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Sample records for 2-ltr hiv-1 dna

  1. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  2. Impact of Chemotherapy for HIV-1 Related Lymphoma on Residual Viremia and Cellular HIV-1 DNA in Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Para, Michael F.; Mellors, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical Trials Registration Unique Identifier: NCT00001137 PMID:24638072

  3. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Para, Michael F; Mellors, John W

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  4. Elite suppressors harbor low levels of integrated HIV DNA and high levels of 2-LTR circular HIV DNA compared to HIV+ patients on and off HAART.

    PubMed

    Graf, Erin H; Mexas, Angela M; Yu, Jianqing J; Shaheen, Farida; Liszewski, Megan K; Di Mascio, Michele; Migueles, Stephen A; Connors, Mark; O'Doherty, Una

    2011-02-01

    Elite suppressors (ES) are a rare population of HIV-infected individuals that are capable of naturally controlling the infection without the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Patients on HAART often achieve viral control to similar (undetectable) levels. Accurate and sensitive methods to measure viral burden are needed to elucidate important differences between these two patient populations in order to better understand their mechanisms of control. Viral burden quantification in ES patients has been limited to measurements of total DNA in PBMC, and estimates of Infectious Units per Million cells (IUPM). There appears to be no significant difference in the level of total HIV DNA between cells from ES patients and patients on HAART. However, recovering infectious virus from ES patient samples is much more difficult, suggesting their reservoir size should be much smaller than that in patients on HAART. Here we find that there is a significant difference in the level of integrated HIV DNA in ES patients compared to patients on HAART, providing an explanation for the previous results. When comparing the level of total to integrated HIV DNA in these samples we find ES patients have large excesses of unintegrated HIV DNA. To determine the composition of unintegrated HIV DNA in these samples, we measured circular 2-LTR HIV DNA forms and found ES patients frequently have high levels of 2-LTR circles in PBMC. We further show that these high levels of 2-LTR circles are not the result of inefficient integration in ES cells, since HIV integrates with similar efficiency in ES and normal donor cells. Our findings suggest that measuring integration provides a better surrogate of viral burden than total HIV DNA in ES patients. Moreover, they add significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms that allow viral control and reservoir maintenance in this unique patient population.

  5. No Effect of Raltegravir Intensification on Viral Replication Markers in the Blood of HIV-1-infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Coombs, Robert W.; Chan, Ellen S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Zheng, Lu; Margolis, David M.; Read, Sarah; Kallungal, Beatrice; Chang, Ming; Goecker, Erin A.; Wiegand, Ann; Kearney, Mary; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; D'Aquila, Richard; Lederman, Michael M.; Mellors, John W.; Eron, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controversy continues regarding the extent of ongoing viral replication in HIV-1-infected patients on effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Adding an additional potent agent, such as raltegravir, to effective ART in patients with low-level residual viremia may reveal whether there is ongoing HIV-1 replication. Methods We previously reported the outcome of a randomized, placebo-controlled study of raltegravir intensification in patients on ART with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL that showed no effect on residual viremia measured by single copy assay (SCA). We now report the effects of raltegravir intensification in that trial on other potential measures of ongoing HIV-1 replication: 2-LTR HIV-1 circles, total cellular HIV-1 DNA and T cell activation. Results Of 50 patients tested, 12 (24%) had 2-LTR-circles detected at baseline. Patients who were 2-LTR-positive had higher plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 DNA levels than 2-LTR-negative individuals. At week 12 of raltegravir intensification, there was no change from baseline in 2-LTR circles, in total HIV-1 DNA or in the ratio of 2-LTR circles to total HIV-1 DNA. There was also no change in markers of T cell activation. Conclusions In HIV-1-infected individuals on effective antiretroviral therapy, we find no evidence of ongoing viral replication in the blood that is suppressible by raltegravir intensification. The results imply that raltegravir intensification alone will not eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:22083073

  6. Integrated and Total HIV-1 DNA Predict Ex Vivo Viral Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kiselinova, Maja; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Buzon, Maria Jose; Malatinkova, Eva; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of a reservoir of latently infected CD4 T cells remains one of the major obstacles to cure HIV. Numerous strategies are being explored to eliminate this reservoir. To translate these efforts into clinical trials, there is a strong need for validated biomarkers that can monitor the reservoir over time in vivo. A comprehensive study was designed to evaluate and compare potential HIV-1 reservoir biomarkers. A cohort of 25 patients, treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy was sampled at three time points, with median of 2.5 years (IQR: 2.4–2.6) between time point 1 and 2; and median of 31 days (IQR: 28–36) between time point 2 and 3. Patients were median of 6 years (IQR: 3–12) on ART, and plasma viral load (<50 copies/ml) was suppressed for median of 4 years (IQR: 2–8). Total HIV-1 DNA, unspliced (us) and multiply spliced HIV-1 RNA, and 2LTR circles were quantified by digital PCR in peripheral blood, at 3 time points. At the second time point, a viral outgrowth assay (VOA) was performed, and integrated HIV-1 DNA and relative mRNA expression levels of HIV-1 restriction factors were quantified. No significant change was found for long- and short-term dynamics of all HIV-1 markers tested in peripheral blood. Integrated HIV-1 DNA was associated with total HIV-1 DNA (p<0.001, R² = 0.85), us HIV-1 RNA (p = 0.029, R² = 0.40), and VOA (p = 0.041, R2 = 0.44). Replication-competent virus was detected in 80% of patients by the VOA and it correlated with total HIV-1 DNA (p = 0.039, R² = 0.54). The mean quantification difference between Alu-PCR and VOA was 2.88 log10, and 2.23 log10 between total HIV-1 DNA and VOA. The levels of usHIV-1 RNA were inversely correlated with mRNA levels of several HIV-1 restriction factors (TRIM5α, SAMHD1, MX2, SLFN11, pSIP1). Our study reveals important correlations between the viral outgrowth and total and integrated HIV-1 DNA measures, suggesting that the total pool of HIV-1 DNA may predict the size of the

  7. Imaging HIV-1 Genomic DNA from Entry through Productive Infection.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Ryan D; Cenker, Jennifer J; McDonald, David

    2017-05-01

    In order to track the fate of HIV-1 particles from early entry events through productive infection, we developed a method to visualize HIV-1 DNA reverse transcription complexes by the incorporation and fluorescent labeling of the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into nascent viral DNA during cellular entry. Monocyte-derived macrophages were chosen as natural targets of HIV-1, as they do not divide and therefore do not incorporate EdU into chromosomal DNA, which would obscure the detection of intranuclear HIV-1 genomes. Using this approach, we observed distinct EdU puncta in the cytoplasm of infected cells within 12 h postinfection and subsequent accumulation of puncta in the nucleus, which remained stable through 5 days. The depletion of the restriction factor SAMHD1 resulted in a markedly increased number of EdU puncta, allowing efficient quantification of HIV-1 reverse transcription events. Analysis of HIV-1 isolates bearing defined mutations in the capsid protein revealed differences in their cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation, and data from quantitative PCR analysis closely recapitulated the EdU results. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization identified actively transcribing, EdU-labeled HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that CDK9, phosphorylated at serine 175, was recruited to RNA-positive HIV-1 DNA, providing a means to directly observe transcriptionally active HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells. Overall, this system allows stable labeling and monitoring of HIV genomic DNA within infected cells during cytoplasmic transit, nuclear import, and mRNA synthesis.IMPORTANCE The fates of HIV-1 reverse transcription products within infected cells are not well understood. Although previous imaging approaches identified HIV-1 intermediates during early stages of infection, few have connected these events with the later stages that ultimately lead to proviral transcription and the

  8. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models.

    PubMed

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-12-02

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency.

  9. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models

    PubMed Central

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency. PMID:27910923

  10. Diversity of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in breast milk from HIV-1-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Becquart, Pierre; Courgnaud, Valerie; Willumsen, Juana; Van de Perre, Philippe

    2007-07-05

    We compared human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA populations in the different fractions of breast milk (lactoserum, lipid layer, cell pellet) and between right and left breasts in four HIV-1-infected mothers by analyzing the hypervariable env C2-V5 region. Phylogenetic analyses of the viral quasispecies revealed that RNA populations and DNA populations were clearly distinct and that viral RNA sequences were similar in lipid layer and lactoserum in the milk of 3 out of 4 mothers. Comparison of viral DNA between milk from right and left breast showed a differential distribution of variants in three mothers. In contrast, RNA variants detected from milk of the two breasts were mixed in 3 out of 4 mothers. This study suggests that each mammary gland is subjected to microenvironmental pressure that may differ from the contralateral breast.

  11. Endogenous CCL2 neutralization restricts HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages by inhibiting viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sabbatucci, Michela; Covino, Daniela Angela; Purificato, Cristina; Mallano, Alessandra; Federico, Maurizio; Lu, Jing; Rinaldi, Arturo Ottavio; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Cara, Andrea; Vella, Stefano; Gessani, Sandra; Andreotti, Mauro; Fantuzzi, Laura

    2015-01-22

    Macrophages are key targets of HIV-1 infection. We have previously described that the expression of CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) increases during monocyte differentiation to macrophages and it is further up-modulated by HIV-1 exposure. Moreover, CCL2 acts as an autocrine factor that promotes viral replication in infected macrophages. In this study, we dissected the molecular mechanisms by which CCL2 neutralization inhibits HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and the potential involvement of the innate restriction factors protein sterile alpha motif (SAM) histidine/aspartic acid (HD) domain containing 1 (SAMHD1) and apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) family members. CCL2 neutralization potently reduced the number of p24 Gag+ cells during the course of either productive or single cycle infection with HIV-1. In contrast, CCL2 blocking did not modify entry of HIV-1 based Virus Like Particles, thus demonstrating that the restriction involves post-entry steps of the viral life cycle. Notably, the accumulation of viral DNA, both total, integrated and 2-LTR circles, was strongly impaired by neutralization of CCL2. Looking for correlates of HIV-1 DNA accumulation inhibition, we found that the antiviral effect of CCL2 neutralization was independent of the modulation of SAMHD1 expression or function. Conversely, a strong and selective induction of APOBEC3A expression, to levels comparable to those of freshly isolated monocytes, was associated with the inhibition of HIV-1 replication mediated by CCL2 blocking. Interestingly, the CCL2 neutralization mediated increase of APOBEC3A expression was type I IFN independent. Moreover, the transcriptome analysis of the effect of CCL2 blocking on global gene expression revealed that the neutralization of this chemokine resulted in the upmodulation of additional genes involved in the defence response to viruses. Neutralization of endogenous CCL2 determines a profound

  12. Establishment and stability of the latent HIV-1 DNA reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Johanna; Zanini, Fabio; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Neher, Richard A; Albert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection cannot be cured because the virus persists as integrated proviral DNA in long-lived cells despite years of suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a previous paper (Zanini et al, 2015) we documented HIV-1 evolution in 10 untreated patients. Here we characterize establishment, turnover, and evolution of viral DNA reservoirs in the same patients after 3–18 years of suppressive ART. A median of 14% (range 0–42%) of the DNA sequences were defective due to G-to-A hypermutation. Remaining DNA sequences showed no evidence of evolution over years of suppressive ART. Most sequences from the DNA reservoirs were very similar to viruses actively replicating in plasma (RNA sequences) shortly before start of ART. The results do not support persistent HIV-1 replication as a mechanism to maintain the HIV-1 reservoir during suppressive therapy. Rather, the data indicate that DNA variants are turning over as long as patients are untreated and that suppressive ART halts this turnover. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18889.001 PMID:27855060

  13. Human macrophages support persistent transcription from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Jeremy; Beddall, Margaret H.; Yu Dongyang; Iyer, Subashini R.; Marsh, Jon W.; Wu Yuntao

    2008-03-15

    Retroviruses require integration of their RNA genomes for both stability and productive viral replication. In HIV infection of non-dividing, resting CD4 T cells, where integration is greatly impeded, the reverse transcribed HIV DNA has limited biological activity and a short half-life. In metabolically active and proliferating T cells, unintegrated DNA rapidly diminishes with cell division. HIV also infects the non-dividing but metabolically active macrophage population. In an in vitro examination of HIV infection of macrophages, we find that unintegrated viral DNA not only has an unusual stability, but also maintains biological activity. The unintegrated linear DNA, 1-LTR, and 2-LTR circles are stable for at least 30 days. Additionally, there is persistent viral gene transcription, which is selective and skewed towards viral early genes such as nef and tat with highly diminished rev and vif. One viral early gene product Nef was measurably synthesized. We also find that independent of integration, the HIV infection process in macrophages leads to generation of numerous chemokines.

  14. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  15. A Real Time PCR Platform for the Simultaneous Quantification of Total and Extrachromosomal HIV DNA Forms in Blood of HIV-1 Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Canovari, Benedetta; Scotti, Maddalena; Acetoso, Marcello; Valentini, Massimo; Petrelli, Enzo; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background The quantitative measurement of various HIV-1 DNA forms including total, unintegrated and integrated provirus play an increasingly important role in HIV-1 infection monitoring and treatment-related research. We report the development and validation of a SYBR Green real time PCR (TotUFsys platform) for the simultaneous quantification of total and extrachromosomal HIV-1 DNA forms in patients. This innovative technique makes it possible to obtain both measurements in a single PCR run starting from frozen blood employing the same primers and standard curve. Moreover, due to identical amplification efficiency, it allows indirect estimation of integrated level. To specifically detect 2-LTR a qPCR method was also developed. Methodology/Findings Primers used for total HIV-1 DNA quantification spanning a highly conserved region were selected and found to detect all HIV-1 clades of group M and the unintegrated forms of the same. A total of 195 samples from HIV-1 patients in a wide range of clinical conditions were analyzed with a 100% success rate, even in patients with suppressed plasma viremia, regardless of CD4+ or therapy. No significant correlation was observed between the two current prognostic markers, CD4+ and plasma viremia, while a moderate or high inverse correlation was found between CD4+ and total HIV DNA, with strong values for unintegrated HIV DNA. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the results support the use of HIV DNA as another tool, in addition to traditional assays, which can be used to estimate the state of viral infection, the risk of disease progression and to monitor the effects of ART. The TotUFsys platform allowed us to obtain a final result, expressed as the total and unintegrated HIV DNA copy number per microgram of DNA or 104 CD4+, for 12 patients within two working days. PMID:25364909

  16. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  17. During Stably Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy Integrated HIV-1 DNA Load in Peripheral Blood is Associated with the Frequency of CD8 Cells Expressing HLA-DR/DP/DQ

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandra; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kiselinova, Maja; Pollakis, Georgios; Beloukas, Apostolos; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Strain, Matthew; Richman, Douglas; Phillips, Andrew; Geretti, Anna Maria; Vitiello, Paola; Mackie, Nicola; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Waters, Anele; Post, Frank; Edwards, Simon; Fox, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterising the correlates of HIV persistence improves understanding of disease pathogenesis and guides the design of curative strategies. This study investigated factors associated with integrated HIV-1 DNA load during consistently suppressive first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Method Total, integrated, and 2-long terminal repeats (LTR) circular HIV-1 DNA, residual plasma HIV-1 RNA, T-cell activation markers, and soluble CD14 (sCD14) were measured in peripheral blood of 50 patients that had received 1–14 years of efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based therapy. Results Integrated HIV-1 DNA load (per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) was median 1.9 log10 copies (interquartile range 1.7–2.2) and showed a mean difference of 0.2 log10 copies per 10 years of suppressive ART (95% confidence interval − 0.2, 0.6; p = 0.28). It was positively correlated with total HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+HLA-DR/DP/DQ+ cells, and was also higher in subjects with higher sCD14 levels, but showed no correlation with levels of 2-LTR circular HIV-1 DNA and residual plasma HIV-1 RNA, or the frequency of CD4+CD38+ and CD8+CD38+ cells. Adjusting for pre-ART viral load, duration of suppressive ART, CD4 cell counts, residual plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, and sCD14 levels, integrated HIV-1 DNA load was mean 0.5 log10 copies higher for each 50% higher frequency of CD8+HLA-DR/DP/DQ+ cells (95% confidence interval 0.2, 0.9; p = 0.01). Conclusions The observed positive association between integrated HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+DR/DP/DQ+ cells indicates that a close correlation between HIV persistence and immune activation continues during consistently suppressive therapy. The inducers of the distinct activation profile warrant further investigation. PMID:26498496

  18. Single-molecule study of DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase on DNA templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangjin; Schroeder, Charles M; Xie, X Sunney

    2010-02-05

    HIV-1 RT (human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase) is a multifunctional polymerase responsible for reverse transcription of the HIV genome, including DNA replication on both RNA and DNA templates. During reverse transcription in vivo, HIV-1 RT replicates through various secondary structures on RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) templates without the need for a nucleic acid unwinding protein, such as a helicase. In order to understand the mechanism of polymerization through secondary structures, we investigated the DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 RT on long ssDNA templates using a multiplexed single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assay. We observed that HIV-1 RT performs fast primer extension DNA synthesis on single-stranded regions of DNA (18.7 nt/s) and switches its activity to slow strand displacement synthesis at DNA hairpin locations (2.3 nt/s). Furthermore, we found that the rate of strand displacement synthesis is dependent on the GC content in hairpin stems and template stretching force. This indicates that the strand displacement synthesis occurs through a mechanism that is neither completely active nor passive: that is, the opening of the DNA hairpin is driven by a combination of free energy released during dNTP (deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate) hydrolysis and thermal fraying of base pairs. Our experimental observations provide new insight into the interchanging modes of DNA replication by HIV-1 RT on long ssDNA templates.

  19. HIV-1 Tropism Determines Different Mutation Profiles in Proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Brito, Sieberth; Paulo Zukurov, Jean; Maricato, Juliana T; Volpini, Angela C; Salim, Anna Christina M; Araújo, Flávio M G; Coimbra, Roney S; Oliveira, Guilherme C; Antoneli, Fernando; Janini, Luiz Mário R

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish new infections HIV-1 particles need to attach to receptors expressed on the cellular surface. HIV-1 particles interact with a cell membrane receptor known as CD4 and subsequently with another cell membrane molecule known as a co-receptor. Two major different co-receptors have been identified: C-C chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-X-C chemokine Receptor type 4 (CXCR4) Previous reports have demonstrated cellular modifications upon HIV-1 binding to its co-receptors including gene expression modulations. Here we investigated the effect of viral binding to either CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptors on viral diversity after a single round of reverse transcription. CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped viruses were used to infect non-stimulated and stimulated PBMCs and purified CD4 positive cells. We adopted the SOLiD methodology to sequence virtually the entire proviral DNA from all experimental infections. Infections with CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped virus resulted in different patterns of genetic diversification. CCR5 virus infections produced extensive proviral diversity while in CXCR4 infections a more localized substitution process was observed. In addition, we present pioneering results of a recently developed method for the analysis of SOLiD generated sequencing data applicable to the study of viral quasi-species. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of viral quasi-species evaluation by NGS methodologies. We presented for the first time strong evidence for a host cell driving mechanism acting on the HIV-1 genetic variability under the control of co-receptor stimulation. Additional investigations are needed to further clarify this question, which is relevant to viral diversification process and consequent disease progression.

