizontal drilling installs dutch waterline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    A 32-in. potable water line system, installed by Van Eijk Leidingen B.V. in Holland, was laid through an intensively cultivated vegetable gardening area, and designed to furnish additional irrigation water. Using a horizontally drilled 42-in. hole under the Maasdijk, though a difficult job, reduced the length by more than 3 miles.

  3. Surface grid generation for multi-block structured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekreijse, S. P.; Boerstoel, J. W.; Kuyvenhoven, J. L.; van der Marel, M. J.

    A new grid generation technique for the computation of a structured grid on a generally curved surface in 3D is discussed. The starting assumption is that the parameterization of the surface exists, i.e. a smooth geometrical shape function exists which maps the parametric space (the unit square) one-to-one on the surface. The grid generation system computes a grid on the surface with as boundary conditions the following data specified along the four edges of the surface: (1) the position of the boundary grid points, (2) the grid line slopes at the boundary grid points, (3) the first grid cell lengths at the boundary grid points. The fourth-order elliptic biharmonic equations are used to compute the two families of grid lines in the parametric space. After that, each grid point in the parametric space is found as the intersection point between two individual grid lines, one from each family. The grid points on the surface are finally found by mapping the grid points in the parametric space on the surface via the geometrical shape function. Results are shown for an O-type 2D Euler grid, a C-type 2D Navier-Stokes grid and on some curved surfaces in 3D space.

  4. Grid Computing Education Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  5. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  6. Grid generation and inviscid flow computation about aircraft geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Grid generation and Euler flow about fighter aircraft are described. A fighter aircraft geometry is specified by an area ruled fuselage with an internal duct, cranked delta wing or strake/wing combinations, canard and/or horizontal tail surfaces, and vertical tail surfaces. The initial step before grid generation and flow computation is the determination of a suitable grid topology. The external grid topology that has been applied is called a dual-block topology which is a patched C (exp 1) continuous multiple-block system where inner blocks cover the highly-swept part of a cranked wing or strake, rearward inner-part of the wing, and tail components. Outer-blocks cover the remainder of the fuselage, outer-part of the wing, canards and extend to the far field boundaries. The grid generation is based on transfinite interpolation with Lagrangian blending functions. This procedure has been applied to the Langley experimental fighter configuration and a modified F-18 configuration. Supersonic flow between Mach 1.3 and 2.5 and angles of attack between 0 degrees and 10 degrees have been computed with associated Euler solvers based on the finite-volume approach. When coupling geometric details such as boundary layer diverter regions, duct regions with inlets and outlets, or slots with the general external grid, imposing C (exp 1) continuity can be extremely tedious. The approach taken here is to patch blocks together at common interfaces where there is no grid continuity, but enforce conservation in the finite-volume solution. The key to this technique is how to obtain the information required for a conservative interface. The Ramshaw technique which automates the computation of proportional areas of two overlapping grids on a planar surface and is suitable for coding was used. Researchers generated internal duct grids for the Langley experimental fighter configuration independent of the external grid topology, with a conservative interface at the inlet and outlet.

  7. Implementing Production Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Ziobarth, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have presented the essence of experience gained in building two production Grids, and provided some of the global context for this work. As the reader might imagine, there were a lot of false starts, refinements to the approaches and to the software, and several substantial integration projects (SRB and Condor integrated with Globus) to get where we are today. However, the point of this paper is to try and make it substantially easier for others to get to the point where Information Power Grids (IPG) and the DOE Science Grids are today. This is what is needed in order to move us toward the vision of a common cyber infrastructure for science. The author would also like to remind the readers that this paper primarily represents the actual experiences that resulted from specific architectural and software choices during the design and implementation of these two Grids. The choices made were dictated by the criteria laid out in section 1. There is a lot more Grid software available today that there was four years ago, and various of these packages are being integrated into IPG and the DOE Grids. However, the foundation choices of Globus, SRB, and Condor would not be significantly different today than they were four years ago. Nonetheless, if the GGF is successful in its work - and we have every reason to believe that it will be - then in a few years we will see that the 28 functions provided by these packages will be defined in terms of protocols and MIS, and there will be several robust implementations available for each of the basic components, especially the Grid Common Services. The impact of the emerging Web Grid Services work is not yet clear. It will likely have a substantial impact on building higher level services, however it is the opinion of the author that this will in no way obviate the need for the Grid Common Services. These are the foundation of Grids, and the focus of almost all of the operational and persistent infrastructure aspects of Grids.

  8. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  9. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  10. Exploring Hypersonic, Unstructured-Grid Issues through Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Kleb, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Pure-tetrahedral unstructured grids have been shown to produce asymmetric heat transfer rates for symmetric problems. Meanwhile, two-dimensional structured grids produce symmetric solutions and as documented here, introducing a spanwise degree of freedom to these structured grids also yields symmetric solutions. The effects of grid skewness and other perturbations of structured-grids are investigated to uncover possible mechanisms behind the unstructured-grid solution asymmetries. By using controlled experiments around a known, good solution, the effects of particular grid pathologies are uncovered. These structured-grid experiments reveal that similar solution degradation occurs as for unstructured grids, especially for heat transfer rates. Non-smooth grids within the boundary layer is also shown to produce large local errors in heat flux but do not affect surface pressures.

  11. Using Grid Benchmarks for Dynamic Scheduling of Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Navigation or dynamic scheduling of applications on computational grids can be improved through the use of an application-specific characterization of grid resources. Current grid information systems provide a description of the resources, but do not contain any application-specific information. We define a GridScape as dynamic state of the grid resources. We measure the dynamic performance of these resources using the grid benchmarks. Then we use the GridScape for automatic assignment of the tasks of a grid application to grid resources. The scalability of the system is achieved by limiting the navigation overhead to a few percent of the application resource requirements. Our task submission and assignment protocol guarantees that the navigation system does not cause grid congestion. On a synthetic data mining application we demonstrate that Gridscape-based task assignment reduces the application tunaround time.

  12. Beyond grid security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, B.; Epting, U.; Koenig, T.

    2008-07-01

    While many fields relevant to Grid security are already covered by existing working groups, their remit rarely goes beyond the scope of the Grid infrastructure itself. However, security issues pertaining to the internal set-up of compute centres have at least as much impact on Grid security. Thus, this talk will present briefly the EU ISSeG project (Integrated Site Security for Grids). In contrast to groups such as OSCT (Operational Security Coordination Team) and JSPG (Joint Security Policy Group), the purpose of ISSeG is to provide a holistic approach to security for Grid computer centres, from strategic considerations to an implementation plan and its deployment. The generalised methodology of Integrated Site Security (ISS) is based on the knowledge gained during its implementation at several sites as well as through security audits, and this will be briefly discussed. Several examples of ISS implementation tasks at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be presented, including segregation of the network for administration and maintenance and the implementation of Application Gateways. Furthermore, the web-based ISSeG training material will be introduced. This aims to offer ISS implementation guidance to other Grid installations in order to help avoid common pitfalls.

  13. Grid generation strategies for turbomachinery configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. D.; Henderson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    Turbomachinery flow fields involve unique grid generation issues due to their geometrical and physical characteristics. Several strategic approaches are discussed to generate quality grids. The grid quality is further enhanced through blending and adapting. Grid blending smooths the grids locally through averaging and diffusion operators. Grid adaptation redistributes the grid points based on a grid quality assessment. These methods are demonstrated with several examples.

  14. Arc Length Based Grid Distribution For Surface and Volume Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1996-01-01

    Techniques are presented for distributing grid points on parametric surfaces and in volumes according to a specified distribution of arc length. Interpolation techniques are introduced which permit a given distribution of grid points on the edges of a three-dimensional grid block to be propagated through the surface and volume grids. Examples demonstrate how these methods can be used to improve the quality of grids generated by transfinite interpolation.

  15. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  16. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, Wade

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of

  17. Hurricanes in an Aquaplanet World: Implications of the Impacts of External Forcing and Model Horizontal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Wehner, Michael F.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-02

    High-resolution climate models have been shown to improve the statistics of tropical storms and hurricanes compared to low-resolution models. The impact of increasing horizontal resolution in the tropical storm simulation is investigated exclusively using a series of Atmospheric Global Climate Model (AGCM) runs with idealized aquaplanet steady-state boundary conditions and a fixed operational storm-tracking algorithm. The results show that increasing horizontal resolution helps to detect more hurricanes, simulate stronger extreme rainfall, and emulate better storm structures in the models. However, increasing model resolution does not necessarily produce stronger hurricanes in terms of maximum wind speed, minimum sea level pressure, and mean precipitation, as the increased number of storms simulated by high-resolution models is mainly associated with weaker storms. The spatial scale at which the analyses are conducted appears to have more important control on these meteorological statistics compared to horizontal resolution of the model grid. When the simulations are analyzed on common low-resolution grids, the statistics of the hurricanes, particularly the hurricane counts, show reduced sensitivity to the horizontal grid resolution and signs of scale invariant.

  18. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  19. Complex Volume Grid Generation Through the Use of Grid Reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a set of surface and volume grid generation techniques which reuse existing surface and volume grids. These methods use combinations of data manipulations to reduce grid generation time, improve grid characteristics, and increase the capabilities of existing domain discretization software. The manipulation techniques utilize physical and computational domains to produce basis function on which to operate and modify grid character and smooth grids using Trans-Finite Interpolation, a vector interpolation method and parametric re-mapping technique. With these new techniques, inviscid grids can be converted to viscous grids, multiple zone grid adaption can be performed to improve CFD solver efficiency, and topological changes to improve modeling of flow fields can be done simply and quickly. Examples of these capabilities are illustrated as applied to various configurations.

  20. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  1. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  2. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S.; Denhan, M.E.; Watkins, D.

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  3. Fusion Data Grid Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Wang, Nanbor

    2004-11-01

    Simulations and experiments in the fusion and plasma physics community generate large datasets at remote sites. Visualization and analysis of these datasets are difficult because of the incompatibility among the various data formats adopted by simulation, experiments, and analysis tools, and the large sizes of analyzed data. Grids and Web Services technologies are capable of providing solutions for such heterogeneous settings, but need to be customized to the field-specific needs and merged with distributed technologies currently used by the community. This paper describes how we are addressing these issues in the Fusion Grid Service under development. We also present performance results of relevant data transfer mechanisms including binary SOAP, DIME, GridFTP and MDSplus and CORBA. We will describe the status of data converters (between HDF5 and MDSplus data types), developed in collaboration with MIT (J. Stillerman). Finally, we will analyze bottlenecks of MDSplus data transfer mechanism (work performed in collaboration with General Atomics (D. Schissel and M. Qian).

  4. Information Power Grid Posters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2003-01-01

    This document is a summary of the accomplishments of the Information Power Grid (IPG). Grids are an emerging technology that provide seamless and uniform access to the geographically dispersed, computational, data storage, networking, instruments, and software resources needed for solving large-scale scientific and engineering problems. The goal of the NASA IPG is to use NASA's remotely located computing and data system resources to build distributed systems that can address problems that are too large or complex for a single site. The accomplishments outlined in this poster presentation are: access to distributed data, IPG heterogeneous computing, integration of large-scale computing node into distributed environment, remote access to high data rate instruments,and exploratory grid environment.

  5. Portable Horizontal-Drilling And Positioning Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smigocki, Edmund; Johnson, Clarence

    1988-01-01

    Portable horizontal-drilling and positioning device, constructed mainly of off-the-shelf components, accurately drills horizontal small holes in irregularly shaped objects. Holes precisely placed and drilled in objects that cannot be moved to shop area. New device provides three axes of movement while maintaining horizontal drilling.

  6. GridPV Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert; Quiroz, Jimmy; Grijalva, Santiago; Reno, Matthew; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.

  7. A Variable Resolution Stretched Grid General Circulation Model: Regional Climate Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Govindaraju, Ravi C.; Suarez, Max J.

    2000-01-01

    The development of and results obtained with a variable resolution stretched-grid GCM for the regional climate simulation mode, are presented. A global variable resolution stretched- grid used in the study has enhanced horizontal resolution over the U.S. as the area of interest The stretched-grid approach is an ideal tool for representing regional to global scale interaction& It is an alternative to the widely used nested grid approach introduced over a decade ago as a pioneering step in regional climate modeling. The major results of the study are presented for the successful stretched-grid GCM simulation of the anomalous climate event of the 1988 U.S. summer drought- The straightforward (with no updates) two month simulation is performed with 60 km regional resolution- The major drought fields, patterns and characteristics such as the time averaged 500 hPa heights precipitation and the low level jet over the drought area. appear to be close to the verifying analyses for the stretched-grid simulation- In other words, the stretched-grid GCM provides an efficient down-scaling over the area of interest with enhanced horizontal resolution. It is also shown that the GCM skill is sustained throughout the simulation extended to one year. The developed and tested in a simulation mode stretched-grid GCM is a viable tool for regional and subregional climate studies and applications.

  8. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  9. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  10. Distributed Accounting on the Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thigpen, William; Hacker, Thomas J.; McGinnis, Laura F.; Athey, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    By the late 1990s, the Internet was adequately equipped to move vast amounts of data between HPC (High Performance Computing) systems, and efforts were initiated to link together the national infrastructure of high performance computational and data storage resources together into a general computational utility 'grid', analogous to the national electrical power grid infrastructure. The purpose of the Computational grid is to provide dependable, consistent, pervasive, and inexpensive access to computational resources for the computing community in the form of a computing utility. This paper presents a fully distributed view of Grid usage accounting and a methodology for allocating Grid computational resources for use on a Grid computing system.

  11. Spillmann's weaves are more resilient than Hermann's grid.

    PubMed

    Hamburger, Kai; Shapiro, Arthur G

    2009-07-01

    In a classic Hermann grid display, faint and transient (illusory) spots are produced at the intersections of a white grid superimposed on a black background (or vice versa). In a variant of the Hermann grid developed by Spillmann and Levine (Spillmann, L., & Levine, J. (1971). Contrast enhancement in a Hermann grid with variable figure-ground ratio. Experimental Brain Research, 13, 547-559), the vertical and horizontal bars have different reflectance levels. In previous studies, the illusory spots in the Hermann and Spillmann and Levine grids have been treated analogously. Here, we focus on differences by introducing two types of 'weaves': one type consists of intertwined vertical and horizontal bars with the same luminance levels (hereinafter referred to as 'equiluminant weaves'); the vertical bars in the other type of weave differ in luminance level from the horizontal bars (hereinafter referred to as 'luminance-mismatched weaves'). The Hermann grid is a type of equiluminant weave, and the portion of the Spillmann and Levine grid in which the bars have different reflectance levels is similar to the luminance-mismatched weave. We demonstrate differences between illusory spots produced by luminance-mismatched weaves (and therefore Spillmann and Levine displays) and spots produced by equiluminant weaves (and therefore the Hermann grid): (1) low-pass equiluminant weaves create scintillating patterns, whereas low-pass luminance-mismatched weaves do not; (2) unlike spots for equiluminant weaves, the spots for the luminance-mismatched weaves are not abolished by jagged bars, wavy bars, thick bars, or orientation changes; (3) unlike the spots for equiluminant weaves, the spots for luminance-mismatched weaves occur foveally; and (4) unlike the spots for equiluminant weaves, luminance-mismatched weaves can be created with contrast variation (contrast-contrast, or 2nd-order weaves). We suggest three possible explanations for these results: (1) equiluminant weaves are just a

  12. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  13. Reduction of a grid moire pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with a digital radiographic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Chun-Joo; Kim, Do-Il; Lee, Jin-Ho; Chung, Nag-Kun; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo

    2007-11-15

    The stationary grid commonly used with a digital x-ray detector causes a moire interference pattern due to the inadequate sampling of the grid shadows by the detector pixels. There are limitations with the previous methods used to remove the moire such as imperfect electromagnetic interference shielding and the loss of image information. A new method is proposed for removing the moire pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with high grid line uniformity with the detector for frequency matching. The grid was aligned to the detector by translating and rotating the x-ray grid with respect to the detector using microcontrolled alignment mechanism. The gap between the grid and the detector surface was adjusted with micrometer precision to precisely match the projected grid line pitch to the detector pixel pitch. Considering the magnification of the grid shadows on the detector plane, the grids were manufactured such that the grid line frequency was slightly higher than the detector sampling frequency. This study examined the factors that affect the moire pattern, particularly the line frequency and displacement. The frequency of the moire pattern was found to be sensitive to the angular displacement of the grid with respect to the detector while the horizontal translation alters the phase but not the moire frequency. The frequency of the moire pattern also decreased with decreasing difference in frequency between the grid and the detector, and a moire-free image was produced after complete matching for a given source to detector distance. The image quality factors including the contrast, signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity in the images with and without the moire pattern were investigated.

  14. Reduction of a grid moiré pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with a digital radiographic detector.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Chun-Joo; Kim, Do-Il; Lee, Jin-Ho; Chung, Nag-Kun; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo

    2007-11-01

    The stationary grid commonly used with a digital x-ray detector causes a moiré interference pattern due to the inadequate sampling of the grid shadows by the detector pixels. There are limitations with the previous methods used to remove the moiré such as imperfect electromagnetic interference shielding and the loss of image information. A new method is proposed for removing the moiré pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with high grid line uniformity with the detector for frequency matching. The grid was aligned to the detector by translating and rotating the x-ray grid with respect to the detector using microcontrolled alignment mechanism. The gap between the grid and the detector surface was adjusted with micrometer precision to precisely match the projected grid line pitch to the detector pixel pitch. Considering the magnification of the grid shadows on the detector plane, the grids were manufactured such that the grid line frequency was slightly higher than the detector sampling frequency. This study examined the factors that affect the moiré pattern, particularly the line frequency and displacement. The frequency of the moiré pattern was found to be sensitive to the angular displacement of the grid with respect to the detector while the horizontal translation alters the phase but not the moiré frequency. The frequency of the moiré pattern also decreased with decreasing difference in frequency between the grid and the detector, and a moiré-free image was produced after complete matching for a given source to detector distance. The image quality factors including the contrast, signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity in the images with and without the moiré pattern were investigated.

  15. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Bockelman, Brian; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Swanson, David

    2011-12-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  16. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  17. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  18. The surveillance error grid.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Lias, Courtney; Vigersky, Robert; Clarke, William; Parkes, Joan Lee; Sacks, David B; Kirkman, M Sue; Kovatchev, Boris

    2014-07-01

    Currently used error grids for assessing clinical accuracy of blood glucose monitors are based on out-of-date medical practices. Error grids have not been widely embraced by regulatory agencies for clearance of monitors, but this type of tool could be useful for surveillance of the performance of cleared products. Diabetes Technology Society together with representatives from the Food and Drug Administration, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, and representatives of academia, industry, and government, have developed a new error grid, called the surveillance error grid (SEG) as a tool to assess the degree of clinical risk from inaccurate blood glucose (BG) monitors. A total of 206 diabetes clinicians were surveyed about the clinical risk of errors of measured BG levels by a monitor. The impact of such errors on 4 patient scenarios was surveyed. Each monitor/reference data pair was scored and color-coded on a graph per its average risk rating. Using modeled data representative of the accuracy of contemporary meters, the relationships between clinical risk and monitor error were calculated for the Clarke error grid (CEG), Parkes error grid (PEG), and SEG. SEG action boundaries were consistent across scenarios, regardless of whether the patient was type 1 or type 2 or using insulin or not. No significant differences were noted between responses of adult/pediatric or 4 types of clinicians. Although small specific differences in risk boundaries between US and non-US clinicians were noted, the panel felt they did not justify separate grids for these 2 types of clinicians. The data points of the SEG were classified in 15 zones according to their assigned level of risk, which allowed for comparisons with the classic CEG and PEG. Modeled glucose monitor data with realistic self-monitoring of blood glucose errors derived from meter testing experiments plotted on the SEG when compared to

  19. Design of a Vector-Vorticity Dynamical Core on a Hexagonal Grid (Hex-VVDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konor, C. S.; Heikes, R. P.; Jung, J.; Randall, D.; Arakawa, A.

    2009-05-01

    We are developing a Global Cloud-Resolving Model (GCRM) based on the vector-vorticity dynamical core (VVDC) that predicts three-dimensional vorticity. The VVDC in an anelastic framework has been originally designed by Jung and Arakawa and used in a Cartesian grid. As the first step in developing the GCRM, we have constructed an intermediate model with the VVDC using a hexagonal grid on a planar quasi-rectangular horizontal domain, which we call the hexagonal VVDC (Hex-VVDC). The purpose of developing the Hex-VVDC is to test and verify the discretization of equations of the VVDC on a hexagonal grid before applying them to the geodesic hexagon/pentagon grid that will be used for the GCRM. It is found that having twice as many as cell walls and three times as many as cell corners than the cell centers in a hexagonal grid produces a computational mode in horizontal and vertical components of vorticity and horizontal velocity fields, which the dynamics cannot control. We have designed a special scheme to treat this computational mode. With this treatment, the Hex-VVDC seems to work well. Currently, we are performing further tests with the Hex-VVDC and also continuing the application of the dynamical core to the geodesic hexagon/pentagon grid. In this presentation, we will discuss the computational design of the Hex-VVDC and show simulated results primarily focusing on vertical transports of vorticity and momentum by convection.

  20. Equil: A Global Grid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Sebastian; Reimer, Christioph; Paulik, Christoph; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Geophysical parameters derived from space-borne Earth Observation Systems are either assigned to discrete points on a fixed Earth grid (e.g. regular lon/lat grid) or located on orbital point nodes with a customized arrangement, often in-line with the instrument's measurement geometry. The driving factors of the choice and structure of a spatial reference system (i.e. the grid) are typically spatial resolution, instrument geometry, measurement technique or application.In this study we propose a global grid system, the so- called Equil grid, and demonstrate its realization and structure. An exemplary Equil grid with a base sampling distance of 12.5 km is compared against two other grids commonly used in the domain of remote sensing of soil moisture. The simple nearly-equidistant grid design makes it interesting for a wide range of other geophysical parameters as well.

  1. Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Khalid; Hewett, Thomas A.; Arbabi, Sepehr; Smith, Marilyn

    1999-11-16

    The generation of suitable simulation grids for heterogeneous media and specific discretization issues that arise. Streamlines and equipotentials are used to define our base grids. Since streamlines are concentrated in high velocity regions they provide a natural means of clustering fine grid cells in crucial flow regions. For complex configurations and particularly for strongly heterogeneous regions the resulting grid cells can become very distorted due to extremely high curvatures. Two types of cell centered formulation are examined together with a cell vertex-point distributed scheme. Important distinctions are found for highly distorted cells. The new grids are tested for accuracy in terms of critical breakthrough parameters and it is shown that a much higher level of grid resolution is required by conventional simulators in order to achieve results that are comparable with those computed on relatively coarse streamline-potential grids.

  2. Grid-size dependence of Cauchy boundary conditions used to simulate stream-aquifer interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines the simulation of stream–aquifer interactions as grids are refined vertically and horizontally and suggests that traditional methods for calculating conductance can produce inappropriate values when the grid size is changed. Instead, different grid resolutions require different estimated values. Grid refinement strategies considered include global refinement of the entire model and local refinement of part of the stream. Three methods of calculating the conductance of the Cauchy boundary conditions are investigated. Single- and multi-layer models with narrow and wide streams produced stream leakages that differ by as much as 122% as the grid is refined. Similar results occur for globally and locally refined grids, but the latter required as little as one-quarter the computer execution time and memory and thus are useful for addressing some scale issues of stream–aquifer interactions. Results suggest that existing grid-size criteria for simulating stream–aquifer interactions are useful for one-layer models, but inadequate for three-dimensional models. The grid dependence of the conductance terms suggests that values for refined models using, for example, finite difference or finite-element methods, cannot be determined from previous coarse-grid models or field measurements. Our examples demonstrate the need for a method of obtaining conductances that can be translated to different grid resolutions and provide definitive test cases for investigating alternative conductance formulations.

  3. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  4. Photofabricated Wire-Grid Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Dengler, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Freestanding metallic grids for use as polarizers for electromagnetic radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths made by simple modification of designs of freestanding square- and nearly-square cell metallic grids, according to proposal. Cross wires provide mechanical support, but distance between cross wires made greater than one wavelength so cross wires have little effect on polarizing characteristics of grid. Possible to fabricate grids commercially for frequencies up to several terahertz.

  5. Applications of algebraic grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Smith, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and applications of algebraic grid generation are described. The techniques are univariate interpolations and transfinite assemblies of univariate interpolations. Because algebraic grid generation is computationally efficient, the use of interactive graphics in conjunction with the techniques is advocated. A flexible approach, which works extremely well in an interactive environment, called the control point form of algebraic grid generation is described. The applications discussed are three-dimensional grids constructed about airplane and submarine configurations.

  6. A grid spacing control technique for algebraic grid generation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    A technique which controls the spacing of grid points in algebraically defined coordinate transformations is described. The technique is based on the generation of control functions which map a uniformly distributed computational grid onto parametric variables defining the physical grid. The control functions are smoothed cubic splines. Sets of control points are input for each coordinate directions to outline the control functions. Smoothed cubic spline functions are then generated to approximate the input data. The technique works best in an interactive graphics environment where control inputs and grid displays are nearly instantaneous. The technique is illustrated with the two-boundary grid generation algorithm.

  7. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  8. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Characteristics of Two Full Scale and One 1/4 Scale Business Jet Horizontal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Papadakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a series of business jet horizontal tail configurations using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, and the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. The horizontal tail models included two full scale wing tips and a 25 percent scale model. Flow solutions for the horizontal tails were generated using the PMARC panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the adaptive grid code ICEGRID. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Octane computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  9. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  10. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  11. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  12. Shuttle computational grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ing, Chang

    1987-01-01

    The well known Karman-Trefftz conformal transformation, consisting of repeated applications of the same basic formula, were found to be quite successful to body, wing, and wing-body cross sections. This grid generation technique is extended to cross sections of more complex forms, and also more automatic. Computer programs were written for the selection of hinge points on cross section with angular shapes, the Karman-Trefftz tranformation of arbitrary shapes, and the special transform of hinge point on the imaginary axis. A feasibility study is performed for the future application of conformal mapping grid generation to complex three dimensional configurations. Examples such as Orbiter vehicle section and a few others were used.

  13. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  14. Wireless Communications in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovic, Zoran; Bakmaz, Bojan

    Communication networks play a crucial role in smart grid, as the intelligence of this complex system is built based on information exchange across the power grid. Wireless communications and networking are among the most economical ways to build the essential part of the scalable communication infrastructure for smart grid. In particular, wireless networks will be deployed widely in the smart grid for automatic meter reading, remote system and customer site monitoring, as well as equipment fault diagnosing. With an increasing interest from both the academic and industrial communities, this chapter systematically investigates recent advances in wireless communication technology for the smart grid.

  15. TRMM Gridded Text Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has many products that contain instantaneous or gridded rain rates often among many other parameters. However, these products because of their completeness can often seem intimidating to users just desiring surface rain rates. For example one of the gridded monthly products contains well over 200 parameters. It is clear that if only rain rates are desired, this many parameters might prove intimidating. In addition, for many good reasons these products are archived and currently distributed in HDF format. This also can be an inhibiting factor in using TRMM rain rates. To provide a simple format and isolate just the rain rates from the many other parameters, the TRMM product created a series of gridded products in ASCII text format. This paper describes the various text rain rate products produced. It provides detailed information about parameters and how they are calculated. It also gives detailed format information. These products are used in a number of applications with the TRMM processing system. The products are produced from the swath instantaneous rain rates and contain information from the three major TRMM instruments: radar, radiometer, and combined. They are simple to use, human readable, and small for downloading.

  16. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  17. Constructing the ASCI computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    BEIRIGER,JUDY I.; BIVENS,HUGH P.; HUMPHREYS,STEVEN L.; JOHNSON,WILBUR R.; RHEA,RONALD E.

    2000-06-01

    The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) computational grid is being constructed to interconnect the high performance computing resources of the nuclear weapons complex. The grid will simplify access to the diverse computing, storage, network, and visualization resources, and will enable the coordinated use of shared resources regardless of location. To match existing hardware platforms, required security services, and current simulation practices, the Globus MetaComputing Toolkit was selected to provide core grid services. The ASCI grid extends Globus functionality by operating as an independent grid, incorporating Kerberos-based security, interfacing to Sandia's Cplant{trademark},and extending job monitoring services. To fully meet ASCI's needs, the architecture layers distributed work management and criteria-driven resource selection services on top of Globus. These services simplify the grid interface by allowing users to simply request ''run code X anywhere''. This paper describes the initial design and prototype of the ASCI grid.

  18. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  19. Horizontal comparative fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for improved spot coordinate detection.

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Marina; König, Simone

    2014-04-01

    Vertical comparative 2D fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) has recently been shown to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots, in particular in singular experiments, which cannot be investigated using DIGE. The method applies a standardized marker grid formed by a set of purified proteins to the sample proteome in a conglomerate of 1DE, 2DE, and DIGE. Here, improvements are demonstrated by transferring CoFGE to horizontal 2DE. These include the elimination of the protein modification by residual acrylamide monomer unavoidable in vertical CoFGE, reduced buffer volumes, and highly efficient laboratory procedures. Spot patterns are well defined and can be easily analyzed using commercially available warping algorithms. With horizontal CoFGE also a correction for changes in pI was introduced using a third fluorescent dye. Horizontal CoFGE holds high promises in comparative proteomics.

  20. GridTool: A surface modeling and grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1995-01-01

    GridTool is designed around the concept that the surface grids are generated on a set of bi-linear patches. This type of grid generation is quite easy to implement, and it avoids the problems associated with complex CAD surface representations and associated surface parameterizations. However, the resulting surface grids are close to but not on the original CAD surfaces. This problem can be alleviated by projecting the resulting surface grids onto the original CAD surfaces. GridTool is designed primary for unstructured grid generation systems. Currently, GridTool supports VGRID and FELISA systems, and it can be easily extended to support other unstructured grid generation systems. The data in GridTool is stored parametrically so that once the problem is set up, one can modify the surfaces and the entire set of points, curves and patches will be updated automatically. This is very useful in a multidisciplinary design and optimization process. GridTool is written entirely in ANSI 'C', the interface is based on the FORMS library, and the graphics is based on the GL library. The code has been tested successfully on IRIS workstations running IRIX4.0 and above. The memory is allocated dynamically, therefore, memory size will depend on the complexity of geometry/grid. GridTool data structure is based on a link-list structure which allows the required memory to expand and contract dynamically according to the user's data size and action. Data structure contains several types of objects such as points, curves, patches, sources and surfaces. At any given time, there is always an active object which is drawn in magenta, or in their highlighted colors as defined by the resource file which will be discussed later.

  1. Smart Grid Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad Lopez, Carlos Adrian

    Current electricity infrastructure is being stressed from several directions -- high demand, unreliable supply, extreme weather conditions, accidents, among others. Infrastructure planners have, traditionally, focused on only the cost of the system; today, resilience and sustainability are increasingly becoming more important. In this dissertation, we develop computational tools for efficiently managing electricity resources to help create a more reliable and sustainable electrical grid. The tools we present in this work will help electric utilities coordinate demand to allow the smooth and large scale integration of renewable sources of energy into traditional grids, as well as provide infrastructure planners and operators in developing countries a framework for making informed planning and control decisions in the presence of uncertainty. Demand-side management is considered as the most viable solution for maintaining grid stability as generation from intermittent renewable sources increases. Demand-side management, particularly demand response (DR) programs that attempt to alter the energy consumption of customers either by using price-based incentives or up-front power interruption contracts, is more cost-effective and sustainable in addressing short-term supply-demand imbalances when compared with the alternative that involves increasing fossil fuel-based fast spinning reserves. An essential step in compensating participating customers and benchmarking the effectiveness of DR programs is to be able to independently detect the load reduction from observed meter data. Electric utilities implementing automated DR programs through direct load control switches are also interested in detecting the reduction in demand to efficiently pinpoint non-functioning devices to reduce maintenance costs. We develop sparse optimization methods for detecting a small change in the demand for electricity of a customer in response to a price change or signal from the utility

  2. The Open Science Grid status and architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; Petravick, Don; Kramer, Bill; Olsen, James D.; Livny, Miron; Roy, Gordon A.; Avery, Paul Ralph; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre J.; Wuerthwein, Frank K.; Foster, Ian; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-09-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. The OSG project[1] is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program. The OSG project provides specific activities for the operation and evolution of the common infrastructure. The US ATLAS and US CMS collaborations contribute to and depend on OSG as the US infrastructure contributing to the World Wide LHC Computing Grid on which the LHC experiments distribute and analyze their data. Other stakeholders include the STAR RHIC experiment, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and several Fermilab Tevatron experiments- CDF, D0, MiniBoone etc. The OSG implementation architecture brings a pragmatic approach to enabling vertically integrated community specific distributed systems over a common horizontal set of shared resources and services. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  3. A new vertical grid nesting capability in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    DOE PAGES

    Daniels, Megan H.; Lundquist, Katherine A.; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; ...