  20. SINGLE-MOLECULE STUDY OF DNA POLYMERIZATION ACTIVITY OF HIV-1 REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE ON DNA TEMPLATES

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangjin; Schroeder, Charles M.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is a multifunctional polymerase responsible for reverse transcription of the HIV genome, including DNA replication on both RNA and DNA templates. During reverse transcription in vivo, HIV-1 RT replicates through various secondary structures on RNA and single-stranded DNA templates without the need for a nucleic acid unwinding protein, such as a helicase. In order to understand the mechanism of polymerization through secondary structures, we investigated the DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 RT on long single-stranded DNA templates using a multiplexed single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assay. We observed that HIV-1 RT performs fast primer extension DNA synthesis on single-stranded regions of DNA (18.7 nt/s) and switches its activity to slow strand displacement synthesis at DNA hairpin locations (2.3 nt/s). Furthermore, we found that the rate of strand displacement synthesis is dependent on the GC content in hairpin stems and template stretching force. This indicates that the strand displacement synthesis occurs through a mechanism that is neither completely active nor passive, i.e. the opening of the DNA hairpin is driven by a combination of free energy released during dNTP hydrolysis and thermal fraying of base pairs. Our experimental observations provide new insight into the interchanging modes of DNA replication by HIV-1 RT on long single-stranded DNA templates. PMID:19968999

  1. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control.

    PubMed

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Koelsch, Kersten K; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2014-09-12

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials.

  2. Laboratory indicators of mastitis are not associated with elevated HIV-1 DNA loads or predictive of HIV-1 RNA loads in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Shetty, Avinash K; Seidel, Kristy D; Matasa, Kuda; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2007-08-15

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 has been associated with symptomatic and asymptomatic mastitis and with the quantity of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in maternal milk. An improved understanding of the relationship between indicators of inflammation and HIV-1 loads in breast milk could improve MTCT prevention strategies. In a cross-sectional study, laboratory indicators of mastitis (breast milk sodium [Na(+)] concentration, sodium : potassium ratio [Na(+) : K(+)], and leukocyte count) were related to breast milk HIV-1 RNA and DNA loads and were evaluated for predicting viral loads in milk. Mastitis was present in 63 (15%) of 407, 60 (15%) of 407, and 76 (18%) of 412 milk specimens, as defined by Na(+) concentration >12 mmol/L, Na(+) : K(+) >1, and total leukocyte counts > or =10(6) cells/mL, respectively. Each indicator was associated with an increased milk HIV-1 RNA load (P<.05) but not with HIV-1 DNA load. Neutrophils correlated better with milk HIV-1 RNA load than total leukocytes. However, neither neutrophil count, Na(+) concentration, nor Na(+) : K(+) displayed a threshold that was both sensitive and specific for the detection of HIV-1 RNA in milk at thresholds of > or =50 or > or =10(4) copies/mL. HIV-1 DNA loads in breast milk were not increased during mastitis. Neither milk cell counts nor electrolyte concentrations were useful predictors of milk HIV-1 RNA or DNA loads for individual women.

  3. RNA versus DNA (NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 versus Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5) for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Kébé, K; Ndiaye, O; Ndiaye, H Diop; Mengue, P Mbakob; Guindo, P M M; Diallo, S; Léye, N; Gueye, S B; Diallo, A Gaye; Kane, C Touré; Mboup, S

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 platform (bioMérieux, France) to the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5 (Roche Molecular Systems, Switzerland) in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants using venipuncture-derived whole blood in tubes and dried blood spots. A total of 149 dried blood spots and 43 EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood samples were collected throughout Dakar and other areas in Senegal from infants and children aged 3 weeks to 24 months who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers. Samples were tested using the NucliSENS and Amplicor technologies. The NucliSENS and Amplicor results were 100% concordant using either EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood or dried blood spots. Compared to Amplicor, the sensitivity and specificity of the NucliSENS test were 100%. The NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 RNA assay performed as well as the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants. In addition, this platform can give an indication of the viral load baseline. The NucliSENS EasyQ platform is a good alternative for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection.

  4. A genotypic HIV-1 proviral DNA coreceptor tropism assay: characterization in viremic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 coreceptor tropism testing is used to evaluate eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. However, HIV-1 RNA-based tests are not suitable for virologically suppressed patients, therefore the use of proviral DNA tropism testing has been investigated. We describe a novel proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism assay and compare its performance to that of a sensitive HIV-1 RNA-based genotypic test. Methods Tropism was determined using HIV-1 plasma RNA and proviral DNA from 42 paired samples from patients with plasma viral loads ≥1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Proviral DNA sample types included whole blood, separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline and peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in spun plasma. The HIV-1 envelope V3 region was PCR-amplified, sequenced in triplicate, and analyzed for tropism with the geno2pheno algorithm using a 10% false-positive rate (FPR). Results Amplicons were obtained from proviral DNA and plasma RNA in 41/42 samples. Tropism predictions were highly concordant (93%–98%) between proviral DNA and plasma RNA, regardless of the proviral DNA isolation method. Non-R5 proviral DNA results were obtained for 100% of patients with detectable non-R5 plasma HIV-1 RNA results. Geno2pheno FPRs for proviral DNA and plasma RNA were highly correlated (Spearman rho = 0.86). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that proviral DNA tropism determinations from whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were highly concordant with plasma HIV-1 RNA tropism determinations. This assay may be useful for screening virologically suppressed patients for CCR5-antagonist eligibility and for research purposes. PMID:24904682

  5. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  6. Impairment of HIV-1 cDNA synthesis by DBR1 knockdown.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Alvaro E; Fisher, Hugh E; Nitta, Takayuki; Fan, Hung; Camerini, David

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies showed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of the RNA lariat debranching enzyme (DBR1) led to a decrease in the production of HIV-1 cDNA. To further characterize this effect, DBR1 shRNA was introduced into GHOST-R5X4 cells, followed by infection at a multiplicity near unity with HIV-1 or an HIV-1-derived vector. DNA and RNA were isolated from whole cells and from cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions at different times postinfection. Inhibition of DBR1 had little or no effect on the formation of minus-strand strong-stop cDNA but caused a significant reduction in the formation of intermediate and full-length cDNA. Moreover, minus-strand strong-stop DNA rapidly accumulated in the cytoplasm in the first 2 h of infection but shifted to the nuclear fraction by 6 h postinfection. Regardless of DBR1 inhibition, greater than 95% of intermediate-length and full-length HIV-1 cDNA was found in the nuclear fraction at all time points. Thus, under these experimental conditions, HIV-1 cDNA synthesis was initiated in the cytoplasm and completed in the nucleus or perinuclear region of the infected cell. When nuclear import of the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex was blocked by expressing a truncated form of the mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation factor CPSF6, the completion of HIV-1 vector cDNA synthesis was detected in the cytoplasm, where it was not inhibited by DBR1 knockdown. Refinement of the cell fractionation procedure indicated that the completion of reverse transcription occurred both within nuclei and in the perinuclear region. Taken together the results indicate that in infections at a multiplicity near 1, HIV-1 reverse transcription is completed in the nucleus or perinuclear region of the infected cell, where it is dependent on DBR1. When nuclear transport is inhibited, reverse transcription is completed in the cytoplasm in a DBR1-independent manner. Thus, there are at least two mechanisms of HIV-1 reverse transcription that require different

  7. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery.

  8. Rapid detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA for early infant diagnosis using recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; Lehman, Dara A; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-04-02

    Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes.

  9. Rapid Detection of HIV-1 Proviral DNA for Early Infant Diagnosis Using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, David S.; Lehman, Dara A.; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes. PMID:23549916

  10. Hepatitis C Therapy With Interferon-α and Ribavirin Reduces CD4 T-Cell–Associated HIV-1 DNA in HIV-1/Hepatitis C Virus–Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Buzon, Maria J.; Shaw, Amy; Berg, Randi Karteebahn; Yu, Xu G.; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Leal, Manuel; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Combined treatment with interferon alpha (IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) can effectively cure HCV infection in a significant proportion of patients, but effects of this regimen on cellular reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are unknown. Here, we show that treatment with IFN-α/RBV led to a moderate but significant and sustained decline of HIV-1 DNA in CD4 T cells from HIV-1/hepatitis C virus–coinfected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (n = 12). However, in vitro experiments failed to demonstrate an effect of pharmacological doses of IFN-α on HIV-1 reactivation. Together, these data suggest that treatment with IFN-α/RBV can moderately reduce the reservoir of HIV-1–infected CD4 T cells that persists despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24277743

  11. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4DCAF1 E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4DCAF1 E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4DCAF1 E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  12. LINE-1 Retrotransposable Element DNA Accumulates in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E.; Buzdin, Anton A.; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4+ cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity. PMID:24089548

  13. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  14. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  15. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  16. Excision of HIV-1 DNA by gene editing: a proof-of-concept in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Bella, R; Yin, C; Otte, J; Ferrante, P; Gendelman, H E; Li, H; Booze, R; Gordon, J; Hu, W; Khalili, K

    2016-08-01

    A CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing strategy has been remarkable in excising segments of integrated HIV-1 DNA sequences from the genome of latently infected human cell lines and by introducing InDel mutations, suppressing HIV-1 replication in patient-derived CD4+ T-cells, ex vivo. Here, we employed a short version of the Cas9 endonuclease, saCas9, together with a multiplex of guide RNAs (gRNAs) for targeting the viral DNA sequences within the 5'-LTR and the Gag gene for removing critically important segments of the viral DNA in transgenic mice and rats encompassing the HIV-1 genome. Tail-vein injection of transgenic mice with a recombinant Adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9) vector expressing saCas9 and the gRNAs, rAAV:saCas9/gRNA, resulted in the cleavage of integrated HIV-1 DNA and excision of a 978 bp DNA fragment spanning between the LTR and Gag gene in the spleen, liver, heart, lung and kidney as well as in the circulating lymphocytes. Retro-orbital inoculation of rAAV9:saCas9/gRNA in transgenic rats eliminated a targeted segment of viral DNA and substantially decreased the level of viral gene expression in circulating blood lymphocytes. The results from the proof-of-concept studies, for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo eradication of HIV-1 DNA by CRISPR/Cas9 on delivery by an rAAV9 vector in a range of cells and tissues that harbor integrated copies of viral DNA.

  17. Structural Insights into the HIV-1 Minus-strand Strong-stop DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingying; Maskri, Ouerdia; Chaminade, Françoise; René, Brigitte; Benkaroun, Jessica; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An essential step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription is the first strand transfer that requires base pairing of the R region at the 3′-end of the genomic RNA with the complementary r region at the 3′-end of minus-strand strong-stop DNA (ssDNA). HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates this annealing process. Determination of the ssDNA structure is needed to understand the molecular basis of NC-mediated genomic RNA-ssDNA annealing. For this purpose, we investigated ssDNA using structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate). This study is the first to determine the secondary structure of the full-length HIV-1 ssDNA in the absence or presence of NC. The probing data and phylogenetic analysis support the folding of ssDNA into three stem-loop structures and the presence of four high-affinity binding sites for NC. Our results support a model for the NC-mediated annealing process in which the preferential binding of NC to four sites triggers unfolding of the three-dimensional structure of ssDNA, thus facilitating interaction of the r sequence of ssDNA with the R sequence of the genomic RNA. In addition, using gel retardation assays and ssDNA mutants, we show that the NC-mediated annealing process does not rely on a single pathway (zipper intermediate or kissing complex). PMID:26668324

  18. DNA Duplexes with Hydrophobic Modifications Inhibit Fusion between HIV-1 and Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Cai, Lifeng; Chen, Xueliang; Jiang, Xifeng; Chong, Huihui; Zheng, Baohua; Wang, Kun; He, Junlin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Maosheng; He, Yuxian

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS typically possessing unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action has been of great importance due to the quick drug-resistant mutations of HIV-1 strains. The work presented in this report describes a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Hydrophobic groups were introduced into a DNA duplex skeleton either at one end, at both ends, or in the middle. These modified DNA duplexes inhibited fusion between HIV-1 and human cell membranes at micro- or submicromolar concentrations. Respective inhibitors adopted an aptamer pattern instead of a base-pairing interaction pattern. Structure-activity relationship studies of the respective DNA duplexes showed that the rigid and negatively charged DNA skeletons, in addition to the presence of hydrophobic groups, were crucial to the anti-HIV-1 activity of these compounds. A fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based inhibitory assay showed that these duplex inhibitors interacted with the primary pocket in the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) instead of interacting with the lipid bilayers. PMID:23896466

  19. Performance characteristics of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Opengene DNA Sequencing System.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Grant, Robert M; Feorino, Paul; Griswold, Marshal; Hoover, Marie; Young, Russell; Day, Stephen; Lloyd Jr, Robert M; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F; Winslow, Dean L

    2003-04-01

    The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System are designed to sequence the protease (PR)- and reverse transcriptase (RT)-coding regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol. Studies were undertaken to determine the accuracy of this assay system in detecting resistance-associated mutations and to determine the effects of RNA extraction methods, anticoagulants, specimen handling, and potentially interfering substances. Samples were plasma obtained from HIV-infected subjects or seronegative plasma to which viruses derived from wild-type and mutant infectious molecular clones (IMC) of HIV-1 were added. Extraction methods tested included standard and UltraSensitive AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR, QIAGEN viral RNA extraction mini kit, and QIAGEN Ultra HIV extraction kit, and NASBA manual HIV-1 quantitative NucliSens. Sequence data from test sites were compared to a "gold standard" reference sequence to determine the percent agreement. Comparisons between test and reference sequences at the nucleotide level showed 97.5 to 100% agreement. Similar results were obtained regardless of extraction method, regardless of use of EDTA or acid citrate dextrose as anticoagulant, and despite the presence of triglycerides, bilirubin, hemoglobin, antiretroviral drugs, HIV-2, hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV, cytomegalovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), or HTLV-2. Samples with HIV-1 RNA titers of >or=1,000 copies/ml gave consistent results. The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System consistently generate highly accurate sequence data when tested with IMC-derived HIV and patient samples.

  20. APOBEC3G restricts early HIV-1 replication in the cytoplasm of target cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenny L; Hope, Thomas J

    2008-05-25

    Cellular APOBEC3G (A3G) protein is packaged into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions in producer cells yet restricts viral replication in target cells. To characterize this restriction in target cells, the effect of A3G on generating various HIV-1 cDNA products was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. A3G decreased cDNA products from Vif-deficient HIV-1, with minor effects on early reverse transcripts and larger declines in late reverse transcripts. However, the greatest decline was typically observed in nuclear 2-LTR circles. Moreover, the magnitude of these declines varied with A3G dose. Adding integration inhibitor did not stop the A3G-mediated loss in 2-LTR circles. Moreover, obstructing HIV-1 nuclear entry using vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein did not stop the A3G-mediated decline in late reverse transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that A3G has important restriction activity in the cytoplasm and progressively diminishes viral cytoplasmic and nuclear cDNA forms with increasing magnitude during restriction.

  1. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA and RNA synthesis during primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Pantaleo, G; Butini, L; Demarest, J F; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Fauci, A S

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 replication and viral burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been reported to be high in primary infection but generally very low during the prolonged period of clinical latency. It is uncertain precisely when this transition occurs during the HIV-1 infection and what the relationship is between the changes in HIV-1 replication versus the clearance of infected cells in the overall control of viral replication. In the present study, the kinetics of viral burden (i.e., frequency of HIV-1-infected cells) and replication during primary and early-chronic infection were analyzed in PBMC of four acutely infected individuals. High frequencies of HIV-1-infected cells and high levels of virus replication were observed in PBMC after primary HIV-1 infection. Down-regulation of virus replication in PBMC was observed in all four patients coincident with the emergence of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Other parameters of virus replication, such as circulating plasma p24 antigen and plasma viremia showed similar kinetics. In contrast, a significant decline in viral burden in PBMC was observed in only one of four patients. These results indicate that the down-regulation in the levels of virus replication associated with the clinical transition from acute to chronic infection does not necessarily reflect a reduction in viral burden, thus suggesting the involvement of additional factors. Identification of these factors will be important in elucidating the host mechanisms involved in the early control of HIV-1 infection and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8341646

  2. Quantification of HIV-1 DNA using real-time recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-06-17

    Although recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has many advantages for the detection of pathogenic nucleic acids in point-of-care applications, RPA has not yet been implemented to quantify sample concentration using a standard curve. Here, we describe a real-time RPA assay with an internal positive control and an algorithm that analyzes real-time fluorescence data to quantify HIV-1 DNA. We show that DNA concentration and the onset of detectable amplification are correlated by an exponential standard curve. In a set of experiments in which the standard curve and algorithm were used to analyze and quantify additional DNA samples, the algorithm predicted an average concentration within 1 order of magnitude of the correct concentration for all HIV-1 DNA concentrations tested. These results suggest that quantitative RPA (qRPA) may serve as a powerful tool for quantifying nucleic acids and may be adapted for use in single-sample point-of-care diagnostic systems.

  3. The use of hairpin DNA duplexes as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: synthesis, characterization, and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Baohua; Chen, Xueliang; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fang; Cai, Lifeng; Cheng, Maosheng; Keliang Liu

    2014-07-23

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS that possess unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action are of great importance due the rapidity with which drug-resistant HIV-1 strains evolve. Recently we reported on a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors modified with hydrophobic groups. The present study describes a new category of hairpin fusion inhibitor DNA duplexes bearing a 3 nucleotide loop located at either the hydrophobic or hydrophilic end. The new loop structures were designed to link 2 separate duplex-forming oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to make helix-assembly easier and more thermally stable resulting in a more compact form of DNA duplex based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A series of new hairpin duplexes were tested for anti-HIV-1 cell-cell membrane fusion activity. In addition, Tm, CD, fluorescent resonance energy transfer assays, and molecular modeling analyses were carried out to define their structural activity relationships and possible mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV-1 Vpr activates the DNA damage response in renal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Paul E; Chan, Justin; Snyder, Alexander; Planelles, Vicente; D'Agati, Vivette D; Klotman, Paul E; Klotman, Mary E

    2009-09-24

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a major cause of HIV-related morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis involves direct infection of the glomerular and tubular epithelial cells leading to characteristic disorder. Recently, we have shown that HIV-1 Vpr causes hypertrophy, hyperploidy, and apoptosis. Here, we report that Vpr activates the DNA damage response resulting in the observed renal phenotype. Renal sections from the HIVAN transgenic mouse model and human biopsies both show an abundant DNA damage response.