    2016-09-16

    Mesoscale atmospheric models are increasingly used for high-resolution (<3 km) simulations to better resolve smaller-scale flow details. Increased resolution is achieved using mesh refinement via grid nesting, a procedure where multiple computational domains are integrated either concurrently or in series. A constraint in the concurrent nesting framework offered by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is that mesh refinement is restricted to the horizontal dimensions. This limitation prevents control of the grid aspect ratio, leading to numerical errors due to poor grid quality and preventing grid optimization. Here, a procedure permitting vertical nesting for one-way concurrent simulation is developedmore » and validated through idealized cases. The benefits of vertical nesting are demonstrated using both mesoscale and large-eddy simulations (LES). Mesoscale simulations of the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) show that vertical grid nesting can alleviate numerical errors due to large aspect ratios on coarse grids, while allowing for higher vertical resolution on fine grids. Furthermore, the coarsening of the parent domain does not result in a significant loss of accuracy on the nested domain. LES of neutral boundary layer flow shows that, by permitting optimal grid aspect ratios on both parent and nested domains, use of vertical nesting yields improved agreement with the theoretical logarithmic velocity profile on both domains. Lastly, vertical grid nesting in WRF opens the path forward for multiscale simulations, allowing more accurate simulations spanning a wider range of scales than previously possible.« less

  4. A new vertical grid nesting capability in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Megan H.; Lundquist, Katherine A.; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Wiersema, David J.; Chow, Fotini K.

    2016-09-16

    Mesoscale atmospheric models are increasingly used for high-resolution (<3 km) simulations to better resolve smaller-scale flow details. Increased resolution is achieved using mesh refinement via grid nesting, a procedure where multiple computational domains are integrated either concurrently or in series. A constraint in the concurrent nesting framework offered by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is that mesh refinement is restricted to the horizontal dimensions. This limitation prevents control of the grid aspect ratio, leading to numerical errors due to poor grid quality and preventing grid optimization. Here, a procedure permitting vertical nesting for one-way concurrent simulation is developed and validated through idealized cases. The benefits of vertical nesting are demonstrated using both mesoscale and large-eddy simulations (LES). Mesoscale simulations of the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) show that vertical grid nesting can alleviate numerical errors due to large aspect ratios on coarse grids, while allowing for higher vertical resolution on fine grids. Furthermore, the coarsening of the parent domain does not result in a significant loss of accuracy on the nested domain. LES of neutral boundary layer flow shows that, by permitting optimal grid aspect ratios on both parent and nested domains, use of vertical nesting yields improved agreement with the theoretical logarithmic velocity profile on both domains. Lastly, vertical grid nesting in WRF opens the path forward for multiscale simulations, allowing more accurate simulations spanning a wider range of scales than previously possible.

  5. Grid-based Meteorological and Crisis Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hluchy, Ladislav; Bartok, Juraj; Tran, Viet; Lucny, Andrej; Gazak, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We present several applications from domain of meteorology and crisis management we developed and/or plan to develop. Particularly, we present IMS Model Suite - a complex software system designed to address the needs of accurate forecast of weather and hazardous weather phenomena, environmental pollution assessment, prediction of consequences of nuclear accident and radiological emergency. We discuss requirements on computational means and our experiences how to meet them by grid computing. The process of a pollution assessment and prediction of the consequences in case of radiological emergence results in complex data-flows and work-flows among databases, models and simulation tools (geographical databases, meteorological and dispersion models, etc.). A pollution assessment and prediction requires running of 3D meteorological model (4 nests with resolution from 50 km to 1.8 km centered on nuclear power plant site, 38 vertical levels) as well as running of the dispersion model performing the simulation of the release transport and deposition of the pollutant with respect to the numeric weather prediction data, released material description, topography, land use description and user defined simulation scenario. Several post-processing options can be selected according to particular situation (e.g. doses calculation). Another example is a forecasting of fog as one of the meteorological phenomena hazardous to the aviation as well as road traffic. It requires complicated physical model and high resolution meteorological modeling due to its dependence on local conditions (precise topography, shorelines and land use classes). An installed fog modeling system requires a 4 time nested parallelized 3D meteorological model with 1.8 km horizontal resolution and 42 levels vertically (approx. 1 million points in 3D space) to be run four times daily. The 3D model outputs and multitude of local measurements are utilized by SPMD-parallelized 1D fog model run every hour. The fog

  6. Grid crusher apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniels, J.D. Jr.

    1994-01-11

    A grid crusher apparatus and method are provided for a nuclear fuel rod consolidation system. Spacer grids are crushed within a basket which is then placed in a storage canister. The grid crusher apparatus has a ram assembly and a basket driving mechanism. The ram assembly has a sleeve ram and a central ram. The sleeve ram surrounds the central ram which is longitudinally movable within the sleeve ram. The central ram protrudes from the sleeve ram at a ram contact end and is retractable upon application of a preselected force to the central ram so that the central ram is flush with the sleeve ram at the ram contact end. The basket driving mechanism is configured to move the basket containing a spacer grid towards the ram contact end so that the spacer grid is crushed within the basket. The spacer grid is crushed by the combination of successive forces from the central ram and the sleeve ram, respectively. Essentially, the central portion of the spacer grid is crushed first, and then the remaining outer portion of the spacer grid is crushed to complete the crushing action of the spacer grid. The foregoing process is repeated for other spacer grids until the basket reaches a predetermined allowable capacity, and then the basket is stored in a storage canister. 11 figs.

  7. On the Hydraulics of Flowing Horizontal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, A.; Zhan, H.

    2003-12-01

    A flowing horizontal well is a special type of horizontal well that does not have pumping/injecting facility. The discharge rate of a flowing horizontal well is controlled by the hydraulic gradient between the aquifer and the well and it generally varies with time if the hydraulic head of the aquifer is transient. This type of well has been used in landslide control, mining dewatering, water table control, underground water transportation through a horizontal tunnel, agricultural water drainage, and other applications. Flowing horizontal wells have quite different hydrodynamic characteristics from horizontal wells with fixed pumping or injecting rates because their discharge rates are functions of the aquifer hydraulic heads (Zhan et al, 2001; Zhan and Zlotnik, 2002). Hydraulics of flowing horizontal wells have rarely been studied although the hydraulics of flowing vertical wells have been extensively investigated before. The purpose of this paper is to obtain analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a flowing horizontal-well in a confined aquifer, in a water table aquifer without precipitation, and in a water table aquifer with precipitation. The functions of the flowing horizontal well discharge rates versus time will be obtained under above mentioned different aquifer conditions. The relationships of the aquifer hydraulic heads versus the discharge rates of the well will be investigated. The rate of water table decline due to the dewatering of the well will also be computed, and this solution is particularly useful for landslide control and mining dewatering. The theoretical solutions will be compared with results of experiments that will be conducted in the hydrological laboratory at Texas A&M University. Reference: Zhan, H., Wang, L.V., and Park, E, On the horizontal well pumping tests in the anisotropic confined aquifers, J. hydrol., 252, 37-50, 2001. Zhan, H., and Zlotnik, V. A., Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

  8. The history of horizontal glottectomy.

    PubMed

    Folz, Benedikt J; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E; Ferlito, Alfio

    2010-02-01

    The history of horizontal glottectomy (HG) for the treatment of bilateral vocal cord lesions is not entirely clear. The present investigation analyzes the history of HG on the basis of cross-referenced database searches in general and professional medical literature databases. Books, original historical articles and medical history reviews were evaluated. The initial work was done by Moser in years from 1959 to 1965, and in 1961 he published the first paper on HG. Follow-up publications were reported in 1977 by Gramowski and in 1984 by Wilke. In 1970, Romanian laryngologists headed by Calaraşu described a HG via excision of a rhomboid-shaped portion of the thyroid cartilage, but the authors had neither sufficient numbers of patients nor a sufficiently long follow-up for the procedure to gain widespread acceptance. In 1978, Calearo and Teatini described HG similar to Calaraşu's method, but slightly more extended by the eventual inclusion of an arytenoid cartilage in the operative specimen. Theses authors have often been credited as the originators of the procedure, but actually were the first to publish in an English language journal. The procedure, while quite effective for treatment of bilateral and anterior commissure lesions, has never gained general acceptance in the United States, and in current practice, has been supplanted by endoscopic and non-surgical treatments.

  9. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R. Daniel; Gardner, Michael G.; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes. PMID:23277587

  10. Evaluating the Information Power Grid using the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaartm Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) are a collection of synthetic distributed applications designed to rate the performance and functionality of computational grids. We compare several implementations of the NGB to determine programmability and efficiency of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), whose services are mostly based on the Globus Toolkit. We report on the overheads involved in porting existing NGB reference implementations to the IPG. No changes were made to the component tasks of the NGB can still be improved.

  11. The Volume Grid Manipulator (VGM): A Grid Reusability Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a manual describing how to use the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) software. The code is specifically designed to alter or manipulate existing surface and volume structured grids to improve grid quality through the reduction of grid line skewness, removal of negative volumes, and adaption of surface and volume grids to flow field gradients. The software uses a command language to perform all manipulations thereby offering the capability of executing multiple manipulations on a single grid during an execution of the code. The command language can be input to the VGM code by a UNIX style redirected file, or interactively while the code is executing. The manual consists of 14 sections. The first is an introduction to grid manipulation; where it is most applicable and where the strengths of such software can be utilized. The next two sections describe the memory management and the manipulation command language. The following 8 sections describe simple and complex manipulations that can be used in conjunction with one another to smooth, adapt, and reuse existing grids for various computations. These are accompanied by a tutorial section that describes how to use the commands and manipulations to solve actual grid generation problems. The last two sections are a command reference guide and trouble shooting sections to aid in the use of the code as well as describe problems associated with generated scripts for manipulation control.

  12. Experience in grid optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Soni, B. K.; Mcclure, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    Two optimization methods for solving a variational problem in grid generation are described and evaluated. The smoothness, cell volumes, and orthogonality of the variational integrals are examined. The Jacobi-Newton iterative method is compared to the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient method. It is observed that a combination of the Jacobi-Newton iteration and the direct solution of the variational problem produces an algorithm which is easy to program and requires less storage and computer time/iteration than the conjugate gradient method.

  13. TASMANIAN Sparse Grids Module

    SciTech Connect

    and Drayton Munster, Miroslav Stoyanov

    2013-09-20

    Sparse Grids are the family of methods of choice for multidimensional integration and interpolation in low to moderate number of dimensions. The method is to select extend a one dimensional set of abscissas, weights and basis functions by taking a subset of all possible tensor products. The module provides the ability to create global and local approximations based on polynomials and wavelets. The software has three components, a library, a wrapper for the library that provides a command line interface via text files ad a MATLAB interface via the command line tool.

  14. Adventures in Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes one supercomputer is not enough. Or your local supercomputers are busy, or not configured for your job. Or you don't have any supercomputers. You might be trying to simulate worldwide weather changes in real time, requiring more compute power than you could get from any one machine. Or you might be collecting microbiological samples on an island, and need to examine them with a special microscope located on the other side of the continent. These are the times when you need a computational grid.

  15. Empower your Smart Grid Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    TWITTER: #seiwebinar © 2011 Carnegie Mellon University Empower your Smart Grid Transformation David White SGMM Project Manager 10 March 2011 Report...2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Empower your Smart Grid Transformation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...and a core development team member for the SEI Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM), a business tool to assist utilities with planning and tracking

  16. Global horizontal shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, T. M.; Priestley, K. F.; Debayle, E.; Chapman, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Rayleigh wave data have been used extensively to produce various SV-wave tomographic models of the upper mantle. Love wave data are more difficult to deal with resulting in fewer SH-wave tomographic models. The models also do not incorporate higher mode information which can place better constraints on the model. We have assembled a large, horizontal component data set and have inverted these seismogram in the 4-13 mHz band including higher mode information. We use a version of the automated waveform inversion technique modified for Love waves. We have explored the effects of various crustal models and because of the greater sensitivity of Love waves to the crustal structure, at present, we limit our inversion to this lower frequency band. Due to the higher mode Love waves having similar group velocities between the periods of 50-100 s for oceanic paths, interference occurs which partition techniques have difficulties dealing with. The modified technique used here does not require partitioning the data and can help extract the data more easily at these period bands. We present a new VSH and Xi model for the upper mantle. High VSH extending to about 250 km depth occurs beneath the cratons and Tibet; Low VSH occurs beneath the mid-ocean ridges, the back arc basins and beneath the Afar hotspot. The Xi model shows that VSH is greater by approximately 3% at 100km and rapidly drops to zero at around 300 km depth where the mantle becomes isotropic. At 250 km depth, there are regions where SV is greater than SH, suggesting more vertical flow beneath mid-ocean ridges at these depths.

  17. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-12

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  18. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    EnviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is a 4-years FP7 Project aiming to address the subjects of ecologically unsustainable development and inadequate resource management. The project develops a Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Black Sea Catchment region. The geospatial technologies offer very specialized functionality for Earth Science oriented applications as well as the Grid oriented technology that is able to support distributed and parallel processing. One challenge of the enviroGRIDS project is the interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures by providing the basic and the extended features of the both technologies. The geospatial interoperability technology has been promoted as a way of dealing with large volumes of geospatial data in distributed environments through the development of interoperable Web service specifications proposed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), with applications spread across multiple fields but especially in Earth observation research. Due to the huge volumes of data available in the geospatial domain and the additional introduced issues (data management, secure data transfer, data distribution and data computation), the need for an infrastructure capable to manage all those problems becomes an important aspect. The Grid promotes and facilitates the secure interoperations of geospatial heterogeneous distributed data within a distributed environment, the creation and management of large distributed computational jobs and assures a security level for communication and transfer of messages based on certificates. This presentation analysis and discusses the most significant use cases for enabling the OGC Web services interoperability with the Grid environment and focuses on the description and implementation of the most promising one. In these use cases we give a special attention to issues such as: the relations between computational grid and

  19. From the grid to the smart grid, topologically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2016-05-01

    In its more visionary acceptation, the smart grid is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the smart grid a reality will the distribution grid have to be upgraded? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of medium and low voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we analyzed samples of the Dutch distribution grid (Pagani and Aiello, 2011) and we considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains (Pagani and Aiello, 2014). In this paper, we take an extra important step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical power grid to a good smart grid model, thus laying the foundations for a decision support system for utilities and governmental organizations. In doing so, we consider several possible evolution strategies and apply them to the Dutch distribution grid. We show how increasing connectivity is beneficial in realizing more efficient and reliable networks. Our proposal is topological in nature, enhanced with economic considerations of the costs of such evolutions in terms of cabling expenses and economic benefits of evolving the grid.

  20. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2016-11-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods (FDM) have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multi-block coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid (LSSG) scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid (LG) scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  1. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2017-03-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multiblock coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  2. A Vertically Flow-Following, Icosahedral Grid Model for Medium-Range and Seasonal Prediction. Part 1: Model Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleck, Rainer; Bao, Jian-Wen; Benjamin, Stanley G.; Brown, John M.; Fiorino, Michael; Henderson, Thomas B.; Lee, Jin-Luen; MacDonald, Alexander E.; Madden, Paul; Middlecoff, Jacques; Rosinski, James; Smirnova, Tanya G.; Sun, Shan; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A hydrostatic global weather prediction model based on an icosahedral horizontal grid and a hybrid terrain following/ isentropic vertical coordinate is described. The model is an extension to three spatial dimensions of a previously developed, icosahedral, shallow-water model featuring user-selectable horizontal resolution and employing indirect addressing techniques. The vertical grid is adaptive to maximize the portion of the atmosphere mapped into the isentropic coordinate subdomain. The model, best described as a stacked shallow-water model, is being tested extensively on real-time medium-range forecasts to ready it for possible inclusion in operational multimodel ensembles for medium-range to seasonal prediction.

  3. NAS Grid Benchmarks: A Tool for Grid Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for benchmarking services provided by computational Grids. It is based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called NAS Grid Benchmark (NGB) in this paper. We present NGB as a data flow graph encapsulating an instance of an NPB code in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. These nodes may be mapped to the same or different Grid machines. Like NPB, NGB will specify several different classes (problem sizes). NGB also specifies the generic Grid services sufficient for running the bench-mark. The implementor has the freedom to choose any specific Grid environment. However, we describe a reference implementation in Java, and present some scenarios for using NGB.

  4. The Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre; Wurthwein, Frank; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  5. Tubing and casing buckling in horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Lin, Y.H.; Cheatham, J.B. )

    1990-02-01

    This paper describes new theoretical results for predicting the buckling behavior of pipe in horizontal holes. Pipe buckling in horizontal holes occurs initially in a sinusoidal mode along the low side of the hole; at higher axial compression a helix is formed. Equations are given for computing the forces required to initiate these different buckling modes. Simple experimental laboratory results confirm the theory. Results presented in this paper apply to friction modeling of buckled tubulars to help predict when pipe can be forced to move along a long section of a horizontal well.

  6. Horizontal fields generated by return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Horizontal fields generated by return strokes play an important role in the interaction of lightning generated electric fields with power lines. In many of the recent investigations on the interaction of lightning electromagnetic fields with power lines, the horizontal field was calculated by employing the expression for the tilt of the electric field of a plane wave propagating over finitely conducting earth. The method is suitable for calculating horizontal fields generated by return strokes at distances as close as 200m. At these close ranges, the use of the wavetilt expression can cause large errors.

  7. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  8. Grid generation using classical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1980-01-01

    A brief historical review of conformal mapping and its applications to problems in fluid mechanics and electromagnetism is presented. The use of conformal mapping as a grid generator is described. The philosophy of the 'closed form' approach and its application to a Neumann problem is discussed. Karman-Trefftz mappings and grids for ablated, three dimensional bodies are also discussed.

  9. Some Observations on Grid Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    It is claimed that current practices in grid convergence studies, particularly in the field of external aerodynamics, are flawed. The necessary conditions to properly establish grid convergence are presented. A theoretical model and a numerical example are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  10. Intelligent automated surface grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Ke-Thia; Gelsey, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The goal of our research is to produce a flexible, general grid generator for automated use by other programs, such as numerical optimizers. The current trend in the gridding field is toward interactive gridding. Interactive gridding more readily taps into the spatial reasoning abilities of the human user through the use of a graphical interface with a mouse. However, a sometimes fruitful approach to generating new designs is to apply an optimizer with shape modification operators to improve an initial design. In order for this approach to be useful, the optimizer must be able to automatically grid and evaluate the candidate designs. This paper describes and intelligent gridder that is capable of analyzing the topology of the spatial domain and predicting approximate physical behaviors based on the geometry of the spatial domain to automatically generate grids for computational fluid dynamics simulators. Typically gridding programs are given a partitioning of the spatial domain to assist the gridder. Our gridder is capable of performing this partitioning. This enables the gridder to automatically grid spatial domains of wide range of configurations.

  11. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  12. On Eddy Viscosity, Energy Cascades, and the Horizontal Resolution of Gridded Satellite Altimeter Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Manuscript received 21 December 2011, in final form 23 August 2012) ABSTRACT Motivated by the recent interest in ocean energetics, the widespread use...Inhomogeneous two-dimensional turbu- lence in the atmosphere. Advances in Turbulence, G. Comte - Bellot and J. Mathieu, Eds., Springer-Verlag, 269-278

  13. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Khalid

    2000-03-06

    One of the key issues addressed was pressure drop in long horizontal wells and its influence on well performance. Very little information is available in the literature on flow in pipes with influx through pipe walls. Virtually all of this work has been in small diameter pipes and with single-phase flow. In order to address this problem new experimental data on flow in horizontal and near horizontal wells have been obtained. Experiments were conducted at an industrial facility on typical 6 1/8 ID, 100 feet long horizontal well model. The new data along with available information in the literature have been used to develop new correlations and mechanistic models. Thus it is now possible to predict, within reasonable accuracy, the effect of influx through the well on pressure drop in the well.

  14. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

    1995-08-01

    The following activities have been carried out in the last three months: Work on developing a three-dimensional Voronoi grid simulator is progressing. Extensive testing of the grid generation and visualization modules of the simulator is continuing while modifications and improvements are being made to these capabilities; The recently developed semi-analytical method for calculating critical cresting rates is being extended for the case of simultaneous gas and water coning toward a horizontal well; The accuracy of available correlations and analytical models for breakthrough times of horizontal wells is being investigated through simulations of a field case; Work on developing methods for coupling between reservoir and the werbore through a network modeling approach is progressing. The current stage of the study involves evaluation of available analytical methods; The necessary modifications have been made to the rig at the Marathon facility and the high rate two-phase flow experiments are about to commence; new correlations for wall friction and interfacial friction factors have been developed for the stratified flow in horizontal and inclined pipes. After further testing this new approach will be used in our mechanistic model; and this quarterly report has been entirely devoted to the task fisted in the last item above and we only present an abridged version of the Masters report of Mr. Liang-Biao Ouyang on which it is based. The complete study will be included in the next Annual Report of the Project.

  15. Horizontal sidetrack taps reservoir sweet spots''

    SciTech Connect

    Wible, J.R. )

    1994-02-21

    Cutting a window at 85[degree] deviation allowed a sidetrack to pass through the high-resistivity sections in a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. Results from logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools indicated the original horizontal bore dropped too low in the reservoir, possibly leading to a low productivity well. The subsequent sidetrack successfully delivered the desired well bore, and the increased productivity justified the efforts in cutting a window in the horizontal section.

  16. Report of the Horizontal Launch Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    A study of horizontal launch concepts has been conducted. This study, jointly sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was tasked to estimate the economic and technical viability of horizontal launch approaches. The study team identified the key parameters and critical technologies which determine mission viability and reported on the state of the art of critical technologies, along with objectives for technology development.

  17. Sensing and Measurement Architecture for Grid Modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; De Martini, Paul

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses architecture for grid sensor networks, with primary emphasis on distribution grids. It describes a forward-looking view of sensor network architecture for advanced distribution grids, and discusses key regulatory, financial, and planning issues.

  18. Single grid accelerator for an ion thrustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margosian, P. M.; Nakanishi, S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A single grid accelerator system for an ion thrustor is discussed. A layer of dielectric material is interposed between this metal grid and the chamber containing an ionized propellant for protecting the grid against sputtering erosion.

  19. Numerical Weather Prediction Over Caucasus Region With Nested Grid Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitashvili, Dr.; Kutaladze, Dr.; Kvatadze, Dr.

    2010-09-01

    Global atmosphere models, which describe the weather processes, give the general character of the weather but can't catch the smaller scale processes, especially local weather for the territories with compound topography. Small-scale processes such as convection often dominate the local weather, which cannot be explicitly represented in models with grid size more then 10 km. A much finer grid is required to properly simulate frontal structures and represent cumulus convection. Georgia lies to the south of the Major Caucasian Ridge and the Lesser Caucasus mountains occupy the southern part of Georgia. About 85 percent of the total land area occupies complex mountain ranges.Therefore for the territory of Georgia it is necessary to use atmosphere models with a very high resolution nested grid system taking into account main orographic features of the area. We have elaborated and configured Whether Research Forecast - Advanced Researcher Weather (WRF-ARW) model for Caucasus region considering geographical-landscape character, topography height, land use, soil type and temperature in deep layers, vegetation monthly distribution, albedo and others. Porting of WRF-ARW application to the grid was a good opportunity for running model on larger number of CPUs and storing large amount of data on the grid storage elements. On the grid WRF was compiled for both Open MP and MPI (Shared + Distributed memory) environment and WPS was compiled for serial environment using PGI (v7.1.6, MPI- version 1.2.7) on the platform Linux-x86. In searching of optimal execution time for time saving different model directory structures and storage schema was used. Simulations were performed using a set of 2 domains with horizontal grid-point resolutions of 15 and 5 km, both defined as those currently being used for operational forecasts The coarser domain is a grid of 94x102 points which covers the South Caucasus region, while the nested inner domain has a grid size of 70x70 points mainly

  20. Grid Integration Studies: Data Requirements, Greening the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    A grid integration study is an analytical framework used to evaluate a power system with high penetration levels of variable renewable energy (VRE). A grid integration study simulates the operation of the power system under different VRE scenarios, identifying reliability constraints and evaluating the cost of actions to alleviate those constraints. These VRE scenarios establish where, how much, and over what timeframe to build generation and transmission capacity, ideally capturing the spatial diversity benefits of wind and solar resources. The results help build confidence among policymakers, system operators, and investors to move forward with plans to increase the amount of VRE on the grid.

  1. Emotion recognition (sometimes) depends on horizontal orientations

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Carol M; Balas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Face recognition depends critically on horizontal orientations (Goffaux & Dakin, 2010). Face images that lack horizontal features are harder to recognize than those that have that information preserved. Presently, we asked if facial emotional recognition also exhibits this dependency by asking observers to categorize orientation-filtered happy and sad expressions. Furthermore, we aimed to dissociate image-based orientation energy from object-based orientation by rotating images 90-degrees in the picture-plane. In our first experiment, we showed that the perception of emotional expression does depend on horizontal orientations and that object-based orientation constrained performance more than image-based orientation. In Experiment 2 we showed that mouth openness (i.e. open versus closed-mouths) also influenced the emotion-dependent reliance on horizontal information. Lastly, we describe a simple computational analysis that demonstrates that the impact of mouth openness was not predicted by variation in the distribution of orientation energy across horizontal and vertical orientation bands. Overall, our results suggest that emotion recognition does largely depend on horizontal information defined relative to the face, but that this bias is modulated by multiple factors that introduce variation in appearance across and within distinct emotions. PMID:24664854

  2. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New grids of Atlas9 models (Howarth, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, I. D.

    2010-11-01

    The "Atlas9.C04" directory contains grids of products newly generated from the atmospheric structures provided by Castelli & Kurucz (2004, IAUS, 203, p. A20; astro-ph/0405087). Subdirectories have names of the form, e.g., "m20v02" or "p05av02", where M20V02 MEANS [m/h] = -2.0, v(turb) = 2 km/s p05av02 means [M/H] = +0.5, alpha elements enhanced, v(turb) = 2 km/s The Atlas9.C04 models use Grevesse & Sauval (1998SSRv...85..161G) solar abundances, and mixing-length parameter l/H=1.25 The "Atlas9.A10" directory contains grids of products from newly calculated structures. Subdirectory naming mirrors that in Atlas9.C04. The models are based on Asplund et al. (2005ASPC..336...25A) solar abundances, and mixing-length parameter l/H=1.25; subdirectories suffixed "r" are for models with l/H=0.5. Model grids at notionally LMC and SMC abundances are included. Within each grid subdirectory there are three plain-text files for each model, with names of the form 't05000g40.', where the base identifies the effective temperature and log(g), and the extension identifies the file content. Files with '.flx' extensions contain listings of physical fluxes at 1221 wavelengths, from 90 angstrom to 160 micron (with 20-angstrom sampling through the optical). Fluxes are tabulated in erg/cm2/s/Å as a function of wavelength (in angstrom). Limb-darkening coefficients are provided in files with extensions '.ucP' (for photon-counting detectors) and '.ucE' (for energy-integrating detectors). (6 data files).

  4. Open-System Magma Reservoir Affects Gas Segregation, Vesiculation, Fragmentation and Lava/Pyroclast Dispersal During the 1.2 km-deep 2007-2010 Submarine Eruption at West Mata Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Soule, S. A.; Resing, J.

    2014-12-01

    West Mata, a small, active rear-arc volcano in the NE Lau Basin, erupts crystal and gas rich boninite magma. Eruptions were observed at the summit (1.2 km water depth) during 5 ROV Jason dives in 2009 (the deepest erupting submarine volcano observed to date). Subsequent ROV and ship-based bathymetric mapping revealed that a pit crater formed and the summit eruption ceased in 2010, with roughly simultaneous eruptions along the SW rift zone. During the summit eruption, a combination of water depth, H2O-CO2-rich and high crystallinity magma, a split in the conduit to feed two vent sites, and waxing/waning magma supply led to a range of effusive/explosive eruption styles and volcanic deposit types. The 2-3 vent Hades cluster and the lone Prometheus vent had different eruption characteristics. Petrographic, petrologic and geochemical studies of erupted products indicate a change in magma composition in time and space over a period of 3.5 yrs, suggesting a small, open-system magma reservoir within the volcano. Prometheus (1174m depth) produced mostly pyroclastic material during our observations (e.g., highly vesicular glowing fluidal ejecta that cooled in the water column and rounded recycled dense clasts), but sampling and 210Po radiometric dating show that several months prior pillowed lava flows, subsequently covered with cm-sized pyroclasts, had flowed >50m from the vent. In contrast, vents at Hades (1200m depth) cycled between lava production and vigorous degassing, 10-20m high fire fountains and bursts of glowing lava-skinned bubbles, the products of which froze/broke in the water column, forming unstable cones of spatter and scoria near the vents. We hypothesize that bubbles collapse rather than form lava balloons because of skin brittleness (from high crystal content) and hydrostatic pressure. Clast settling times and patterns suggest >100m water column rise height for 10+ cm-sized fragments. Pillow flows were also observed to be issuing from the base of the

  5. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  6. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  7. A Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Foster, I.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit. The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to communicate also with the C Globus reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise, and peer-to peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop server side Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Globus jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  8. GridOPTICS Software System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A; Ciraci, PNNL Selim; Gibson, PNNL Tara; Rice, PNNL Mark; Sharma, PNNL Poorva; Yin, PNNL Jian; Allwardt, PNNL Craig; PNNL,

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allow power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: • A platform to support future EMS development. • A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. • A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. • Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. • An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.

  9. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kropski, Ben; Pratt, Rob

    2014-03-28

    This paper outlines the nature of the power grid, lists challenges and barriers to the implementation of a transactive energy ecosystem, and provides concept solutions to current technological impediments.

  10. Running medical image analysis on GridFactory desktop grid.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; Rosendahl, Peter; Müller, Henning; Waananen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    At the Geneva University Hospitals work is in progress to establish a computing facility for medical image analysis, potentially using several hundreds of desktop computers. Typically, hospitals do not have a computer infrastructure dedicated to research, nor can the data leave the hospital network for the reasons of privacy. For this purpose, a novel batch system called GridFactory has been tested along-side with the well-known batch system Condor. GridFactory's main benefits, compared to other batch systems, lie in its virtualization support and firewall friendliness. The tests involved running visual feature extraction from 50,000 anonymized medical images on a small local grid of 20 desktop computers. A comparisons with a Condor based batch system in the same computers is then presented. The performance of GridFactory is found satisfactory.

  11. Grid Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Fisher, Forest; Estlin, Tara; Gaines, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The Grid Visualization Tool (GVT) is a computer program for displaying the path of a mobile robotic explorer (rover) on a terrain map. The GVT reads a map-data file in either portable graymap (PGM) or portable pixmap (PPM) format, representing a gray-scale or color map image, respectively. The GVT also accepts input from path-planning and activity-planning software. From these inputs, the GVT generates a map overlaid with one or more rover path(s), waypoints, locations of targets to be explored, and/or target-status information (indicating success or failure in exploring each target). The display can also indicate different types of paths or path segments, such as the path actually traveled versus a planned path or the path traveled to the present position versus planned future movement along a path. The program provides for updating of the display in real time to facilitate visualization of progress. The size of the display and the map scale can be changed as desired by the user. The GVT was written in the C++ language using the Open Graphics Library (OpenGL) software. It has been compiled for both Sun Solaris and Linux operating systems.

  12. National transmission grid study

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Spencer

    2003-05-31

    The National Energy Policy Plan directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to address them. DOE began by conducting an independent analysis of U.S. electricity markets and identifying transmission system bottlenecks using DOE’s Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS). DOE’s analysis, presented in Section 2, confirms the central role of the nation’s transmission system in lowering costs to consumers through increased trade. More importantly, DOE’s analysis also confirms the results of previous studies, which show that transmission bottlenecks and related transmission system market practices are adding hundreds of millions of dollars to consumers’ electricity bills each year. A more detailed technical overview of the use of POEMS is provided in Appendix A. DOE led an extensive, open, public input process and heard a wide range of comments and recommendations that have all been considered.1 More than 150 participants registered for three public workshops held in Detroit, MI (September 24, 2001); Atlanta, GA (September 26, 2001); and Phoenix, AZ (September 28, 2001).

  13. Grid flexibility and patching techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, T. G.; Smith, L. W.; Yung, C. N.; Barthelson, S. H.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The numerical determination of combustor flowfields is of great value to the combustor designer. An a priori knowledge of the flow behavior can speed the combustor design process and reduce the number of experimental test rigs required to arrive at an optimal design. Even 2-D steady incompressible isothermal flow predictions are of use; many codes of this kind are available, each employing different techniques to surmount the difficulties arising from the nonlinearity of the governing equations and from typically irregular combustor geometries. Mapping techniques (algebraic and elliptic PDE), and adaptive grid methods (both multi-grid and grid embedding) as applied to axisymmetric combustors are discussed.

  14. Grid technologies empowering drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Chien, Andrew; Foster, Ian; Goddette, Dean

    2002-10-15

    Grid technologies enable flexible coupling and sharing of computers, instruments and storage. Grids can provide technical solutions to the volume of data and computational demands associated with drug discovery by delivering larger computing capability (flexible resource sharing), providing coordinated access to large data resources and enabling novel online exploration (coupling computing, data and instruments online). Here, we illustrate this potential by describing two applications: the use of desktop PC grid technologies for virtual screening, and distributed X-ray structure reconstruction and online visualization.

  15. Horizontal oil shale and tar sands retort

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.

    1982-08-31

    A horizontal retorting apparatus and method are disclosed designed to pyrolyze tar sands and oil shale, which are often found together in naturally occurring deposits. The retort is based on a horizontal retorting tube defining a horizontal retort zone having an upstream and a downstream end. Inlet means are provided for introducing the combined tar sands and oil shale into the upstream end of the retort. A screw conveyor horizontally conveys tar sands and oil shale from the upstream end of the retort zone to the downstream end of the retort zone while simultaneously mixing the tar sands and oil shale to insure full release of product gases. A firebox defining a heating zone surrounds the horizontal retort is provided for heating the tar sands and oil shale to pyrolysis temperatures. Spent shale and tar sands residue are passed horizontally beneath the retort tube with any carbonaceous residue thereon being combusted to provide a portion of the heat necessary for pyrolysis. Hot waste solids resulting from combustion of spent shale and tar sands residue are also passed horizontally beneath the retort tube whereby residual heat is radiated upward to provide a portion of the pyrolysis heat. Hot gas inlet holes are provided in the retort tube so that a portion of the hot gases produced in the heating zone are passed into the retort zone for contacting and directly heating the tar sands and oil shale. Auxiliary heating means are provided to supplement the heat generated from spent shale and tar sands residue combustion in order to insure adequate pyrolysis of the raw materials with varying residual carbonaceous material.

  16. Assistive Awareness in Smart Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourazeri, Aikaterini; Almajano, Pablo; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Lopez-Sanchez, Maite

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Background * The User-Infrastructure Interface * User Engagement through Assistive Awareness * Research Impact * Serious Games for Smart Grids * Serious Game Technology * Game scenario * Game mechanics * Related Work * Summary and Conclusions

  17. Modal Analysis for Grid Operation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-03

    MANGO software is to provide a solution for improving small signal stability of power systems through adjusting operator-controllable variables using PMU measurement. System oscillation problems are one of the major threats to the grid stability and reliability in California and the Western Interconnection. These problems result in power fluctuations, lower grid operation efficiency, and may even lead to large-scale grid breakup and outages. This MANGO software aims to solve this problem by automatically generating recommended operation procedures termed Modal Analysis for Grid Operation (MANGO) to improve damping of inter-area oscillation modes. The MANGO procedure includes three steps: recognizing small signal stability problems, implementing operating point adjustment using modal sensitivity, and evaluating the effectiveness of the adjustment. The MANGO software package is designed to help implement the MANGO procedure.

  18. Successful drilling of the first horizontal well in a mature field

    SciTech Connect

    Marruffo, I.; Achong, C.

    1996-08-01

    This paper discusses how the decision to drill the first horizontal well of a reservoir was taken, based on Production acceleration and the incremental economy of cash flow. The reservoir is located in the Guafita-Norto Field in Western Venezuela, contiguous to the La Yuca-Cano Limon Fields in Colombia. Guafita-Norte has 183 million stb of remaining oil reserves with 26 production wells on electrical submergible pumps. The STOIP of this under saturated reservoir (bubble point pressure is 36 psi) is 160 million stb with an initial GOR of 10 stf/stb, having a permeability between 1.5-12 darcies with a strong water drive, water coning and sanding problems due to fines migration. During 1995, it was decided to drill the first horizontal well in the reservoir based on a 3-D numerical simulation with radial flow (for water coning) and local grid refinement (for horizontal wells) coupled to an economic analysis. The simulation predetermines an initial production rate for a horizontal well 2.5 times greater than for a vertical one, and the incremental cash flow for the horizontal well is 4.5 MM$ larger for the vertical one in four (4) years, with a ROR of 200%. The horizontal well was drilled with oil-based mud to avoid hole collapse, and it was completed open hole with a single screen pack. The well is currently producing between 2000 and 3500 stb/d, clean, on natural flow. This study has clearly shown that the ultimate and decisive parameter to be weighed before undertaking this type of project, is the economic analysis, which must be performed as extensively as the technical analysis.

  19. How to drill horizontal sections faster

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that fewer trips, reduced slide time and lower drag during sliding have resulted from the application of downhole-adjustable stabilizers to horizontal drilling. Faster drilling times mean lower measurement while drilling (MWD) cost, and less wear on downhole equipment, motors and bits. These advantages combined with reduced drilling shocks have increased drilling rates and efficiency. Applying existing technology in new situations is an important way of reducing the cost of finding, exploring for and developing reserves. Engineers are responsible for using current technology to its fullest and developing new technology to reduce drilling expenses. Horizontal drilling was used in its early stages to develop the Austin chalk formation in Pearsall oil field more effectively. As procedures were generated to drill horizontal wells, Oryx drilling engineers began to develop new technology and investigate ways for existing technology to be used or altered to fit horizontal drilling programs. The new technology of downhole-adjustable stabilizers has been used successfully to further improve horizontal drilling efficiency.

  20. Optimising the vertical grid for numerical simulations of the Black Sea dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, G. I.; Pickering, J.; Luneva, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to analytical methods which deal with continuous functions, solutions obtained using numerical methods depend on the type of discretisation used in the model. It is known that not only different classes of discretisation (such as finite difference, finite element, finite volume etc.) result in different numerical outputs but also variations within the same class may have significant effect on the quality of simulation. When it comes to discretization in the vertical, examples include z- or terrain-following coordinate systems all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The aim of this study is to identify how sensitive modelling results are to changes in the vertical grid structure, under condition that all other parameters, both physical (e.g. initial temperature and salinity field and meteo forcing) and numerical ( e.g. time step, horizontal resolution, number of vertical layers) are kept the same. The simulations were carried out using the NEMO ocean model at 6 km resolution for the Black Sea which has both deep (more than 2 km) areas and an extensive (hundreds of kilometres) continental shelf. The shelf break, where the slope changes abruptly, is traditionally a difficult location for many types of models. The terrain-following coordinate systems (such as s- and sigma-) are prone the pressure gradient (PG) errors, while z-coordinate systems create a serrated edge near the bottom. Some improvements are provided by z-coordinates with partial steps; however this approach has its own limitations. In this study we compare 4 vertical coordinate system: z-, s-, hybrid (s- on top of z-), and advanced hybrid (modified s- on top of z-). The latter two are the new systems, not yet implemented in the standard NEMO code and developed specifically for this study. The hybrid system uses s-coordinates in the upper layer of the ocean, from the sea surface to the depth of the shelf break and z-coordinate below this level. Such configuration minimizes the PG

  1. Revised Extended Grid Library

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Roger L.

    2016-07-15

    The Revised Eolus Grid Library (REGL) is a mesh-tracking library that was developed for use with the MCNP6TM computer code so that (radiation) particles can track on an unstructured mesh. The unstructured mesh is a finite element representation of any geometric solid model created with a state-of-the-art CAE/CAD tool. The mesh-tracking library is written using modern Fortran and programming standards; the library is Fortran 2003 compliant. The library was created with a defined application programmer interface (API) so that it could easily integrate with other particle tracking/transport codes. The library does not handle parallel processing via the message passing interface (mpi), but has been used successfully where the host code handles the mpi calls. The library is thread-safe and supports the OpenMP paradigm. As a library, all features are available through the API and overall a tight coupling between it and the host code is required. Features of the library are summarized with the following list: • can accommodate first and second order 4, 5, and 6-sided polyhedra • any combination of element types may appear in a single geometry model • parts may not contain tetrahedra mixed with other element types • pentahedra and hexahedra can be together in the same part • robust handling of overlaps and gaps • tracks element-to-element to produce path length results at the element level • finds element numbers for a given mesh location • finds intersection points on element faces for the particle tracks • produce a data file for post processing results analysis • reads Abaqus .inp input (ASCII) files to obtain information for the global mesh-model • supports parallel input processing via mpi • support parallel particle transport by both mpi and OpenMP

  2. Oxygen-enhanced models for globular cluster stars. III - Horizontal-branch sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, Ben

    1992-01-01

    A large grid of horizontal-branch (HB) evolutionary sequences which have been calculated with core expansion and semiconvection and with enhanced oxygen composition are presented and described. Tracks for 10 different metallicities are computed; they range from (Fe/H) = -0.47 to -2.26 and comprise a total of 115 sequences. The evolution is traced from the zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) to the lower AGB at a point where log L/solar luminosity = 2.25. All of the sequences are illustrated on both the theoretical H-R diagram and on the B, V color-magnitude diagram. A complete set of tables for the ZAHB models and a representative sample of tabulations of the track parameters are provided. The phenomena which control HB evolution morphology, and existing certainties in theoretical HB models are discussed.

  3. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  4. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2016-07-12

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  5. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2016-07-12

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  6. Parallel Power Grid Simulation Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steve; Kelley, Brian; Banks, Lawrence; Top, Philip; Woodward, Carol

    2015-09-14

    ParGrid is a 'wrapper' that integrates a coupled Power Grid Simulation toolkit consisting of a library to manage the synchronization and communication of independent simulations. The included library code in ParGid, named FSKIT, is intended to support the coupling multiple continuous and discrete even parallel simulations. The code is designed using modern object oriented C++ methods utilizing C++11 and current Boost libraries to ensure compatibility with multiple operating systems and environments.

  7. Oscillating-grid experiments in water and superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honey, Rose E.; Hershberger, Robert; Donnelly, Russell J.; Bolster, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    Passing a fluid through a grid is a well-known mechanism used to study the properties of turbulence. Oscillating a horizontal grid vertically in a tank has also been used extensively and is considered to be a source of almost homogenous isotropic turbulence. When the oscillating grid is turned on a turbulent flow is induced. A front translates into the experimental tank, behind which the flow is highly turbulent. Long predicted that the growth of such a front would grow diffusively as the square root of time (i.e., d ˜√t ) and Dickinson and Long presented experimental evidence for the diffusive result at a low mesh Reynolds number of 555. This paper revisits these experiments and attempts a set of two models for the advancing front in both square and round tanks. We do not observe significant differences between runs in square and round tanks. The experiments in water reach mesh Reynolds numbers of order 30000. Using some data from superfluid helium experiments we are able to explore mesh Reynolds numbers to about 43000. We find the power law for the advancing front decreases weakly with the mesh Reynolds number. Using a very long tank we find that the turbulent front stops completely at a certain depth and attempt a simple explanation for that behavior. We study the propagation of the turbulent front into tubes of different diameters inserted into the main tank. We show that these tubes exclude wavelengths much larger than the tube diameter. We explore the variation of the position of the steady-state boundary H on tube diameter D and find that H =cD with c ˜2. We suggest this may be explained by saturation of the energy-containing length scale ℓe. We also report on the effect of plugging up just one hole of the grid. Finally, we recall some earlier oscillating grid experiments in superfluid 4He in the light of the present results.

  8. Oscillating-grid experiments in water and superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Honey, Rose E; Hershberger, Robert; Donnelly, Russell J; Bolster, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    Passing a fluid through a grid is a well-known mechanism used to study the properties of turbulence. Oscillating a horizontal grid vertically in a tank has also been used extensively and is considered to be a source of almost homogenous isotropic turbulence. When the oscillating grid is turned on a turbulent flow is induced. A front translates into the experimental tank, behind which the flow is highly turbulent. Long predicted that the growth of such a front would grow diffusively as the square root of time (i.e., d ∼ sqrt[t]) and Dickinson and Long presented experimental evidence for the diffusive result at a low mesh Reynolds number of 555. This paper revisits these experiments and attempts a set of two models for the advancing front in both square and round tanks. We do not observe significant differences between runs in square and round tanks. The experiments in water reach mesh Reynolds numbers of order 30000. Using some data from superfluid helium experiments we are able to explore mesh Reynolds numbers to about 43000. We find the power law for the advancing front decreases weakly with the mesh Reynolds number. Using a very long tank we find that the turbulent front stops completely at a certain depth and attempt a simple explanation for that behavior. We study the propagation of the turbulent front into tubes of different diameters inserted into the main tank. We show that these tubes exclude wavelengths much larger than the tube diameter. We explore the variation of the position of the steady-state boundary H on tube diameter D and find that H = cD with c ∼ 2. We suggest this may be explained by saturation of the energy-containing length scale ℓ(e). We also report on the effect of plugging up just one hole of the grid. Finally, we recall some earlier oscillating grid experiments in superfluid (4)He in the light of the present results.

  9. Towards a new high resolution gridded daily precipitation dataset over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreti, Andrea; Naveau, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The availability of high resolution daily gridded observational datasets is essential in many applications and to properly evaluate regional climate models. As the horizontal resolution of such models has significantly increased in recent modelling exercises (e.g., Euro-Cordex), while the one of the available observational datasets has remained constant (approx. 25km), new approaches are needed to develop gridded dataset of daily precipitation. Here, we discuss a statistical conceptual framework to combine data from neighbouring stations and model outputs. Our approach is based on recent statistical models for precipitation distributions, meshed with a data assimilation scheme. Our study focuses on the European region.

  10. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model -- Documentation of the Model-Layer Variable-Direction Horizontal Anisotropy (LVDA) capability of the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Kipp, K.L.; Hill, Mary C.; Valstar, Johan; Neupauer, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the model-layer variable-direction horizontal anisotropy (LVDA) capability of the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package of MODFLOW-2000. The LVDA capability allows the principal directions of horizontal anisotropy to be different than the model-grid row and column directions, and for the directions to vary on a cell-by-cell basis within model layers. The HUF Package calculates effective hydraulic properties for model grid cells based on hydraulic properties of hydrogeologic units with thicknesses defined independently of the model layers. These hydraulic properties include, among other characteristics, hydraulic conductivity and a horizontal anisotropy ratio. Using the LVDA capability, horizontal anisotropy direction is defined for model grid cells within which one or more hydrogeologic units may occur. For each grid cell, the HUF Package calculates the effective horizontal hydraulic conductivity along the primary direction of anisotropy using the hydrogeologic-unit hydraulic conductivities, and calculates the effective horizontal hydraulic conductivity along the orthogonal anisotropy direction using the effective primary direction hydraulic conductivities and horizontal anisotropy ratios. The direction assigned to the model layer effective primary hydraulic conductivity is specified using a new data set defined by the LVDA capability, when active, to calculate coefficients needed to solve the ground-water flow equation. Use of the LVDA capability is illustrated in four simulation examples, which also serve to verify hydraulic heads, advective-travel paths, and sensitivities calculated using the LVDA capability. This version of the LVDA capability defines variable-direction horizontal anisotropy using model layers, not the hydrogeologic units defined by the HUF Package. This difference needs to be taken into account when designing model layers and hydrogeologic units to produce simulations that accurately represent a given field problem. This

  11. REE and Y in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of Proterozoic granitoids (Eastern Sweden) - Assessing the role of composition and origin of groundwaters, geochemistry of fractures, and organic/inorganic aqueous complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Åström, Mats E.; Drake, Henrik; Maskenskaya, Olga M.; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.

    2014-11-01

    Yttrium and rare earth elements (YREEs) are studied in groundwater in the shallow regolith aquifer and the fracture networks of the upper 1.2 km of Paleoproterozoic granitoids in boreal Europe (Laxemar and Forsmark areas, Sweden). The study includes groundwater sampled via a total of 34 shallow boreholes reaching the bottom of the regolith aquifer, and 72 deep boreholes with equipment designed for retrieval of representative groundwater at controlled depths in the fractured bedrock. The groundwater composition differs substantially between regolith and fracture groundwater and between areas, which affects the dissolved YREE features, including concentrations and NASC normalized patterns. In the fresh groundwater in the regolith aquifers, highest YREE concentrations occur (10th and 90th percentile; Laxemar: 4.4-82 μg L-1; Forsmark: 1.9-19 μg L-1), especially in the slightly acidic groundwater (pH: 6.3-7.2 - Laxemar), where the normalized YREE patterns are slightly enriched in light REEs (LaNASC/YNASC: 1.1-2.4). In the recharge areas, where redox potentials of the regolith groundwater is more moderate, negative Ce anomaly (Laxemar: 0.37-0.45; Forsmark: 0.15-0.92) and positive Y anomaly (mainly in Forsmark: 1.0-1.7) are systematically more pronounced than in discharge areas. The significant correlations between the YREE features and dissolved organic carbon, minor elements, and somewhat pH suggest a strong control of humic substances (HSs) together with Al rich colloids and redox sensitive Fe-Mn hydrous precipitates on the dissolved YREE pools. In the bedrock fractures, the groundwater is circumneutral to slightly basic and displays YREE concentrations that are at least one order of magnitude lower than the regolith groundwater, and commonly below detection limit in the deep brackish and saline groundwater, with some exceptions such as La and Y. At intermediate depth (>50 m), where groundwater of meteoric origin percolates, the LaNASC/YNASC values moderately to

  12. AstroGrid-D: Grid technology for astronomical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enke, Harry; Steinmetz, Matthias; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Beck-Ratzka, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Brüsemeister, Thomas; Carlson, Arthur; Ensslin, Torsten; Högqvist, Mikael; Nickelt, Iliya; Radke, Thomas; Reinefeld, Alexander; Reiser, Angelika; Scholl, Tobias; Spurzem, Rainer; Steinacker, Jürgen; Voges, Wolfgang; Wambsganß, Joachim; White, Steve

    2011-02-01

    We present status and results of AstroGrid-D, a joint effort of astrophysicists and computer scientists to employ grid technology for scientific applications. AstroGrid-D provides access to a network of distributed machines with a set of commands as well as software interfaces. It allows simple use of computer and storage facilities and to schedule or monitor compute tasks and data management. It is based on the Globus Toolkit middleware (GT4). Chapter 1 describes the context which led to the demand for advanced software solutions in Astrophysics, and we state the goals of the project. We then present characteristic astrophysical applications that have been implemented on AstroGrid-D in chapter 2. We describe simulations of different complexity, compute-intensive calculations running on multiple sites (Section 2.1), and advanced applications for specific scientific purposes (Section 2.2), such as a connection to robotic telescopes (Section 2.2.3). We can show from these examples how grid execution improves e.g. the scientific workflow. Chapter 3 explains the software tools and services that we adapted or newly developed. Section 3.1 is focused on the administrative aspects of the infrastructure, to manage users and monitor activity. Section 3.2 characterises the central components of our architecture: The AstroGrid-D information service to collect and store metadata, a file management system, the data management system, and a job manager for automatic submission of compute tasks. We summarise the successfully established infrastructure in chapter 4, concluding with our future plans to establish AstroGrid-D as a platform of modern e-Astronomy.

  13. ESP's placed in horizontal lateral increase production

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, A.; Wilson, B.L. ); Marshall, R. )

    1990-06-18

    By design, the electric submersible pump (ESP) is an effective method of lifting fluids from horizontal wells. But this ESP application does have unique installation and operating parameters that need to be considered. ESP's have been used for many years in directional wells. This application provides an experience base for understanding deflection limits on the unit. To avoid damaging the ESP, special equipment may be required in some horizontal installations. This paper discusses how several ESP's have been designed specifically for medium-radius wells. In these applications, the deeper pump setting provides for a significant increase in production rate. In general, to realize the full benefit of a horizontal installation, the ESP should be considered when planning, drilling, and completing the well.

  14. The horizontal computerized rotational impulse test.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Shirey, Ian; Roxberg, Jillyn; Kiderman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body impulsive rotations were used to overcome several limitations associated with manual head impulse testing. A computer-controlled rotational chair delivered brief, whole-body, earth-vertical axis yaw impulsive rotations while eye movements were measured using video-oculography. Results from an unselected group of 20 patients with dizziness and a group of 22 control subjects indicated that the horizontal computerized rotational head impulse test (crHIT) is well-tolerated and provides an estimate of unidirectional vestibulo-ocular reflex gain comparable to results from caloric testing. This study demonstrates that the horizontal crHIT is a new assessment tool that overcomes many of the limitations of manual head impulse testing and provides a reliable laboratory-based measure of unilateral horizontal semicircular canal function.

  15. Algebraic grid generation for complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An efficient computer program called GRID2D/3D has been developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation. The distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions and grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For 2D spatial domains the boundary curves are constructed by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3D spatial domains the boundary surfaces are constructed by using a new technique, developed in this study, referred to as 3D bidirectional Hermite interpolation.

  16. Ion beamlet vectoring by grid translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homa, J. M.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beamlet vectoring is investigated by collecting deflection and divergence angle data for two-grid systems as a function of the relative displacement of these grids. Results show that at large displacements, accelerator grid impingement becomes a limiting factor and this determines the useful range of beamlet deflection. Beamlet deflection was shown to vary linearly with grid offset angle over this range. Values of deflection-to-offset angle ratio and useful range of deflection are presented as functions of grid-hole geometries, perveance levels, and accelerating voltages. It is found that the divergence of the beamlets is unaffected by deflection over the useful range of beamlet deflection. The grids of a typical dished-grid ion thruster are examined to determine where over the grid surface the grid offsets exceed the useful range, which indicates the regions on the surface where high accelerator grid impingment is probably occurring.

  17. Horizontally scaling dChache SRM with the Terracotta platform

    SciTech Connect

    Perelmutov, T.; Crawford, M.; Moibenko, A.; Oleynik, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The dCache disk caching file system has been chosen by a majority of LHC experiments Tier 1 centers for their data storage needs. It is also deployed at many Tier 2 centers. The Storage Resource Manager (SRM) is a standardized grid storage interface and a single point of remote entry into dCache, and hence is a critical component. SRM must scale to increasing transaction rates and remain resilient against changing usage patterns. The initial implementation of the SRM service in dCache suffered from an inability to support clustered deployment, and its performance was limited by the hardware of a single node. Using the Terracotta platform, we added the ability to horizontally scale the dCache SRM service to run on multiple nodes in a cluster configuration, coupled with network load balancing. This gives site administrators the ability to increase the performance and reliability of SRM service to face the ever-increasing requirements of LHC data handling. In this paper we will describe the previous limitations of the architecture SRM server and how the Terracotta platform allowed us to readily convert single node service into a highly scalable clustered application.

  18. Horizontally scaling dCache SRM with the Terracotta platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelmutov, T.; Crawford, M.; Moibenko, A.; Oleynik, G.

    2011-12-01

    The dCache disk caching file system has been chosen by a majority of LHC experiments' Tier 1 centers for their data storage needs. It is also deployed at many Tier 2 centers. The Storage Resource Manager (SRM) is a standardized grid storage interface and a single point of remote entry into dCache, and hence is a critical component. SRM must scale to increasing transaction rates and remain resilient against changing usage patterns. The initial implementation of the SRM service in dCache suffered from an inability to support clustered deployment, and its performance was limited by the hardware of a single node. Using the Terracotta platform[l], we added the ability to horizontally scale the dCache SRM service to run on multiple nodes in a cluster configuration, coupled with network load balancing. This gives site administrators the ability to increase the performance and reliability of SRM service to face the ever-increasing requirements of LHC data handling. In this paper we will describe the previous limitations of the architecture SRM server and how the Terracotta platform allowed us to readily convert single node service into a highly scalable clustered application.

  19. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  20. Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies (Spanish Version)

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    This is the Spanish version of 'Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies'. Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid.

  1. Scaling Up Renewable Energy Generation: Aligning Targets and Incentives with Grid Integration Considerations, Greening The Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Jessica; Cochran, Jaquelin

    2015-05-27

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document, part of a Greening the Grid toolkit, provides power system planners with tips to help secure and sustain investment in new renewable energy generation by aligning renewable energy policy targets and incentives with grid integration considerations.

  2. Insights into horizontal acquisition patterns of dormancy and reactivation regulon genes in mycobacterial species using a partitioning-based framework.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Varun; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-09-01

    Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) events, initially thought to be rare in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have recently been shown to be involved in the acquisition of virulence operons in M. tuberculosis. We have developed a new partitioning framework based HGT prediction algorithm, called Grid3M, and applied the same for the prediction of HGTs in Mycobacteria. Validation and testing using simulated and real microbial genomes indicated better performance of Grid3M as compared with other widely used HGT prediction methods. Specific analysis of the genes belonging to dormancy/reactivation regulons across 14 mycobacterial genomes indicated that horizontal acquisition is specifically restricted to important accessory proteins. The results also revealed Burkholderia species to be a probable source of HGT genes belonging to these regulons. The current study provides a basis for similar analyses investigating the functional/evolutionary aspects of HGT genes in other pathogens. A database of Grid3M predicted HGTs in completely sequenced genomes is available at https://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/Grid3M/.

  3. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  4. Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Saifur

    2014-08-31

    Since the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was enacted, there has been a large number of websites that discusses smart grid and relevant information, including those from government, academia, industry, private sector and regulatory. These websites collect information independently. Therefore, smart grid information was quite scattered and dispersed. The objective of this work was to develop, populate, manage and maintain the public Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC) web portal. The information in the SGIC website is comprehensive that includes smart grid information, research & development, demonstration projects, technical standards, costs & benefit analyses, business cases, legislation, policy & regulation, and other information on lesson learned and best practices. The content in the SGIC website is logically grouped to allow easily browse, search and sort. In addition to providing the browse and search feature, the SGIC web portal also allow users to share their smart grid information with others though our online content submission platform. The Clearinghouse web portal, therefore, serves as the first stop shop for smart grid information that collects smart grid information in a non-bias, non-promotional manner and can provide a missing link from information sources to end users and better serve users’ needs. The web portal is available at www.sgiclearinghouse.org. This report summarizes the work performed during the course of the project (September 2009 – August 2014). Section 2.0 lists SGIC Advisory Committee and User Group members. Section 3.0 discusses SGIC information architecture and web-based database application functionalities. Section 4.0 summarizes SGIC features and functionalities, including its search, browse and sort capabilities, web portal social networking, online content submission platform and security measures implemented. Section 5.0 discusses SGIC web portal contents, including smart grid 101, smart grid projects

  5. Horizontal Axis Levitron--A Physics Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the "spignet". Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic…

  6. Comparing cost and performance of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pocovi, A.S.; Gustavino, L.L. ); Pozzo, A.; Musmarra, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Argentina's state oil company, YPF, was forced through technical and economic constraints to undertake a four-well pilot horizontal drilling program in its Neuquen fields. This article discusses techniques used, the results and costs, and compares them to costs incurred by the area's original vertical wells.

  7. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  8. Horizontally separated 1-in-1 crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    Previous to this workshop, realistic lattices have been developed for vertically separated l-in-l (e.g., D.E. Johnson, A.A. Garren) and 2-in-1 (e.g., S. Heifets) magnets as well as for horizontally separated 2-in-l magnets (e.g., SSC RDS). Bringing together the widely separated ({approximately}60-70 cm) beams in a reasonable length of tunnel and keeping the dispersion zero at the interaction point has been difficult in the vertical l-in-l case. Most designs have required spacial 2-in-1 quadrupoles near the interaction point where the beams are separated by 15 cm or less. It is not clear that such magnets, as dictated by some of these lattice designs, can easily be built. The purpose of this exercise is to provide a crossing insertion for a realistic lattice which involves horizontally separated l-in-l magnets. The following horizontal crossing insertions, which incorporate the dispersion suppressors and phase trombones into the major arcs, need no special 2-in-1 magnets near the interaction point. The dispersion at the IP created by the horizontal crossing can be cancelled by the dispersion suppressor and one set of triplets.

  9. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1... intensities. The intensities shall decrease to reach practical cut-off between 1 and 3 degrees outside the prescribed sectors. (2) For sternlights and masthead lights and at 22.5 degrees abaft the beam for...

  10. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1... intensities. The intensities shall decrease to reach practical cut-off between 1 and 3 degrees outside the prescribed sectors. (2) For sternlights and masthead lights and at 22.5 degrees abaft the beam for...

  11. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1... intensities. The intensities shall decrease to reach practical cut-off between 1 and 3 degrees outside the prescribed sectors. (2) For sternlights and masthead lights and at 22.5 degrees abaft the beam for...

  12. Cutting Down the Tall Poppies: Horizontal Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    Many women in educational leadership positions experience negative treatment from female teachers and female superintendents. This phenomenon is known as horizontal violence, "the curious behavior of members of oppressed groups who often lash out at their peers in response to oppression instead of attacking their oppressors." This paper explores…

  13. Detecting Highways of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Mukul S.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Shamir, Ron

    In a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event a gene is transferred between two species that do not share an ancestor-descendant relationship. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two species. However, several studies identified pairs of species between which many different genes were horizontally transferred. Such a pair is said to be linked by a highway of gene sharing. We present a method for inferring such highways. Our method is based on the fact that the evolutionary histories of horizontally transferred genes disagree with the corresponding species phylogeny. Specifically, given a set of gene trees and a trusted rooted species tree, each gene tree is first decomposed into its constituent quartet trees and the quartets that are inconsistent with the species tree are identified. Our method finds a pair of species such that a highway between them explains the largest (normalized) fraction of inconsistent quartets. For a problem on n species, our method requires O(n 4) time, which is optimal with respect to the quartets input size. An application of our method to a dataset of 1128 genes from 11 cyanobacterial species, as well as to simulated datasets, illustrates the efficacy of our method.