  5. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  6. Correlates of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: association with maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA load, genital HIV-1 DNA shedding, and breast infections.

    PubMed

    John, G C; Nduati, R W; Mbori-Ngacha, D A; Richardson, B A; Panteleeff, D; Mwatha, A; Overbaugh, J; Bwayo, J; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K

    2001-01-15

    To determine the effects of plasma, genital, and breast milk human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and breast infections on perinatal HIV-1 transmission, a nested case-control study was conducted within a randomized clinical trial of breast-feeding and formula feeding among HIV-1-seropositive mothers in Nairobi, Kenya. In analyses comparing 92 infected infants with 187 infants who were uninfected at 2 years, maternal viral RNA levels >43,000 copies/mL (cohort median) were associated with a 4-fold increase in risk of transmission (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-7.2). Maternal cervical HIV-1 DNA (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.4), vaginal HIV-1 DNA (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.7), and cervical or vaginal ulcers (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-5.8) were significantly associated with infant infection, independent of plasma virus load. Breast-feeding (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9) and mastitis (relative risk [RR], 3.9; 95% CI, 1.2-12.7) were associated with increased transmission overall, and mastitis (RR, 21.8; 95% CI, 2.3-211.0) and breast abscess (RR, 51.6; 95% CI, 4.7-571.0) were associated with late transmission (occurring >2 months postpartum). Use of methods that decrease infant exposure to HIV-1 in maternal genital secretions or breast milk may enhance currently recommended perinatal HIV-1 interventions.

  7. HIV-1 Vpr degrades the HLTF DNA translocase in T cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lahouassa, Hichem; Blondot, Marie-Lise; Chauveau, Lise; Chougui, Ghina; Morel, Marina; Leduc, Marjorie; Guillonneau, François; Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Schwartz, Olivier; Margottin-Goguet, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Viruses often interfere with the DNA damage response to better replicate in their hosts. The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) protein has been reported to modulate the activity of the DNA repair structure-specific endonuclease subunit (SLX4) complex and to promote cell cycle arrest. Vpr also interferes with the base-excision repair pathway by antagonizing the uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung2) enzyme. Using an unbiased quantitative proteomic screen, we report that Vpr down-regulates helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase involved in the repair of damaged replication forks. Vpr subverts the DDB1–cullin4-associated-factor 1 (DCAF1) adaptor of the Cul4A ubiquitin ligase to trigger proteasomal degradation of HLTF. This event takes place rapidly after Vpr delivery to cells, before and independently of Vpr-mediated G2 arrest. HLTF is degraded in lymphocytic cells and macrophages infected with Vpr-expressing HIV-1. Our results reveal a previously unidentified strategy for HIV-1 to antagonize DNA repair in host cells. PMID:27114546

  8. Effect of ribonucleotides embedded in a DNA template on HIV-1 reverse transcription kinetics and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Noble, Erin; Nguyen, Laura A; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Baek

    2013-05-03

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) frequently incorporates ribonucleoside triphosphates (rNTPs) during proviral DNA synthesis, particularly under the limited dNTP conditions found in macrophages. We investigated the mechanistic impacts of an rNMP embedded in DNA templates on HIV-1 RT-mediated DNA synthesis. We observed that the template-embedded rNMP induced pausing of RT and delayed DNA synthesis kinetics at low macrophage dNTP concentrations but not at high T cell dNTP concentrations. Although the binding affinity of RT to the rNMP-containing template-primer was not altered, the dNTP incorporation kinetics of RT were significantly reduced at one nucleotide upstream and downstream of the rNMP site, leading to pause sites. Finally, HIV-1 RT becomes more error-prone at rNMP sites with an elevated mismatch extension capability but not enhanced misinsertion capability. Together these data suggest that rNMPs embedded in DNA templates may influence reverse transcription kinetics and impact viral mutagenesis in macrophages.

  9. Safeguard against DNA sensing: the role of TREX1 in HIV-1 infection and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Maroof; Yan, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune recognition is crucial for host responses against viral infections, including infection by human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Human cells detect such invading pathogens with a collection of pattern recognition receptors that activate the production of antiviral proteins, such as the cytokine interferon-type I, to initiate antiviral responses immediately as well as the adaptive immune response for long-term protection. To establish infection in the host, many viruses have thus evolved strategies for subversion of these mechanisms of innate immunity. For example, acute infection by HIV-1 and other retroviruses have long been thought to be non-immunogenic, signifying suppression of host defenses by these pathogens. Studies in the past few years have begun to uncover a multifaceted scheme of how HIV-1 evades innate immune detection, especially of its DNA, by exploiting host proteins. This review will discuss the host mechanisms of HIV-1 DNA sensing and viral immune evasion, with a particular focus on TREX1, three prime repair exonuclease 1, a host 3' exonuclease (also known as DNase III).

  10. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity by BCG-PSN, a novel adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hou, Jue; Li, Dingfeng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Ningzhu; Hao, Yanling; Fu, Jingjing; Hu, Yunzhang; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-07

    Although the importance of DNA vaccines, especially as a priming immunization has been well established in numerous HIV vaccine studies, the immunogenictiy of DNA vaccines is generally moderate. Novel adjuvant is in urgent need for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Polysaccharide and nucleic acid fraction extracted by hot phenol method from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, known as BCG-PSN, is a widely used immunomodulatory product in China clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated whether the BCG-PSN could serve as a novel adjuvant of DNA vaccine to trigger better cellular and humoral immune responses against the HIV-1 Env antigen in Balb/C mouse model. The BCG-PSN was mixed with 10 μg or 100 μg of pDRVI1.0gp145 (HIV-1 CN54 gp145 gene) DNA vaccine and intramuscularly immunized two or three times. We found that BCG-PSN could significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine when co-administered with DNA vaccine. Further, at the same vaccination schedule, BCG-PSN co-immunization with 10 μg DNA vaccine could elicit cellular and humoral immune responses which were comparable to that induced by 100 μg DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, our results demonstrate that BCG-PSN can activate TLR signaling pathways and induce Th1-type cytokines secretion. These findings suggest that BCG-PSN can serve as a novel and effective adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  11. RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: evidence of discrimination between DNA and RNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S G; Anderson, K S

    1997-11-18

    The RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been investigated using pre-steady-state kinetics under single turnover conditions. In contrast to previous estimates of low replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the present study finds the enzyme to be more highly discriminating when an RNA/DNA template-primer is employed as compared with the corresponding DNA/DNA template-primer. The basis of this selectivity is due to extremely slow polymerization kinetics for incorporation of an incorrect deoxynucleotide. The maximum rates for misincorporation (kpol) of dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP opposite a template uridine were 0.2, 0.03, and 0.003 s-1, respectively. The equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the incorrect nucleotide opposite a template uridine were 1.0, 1.1, and 0.7 mM for dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP, respectively. These kinetic values provide fidelity estimates of 26 000 for discrimination against dGTP, 176 000 for dCTP, and 1 x 10(6) for dTTP misincorporation at this position. Similar observations were obtained when incorrect nucleotide misincorporation was examined opposite a template adenine. Thus in a direct comparison of RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA template-primer substrates, HIV-1 RT exhibits approximately a 10-60-fold increase in fidelity. This study augments our current understanding of the similarities and differences of catalytic activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using RNA and DNA substrates. Moreover, these studies lend further support for a model for nucleotide incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase involving a two-step binding mechanism governed by a rate-limiting conformational change for correct incorporation.

  12. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-07

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors.

  13. TNPO3 protects HIV-1 replication from CPSF6-mediated capsid stabilization in the host cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    De Iaco, Alberto; Santoni, Federico; Vannier, Anne; Guipponi, Michel; Antonarakis, Stylianos; Luban, Jeremy

    2013-02-15

    Despite intensive investigation the mechanism by which HIV-1 reaches the host cell nucleus is unknown. TNPO3, a karyopherin mediating nuclear entry of SR-proteins, was shown to be required for HIV-1 infectivity. Some investigators have reported that TNPO3 promotes HIV-1 nuclear import, as would be expected for a karyopherin. Yet, an equal number of investigators have failed to obtain evidence that supports this model. Here, a series of experiments were performed to better elucidate the mechanism by which TNPO3 promotes HIV-1 infectivity. To examine the role of TNPO3 in HIV-1 replication, the 2-LTR circles that are commonly used as a marker for HIV-1 nuclear entry were cloned after infection of TNPO3 knockdown cells. Potential explanation for the discrepancy in the literature concerning the effect of TNPO3 was provided by sequencing hundreds of these clones: a significant fraction resulted from autointegration into sites near the LTRs and therefore were not bona fide 2-LTR circles. In response to this finding, new techniques were developed to monitor HIV-1 cDNA, including qPCR reactions that distinguish 2-LTR circles from autointegrants, as well as massive parallel sequencing of HIV-1 cDNA. With these assays, TNPO3 knockdown was found to reduce the levels of 2-LTR circles. This finding was puzzling, though, since previous work has shown that the HIV-1 determinant for TNPO3-dependence is capsid (CA), an HIV-1 protein that forms a mega-dalton protein lattice in the cytoplasm. TNPO3 imports cellular splicing factors via their SR-domain. Attention was therefore directed towards CPSF6, an SR-protein that binds HIV-1 CA and inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import when the C-terminal SR-domain is deleted. The effect of 27 HIV-1 capsid mutants on sensitivity to TNPO3 knockdown was then found to correlate strongly with sensitivity to inhibition by a C-terminal deletion mutant of CPSF6 (R2 = 0.883, p < 0.0001). TNPO3 knockdown was then shown to cause CPSF6 to accumulate in the

  14. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  15. Detection of HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in feces and urine from chronic HIV-1 infected subjects with and without anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Caruso, Lori; Ding, Ming; Shen, Chengli; Buchanan, William; Gupta, Phalguni; Rinaldo, Charles R; Chen, Yue

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 infects gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) very early after transmission by multiple routes. The infected GALT consequently serves as the major reservoir for HIV-1 infection and could constantly shed HIV-1 and CD4+ T cells into the intestinal lumen. To examine this hypothesis, we monitored HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in fecal samples of chronically infected subjects with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared this to levels of HIV-1 RNA/DNA in urine and blood from the same subjects. Our results show that HIV-1 DNA, RNA and CD4 mRNA were detected in 8%, 19% and 31% respectively, of feces samples from infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load, and were not detected in any of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. In urine samples, HIV-1 DNA was detected in 24% of infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load and 23% of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope sequences of HIV-1 revealed distinct virus populations in concurrently collected serum, feces and urine samples from one subject. In addition, our study demonstrated for the first time the presence of CD4 mRNA in fecal specimens of HIV-1 infected subjects, which could be used to assess GALT pathogenesis in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19799780

  16. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  17. HIV-1 replication in human immune cells is independent of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) expression.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Julia; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Floss, Thomas; Schindler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was originally identified as a host cell factor binding to the HIV-1 LTR and thereby suppressing HIV-1 transcription and gene expression (Ou et al., J.Virol. 1995, 69(6):3584). TDP-43 is a global regulator of transcription, can influence RNA metabolism in many different ways and is ubiquitously expressed. Thus, TDP-43 could be a major factor restricting HIV-1 replication at the level of LTR transcription and gene expression. These facts prompted us to revisit the role of TDP-43 for HIV-1 replication. We utilized established HIV-1 cell culture systems as well as primary cell models and performed a comprehensive analysis of TDP-43 function and investigated its putative impact on HIV-1 gene expression. In HIV-1 infected cells TDP-43 was neither degraded nor sequestered from the nucleus. Furthermore, TDP-43 overexpression as well as siRNA mediated knockdown did not affect HIV-1 gene expression and virus production in T cells and macrophages. In summary, our experiments argue against a restricting role of TDP-43 during HIV-1 replication in immune cells.

  18. HIV-1 Replication in Human Immune Cells Is Independent of TAR DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nehls, Julia; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Floss, Thomas; Schindler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was originally identified as a host cell factor binding to the HIV-1 LTR and thereby suppressing HIV-1 transcription and gene expression (Ou et al., J.Virol. 1995, 69(6):3584). TDP-43 is a global regulator of transcription, can influence RNA metabolism in many different ways and is ubiquitously expressed. Thus, TDP-43 could be a major factor restricting HIV-1 replication at the level of LTR transcription and gene expression. These facts prompted us to revisit the role of TDP-43 for HIV-1 replication. We utilized established HIV-1 cell culture systems as well as primary cell models and performed a comprehensive analysis of TDP-43 function and investigated its putative impact on HIV-1 gene expression. In HIV-1 infected cells TDP-43 was neither degraded nor sequestered from the nucleus. Furthermore, TDP-43 overexpression as well as siRNA mediated knockdown did not affect HIV-1 gene expression and virus production in T cells and macrophages. In summary, our experiments argue against a restricting role of TDP-43 during HIV-1 replication in immune cells. PMID:25127017

  19. Dolutegravir Interactions with HIV-1 Integrase-DNA: Structural Rationale for Drug Resistance and Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    DeAnda, Felix; Hightower, Kendra E.; Nolte, Robert T.; Hattori, Kazunari; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kawasuji, Takashi; Underwood, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Signature HIV-1 integrase mutations associated with clinical raltegravir resistance involve 1 of 3 primary genetic pathways, Y143C/R, Q148H/K/R and N155H, the latter 2 of which confer cross-resistance to elvitegravir. In accord with clinical findings, in vitro drug resistance profiling studies with wild-type and site-directed integrase mutant viruses have shown significant fold increases in raltegravir and elvitegravir resistance for the specified viral mutants relative to wild-type HIV-1. Dolutegravir, in contrast, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in subjects failing raltegravir therapy due to integrase mutations at Y143, Q148 or N155, which is consistent with its distinct in vitro resistance profile as dolutegravir’s antiviral activity against these viral mutants is equivalent to its activity against wild-type HIV-1. Kinetic studies of inhibitor dissociation from wild-type and mutant integrase-viral DNA complexes have shown that dolutegravir also has a distinct off-rate profile with dissociative half-lives substantially longer than those of raltegravir and elvitegravir, suggesting that dolutegravir’s prolonged binding may be an important contributing factor to its distinct resistance profile. To provide a structural rationale for these observations, we constructed several molecular models of wild-type and clinically relevant mutant HIV-1 integrase enzymes in complex with viral DNA and dolutegravir, raltegravir or elvitegravir. Here, we discuss our structural models and the posited effects that the integrase mutations and the structural and electronic properties of the integrase inhibitors may have on the catalytic pocket and inhibitor binding and, consequently, on antiviral potency in vitro and in the clinic. PMID:24146996

  20. Diverse fates of uracilated HIV-1 DNA during infection of myeloid lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik C; Ransom, Monica; Hesselberth, Jay R; Hosmane, Nina N; Capoferri, Adam A; Bruner, Katherine M; Pollack, Ross A; Zhang, Hao; Drummond, Michael Bradley; Siliciano, Janet M; Siliciano, Robert; Stivers, James T

    2016-01-01

    We report that a major subpopulation of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) contains high levels of dUTP, which is incorporated into HIV-1 DNA during reverse transcription (U/A pairs), resulting in pre-integration restriction and post-integration mutagenesis. After entering the nucleus, uracilated viral DNA products are degraded by the uracil base excision repair (UBER) machinery with less than 1% of the uracilated DNA successfully integrating. Although uracilated proviral DNA showed few mutations, the viral genomic RNA was highly mutated, suggesting that errors occur during transcription. Viral DNA isolated from blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages (but not T cells) of drug-suppressed HIV-infected individuals also contained abundant uracils. The presence of viral uracils in short-lived monocytes suggests their recent infection through contact with virus producing cells in a tissue reservoir. These findings reveal new elements of a viral defense mechanism involving host UBER that may be relevant to the establishment and persistence of HIV-1 infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18447.001 PMID:27644592

  1. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  2. Delivery of DNA HIV-1 Vaccine to the Liver Induces High and Long-lasting Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Jan; Hel, Zdenek; Bozja, Jadranka; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai; Mestecky, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    The quality of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination depends on the site of DNA administration, the expression, and the properties of the encoded antigen. In the present study we demonstrate that intravenous hydrodynamic HIV-1 envelope DNA injection resulted in high levels of expression of HIV-1 envelope antigen in the liver. When compared to the administration of DNA by i.n., i.d., i.m., and i.splenic routes, hydrodynamic vaccination induced, upon DNA boosting, 40 times increase of HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies over the preimmune levels. Hydrodynamic vaccination with 1 μg DNA induced higher humoral responses than 100 μg DNA given intramuscularly in the prime – boost regimen. High levels of envelope-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were induced in genital tract secretions after two doses of DNA followed by intranasal boosting with recombinant HIV-1 gp120 protein. Furthermore, two doses of 100 μg DNA generated interferon-gamma production in ~ 4.3 ± 1.7 % of CD8+ splenocytes after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1 envelope peptides. These results demonstrate that DNA vaccines targeted to tissues with high proteosynthetic activity, such as the liver, results in enhanced immune responses. PMID:18304708

  3. Quantification of viral DNA during HIV-1 infection: A review of relevant clinical uses and laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Alidjinou, E K; Bocket, L; Hober, D

    2015-02-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy usually leads to undetectable HIV-1 RNA in the plasma. However, the virus persists in some cells of infected patients as various DNA forms, both integrated and unintegrated. This reservoir represents the greatest challenge to the complete cure of HIV-1 infection and its characteristics highly impact the course of the disease. The quantification of HIV-1 DNA in blood samples constitutes currently the most practical approach to measure this residual infection. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is the most common method used for HIV-DNA quantification and many strategies have been developed to measure the different forms of HIV-1 DNA. In the literature, several "in-house" PCR methods have been used and there is a need for standardization to have comparable results. In addition, qPCR is limited for the precise quantification of low levels by background noise. Among new assays in development, digital PCR was shown to allow an accurate quantification of HIV-1 DNA. Total HIV-1 DNA is most commonly measured in clinical routine. The absolute quantification of proviruses and unintegrated forms is more often used for research purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism using proviral DNA in women before and after viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Russell E; Rogers, Amy A; Hamdan, Hasnah B; Burger, Harold; Weiser, Barbara; Gao, Wei; Anastos, Kathryn; Young, Mary; Meyer, William A; Pesano, Rick L; Kagan, Ron M

    2015-01-01

    An HIV-1 tropism test is recommended prior to CCR5 antagonist administration to exclude patients harboring non-R5 virus from treatment with this class of antiretrovirals. HIV-1 tropism determination based on proviral DNA (pvDNA) may be useful in individuals with plasma viral RNA suppression. We developed a genotypic tropism assay for pvDNA and assessed its performance in a retrospective analysis of samples collected longitudinally. We randomly selected paired plasma/PBMC samples from the Women's Interagency HIV Study with plasma viral load ≥5,000 cp/mL at time 1 (T1), undetectable viral load maintained for ≥1 year and CD4+ >200 cells/μL at time 2 (T2). pvDNA was isolated from cryopreserved PBMCs. Sequences were analyzed in triplicate from 49/50 women, with tropism assigned using the geno2pheno (g2p) algorithm. The median time between T1 and T2 was 4.1 years. CXCR4-using virus was detected in 24% of the RNA samples and 33% of the pvDNA samples at T1, compared to 37% of the pvDNA samples at T2. Concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA tropism was 88% at T1 and 80% at T2. The g2p scores for RNA (T1) vs DNA (T1, T2) were strongly correlated (Spearman rho: 0.85 (T1); 0.78 (T2)). In women with evidence of tropism switch at T2 (either R5 to non-R5 or non-R5 to R5), there was a correlation between change in tropism and time. Mean pvDNA viral load decreased by 0.4 log10 copies/106 cells between T1 and T2 (p < 0.0001), but this decrease was not significantly associated with tropism status. We demonstrated that pvDNA tropism in women with HIV-1 suppression is concordant with prior RNA tropism results, even after a median time of >4 years. pvDNA tropism testing may be useful to determine eligibility of patients with viral suppression to switch to a CCR5-antagonist based regimen as well as for research purposes.