  14. Detecting highways of horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Mukul S; Banay, Guy; Gogarten, J Peter; Shamir, Ron

    2011-09-01

    In a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event, a gene is transferred between two species that do not have an ancestor-descendant relationship. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two species. However, several studies identified pairs of species between which many different genes were horizontally transferred. Such a pair is said to be linked by a highway of gene sharing. We present a method for inferring such highways. Our method is based on the fact that the evolutionary histories of horizontally transferred genes disagree with the corresponding species phylogeny. Specifically, given a set of gene trees and a trusted rooted species tree, each gene tree is first decomposed into its constituent quartet trees and the quartets that are inconsistent with the species tree are identified. Our method finds a pair of species such that a highway between them explains the largest (normalized) fraction of inconsistent quartets. For a problem on n species and m input quartet trees, we give an efficient O(m + n(2))-time algorithm for detecting highways, which is optimal with respect to the quartets input size. An application of our method to a dataset of 1128 genes from 11 cyanobacterial species, as well as to simulated datasets, illustrates the efficacy of our method.

  15. Uniform head in horizontal and vertical wells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The steady-state head within a fully penetrating well may be estimated by evaluating the Thiem equation at the radius of the well. A method is presented here to extend results from the Thiem equation to horizontal wells and to partially penetrating wells. The particular model used in this investigat...

  16. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  17. Electroluminescence from completely horizontally oriented dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komino, Takeshi; Sagara, Yuta; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oki, Yuji; Nakamura, Nozomi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    A complete horizontal molecular orientation of a linear-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescent guest emitter 2,6-bis(4-(10Hphenoxazin-10-yl)phenyl)benzo[1,2-d:5,4-d'] bis(oxazole) (cis-BOX2) was obtained in a glassy host matrix by vapor deposition. The orientational order of cis-BOX2 depended on the combination of deposition temperature and the type of host matrix. Complete horizontal orientation was obtained when a thin film with cis-BOX2 doped in a 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) host matrix was fabricated at 200 K. The ultimate orientation of guest molecules originates from not only the kinetic relaxation but also the kinetic stability of the deposited guest molecules on the film surface during film growth. Utilizing the ultimate orientation, a highly efficient organic light-emitting diode with the external quantum efficiency of 33.4 ± 2.0% was realized. The thermal stability of the horizontal orientation of cis-BOX2 was governed by the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the CBP host matrix; the horizontal orientation was stable unless the film was annealed above Tg.

  18. Stereoscopic watermarking by horizontal noise mean shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Hak-Yeol; Choi, Sung-Hee; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2012-03-01

    Depth-image-based rendering (DIBR) is a method to represent a stereoscopic content. The DIBR consists of a monoscopic center view and an associated per-pixel depth map. Using these two components and given depth condition from a user, the DIBR renders left and right views. The advantages of DIBR are numerous. The user can choose not only the monoscopic or stereoscopic view selectively, but also the depth condition what he prefers when he watches a stereoscopic content. However, in the view of copyright protection, since not only the center view but also each left or right view can be used as a monoscopic content when they are illegally distributed, the watermark signal which is embedded in the center view must have an ability to protect the respective three views. In this study, we solve this problem by exploiting the horizontal noise mean shifting (HNMS) technique. We exploit the fact that the objects in the view are shifted only to horizontal way when the center view renders to the left and right views. Using this fact, the proposed stereoscopic watermarking scheme moves the mean of horizontal noise histogram which is invariant to horizontal shifting, and we achieve good performance as shown in the experimental results.

  19. Power grid reliability and security

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Anjan; Venkatasubramanian, Vaithianathan; Hauser, Carl; Bakken, David; Anderson, David; Zhao, Chuanlin; Liu, Dong; Yang, Tao; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Lin; Ning, Jiawei; Tashman, Zaid

    2015-01-31

    This project has led to the development of a real-time simulation platform for electric power grids called Grid Simulator or GridSim for simulating the dynamic and information network interactions of large- scale power systems. The platform consists of physical models of power system components including synchronous generators, loads and control, which are simulated using a modified commercial power simulator namely Transient Stability Analysis Tool (TSAT) [1] together with data cleanup components, as well as an emulated substation level and wide-area power analysis components. The platform also includes realistic representations of communication network middleware that can emulate the real-time information flow back and forth between substations and control centers in wide-area power systems. The platform has been validated on a realistic 6000-bus model of the western American power system. The simulator GridSim developed in this project is the first of its kind in its ability to simulate real-time response of large-scale power grids, and serves as a cost effective real-time stability and control simulation platform for power industry.

  20. Errors induced by different approximations in handling horizontal atmospheric inhomogeneities in MIPAS/ENVISAT retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Elisa; Ridolfi, Marco; Carlotti, Massimo; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Kirner, Oliver; Kiefer, Michael; Dinelli, Bianca Maria

    2016-11-01

    MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) is a mid-infrared limb emission sounder that operated on board the polar satellite ENVISAT from 2002 to 2012. The retrieval algorithm used by the European Space Agency to process MIPAS measurements exploits the assumption that the atmosphere is horizontally homogeneous. However, previous studies highlighted how this assumption causes significant errors on the retrieved profiles of some MIPAS target species.In this paper we quantify the errors induced by this assumption and evaluate the performances of three different algorithms that can be used to mitigate the problem. We generate synthetic observations with a high spatial resolution atmospheric model and carry out the retrievals with four alternative methods. The first assumes horizontal homogeneity (1-D retrieval), the second includes a model of the horizontal gradient of atmospheric temperature (1-D plus temperature gradient retrieval), the third accounts for an horizontal gradient of temperature and composition (1-D plus temperature and composition gradient retrieval), while the fourth is the full two-dimensional (2-D) inversion approach.Our results highlight that the 1-D retrieval implies errors that are significant for averages of profiles. Furthermore, for some targets (e.g. T, CH4 and N2O below 10 hPa) the error induced by the 1-D approximation also becomes visible in the individual retrieved profiles. The inclusion of any kind of horizontal variability model improves all the targets with respect to the horizontal homogeneity assumption. For temperature, HNO3 and CFC-11, the inclusion of an horizontal temperature gradient leads to a significant reduction of the error. For other targets, such as H2O, O3, N2O, CH4, the improvements due to the inclusion of an horizontal temperature gradient are minor. In these cases, the inclusion of a gradient in the target volume mixing ratio leads to significant improvements. Among all the methods tested in

  1. 75 FR 63462 - Smart Grid Interoperability Standards; Notice of Docket Designation for Smart Grid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Smart Grid Interoperability Standards; Notice of Docket Designation for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards October 7, 2010. 1. The Energy Independence and Security Act of... interoperability of smart grid devices and systems, including protocols and model standards for...

  2. TIGGERC: Turbomachinery Interactive Grid Generator for 2-D Grid Applications and Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block grid generator has been developed for a new design and analysis system for studying multiple blade-row turbomachinery problems. TIGGERC is a mouse driven, interactive grid generation program which can be used to modify boundary coordinates and grid packing and generates surface grids using a hyperbolic tangent or algebraic distribution of grid points on the block boundaries. The interior points of each block grid are distributed using a transfinite interpolation approach. TIGGERC can generate a blocked axisymmetric H-grid, C-grid, I-grid or O-grid for studying turbomachinery flow problems. TIGGERC was developed for operation on Silicon Graphics workstations. Detailed discussion of the grid generation methodology, menu options, operational features and sample grid geometries are presented.

  3. Grids: The Top Ten Questions

    DOE PAGES

    Schopf, Jennifer M.; Nitzberg, Bill

    2002-01-01

    The design and implementation of a national computing system and data grid has become a reachable goal from both the computer science and computational science point of view. A distributed infrastructure capable of sophisticated computational functions can bring many benefits to scientific work, but poses many challenges, both technical and socio-political. Technical challenges include having basic software tools, higher-level services, functioning and pervasive security, and standards, while socio-political issues include building a user community, adding incentives for sites to be part of a user-centric environment, and educating funding sources about the needs of this community. This paper details the areasmore » relating to Grid research that we feel still need to be addressed to fully leverage the advantages of the Grid.« less

  4. Anisotropic grid adaptation in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The modeling errors depend directly on the grid (or filter) spacing in turbulence-resolving simulations (LES, DNS, DES, etc), and are typically at least as significant as the numerical errors. This makes adaptive grid-refinement complicated, since it prevents the estimation of the local error sources through numerical analysis. The present work attempts to address this difficulty with a physics-based error-source indicator that accounts for the anisotropy in the smallest resolved scales, which can thus be used to drive an anisotropic grid-adaptation process. The proposed error indicator is assessed on a sequence of problems, including turbulent channel flow and flows in more complex geometries. The formulation is geometrically general and applicable to complex geometries.

  5. Wavelet-Based Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1996-01-01

    Wavelets can provide a basis set in which the basis functions are constructed by dilating and translating a fixed function known as the mother wavelet. The mother wavelet can be seen as a high pass filter in the frequency domain. The process of dilating and expanding this high-pass filter can be seen as altering the frequency range that is 'passed' or detected. The process of translation moves this high-pass filter throughout the domain, thereby providing a mechanism to detect the frequencies or scales of information at every location. This is exactly the type of information that is needed for effective grid generation. This paper provides motivation to use wavelets for grid generation in addition to providing the final product: source code for wavelet-based grid generation.

  6. TBGG- INTERACTIVE ALGEBRAIC GRID GENERATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    TBGG, Two-Boundary Grid Generation, applies an interactive algebraic grid generation technique in two dimensions. The program incorporates mathematical equations that relate the computational domain to the physical domain. TBGG has application to a variety of problems using finite difference techniques, such as computational fluid dynamics. Examples include the creation of a C-type grid about an airfoil and a nozzle configuration in which no left or right boundaries are specified. The underlying two-boundary technique of grid generation is based on Hermite cubic interpolation between two fixed, nonintersecting boundaries. The boundaries are defined by two ordered sets of points, referred to as the top and bottom. Left and right side boundaries may also be specified, and call upon linear blending functions to conform interior interpolation to the side boundaries. Spacing between physical grid coordinates is determined as a function of boundary data and uniformly spaced computational coordinates. Control functions relating computational coordinates to parametric intermediate variables that affect the distance between grid points are embedded in the interpolation formulas. A versatile control function technique with smooth cubic spline functions is also presented. The TBGG program is written in FORTRAN 77. It works best in an interactive graphics environment where computational displays and user responses are quickly exchanged. The program has been implemented on a CDC Cyber 170 series computer using NOS 2.4 operating system, with a central memory requirement of 151,700 (octal) 60 bit words. TBGG requires a Tektronix 4015 terminal and the DI-3000 Graphics Library of Precision Visuals, Inc. TBGG was developed in 1986.

  7. Grid for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, Monique; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    The civil society at large has addressed to the Earth Science community many strong requirements related in particular to natural and industrial risks, climate changes, new energies. The main critical point is that on one hand the civil society and all public ask for certainties i.e. precise values with small error range as it concerns prediction at short, medium and long term in all domains; on the other hand Science can mainly answer only in terms of probability of occurrence. To improve the answer or/and decrease the uncertainties, (1) new observational networks have been deployed in order to have a better geographical coverage and more accurate measurements have been carried out in key locations and aboard satellites. Following the OECD recommendations on the openness of research and public sector data, more and more data are available for Academic organisation and SMEs; (2) New algorithms and methodologies have been developed to face the huge data processing and assimilation into simulations using new technologies and compute resources. Finally, our total knowledge about the complex Earth system is contained in models and measurements, how we put them together has to be managed cleverly. The technical challenge is to put together databases and computing resources to answer the ES challenges. However all the applications are very intensive computing. Different compute solutions are available and depend on the characteristics of the applications. One of them is Grid especially efficient for independent or embarrassingly parallel jobs related to statistical and parametric studies. Numerous applications in atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, seismology, hydrology, pollution, climate and biodiversity have been deployed successfully on Grid. In order to fulfill requirements of risk management, several prototype applications have been deployed using OGC (Open geospatial Consortium) components with Grid middleware. The Grid has permitted via a huge number of runs to

  8. Scientific Computing on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gabrielle; Seidel, Edward; Shalf, John

    2001-12-12

    Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important as the only means for studying and interpreting the complex processes of nature. Yet the scope and accuracy of these simulations are severely limited by available computational power, even using today's most powerful supercomputers. As we endeavor to simulate the true complexity of nature, we will require much larger scale calculations than are possible at present. Such dynamic and large scale applications will require computational grids and grids require development of new latency tolerant algorithms, and sophisticated code frameworks like Cactus to carry out more complex and high fidelity simulations with a massive degree of parallelism.

  9. DARHT Radiographic Grid Scale Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Warthen, Barry J.

    2015-02-13

    Recently it became apparent that the radiographic grid which has been used to calibrate the dimensional scale of DARHT radiographs was not centered at the location where the objects have been centered. This offset produced an error of 0.188% in the dimensional scaling of the radiographic images processed using the assumption that the grid and objects had the same center. This paper will show the derivation of the scaling correction, explain how new radiographs are being processed to account for the difference in location, and provide the details of how to correct radiographic image processed with the erroneous scale factor.

  10. GENI: Grid Hardware and Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-09

    GENI Project: The 15 projects in ARPA-E’s GENI program, short for “Green Electricity Network Integration,” aim to modernize the way electricity is transmitted in the U.S. through advances in hardware and software for the electric grid. These advances will improve the efficiency and reliability of electricity transmission, increase the amount of renewable energy the grid can utilize, and provide energy suppliers and consumers with greater control over their power flows in order to better manage peak power demand and cost.

  11. IGB grid: User's manual (A turbomachinery grid generation code)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, T. A.; Hoffman, G.

    1992-01-01

    A grid generation code called IGB is presented for use in computational investigations of turbomachinery flowfields. It contains a combination of algebraic and elliptic techniques coded for use on an interactive graphics workstation. The instructions for use and a test case are included.

  12. Grid generation and inviscid flow computation about cranked-winged airplane geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, L.-E.; Smith, R. E.; Wiese, M. R.; Farr, N.

    1987-01-01

    An algebraic grid generation procedure that defines a patched multiple-block grid system suitable for fighter-type aircraft geometries with fuselage and engine inlet, canard or horizontal tail, cranked delta wing and vertical fin has been developed. The grid generation is based on transfinite interpolation and requires little computational power. A finite-volume Euler solver using explicit Runge-Kutta time-stepping has been adapted to this grid system and implemented on the VPS-32 vector processor with a high degree of vectorization. Grids are presented for an experimental aircraft with fuselage, canard, 70-20-cranked wing, and vertical fin. Computed inviscid compressible flow solutions are presented for Mach 2 at 3.79, 7 and 10 deg angles of attack. Conmparisons of the 3.79 deg computed solutions are made with available full-potential flow and Euler flow solutions on the same configuration but with another grid system. The occurrence of an unsteady solution in the 10 deg angle of attack case is discussed.

  13. A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersema, David John; Lundquist, Katherine A.; Chow, Fotini Katapodes

    2016-09-29

    With advances in computational power, mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are often pushed to higher resolutions. As the model’s horizontal resolution is refined, the maximum resolved terrain slope will increase. Because WRF uses a terrain-following coordinate, this increase in resolved terrain slopes introduces additional grid skewness. At high resolutions and over complex terrain, this grid skewness can introduce large numerical errors that require methods, such as the immersed boundary method, to keep the model accurate and stable. Our implementation of the immersed boundary method in the WRF model, WRF-IBM, has proven effective at microscale simulations over complex terrain. WRF-IBM uses a non-conforming grid that extends beneath the model’s terrain. Boundary conditions at the immersed boundary, the terrain, are enforced by introducing a body force term to the governing equations at points directly beneath the immersed boundary. Nesting between a WRF parent grid and a WRF-IBM child grid requires a new framework for initialization and forcing of the child WRF-IBM grid. This framework will enable concurrent multi-scale simulations within the WRF model, improving the accuracy of high-resolution simulations and enabling simulations across a wide range of scales.

  14. Articulating Support for Horizontal Resistive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason; Loehr, James A.

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mechanical device provides support for a user engaged in any of a variety of resistive exercises in a substantially horizontal orientation. The unique features and versatility of the device promise to be useful in bedrest studies, rehabilitation, and specialized strength training. The device affords a capability for selectively loading and unloading of portions of the user s body through its support mechanisms, so that specific parts of the body can be trained with little or no effect on other parts that may be disabled or in the process of recovery from injury. Thus, the device is ideal for rehabilitation exercise programs prescribed by physicians and physical therapists. The capability for selective loading and support also offers potential benefits to strength and conditioning trainers and athletes who wish to selectively strengthen selected parts. The principal innovative aspect of the device is that it supports the subject s weight while enabling the subject, lying substantially horizontally, to perform an exercise that closely approximates a full standing squat. The device includes mechanisms that support the subject in such a way that the hips are free to translate both horizontally and vertically and are free to rotate about the line connecting the hips. At the same time, the shoulders are free to translate horizontally while the upper back is free to rotate about the line connecting the shoulders. Among the mechanisms for hip motion and support is a counterbalance that offsets the weight of the subject as the subject s pelvis translates horizontally and vertically and rotates the pelvis about the line connecting the hips. The counterbalance is connected to a pelvic support system that allows these pelvic movements. The subject is also supported at the shoulder by a mechanism that can tilt to provide continuous support of the upper back while allowing the rotation required for arching the back as the pelvis is displaced. The shoulder support

  15. MrGrid: A Portable Grid Based Molecular Replacement Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Cyril F.; Androulakis, Steve G.; Phan, Jennifer M. N.; Whisstock, James C.; Goscinski, Wojtek J.; Abramson, David; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The crystallographic determination of protein structures can be computationally demanding and for difficult cases can benefit from user-friendly interfaces to high-performance computing resources. Molecular replacement (MR) is a popular protein crystallographic technique that exploits the structural similarity between proteins that share some sequence similarity. But the need to trial permutations of search models, space group symmetries and other parameters makes MR time- and labour-intensive. However, MR calculations are embarrassingly parallel and thus ideally suited to distributed computing. In order to address this problem we have developed MrGrid, web-based software that allows multiple MR calculations to be executed across a grid of networked computers, allowing high-throughput MR. Methodology/Principal Findings MrGrid is a portable web based application written in Java/JSP and Ruby, and taking advantage of Apple Xgrid technology. Designed to interface with a user defined Xgrid resource the package manages the distribution of multiple MR runs to the available nodes on the Xgrid. We evaluated MrGrid using 10 different protein test cases on a network of 13 computers, and achieved an average speed up factor of 5.69. Conclusions MrGrid enables the user to retrieve and manage the results of tens to hundreds of MR calculations quickly and via a single web interface, as well as broadening the range of strategies that can be attempted. This high-throughput approach allows parameter sweeps to be performed in parallel, improving the chances of MR success. PMID:20386612

  16. Tuned grid generation with ICEM CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf, Armin; Akdag, Vedat

    1995-01-01

    ICEM CFD is a CAD based grid generation package that supports multiblock structured, unstructured tetrahedral and unstructured hexahedral grids. Major development efforts have been spent to extend ICEM CFD's multiblock structured and hexahedral unstructured grid generation capabilities. The modules added are: a parametric grid generation module and a semi-automatic hexahedral grid generation module. A fully automatic version of the hexahedral grid generation module for around a set of predefined objects in rectilinear enclosures has been developed. These modules will be presented and the procedures used will be described, and examples will be discussed.

  17. Simulation of the Summer Monsoon Rainfall over East Asia using the NCEP GFS Cumulus Parameterization at Different Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Song You; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Han, Jongil

    2014-10-01

    The most recent version of Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus scheme in National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS) (GFS SAS) has been implemented into the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model with a modification of triggering condition and convective mass flux to become depending on model’s horizontal grid spacing. East Asian Summer Monsoon of 2006 from June to August is selected to evaluate the performance of the modified GFS SAS scheme. Simulated monsoon rainfall with the modified GFS SAS scheme shows better agreement with observation compared to the original GFS SAS scheme. The original GFS SAS scheme simulates the similar ratio of subgrid-scale precipitation, which is calculated from a cumulus scheme, against total precipitation regardless of model’s horizontal grid spacing. This is counter-intuitive because the portion of resolved clouds in a grid box should be increased as the model grid spacing decreases. This counter-intuitive behavior of the original GFS SAS scheme is alleviated by the modified GFS SAS scheme. Further, three different cumulus schemes (Grell and Freitas, Kain and Fritsch, and Betts-Miller-Janjic) are chosen to investigate the role of a horizontal resolution on simulated monsoon rainfall. The performance of high-resolution modeling is not always enhanced as the spatial resolution becomes higher. Even though improvement of probability density function of rain rate and long wave fluxes by the higher-resolution simulation is robust regardless of a choice of cumulus parameterization scheme, the overall skill score of surface rainfall is not monotonically increasing with spatial resolution.

  18. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; McInnes, Ian D.; Massey, John V.

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  19. Elf cites 5 advantages of horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    ELF Aquitaine used horizontal drilling during a pilot test program to bring commercial production from its Rospo Mare oil discovery in the Adriatic, which would have been a costly disappointment if drilled by a conventional vertical well bore. Rospo Mare is a large reservoir containing a top column of highly viscous crude underlain by a water column. The company felt that a well bore that penetrated the reservoir vertically would bring early flooding of the oil column and yield only water. By penetrating the reservoir with a horizontal well drilled high in the oil column, the well successfully produced on numerous tests from Oct. 1982 until the end of the test program in 1983. Production was termed excellent, with productivity during tests reportedly reaching ca 15 times the rate produced from nearby vertical wells. However, ELF said the results usually average ca 5 times the usual rate of vertical wells.

  20. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  1. Kinematics of horizontal and vertical caterpillar crawling.

    PubMed

    van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Trimmer, Barry A

    2009-05-01

    Unlike horizontal crawling, vertical crawling involves two counteracting forces: torque rotating the body around its center of mass and gravity resisting forward movement. The influence of these forces on kinematics has been examined in the soft-bodied larval stage of Manduca sexta. We found that crawling and climbing are accomplished using the same movements, with both segment timing and proleg lift indistinguishable in horizontal and vertical locomotion. Minor differences were detected in stride length and in the delay between crawls, which led to a lower crawling speed in the vertical orientation. Although these differences were statistically significant, they were much smaller than the variation in kinematic parameters between animals. The ability of Manduca to crawl and climb using the same movements is best explained by Manduca's relatively small size, slow speed and strong, controlled, passive grip made possible by its proleg/crochets.

  2. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  3. FermiGrid - experience and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid and the WLCG. FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the Open Science Grid (OSG), EGEE and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure--the successes and the problems.

  4. Sensitivity of snow cover to horizontal resolution in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, E.; Kotlarski, S.; Viterbo, P.; Balsamo, G.; Miranda, P. M. A.; Schär, C.

    2010-09-01

    Snow cover is a highly variable land surface condition that exerts a strong control on the heat and moisture budget of the overlying atmosphere. Modeling studies based on long integrations of global circulation models (GCM) are normally carried out at very low resolution (typically coarser than 100 km) due to their high computational demand. On local scales, snow cover plays an important socioeconomic role, ranging from water management applications to outdoor recreation. These latter applications vary in horizontal resolution from a few hundred meters to a few kilometers, where small scale topography, land cover and local circulation effects play a significant role. In this study our focus will be on horizontal scales ranging from typical GCM global climate modeling to high resolution global weather forecasts. In the land surface component of a GCM (land surface model - LSM), snow cover temporal and spatial variability is mainly determined by the overlying atmospheric conditions. However, once snowfall settles on the ground, the sub-grid scale variability associated with complex terrain and land cover variability (not resolved at the model resolution) is parameterized following simple physical and/or empirical relations. The present study intends to access the impact of horizontal resolution in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) land surface model (HTESSEL). HTESSEL is forced by the ECMWF operational weather forecasts since March 2006 to December 2009 (runs in offline/stand-alone mode). The control run is carried out at the horizontal resolution of the forecasts at TL799 (gaussian reduced grid N400 -about 25 km). Two lower horizontal resolutions are then tested: TL255 (gaussian reduced grid - about 80 km, same as the ERA-Interim reanalysis), and TL95 (gaussian reduced grid N48 - about 200 km). The length of the simulations is rather small (only 46 months), however global meteorological forcing at 25 km can only be accessed through the

  5. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Brian L; Tierney, Brian L; Gunter, Dan

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to help developers of Grid middleware and application software generate log files that will be useful to Grid administrators, users, developers and Grid middleware itself. Currently, most of the currently generated log files are only useful to the author of the program. Good logging practices are instrumental to performance analysis, problem diagnosis, and security auditing tasks such as incident tracing and damage assessment. This document does not discuss the issue of a logging API. It is assumed that a standard log API such as syslog (C), log4j (Java), or logger (Python) is being used. Other custom logging API or even printf could be used. The key point is that the logs must contain the required information in the required format. At a high level of abstraction, the best practices for Grid logging are: (1) Consistently structured, typed, log events; (2) A standard high-resolution timestamp; (3) Use of logging levels and categories to separate logs by detail and purpose; (4) Consistent use of global and local identifiers; and (5) Use of some regular, newline-delimited ASCII text format. The rest of this document describes each of these recommendations in detail.

  6. Grid-coordinate generation program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, Oliver J.; Horwich, Esther

    1974-01-01

    This program description of the grid-coordinate generation program is written for computer users who are familiar with digital aquifer models. The program computes the coordinates for a variable grid -used in the 'Pinder Model' (a finite-difference aquifer simulator), for input to the CalComp GPCP (general purpose contouring program). The program adjusts the y-value by a user-supplied constant in order to transpose the origin of the model grid from the upper left-hand corner to the lower left-hand corner of the grid. The user has the options of, (1.) choosing the boundaries of the plot; (2.) adjusting the z-values (altitudes) by a constant; (3.) deleting superfluous z-values and (4.) subtracting the simulated surfaces from each other to obtain the decline. Output of this program includes the fixed format CNTL data cards and the other data cards required for input to GPCP. The output from GPCP then is used to produce a potentiometric map or a decline map by means of the CalComp plotter.

  7. Smart Grid Communications System Blueprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Adrian; Pavlovski, Chris

    2010-10-01

    Telecommunications operators are well versed in deploying 2G and 3G wireless networks. These networks presently support the mobile business user and/or retail consumer wishing to place conventional voice calls and data connections. The electrical power industry has recently commenced transformation of its distribution networks by deploying smart monitoring and control devices throughout their networks. This evolution of the network into a `smart grid' has also motivated the need to deploy wireless technologies that bridge the communication gap between the smart devices and information technology systems. The requirements of these networks differ from traditional wireless networks that communications operators have deployed, which have thus far forced energy companies to consider deploying their own wireless networks. We present our experience in deploying wireless networks to support the smart grid and highlight the key properties of these networks. These characteristics include application awareness, support for large numbers of simultaneous cell connections, high service coverage and prioritized routing of data. We also outline our target blueprint architecture that may be useful to the industry in building wireless and fixed networks to support the smart grid. By observing our experiences, telecommunications operators and equipment manufacturers will be able to augment their current networks and products in a way that accommodates the needs of the emerging industry of smart grids and intelligent electrical networks.

  8. Natural Convection Above A Horizontal Heat Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    surface was a thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) sheet. Used to ensure a smooth flat surface, the sheet also provided a visualization of the temperature...a flat horizontal heated surface surrounded by an unheated area. This can contribute significantly to studies in liquid immersion cooling...Gebhart, B., "The Transition of Plane Plumes," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, v.18., pp. 513-526, 1975. 13. Gaiser, A.O., "Natural Convection Liquid

  9. Management of horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor

    PubMed Central

    Katta, Anil Kumar; Peddu, Revathi; Vannala, Venkataramana; Dasari, Vaishnavi

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary lateral incisor with odontome and retained deciduous tooth is not often seen in regular dental practice. Impaction of anterior teeth cause generalized spacing which affects the esthetics of the face. Here we report a case of an 18-year-old patient with horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor, which was bought into occlusion with the help of orthodontic tooth movement within a span of 18 months. PMID:26538954

  10. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  11. Horizontal-parallax-only electronic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, T.-C.; Akin, T.; Indebetouw, G.; Kim, T.

    2005-04-01

    The principle of optical scanning holography (OSH) is proposed to acquire horizontal-parallax-only (HPO) holographic information electronically. We first briefly summarize the results of OSH and then discuss how HPO-electronic holographic information can be acquired using OSH. Finally we provide simulations to illustrate and clarify the proposed idea. Although many ideas of HPO-holography have been proposed and studied, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first proposed electronic technique to acquire HPO-holographic information.

  12. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.

  13. Search for horizontal bosons at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, C.H.; Deshpande, N.G.; Gunion, J.F.; Haber, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The production process anti p p ..-->.. l/sup -/l'/sup +/ + X, where the leptons belong to two different generations and X refers to spectator jets, provides a clear signature for horizontal (generation-changing) bosons when the leptons are emitted nearly back-to-back and p/sub T//sup miss/ = 0. Cross sections and p/sub T/ distributions for each lepton are presented, and discovery limits on M/sub H/ are extracted for several different channels.

  14. Horizontal transmission of streptococcus mutans in schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana M.; Liébana, Maria J.; Castillo, Francisca; Martín-Platero, Antonio; Liébana, José

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: The aim of this study was to analyze possible horizontal transmission patterns of S. mutans among 6-7-yr-old schoolchildren from the same class, identifying genotypes and their diversity and relationship with caries disease status. Study Design: Caries indexes and saliva mutans streptococci and lactobacilli counts were recorded in 42 schoolchildren. Mutans streptococci colonies were identified by means of biochemical tests and all S. mutans strains were genotyped by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction. A child was considered free of S. mutans when it could not be isolated in 3 samples at 1-week intervals. Results: S. mutans was isolated in 30 schoolchildren: 20 having one genotype and 10 two genotypes. Higher mutans streptococci and caries index values were found in those with two genotypes. Five genotypes were isolated in more than 1 schoolchild and one of these was isolated in 3 schoolchildren. Our results suggest that horizontal transmission may take place. Conclusion: Schoolchildren aged 6-7 yrs may be the source of mutual transmission of S. mutans. Key words:Streptococcus mutans, Horizontal transmission, AP-PCR, genotyping PMID:22143733

  15. Vertical and horizontal seismometric observations of tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambotte, S.; Rivera, L.; Hinderer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Tidal signals have been largely studied with gravimeters, strainmeters and tiltmeters, but can also be retrieved from digital records of the output of long-period seismometers, such as STS-1, particularly if they are properly isolated. Horizontal components are often noisier than the vertical ones, due to sensitivity to tilt at long periods. Hence, horizontal components are often disturbed by local effects such as topography, geology and cavity effects, which imply a strain-tilt coupling. We use series of data (duration larger than 1 month) from several permanent broadband seismological stations to examine these disturbances. We search a minimal set of observable signals (tilts, horizontal and vertical displacements, strains, gravity) necessary to reconstruct the seismological record. Such analysis gives a set of coefficients (per component for each studied station), which are stable over years and then can be used systematically to correct data from these disturbances without needing heavy numerical computation. A special attention is devoted to ocean loading for stations close to oceans (e.g. Matsushiro station in Japon (MAJO)), and to pressure correction when barometric data are available. Interesting observations are made for vertical seismometric components; in particular, we found a pressure admittance between pressure and data 10 times larger than for gravimeters for periods larger than 1 day, while this admittance reaches the usual value of -3.5 nm/s 2/mbar for periods below 3 h. This observation may be due to instrumental noise, but the exact mechanism is not yet understood.

  16. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Mi. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines (HATTs). First, an HATT blade was designed using the blade element momentum method in conjunction with a genetic optimization algorithm. Several unstructured computational grids were generated using this blade geometry and steady CFD simulations were used to perform a grid resolution study. Transient simulations were then performed to determine the effect of time-dependent flow phenomena and the size of the computational timestep on the numerical solution. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  17. Spaceflight Operations Services Grid (SOSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Thigpen, William W.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to adapt existing space flight operations services to new emerging Grid technologies we are developing a Grid-based prototype space flight operations Grid. This prototype is based on the operational services being provided to the International Space Station's Payload operations located at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama. The prototype services will be Grid or Web enabled and provided to four user communities through portal technology. Users will have the opportunity to assess the value and feasibility of Grid technologies to their specific areas or disciplines. In this presentation descriptions of the prototype development, User-based services, Grid-based services and status of the project will be presented. Expected benefits, findings and observations (if any) to date will also be discussed. The focus of the presentation will be on the project in general, status to date and future plans. The End-use services to be included in the prototype are voice, video, telemetry, commanding, collaboration tools and visualization among others. Security is addressed throughout the project and is being designed into the Grid technologies and standards development. The project is divided into three phases. Phase One establishes the baseline User-based services required for space flight operations listed above. Phase Two involves applying Gridlweb technologies to the User-based services and development of portals for access by users. Phase Three will allow NASA and end users to evaluate the services and determine the future of the technology as applied to space flight operational services. Although, Phase One, which includes the development of the quasi-operational User-based services of the prototype, development will be completed by March 2004, the application of Grid technologies to these services will have just begun. We will provide status of the Grid technologies to the individual User-based services. This effort will result in an extensible

  18. Additional Security Considerations for Grid Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidson, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of Grid computing environments is growing in popularity. A Grid computing environment is primarily a wide area network that encompasses multiple local area networks, where some of the local area networks are managed by different organizations. A Grid computing environment also includes common interfaces for distributed computing software so that the heterogeneous set of machines that make up the Grid can be used more easily. The other key feature of a Grid is that the distributed computing software includes appropriate security technology. The focus of most Grid software is on the security involved with application execution, file transfers, and other remote computing procedures. However, there are other important security issues related to the management of a Grid and the users who use that Grid. This note discusses these additional security issues and makes several suggestions as how they can be managed.

  19. Idealised simulations of open cellular convection and horizontal wind fluctuations over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Hahmann, Andrea; Pinson, Pierre; Giebel, Gregor

    2010-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to study the skill, sensitivity and limitations of a mesoscale model in predicting wind speed fluctuations on time scales of tens of minutes to hours. The work was motivated by the severely variable wind conditions that are often observed at the Horns Rev wind farm in the Danish North Sea. From a wind energy perspective, such fluctuations present challenges for both electricity transmission system operators, who must ensure reliability of the electricity grid, and wind farm operators, who must avoid financial losses associated with sudden and unexpected dips in wind power. Good forecasts of the onset of severely variable wind conditions are one way of increasing preparedness for such events. WRF was first used to model an episode of intense wind fluctuations that was observed at an offshore meteorological mast near the Horns Rev wind farm on 23-24th October 2002. WRF was able to reproduce large fluctuations in horizontal wind speed with a similar frequency to that of the observed wind fluctuations. Building on this result, WRF was then set up in an idealised framework as a simple simulation of wind blowing over water. The initialisation of the model was based on the actual conditions during a severely variable wind event over the North Sea. The benefit of running the model in an idealised mode was that individual aspects of model performance could be clearly isolated. During the first few hours of simulation, WRF produced unrealistic fluctuations in wind speed that were dominated by the horizontal grid spacing of the model. After 4 to 5 hours, realistic open cellular convection developed, with large fluctuations in horizontal wind speed similar to those observed in the real case. The structure of the convective cells had a spatial scale of about 30 km, which corresponded closely to cloud patterns seen in a visual satellite picture from the same event. The scale of the cells was largely invariant to changes

  20. Modeling flow into horizontal wells in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Henk; Kuzin, Sergey; Kelson, Vic; Abrams, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal wells or radial collector wells are used in shallow aquifers to enhance water withdrawal rates. Groundwater flow patterns near these wells are three-dimensional (3D), but difficult to represent in a 3D numerical model because of the high degree of grid refinement needed. However, for the purpose of designing water withdrawal systems, it is sufficient to obtain the correct production rate of these wells for a given drawdown. We developed a Cauchy boundary condition along a horizontal well in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model. Such a steady-state 2D model is not only useful for predicting groundwater withdrawal rates but also for capture zone delineation in the context of source water protection. A comparison of our Dupuit-Forchheimer model for a radial collector well with a 3D model yields a nearly exact production rate. Particular attention is given to horizontal wells that extend underneath a river. A comparison of our approach with a 3D solution for this case yields satisfactory results, at least for moderate-to-large river bottom resistances.

  1. Best Practices In Overset Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Gomez, Reynaldo J., III; Rogers, Stuart E.; Buning, Pieter G.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Grid generation for overset grids on complex geometry can be divided into four main steps: geometry processing, surface grid generation, volume grid generation and domain connectivity. For each of these steps, the procedures currently practiced by experienced users are described. Typical problems encountered are also highlighted and discussed. Most of the guidelines are derived from experience on a variety of problems including space launch and return vehicles, subsonic transports with propulsion and high lift devices, supersonic vehicles, rotorcraft vehicles, and turbomachinery.

  2. The National Grid Project: A system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaither, Adam; Gaither, Kelly; Jean, Brian; Remotigue, Michael; Whitmire, John; Soni, Bharat; Thompson, Joe; Dannenhoffer,, John; Weatherill, Nigel

    1995-01-01

    The National Grid Project (NGP) is a comprehensive numerical grid generation software system that is being developed at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center (ERC) for Computational Field Simulation (CFS) at Mississippi State University (MSU). NGP is supported by a coalition of U.S. industries and federal laboratories. The objective of the NGP is to significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to generate a numerical grid for complex geometries and to increase the quality of these grids to enable computational field simulations for applications in industry. A geometric configuration can be discretized into grids (or meshes) that have two fundamental forms: structured and unstructured. Structured grids are formed by intersecting curvilinear coordinate lines and are composed of quadrilateral (2D) and hexahedral (3D) logically rectangular cells. The connectivity of a structured grid provides for trivial identification of neighboring points by incrementing coordinate indices. Unstructured grids are composed of cells of any shape (commonly triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra and hexahedra), but do not have trivial identification of neighbors by incrementing an index. For unstructured grids, a set of points and an associated connectivity table is generated to define unstructured cell shapes and neighboring points. Hybrid grids are a combination of structured grids and unstructured grids. Chimera (overset) grids are intersecting or overlapping structured grids. The NGP system currently provides a user interface that integrates both 2D and 3D structured and unstructured grid generation, a solid modeling topology data management system, an internal Computer Aided Design (CAD) system based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS), a journaling language, and a grid/solution visualization system.

  3. The fundamentals of adaptive grid movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Basic grid point movement schemes are studied. The schemes are referred to as adaptive grids. Weight functions and equidistribution in one dimension are treated. The specification of coefficients in the linear weight, attraction to a given grid or a curve, and evolutionary forces are considered. Curve by curve and finite volume methods are described. The temporal coupling of partial differential equations solvers and grid generators was discussed.

  4. Visual analytics for power grid contingency analysis.

    PubMed

    Pak Chung Wong; Zhenyu Huang; Yousu Chen; Mackey, Patrick; Shuangshuang Jin

    2014-01-01

    Contingency analysis employs different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to any threats. A proposed visual-analytics pipeline for power grid management can transform approximately 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form. Grid operators can examine individual scenarios and devise preventive or mitigation strategies in a timely manner. Power grid engineers have applied the pipeline to a Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model.

  5. Integrating PEVs with Renewables and the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Meintz, Andrew; Markel, Tony; Jun, Myungsoo; Zhang, Jiucai

    2016-06-29

    This presentation is an overview of NREL's Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) efforts toward integrating Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) with renewable energy and the grid. Efforts include managed charging, local power quality, emergency backup power, and bi-directional power flow. Discussion of future vehicle-related activities under the Grid Modernization Initiative by the Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Working Group.

  6. The State of NASA's Information Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Vaziri, Arsi; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Feiereisen, William J.; Thigpen, William; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation transfers the concept of the power grid to information sharing in the NASA community. An information grid of this sort would be characterized as comprising tools, middleware, and services for the facilitation of interoperability, distribution of new technologies, human collaboration, and data management. While a grid would increase the ability of information sharing, it would not necessitate it. The onus of utilizing the grid would rest with the users.

  7. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  8. High accuracy diffuse horizontal irradiance measurements without a shadowband

    SciTech Connect

    Schlemmer, J.A; Michalsky, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    The standard method for measuring diffuse horizontal irradiance uses a fixed shadowband to block direct solar radiation. This method requires a correction for the excess skylight blocked by the band, and this correction varies with sky conditions. Alternately, diffuse horizontal irradiance may be calculated from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance. This method is in error because of angular (cosine) response of the total horizontal pyranometer to direct beam irradiance. This paper describes an improved calculation of diffuse horizontal irradiance from total horizontal and direct normal irradiance using a predetermination of the angular response of the total horizontal pyranometer. We compare these diffuse horizontal irradiance calculations with measurements made with a shading-disk pyranometer that shields direct irradiance using a tracking disk. Results indicate significant improvement in most cases. Remaining disagreement most likely arises from undetected tracking errors and instrument leveling.

  9. 12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, CHESTNUT ST. (lower horizontal line) TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, CHESTNUT ST. (lower horizontal line) TO WALNUT ST. (upper horizontal line), SHOWING SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Power grid complex network evolutions for the smart grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2014-02-01

    The shift towards an energy grid dominated by prosumers (consumers and producers of energy) will inevitably have repercussions on the electricity distribution infrastructure. Today the grid is a hierarchical one delivering energy from large scale facilities to end-users. Tomorrow it will be a capillary infrastructure at the medium and low voltage levels that will support local energy trading among prosumers. We investigate how different network topologies and growth models facilitate a more efficient and reliable network, and how they can facilitate the emergence of a decentralized electricity market. We show how connectivity plays an important role in improving the properties of reliability and path-cost reduction. Our results indicate that a specific type of evolution balances best the ratio between increased connectivity and costs to achieve the network growth.

  11. Stable boundary conditions for Cartesian grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Leveque, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid Euler equations in complicated geometries are solved using a Cartesian grid. This requires solid wall boundary conditions in the irregular grid cells near the boundary. Since these cells may be orders of magnitude smaller than the regular grid cells, stability is a primary concern. An approach to this problem is presented and its use is illustrated.

  12. 75 FR 55306 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... provide an update on NIST's Smart Grid program. The agenda may change to accommodate Committee...

  13. 76 FR 46279 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... should be sent to Office of the National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability, National...

  14. 77 FR 38768 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel transition plan, review the status of the research...

  15. 76 FR 12711 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... will be posted on the Smart Grid Web site at http://www.nist.gov/smartgrid . DATES: The SGAC will...

  16. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  17. Surface Grid Generation in a Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a non-uniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  18. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Samareh-Abolhassani, J.; Stewart, J.E. )

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  20. Multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.; Ober, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    A multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus comprises associating points in each overset grid with processors and using mapped interpolation transformations to communicate intermediate values between processors assigned base and target points of the interpolation transformations. The method allows a multiprocessor computer to operate with effective load balance on overset grid applications.

  1. ITIL and Grid services at GridKa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marten, H.; Koenig, T.

    2010-04-01

    The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) is a new organizational unit of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Founded in February 2008 as a merger of the previous Institute for Scientific Computing of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Computing Centre of the Technical University Karlsruhe, SCC provides a broad spectrum of IT services for 8.000 employees and 18.000 students and carries out research and development in key areas of information technology under the same roof. SCC is also known to host the German WLCG [1] Tier-1 centre GridKa. In order to accompany the merging of the two existing computing centres located at a distance of about 10 km and to provide common first class services for science, SCC has selected the IT service management according to the industrial quasi-standard "IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)" [3] as a strategic element. The paper discusses the implementation of a few ITIL key components from the perspective of a Scientific Computing Centre using examples of Grid services at GridKa.

  2. Projections of Horizontal Water Vapor Transport across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    With a warming Earth's atmosphere, the global water cycle is expected to intensify, a process that is likely to yield changes in the frequency and intensity of hydrological extremes. To quantify such changes over Europe, most previous research has been based upon precipitation scenarios. However, seldom has the horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport IVT) been investigated, a key variable responsible for heavy precipitation events and one that links water source and sink regions. It is hence the aim of this study to assess the projections of IVT across Europe. The Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is the source of the climate model projections. The historical simulations (1979-2005) and two emissions scenarios (2073-2099), or representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) from 22 global circulation models were retrieved and evaluated. In particular, at model grid points across Europe the mean, standard deviation, and the 95th percentile of IVT were calculated for December, January, and February (Boreal winter); and for June, July, and August (Austral winter). The CMIP5 historical multi-model mean closely resembles the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis. In the future under the two emissions scenarios, the IVT increases in magnitude, with the highest percentage changes occurring in the extreme emissions (RCP8.5) scenario; for example, multi-model mean IVT increases of 30% are found in the domain. An evaluation of the low-altitude moisture and winds indicates that higher atmospheric water vapor content is the primary cause of these projected changes.

  3. Study of the Local Horizon. (Spanish Title: Estudio del Horizonte Local.) Estudo do Horizonte Local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-12-01

    The study of the horizon is fundamental to easy the first observations of the students at any education center. A simple model, to be developed in each center, allows to easy the study and comprehension of the rudiments of astronomy. The constructed model is presented in turn as a simple equatorial clock, other models (horizontal and vertical) may be constructed starting from it. El estudio del horizonte es fundamental para poder facilitar las primeras observaciones de los alumnos en un centro educativo. Un simple modelo, que debe realizarse para cada centro, nos permite facilitar el estudio y la comprensión de los primeros rudimentos astronómicos. El modelo construido se presenta a su vez como un sencillo modelo de reloj ecuatorial y a partir de él se pueden construir otros modelos (horizontal y vertical). O estudo do horizonte é fundamental para facilitar as primeiras observações dos alunos num centro educativo. Um modelo simples, que deve ser feito para cada centro, permite facilitar o estudo e a compreensão dos primeiros rudimentos astronômicos. O modelo construído apresenta-se, por sua vez, como um modelo simples de relógio equatorial e a partir dele pode-se construir outros modelos (horizontal e vertical)

  4. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1995-01-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers. 19 figs.

  5. Horizontal core acquisition and orientation for formation evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Skopec, R.A. ); Mann, M.M. ); Grier, S.P. )

    1992-03-01

    The increase in horizontal drilling activity has produced a need for improved coring technology. The development of a reliable horizontal (medium-radius) coring and orientation system has greatly improved the acquisition of information necessary for formation evaluation and reservoir engineering. This paper describes newly developed hardware and methods for obtaining horizontal core sections.

  6. [Extraction of 56 horizontally impacted teeth using dental implanter].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-ping; Liang, Na

    2005-06-01

    50 cases, totally 56 horizontally impacted teeth were extracted using dental implanter to remove the alveolar bone. Another 56 horizontally impacted teeth were extracted using high speed turbine.It's concluded that is a safe and easy way using the dental implanter to remove the horizontally impacted teeth, and the reaction and the complications could be minimized.

  7. Forming blocks speed production of strain gage grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonn, J. L.; Gardner, D. E.

    1965-01-01

    A tool is designed which facilitates the forming of wire grids used in manufacturing strain gage grids. Flattening the grid wire by a cold working process produces a stabilized grid which can be readily handled for storage or shipment.

  8. Vehicle to Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Willett Kempton; Meryl Gardner; Michael Hidrue; Fouad Kamilev; Sachin Kamboj; Jon Lilley; Rodney McGee; George Parsons; Nat Pearre; Keith Trnka

    2010-12-31

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of a two-year DOE-funded project on Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIV) with vehicle to grid power (V2G). The project included several research and development components: an analysis of US driving patterns; an analysis of the market for EVs and V2G-capable EVs; development and testing of GIV components (in-car and in-EVSE); interconnect law and policy; and development and filing of patents. In addition, development activities included GIV manufacturing and licensing of technologies developed under this grant. Also, five vehicles were built and deployed, four for the fleet of the State of Delaware, plus one for the University of Delaware fleet.

  9. Convective mixing in formations with horizontal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenius, Maria T.; Gasda, Sarah E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that convective mixing in porous media flow is important for applications such as saltwater intrusion and geological storage of carbon dioxide. In the latter case, dissolution from the injected phase to the resident brine is assisted by convective mixing, which leads to enhanced storage security through reduced buoyancy. Here, we focus on the effect of horizontal barriers on the efficiency of convective mixing. Previous investigations of the effect of heterogeneity on mixing efficiency have focused on random permeability fields or barriers of small extent compared to the intrinsic finger wavelength. The effect of horizontal barriers of larger extent, such as mudstone inclusions or thin shale deposits, has not been given sufficient attention. We perform detailed numerical investigations to represent the continuous solution of this problem in semi-infinite domains with barriers arranged in a periodic manner. The results show that mass flux into the domain, which is a measure of the efficiency of redistribution of the solute, is inversely proportional to the barrier length and proportional to the horizontal and vertical aperture between the barriers, for the cases studied. The flow structure is complex, and it depends not only on the total area of barriers but also largely on the distribution of barriers. Therefore, neither simple analytical models nor simple upscaling methods that lack information about the flow paths, can be used to predict the behavior. However, we compute the effective vertical permeability by flow-based upscaling and show that it can be used to directly obtain a first-order approximation to the mass flux into the domain.

  10. Towards Modernizing the Electrical Grid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Towards Modernizing the Electrical Grid The Real- Time Middleware Experts Gabriela F. Ciocarlie, PhD Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Real- Time Innovations

  11. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  12. A portal for visualizing grid usage.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; DiCarlo, J.; Allcock, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-08-25

    We introduce a framework for measuring the use of Grid services and exposing simple summary data to an authorized set of Grid users through a JSR168-enabled portal. The sensor framework has been integrated into the Globus Toolkit and allows Grid administrators to have access to a mechanism helping with report and usage statistics. Although the original focus was the reporting of actions in relationship to GridFTP services, the usage service has been expanded to report also on the use of other Grid services.

  13. Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) using helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Yan, Yulong; Liang, Xiaoying; Morrill, Steven; Griffin, Robert J; Corry, Peter; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2016-01-08

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) was designed to treat large tumors while sparing skin, and it is usually delivered with a linear accelerator using a commercially available block or multileaf collimator (LINAC-GRID). For deep-seated (skin to tumor distance (> 8 cm)) tumors, it is always a challenge to achieve adequate tumor dose coverage. A novel method to perform GRID treatment using helical tomotherapy (HT-GRID) was developed at our institution. Our approach allows treating patients by generating a patient-specific virtual GRID block (software-generated) and using IMRT technique to optimize the treatment plan. Here, we report our initial clinical experience using HT-GRID, and dosimetric comparison results between HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. This study evaluates 10 previously treated patients who had deep-seated bulky tumors with complex geometries. Five of these patients were treated with HT-GRID and replanned with LINAC-GRID for comparison. Similarly, five other patients were treated with LINAC-GRID and replanned with HT-GRID for comparison. The prescription was set such that the maximum dose to the GTV is 20 Gy in a single fraction. Dosimetric parameters compared included: mean GTV dose (DGTV mean), GTV dose inhomogeneity (valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPR)), normal tissue doses (DNmean), and other organs-at-risk (OARs) doses. In addition, equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for both GTV and normal tissue were evaluated. In summary, HT-GRID technique is patient-specific, and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to match different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deep-seated and cannot be adequately treated with LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DGTV mean, EUD, and VPR compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers a higher DNmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID plans also have more options for tumors with complex anatomical relationships between the GTV and the avoidance OARs (abutment or close proximity).

  14. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Mark G. Beckett, Paul Coddington, Bálint Joó, Chris M. Maynard, Dirk Pleiter, Osamu Tatebe, Tomoteru Yoshie

    2011-06-01

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid-of-grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file-format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the two years of production.

  15. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  16. Evaluating the Effects of Horizontal Spatial Discretization on Interflow in the Soil Zone Using the Richards and Groundwater Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In many mountainous regions, a large proportion of streamflow originates as shallow subsurface storm flow (interflow) within the shallow soils of hillslopes. Infiltration can accumulate to form perched groundwater within the upper few meters of the soil horizon that drains to streams through both macropores and soil-matrix. Richards Equation has become a commonly used governing equation for simulating interflow in regional-scale models. Recent research has shown that optimal vertical discretization for Richards Equation near land surface and the water table is much smaller than the discretization typically used in basin-scale hydrologic models, yet little is known about optimal horizontal discretization or potential effects of horizontal discretization on interflow solutions. Most of the work related to the effects of discretization on the solution of Richards Equation has focused on the vertical infiltration problem. This study evaluates horizontal spatial discretization effects on interflow predictions using 1) a modified version of GSFLOW and 2) VS2DT. The modified GSFLOW couples Smith-Parlange 1-D infiltration equations with 3-D unconfined groundwater flow equation, whereas VS2DT uses Richards Equation to represent infiltration and variably saturated flow. Interflow solutions and breakthrough at the stream were compared using a model domain similar to Vauclin and others (1979) with horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 0.05-5m and vertical resolutions ranging between 0.05-1m, with horizontal flow path lengths of 25m to the stream. Variable horizontal spatial resolutions affected VS2DT interflow solutions (RMSE up to 0.12) and interflow breakthrough at the stream, whereas GSFLOW solutions were well correlated (RMSE <0.052). Interflow breakthrough was delayed by up to 10 days with increasing resolution in VS2DT, whereas GSFLOW breakthrough was consistently the same day. Results indicate that the solution of Richards Equation for soil-zone interflow is much

  17. Horizontal axis Levitron—a physics demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the ‘spignet’. Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic resonance imaging, particle traps and the movement of bodies in space. Longitudinal and lateral bounce behaviour is explained via ‘the principle of gentle superposition’ of two traps: the micro-precessional and the macro-trap. Theory is initiated. Scaling experiments are mentioned. Industrial applications might follow. Patent pending.

  18. Fluidization of a horizontally driven granular monolayer.

    PubMed

    Heckel, Michael; Sack, Achim; Kollmer, Jonathan E; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    We consider the transition of a horizontally vibrated monodisperse granular monolayer between its condensed state and its three-dimensional gaseous state as a function of the vibration parameters, amplitude, and frequency as well as particle number density. The transition is characterized by an abrupt change of the dynamical state which leaves its fingerprints in several measurable quantities including dissipation rate, sound emission, and a gap size which characterizes the sloshing motion of the material. The transition and its pronounced hysteresis is explained through the energy due to the collective motion of the particles relative to the container.

  19. Does horizontal transmission invalidate cultural phylogenies?

    PubMed Central

    Greenhill, Simon J.; Currie, Thomas E.; Gray, Russell D.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic methods have recently been applied to studies of cultural evolution. However, it has been claimed that the large amount of horizontal transmission that sometimes occurs between cultural groups invalidates the use of these methods. Here, we use a natural model of linguistic evolution to simulate borrowing between languages. The results show that tree topologies constructed with Bayesian phylogenetic methods are robust to realistic levels of borrowing. Inferences about divergence dates are slightly less robust and show a tendency to underestimate dates. Our results demonstrate that realistic levels of reticulation between cultures do not invalidate a phylogenetic approach to cultural and linguistic evolution. PMID:19324763

  20. The CMS integration grid testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  1. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  2. Certainty grids for mobile robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moravec, H. P.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical representation of uncertain and incomplete sensor knowledge called Certainty Grids has been used successfully in several mobile robot control programs, and has proven itself to be a powerful and efficient unifying solution for sensor fusion, motion planning, landmark identification, and many other central problems. Researchers propose to build a software framework running on processors onboard the new Uranus mobile robot that will maintain a probabilistic, geometric map of the robot's surroundings as it moves. The certainty grid representation will allow this map to be incrementally updated in a uniform way from various sources including sonar, stereo vision, proximity and contact sensors. The approach can correctly model the fuzziness of each reading, while at the same time combining multiple measurements to produce sharper map features, and it can deal correctly with uncertainties in the robot's motion. The map will be used by planning programs to choose clear paths, identify locations (by correlating maps), identify well-known and insufficiently sensed terrain, and perhaps identify objects by shape. The certainty grid representation can be extended in the same dimension and used to detect and track moving objects.

  3. Telemedical applications and grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Schlag, Peter M.; Kaiser, Silvan; Albayrak, Sahin

    2005-11-01

    Due to the experience in the exploitation of previous European telemedicine projects an open Euro-Mediterranean consortium proposes the Virtual Euro-Mediterranean Hospital (VEMH) initiative. The provision of the same advanced technologies to the European and Mediterranean Countries should contribute to their better dialogue for integration. VEMH aims to facilitate the interconnection of various services through real integration which must take into account the social, human and cultural dimensions. VEMH will provide a platform consisting of a satellite and terrestrial link for the application of medical e-learning, real-time telemedicine and medical assistance. The methodologies for the VEMH are medical-needs-driven instead of technology-driven. They supply new management tools for virtual medical communities and allow management of clinical outcomes for implementation of evidence-based medicine. Due to the distributed character of the VEMH Grid technology becomes inevitable for successful deployment of the services. Existing Grid Engines provide basic computing power needed by today's medical analysis tasks but lack other capabilities needed for communication and knowledge sharing services envisioned. When it comes to heterogeneous systems to be shared by different institutions especially the high level system management areas are still unsupported. Therefore a Metagrid Engine is needed that provides a superset of functionalities across different Grid Engines and manages strong privacy and Quality of Service constraints at this comprehensive level.

  4. Grid artifact reduction for direct digital radiography detectors based on rotated stationary grids with homomorphic filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Grid artifacts are caused when using the antiscatter grid in obtaining digital x-ray images. In this paper, research on grid artifact reduction techniques is conducted especially for the direct detectors, which are based on amorphous selenium. Methods: In order to analyze and reduce the grid artifacts, the authors consider a multiplicative grid image model and propose a homomorphic filtering technique. For minimal damage due to filters, which are used to suppress the grid artifacts, rotated grids with respect to the sampling direction are employed, and min-max optimization problems for searching optimal grid frequencies and angles for given sampling frequencies are established. The authors then propose algorithms for the grid artifact reduction based on the band-stop filters as well as low-pass filters. Results: The proposed algorithms are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from direct detectors with the rotated grids, and are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that the proposed algorithms can successfully reduce the grid artifacts for direct detectors. Conclusions: By employing the homomorphic filtering technique, the authors can considerably suppress the strong grid artifacts with relatively narrow-bandwidth filters compared to the normal filtering case. Using rotated grids also significantly reduces the ringing artifact. Furthermore, for specific grid frequencies and angles, the authors can use simple homomorphic low-pass filters in the spatial domain, and thus alleviate the grid artifacts with very low implementation complexity.

  5. GridMol: a grid application for molecular modeling and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Shen, Bin; Lu, Zhonghua; Jin, Zhong; Chi, Xuebin

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we present GridMol, an extensible tool for building a high performance computational chemistry platform in the grid environment. GridMol provides computational chemists one-stop service for molecular modeling, scientific computing and molecular information visualization. GridMol is not only a visualization and modeling tool but also simplifies control of remote Grid software that can access high performance computing resources. GridMol has been successfully integrated into China National Grid, the most powerful Chinese Grid Computing platform. In Section "Grid computing" of this paper, a computing example is given to show the availability and efficiency of GridMol. GridMol is coded using Java and Java3D for portability and cross-platform compatibility (Windows, Linux, MacOS X and UNIX). GridMol can run not only as a stand-alone application, but also as an applet through web browsers. In this paper, we will present the techniques for molecular visualization, molecular modeling and grid computing. GridMol is available free of charge under the GNU Public License (GPL) from our website: http://www.sccas.cn/ syh/GridMol/index.html.

  6. Effects of ocean grid resolution on tropical cyclone-induced upper ocean responses using a global ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Sriver, Ryan L.

    2016-11-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have the potential to influence regional and global climate through interactions with the upper ocean. Here we present results from a suite of ocean-only model experiments featuring the Community Earth System Model, in which we analyze the effect of tropical cyclone wind forcing on the global ocean using three different horizontal ocean grid resolutions (3°, 1°, and 0.1°). The ocean simulations are forced with identical atmospheric inputs from the Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments version 2 (COREv2) normal year forcing conditions, featuring global blended TC winds from a fully coupled CESM simulation with a 25 km atmosphere. The simulated TC climatology shows good agreement with observational estimates of annual TC statistics, including annual frequency, intensity distributions, and geographic distributions. Each ocean simulation is composed of a 5 year spin-up with COREv2 normal year forcing, followed by 18 months with blended TC winds. In addition, we conduct corresponding control simulations for each grid resolution configuration without blended TC winds. We find that ocean horizontal and vertical grid resolutions affect TC-induced heat and momentum fluxes, poststorm cold wake features, and ocean subsurface temperature profiles. The responses are amplified for smaller grid spacing. Moreover, analyses show that the annually accumulated TC-induced ocean heat uptake is also sensitive to ocean grid resolution, which may have important implications for modeled ocean heat budgets and variability.

  7. Interactive solution-adaptive grid generation procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Todd L.; Choo, Yung K.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    TURBO-AD is an interactive solution adaptive grid generation program under development. The program combines an interactive algebraic grid generation technique and a solution adaptive grid generation technique into a single interactive package. The control point form uses a sparse collection of control points to algebraically generate a field grid. This technique provides local grid control capability and is well suited to interactive work due to its speed and efficiency. A mapping from the physical domain to a parametric domain was used to improve difficulties encountered near outwardly concave boundaries in the control point technique. Therefore, all grid modifications are performed on the unit square in the parametric domain, and the new adapted grid is then mapped back to the physical domain. The grid adaption is achieved by adapting the control points to a numerical solution in the parametric domain using control sources obtained from the flow properties. Then a new modified grid is generated from the adapted control net. This process is efficient because the number of control points is much less than the number of grid points and the generation of the grid is an efficient algebraic process. TURBO-AD provides the user with both local and global controls.

  8. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  9. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  10. Getting a Grip on Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    GridPro is an automatic, object-oriented, multi-block grid generator that provides ease of use, high quality, rapid production, and parametric design. When paired with a 3-D graphic user interface called az- Manager, GridPro presents users with an extremely efficient, interactive capability to build topology, edit surfaces, set computational fluid dynamics (CFD) boundary conditions, and view multi-block grids. The origins of the GridPro technology date back to a 1989 SBIR contract with NASA's Glenn Research Center, in which Glenn was seeking a multi-block grid generation program that would run automatically upon identifying a pattern of grid blocks supplied by a user. The technology is currently used in many engineering fields, including aerospace, turbo- machinery, automotive, and chemical industries.

  11. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Craig, Anthony P.; Bates, Susan C.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.

    2016-02-25

    This article discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric grid cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere–ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.

  12. Matrix stimulation method for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Economides, M.J.; Naceur, K.B.; Klem, R.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Well-performance forecasts suggests that many horizontal wells could be good candidates for matrix stimulation, even in certain reservoirs where vertical wells should be stimulated only by hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents a technique for the matrix treatment of horizontal wells to allow uniform distribution of the stimulation fluids. It involves pumping a reactive fluid through coiled tubing and an inert fluid through the coiled-tubing/well annulus. The well is completed with either a slotted liner or a cemented and perforated casing. The coiled tubing, placed at the farthest end of the well is retrieved gradually at a rate dependent on the injection rate. Both rates are calculated and are contingent upon reservoir and well properties and upon desired stimulation-fluid coverage. The complex phenomenon of acid stimulation involves different rheological properties between acid and the inert fluid, simultaneous mass transfer and reaction kinetics, and for carbonate reservoirs, such instabilities as wormhole growth. Acid-volume distributions along the well are presented for cases with and without coiled tubing. This paper details the procedures for this treatment, discusses hardware configurations, and outlines recommended fluids, additives, and rates.

  13. Reservoir visualization for geosteering of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, I.D.; Baygun, B.; Frass, M.; Casco, R.