  5. Electroporation-mediated administration of candidate DNA vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent HIV remain desperately needed, but a number of challenges, including retroviral integration, establishment of anatomic reservoir sites, high sequence diversity, and heavy envelope glycosylation. have precluded development of a highly effective vaccine. DNA vaccines have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccines because of their ability to generate cellular and humoral immune responses, the lack of anti-vector response allowing for repeat administration, and their ability to prime the response to viral-vectored vaccines. Because the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected the developing world, the favorable thermostability profile and relative ease and low cost of manufacture of DNA vaccines offer additional advantages. In vivo electroporation (EP) has been utilized to improve immune responses to DNA vaccines as candidate HIV-1 vaccines in standalone or prime-boost regimens with both proteins and viral-vectored vaccines in several animal models and, more recently, in human clinical trials. This chapter describes the preclinical and clinical development of candidate DNA vaccines for HIV-1 delivered by EP, including challenges to bringing this technology to the developing world.

  6. Peptides derived from the HIV-1 integrase promote HIV-1 infection and multi-integration of viral cDNA in LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of the cellular Lens Epithelium Derived Growth Factor p75 (LEDGF/p75) protein is essential for integration of the Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cDNA and for efficient virus production. In the absence of LEDGF/p75 very little integration and virus production can be detected, as was demonstrated using LEDGF/p75-knokdown cells. Results Here we show that the failure to infect LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells has another reason aside from the lack of LEDGF/p75. It is also due to inhibition of the viral integrase (IN) enzymatic activity by an early expressed viral Rev protein. The formation of an inhibitory Rev-IN complex in virus-infected cells can be disrupted by the addition of three IN-derived, cell-permeable peptides, designated INr (IN derived-Rev interacting peptides) and INS (IN derived-integrase stimulatory peptide). The results of the present work confirm previous results showing that HIV-1 fails to infect LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells. However, in the presence of INrs and INS peptides, relatively high levels of viral cDNA integration as well as productive virus infection were obtained following infection by a wild type (WT) HIV-1 of LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells. Conclusions It appears that the lack of integration observed in HIV-1 infected LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells is due mainly to the inhibitory effect of Rev following the formation of a Rev-IN complex. Disruption of this inhibitory complex leads to productive infection in those cells. PMID:20678206

  7. Broad and potent immune responses to a low dose intradermal HIV-1 DNA boosted with HIV-1 recombinant MVA among healthy adults in Tanzania☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Nilsson, Charlotta; Francis, Joel; Buma, Deus; Moshiro, Candida; Aris, Eric A.; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Janabi, Mohamed; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Joachim, Agricola; Polonis, Victoria R.; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia; Robb, Merlin; Marovich, Mary; Wahren, Britta; Pallangyo, Kisali; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a phase I/II randomized placebo-controlled trial with the aim of exploring whether priming with a low intradermal dose of a multiclade, multigene HIV-1 DNA vaccine could improve the immunogenicity of the same vaccine given intramuscularly prior to boosting with a heterologous HIV-1 MVA among healthy adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Sixty HIV-uninfected volunteers were randomized to receive DNA plasmid vaccine 1 mg intradermally (id), n = 20, or 3.8 mg intramuscularly (im), n = 20, or placebo, n = 20, using a needle-free injection device. DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtype A, B, C; rev B; p17/p24 gag A, B and Rtmut B were given at weeks 0, 4 and 12. Recombinant MVA (108 pfu) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE or placebo was administered im at month 9 and 21. Results The vaccines were well tolerated. Two weeks after the third HIV-DNA injection, 22/38 (58%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Gag. Two weeks after the first HIV-MVA boost all 35 (100%) vaccinees responded to Gag and 31 (89%) to Env. Two to four weeks after the second HIV-MVA boost, 28/29 (97%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 27 (93%) to Gag and 23 (79%) to Env. The id-primed recipients had significantly higher responses to Env than im recipients. Intracellular cytokine staining for Gag-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 production showed both CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. All vaccinees had HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses. All vaccinees reacted in diagnostic HIV serological tests and 26/29 (90%) had antibodies against gp160 after the second HIV-MVA boost. Furthermore, while all of 29 vaccinee sera were negative for neutralizing antibodies against clade B, C and CRF01 AE pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl neutralization assay, in a PBMC assay, the response rate ranged from 31% to 83% positives, depending upon the clade B or CRF01_AE virus tested. This vaccine approach is safe and highly immunogenic. Low dose, id HIV-DNA priming elicited higher

  8. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  9. Integrase residues that determine nucleotide preferences at sites of HIV-1 integration: implications for the mechanism of target DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Li, Xiang; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan; Maertens, Goedele N.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses favor target-DNA (tDNA) distortion and particular bases at sites of integration, but the mechanism underlying HIV-1 selectivity is unknown. Crystal structures revealed a network of prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase residues that distort tDNA: Ala188 and Arg329 interact with tDNA bases, while Arg362 contacts the phosphodiester backbone. HIV-1 integrase residues Ser119, Arg231, and Lys258 were identified here as analogs of PFV integrase residues Ala188, Arg329 and Arg362, respectively. Thirteen integrase mutations were analyzed for effects on integrase activity in vitro and during virus infection, yielding a total of 1610 unique HIV-1 integration sites. Purine (R)/pyrimidine (Y) dinucleotide sequence analysis revealed HIV-1 prefers the tDNA signature (0)RYXRY(4), which accordingly favors overlapping flexible dinucleotides at the center of the integration site. Consistent with roles for Arg231 and Lys258 in sequence specific and non-specific binding, respectively, the R231E mutation altered integration site nucleotide preferences while K258E had no effect. S119A and S119T integrase mutations significantly altered base preferences at positions −3 and 7 from the site of viral DNA joining. The S119A preference moreover mimicked wild-type PFV selectivity at these positions. We conclude that HIV-1 IN residue Ser119 and PFV IN residue Ala188 contact analogous tDNA bases to effect virus integration. PMID:24520116

  10. HIV-1 Tat depresses DNA-PK{sub CS} expression and DNA repair, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yi; Huang Yuechen; Xu Qinzhi; Wang Huiping; Bai Bei; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun . E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-07-01

    Purpose There is accumulating evidence that cancer patients with human immmunodeficiency virus-1/acquired immunodeficency syndrome (HIV-1/AIDS) have more severe tissue reactions and often develop cutaneous toxic effects when subjected to radiotherapy. Here we explored the effects of the HIV-1 Tat protein on cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials Two Tat-expressing cell lines, TT2 and TE671-Tat, were derived from human rhabdomyosarcoma cells by transfecting with the HIV-1 tat gene. Radiosensitivity was determined using colony-forming ability. Gene expression was assessed by cDNA microarray and immunohybridization. The Comet assay and {gamma}-H2AX foci were use to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. Results The radiosensitivity of TT2 and TE671-Tat cells was significantly increased as compared with parental TE671 cells or the control TE671-pCI cells. Tat also increased proliferation activity. The comet assay and {gamma}H2AX foci detection revealed a decreased capacity to repair radiation-induced DNA DSBs in Tat-expressing cells. Microarray assay demonstrated that the DNA repair gene DNA-PKcs, and cell cycle-related genes Cdc20, Cdc25C, KIF2C and CTS1 were downregulated in Tat-expressing cells. Depression of DNA-PKcs in Tat-expressing cells was further confirmed by RT-PCR and immuno-hybridization analysis. Tat-expressing cells exhibited a prolonged S phase arrest after 4 Gy {gamma}-irradiation, and a noticeable delay in the initiation and elimination of radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest as compared with parental cells. In addition, the G{sub 2}/M arrest was incomplete in TT2 cells. Moreover, HIV-1 Tat resulted in a constitutive overexpression of cyclin B1 protein. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation via depressing DNA repair and dysregulating cell cycle checkpoints. These observations provide new insight into the increased

  11. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  12. Higher viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in seminal compartments than in blood of seven Chinese men who have sex with men and have early HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan-Mei; Chen, Guang-Lei; Zhu, Wei-Jun; Huang, Hui-Huang; Fu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ming; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    To date, there have been no reports characterizing HIV-1 in the semen of Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) with early infection. In this study, genetic diversity and viral load of HIV-1 in the seminal compartments and blood of Chinese MSM with early HIV-1 infection were examined. Viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in paired samples of semen and blood were analyzed in seven MSM with early HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantitated by real-time PCR assays. Through sequencing the C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 env gene, the HIV-1 genotype and genetic diversity based on V3 loop amino acid sequences were determined by using Geno2pheno and PSSM programs co-receptor usage. It was found that there was more HIV-1 RNA in seminal plasma than in blood plasma and total, and more 2-LTR circular and integrated HIV-1 DNA in seminal cells than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all seven patients with early HIV-infection. There was also greater HIV-1 genetic diversity in seminal than in blood compartments. HIV-1 in plasma displayed higher genetic diversity than in cells from the blood and semen. In addition, V3 loop central motifs, which present some key neutralizing antibody epitopes, varied between blood and semen. Thus, virological characteristics in semen may be more representative when evaluating risk of transmission in persons with early HIV infection. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Autograft HIV-DNA load predicts HIV-1 peripheral reservoir after stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Pratesi, Chiara; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Abbruzzese, Luciano; Mazzucato, Mario; Spina, Michele; Vaccher, Emanuela; Tirelli, Umberto; Rupolo, Maurizio; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Di Mascio, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a widely used procedure for AIDS-related lymphomas, and it represents an opportunity to evaluate strategies curing HIV-1 infection. The association of autograft HIV-DNA load with peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir before ASCT and its contribution in predicting HIV-1 reservoir size and stability during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after transplantation are unknown. Aiming to obtain information suggesting new functional cure strategies by ASCT, we retrospectively evaluated HIV-DNA load in autograft and in peripheral blood before and after transplantation in 13 cART-treated HIV-1 relapse/refractoring lymphoma patients. Among them seven discontinued cART after autograft infusion. HIV-DNA was evaluated by a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After debulking chemotherapy/mobilization, the autograft HIV-1 reservoir was higher than and not associated with the peripheral HIV-1 reservoir at baseline [median 215 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) autograft mononuclear cells, range 13-706 vs. 82 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), range 13-479, p = 0.03]. After high dose chemotherapy and autograft infusion, HIV-DNA levels reached a plateau between month 6 and 12 of follow-up. No association was found between peripheral HIV-DNA levels at baseline and after infusion in both cART interrupting and not interrupting patients. Only in the last subgroup, a stable significant linear association between autograft and peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir emerged from month 1 (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.01) to month 12 follow-up (R(2) = 0.99, p = 0.0005). In summary, autograft HIV-1 reservoir size could be influenced by the mobilization phase and predicts posttransplant peripheral HIV-1 reservoir size in patients on continuous cART. These findings could promote new research on strategies reducing the HIV-1 reservoir by using the ASCT procedure.

  14. Usefulness of Integrase resistance testing in proviral HIV-1 DNA in patients with Raltegravir prior failure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; Álvarez, Marta; Mérida, María Dolores; López, Josefa; Sánchez, José Antonio; Vinuesa, David; Martínez, María Ángeles; Hernández, José; García, Federico

    2016-05-13

    In our study, we have hypothesized that proviral DNA may show the history of mutations that emerged at previous failures to a Raltegravir containing regimen, in patients who are currently undetectable and candidates to simplification to a Dolutegravir containing regimen, in order to decide on once a day or twice a day dosing. We have performed a pilot, observational, retrospective, non interventional study, including 7 patients infected by HIV-1, all with a history of previous failure to a RAL containing regimen, that were successfully salvaged and had reached viral suppression. A genotypic viral Integrase region study was available for each patient at the moment of RAL failure. After an average (IQR) time of 48 months (29-53) Integrase resistance mutations in proviral DNA were studied. All the patients were infected by HIV-1 B subtypes, with a mean age of 55 (range 43 to 56), originating from Spain, and 4 were women. Median viral load (log) and CD4 count at the moment of the study on proviral DNA was of 1.3 log cp/ml (range 0-1.47) and 765.5 cells/μL (range; 436.75-1023.75). The median time (IQR) between previous failure to RAL and the study on proviral DNA was 48 (29-53) months. At Raltegravir failure, N155H was detected in four patients, and other secondary mutations were detected in five patients (71.4 %). In proviral DNA, N155H was detected by population sequencing in three patients (42.8 %), and UDS demonstrated a 9.77 % relative abundance of N155H in the remaining patient. Sanger sequencing correctly identified all the secondary mutations. This is a pilot study that demonstrates the possibility of properly identifying N155H and some secondary mutations 29-53 months after failure.

  15. 31P NMR conformational studies of non-palindromic DNA duplexes related to HIV-1 enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisne, C.; Simenel, C.; Hantz, E.; Delepierre, M.

    1998-02-01

    Assignment of all 31P resonances of 16 base-pair DNA duplexes, 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3', related to the DNA kappaB site of the HIV-1 LTR together with a mutated sequence 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' was determined by 2D heteronuclear inverse NMR spectroscopy (HSQC-TOCSY and heteronuclear COSY). ^3JH{3'}-P coupling constants for most of the phosphates of the mutated oligomer were obtained using heteronuclear selective COSY. L'attribution des résonances 31P du fragment d'ADN de seize paires de base 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3' (16N) correspondant au site kappaB du LTR du HIV-1 et de la séquence mutée 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' (16M) a été déterminée à l'aide de méthodes 2D hétéronucléaires à détection indirecte (HSQC-TOCSY et COSY hétéronucléaires). Les constantes de couplage ^3JH{3'}-P ont été mesurées pour la plupart des phosphates de 16 M à l'aide d'expérience COSY hétéronucléaires sélectives.

  16. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  17. Zinc finger nuclease: a new approach for excising HIV-1 proviral DNA from infected human T cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Ding, Donglin; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Gongmin; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaoli; Zeng, Hanxian; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-09-01

    A major reason that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cannot be completely cured is the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) provirus integrated into the human genome. Though existing therapies can inhibit replication of HIV-1, they cannot eradicate it. A molecular therapy gains popularity due to its specifically targeting to HIV-1 infected cells and effectively removing the HIV-1, regardless of viral genes being active or dormant. Now, we propose a new method which can excellently delete the HIV provirus from the infected human T cell genome. First, we designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target a sequence within the long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 region that is highly conserved in whole clade. Then, we screened out one pair of ZFN and named it as ZFN-U3. We discovered that ZFN-U3 can exactly target and eliminate the full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA after the infected human cell lines treated with it, and the frequency of its excision was about 30 % without cytotoxicity. These results prove that ZFN-U3 can efficiently excise integrated HIV-1 from the human genome in infected cells. This method to delete full length HIV-1 in human genome can therefore provide a novel approach to cure HIV-infected individuals in the future.

  18. Interlaboratory quality control of total HIV-1 DNA load measurement for multicenter reservoir studies.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Pierre; Mélard, Adeline; Damond, Florence; Delaugerre, Constance; Dina, Julia; Gueudin, Marie; Maillard, Anne; Sauné, Karine; Rodallec, Audrey; Tuaillon, Edouard; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique

    2017-11-01

    Viral reservoirs represent an important barrier to HIV cure. Accurate markers of HIV reservoirs are needed to develop multicenter studies. The aim of this multicenter quality control (QC) was to evaluate the inter-laboratory reproducibility of total HIV-1-DNA quantification. Ten laboratories of the ANRS-AC11 working group participated by quantifying HIV-DNA with a real-time qPCR assay (Biocentric) in four samples (QCMD). Good reproducibility was found between laboratories (standard deviation ≤ 0.2 log10 copies/10(6) PBMC) for the three positive QC that were correctly classified by each laboratory (QC1

  19. Interaction of HIV-1 Gag protein components with single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Gorelick, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    The Gag protein of the HIV-1 retrovirus is cleaved into three major proteins as part of viral maturation: nucleocapsid (NC), capsid, and matrix. NC is the first of these proteins to be cleaved, and it is cleaved in three stages into NCp15, followed by NCp9, and finally NCp7. In this study, we use optical tweezers to investigate the capability of these NC proteins to alter the helix-coil transition of single DNA molecules. We have previously shown that the capability to alter the DNA helix-coil transition is an excellent probe of the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC proteins, in which the secondary structure of nucleic acids is rearranged to facilitate reverse transcription. By examining the capability of NCp15, NCp9, and NCp7 to alter DNA stretching, the current studies will test the role of proteolytic cleavage of Gag in regulating the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC. Whereas binding studies suggest that NCp9 and NCp15 bind more strongly to DNA than NCp7, our DNA stretching results indicate that these proteins all have similar effects on DNA stretching.

  20. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses.

  1. Early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in Luanda, Angola, using a new DNA PCR assay and dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Mateus, Rita; Bolzan, Anna; Gomes, Perpétua; Brito, José; Carvalho, Ana Patrícia; Cardoso, Yolanda; Domingos, Cristovão; Lôa Clemente, Vanda Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment reduces HIV-1-related mortality, morbidity and size of viral reservoirs in infants infected perinatally. Commercial molecular tests enable the early diagnosis of infection in infants but the high cost and low sensitivity with dried blood spots (DBS) limit their use in sub-Saharan Africa. To develop and validate a sensitive and cheap qualitative proviral DNA PCR-based assay for early infant diagnosis (EID) in HIV-1-exposed infants using DBS samples. Chelex-based method was used to extract DNA from DBS samples followed by a nested PCR assay using primers for the HIV-1 integrase gene. Limit of detection (LoD) was determined by Probit regression using limiting dilutions of newly produced recombinant plasmids with the integrase gene of all HIV-1 subtypes and ACH-2 cells. Clinical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated on 100 HIV-1 infected adults; 5 infected infants; 50 healthy volunteers; 139 HIV-1-exposed infants of the Angolan Pediatric HIV Cohort (APEHC) with serology at 18 months of life. All subtypes and CRF02_AG were amplified with a LoD of 14 copies. HIV-1 infection in infants was detected at month 1 of life. Sensitivity rate in adults varied with viral load, while diagnostic specificity was 100%. The percentage of HIV-1 MTCT cases between January 2012 and October 2014 was 2.2%. The cost per test was 8-10 USD which is 2- to 4-fold lower in comparison to commercial assays. The new PCR assay enables early and accurate EID. The simplicity and low-cost of the assay make it suitable for generalized implementation in Angola and other resource-constrained countries.

  2. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  3. A post-entry role for CD63 in early HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guangyu; Dziuba, Natallia; Friedrich, Brian; Murray, James L.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2011-04-10

    Macrophages and CD4{sup +} lymphocytes are the major reservoirs for HIV-1 infection. CD63 is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein, which has been shown to play an essential role during HIV-1 replication in macrophages. In this study, we further confirm the requirement of CD63 in early HIV-1 replication events in both macrophages and a CD4{sup +} cell line. Further analysis revealed that viral attachment and cell-cell fusion were unaffected by CD63 silencing. However, CD63-depleted macrophages showed a significant decrease in the initiation and completion of HIV-1 reverse transcription, affecting subsequent events of the HIV-1 life cycle. Integration of HIV-1 cDNA as well as the formation of 2-LTR circles was notably reduced. Reporter assays showed that CD63 down regulation reduced production of the early HIV protein Tat. In agreement, CD63 silencing also inhibited production of the late protein p24. These findings suggest that CD63 plays an early post-entry role prior to or at the reverse transcription step.

  4. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by manual and automated DNA extraction methods using venous blood and dried blood spots for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Nsojo, Anthony; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using venous blood sample has been used for many years in low resource settings for early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in children less than 18 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance characteristics of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay version 1.5 following processing of venous blood and dried blood spot (DBS) samples by Roche manual DNA extraction and automated Roche MagNA Pure LC instrument (MP) for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in order to scale up early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in routine practice. Venous blood samples from children under 18 months born to HIV-infected mothers between January and April 2008 were collected. Venous blood was used to prepare cell pellet and DBS samples. DNA extractions by manual procedure and MP were performed each on cell pellet, venous blood and DBS samples and tested by Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay. Of 325 samples included, 60 (18.5%) were confirmed HIV-infected by manual extraction performed on cell pellets. Sensitivity of the assay following MP processing of venous blood was 95% (95% CI; 86.1-99.0%) and 98.3% (95% CI; 91.1 to 99.9%) for the manual extraction and processing by MP performed on DBS samples. Specificity of the assay with all DNA extraction methods was 99.6% (95% CI; 97.9 to 100%). Performance of the assay with Roche manual extraction and processing by MP on DBS samples compared well with Roche manual extraction performed on cell pellet samples. The choice of DNA extraction method needs to be individualized based on the level of laboratory facility, volume of testing and cost benefit analysis before it is adopted for use.

  5. Delivery of double-stranded DNA thioaptamers into HIV-1 infected cells for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Monique R; Rojo, Daniel R; Somasunderam, Anoma; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Ridley, Bettye D; Yang, Xianbin; Gorenstein, David G

    2006-06-09

    Oligonucleotide agents (ODN) are emerging as attractive alternatives to chemical drugs. However, the clinical use of ODNs as therapeutics has been hindered by their susceptibility to degradation by cellular enzymes and their limited ability to penetrate intact cells. We have used various liposome-mediated transfection agents, for the in vitro delivery of DNA thioaptamers into U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells. Our lead thioaptamer, R12-2, targets the RNase H domain of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and inhibits viral infection in U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells. R12-2, a 62-base-pair, double-stranded DNA molecule with a monothio-phosphate modified backbone, was selected through a novel combinatorial selection method. We studied the use of oligofectamine (OF), TFX-20, Transmessenger (TM), and Gene Jammer (GJ) for transfection of the thio-modified DNA aptamers. OF-transfected U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells resulted in 68% inhibition of HIV infection in the treated cells compared to the untreated control. Inhibition was observed in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 83%. In this report, we demonstrate that monothioate-modified DNA duplex oligonucleotides can be efficiently delivered into cells by liposome-based transfection agents to inhibit HIV replication.

  6. Activation of the HIV-1 enhancer by the LEF-1 HMG protein on nucleosome-assembled DNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, P L; Sheline, C T; Cannon, K; Voz, M L; Pazin, M J; Kadonaga, J T; Jones, K A

    1995-09-01

    Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1) is a regulatory high mobility group (HMG) protein that activates the T cell receptor alpha (TCR alpha) enhancer in a context-restricted manner in T cells. In this paper we demonstrate that the distal region of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enhancer, which contains DNA-binding sites for LEF-1 and Ets-1, also provides a functional context for activation by LEF-1. First, we show that mutations in the LEF-1-binding site inhibit the activity of multimerized copies of the HIV-1 enhancer in Jurkat T cells, and that LEF-1/GAL4 can activate a GAL4-substituted HIV-1 enhancer 80- to 100-fold in vivo. Second, recombinant LEF-1 is shown to activate HIV-1 transcription on chromatin-assembled DNA in vitro. By using a nucleosome-assembly system derived from Drosophila embryos, we find that the packaging of DNA into chromatin in vitro strongly represses HIV-1 transcription and that repression can be counteracted efficiently by preincubation of the DNA with LEF-1 (or LEF-1 and Ets-1) supplemented with fractions containing the promoter-binding protein, Sp1. Addition of TFE-3, which binds to an E-box motif upstream of the LEF-1 and Ets-1 sites, further augments transcription in this system. Individually or collectively, none of the three enhancer-binding proteins (LEF-1, Ets-1, and TFE-3) could activate transcription in the absence of Sp1. A truncation mutant of LEF-1 (HMG-88), which contains the HMG box but lacks the trans-activation domain, did not activate transcription from nucleosomal DNA, indicating that bending of DNA by the HMG domain is not sufficient to activate transcription in vitro. We conclude that transcription activation by LEF-1 in vitro is a chromatin-dependent process that requires a functional trans-activation domain in addition to the HMG domain.

  7. HIV DNA and Dementia in Treatment-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Nidhinandana, Samart; Thitivichianlert, Sataporn; Watt, George; deSouza, Mark; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Sukwit, Suchitra; Chitpatima, Suwicha; Robertson, Kevin; Paul, Robert; Shikuma, Cecilia; Valcour, Victor

    2007-01-01

    High HIV-1 DNA (HIV DNA) levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) correlate with HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). If this relationship also exists among HAART-naïve patients, then HIV DNA may be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAD. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between HIV DNA and cognition in subjects naïve to HAART in a neuro AIDS cohort in Bangkok, Thailand. Subjects with and without HAD were recruited and matched for age, gender, education, and CD4 cell count. PBMC and cellular subsets were analyzed for HIV DNA using real-time PCR. The median log10 HIV DNA copies per 106 PBMC for subjects with HAD (n=15) was 4.27, which was higher than that found in subjects without dementia (ND; n=15), 2.28, p<0.001. This finding was unchanged in a multivariate model adjusting for plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. From a small subset of individuals, in which adequate number of cells were available, more HIV DNA was in monocytes/macrophages from those with HAD compared to those with ND. These results are consistent with a previous report among HAART-experienced subjects, thus further implicating HIV DNA in the pathogenesis of HAD. PMID:17211496

  8. Sequence-specific fluorometric recognition of HIV-1 ds-DNA with zwitterionic zinc(II)-carboxylate polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Zhao, Hai-Qing; Xie, Bao-Ping; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Jin-Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Four water-stable zwitterionic zinc-carboxylate polymers are prepared by reacting N-carboxymethyl-(3,5-dicarboxy)-pyridinium bromide (H3CmdcpBr) with zinc(II) nitrate in the presence of NaOH, through adjusting the solvents and ancillary ligands. With H2O as the solvent and the absence of an ancillary ligand, a two-dimensional (2D) polymer network [Zn(Cmdcp)(H2O)]n (1) is formed. In a mixed H2O/DMF solvent and with the presence of chelating ligands 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 2-(4-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pbz), a one-dimensional (1D) polymer of {[Zn2(Cmdcp)(bipy)2(H2O)5](NO3)2·3H2O}n (2), a mononuclear ionic species of [Zn(phen)(H2O)4][Cmdcp] (3), and a 2D polymer of {[Zn(Cmdcp)(pbz)][pbz]·7H2O}n (4) are accordingly formed. Compounds 1-4 are characterized by IR, elemental analyses and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Compound 2 strongly adsorbs single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) probe (denoted as P-DNA) labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and quenches its fluorescence via a photo-induced electron transfer process. If, however, a double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 ds-DNA) is further present, the P-DNA interacts with the major groove in HIV-1 ds-DNA via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form a rigid triplex structure. This results in partial or complete fluorescence recovery depending on the concentration of HIV-1 ds-DNA. The findings are applied in fluorometric sensing of HIV-1 ds-DNA. The calibration plot is linear in the 0-60nM target DNA concentration range, with a 7.4nM detection limit (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The assay is highly specific and not interfered by one base pair mutated for complementary target HIV-1 ds-DNA, complementary ss-DNA, single-base pair mutated for complementary ss-DNA, non-specific ss-DNA sequences, and higher-order dimeric G-quadruplexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanism of polyoxometalate-mediated inactivation of DNA polymerases: an analysis with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicates specificity for the DNA-binding cleft.

    PubMed Central

    Sarafianos, S G; Kortz, U; Pope, M T; Modak, M J

    1996-01-01

    The anti-DNA polymerase activity of a structural family of polyoxometalates has been determined. Two representative compounds of this family, possessing a saddle-like structure [(O3POPO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate I) and [(O3PCH2PO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate II) were found to inhibit all the DNA polymerases tested, with IC50 values ranging from 2 to 10 microM. A comparative study with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and Klenow polymerase as representative DNA polymerases indicated that protection from inactivation was achieved by inclusion of DNA but not by deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). Kinetic analysis revealed that the mode of HIV-1 RT inhibition is competitive with respect to DNA, and non-competitive with respect to dNTP binding. Cross-linking experiments confirmed that the inhibitors interfere with the DNA-binding function of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Interestingly, a number of drug-resistant mutants of HIV-1 RT exhibit a sensitivity to polyoxometalate comparable to the wild-type HIV-1 RT, suggesting that these polyoxometalates interact at a novel site. Because different polymerases contain DNA-binding clefts of various dimensions, it should be possible to modify polyoxometalates or to add a link to an enzyme-specific drug so that more effective inhibitors could be developed. Using a computer model of HIV-1 RT we performed docking studies in a binary complex (enzyme-polyoxometalate I) to propose tentatively a possible interacting site in HIV-1 RT consistent with the available biochemical results as well as with the geometric and charge constraints of the two molecules. PMID:8912703

  10. Quantitative analysis of the time-course of viral DNA forms during the HIV-1 life cycle.

    PubMed

    Munir, Soundasse; Thierry, Sylvain; Subra, Frédéric; Deprez, Eric; Delelis, Olivier

    2013-08-13

    HIV-1 DNA is found both integrated in the host chromosome and unintegrated in various forms: linear (DNAL) or circular (1-LTRc, 2-LTRc or products of auto-integration). Here, based on pre-established strategies, we extended and characterized in terms of sensitivity two methodologies for quantifying 1-LTRc and DNAL, respectively, the latter being able to discriminate between unprocessed or 3'-processed DNA. Quantifying different types of viral DNA genome individually provides new information about the dynamics of all viral DNA forms and their interplay. For DNAL, we found that the 3'-processing reaction was efficient during the early stage of the replication cycle. Moreover, strand-transfer inhibitors (Dolutegravir, Elvitegravir, Raltegravir) affected 3'-processing differently. The comparisons of 2-LTRc accumulation mediated by either strand-transfer inhibitors or catalytic mutation of integrase indicate that 3'-processing efficiency did not influence the total 2-LTRc accumulation although the nature of the LTR-LTR junction was qualitatively affected. Finally, a significant proportion of 1-LTRc was generated concomitantly with reverse transcription, although most of the 1-LTRc were produced in the nucleus. We describe the fate of viral DNA forms during HIV-1 infection. Our study reveals the interplay between various forms of the viral DNA genome, the distribution of which can be affected by mutations and by inhibitors of HIV-1 viral proteins. In the latter case, the quantification of 3'-processed DNA in infected cells can be informative about the mechanisms of future integrase inhibitors directly in the cell context.

  11. Nucleocapsid Protein Annealing of a Primer-Template Enhances (+)-Strand DNA Synthesis and Fidelity by HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiae; Roberts, Anne; Yuan, Hua; Xiong, Yong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) for proper viral replication. HIV-1 NCp7 has been shown to enhance various steps in reverse transcription including tRNA initiation and strand transfer which may be mediated through interactions with RT as well as RNA and DNA oligonucleotides. With the use of DNA oligonucleotides, we have examined the interaction of NCp7 with RT and the kinetics of reverse transcription during (+)-strand synthesis with an NCp7-facilitated annealed primer-template. Using a pre-steady state kinetics approach, the NCp7-annealed primer-template has a substantial increase (3-7 fold) in the rate of incorporation (kpol) by RT as compared to heat annealed primer-template with single nucleotide incorporation. There was also a 2-fold increase in the binding affinity constant (Kd) of the nucleotide. These differences in kpol and Kd were not through direct interactions between HIV-1 RT and NCp7. When examining extension by RT, the data suggests that the NCp7-annealed primer-template facilitates the formation of a longer product more quickly compared to the heat annealed primer-template. This enhancement in rate is mediated through interactions with NCp7’s zinc fingers and N-terminal domain and nucleic acids. The NCp7-annealed primer-template also enhances the fidelity of RT (3-fold) by slowing the rate of incorporation of an incorrect nucleotide. Taken together, this study elucidates a new role of NCp7 by facilitating DNA-directed DNA synthesis during reverse transcription by HIV-1 RT that may translate into enhanced viral fitness and offers an avenue to exploit for targeted therapeutic intervention against HIV. PMID:22210155

  12. Optimization of HIV-1 Envelope DNA Vaccine Candidates within Three Different Animal Models, Guinea Pigs, Rabbits and Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Vinner, Lasse; Andresen, Betina Skovgaard; Grevstad, Berit; Repits, Johanna; Melchers, Mark; Elvang, Tara Laura; Sanders, Rogier W; Martinon, Frédéric; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Bowles, Emma Joanne; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Biswas, Priscilla; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Heyndrickx, Leo; Le Grand, Roger; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 DNA vaccines have many advantageous features. Evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates often starts in small animal models before macaque and human trials. Here, we selected and optimized DNA vaccine candidates through systematic testing in rabbits for the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb). We compared three different animal models: guinea pigs, rabbits and cynomolgus macaques. Envelope genes from the prototype isolate HIV-1 Bx08 and two elite neutralizers were included. Codon-optimized genes, encoded secreted gp140 or membrane bound gp150, were modified for expression of stabilized soluble trimer gene products, and delivered individually or mixed. Specific IgG after repeated i.d. inoculations with electroporation confirmed in vivo expression and immunogenicity. Evaluations of rabbits and guinea pigs displayed similar results. The superior DNA construct in rabbits was a trivalent mix of non-modified codon-optimized gp140 envelope genes. Despite NAb responses with some potency and breadth in guinea pigs and rabbits, the DNA vaccinated macaques displayed less bNAb activity. It was concluded that a trivalent mix of non-modified gp140 genes from rationally selected clinical isolates was, in this study, the best option to induce high and broad NAb in the rabbit model, but this optimization does not directly translate into similar responses in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:26344115

  13. Single step detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA and housekeeping β-actin gene from dried blood spots by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ipsita; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Patil, Ajit; Mukhopadhyaya, Robin; Paranjape, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for developing a simple, rapid, reliable and cost effective method for detection of HIV-1 for early diagnosis of the infection especially in developing countries and in resource limited settings. A method for simultaneous detection of the HIV-1 p17 gene and the house keeping human β-actin gene from dried blood spots (DBS) by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. Genomic DNA was extracted from 40 HIV-1 positive and 40 HIV-1 negative DBS and used as templates to amplify both the HIV-1 p17 and β-actin genes simultaneously under the same cycling condition by a single round PCR. This method of detection of HIV-1 may provide a simple, rapid and cost effective alternative in resource limited settings; however, it would require testing a larger number of samples before widespread use.