    1996-08-01

    Horizontal infill wells in the Lower Lagunillas reservoir of Bloque IV, Lake Maracaibo are being drilled in thin, oil-bearing zones that have been bypassed by gas. Steering the horizontal sections of these wells requires high resolution reservoir models that can be updated during drilling. An example from well VLD-1152 serves to illustrate how these models are generated and used. Resistivity images collected by wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools in the pilot well formed the basis of prejob, high resolution modeling of the formation properties. 3-D seismic data and data from an offset vertical seismic profile collected in the pilot well provided the structural model. During drilling information from cuttings and LWD tools was used to continuously update these models. After the well had been drilled, analysis of LWD resistivity images provided a detailed model of the relationship between the well trajectory and the dip of the formation. This information is used to improve interpretation of the LWD logs to provide a petrophysical evaluation of the well.

  14. Improving mobile robot localization: grid-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Junchi

    2012-02-01

    Autonomous mobile robots have been widely studied not only as advanced facilities for industrial and daily life automation, but also as a testbed in robotics competitions for extending the frontier of current artificial intelligence. In many of such contests, the robot is supposed to navigate on the ground with a grid layout. Based on this observation, we present a localization error correction method by exploring the geometric feature of the tile patterns. On top of the classical inertia-based positioning, our approach employs three fiber-optic sensors that are assembled under the bottom of the robot, presenting an equilateral triangle layout. The sensor apparatus, together with the proposed supporting algorithm, are designed to detect a line's direction (vertical or horizontal) by monitoring the grid crossing events. As a result, the line coordinate information can be fused to rectify the cumulative localization deviation from inertia positioning. The proposed method is analyzed theoretically in terms of its error bound and also has been implemented and tested on a customary developed two-wheel autonomous mobile robot.

  15. Modelling coastal low-level wind-jets: does horizontal resolution matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjha, Raza; Tjernström, Michael; Svensson, Gunilla; Semedo, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric flows in coastal regions are impacted by land-sea temperature contrasts, complex terrain, shape of the coastline, among many things. Along the west coast of central North America, winds in the boundary layer are mainly from north or northwest, roughly parallel to the coastline. Frequently, the coastal low-level wind field is characterized by a sharp wind maximum along the coast in the lowest kilometre. This feature, commonly referred to as a coastal low-level jet (CLLJ), has significant impact on the climatology of the coastal region and affects many human activities in the littoral zone. Hence, a good understanding and forecasting of CLLJs are vital. This study evaluates the issue of proper mesoscale numerical model resolution to describe the physics of a CLLJ, and its impact on the upper ocean. The COAMPS® model is used for a summer event to determine the realism of the model results compared to observations, from an area of supercritical flow adjustment between Pt. Sur and Pt. Conception, California. Simulations at different model horizontal resolutions, from 54 to 2 km are performed. While the model produces realistic results with increasing details at higher resolution, the results do not fully converge even at a resolution of only few kilometres and an objective analysis of model errors do not show an increased skill with increasing resolution. Based on all available information, a compromise resolution appears to be at least 6 km. New methods may have to be developed to evaluate models at very high resolution.

  16. Globally Gridded Satellite (GridSat) Observations for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Kenneth R.; Ansari, Steve; Bain, Caroline L.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Dickinson, Michael J.; Funk, Chris; Helms, Chip N.; Hennon, Christopher C.; Holmes, Christopher D.; Huffman, George J.; Kossin, James P.; Lee, Hai-Tien; Loew, Alexander; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them: there is no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multi-satellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full resolution geostationary data at approx.10 km resolution at 3 hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA s National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in the netCDF format using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to quickly and easily process the data. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  17. Effects of grid size and aggregation on regional scale landuse scenario calculations using SVAT schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, H.

    2006-09-01

    This paper analyses the effect of spatial input data resolution on the simulated effects of regional scale landuse scenarios using the TOPLATS model. A data set of 25 m resolution of the central German Dill catchment (693 km2) and three different landuse scenarios are used for the investigation. Landuse scenarios in this study are field size scenarios, and depending on a specific target field size (0.5 ha, 1.5 ha and 5.0 ha) landuse is determined by optimising economic outcome of agricultural used areas and forest. After an aggregation of digital elevation model, soil map, current landuse and landuse scenarios to 50 m, 75 m, 100 m, 150 m, 200 m, 300 m, 500 m, 1 km and 2 km, water balances and water flow components for a 20 years time period are calculated for the entire Dill catchment as well as for 3 subcatchments without any recalibration. Additionally water balances based on the three landuse scenarios as well as changes between current conditions and scenarios are calculated. The study reveals that both model performance measures (for current landuse) as well as water balances (for current landuse and landuse scenarios) almost remain constant for most of the aggregation steps for all investigated catchments. Small deviations are detected at the resolution of 50 m to 500 m, while significant differences occur at the resolution of 1 km and 2 km which can be explained by changes in the statistics of the input data. Calculating the scenario effects based on increasing grid sizes yields similar results. However, the change effects react more sensitive to data aggregation than simple water balance calculations. Increasing deviations between simulations based on small grid sizes and simulations using grid sizes of 300 m and more are observed. Summarizing, this study indicates that an aggregation of input data for the calculation of regional water balances using TOPLATS type models does not lead to significant errors up to a resolution of 500 m. Focusing on scenario

  18. Estimating the horizontal and vertical direction-of-arrival of water-borne seismic signals in the northern Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Simon E; D'Spain, Gerald L; Lynch, Stephen D; Stephen, Ralph A; Heaney, Kevin D; Murray, James J; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A

    2013-10-01

    Conventional and adaptive plane-wave beamforming with simultaneous recordings by large-aperture horizontal and vertical line arrays during the 2009 Philippine Sea Engineering Test (PhilSea09) reveal the rate of occurrence and the two-dimensional arrival structure of seismic phases that couple into the deep ocean. A ship-deployed, controlled acoustic source was used to evaluate performance of the horizontal array for a range of beamformer adaptiveness levels. Ninety T-phases from unique azimuths were recorded between Yeardays 107 to 119. T-phase azimuth and S-minus-P-phase time-of-arrival range estimates were validated using United States Geological Survey seismic monitoring network data. Analysis of phases from a seismic event that occurred on Yearday 112 near the east coast of Taiwan approximately 450 km from the arrays revealed a 22° clockwise evolution of T-phase azimuth over 90 s. Two hypotheses to explain such evolution-body wave excitation of multiple sources or in-water scattering-are presented based on T-phase origin sites at the intersection of azimuthal great circle paths and ridge/coastal bathymetry. Propagation timing between the source, scattering region, and array position suggests the mechanism behind the evolution involved scattering of the T-phase from the Ryukyu Ridge and a T-phase formation/scattering location estimation error of approximately 3.2 km.

  19. Web-based visualization of gridded dataset usings OceanBrowser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Watelet, Sylvain; Troupin, Charles; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    OceanBrowser is a web-based visualization tool for gridded oceanographic data sets. Those data sets are typically four-dimensional (longitude, latitude, depth and time). OceanBrowser allows one to visualize horizontal sections at a given depth and time to examine the horizontal distribution of a given variable. It also offers the possibility to display the results on an arbitrary vertical section. To study the evolution of the variable in time, the horizontal and vertical sections can also be animated. Vertical section can be generated by using a fixed distance from coast or fixed ocean depth. The user can customize the plot by changing the color-map, the range of the color-bar, the type of the plot (linearly interpolated color, simple contours, filled contours) and download the current view as a simple image or as Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file for visualization in applications such as Google Earth. The data products can also be accessed as NetCDF files and through OPeNDAP. Third-party layers from a web map service can also be integrated. OceanBrowser is used in the frame of the SeaDataNet project (http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/web-vis/) and EMODNET Chemistry (http://oceanbrowser.net/emodnet/) to distribute gridded data sets interpolated from in situ observation using DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis).

  20. The Dependence on Grid Resolution of Numerically Simulated Convective Cloud Systems Using Ice Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Ferrier, Bradley S.

    1999-01-01

    Mesoscale research and forecast models are increasingly being used at horizontal resolutions of 1-8 km to simulate a variety of precipitating systems. When the model is used to simulate convective systems, it is uncertain to what extent the dynamics and microphysics of convective updrafts can be resolved with grids larger than 1 km. In this study, two- and three-dimensional versions of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model are used to determine the impact of horizontal grid resolution on the behavior of the simulated storms and on the characteristics of the cloud microphysical fields. It will be shown that as resolution decreases from about 1 km to greater than 3 km, there is a fairly rapid degradation of the storm structure in the form of reduced convective mass fluxes, updraft tilts, and cloud microphysics. A high-resolution simulation of hurricane outer rainbands using the MM5 mesoscale model shows also that there can be a substantial modification of the key microphysical processes that contribute to rainfall as a result of reducing the horizontal resolution.

  1. Global ocean simulations by HYCOM on icosahedral and logically rectangular grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shan; Bleck, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    iHYCOM, short for "icosahedral HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model", is being developed at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. The purpose of formulating HYCOM on an icosahedral grid is to allow coupling to an existing icosahedral weather prediction model ("FIM", see http://fim.noaa.gov) unencumbered by interpolation problems at the air-sea-ice interface. We have tested the traditional HYCOM, formulated on a Mercator grid augmented by a bipolar pole patch, with iHYCOM for several decades at comparable horizontal mesh sizes in the 0.5-1.0 deg range, employing the same vertical resolution of 26 potential density (sigma_1) layers. These comparison runs were forced by CORE (Common Ocean-Ice Reference Experiment) fields. Several performance measures indicate that formulating HYCOM on an icosahedral mesh is feasible, although a numerically stable barotropic-baroclinic mode splitting scheme is not available yet. We compare the large scale circulations simulated by both model versions and investigate the model sensitivity to different horizontal grids.

  2. Insightful Workflow For Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Charles Earl

    2008-10-09

    We developed a workflow adaptation and scheduling system for Grid workflow. The system currently interfaces with and uses the Karajan workflow system. We developed machine learning agents that provide the planner/scheduler with information needed to make decisions about when and how to replan. The Kubrick restructures workflow at runtime, making it unique among workflow scheduling systems. The existing Kubrick system provides a platform on which to integrate additional quality of service constraints and in which to explore the use of an ensemble of scheduling and planning algorithms. This will be the principle thrust of our Phase II work.

  3. Bootstrapping to a Semantic Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Schwidder, Jens; Talbott, Tara; Myers, James D.

    2005-02-28

    The Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) is a set of components and services that enable researchers, applications, problem solving environments (PSE) and software agents to create metadata and annotations about data objects and document the semantic relationships between them. Developed starting in 2001, SAM allows applications to encode metadata within files or to manage metadata at the level of individual relationships as desired. SAM then provides mechanisms to expose metadata and relation¬ships encoded either way as WebDAV properties. In this paper, we report on work to further map this metadata into RDF and discuss the role of middleware such as SAM in bridging between traditional and semantic grid applications.

  4. Information in environmental data grids.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, B N; Lowry, R; Miller, P; Snaith, H; Woolf, A

    2009-03-13

    Providing homogeneous access ('services') to heterogeneous environmental data distributed across heterogeneous computing systems on a wide area network requires a robust information paradigm that can mediate between differing storage and information formats. While there are a number of ISO standards that provide some guidance on how to do this, the information landscape within domains is not well described. In this paper, we present an information taxonomy and two information components, which have been built for a specific application. These two components, one to aid data understanding and the other to aid data manipulation, are both deployed in the UK NERC DataGrid as described elsewhere.

  5. Grid computing and biomolecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Ng, Muan Hong; Johnston, Steven; Murdock, Stuart E; Wu, Bing; Tai, Kaihsu; Fangohr, Hans; Jeffreys, Paul; Cox, Simon; Frey, Jeremy G; Sansom, Mark S P; Essex, Jonathan W

    2005-08-15

    Biomolecular computer simulations are now widely used not only in an academic setting to understand the fundamental role of molecular dynamics on biological function, but also in the industrial context to assist in drug design. In this paper, two applications of Grid computing to this area will be outlined. The first, involving the coupling of distributed computing resources to dedicated Beowulf clusters, is targeted at simulating protein conformational change using the Replica Exchange methodology. In the second, the rationale and design of a database of biomolecular simulation trajectories is described. Both applications illustrate the increasingly important role modern computational methods are playing in the life sciences.

  6. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  7. Method for horizontally growing ribbon crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudo, B.

    1980-01-01

    A high speed method for forming ribbon crystal of desired width and thickness is characterized by drawing out the ribbon through a space whose distance is 5.7 times that of the thickness of the grown ribbon. The ribbon is drawn out between the molten body of the lower surface and the tip of the upper surface of the seed crystal and growing crystal. The ribbon growing at the tip of the seed crystal is drawn out horizontally and centrifugally by controlling the amount of cooling and heating. The temperature is maintained about equal to the upper surface of the outlets from which the molten substance is drawn, at least in certain portions of the crucible rim, the rim is elevated to prevent dropping of the molten raw material.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer: A critical view

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, C. G.; Canback, B.; Berg, Otto G.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the “essence of phylogeny.” In contrast, much data suggest that this is an exaggeration resulting in part from a reliance on inadequate methods to identify HGT events. In addition, the assumption that HGT is a ubiquitous influence throughout evolution is questionable. Instead, rampant global HGT is likely to have been relevant only to primitive genomes. In modern organisms we suggest that both the range and frequencies of HGT are constrained most often by selective barriers. As a consequence those HGT events that do occur most often have little influence on genome phylogeny. Although HGT does occur with important evolutionary consequences, classical Darwinian lineages seem to be the dominant mode of evolution for modern organisms. PMID:12902542

  9. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  10. Horizontal Gene Exchange in Environmental Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the evolution of life on the Earth. This view is supported by numerous occasions of HGT that are recorded in the genomes of all three domains of living organisms. HGT-mediated rapid evolution is especially noticeable among the Bacteria, which demonstrate formidable adaptability in the face of recent environmental changes imposed by human activities, such as the use of antibiotics, industrial contamination, and intensive agriculture. At the heart of the HGT-driven bacterial evolution and adaptation are highly sophisticated natural genetic engineering tools in the form of a variety of mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The main aim of this review is to give a brief account of the occurrence and diversity of MGEs in natural ecosystems and of the environmental factors that may affect MGE-mediated HGT. PMID:21845185

  11. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2017-03-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios ( KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }}); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }}. It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  12. Passive magnetic bearing for a horizontal shaft

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2003-12-02

    A passive magnetic bearing is composed of a levitation element and a restorative element. The levitation element is composed of a pair of stationary arcuate ferromagnetic segments located within an annular radial-field magnet array. The magnet array is attached to the inner circumference of a hollow shaft end. An attractive force between the arcuate segments and the magnet array acts vertically to levitate the shaft, and also in a horizontal transverse direction to center the shaft. The restorative element is comprised of an annular Halbach array of magnets and a stationary annular circuit array located within the Halbach array. The Halbach array is attached to the inner circumference of the hollow shaft end. A repulsive force between the Halbach array and the circuit array increases inversely to the radial space between them, and thus acts to restore the shaft to its equilibrium axis of rotation when it is displaced therefrom.

  13. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    A.K. Scheider

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer in parasitic plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Charles C; Xi, Zhenxiang

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between species has been a major focus of plant evolutionary research during the past decade. Parasitic plants, which establish a direct connection with their hosts, have provided excellent examples of how these transfers are facilitated via the intimacy of this symbiosis. In particular, phylogenetic studies from diverse clades indicate that parasitic plants represent a rich system for studying this phenomenon. Here, HGT has been shown to be astonishingly high in the mitochondrial genome, and appreciable in the nuclear genome. Although explicit tests remain to be performed, some transgenes have been hypothesized to be functional in their recipient species, thus providing a new perspective on the evolution of novelty in parasitic plants.

  15. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  16. Reservoir property grids improve with geostatistics

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, J. . E and P Technology Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    Visualization software, reservoir simulators and many other E and P software applications need reservoir property grids as input. Using geostatistics, as compared to other gridding methods, to produce these grids leads to the best output from the software programs. For the purpose stated herein, geostatistics is simply two types of gridding methods. Mathematically, these methods are based on minimizing or duplicating certain statistical properties of the input data. One geostatical method, called kriging, is used when the highest possible point-by-point accuracy is desired. The other method, called conditional simulation, is used when one wants statistics and texture of the resulting grid to be the same as for the input data. In the following discussion, each method is explained, compared to other gridding methods, and illustrated through example applications. Proper use of geostatistical data in flow simulations, use of geostatistical data for history matching, and situations where geostatistics has no significant advantage over other methods, also will be covered.

  17. The entorhinal grid map is discretized.

    PubMed

    Stensola, Hanne; Stensola, Tor; Solstad, Trygve; Frøland, Kristian; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2012-12-06

    The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) is part of the brain's circuit for dynamic representation of self-location. The metric of this representation is provided by grid cells, cells with spatial firing fields that tile environments in a periodic hexagonal pattern. Limited anatomical sampling has obscured whether the grid system operates as a unified system or a conglomerate of independent modules. Here we show with recordings from up to 186 grid cells in individual rats that grid cells cluster into a small number of layer-spanning anatomically overlapping modules with distinct scale, orientation, asymmetry and theta-frequency modulation. These modules can respond independently to changes in the geometry of the environment. The discrete topography of the grid-map, and the apparent autonomy of the modules, differ from the graded topography of maps for continuous variables in several sensory systems, raising the possibility that the modularity of the grid map is a product of local self-organizing network dynamics.

  18. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2016-07-12

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  19. An Introduction to Grid Computing Using EGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, John; Coghlan, Brian; Childs, Stephen

    Grid is an evolving and maturing architecture based on several well-established services, including amongst others, distributed computing, role and group management, distributed data management and Public Key Encryption systems Currently the largest scientific grid infrastructure is Enabling Grids e-Science (EGEE), comprised of approximately ˜250 sites, ˜50,000 CPUs and tens of petabytes of storage. Moreover, EGEE covers a large variety of scientific disciplines including Astrophysics. The scope of this work is to provide the keen astrophysicist with an introductory overview of the motivations for using Grid, and of the core production EGEE services and its supporting software and/or middleware (known by the name gLite). We present an overview of the available set of commands, tools and portals as used within these Grid communities. In addition, we present the current scheme for supporting MPI programs on these Grids.

  20. 45 Km Horizontal Path Optical Link Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Ceniceros, J.; Novak, M.; Jeganathan, M.; Portillo, A.; Erickson, D.; Depew, J.; Sanii, B.; Lesh, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Mountain-top to mountain-top optical link experiments have been initiated at JPL, in order to perform a systems level evaluation of optical communications. Progress made so far is reported. ne NASA, JPL developed optical communications demonstrator (OCD) is used to transmit a laser signal from Strawberry Peak (SP), located in the San Bernadino mountains of California. This laser beam is received by a 0.6 m aperture telescope at JPL's Table Mountain Facility (TMF), located in Wrightwood, California. The optical link is bi-directional with the TMF telescope transmitting a continuous 4-wave (cw) 780 run beacon and the OCD sending back a 840 nm, 100 - 500 Mbps pseudo noise (PN) modulated, laser beam. The optical link path is at an average altitude of 2 km above sea level, covers a range of 46.8 km and provides an atmospheric channel equivalent to approx. 4 air masses. Average received power measured at either end fall well within the uncertainties predicted by link analysis. The reduction in normalized intensity variance (sigma(sup 2, sub I)) for the 4-beam beacon, compared to each individual beam, at SP, was from approx. 0.68 to 0.22. With some allowance for intra-beam mis-alignment, this is consistent with incoherent averaging. The sigma(sup2, sub I) measured at TMF approx. 0.43 +/- 0.22 exceeded the expected aperture averaged value of less than 0.1, probably because of beam wander. The focused spot sizes of approx. 162 +/- 6 microns at the TMF Coude and approx. 64 +/- 3 microns on the OCD compare to the predicted size range of 52 - 172 microns and 57 - 93 microns, respectively. This is consistent with 4 - 5 arcsec of atmospheric "seeing". The preliminary evaluation of OCD's fine tracking indicates that the uncompensated tracking error is approx. 3.3 micro rad compared to approx. 1.7 micro rad observed in the laboratory. Fine tracking performance was intermittent, primarily due to beacon fades on the OCD tracking sensor. The best bit error rates observed while

  1. Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research

    SciTech Connect

    Virden, Jud; Huang, Henry; Skare, Paul; Dagle, Jeff; Imhoff, Carl; Stoustrup, Jakob; Melton, Ron; Stiles, Dennis; Pratt, Rob

    2015-08-19

    Researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle the nation’s most pressing energy challenges through PNNL’s new Systems Engineering Building – including challenges in grid modernization, buildings efficiency and renewable energy integration. This lab links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.

  2. Spatial data grid based on CDN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, XiaoGuang; Zhu, Xinyan; Li, Deren

    2008-12-01

    This paper firstly introduces the spatial data grid and the CDN (Content Delivery Network) technology. And then it depicts the significance of integrating grid with CDN. On this basis, this paper proposes a method of constructing the spatial data grid system by using CDN to support the massive spatial data online service. Finally, the simulation results by OPNET show that the programme do can improve the system performance, and reduce response time in a greater extent.

  3. FINAL REPORT - CENTER FOR GRID MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, Daniel R

    2008-06-30

    The objective of the CGM was to develop high-priority grid modernization technologies in advanced sensors, communications, controls and smart systems to enable use of real-time or near real-time information for monitoring, analyzing and managing distribution and transmission grid conditions. The key strategic approach to carry out individual CGM research and development (R&D) projects was through partnerships, primarily with the GridApp™ Consortium utility members.

  4. Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research

    ScienceCinema

    Virden, Jud; Huang, Henry; Skare, Paul; Dagle, Jeff; Imhoff, Carl; Stoustrup, Jakob; Melton, Ron; Stiles, Dennis; Pratt, Rob

    2016-07-12

    Researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle the nation’s most pressing energy challenges through PNNL’s new Systems Engineering Building – including challenges in grid modernization, buildings efficiency and renewable energy integration. This lab links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.

  5. Grid generation on surfaces in 3 dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a surface grid generation algorithm was initiated. The basic adaptive movement technique of mean-value-relaxation was extended from the viewpoint of a single coordinate grid over a surface described by a single scalar function to that of a surface more generally defined by vector functions and covered by a collection of smoothly connected grids. Within the multiconnected assemblage, the application of control was examined in several instances.

  6. Improved Gridded Aerosol Data for India

    SciTech Connect

    Gueymard, C.; Sengupta, M.

    2013-11-01

    Using point data from ground sites in and around India equipped with multiwavelength sunphotometers, as well as gridded data from space measurements or from existing aerosol climatologies, an improved gridded database providing the monthly aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) and Angstrom exponent (AE) over India is produced. Data from 83 sunphotometer sites are used here as ground truth tocalibrate, optimally combine, and validate monthly gridded data during the period from 2000 to 2012.

  7. Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, John; Kaplan, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

  8. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  9. Grids for Dummies: Featuring Earth Science Data Mining Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas H.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the concept and advantages of linking computers together into data grids, an emerging technology for managing information across institutions, and potential users of data grids. The logistics of access to a grid, including the use of the World Wide Web to access grids, and security concerns are also discussed. The potential usefulness of data grids to the earth science community is also discussed, as well as the Global Grid Forum, and other efforts to establish standards for data grids.

  10. A Moving Grid Capability for NPARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Version 3.1 of the NPARC computational fluid dynamics flow solver introduces a capability to solve unsteady flow on moving multi-block, structured grids with nominally second-order time accuracy. The grid motion is due to segments of the boundary grid that translate and rotate in a rigid-body manner or deform. The grid is regenerated at each time step to accommodate the boundary grid motion. The flow equations and computational models sense the moving grid through the grid velocities, which are computed from a time-difference of the grids at two consecutive time levels. For three-dimensional flow domains, it is assumed that the grid retains a planar character with respect to one coordinate. The application and accuracy of NPARC v3.1 is demonstrated for flow about a flying wedge, rotating flap, a collapsing bump in a duct, and the upstart / restart flow in a variable-geometry inlet. The results compare well with analytic and experimental results.

  11. Workshop on Grid Generation and Related Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of papers given at the Workshop on Grid Generation and Related Areas is presented. The purpose of this workshop was to assemble engineers and scientists who are currently working on grid generation for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), surface modeling, and related areas. The objectives were to provide an informal forum on grid generation and related topics, to assess user experience, to identify needs, and to help promote synergy among engineers and scientists working in this area. The workshop consisted of four sessions representative of grid generation and surface modeling research and application within NASA LeRC. Each session contained presentations and an open discussion period.

  12. Effects of grids in drift tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura M.; Yamauchi, H.

    2012-05-20

    In 2011, we upgraded a 201 MHz buncher in the proton injector for the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) - relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) complex. In the buncher we installed four grids made of tungsten to improve the transit time factor. The grid installed drift tubes have 32 mm of inner diameter and the each grid consists of four quadrants. The quadrants were cut out precisely from 1mm thick tungsten plates by a computerized numerically controlled (CNC) wire cutting electrical discharge machining (EDM). The 3D electric field of the grid was simulated.

  13. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  14. Electron Backstreaming Mitigation via a Magnetic Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John F.; Roman, Robert F.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Electron backstreaming due to accelerator grid hole enlargement has been identified as a failure mechanism that will limit ion thruster service lifetime. Over extended periods of time as accelerator grid apertures enlarge due to erosion, ion thrusters are required to operate at increasingly higher accelerator grid voltages in order to prevent electron backstreaming. These higher voltages give rise to higher grid erosion rates, which in turn accelerates aperture enlargement. Presented here is an approach to mitigate the backflow of electrons into the engine by using a transverse magnetic field.

  15. Best Practices for Unstructured Grid Shock Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    Unstructured grid solvers have well-known issues predicting surface heat fluxes when strong shocks are present. Various efforts have been made to address the underlying numerical issues that cause the erroneous predictions. The present work addresses some of the shortcomings of unstructured grid solvers, not by addressing the numerics, but by applying structured grid best practices to unstructured grids. A methodology for robust shock detection and shock fitting is outlined and applied to production relevant cases. Results achieved by using the Loci-CHEM Computational Fluid Dynamics solver are provided.

  16. Spaceflight Operations Services Grid (SOSG) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert; Lisotta, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    The motivation, goals, and objectives of the Space Operations Services Grid Project (SOSG) are covered in this viewgraph presentation. The goals and objectives of SOSG include: 1) Developing a grid-enabled prototype providing Space-based ground operations end user services through a collaborative effort between NASA, academia, and industry to assess the technical and cost feasibility of implementation of Grid technologies in the Space Operations arena; 2) Provide to space operations organizations and processes, through a single secure portal(s), access to all the information technology (Grid and Web based) services necessary for program/project development, operations and the ultimate creation of new processes, information and knowledge.

  17. Development of a smart DC grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalimunthe, Amty Ma'rufah Ardhiyah; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-01

    Smart grid and distributed generation should be the solution of the global climate change and the crisis energy of the main source of electrical power generation which is fossil fuel. In order to meet the rising electrical power demand and increasing service quality demands, as well as reduce pollution, the existing power grid infrastructure should be developed into a smart grid and distributed power generation which provide a great opportunity to address issues related to energy efficiency, energy security, power quality and aging infrastructure systems. The conventional of the existing distributed generation system is an AC grid while for a renewable resources requires a DC grid system. This paper explores the model of smart DC grid by introducing a model of smart DC grid with the stable power generation give a minimal and compressed circuitry that can be implemented very cost-effectively with simple components. The PC based application software for controlling was developed to show the condition of the grid and to control the grid become `smart'. The model is then subjected to a severe system perturbation, such as incremental change in loads to test the performance of the system again stability. It is concluded that the system able to detect and controlled the voltage stability which indicating the ability of power system to maintain steady voltage within permissible rangers in normal condition.

  18. Structured adaptive grid generation using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, Bharat K.; Roger, R. P.; Chan, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical algorithm depends not only on the formal order of approximation but also on the distribution of grid points in the computational domain. Grid adaptation is a procedure which allows optimal grid redistribution as the solution progresses. It offers the prospect of accurate flow field simulations without the use of an excessively timely, computationally expensive, grid. Grid adaptive schemes are divided into two basic categories: differential and algebraic. The differential method is based on a variational approach where a function which contains a measure of grid smoothness, orthogonality and volume variation is minimized by using a variational principle. This approach provided a solid mathematical basis for the adaptive method, but the Euler-Lagrange equations must be solved in addition to the original governing equations. On the other hand, the algebraic method requires much less computational effort, but the grid may not be smooth. The algebraic techniques are based on devising an algorithm where the grid movement is governed by estimates of the local error in the numerical solution. This is achieved by requiring the points in the large error regions to attract other points and points in the low error region to repel other points. The development of a fast, efficient, and robust algebraic adaptive algorithm for structured flow simulation applications is presented. This development is accomplished in a three step process. The first step is to define an adaptive weighting mesh (distribution mesh) on the basis of the equidistribution law applied to the flow field solution. The second, and probably the most crucial step, is to redistribute grid points in the computational domain according to the aforementioned weighting mesh. The third and the last step is to reevaluate the flow property by an appropriate search/interpolate scheme at the new grid locations. The adaptive weighting mesh provides the information on the desired concentration

  19. Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, Peter E.

    2015-06-01

    This application note describes how to model steady-state power flows and transient events in electric power grids with the SPICE-compatible Xyce TM Parallel Electronic Simulator developed at Sandia National Labs. This application notes provides a brief tutorial on the basic devices (branches, bus shunts, transformers and generators) found in power grids. The focus is on the features supported and assumptions made by the Xyce models for power grid elements. It then provides a detailed explanation, including working Xyce netlists, for simulating some simple power grid examples such as the IEEE 14-bus test case.

  20. The Grid-idea and its evolution.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we review the essence of the Grid-Idea. Specifically, we explore the changing definition of the Grid and follow its evolution over the past decade. This evolution is motivated by the gradual expansion of management issues that must be addressed to make production Grids a reality and to meet user requirements for increased functionality. Additionally, we focus on the evolutionary path of the Globus Toolkit taken to address the increasing needs of the community. We also discuss the evolutionary inclusion of commodity technologies as illustrated by the Java Commodity Grid Project.

  1. Software for Refining or Coarsening Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell; Woods, Jody

    2003-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations for refinement or coarsening of computational grids of the type called structured (signifying that they are geometrically regular and/or are specified by relatively simple algebraic expressions). This program is designed to facilitate analysis of the numerical effects of changing structured grids utilized in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Unlike prior grid-refinement and -coarsening programs, this program is not limited to doubling or halving: the user can specify any refinement or coarsening ratio, which can have a noninteger value. In addition to this ratio, the program accepts, as input, a grid file and the associated restart file, which is basically a file containing the most recent iteration of flow-field variables computed on the grid. The program then refines or coarsens the grid as specified, while maintaining the geometry and the stretching characteristics of the original grid. The program can interpolate from the input restart file to create a restart file for the refined or coarsened grid. The program provides a graphical user interface that facilitates the entry of input data for the grid-generation and restart-interpolation routines.

  2. Performance of European chemistry transport models as function of horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M.; Cuvelier, C.; Hendriks, C.; Bessagnet, B.; Baldasano, J. M.; Colette, A.; Thunis, P.; Karam, D.; Fagerli, H.; Graff, A.; Kranenburg, R.; Nyiri, A.; Pay, M. T.; Rouïl, L.; Schulz, M.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.; Terrenoire, E.; Wind, P.