  14. APOBEC3B lysine residues are dispensable for DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Molan, Amy M; Hanson, Heather M; Chweya, Cynthia M; Anderson, Brett D; Starrett, Gabriel J; Richards, Christopher M; Harris, Reuben S

    2017-11-01

    The APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminase family comprises a fundamental arm of the innate immune response and is best known for retrovirus restriction. Several APOBEC3 enzymes restrict HIV-1 and related retroviruses by deaminating viral cDNA cytosines to uracils compromising viral genomes. Human APOBEC3B (A3B) shows strong virus restriction activities in a variety of experimental systems, and is subjected to tight post-translational regulation evidenced by cell-specific HIV-1 restriction activity and active nuclear import. Here we ask whether lysines and/or lysine post-translational modifications are required for these A3B activities. A lysine-free derivative of human A3B was constructed and shown to be indistinguishable from the wild-type enzyme in DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization activities. However, lysine loss did render the protein resistant to degradation by SIV Vif. Taken together, we conclude that lysine side chains and modifications thereof are unlikely to be central to A3B function or regulation in human cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Uracil DNA glycosylase initiates degradation of HIV-1 cDNA containing misincorporated dUTP and prevents viral integration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Amy F.; Ghosh, Devlina; Zhou, Yan; Seiple, Lauren; McMahon, Moira A.; Spivak, Adam M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Stivers, James T.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase discriminates poorly between dUTP and dTTP, and accordingly, viral DNA products become heavily uracilated when viruses infect host cells that contain high ratios of dUTP:dTTP. Uracilation of invading retroviral DNA is thought to be an innate immunity barrier to retroviral infection, but the mechanistic features of this immune pathway and the cellular fate of uracilated retroviral DNA products is not known. Here we developed a model system in which the cellular dUTP:dTTP ratio can be pharmacologically increased to favor dUTP incorporation, allowing dissection of this innate immunity pathway. When the virus-infected cells contained elevated dUTP levels, reverse transcription was found to proceed unperturbed, but integration and viral protein expression were largely blocked. Furthermore, successfully integrated proviruses lacked detectable uracil, suggesting that only nonuracilated viral DNA products were integration competent. Integration of the uracilated proviruses was restored using an isogenic cell line that had no detectable human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG2) activity, establishing that hUNG2 is a host restriction factor in cells that contain high dUTP. Biochemical studies in primary cells established that this immune pathway is not operative in CD4+ T cells, because these cells have high dUTPase activity (low dUTP), and only modest levels of hUNG activity. Although monocyte-derived macrophages have high dUTP levels, these cells have low hUNG activity, which may diminish the effectiveness of this restriction pathway. These findings establish the essential elements of this pathway and reconcile diverse observations in the literature. PMID:23341616

  16. Combinatorial CRISPR-Cas9 and RNAi attack on HIV-1 DNA and RNA can lead to cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wang, Gang; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2017-09-11

    Many potent antiviral drugs have been developed against HIV-1 and their combined action is usually successful in achieving durable virus suppression in infected individuals. This success is based on two effects: additive or even synergistic virus inhibition and an increase in the genetic threshold for development of drug-resistance. More recently, several genetic approaches have been developed to attack the HIV-1 genome in a gene therapy setting. We set out to test the combinatorial possibilities for a therapy based on the CRISPR-Cas9 and RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms that attack the viral DNA and RNA, respectively. When two different sites in the HIV-1 genome were targeted, either with dual CRISPR-Cas9 antivirals or with a combination of CRISPR-Cas9 and RNAi antivirals, we observed additive inhibition much like what was reported for antiviral drugs. However, when the same or overlapping viral sequence was attacked by the antivirals, rapid escape from a CRISPR-Cas9 antiviral, assisted by the error-prone NHEJ DNA repair machinery, accelerated the development of cross-resistance to the other CRISPR-Cas9 or RNAi antiviral. Thus, genetic antiviral approaches can be combined, but overlap should be avoided. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  18. Evaluation in macaques of HIV-1 DNA vaccines containing primate CpG motifs and fowlpoxvirus vaccines co-expressing IFNgamma or IL-12.

    PubMed

    Dale, C Jane; De Rose, Robert; Wilson, Kim M; Croom, Hayley A; Thomson, Scott; Coupar, Barbara E H; Ramsay, Alistair; Purcell, Damian F J; Ffrench, Rosemary; Law, Matthew; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A; Ramshaw, Ian A; Boyle, David B; Kent, Stephen J

    2004-11-25

    Induction of HIV-specific T-cell responses by vaccines may facilitate efficient control of HIV. Plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV) vaccines are promising HIV-1 vaccine candidates, although either vaccine alone may be insufficient to protect against HIV-1. A consecutive immunisation strategy involving priming with DNA and boosting with rFPV vaccines encoding multiple common HIV-1 antigens was further evaluated in 30 macaques. The DNA vaccine vector included CpG immunostimulatory molecules, and rFPV vaccines were compared with rFPV vaccines co-expressing the pro-T cell cytokines IFNgamma or IL-12. Vaccines expressed multiple HIV-1 genes, mutated to remove active sites of the HIV proteins. The vaccines were well tolerated, and a significant enhancement of DNA-vaccine primed HIV-1 specific T lymphocyte responses was observed following rFPV boosting. Co-expression of IFNgamma or IL-12 by the rFPV vaccines did not further enhance immune responses. Non-sterilising protection from a non-pathogenic HIV-1 challenge was observed. This study provides evidence of a safe, optimised, strategy for the generation of T-cell mediated immunity to HIV-1.

  19. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  20. In silico design of a DNA-based HIV-1 multi-epitope vaccine for Chinese populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Sun, Weilai; Guo, Jingjing; Zhao, Guangyu; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Li, Jungfeng; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The development of an HIV-1 vaccine that is capable of inducing effective and broadly cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses remains a challenging task because of the extensive diversity of HIV-1, the difference of virus subtypes (clades) in different geographical regions, and the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). We performed an in silico design of 3 DNA vaccines, designated pJW4303-MEG1, pJW4303-MEG2 and pJW4303-MEG3, encoding multi-epitopes that are highly conserved within the HIV-1 subtypes most prevalent in China and can be recognized through HLA alleles dominant in China. The pJW4303-MEG1-encoded protein consisted of one Th epitope in Env, and one, 2, and 6 epitopes in Pol, Env, and Gag proteins, respectively, with a GGGS linker sequence between epitopes. The pJW4303-MEG2-encoded protein contained similar epitopes in a different order, but with the same linker as pJW4303-MEG1. The pJW4303-MEG3-encoded protein contained the same epitopes in the same order as that of pJW4303-MEG2, but with a different linker sequence (AAY). To evaluate immunogenicity, mice were immunized intramuscularly with these DNA vaccines. Both pJW4303-MEG1 and pJW4303-MEG2 vaccines induced equally potent humoral and cellular immune responses in the vaccinated mice, while pJW4303-MEG3 did not induce immune responses. These results indicate that both epitope and linker sequences are important in designing effective epitope-based vaccines against HIV-1 and other viruses. PMID:25839222

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA load in purified CD4+ cells by LightCycler® Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kabamba-Mukadi, Benoît; Henrivaux, Philippe; Ruelle, Jean; Delferrière, Nicole; Bodéus, Monique; Goubau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA persists in infected cells, even after prolonged successful HAART. In the present study, a relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA by LightCycler® real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I detection was developed in comparison to the number of purified CD4+ cells as estimated by the quantification of the β-globin gene. Methods The ability of the designed gag primers to quantify HIV-1 Group M and the PCR efficiency were assessed on HIV-1 reference isolate subtypes A, B, C and D. The 8E5 cell line containing a single defective copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA was used as a standard for both the HIV-1 target gene and the β-globin reference gene. The assay was applied on thirty consecutive patient samples received for RNA viral load determinations and on retrospective samples from fifteen patients undergoing 2 years of structured treatment interruption (STI). Results The lower limit of quantification was 50 HIV-1 DNA proviral copies per CD4+ cell sample. The dynamic range was from 50 to 106 HIV-1 DNA copies per CD4+ cell sample with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variability ranging from 3.1% to 37.1%. The β-globin reference gene was quantified down to a limit of 1.5 pg of DNA/μl (approximately 5 cells) with intra- and interassay coefficients of variability ranging from 1.8% to 21%. DNA proviral load varies widely among HIV-1 infected patients. Proviral load and plasma viral load rebound were high in STI patients who took longer to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load under therapy. A statistically significant correlation was observed between DNA proviral load and RNA steady state viral load in STI patients (p-value = 0,012). Conclusion We have developed a fast, sensitive and specific relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA in purified CD4+ cells. The assay enables the monitoring of HIV-1 proviral load, which may be useful to monitor therapy efficacy especially in

  2. DNA and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccines Encoding Multiple Cytotoxic and Helper T-Lymphocyte Epitopes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Are Safe but Weakly Immunogenic in HIV-1-Uninfected, Vaccinia Virus-Naive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Mark J.; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22398243

  3. DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines encoding multiple cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are safe but weakly immunogenic in HIV-1-uninfected, vaccinia virus-naive adults.

    PubMed

    Gorse, Geoffrey J; Newman, Mark J; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Kalams, Spyros A; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins.

  4. Mechanistic studies of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-10-13

    HIV-1 reverse transcription involves several nucleic acid rearrangements, which are catalyzed by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) DNA hairpin to a complementary TAR RNA hairpin, resulting in the formation of an extended 98-base-pair duplex, is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. To elucidate the TAR RNA/DNA annealing reaction pathway, annealing kinetics were studied systematically by gel-shift assays performed in the presence or absence of HIV-1 NC. Truncated 27 nucleotide mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs were used in this work. In the absence of NC, the annealing is slow, and involves the fast formation of an unstable extended "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower strand exchange between the terminal stems. This annealing is very sensitive to loop-loop complementarity, as well as to nucleic acid concentration, ionic strength and temperature. NC stimulates the annealing approximately 5000-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate approximately 100 to 200-fold, and promoting the subsequent strand exchange reaction approximately 10 to 20-fold. NC concentration dependence studies suggest that there is a direct correlation between the amount of NC required to stabilize the intermediate and the amount needed to induce mini-TAR aggregation. Whereas saturating levels of NC are required to efficiently aggregate nucleic acids, sub-saturating NC is sufficient to significantly enhance duplex destabilization. Equilibrium levels of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing were also measured under a variety of conditions. Taken together, the results presented here provide a quantitative accounting of HIV-1 NC's aggregation and duplex destabilizing activity, and provide insights into the universal nucleic acid chaperone activity of this essential viral protein.

  5. Influence of storage temperature on the stability of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions collected by vaginal washing.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jerome; Tanton, Clare; Lecerf, Maxime; Grésenguet, Gérard; Nzambi, Khonde; Bouhlal, Hicham; Weiss, Helen; Belec, Laurent

    2006-12-01

    Variability in the handling of samples of genital secretions prior to quantitation of HIV-1 RNA and HSV DNA may profoundly affect both the detection and quantitation of these nucleic acids. Over 144 h, we evaluated, the influence of storage temperature (4 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on the quantity of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in HIV and HSV negative cervicovaginal lavage pools spiked with known amounts of HIV-1 and HSV-2 and in HIV-1 and HSV-2 co-infected cervicovaginal lavage pools. The level of viral nucleic acids remained stable at 4 degrees C for 24h but decreased significantly when cervicovaginal lavages were stored at 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C, demonstrating that, cervicovaginal lavages to be quantified for viral RNA or DNA require, at minimum, immediate storage at 4 degrees C.

  6. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ebina, Hirotaka Kanemura, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Urata, Kozue; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2012-05-25

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  7. Structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase bound to a novel 38-mer hairpin template-primer DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew T; Tuske, Steve; Das, Kalyan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    The development of a modified DNA aptamer that binds HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with ultra-high affinity has enabled the X-ray structure determination of an HIV-1 RT-DNA complex to 2.3 Å resolution without the need for an antibody Fab fragment or RT-DNA cross-linking. The 38-mer hairpin-DNA aptamer has a 15 base-pair duplex, a three-deoxythymidine hairpin loop, and a five-nucleotide 5'-overhang. The aptamer binds RT in a template-primer configuration with the 3'-end positioned at the polymerase active site and has 2'-O-methyl modifications at the second and fourth duplex template nucleotides that interact with the p66 fingers and palm subdomains. This structure represents the highest resolution RT-nucleic acid structure to date. The RT-aptamer complex is catalytically active and can serve as a platform for studying fundamental RT mechanisms and for development of anti-HIV inhibitors through fragment screening and other approaches. Additionally, the structure allows for a detailed look at a unique aptamer design and provides the molecular basis for its remarkably high affinity for RT. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  8. A Combinatorial CRISPR-Cas9 Attack on HIV-1 DNA Extinguishes All Infectious Provirus in Infected T Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2016-12-13

    Current drug therapies effectively suppress HIV-1 replication but do not inactivate the provirus that persists in latent reservoirs. Recent studies have found that the guide RNA (gRNA)-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used for sequence-specific attack on this proviral DNA. Although potent inhibition of virus replication was reported, HIV-1 can escape from a single antiviral gRNA by mutation of the target sequence. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of two antiviral gRNAs delay viral escape, and identify two gRNA combinations that durably block virus replication. When viral escape is prevented, repeated Cas9 cleavage leads to saturation of major mutations in the conserved target sequences that encode critical proteins. This hypermutation coincides with the loss of replication-competent virus as scored in sensitive co-cultures with unprotected cells, demonstrating complete virus inactivation. These results provide a proof-of-principle that HIV-1-infected cells can be functionally cured by dual-gRNA CRISPR/Cas9 treatment.

  9. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  10. Enhanced Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Delivered with Electroporation via Combined Intramuscular and Intradermal Routes

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Paul F.; Fiserova, Anezka; Klein, Katja; Cope, Alethea; Rogers, Paul; Swales, Julie; Seaman, Michael S.; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is accepted that an effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine is likely to have the greatest impact on viral transmission rates. As previous reports have implicated DNA-priming, protein boost regimens to be efficient activators of humoral responses, we sought to optimize this regimen to further augment vaccine immunogenicity. Here we evaluated single versus concurrent intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinations as a DNA-priming strategy for their abilities to elicit humoral and cellular responses against a model HIV-1 vaccine antigen, CN54-gp140. To further augment vaccine-elicited T and B cell responses, we enhanced cellular transfection with electroporation and then boosted the DNA-primed responses with homologous protein delivered subcutaneously (s.c.), intranasally (i.n.), i.m., or transcutaneously (t.c.). In mice, the concurrent priming regimen resulted in significantly elevated gamma interferon T cell responses and high-avidity antigen-specific IgG B cell responses, a hallmark of B cell maturation. Protein boosting of the concurrent DNA strategy further enhanced IgG concentrations but had little impact on T cell reactivity. Interestingly protein boosting by the subcutaneous route increased antibody avidity to a greater extent than protein boosting by either the i.m., i.n., or t.c. route, suggesting that this route may be preferential for driving B cell maturation. Using an alternative and larger animal model, the rabbit, we found the concurrent DNA-priming strategy followed by s.c. protein boosting to again be capable of eliciting high-avidity humoral responses and to also be able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudoviruses from diverse clades (clades A, B, and C). Taken together, we show that concurrent multiple-route DNA vaccinations induce strong cellular immunity, in addition to potent and high-avidity humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE The route of vaccination has profound effects on prevailing immune responses. Due to the insufficient

  11. Integrase and integration: biochemical activities of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Delelis, Olivier; Carayon, Kevin; Saïb, Ali; Deprez, Eric; Mouscadet, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Integration of retroviral DNA is an obligatory step of retrovirus replication because proviral DNA is the template for productive infection. Integrase, a retroviral enzyme, catalyses integration. The process of integration can be divided into two sequential reactions. The first one, named 3'-processing, corresponds to a specific endonucleolytic reaction which prepares the viral DNA extremities to be competent for the subsequent covalent insertion, named strand transfer, into the host cell genome by a trans-esterification reaction. Recently, a novel specific activity of the full length integrase was reported, in vitro, by our group for two retroviral integrases (HIV-1 and PFV-1). This activity of internal cleavage occurs at a specific palindromic sequence mimicking the LTR-LTR junction described into the 2-LTR circles which are peculiar viral DNA forms found during viral infection. Moreover, recent studies demonstrated the existence of a weak palindromic consensus found at the integration sites. Taken together, these data underline the propensity of retroviral integrases for binding symmetrical sequences and give perspectives for targeting specific sequences used for gene therapy. PMID:19091057

  12. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Cohn, Lillian B.; Kreider, Edward F.; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1–infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4+ T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones. PMID:27872306

  13. Structural determinants of TAR RNA-DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; Godet, Julien; René, Brigitte; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin is required for the minus-strand transfer step of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. To gain insight into the mechanism of NC-mediated TAR RNA–DNA annealing, we used structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate), gel retardation assays, fluorescence anisotropy and cTAR mutants under conditions allowing strand transfer. In the absence of NC, cTAR DNA-TAR RNA annealing depends on nucleation through the apical loops. We show that the annealing intermediate of the kissing pathway is a loop–loop kissing complex involving six base-pairs and that the apical stems are not destabilized by this loop–loop interaction. Our data support a dynamic structure of the cTAR hairpin in the absence of NC, involving equilibrium between both the closed conformation and the partially open ‘Y’ conformation. This study is the first to show that the apical and internal loops of cTAR are weak and strong binding sites for NC, respectively. NC slightly destabilizes the lower stem that is adjacent to the internal loop and shifts the equilibrium toward the ‘Y’ conformation exhibiting at least 12 unpaired nucleotides in its lower part. PMID:21724607

  14. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Julio C C; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Cohn, Lillian B; Kreider, Edward F; Barton, John P; Learn, Gerald H; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L; Horwitz, Joshua A; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S; Chakraborty, Arup K; Hahn, Beatrice H; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-12-06

    HIV-1-infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4(+) T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones.

  15. Quantification of HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a high throughput four-competitor competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Comandini, U V; Sönnerborg, A; Vahlne, A; Yun, Z

    1997-12-01

    A multiple competitor PCR (mcPCR) was developed to quantify HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DNA extracted from a mixture of HIV infected PBMC and four size-mutated DNA competitors were co-amplified. The Cy5-fluorescence labelled PCR products were denatured by heating, separated using an automated DNA sequencer and quantified by a fragment analysis computer software. An internal standard was generated by plotting the peak areas of the four competitors against their inputs. Based on the internal standard, HIV sample DNA was quantified by extrapolating the corresponding signal. The linear range of the mcPCR was three log wide and the quantitation limit was about 20 copies of HIV DNA/10(6) PBMC. Using the mcPCR, HIV DNA was quantified from 14 long-term non progressors (LTNP) and 14 patients with advanced disease. A significantly lower copy number of HIV DNA was obtained in the LTNP (p = 0.018). These data suggest that the mcPCR is sensitive, reliable and especially useful for HIV DNA quantification of a large number of clinical samples.

  16. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors.

  17. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  18. Low concentrations of HIV-1 DNA at birth delays diagnosis, complicating identification of infants for antiretroviral therapy to potentially prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline; Dross, Sandra; Beck, Ingrid A; Micek, Mark A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2014-04-01

    Among infants exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), detection of viral infection at birth was increased by 39% (95% confidence interval, 19%-47%) by increasing DNA input from dried blood spots into polymerase chain reaction. Infants with low concentrations of HIV-1 at birth may be the best target population to evaluate whether immediate antiretroviral therapy can prevent long-term infection.

  19. Low Concentrations of HIV-1 DNA at Birth Delays Diagnosis, Complicating Identification of Infants for Antiretroviral Therapy to Potentially Prevent the Establishment of Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Caroline; Dross, Sandra; Beck, Ingrid A.; Micek, Mark A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Among infants exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), detection of viral infection at birth was increased by 39% (95% confidence interval, 19%–47%) by increasing DNA input from dried blood spots into polymerase chain reaction. Infants with low concentrations of HIV-1 at birth may be the best target population to evaluate whether immediate antiretroviral therapy can prevent long-term infection. PMID:24501389

  20. The Safety and Immunogenicity of an Interleukin-12-Enhanced Multiantigen DNA Vaccine Delivered by Electroporation for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Zheng, Lu; Wilson, Cara C.; Tebas, Pablo; Matining, Roy M.; Egan, Michael A.; Eldridge, John; Landay, Alan L.; Clifford, David B.; Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Tiu, Jennifer; Martinez, Ana; Janik, Jennifer; Spitz, Teresa A.; Hural, John; McElrath, Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccination is being studied in eradication and “functional cure” strategies for HIV-1. The Profectus Biosciences (Tarrytown, NY) multiantigen (MAG) HIV-1 DNA vaccine encodes HIV-1 Gag/Pol, Nef/Tat/Vif, and Envelope, and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and is delivered by electroporation (EP) combined with intramuscular injection (IM-EP). Methods Sixty-two HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤200 copies/mL; CD4+ T-cell counts ≥500 cells/mm3) were randomly allocated 5:1 to receive vaccine or placebo. At weeks 0, 4 and 12, four consecutive cohorts received 3000 μg HIV MAG pDNA with 0, 50, 250, or 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by IM-EP. A 5th cohort received HIV MAG pDNA plus 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by standard IM injection. Results CD4+ T cells expressing IL-2 in response to Gag and Pol and interferon-γ responses to Gag, Pol, and Env increased from baseline to week 14 in the low-dose (50-μg) IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P < 0.05; intracellular cytokine staining). The total increase in the IL-2 expressing CD4+ T-cell responses to any antigen was also higher in the low-dose IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P = 0.04). Cytokine responses by CD8 T cells to HIV antigens were not increased in any vaccine arm relative to placebo. Conclusions HIV-1 MAG/low-dose IL-12 DNA vaccine delivered by IM-EP augmented CD4+ but not CD8+ T-cell responses to multiple HIV-1 antigens. PMID:26761518

  1. The Safety and Immunogenicity of an Interleukin-12-Enhanced Multiantigen DNA Vaccine Delivered by Electroporation for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Zheng, Lu; Wilson, Cara C; Tebas, Pablo; Matining, Roy M; Egan, Michael A; Eldridge, John; Landay, Alan L; Clifford, David B; Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Tiu, Jennifer; Martinez, Ana L; Janik, Jennifer; Spitz, Teresa A; Hural, John; McElrath, Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination is being studied in eradication and "functional cure" strategies for HIV-1. The Profectus Biosciences multiantigen (MAG) HIV-1 DNA vaccine encodes HIV-1 Gag/Pol, Nef/Tat/Vif, and Envelope, and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and is delivered by electroporation combined with intramuscular injection (IM-EP). Sixty-two HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤ 200 copies/mL; CD4(+) T-cell counts ≥ 500 cells/mm(3)) were randomly allocated 5:1 to receive vaccine or placebo. At weeks 0, 4, and 12, 4 consecutive cohorts received 3000 μg HIV MAG pDNA with 0, 50, 250, or 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by IM-EP. A fifth cohort received HIV MAG pDNA and 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by standard IM injection. CD4(+) T cells expressing IL-2 in response to Gag and Pol and interferon-γ responses to Gag, Pol, and Env increased from baseline to week 14 in the low-dose (50-μg) IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P < 0.05; intracellular cytokine staining). The total increase in the IL-2-expressing CD4 T-cell responses to any antigen was also higher in the low-dose IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P = 0.04). Cytokine responses by CD8 T cells to HIV antigens were not increased in any vaccine arm relative to placebo. HIV-1 MAG/low-dose IL-12 DNA vaccine delivered by IM-EP augmented CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T-cell responses to multiple HIV-1 antigens.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Study of HIV-1 RT-DNA-Nevirapine Complexes Explains NNRTI Inhibition, and Resistance by Connection Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, R.S.K.; Arnold, Eddy; Das, Kalyan

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme that is targeted by nucleoside analogs (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs). NNRTIs are allosteric inhibitors of RT, and constitute an integral part of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen. Under selective pressure, HIV-1 acquires resistance against NNRTIs primarily by selecting mutations around the NNRTI pocket. Complete RT sequencing of clinical isolates revealed that spatially distal mutations arising in connection and the RNase H domain also confer NNRTI resistance and contribute to NRTI resistance. However, the precise structural mechanism by which the connection domain mutations confer NNRTI resistance is poorly understood. We performed 50-ns MD simulations, followed by essential dynamics, free-energy landscape analyses and network analyses of RT-DNA, RT-DNA-nevirapine, and N348I/T369I mutant RT-DNA-nevirapine complexes. MD simulation studies revealed altered global motions and restricted conformational landscape of RT upon nevirapine binding. Analysis of protein structure network parameters demonstrated a dissortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA complex and an assortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA-nevirapine complex suggesting enhanced rigidity of RT upon nevirapine binding. The connection subdomain mutations N348I/T369I did not induce any significant structural change; rather, these mutations modulate the conformational dynamics and alter the long-range allosteric communication network between the connection subdomain and NNRTI pocket. Insights from the present study provide a structural basis for the biochemical and clinical findings on drug resistance caused by the connection and RNase H mutations. PMID:24174331

  3. HIV-1 Treated Patients with Undetectable Viral Loads have Lower Levels of Innate Immune Responses via Cytosolic DNA Sensing Systems Compared with Healthy Uninfected Controls.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Sui, Hongyan; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Chen, Qian; Sneller, Michael; Migueles, Stephen A; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran; Ober, Alexander; Jones, Sara; Rehm, Catherine A; Lane, H Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2014-06-01

    After DNA or RNA virus infection, cytosolic foreign DNA or RNA derived from the infecting viruses is recognized by intracellular pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) and induces activation of the innate immune system. Transfection of DNA has been used as an experimental model for DNA virus-mediated innate responses. We have previously reported that DNA transfection preferentially induces Type-III IFN (IFN-λ1) rather than Type-I IFN (IFN-β). In this study, we compared the DNA-mediated immune response between healthy controls and HIV-1 infected patients with undetectable viral loads and assessed potential innate immune responses in these patients. The study consisted of 50 HIV-1 negative healthy donors, 46 patients on combination antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 viral loads <50 copies/ml and 7 long term non-progressors (LTNPs). PBMCs were isolated from whole blood using Ficoll-Paque. DNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine 2000. After 22 hours incubation, total cellular RNA was extracted and real time RT-PCR was performed to determine gene expression level of IFN-λ1, IFN-β and RANTES. Gene induction was compared by fold change. Baseline levels of endogenous gene expression of IFN-λ1, IFN-β and RANTES in HIV-1 patients were higher than in controls. Following DNA transfection, both HIV infected patients and healthy controls induced gene induction, however, the induction in HIV-1 patients was at a significantly lower level compared to uninfected controls. HIV-1 treated patients with undetectable viral loads have lower levels of innate immune responses via cytosolic DNA sensing systems. This may be caused by persistent immune activation.

  4. Keeping your armour intact: how HIV-1 evades detection by the innate immune system: HIV-1 capsid controls detection of reverse transcription products by the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS.

    PubMed

    Maelfait, Jonathan; Seiradake, Elena; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2014-07-01

    HIV-1 infects dendritic cells (DCs) without triggering an effective innate antiviral immune response. As a consequence, the induction of adaptive immune responses controlling virus spread is limited. In a recent issue of Immunity, Lahaye and colleagues show that intricate interactions of HIV capsid with the cellular cofactor cyclophilin A (CypA) control infection and innate immune activation in DCs. Manipulation of HIV-1 capsid to increase its affinity for CypA results in reduced virus infectivity and facilitates access of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS to reverse transcribed DNA. This in turn induces a strong host response. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of recent developments in innate immunity and consider the implications for disease control and vaccine design.

  5. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  6. A CRISPR/Cas9 approach reveals that the polymerase activity of DNA polymerase β is dispensable for HIV-1 infection in dividing and nondividing cells.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Russell W; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2017-08-25

    Retrovirus integration into the host genome relies on several host enzymes, potentially including DNA polymerase β (Pol β). However, whether human Pol β is essential for lentivirus replication in human cells is unclear. Here, we abolished DNA polymerase β (Pol β) expression by targeting its DNA polymerase domain with CRISPR/Cas9 in human monocytic THP-1 cells to investigate the role of Pol β in HIV-1 transduction in both dividing and nondividing macrophage stages of THP-1 cells. Pol β-knock-out was confirmed by enhanced sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage. Of note, nuclear extracts from Pol β-knock-out THP-1 cells prepared from both dividing and nondividing stages displayed significantly reduced capability to repair the gapped HIV-1 integration intermediate DNA substrate in a biochemical simulation. However, nuclear extract from both dividing and nondividing stages of the Pol β-KO cells had detectable gap repair activity, suggesting that other host DNA polymerases also repair gapped HIV-1 DNA, particularly in dividing cells. Next, when we compared transduction using HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus in control and Pol β-KO cells, the loss of the Pol β expression did not affect transduction efficiency of these lentiviruses in both dividing and nondividing stages. Finally, the gap repair assay indicated that limited cellular dNTP pools, but not Pol β expression, are a primary factor for HIV-1 DNA gap repair, particularly in nondividing cells. These data support the idea that Pol β polymerase activity is dispensable for HIV-1 infection in both dividing and nondividing stages of human cells targeted by the virus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Intensification of Antiretroviral Therapy with a CCR5 Antagonist in Patients with Chronic HIV-1 Infection: Effect on T Cells Latently Infected

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Alejandro; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; Abad, María; Madrid, Nadia; Dahl, Viktor; Rubio, Rafael; Moreno, Ana M.; Dronda, Fernando; Casado, José Luis; Navas, Enrique; Pérez-Elías, María Jesús; Zamora, Javier; Palmer, Sarah; Muñoz, Eduardo; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Moreno, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to assess the effect of MVC intensification on latently infected CD4+ T cells in chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed an open-label pilot phase II clinical trial involving chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving stable antiretroviral therapy whose regimen was intensified with 48 weeks of maraviroc therapy. We analyzed the latent reservoir, the residual viremia and episomal 2LTR DNA to examine the relationship between these measures and the HIV-1 latent reservoir, immune activation, lymphocyte subsets (including effector and central memory T cells), and markers associated with bacterial translocation. Results Overall a non significant reduction in the size of the latent reservoir was found (p = 0.068). A mean reduction of 1.82 IUPM was observed in 4 patients with detectable latent reservoir at baseline after 48 weeks of intensification. No effect on plasma residual viremia was observed. Unexpectedly, all the patients had detectable 2LTR DNA circles at week 24, while none of them showed those circles at the end of the study. No changes were detected in CD4+ or CD8+ counts, although a significant decrease was found in the proportion of HLA-DR+/CD38+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. LPS and sCD14 levels increased. Conclusions Intensification with MVC was associated with a trend to a decrease in the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in memory T cells. No impact on residual viremia was detected. Additional studies with larger samples are needed to confirm the results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00795444 PMID:22174752

  8. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  9. Sequence specific recognition of HIV-1 dsDNA in the large amount of normal dsDNA based upon nicking enzyme signal amplification and triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Houya; Zhang, Manjun; Zou, Li; Li, Ruimin; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-10-01

    A sensitive fluorescent strategy for sequence specific recognition of HIV dsDNA was established based upon Nicking Enzyme Signal Amplification (NESA) and triplex formation. dsDNA sequence from the site 7960 to site 7991 of the HIV1 dsDNA gene was designed as target dsDNA, which was composed of two complementary strands Oligonucleotide 1 with the sequence of 3'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA CCT CTC TCT CT-5' (Oligo-1) and Oligonucleotide 2 with the sequence of 5'-GAA GGA ATA GAA GAA GAA GGT GGA GAG AGA GA-3' (Oligo-2). As a proof of concept, Oligonucleotide 5'-6-FAM-GAG GTG GAG CTG CGC GAC TCC TCC TCT CTC TCT CTC CAC CTC-BHQ-1-3'(Oligo-4) acted as molecular beacon(MB) probe, Oligonucleotide 5'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA AAA GGA GTC GCG-3' (Oligo-7) acted as assistant probe. In the presence of target dsDNA, Oligo-4 and Oligo-7 hybridized with target dsDNA through triplex formation and formed Y-shaped structure, NESA occurred with further addition of Nt.BbvCI, accompanied with the release of fluorescent DNA fragment circularly, resulted in the increase of fluorescence intensity. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity was linear with the concentration of target dsDNA over the range from 100pM to 200nM, the linear regression equation was I = 1.266 C + 84.3 (C: nmol/L, R(2) = 0.991), with a detection limit of 65pM. Moreover, the effect of coexisted other dsDNA was investigated as well, and satisfactory results were obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Four-tiered pi interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive pi electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished pi interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the pi interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this pi-pi interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  11. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    PubMed

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  12. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  13. Effects of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase connection subdomain mutations on polypurine tract removal and initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Betancor, Gilberto; Álvarez, Mar; Marcelli, Barbara; Andrés, Cristina; Martínez, Miguel A.; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) connection subdomain mutations at positions 348, 369 and 376 have been associated with resistance to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). N348I may interfere with the initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis by reducing polypurine tract (PPT) removal in the presence of nevirapine. The effect of NNRTIs on the RNase H-mediated cleavage of PPT-containing template-primers has been studied with wild-type HIV-1 RT and mutants N348I, T369I, T369V, T376S and N348I/T369I. In the presence of NNRTIs, all RTs were able to stimulate PPT cleavage after primer elongation. The enhancing effects of nevirapine and efavirenz were reduced in RTs carrying mutation N348I, and specially N348I/T369I. However, those mutations had no effect on rilpivirine-mediated cleavage. Prior to elongation, the PPT remains resilient to cleavage, although efavirenz and rilpivirine facilitate RNase H-mediated trimming of its 3′-end. The integrity of the 3′-end is essential for the initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis. In the presence of dNTPs, rilpivirine was the most effective inhibitor of (+)-strand DNA synthesis blocking nucleotide incorporation and preventing usage of available PPT primers. The N348I/T369I RT showed reduced ability to generate short RNA products revealing a cleavage window defect. Its lower RNase H activity could be attributed to enhanced rigidity compared to the wild-type enzyme. PMID:25662223

  14. Interlaboratory concordance of DNA sequence analysis to detect reverse transcriptase mutations in HIV-1 proviral DNA. ACTG Sequencing Working Group. AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Demeter, L M; D'Aquila, R; Weislow, O; Lorenzo, E; Erice, A; Fitzgibbon, J; Shafer, R; Richman, D; Howard, T M; Zhao, Y; Fisher, E; Huang, D; Mayers, D; Sylvester, S; Arens, M; Sannerud, K; Rasheed, S; Johnson, V; Kuritzkes, D; Reichelderfer, P; Japour, A

    1998-11-01

    Thirteen laboratories evaluated the reproducibility of sequencing methods to detect drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Blinded, cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell pellets were distributed to each laboratory. Each laboratory used its preferred method for sequencing proviral DNA. Differences in protocols included: DNA purification; number of PCR amplifications; PCR product purification; sequence/location of PCR/sequencing primers; sequencing template; sequencing reaction label; sequencing polymerase; and use of manual versus automated methods to resolve sequencing reaction products. Five unknowns were evaluated. Thirteen laboratories submitted 39043 nucleotide assignments spanning codons 10-256 of HIV-1 RT. A consensus nucleotide assignment (defined as agreement among > or = 75% of laboratories) could be made in over 99% of nucleotide positions, and was more frequent in the three laboratory isolates. The overall rate of discrepant nucleotide assignments was 0.29%. A consensus nucleotide assignment could not be made at RT codon 41 in the clinical isolate tested. Clonal analysis revealed that this was due to the presence of a mixture of wild-type and mutant genotypes. These observations suggest that sequencing methodologies currently in use in ACTG laboratories to sequence HIV-1 RT yield highly concordant results for laboratory strains; however, more discrepancies among laboratories may occur when clinical isolates are tested.