    2015-07-01

    Air pollution causes adverse effects on human health as well as ecosystems and crop yield and also has an impact on climate change trough short-lived climate forcers. To design mitigation strategies for air pollution, 3D Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) have been developed to support the decision process. Increases in model resolution may provide more accurate and detailed information, but will cubically increase computational costs and pose additional challenges concerning high resolution input data. The motivation for the present study was therefore to explore the impact of using finer horizontal grid resolution for policy support applications of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) model within the Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP) convention. The goal was to determine the "optimum resolution" at which additional computational efforts do not provide increased model performance using presently available input data. Five regional CTMs performed four runs for 2009 over Europe at different horizontal resolutions. The models' responses to an increase in resolution are broadly consistent for all models. The largest response was found for NO2 followed by PM10 and O3. Model resolution does not impact model performance for rural background conditions. However, increasing model resolution improves the model performance at stations in and near large conglomerations. The statistical evaluation showed that the increased resolution better reproduces the spatial gradients in pollution regimes, but does not help to improve significantly the model performance for reproducing observed temporal variability. This study clearly shows that increasing model resolution is advantageous, and that leaving a resolution of 50 km in favour of a resolution between 10 and 20 km is practical and worthwhile. As about 70% of the model response to grid resolution is determined by the difference in the spatial emission distribution, improved emission allocation

  3. Enhancing the resolution of airborne gamma-ray data using horizontal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, David

    2016-09-01

    The spatial resolution characteristics of airborne gamma-ray data are largely controlled by survey elevation and line separation. In the UK, although low nominal surveys altitudes may be permitted, regulatory zones with elevations in excess of 180 m are required above conurbations. Since the data, typically in the form of grids, are evaluated alongside many other detailed geoscientific spatial datasets their absolute resolution limits, together with their spatial characteristics, become relevant. Here, using published software, we study the theoretical resolution characteristics of this form of survey data obtained with a line separation of 200 m. Of particular interest is the airborne response behaviour when non-uniform distributions of radioactivity are encountered. Although ultimately a function of the radioelement-concentration contrast encountered, the calculations reveal that such zones are most difficult to identify when their scale length decreases below the scale of the line separation. This limited resolution then further decreases with elevation. In order to increase our ability to resolve the edges of non-uniform source regions we calculate the horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM) of the observed data. While the data used can be the estimated radioelement concentrations (potassium, thorium and uranium) or their ratios, we demonstrate that the total count is particularly suited to this type of analysis. The theoretical calculations are supported by an examination of survey data across a series of isolated bodies (offshore islands). This empirical study indicates the practical limits to resolution when using the horizontal gradient and these are governed by the survey line separation. The HGM response provides an enhanced mapping of the edges of zones associated with a contrast in flux behaviour. The edges are detected using the maxima in the response and these can be additionally examined using grid curvature analysis. The technique is assessed using

  4. Hyperbolic Prismatic Grid Generation and Solution of Euler Equations on Prismatic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, S. A.; Chattot, JJ; Hafez, M. M.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyperbolic grid generation method is used to generate prismatic grids and an approach using prismatic grids to solve the Euler equations is presented. The theory of the stability and feasibility of the hyperbolic grid generation method is presented. The hyperbolic grid generation method of Steger et al for structured grids is applied to a three dimensional triangularized surface definition to generate a grid that is unstructured on each successive layer. The grid, however, retains structure in the body-normal direction and has a computational cell shaped like a triangular prism. In order to take advantage of the structure in the normal direction, a finite-volume scheme that treats the unknowns along the normal direction implicitly is introduced and the flow over a sphere is simulated.

  5. Structured background grids for generation of unstructured grids by advancing front method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1991-01-01

    A new method of background grid construction is introduced for generation of unstructured tetrahedral grids using the advancing-front technique. Unlike the conventional triangular/tetrahedral background grids which are difficult to construct and usually inadequate in performance, the new method exploits the simplicity of uniform Cartesian meshes and provides grids of better quality. The approach is analogous to solving a steady-state heat conduction problem with discrete heat sources. The spacing parameters of grid points are distributed over the nodes of a Cartesian background grid by interpolating from a few prescribed sources and solving a Poisson equation. To increase the control over the grid point distribution, a directional clustering approach is used. The new method is convenient to use and provides better grid quality and flexibility. Sample results are presented to demonstrate the power of the method.

  6. Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration, a Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yinger, Robert; Irwin, Mark

    2015-12-29

    ISGD was a comprehensive demonstration that spanned the electricity delivery system and extended into customer homes. The project used phasor measurement technology to enable substation-level situational awareness, and demonstrated SCE’s next-generation substation automation system. It extended beyond the substation to evaluate the latest generation of distribution automation technologies, including looped 12-kV distribution circuit topology using URCIs. The project team used DVVC capabilities to demonstrate CVR. In customer homes, the project evaluated HAN devices such as smart appliances, programmable communicating thermostats, and home energy management components. The homes were also equipped with energy storage, solar PV systems, and a number of energy efficiency measures (EEMs). The team used one block of homes to evaluate strategies and technologies for achieving ZNE. A home achieves ZNE when it produces at least as much renewable energy as the amount of energy it consumes annually. The project also assessed the impact of device-specific demand response (DR), as well as load management capabilities involving energy storage devices and plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. In addition, the ISGD project sought to better understand the impact of ZNE homes on the electric grid. ISGD’s SENet enabled end-to-end interoperability between multiple vendors’ systems and devices, while also providing a level of cybersecurity that is essential to smart grid development and adoption across the nation. The ISGD project includes a series of sub-projects grouped into four logical technology domains: Smart Energy Customer Solutions, Next-Generation Distribution System, Interoperability and Cybersecurity, and Workforce of the Future. Section 2.3 provides a more detailed overview of these domains.

  7. Can Clouds replace Grids? Will Clouds replace Grids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiers, J. D.

    2010-04-01

    The world's largest scientific machine - comprising dual 27km circular proton accelerators cooled to 1.9oK and located some 100m underground - currently relies on major production Grid infrastructures for the offline computing needs of the 4 main experiments that will take data at this facility. After many years of sometimes difficult preparation the computing service has been declared "open" and ready to meet the challenges that will come shortly when the machine restarts in 2009. But the service is not without its problems: reliability - as seen by the experiments, as opposed to that measured by the official tools - still needs to be significantly improved. Prolonged downtimes or degradations of major services or even complete sites are still too common and the operational and coordination effort to keep the overall service running is probably not sustainable at this level. Recently "Cloud Computing" - in terms of pay-per-use fabric provisioning - has emerged as a potentially viable alternative but with rather different strengths and no doubt weaknesses too. Based on the concrete needs of the LHC experiments - where the total data volume that will be acquired over the full lifetime of the project, including the additional data copies that are required by the Computing Models of the experiments, approaches 1 Exabyte - we analyze the pros and cons of Grids versus Clouds. This analysis covers not only technical issues - such as those related to demanding database and data management needs - but also sociological aspects, which cannot be ignored, neither in terms of funding nor in the wider context of the essential but often overlooked role of science in society, education and economy.

  8. DRAGON Grid: A Three-Dimensional Hybrid Grid Generation Code Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2000-01-01

    Because grid generation can consume 70 percent of the total analysis time for a typical three-dimensional viscous flow simulation for a practical engineering device, payoffs from research and development could reduce costs and increase throughputs considerably. In this study, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field developed a new hybrid grid approach with the advantages of flexibility, high-quality grids suitable for an accurate resolution of viscous regions, and a low memory requirement. These advantages will, in turn, reduce analysis time and increase accuracy. They result from an innovative combination of structured and unstructured grids to represent the geometry and the computation domain. The present approach makes use of the respective strengths of both the structured and unstructured grid methods, while minimizing their weaknesses. First, the Chimera grid generates high-quality, mostly orthogonal meshes around individual components. This process is flexible and can be done easily. Normally, these individual grids are required overlap each other so that the solution on one grid can communicate with another. However, when this communication is carried out via a nonconservative interpolation procedure, a spurious solution can result. Current research is aimed at entirely eliminating this undesired interpolation by directly replacing arbitrary grid overlapping with a nonstructured grid called a DRAGON grid, which uses the same set of conservation laws over the entire region, thus ensuring conservation everywhere. The DRAGON grid is shown for a typical film-cooled turbine vane with 33 holes and 3 plenum compartments. There are structured grids around each geometrical entity and unstructured grids connecting them. In fiscal year 1999, Glenn researchers developed and tested the three-dimensional DRAGON grid-generation tools. A flow solver suitable for the DRAGON grid has been developed, and a series of validation tests are underway.

  9. Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch{reg_sign}) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion.

  10. Power grid simulation applications developed using the GridPACK™ high performance computing framework

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Perkins, William; Palmer, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the GridPACK™ software framework for developing power grid simulations that can run on high performance computing platforms, with several example applications (dynamic simulation, static contingency analysis, and dynamic contingency analysis) that have been developed using GridPACK.

  11. Grid-Integrated Distributed Solar: Addressing Challenges for Operations and Planning, Greening the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, Michael; Miller, Mackay; Katz, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document introduces a brief overview of common technical impacts of PV on distribution systems and operations, as well as emerging strategies for successfully addressing some of the priority issues.

  12. Hydrological Scenario Using Tools and Applications Available in enviroGRIDS Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacu, V.; Mihon, D.; Stefanut, T.; Rodila, D.; Cau, P.; Manca, S.; Soru, C.; Gorgan, D.

    2012-04-01

    the other hand, the applications can collaborate at the same architectural levels, which represent the horizontal interoperability. Both the horizontal and vertical interoperability is accomplished by services and by exchanging data. The calibration procedure requires huge computational resources, which are provided by the Grid infrastructure. On the other hand the scenario development through BASHYT requires a flexible way of interaction with the SWAT model in order to easily change the input model. The large user community of SWAT from the enviroGRIDS consortium or outside may greatly benefit from tools and applications related with the calibration process, scenario development and execution from the enviroGRIDS portal. [1]. enviroGRIDS project, http://envirogrids.net/ [2]. Gorgan D., Abbaspour K., Cau P., Bacu V., Mihon D., Giuliani G., Ray N., Lehmann A., Grid Based Data Processing Tools and Applications for Black Sea Catchment Basin. IDAACS 2011 - The 6th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications 15-17 September 2011, Prague. IEEE Computer Press, pp. 223 - 228 (2011). [3]. Soil and Water Assessment Tool, http://www.brc.tamus.edu/swat/index.html [4]. Bacu V., Mihon D., Rodila D., Stefanut T., Gorgan D., Grid Based Architectural Components for SWAT Model Calibration. HPCS 2011 - International Conference on High Performance Computing and Simulation, 4-8 July, Istanbul, Turkey, ISBN 978-1-61284-381-0, doi: 10.1109/HPCSim.2011.5999824, pp. 193-198 (2011). [5]. Manca S., Soru C., Cau P., Meloni G., Fiori M., A multi model and multiscale, GIS oriented Web framework based on the SWAT model to face issues of water and soil resource vulnerability. Presentation at the 5th International SWAT Conference, August 3-7, 2009, http://www.brc.tamus.edu/swat/4thswatconf/docs/rooma/session5/Cau-Bashyt.pdf [6]. Bacu V., Mihon D., Stefanut T., Rodila D., Gorgan D., Cau P., Manca S., Grid Based Services and

  13. Parallel Grid Manipulations in Earth Science Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W.; Lucchesi, R.; daSilva, A.; Takacs, L. L.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the Goddard Space Flight Center is moving its data assimilation system to massively parallel computing platforms. This parallel implementation of GEOS DAS will be used in the DAO's normal activities, which include reanalysis of data, and operational support for flight missions. Key components of GEOS DAS, including the gridpoint-based general circulation model and a data analysis system, are currently being parallelized. The parallelization of GEOS DAS is also one of the HPCC Grand Challenge Projects. The GEOS-DAS software employs several distinct grids. Some examples are: an observation grid- an unstructured grid of points at which observed or measured physical quantities from instruments or satellites are associated- a highly-structured latitude-longitude grid of points spanning the earth at given latitude-longitude coordinates at which prognostic quantities are determined, and a computational lat-lon grid in which the pole has been moved to a different location to avoid computational instabilities. Each of these grids has a different structure and number of constituent points. In spite of that, there are numerous interactions between the grids, e.g., values on one grid must be interpolated to another, or, in other cases, grids need to be redistributed on the underlying parallel platform. The DAO has designed a parallel integrated library for grid manipulations (PILGRIM) to support the needed grid interactions with maximum efficiency. It offers a flexible interface to generate new grids, define transformations between grids and apply them. Basic communication is currently MPI, however the interfaces defined here could conceivably be implemented with other message-passing libraries, e.g., Cray SHMEM, or with shared-memory constructs. The library is written in Fortran 90. First performance results indicate that even difficult problems, such as above-mentioned pole rotation- a

  14. New solutions for the confined horizontal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    The Boussinesq equation is a dynamical equation for the free surface of saturated subsurface flows over an impervious bed. Boussinesq equation is non-linear. The non-linearity comes from the reduction of the dimensionality of the problem: The flow is assumed to be vertically homogeneous, therefore the flow rate through a cross section of the flow is proportional to the free surface height times the hydraulic gradient, which is assumed to be equal to the slope of the free surface. In the present work we consider the case of the subsurface flow with horizontal bed. This is a case with an infinite Henderson and Wooding parameter, that is, it is the limiting case where the non-linear term is present in the Boussinesq equation while the linear spatial derivative term vanishes. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave exists in this case as there is no exact solution for the build-up phase. Neither is there an exact recession-phase solution that holds in early times, as the Boussinesq separable solution is actually an asymptotic solution for large times. We construct approximate solutions for the horizontal aquifer which utilize directly the dynamical content of the non-linear Boussinesq equation. The approximate character of the solution lies in the fact that we start with a pre-supposed form for the solution, an educated guess, based on the nature of the initial condition as well as empirical observations from the numerical solution of the problem. The forms we shall use are power series of the location variable x along the bed with time-dependent coefficients. The series are not necessarily analytic. The boundary conditions are incorporated in the structure of the series from the beginning. The time-dependent coefficients are then determined by applying the Boussinesq equation and its spatial derivatives at the end-points of the aquifer. The forms are chosen also on the basis of their solubility; we would like to be able to construct explicitly the approximate

  15. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  16. Seasonal variations and horizontal distribution of precipitation over extratropical continental regions in CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, A.; Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal variations and horizontal distribution of precipitation over extratropical continental regions by the CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs are evaluated, in comparison with GPCP, CMAP, daily gridded gauge data APHRODITE, and with various reanalysis data. Eight regions are selected over the Eastern Europe, northwestern Russia, Mongolia, northeastern Russia, Alaska, western US, eastern Canada, and eastern US. It is shown that precipitation reproducibility over extratropical continental regions in climate models widely varies depending on regions and seasons, probably attributed to the matching of the precipitation characteristics and treatments of physical processes in the climate models. In some regions, additional treatments of physical processes such as those implemented in the Earth System Models improve the result, while in other regions, horizontal resolution looks essential for the improvements. The reproducibility also varies depending on seasons in a same region, for example, differs between summer and winter in the Eastern Europe. It is also noted that estimated rain amounts considerably vary among GPCP, CMAP, and APHRODITE. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by the 6th GPM/TRMM RA of JAXA, Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (A-1201) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  17. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. J.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, a new non-hydrostatic (NH) dynamical core using the spectral element method (SEM) in the horizontal discretization and the finite difference method (FDM) in the vertical discretization will be presented. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, we can achieve a high level of scalability. Also by using vertical FDM, we provide an easy way for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hybrid sigma hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are similar to those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Within these Euler equations, we use a time-split third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) for the time discretization. In order to establish robustness, firstly the NH dynamical core is verified in a simplified two dimensional (2D) slice framework by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests, and then we verify the global three dimensional (3D) dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid with several test cases introduced by Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP).

  18. Numerical study of natural convection in a horizontal cylinder filled with water-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural heat convection of water-based alumina (Al2O3/water) nanofluids (with volume fraction 1% and 4%) in a horizontal cylinder is numerically investigated. The whole three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure is performed in a completely open-source way. Blender, enGrid, OpenFOAM and ParaView are employed for geometry creation, mesh generation, case simulation and post process, respectively. Original solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleFoam' is selected for the present study, and a temperature-dependent solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleTDFoam' is developed to ensure the simulation is more realistic. The two solvers are used for same cases and compared to corresponding experimental results. The flow regime in these cases is laminar (Reynolds number is 150) and the Rayleigh number range is 0.7 × 10(7) ~ 5 × 10(7). By comparison, the average natural Nusselt numbers of water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are found to increase with the Rayleigh number. At the same Rayleigh number, the Nusselt number is found to decrease with nanofluid volume fraction. The temperature-dependent solver is found better for water and 1% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases, while the original solver is better for 4% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases. Furthermore, due to strong three-dimensional flow features in the horizontal cylinder, three-dimensional CFD simulation is recommended instead of two-dimensional simplifications.

  19. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling of particle uptake by an occupational air sampler using manually-scaled and adaptive grids.

    PubMed

    Landázuri, Andrea C; Sáez, A Eduardo; Anthony, T Renée

    2016-05-01

    This work presents fluid flow and particle trajectory simulation studies to determine the aspiration efficiency of a horizontally oriented occupational air sampler using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Grid adaption and manual scaling of the grids were applied to two sampler prototypes based on a 37-mm cassette. The standard k-ε model was used to simulate the turbulent air flow and a second order streamline-upwind discretization scheme was used to stabilize convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Successively scaled grids for each configuration were created manually and by means of grid adaption using the velocity gradient in the main flow direction. Solutions were verified to assess iterative convergence, grid independence and monotonic convergence. Particle aspiration efficiencies determined for both prototype samplers were undistinguishable, indicating that the porous filter does not play a noticeable role in particle aspiration. Results conclude that grid adaption is a powerful tool that allows to refine specific regions that require lots of detail and therefore better resolve flow detail. It was verified that adaptive grids provided a higher number of locations with monotonic convergence than the manual grids and required the least computational effort.

  20. Jet streak circulations associated with a moderate snowfall event as diagnosed from NGM model output. [Nested Grid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocin, Paul J.; Uccellini, Louis W.; Skillman, William C.; Grumm, Richard H.

    1989-01-01

    The existence, evolution, and interaction of vertical circulations associated with upper-level jet streaks during a moderate snowfall event are diagnosed using a nested grid model (NGM). The event itself is overviewed, and the diagnosis of transverse circulations utilizing NGM output is discussed. Focus is placed on the identification of the horizontal and vertical components of the circulation, the temporal evolution of the circulation, and the comparison of the circulation from successive model forecasts. A preliminary analysis of the model data indicates that the horizontal and vertical branches of the circulations can be diagnosed from the model output, and the horizontal and vertical components of the circulations may be identified and followed during an individual forecast cycle.

  1. Computational studies of horizontal axis wind turbines in high wind speed condition using advanced turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjanirat, Sarun

    Next generation horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) will operate at very high wind speeds. Existing engineering approaches for modeling the flow phenomena are based on blade element theory, and cannot adequately account for 3-D separated, unsteady flow effects. Therefore, researchers around the world are beginning to model these flows using first principles-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approaches. In this study, an existing first principles-based Navier-Stokes approach is being enhanced to model HAWTs at high wind speeds. The enhancements include improved grid topology, implicit time-marching algorithms, and advanced turbulence models. The advanced turbulence models include the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, k-epsilon, k-o and Shear Stress Transport (k-o-SST) models. These models are also integrated with detached eddy simulation (DES) models. Results are presented for a range of wind speeds, for a configuration termed National Renewable Energy Laboratory Phase VI rotor, tested at NASA Ames Research Center. Grid sensitivity studies are also presented. Additionally, effects of existing transition models on the predictions are assessed. Data presented include power/torque production, radial distribution of normal and tangential pressure forces, root bending moments, and surface pressure fields. Good agreement was obtained between the predictions and experiments for most of the conditions, particularly with the Spalart-Allmaras-DES model.

  2. Temporal and Spatial Comparison of Gridded TMY, TDY, and TGY Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Lopez, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2014-02-01

    Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) data sets provide industry standard resource information for building designers and are commonly used by the solar industry to estimate photovoltaic and concentrating solar power system performance. Historically, TMY data sets were only available for certain station locations, but current TMY data sets are available on the same grid as the National Solar Radiation Database data and are referred to as the gridded TMY. In this report, a comparison of TMY, typical direct (normal irradiance) year (TDY), and typical global (horizontal irradiance) year (TGY) data sets were performed to better understand the impact of ancillary weather variables upon them. These analyses identified geographical areas of high and low temporal and spatial variability, thereby providing insight into the representativeness of a particular TMY data set for use in renewable energy as well as other applications.

  3. Regional Studies and Applications with a Variable Resolution Stretched Grid Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael; Dee, Dick; Takacs, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    The variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS) incorporating the GEOS SG-GCM, is used for regional analysis, forecast, and climate applications. The region of interest with enhanced horizontal resolution, mostly used in experiments, is a rectangle over the U.S. The SG-DAS is capable of reproducing regional mesoscale fields, patterns and diagnostics that are not produced by the medium uniform resolution run with the same amount of grid points as for the SG. The SG-DAS regional analyses and diagnostics are used for: validation of regional climate simulation experiments produced with the SG-GCM for the U.S. 1988 summer drought; and are planned to be used for atmospheric chemistry transport experiments. Also, a case study is conducted on a super-typhoon development in December 1997. The SG-DAS appears to be a viable candidate for a variety of regional studies and applications.

  4. An Application of Overset Grids to Payload/Fairing Three-Dimensional Internal Flow CFD Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Nallasamy, R.; Schallhorn, P.; Duncil, L.

    2007-01-01

    The application of overset grids to the computational fluid dynamics analysis of three-dimensional internal flow in the payload/fairing of an expendable launch vehicle is described. In conjunction with the overset grid system, the flowfield in the payload/fairing configuration is obtained with the aid of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes code. The solution exhibits a highly three dimensional complex flowfield with swirl, separation, and vortices. Some of the computed flow features are compared with the measured Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data on a 1/5th scale model of the payload/fairing configuration. The counter-rotating vortex structures and the location of the saddle point predicted by the CFD analysis are in general agreement with the LDV data. Comparisons of the computed (CFD) velocity profiles on horizontal and vertical lines in the LDV measurement plane in the faring nose region show reasonable agreement with the LDV data.

  5. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  6. Horizontal visibility graphs from integer sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-09-01

    The horizontal visibility graph (HVG) is a graph-theoretical representation of a time series and builds a bridge between dynamical systems and graph theory. In recent years this representation has been used to describe and theoretically compare different types of dynamics and has been applied to characterize empirical signals, by extracting topological features from the associated HVGs which have shown to be informative on the class of dynamics. Among some other measures, it has been shown that the degree distribution of these graphs is a very informative feature that encapsulates nontrivial information of the series's generative dynamics. In particular, the HVG associated to a bi-infinite real-valued series of independent and identically distributed random variables is a universal exponential law P(k)=(1/3){(2/3)}k-2, independent of the series marginal distribution. Most of the current applications have however only addressed real-valued time series, as no exact results are known for the topological properties of HVGs associated to integer-valued series. In this paper we explore this latter situation and address univariate time series where each variable can only take a finite number n of consecutive integer values. We are able to construct an explicit formula for the parametric degree distribution {P}n(k), which we prove to converge to the continuous case for large n and deviates otherwise. A few applications are then considered.

  7. Sheared bioconvection in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croze, O. A.; Ashraf, E. E.; Bees, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The recent interest in using microorganisms for biofuels is motivation enough to study bioconvection and cell dispersion in tubes subject to imposed flow. To optimize light and nutrient uptake, many microorganisms swim in directions biased by environmental cues (e.g. phototaxis in algae and chemotaxis in bacteria). Such taxes inevitably lead to accumulations of cells, which, as many microorganisms have a density different to the fluid, can induce hydrodynamic instabilites. The large-scale fluid flow and spectacular patterns that arise are termed bioconvection. However, the extent to which bioconvection is affected or suppressed by an imposed fluid flow and how bioconvection influences the mean flow profile and cell transport are open questions. This experimental study is the first to address these issues by quantifying the patterns due to suspensions of the gravitactic and gyrotactic green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas in horizontal tubes subject to an imposed flow. With no flow, the dependence of the dominant pattern wavelength at pattern onset on cell concentration is established for three different tube diameters. For small imposed flows, the vertical plumes of cells are observed merely to bow in the direction of flow. For sufficiently high flow rates, the plumes progressively fragment into piecewise linear diagonal plumes, unexpectedly inclined at constant angles and translating at fixed speeds. The pattern wavelength generally grows with flow rate, with transitions at critical rates that depend on concentration. Even at high imposed flow rates, bioconvection is not wholly suppressed and perturbs the flow field.

  8. A theory of the MJO horizontal scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2014-02-01

    Here we ask, what controls the horizontal scale of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, i.e., what controls its zonal wave number k? We present a new one-dimensional (1D) β-plane model that successfully simulates the MJO with the same governing mechanism as the 2D shallow water model of Yang and Ingersoll (2013). Convection is parameterized as a short-duration localized mass source that is triggered when the layer thickness falls below a critical value. Radiation is parameterized as a steady uniform mass sink. Both models tend toward a statistically steady state—a state of radiative-convective equilibrium, not just on a global scale but also on the scale of each MJO event. This gives k ~ (Sc/c)1/2, where Sc is the spatial-temporal frequency of convection events and c is the Kelvin wave speed. We offer this scaling as a prediction of how the MJO would respond to climate change.

  9. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C. )

    1992-05-01

    Designers of a horizontal axis wind turbine yaw mechanism are faced with a difficult decision. They know that if they elect to use a yaw- controlled rotor then the system will suffer increased initial cost and increased inherent maintenance and reliability problems. On the other hand, if they elect to allow the rotor to freely yaw they known they will have to account for unknown and random, though bounded, yaw rates. They will have a higher-risk design to trade-off against the potential for cost savings and reliability improvement. The risk of a yaw-free system could be minimized if methods were available for analyzing and understanding yaw behavior. The complexity of yaw behavior has, until recently, discouraged engineers from developing a complete yaw analysis method. The objectives of this work are to (1) provide a fundamental understanding of free-yaw mechanics and the design concepts most effective at eliminating yaw problems, and (2) provide tested design tools and guidelines for use by free-yaw wind systems manufacturers. The emphasis is on developing practical and sufficiently accurate design methods.

  10. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E; Neufeld, Jerome A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  11. Analysis of Near Horizontal Muons at HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Ahron; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) gamma ray observatory observes muons with nearly horizontal trajectories. HAWC is located at an altitude of 4100 meters a.s.l. on Sierra Negra in Mexico. The Gamma and Cosmic Ray detector is composed of 300 water tanks, 7.3 m in diameter and 4.5 m tall, spread over a physical area of 22,000 m2. Due to its thickness of 4.5 m, HAWC acts as a hodoscope capable of observing muons with trajectories at zenith angles greater than 75 degrees to just over 90 degrees. These muon trajectories have a unique signal in that they are linear and travel at nearly the speed of light. CORSIKA simulations indicate that these muons originate from high zenith angle cosmic ray events, where the air shower core is located at great distance from HAWC. I will present the angular distribution and rate at which HAWC observes these muon events. High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory.

  12. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  13. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  14. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  15. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  16. Spaceflight Operations Services Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Lisotta, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    NASA over the years has developed many types of technologies and conducted various types of science resulting in numerous variations of operations, data and applications. For example, operations range from deep space projects managed by JPL, Saturn and Shuttle operations managed from JSC and KSC, ISS science operations managed from MSFC and numerous low earth orbit satellites managed from GSFC that are varied and intrinsically different but require many of the same types of services to fulfill their missions. Also, large data sets (databases) of Shuttle flight data, solar system projects and earth observing data exist which because of their varied and sometimes outdated technologies are not and have not been fully examined for additional information and knowledge. Many of the applications/systems supporting operational services e.g. voice, video, telemetry and commanding, are outdated and obsolete. The vast amounts of data are located in various formats, at various locations and range over many years. The ability to conduct unified space operations, access disparate data sets and to develop systems and services that can provide operational services does not currently exist in any useful form. In addition, adding new services to existing operations is generally expensive and with the current budget constraints not feasible on any broad level of implementation. To understand these services a discussion of each one follows. The Spaceflight User-based Services are those services required to conduct space flight operations. Grid Services are those Grid services that will be used to overcome, through middleware software, some or all the problems that currently exists. In addition, Network Services will be discussed briefly. Network Services are crucial to any type of remedy and are evolving adequately to support any technology currently in development.

  17. Grid generation: A view from the trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David; Miller, Robert; Siddons, William; Vandyke, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents 'A view from the trenches' on CFD grid generation from a Pratt & Whitney perspective. We anticipate that other organizations have similar views. We focus on customer expectations and the consequent requirements. We enunciate a vision for grid generation, discuss issues that developers must recognize.

  18. Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop on Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software was conducted for NASA to assess its unstructured grid activities, improve the coordination among NASA centers, and promote technology transfer to industry. The proceedings represent contributions from Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, and the Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Centers. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop.

  19. Uncertainty in gridded CO2 emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, Susannah; Marland, Eric; Andres, Robert J.; Marland, Gregg; Woodard, Dawn

    2016-05-01

    We are interested in the spatial distribution of fossil-fuel-related emissions of CO2 for both geochemical and geopolitical reasons, but it is important to understand the uncertainty that exists in spatially explicit emissions estimates. Working from one of the widely used gridded data sets of CO2 emissions, we examine the elements of uncertainty, focusing on gridded data for the United States at the scale of 1° latitude by 1° longitude. Uncertainty is introduced in the magnitude of total United States emissions, the magnitude and location of large point sources, the magnitude and distribution of non-point sources, and from the use of proxy data to characterize emissions. For the United States, we develop estimates of the contribution of each component of uncertainty. At 1° resolution, in most grid cells, the largest contribution to uncertainty comes from how well the distribution of the proxy (in this case population density) represents the distribution of emissions. In other grid cells, the magnitude and location of large point sources make the major contribution to uncertainty. Uncertainty in population density can be important where a large gradient in population density occurs near a grid cell boundary. Uncertainty is strongly scale-dependent with uncertainty increasing as grid size decreases. Uncertainty for our data set with 1° grid cells for the United States is typically on the order of ±150%, but this is perhaps not excessive in a data set where emissions per grid cell vary over 8 orders of magnitude.

  20. Interactive Hyperbolic Grid Generation for Projectile CFD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    J . F . "A Composite Grid Generation Code for General 3D Regions - The EAGLE Code." AIAA Journal, vol. 26, no. 3, p. 271, March 1988. Thompson , J . F ., and...Grid Generation." AGARD FDP Specialists Meeting on "Mesh Generation for Complex Three-Dimensional Configurations." Leon, Norway, May 1989. Thompson

  1. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  2. A Debugger for Computational Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robert; Jost, Gabriele; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of a debugger for computational grid applications. Details are given on NAS parallel tools groups (including parallelization support tools, evaluation of various parallelization strategies, and distributed and aggregated computing), debugger dependencies, scalability, initial implementation, the process grid, and information on Globus.

  3. Towards Verification of Unstructured-Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    New methodology for verification of finite-volume computational methods using unstructured grids is presented. The discretization order properties are studied in computational windows, easily constructed within a collection of grids or a single grid. Tests are performed within each window and address a combination of problem-, solution-, and discretization/grid-related features affecting discretization error convergence. The windows can be adjusted to isolate particular elements of the computational scheme, such as the interior discretization, the boundary discretization, or singularities. Studies can use traditional grid-refinement computations within a fixed window or downscaling, a recently-introduced technique in which computations are made within windows contracting toward a focal point of interest. Grids within the windows are constrained to be consistently refined, allowing a meaningful assessment of asymptotic error convergence on unstructured grids. Demonstrations of the method are shown, including a comparative accuracy assessment of commonly-used schemes on general mixed grids and the identification of local accuracy deterioration at boundary intersections. Recommendations to enable attainment of design-order discretization errors for large-scale computational simulations are given.

  4. Features of the Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Rehn, N.; Russell, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit (Java CoG Kit). The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus Toolkit protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to also communicate with the services distributed as part of the C Globus Toolkit reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise and peer-to-peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus Toolkit software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop serverside Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Grid jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  5. 76 FR 70412 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... agenda may change to accommodate Committee business. The final agenda will be posted on the Smart...

  6. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  7. Computing Flows Using Chimera and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2006-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of flows in complexly shaped three-dimensional regions discretized by use of a direct replacement of arbitrary grid overlapping by nonstructured (DRAGON) grid. A DRAGON grid (see figure) is a combination of a chimera grid (a composite of structured subgrids) and a collection of unstructured subgrids. DRAGONFLOW incorporates modified versions of two prior Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs: OVERFLOW, which is designed to solve on chimera grids; and USM3D, which is used to solve on unstructured grids. A master module controls the invocation of individual modules in the libraries. At each time step of a simulated flow, DRAGONFLOW is invoked on the chimera portion of the DRAGON grid in alternation with USM3D, which is invoked on the unstructured subgrids of the DRAGON grid. The USM3D and OVERFLOW modules then immediately exchange their solutions and other data. As a result, USM3D and OVERFLOW are coupled seamlessly.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1910 - Radiographic grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic grid. 892.1910 Section 892.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1910 Radiographic grid. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 892.1910 - Radiographic grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic grid. 892.1910 Section 892.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1910 Radiographic grid. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 892.1910 - Radiographic grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic grid. 892.1910 Section 892.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1910 Radiographic grid. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 892.1910 - Radiographic grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic grid. 892.1910 Section 892.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1910 Radiographic grid. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 892.1910 - Radiographic grid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic grid. 892.1910 Section 892.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1910 Radiographic grid. (a) Identification....

  13. Optimizing SAS tasks for Grid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, A.; Tapiador, D.; Félix, F.; Gabriel, C.; Arviset, C.; Hoar, J.; Ansari, S.

    2006-07-01

    We present the first prototype of a XMM-Newton pipeline processing task parallelized at a CCD level, which can be run in a GRID system. By using the GridWay application, the processing of the XMM-Newton data is distributed across the Virtual Organization constituted by three different research centres (ESAC, ESTEC, Complutense Madrid University).

  14. Grid Convergence for Turbulent Flows(Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Schwoppe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed grid convergence study has been conducted to establish accurate reference solutions corresponding to the one-equation linear eddy-viscosity Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for two dimensional turbulent flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat plate. The study involved three widely used codes, CFL3D (NASA), FUN3D (NASA), and TAU (DLR), and families of uniformly refined structured grids that differ in the grid density patterns. Solutions computed by different codes on different grid families appear to converge to the same continuous limit, but exhibit different convergence characteristics. The grid resolution in the vicinity of geometric singularities, such as a sharp trailing edge, is found to be the major factor affecting accuracy and convergence of discrete solutions, more prominent than differences in discretization schemes and/or grid elements. The results reported for these relatively simple turbulent flows demonstrate that CFL3D, FUN3D, and TAU solutions are very accurate on the finest grids used in the study, but even those grids are not sufficient to conclusively establish an asymptotic convergence order.

  15. Grids and clouds in the Czech NGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrát, Jan; Adam, Martin; Adamová, Dagmar; Chudoba, Jiří; Kouba, Tomáš; Lokajíček, Miloš; Mikula, Alexandr; Říkal, Václav; Švec, Jan; Vohnout, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    There are several infrastructure operators within the Czech Republic NGI (National Grid Initiative) which provide users with access to high-performance computing facilities over a grid and cloud interface. This article focuses on those where the primary author has personal first-hand experience. We cover some operational issues as well as the history of these facilities.

  16. The Administrative Grid: A Leader Style Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Donald G.; Heun, Richard E.

    The Administrative Grid was developed to aid in rapid interpretation of orthogonal data on management style. The grid is a simple device for illustrating Z-score values from any instrument with orthogonality determined and scores normalized. The two dimensions, "people" and "task,"are divided into standard deviations and, by…

  17. Parallel unstructured grid generation for computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop efficient parallel automatic grid generation procedures for use in computational aerosciences. This effort is focused on a parallel version of the Finite Octree grid generator. Progress made during the first six months is reported.

  18. VGRIDSG: An unstructured surface grid generation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the VGRIDSG unstructured surface grid generation program. The VGRIDSG program was created from the VGRID3D unstructured grid generation program developed by Vigyan, Inc. The purpose of this report is to document the changes from the original VGRID3D program and to describe the capabilities of the new program.

  19. Dynamics and control of orbiting grid and the synchronously deployable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Saba, E. G.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of a grid structure hung from the ceiling by two steel wires is described. The method of approach uses the discrete mass model system. The concept of the bifilar pendulum is used in writing the equation of motion. Assumptions are made with regard to the bar stiffnesses in the vertical and horizontal planes. The discrete mases are assumed to be connected by inextensible massless strings that do not provide any torsion or bending. The modal frequencies obtained by this method are compared with those obtained from the finite element model.

  20. Generation of reproducible turbulent inflows for wind tunnel applications using active grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Lars; Guelker, Gerd; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows are omnipresent in nature. In the case of wind energy applications, reproducible measurements in situ are quite difficult, therefore research in turbulence demands for experimental setups with reproducible turbulent flow fields. To simulate the situation from the outside in a wind tunnel an active grid can be used. It consists of horizontal and vertical rotating axes with attached square flaps which could be moved individually. This dynamically driven setup and the possibility to repeat the motions of the active grid axes permits to generate reproducible, statistically well defined turbulence with a wide range of statistical behavior. The objective of this work is to create turbulence with two active grids of different dimensions, to establish comparable setups in our available wind tunnel facilities. In this study the wake of the active grids was investigated by high speed PIV and hotwire measurements. To determine the similarities and limitations between the setups of different dimensions the hotwire data is compared using higher order statistics, increment analysis and the power spectra. The PIV data is used to observe spatial correlations and the prevailing length scales in the turbulent wakes. First results regarding this comparison are shown.

  1. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; ...

    2016-02-25

    This article discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric gridmore » cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere–ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.« less

  2. Conservative treatment of boundary interfaces for overlaid grids and multi-level grid adaptations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1989-01-01

    Conservative algorithms for boundary interfaces of overlaid grids are presented. The basic method is zeroth order, and is extended to a higher order method using interpolation and subcell decomposition. The present method, strictly based on a conservative constraint, is tested with overlaid grids for various applications of unsteady and steady supersonic inviscid flows with strong shock waves. The algorithm is also applied to a multi-level grid adaptation in which the next level finer grid is overlaid on the coarse base grid with an arbitrary orientation.

  3. Prediction of Emission from Wire Polarizing Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    A simple inhomogeneous circuit model for a grid comprised of wires with circular cross section is derived and compared to measured observations. The proposed approximations are valid in the limit the geometric parameters for the grid are small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation. Expressions for the emission, reflection, and transmission are provided. The accuracy of this circuit model is compared against full wave numerical simulations as a function of grid filling fraction. For perpendicular illumination of the grid the expressions used in the literature for zero thickness polarizers are recovered. For parallel illumination the influence of the finite wire thickness has a non-negectable influence on the emission properties of a wire grid polarizer is found.

  4. Towards Verification of Unstructured-Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    New methodology for verification of computational methods using unstructured grids is presented. The discretization order properties are studied in computational windows, easily constructed within a collection of grids or a single grid. The windows can be adjusted to isolate the interior discretization, the boundary discretization, or singularities. A major component of the methodology is the downscaling test, introduced previously for studying the convergence rates of truncation and discretization errors of finite-volume discretization schemes on general unstructured grids. Demonstrations of the method are shown, including a comparative accuracy assessment of commonly-used schemes on general mixed grids and the identification of local accuracy deterioration at intersections of tangency and inflow/outflow boundaries. Recommendations for the use of the methodology in large-scale computational simulations are given.

  5. An Extensible Information Grid for Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Bell, David G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes recent work on developing an extensible information grid for risk management at NASA - a RISK INFORMATION GRID. This grid is being developed by integrating information grid technology with risk management processes for a variety of risk related applications. To date, RISK GRID applications are being developed for three main NASA processes: risk management - a closed-loop iterative process for explicit risk management, program/project management - a proactive process that includes risk management, and mishap management - a feedback loop for learning from historical risks that escaped other processes. This is enabled through an architecture involving an extensible database, structuring information with XML, schemaless mapping of XML, and secure server-mediated communication using standard protocols.

  6. Defending the Power Grid from Hackers

    SciTech Connect

    Eber, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    A new initiative underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is intended to prevent hackers from gaining control of parts of the nation's power grid, potentially damaging electrical equipment and causing localized power outages. Our nation's power grid is evolving to be more responsive to changing power needs, more able to integrate renewable energy, more efficient, and more reliable. One key element of this evolution is adding communication and control devices to the power grid, closer to the end user, so that utilities have greater situational awareness of the grid and can respond quickly to disturbances. But these new devices and their communications requirements can also open up the power grid to potential cyber attacks.

  7. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  8. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  9. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  10. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  11. Unlocking the potential of the smart grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    The smart grid refers to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the whole delivery electrical energy process. The generation, delivery and consumption energy, all the steps for power transmission and distribution make the smart grid a complex system. The question is if the amount, diversity, and uses of such data put the smart grid in the category of Big Data applications, followed by the natural question of what is the true value of such data. In this paper an initial answer to this question is provided, the current state of data generation of the Polish grid is analyzed, and a future realistic scenario is illustrated. The analysis shows that the amount of data generated in smart grid is comparable to some of Big Data system examples.

  12. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  13. Parallel algorithms for dynamically partitioning unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, P.; Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1994-10-01

    Grid partitioning is the method of choice for decomposing a wide variety of computational problems into naturally parallel pieces. In problems where computational load on the grid or the grid itself changes as the simulation progresses, the ability to repartition dynamically and in parallel is attractive for achieving higher performance. We describe three algorithms suitable for parallel dynamic load-balancing which attempt to partition unstructured grids so that computational load is balanced and communication is minimized. The execution time of algorithms and the quality of the partitions they generate are compared to results from serial partitioners for two large grids. The integration of the algorithms into a parallel particle simulation is also briefly discussed.

  14. Horizontal Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in Reindeer

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S. Jo; Kunkle, Robert; Greenlee, M. Heather West; Nicholson, Eric; Richt, Jürgen; Hamir, Amir; Waters, W. Ray

    2016-01-01

    We challenged reindeer by the intracranial route with the agent of chronic wasting disease sourced from white-tailed deer, mule deer, or elk and tested for horizontal transmission to naive reindeer. Reindeer were susceptible to chronic wasting disease regardless of source species. Horizontal transmission occurred through direct contact or indirectly through the environment. PMID:27869594

  15. Horizontal technology helps spark Louisiana`s Austin chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-04-29

    A handful of companies paced by some of the most active operators in the US are pressing the limits of horizontal technology to ramp up Cretaceous Austin chalk exploration and development (E and D) across Louisiana. Companies find applications in Louisiana for lessons learned drilling horizontal wells to produce chalk intervals in Texas in Giddings, Pearsall, and Brookeland fields. Continuing advances in horizontal well technology are helping operators deal with deeper, hotter reservoirs in more complex geological settings that typify the chalk in Louisiana. Better horizontal drilling, completion, formation evaluation, and stimulation techniques have enabled operators to produce oil and gas from formations previously thought to be uneconomical. Most of the improved capabilities stem from better horizontal tools. Horizontal drilling breakthroughs include dual powered mud motors and retrievable whipstocks, key links in the ability to drill wells with more than one horizontal lateral. Better geosteering tools have enabled operators to maintain horizontal wellbores in desired intervals by signaling bit positions downhole while drilling. This paper reviews the technology and provides a historical perspective on the various drilling programs which have been completed in this trend. It also makes predictions on future drilling successes.

  16. Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail; Chord Joining Block & Spacer Block Detail; Cross Bracing Joint Detail; Chord Panel Post Diagonal & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail - Jackson Covered Bridge, Spanning Sugar Creek, CR 775N (Changed from Spanning Sugar Creek), Bloomingdale, Parke County, IN

  17. Hearing Impaired Children's Performance on the Piagetian Liquid Horizontality Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Berman, Virginia; And Others

    A paper-and-pencil test consisting of a series of 24 sketches was administered to assess the performance of hearing impaired students aged 9-12 on a Piagetian horizontality task. This age range among hearing students is the developmental period during which comprehension of the principle of horizontality should begin to emerge, indicating ability…

  18. Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    1 Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity ...in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...generated by surface wind stress with constant eddy viscosity in homogeneous ocean. In real oceans, the eddy viscosity varies due to turbulent mixing

  19. caGrid 1.0 : an enterprise Grid infrastructure for biomedical research.

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, S.; Langella, S.; Hastings, S.; Ervin, D.; Madduri, R.; Phillips, J.; Kurc, T.; Siebenlist, F.; Covitz, P.; Shanbhag, K.; Foster, I.; Saltz, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; The Ohio State Univ.; National Cancer Inst. Centerfor Bioinformatics; SemanticBits

    2008-03-01

    To develop software infrastructure that will provide support for discovery, characterization, integrated access, and management of diverse and disparate collections of information sources, analysis methods, and applications in biomedical research. Design: An enterprise Grid software infrastructure, called caGrid version 1.0 (caGrid 1.0), has been developed as the core Grid architecture of the NCI-sponsored cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG{trademark}) program. It is designed to support a wide range of use cases in basic, translational, and clinical research, including (1) discovery, (2) integrated and large-scale data analysis, and (3) coordinated study. Measurements: The caGrid is built as a Grid software infrastructure and leverages Grid computing technologies and the Web Services Resource Framework standards. It provides a set of core services, toolkits for the development and deployment of new community provided services, and application programming interfaces for building client applications. Results: The caGrid 1.0 was released to the caBIG community in December 2006. It is built on open source components and caGrid source code is publicly and freely available under a liberal open source license. The core software, associated tools, and documentation can be downloaded from the following URL: Grid>.

  20. GridOPTICS(TM): A Design for Plug-and-Play Smart Grid Software Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2012-06-03

    As the smart grid becomes reality, software architectures for integrating legacy systems with new innovative approaches for grid management are needed. These architectures must exhibit flexibility, extensibility, interoperability and scalability. In this position paper, we describe our preliminary work to design such an architecture, known as GridOPTICS, that will enable the deployment and integration of new software tools in smart grid operations. Our preliminary design is based upon use cases from PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative, which is a developing a collection of advanced software technologies for smart grid management and control. We describe the motivations for GridOPTICS, and the preliminary design that we are currently prototyping for several distinct use cases.

  1. Comparison tomography relocation hypocenter grid search and guided grid search method in Java island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdian, S. W.; Adu, N.; Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.

    2016-11-01

    The main data in this research is earthquake data recorded from 1952 to 2012 with 9162 P wave and 2426 events are recorded by 30 stations located around Java island. Relocation hypocenter processed using grid search and guidded grid search method. Then the result of relocation hypocenter become input for tomography pseudo bending inversion process. It can be used to identification the velocity distribution in subsurface. The result of relocation hypocenter by grid search and guided grid search method after tomography process shown in locally and globally. In locally area grid search method result is better than guided grid search according to geological reseach area. But in globally area the result of guided grid search method is better for a broad area because the velocity variation is more diverse than the other one and in accordance with local geological research conditions.

  2. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  3. OVERGRID: A Unified Overset Grid Generation Graphical Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Akien, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a unified graphical interface and gridding strategy for performing overset grid generation. The interface called OVERGRID has been specifically designed to follow an efficient overset gridding strategy, and contains general grid manipulation capabilities as well as modules that are specifically suited for overset grids. General grid utilities include functions for grid redistribution, smoothing, concatenation, extraction, extrapolation, projection, and many others. Modules specially tailored for overset grids include a seam curve extractor, hyperbolic and algebraic surface grid generators, a hyperbolic volume grid generator, and a Cartesian box grid generator, Grid visualization is achieved using OpenGL while widgets are constructed with Tcl/Tk. The software is portable between various platforms from UNIX workstations to personal computers.

  4. Three-dimensional grid generation about a submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid Samareh; Smith, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    A systematic multiple-block grid method has been developed to compute grids about submarines. Several topologies are proposed, and an oscillatory transfinite interpolation is used in the grid construction.

  5. The 3D Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 3-dimensional Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the design cycle; Cartesian grid strategy; structured body fit; grid generation; prolate spheroid; and ONERA M6 wing.

  6. Effects of grid geometry on non-equilibrium dissipation in grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Saiki, Teppei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Ito, Yasumasa; Iwano, Koji

    2017-01-01

    A total of 11 grids in four families, including single- and multi-scale grids, are tested to investigate the development and decay characteristics of grid-generated turbulence. Special attention has been focused on dissipation and non-equilibrium characteristics in the decay region. A wide non-equilibrium region is observed for fractal square grids with three and four iterations. The distributions of the Taylor microscale λ, integral length scale Lu, and dissipation coefficient C ɛ show that a simple combination of large and small grids does not reproduce elongated non-equilibrium regions as realized by the fractal square grid. On the other hand, a new kind of grid, quasi-fractal grids, in which the region of the smaller fractal elements ( N = 2 - 4 ) of the fractal square grid is replaced by regular grids, successfully reproduce a similar flow field and non-equilibrium nature to that seen in the fractal square grid case. This suggests that the combination of large square grid and inhomogeneously arranged smaller grids produces an elongated non-equilibrium region. The dissipation coefficient C ɛ is better collapsed using R e 0 = t 0 U ∞ / ν (where t0 is the thickness of the largest grid bar, U ∞ the inflow velocity, and ν the kinematic viscosity) as a global/inlet Reynolds number rather than R e M = M U ∞ / ν (where M is the mesh size) [P. C. Valente and J. C. Vassilicos, "Universal dissipation scaling for non-equilibrium turbulence," Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 214503 (2012)].

  7. Characterization of Slosh Damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid Internal Tank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Sansone, Marco D.; Eberhart, Chad J.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Grid stiffened tank structures such as Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid are widely used in cryogenic tanks for providing stiffening to the tank while reducing mass, compared to tank walls of constant cross-section. If the structure is internal to the tank, it will positively affect the fluid dynamic behavior of the liquid propellant, in regard to fluid slosh damping. As NASA and commercial companies endeavor to explore the solar system, vehicles will by necessity become more mass efficient, and design margin will be reduced where possible. Therefore, if the damping characteristics of the Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structure is understood, their positive damping effect can be taken into account in the systems design process. Historically, damping by internal structures has been characterized by rules of thumb and for Ortho-Grid, empirical design tools intended for slosh baffles of much larger cross-section have been used. There is little or no information available to characterize the slosh behavior of Iso-Grid internal structure. Therefore, to take advantage of these structures for their positive damping effects, there is much need for obtaining additional data and tools to characterize them. Recently, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted both sub-scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of slosh damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid tanks for cylindrical tanks containing water. Enhanced grid meshing techniques were applied to the geometrically detailed and complex Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures. The Loci-STREAM CFD program with the Volume of Fluid Method module for tracking and locating the water-air fluid interface was used to conduct the simulations. The CFD simulations were validated with the test data and new empirical models for predicting damping and frequency of Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures were generated.

  8. Solar thermal energy predictability for the grid (STEP4Grid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-León, Mercedes; Pacheco, Germán; Bolinaga, Beatriz; Campa, Luis; Lara-Fanego, Vicente; Valenzuela, José M.

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing concern about the importance of the improvement of efficiency, the dispatchability of thermosolar plants and the predictability of the energy production for electrical markets. In the current research, a new developed system denominated STEP4Grid is presented and their products are analyzed. Currently it is on operation in the thermosolar plant of Solúcar in Sanlúcar la Mayor, Seville, Spain. Forecasting Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) and Forecasting Gross Production (FGP) have been provided by the system. This product generates different time horizon forecasts combining all-sky cameras, satellite and Numerical Weather Prediction Model (NWPM) forecasts. The sensors network installed all over the plant provides continuous meteorological and non-meteorological data, which act as an input for the energy production model. The whole system is viewable by plant operators with the help of a layout system. For the May and June of 2015 database, the FGP based on satellite and Numerical Weather Prediction Models (NWPM) DNI predictions have an rMAE for an hour-ahead horizon of 16 % (May) and 17 % (June) respectively. For all the horizons, the FGP increases their deviations the further it is from the real-time and the profile is similar to the evolution of DNI forecasting rMAE.

  9. A very low noise monolithic Horizontal accelerometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Alessandro; Takamori, Akiteru; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Francesconi, Mario; Desalvo, Riccardo; Sannibale, Virginio

    2000-04-01

    We present a new low noise, low frequency, horizontal accelerometer. The mechanical design and the machining process aim to improve the sensitivity in the frequency region between 0.01 and 1 Hz, where metal internal friction and thermal elastic effects become critical. The accelerometer mechanics is shaped as a small folded pendulum in order to obtain a very low resonant frequency and low mechanical losses. A folded pendulum is essentially a mass suspended on one side by a simple pendulum and on the other by an inverted pendulum working antagonistically. The straight pendulum positive gravitational spring constant is balanced by the inverted pendulum’s negative one; by changing the center of mass position one can lower arbitrarily the resonant frequency. The only dissipation is in the anelasticity of the mechanical flex joint and in the readout/actuation system. If the spring constant is minimised, the mechanical losses are minimal. The monolithic design of the accelerometer eliminates the stick-and-slip friction localised in the flexure clamps. Low stiffness, 10 micron thick flex joints are achieved by EDM and electropolishing. The instrument is equipped with a low capacitance position sensor; the signal from the sensor is filtered by a PID controller and fed back to the mass through capacitive force actuator for feedback closed-loop operation. The sensor noise matches the expected thermal noise performances, 10-12 m/√Hz , with measuring range of a few microns. The expected sensitivity, less than 10-11 m/ s^2 / √Hz around 150 mHz, is a factor 30 below the state of the art limit. This accelerometer was designed to be integrated in the active control of the LIGO II mirror seismic isolators.

  10. Scalable Real Time Data Management for Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Purohit, Sumit; Gorton, Ian; Akyol, Bora A.

    2011-12-16

    This paper presents GridMW, a scalable and reliable data middleware for smart grids. Smart grids promise to improve the efficiency of power grid systems and reduce green house emissions through incorporating power generation from renewable sources and shaping demand to match the supply. As a result, power grid systems will become much more dynamic and require constant adjustments, which requires analysis and decision making applications to improve the efficiency and reliability of smart grid systems.

  11. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  12. Models for the modern power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardelli, Pedro H. J.; Rubido, Nicolas; Wang, Chengwei; Baptista, Murilo S.; Pomalaza-Raez, Carlos; Cardieri, Paulo; Latva-aho, Matti

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews different kinds of models for the electric power grid that can be used to understand the modern power system, the smart grid. From the physical network to abstract energy markets, we identify in the literature different aspects that co-determine the spatio-temporal multilayer dynamics of power system. We start our review by showing how the generation, transmission and distribution characteristics of the traditional power grids are already subject to complex behaviour appearing as a result of the the interplay between dynamics of the nodes and topology, namely synchronisation and cascade effects. When dealing with smart grids, the system complexity increases even more: on top of the physical network of power lines and controllable sources of electricity, the modernisation brings information networks, renewable intermittent generation, market liberalisation, prosumers, among other aspects. In this case, we forecast a dynamical co-evolution of the smart grid and other kind of networked systems that cannot be understood isolated. This review compiles recent results that model electric power grids as complex systems, going beyond pure technological aspects. From this perspective, we then indicate possible ways to incorporate the diverse co-evolving systems into the smart grid model using, for example, network theory and multi-agent simulation.

  13. AMSR-E/Aqua Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Knowles, K.

    2006-12-01

    Passive microwave brightness temperature data are a major component in many geophysical models and algorithms. For many researchers, a major difficulty in using these data is transforming the satellite swath data into a model-friendly, gridded format. Two new data sets and improvements to a toolkit at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will help scientists incorporate these data into their research. We have produced "AMSR-E/Aqua Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures" from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument aboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. This data set will complement and extend NSIDC's existing EASE-grid brightness temperature data sets, with new data beginning June 2002 and continuing throughout the life-cycle of the instrument. Additionally, in order to respond to user demand for quarter-degree data, we are distributing "AMSR-E/Aqua Daily Global Quarter-Degree Gridded Brightness Temperatures" also spanning the AMSR-E time period. Researchers whose needs are not met by the above data sets can create customized grids with our AMSR-E Swath to Grid Toolkit. Recent improvements to the toolkit allow subsetted swath data as input, greatly reducing the initial data volume required to produce customized grids.

  14. Grid generation for a complex aircraft configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruns, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The procedure used to create a grid around the F/A-18 fighter aircraft is presented. This work was done for the NASA High Alpha Technology Program. As part of this program, LeRC is numerically and experimentally investigating the flow in the F/A-18 inlet duct at high angles of attack. A grid was needed which could be used to calculate both the external and internal flow around the F/A-18. The grid had to be compatible with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes PARC3D and CFL3D. The programs used to create this grid were I3GVIRGO and GRIDGEN. A surface definition used to create the grid was obtained from McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) and was composed of numerous files each containing a point definition of a portion of the aircraft. These files were read into the geometry manipulation program I3GVIRGO, where they were modified and grouped into smaller GRIDGEN database files. Next, the block outlines and boundary conditions were specified in the GRIDBLOCK program. The GRIDGEN2D program was used to create the surface grid on the block faces, and GRIDGEN3D was used to create the full 3-D grid.

  15. Complex Kohn calculations on an overset grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Loren; Lucchese, Robert; McCurdy, C. William

    2016-05-01

    An implentation of the overset grid method for complex Kohn scattering calculations is presented, along with static exchange calculations of electron-molecule scattering for small molecules including methane. The overset grid method uses multiple numerical grids, for instance Finite Element Method - Discrete Variable Representation (FEM-DVR) grids, expanded radially around multiple centers (corresponding to the individual atoms in each molecule as well as the center-of-mass of the molecule). The use of this flexible grid allows the complex angular dependence of the wavefunctions near the atomic centers to be well-described, but also allows scattering wavefunctions that oscillate rapidly at large distances to be accurately represented. Additionally, due to the use of multiple grids (and also grid shells), the method is easily parallelizable. The method has been implemented in ePolyscat, a multipurpose suite of programs for general molecular scattering calculations. It is interfaced with a number of quantum chemistry programs (including MolPro, Gaussian, GAMESS, and Columbus), from which it can read molecular orbitals and wavefunctions obtained using standard computational chemistry methods. The preliminary static exchange calculations serve as a test of the applicability.

  16. Transonic airfoil calculations using solution-adaptive grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Brown, D.

    1981-01-01

    A new algorithm for generating solution-adaptive grids (SAG) about airfoil configurations embedded in transonic flow is presented. The present SAG approach uses only the airfoil surface solution to recluster grid points on the airfoil surface, i.e., the reclustering problem is one dimension smaller than the flow-field calculation problem. Special controls automatically built into the elliptic grid generation procedure are then used to obtain grids with suitable interior behavior. This concept of redistributing grid points greatly simplifies the idea of solution-adaptive grids. Numerical results indicate significant improvements in accuracy for SAG grids relative to standard grids using the same number of points.

  17. Unstructured Cartesian/prismatic grid generation for complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of a hybrid grid system for discretizing complex three dimensional (3D) geometries is described. The primary grid system is an unstructured Cartesian grid automatically generated using recursive cell subdivision. This grid system is sufficient for computing Euler solutions about extremely complex 3D geometries. A secondary grid system, using triangular-prismatic elements, may be added for resolving the boundary layer region of viscous flows near surfaces of solid bodies. This paper describes the grid generation processes used to generate each grid type. Several example grids are shown, demonstrating the ability of the method to discretize complex geometries, with very little pre-processing required by the user.

  18. Comparisons of the Anelastic and Unified Modes Based on the Lorenz and Charney-Phillips Vertical Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konor, Celal; Arakawa, Akio

    2010-05-01

    The anelastic and unified models based on the Lorenz and Charney-Phillips vertical grids are compared in view of nonhydrostatic simulation of buoyant bubbles. It is widely accepted that small-scale nonacoustic motions such as convection and turbulence are basically anelastic. The recently proposed unified system (Arakawa and Konor, 2009) unifies the anelastic and quasi-hydrostatic systems by including quasi-hydrostatic compressibility and, therefore, it can be used for simulating a wide range of motion from turbulence to planetary scales. There are two basic grids for the vertical discretization of governing equations. The most commonly used vertical grid is the Lorenz grid (L-grid), on which the thermodynamic variables and the horizontal momentum are staggered from the vertical momentum. The other is the less commonly used Charney-Phillips grid (CP-grid), on which the thermodynamic variables and the vertical momentum are staggered from the horizontal momentum. The existence of a computational mode with the L-grid in the vertical structure of temperature is well-known. It should be also pointed out that, when the L-grid is used in a non-hydrostatic model, the buoyancy force cannot properly respond to the dynamically generated noise in the vertical velocity field. With the unified system of equations, however, we find that the dynamical generation of noise tends to be suppressed. This can be interpreted as a result of including the quasi-hydrostatic compressibility. Even when the motion is basically nonhydrostatic, the generated noise tends to be quasi-stationary and, therefore, quasi-hydrostatic. Although the original intention of including the quasi-hydrostatic compressibility in the unified system is to improve simulation of planetary waves, the results presented here indicate that the unified system can also better control small-scale computational noise without generating vertically propagating acoustic waves. In this presentation, we show results from

  19. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Timothy M.; Palmintier, Bryan; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Maciejewski, Anthony A.; Siegel, Howard Jay

    2015-07-03

    As more Smart Grid technologies (e.g., distributed photovoltaic, spatially distributed electric vehicle charging) are integrated into distribution grids, static distribution simulations are no longer sufficient for performing modeling and analysis. GridLAB-D is an agent-based distribution system simulation environment that allows fine-grained end-user models, including geospatial and network topology detail. A problem exists in that, without outside intervention, once the GridLAB-D simulation begins execution, it will run to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management systems and aggregator control. We address this lack of runtime interaction by designing a flexible communication interface, Bus.py (pronounced bus-dot-pie), that uses Python to pass messages between one or more GridLAB-D instances and a Smart Grid simulator. This work describes the design and implementation of Bus.py, discusses its usefulness in terms of some Smart Grid scenarios, and provides an example of an aggregator-based residential demand response system interacting with GridLAB-D through Bus.py. The small scale example demonstrates the validity of the interface and shows that an aggregator using said interface is able to control residential loads in GridLAB-D during runtime to cause a reduction in the peak load on the distribution system in (a) peak reduction and (b) time-of-use pricing cases.

  20. A Roadmap for caGrid, an Enterprise Grid Architecture for Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Saltz, Joel; Hastings, Shannon; Langella, Stephen; Oster, Scott; Kurc, Tahsin; Payne, Philip; Ferreira, Renato; Plale, Beth; Goble, Carole; Ervin, David; Sharma, Ashish; Pan, Tony; Permar, Justin; Brezany, Peter; Siebenlist, Frank; Madduri, Ravi; Foster, Ian; Shanbhag, Krishnakant; Mead, Charlie; Hong, Neil Chue

    2012-01-01

    caGrid is a middleware system which combines the Grid computing, the service oriented architecture, and the model driven architecture paradigms to support development of interoperable data and analytical resources and federation of such resources in a Grid environment. The functionality provided by caGrid is an essential and integral component of the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG™) program. This program is established by the National Cancer Institute as a nationwide effort to develop enabling informatics technologies for collaborative, multi-institutional biomedical research with the overarching goal of accelerating translational cancer research. Although the main application domain for caGrid is cancer research, the infrastructure provides a generic framework that can be employed in other biomedical research and healthcare domains. The development of caGrid is an ongoing effort, adding new functionality and improvements based on feedback and use cases from the community. This paper provides an overview of potential future architecture and tooling directions and areas of improvement for caGrid and caGrid-like systems. This summary is based on discussions at a roadmap workshop held in February with participants from biomedical research, Grid computing, and high performance computing communities. PMID:18560123