  15. Soluble multi-trimeric TNF superfamily ligand adjuvants enhance immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana K; Snarsky, Victoria; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Barzee, Suzanne; Wright, Jacqueline A; Khan, Wasif N; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2012-01-17

    DNA vaccines remain an important component of HIV vaccination strategies, typically as part of a prime/boost vaccination strategy with viral vector or protein boost. A number of DNA prime/viral vector boost vaccines are currently being evaluated for both preclinical studies and in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. These vaccines would benefit from molecular adjuvants that increase correlates of immunity during the DNA prime. While HIV vaccine immune correlates are still not well defined, there are a number of immune assays that have been shown to correlate with protection from viral challenge including CD8+ T cell avidity, antigen-specific proliferation, and polyfunctional cytokine secretion. Recombinant DNA vaccine adjuvants composed of a fusion between Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and either CD40 Ligand (CD40L) or GITR Ligand (GITRL) were previously shown to enhance HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccines. Here we show that similar fusion constructs composed of the TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFL) 4-1BBL, OX40L, RANKL, LIGHT, CD70, and BAFF can also enhanced immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmids expressing secreted Gag and SP-D-TNFSFL fusions. Initially, mice were analyzed 2 weeks or 7 weeks following vaccination to evaluate the relative efficacy of each SP-D-TNFSFL construct. All SP-D-TNFSFL constructs enhanced at least one Gag-specific immune response compared to the parent vaccine. Importantly, the constructs SP-D-4-1BBL, SP-D-OX40L, and SP-D-LIGHT enhanced CD8+ T cell avidity and CD8+/CD4+ T cell proliferation 7 weeks post vaccination. These avidity and proliferation data suggest that 4-1BBL, OX40L, and LIGHT fusion constructs may be particularly effective as vaccine adjuvants. Constructs SP-D-OX40L, SP-D-LIGHT, and SP-D-BAFF enhanced Gag-specific IL-2 secretion in memory T cells, suggesting these adjuvants can increase the number of self-renewing Gag-specific CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cells. Finally adjuvants SP

  16. Structural basis for HIV-1 DNA integration in the human genome, role of the LEDGF/P75 cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Fabrice; Crucifix, Corinne; Granger, Florence; Eiler, Sylvia; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Korolev, Sergei; Agapkina, Julia; Ziganshin, Rustam; Gottikh, Marina; Nazabal, Alexis; Emiliani, Stéphane; Benarous, Richard; Moras, Dino; Schultz, Patrick; Ruff, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) cDNA into the human genome is catalysed by integrase. Several studies have shown the importance of the interaction of cellular cofactors with integrase for viral integration and infectivity. In this study, we produced a stable and functional complex between the wild-type full-length integrase (IN) and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 that shows enhanced in vitro integration activity compared with the integrase alone. Mass spectrometry analysis and the fitting of known atomic structures in cryo negatively stain electron microscopy (EM) maps revealed that the functional unit comprises two asymmetric integrase dimers and two LEDGF/p75 molecules. In the presence of DNA, EM revealed the DNA-binding sites and indicated that, in each asymmetric dimer, one integrase molecule performs the catalytic reaction, whereas the other one positions the viral DNA in the active site of the opposite dimer. The positions of the target and viral DNAs for the 3′ processing and integration reaction shed light on the integration mechanism, a process with wide implications for the understanding of viral-induced pathologies. PMID:19229293

  17. Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing data for characterization of CTL epitopes in archived HIV-1 proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Tumiotto, Camille; Riviere, Lionel; Bellecave, Pantxika; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Vilain-Parce, Alice; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Fleury, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    One of the strategies for curing viral HIV-1 is a therapeutic vaccine involving the stimulation of cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells (CTL) that are Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-restricted. The lack of efficiency of previous vaccination strategies may have been due to the immunogenic peptides used, which could be different from a patient's virus epitopes and lead to a poor CTL response. To counteract this lack of specificity, conserved epitopes must be targeted. One alternative is to gather as many data as possible from a large number of patients on their HIV-1 proviral archived epitope variants, taking into account their genetic background to select the best presented CTL epitopes. In order to process big data generated by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the DNA of HIV-infected patients, we have developed a software package called TutuGenetics. This tool combines an alignment derived either from Sanger or NGS files, HLA typing, target gene and a CTL epitope list as input files. It allows automatic translation after correction of the alignment obtained between the HxB2 reference and the reads, followed by automatic calculation of the MHC IC50 value for each epitope variant and the HLA allele of the patient by using NetMHCpan 3.0, resulting in a csv file as output result. We validated this new tool by comparing Sanger and NGS (454, Roche) sequences obtained from the proviral DNA of patients at success of ART included in the Provir Latitude 45 study and showed a 90% correlation between the quantitative results of NGS and Sanger. This automated analysis combined with complementary samples should yield more data regarding the archived CTL epitopes according to the patients' HLA alleles and will be useful for screening epitopes that in theory are presented efficiently to the HLA groove, thus constituting promising immunogenic peptides for a therapeutic vaccine.

  18. HIV-1 uses dynamic capsid pores to import nucleotides and fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, David A.; McEwan, William A.; Hilditch, Laura; Price, Amanda J.; Towers, Greg J.; James, Leo C.

    2016-01-01

    During the early stages of infection, the HIV-1 capsid protects viral components from cytosolic sensors, such as cGAS, and nucleases, such as TREX, while allowing access to nucleotides for efficient reverse transcription1. Here we show that each capsid hexamer has a size-selective pore bounded by a ring of six arginine residues and a ‘molecular iris’ formed by the N-terminal β-hairpin. The arginine ring creates a strongly positively charged channel that recruits the four nucleotides with on-rates that near diffusion limits. Progressive removal of pore arginines results in a dose-dependent and concomitant decrease in nucleotide affinity, reverse transcription and infectivity. This positively charged channel is universally conserved in lentiviral capsids despite the fact that it is strongly destabilising without nucleotides to counteract charge repulsion. We also describe a channel inhibitor, hexacarboxybenzene, which competes for nucleotide binding and efficiently blocks encapsidated reverse transcription demonstrating the tractability of the pore as a novel drug target. PMID:27509857

  19. HIV-1 uses dynamic capsid pores to import nucleotides and fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, David A; McEwan, William A; Hilditch, Laura; Price, Amanda J; Towers, Greg J; James, Leo C

    2016-08-18

    During the early stages of infection, the HIV-1 capsid protects viral components from cytosolic sensors and nucleases such as cGAS and TREX, respectively, while allowing access to nucleotides for efficient reverse transcription. Here we show that each capsid hexamer has a size-selective pore bound by a ring of six arginine residues and a 'molecular iris' formed by the amino-terminal β-hairpin. The arginine ring creates a strongly positively charged channel that recruits the four nucleotides with on-rates that approach diffusion limits. Progressive removal of pore arginines results in a dose-dependent and concomitant decrease in nucleotide affinity, reverse transcription and infectivity. This positively charged channel is universally conserved in lentiviral capsids despite the fact that it is strongly destabilizing without nucleotides to counteract charge repulsion. We also describe a channel inhibitor, hexacarboxybenzene, which competes for nucleotide binding and efficiently blocks encapsidated reverse transcription, demonstrating the tractability of the pore as a novel drug target.

  20. Source identification in two criminal cases using phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaduto, Diane I.; Brown, Jeremy M.; Haaland, Wade C.; Zwickl, Derrick J.; Hillis, David M.; Metzker, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has been widely used to test the a priori hypothesis of epidemiological clustering in suspected transmission chains of HIV-1. Among studies showing strong support for relatedness between HIV samples obtained from infected individuals, evidence for the direction of transmission between epidemiologically related pairs has been lacking. During transmission of HIV, a genetic bottleneck occurs, resulting in the paraphyly of source viruses with respect to those of the recipient. This paraphyly establishes the direction of transmission, from which the source can then be inferred. Here, we present methods and results from two criminal cases, State of Washington v Anthony Eugene Whitfield, case number 04-1-0617-5 (Superior Court of the State of Washington, Thurston County, 2004) and State of Texas v Philippe Padieu, case numbers 219-82276-07, 219-82277-07, 219-82278-07, 219-82279-07, 219-82280-07, and 219-82705-07 (219th Judicial District Court, Collin County, TX, 2009), which provided evidence that direction can be established from blinded case samples. The observed paraphyly from each case study led to the identification of an inferred source (i.e., index case), whose identity was revealed at trial to be that of the defendant. PMID:21078965

  1. HIV vaccine update. DNA vaccination: a promising candidate for a vaccine against HIV-1?

    PubMed

    Van Der Ryst, E

    1996-01-01

    According to animal studies, DNA vaccines employ the genes encoding proteins of pathogens or tumors, in contrast to the more conventional vaccine approaches. In addition, DNA vaccinations do not involve infectious agents, proteins are expressed in their natural form resulting to better recognition of viral proteins by the antibodies, and both strong and durable cellular immune responses as well as neutralizing antibodies are induced. Altogether, this makes DNA vaccinations one of the most promising future candidates in the field of HIV vaccines. However, safety of DNA vaccines should be examined before these vaccines can be considered for large-scale clinical trials in humans. The question of a possible induction of anti-DNA antibodies, with the consequent development of autoimmune manifestations is emphasized. Another is the possible integration of DNA with insertional mutagenesis, which could lead to tumor formation and development of immunologic tolerance of antigen production persists.

  2. Different Mutagenic Potential of HIV-1 Restriction Factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Is Determined by Distinct Single-Stranded DNA Scanning Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (−)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (−)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an 190NPM192 motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F 191Pro to 191Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F 190NGM192 could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif (APOBEC3F, 5

  3. Indicators of therapeutic effect in FIT-06, a Phase II trial of a DNA vaccine, GTU(®)-Multi-HIVB, in untreated HIV-1 infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Eftyhia; Stanescu, Ioana; Leinonen, Mika; Ellefsen, Kim; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Valtavaara, Minna; Ustav, Mart; Reijonen, Kalevi

    2012-06-08

    Combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly decreased HIV-1 related morbidity and mortality globally transforming HIV into a controllable condition. HAART has a number of limitations though, including limited access in resource constrained countries, which have driven the search for simpler, affordable HIV-1 treatment modalities. Therapeutic HIV-1 vaccines aim to provide immunological support to slow disease progression and decrease transmission. We evaluated the safety, immunogenicity and clinical effect of a novel recombinant plasmid DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine, GTU(®)-multi-HIVB, containing 6 different genes derived from an HIV-1 subtype B isolate. 63 untreated, healthy, HIV-1 infected, adults between 18 and 40 years were enrolled in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase II trial in South Africa. Subjects were HIV-1 subtype C infected, had never received antiretrovirals, with CD4 ≥ 350 cells/mm(3) and pHIV-RNA ≥ 50 copies/mL at screening. Subjects were allocated to vaccine or placebo groups in a 2:1 ratio either administered intradermally (ID) (0.5mg/dose) or intramuscularly (IM) (1mg/dose) at 0, 4 and 12 weeks boosted at 76 and 80 weeks with 1mg/dose (ID) and 2mg/dose (IM), respectively. Safety was assessed by adverse event monitoring and immunogenicity by HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts. Vaccine was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Significant declines in log pHIV-RNA (p=0.012) and increases in CD4+ T cell counts (p=0.066) were observed in the vaccine group compared to placebo, more pronounced after IM administration and in some HLA haplotypes (B*5703) maintained for 17 months after the final immunisation. The GTU(®)-multi-HIVB plasmid recombinant DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine is safe, well tolerated and favourably affects pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals after IM

  4. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup A Decreases the Risk of Drug Addiction but Conversely Increases the Risk of HIV-1 Infection in Chinese Addicts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-Mei; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Feng-Liang; Bi, Rui; Yang, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Hao; Logan, Ian; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is one of the most serious social problems in the world today and addicts are always at a high risk of acquiring HIV infection. Mitochondrial impairment has been reported in both drug addicts and in HIV patients undergoing treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup could affect the risk of drug addiction and HIV-1 infection in Chinese. We analyzed mtDNA sequence variations of 577 Chinese intravenous drug addicts (289 with HIV-1 infection and 288 without) and compared with 2 control populations (n = 362 and n = 850). We quantified the viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without haplogroup A status and investigated the potential effect of haplogroup A defining variants m.4824A > G and m.8794C > T on the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by using an allotopic expression assay. mtDNA haplogroup A had a protective effect against drug addiction but appeared to confer an increased risk of HIV infection in addicts. HIV-1-infected addicts with haplogroup A had a trend for a higher viral load, although the mean viral load was similar between carriers of haplogroup A and those with other haplogroup. Hela cells overexpressing allele m.8794 T showed significantly decreased ROS levels as compared to cells with the allele m.8794C (P = 0.03). Our results suggested that mtDNA haplogroup A might protect against drug addiction but increase the risk of HIV-1 infection. The contradictory role of haplogroup A might be caused by an alteration in mitochondrial function due to a particular mtDNA ancestral variant.

  6. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  7. Comparing Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell DNA and Circulating Plasma viral RNA pol Genotypes of Subtype C HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lauren; Gholamin, Sharareh; White, Elizabeth; Zijenah, Lynn; Katzenstein, David A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Drug resistance mutations (DRM) in viral RNA are important in defining to provide effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Detection of DRM in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA is another source of information, although the clinical significance of DRMs in proviral DNA is less clear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 25 patients receiving ART at a center in Zimbabwe, 32 blood samples were collected. Dideoxy-sequencing of gag-pol identified subtype and resistance mutations from plasma viral RNA and proviral DNA. Drug resistance was estimated using the calibrated population resistance tool on www.hivdb.stanford.edu database. Numerical resistance scores were calculated for all antiretroviral drugs and for the subjects' reported regimen. Phylogenetic analysis as maximum likelihood was performed to determine the evolutionary distance between sequences. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients, 4 patients (2 of which had given 2 blood samples) were not known to be on ART (NA) and had exclusively wild-type virus, 17 had received Protease inhibitors (PI), 18, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and 19, two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Of the 17 with history of PI, 10 had PI mutations, 5 had minor differences between mutations in RNA and DNA. Eighteen samples had NNRTI mutations, six of which demonstrated some discordance between DNA and RNA mutations. Although NRTI resistance mutations were frequently different between analyses, mutations resulted in very similar estimated phenotypes as measured by resistance scores. The numerical resistance scores from RNA and DNA for PIs differed between 2/10, for NNRTIs between 8/18, and for NRTIs between 17/32 pairs. When calculated resistance scores were collapsed, 3 pairs showed discordance between RNA and DNA for at least one PI, 6 were discordant for at least one NNRTI and 11 for at least one NRTI. Regarding phylogenetic evolutionary analysis, all

  8. A simple and rapid DNA extraction method from whole blood for highly sensitive detection and quantitation of HIV-1 proviral DNA by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    McFall, Sally M; Wagner, Robin L; Jangam, Sujit R; Yamada, Douglas H; Hardie, Diana; Kelso, David M

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis and access to treatment for infants with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is critical to reduce infant mortality. The lack of simple point-of-care tests impedes the timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The development of FINA, filtration isolation of nucleic acids, a novel DNA extraction method that can be performed by clinic personnel in less than 2 min has been reported previously. In this report, significant improvements in the DNA extraction and amplification methods are detailed that allow sensitive quantitation of as little as 10 copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA and detection of 3 copies extracted from 100 μl of whole blood. An internal control to detect PCR inhibition was also incorporated. In a preliminary field evaluation of 61 South African infants, the FINA test demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. The proviral copy number of the infant specimens was quantified, and it was established that 100 microliters of whole blood is required for sensitive diagnosis of infants.

  9. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus (VV) in a multi-envelope DNA-VV-protein (DVP) HIV-1 vaccine protects macaques from lethal challenge with heterologous SHIV.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Sealy, Robert E; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Freiden, Pamela J; Surman, Sherri L; Blanchard, James L; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2012-05-02

    The pandemic of HIV-1 has continued for decades, yet there remains no licensed vaccine. Previous research has demonstrated the effectiveness of a multi-envelope, multi-vectored HIV-1 vaccine in a macaque-SHIV model, illustrating a potential means of combating HIV-1. Specifically, recombinant DNA, vaccinia virus (VV) and purified protein (DVP) delivery systems were used to vaccinate animals with dozens of antigenically distinct HIV-1 envelopes for induction of immune breadth. The vaccinated animals controlled disease following challenge with a heterologous SHIV. This demonstration suggested that the antigenic cocktail vaccine strategy, which has succeeded in several other vaccine fields (e.g. pneumococcus), might also succeed against HIV-1. The strategy remains untested in an advanced clinical study, in part due to safety concerns associated with the use of replication-competent VV. To address this concern, we designed a macaque study in which psoralen/ultraviolet light-inactivated VV (UV VV) was substituted for replication-competent VV in the multi-envelope DVP protocol. Control animals received a vaccine encompassing no VV, or no vaccine. All VV vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward VV, and all vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward HIV-1 envelope. After challenge with heterologous SHIV 89.6P, animals that received replication-competent VV or UV VV experienced similar outcomes. They exhibited reduced peak viral loads, maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts and improved survival compared to control animals that received no VV or no vaccine; there were 0/15 deaths among all animals that received VV and 5/9 deaths among controls. Results define a practical means of improving VV safety, and encourage advancement of a promising multi-envelope DVP HIV-1 vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The degree of apoptosis as an immunostimulant for a DNA vaccine against HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Jounai, Nao; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Okuda, Kentaro; Watabe, Setsuko; Xin, Ke-Qin; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-01-05

    To regulate the expression of the apoptotic gene, we constructed bicistronic DNA vaccines that encode for HIV env and caspase-3 mutant (casp 3m) that are expressed via the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-dependent translations. While IRES-casp 3m induced weak apoptosis and caused little reduction in antigen expression, CMV-casp 3m elicited strong apoptosis and led to a marked decrease in the antigen expression. Therefore, IRES-casp 3m augmented HIV-specific immune responses, and IRES-casp 3m induced significant protection against the vaccinia-HIV chimeric virus. These results suggest that the appropriate level of apoptosis is important for DNA vaccine development.

  11. Premature strand transfer by the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase during strong-stop DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Klaver, B; Berkhout, B

    1994-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes starts near the 5' end of the viral RNA by use of an associated tRNA primer. According to the current model of reverse transcription, the initial cDNA product, termed minus-strand strong-stop DNA, 'jumps' to a repeated sequence (R region) at the 3' end of the RNA template. The human retroviruses have relatively long R regions (97-247 nucleotides) when compared to murine and avian viruses (16-68 nucleotides). This suggests that the full complement of the R region is not required for strand transfer and that partial cDNA copies of the 5' R can prematurely jump to the 3' R. To test this hypothesis, we generated mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus with R region changes and analyzed whether 5' or 3' R sequences were inherited by the progeny. We found that in most cases, 5' R-encoded sequences are dominant, which is consistent with the model of reverse transcription. Using a selection protocol, however, we were also able to identify progeny viruses with R sequences derived from the original 3' R element. These results suggest that partial strong stop cDNAs can be transferred with R region homologies much shorter than 97 nucleotides. Images PMID:7510065

  12. Safety and Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 Gag DNA Vaccine with or without IL-12 and/or IL-15 Plasmid Cytokine Adjuvant in Healthy, HIV-1 Uninfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalams, Spyros A.; Parker, Scott; Jin, Xia; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Wang, Maggie; Hural, John; Lubeck, Michael; Eldridge, John; Cardinali, Massimo; Blattner, William A.; Sobieszczyk, Magda; Suriyanon, Vinai; Kalichman, Artur; Weiner, David B.; Baden, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA vaccines are a promising approach to vaccination since they circumvent the problem of vector-induced immunity. DNA plasmid cytokine adjuvants have been shown to augment immune responses in small animals and in macaques. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed two first in human HIV vaccine trials in the US, Brazil and Thailand of an RNA-optimized truncated HIV-1 gag gene (p37) DNA derived from strain HXB2 administered either alone or in combination with dose-escalation of IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Vaccinations with both the HIV immunogen and cytokine adjuvant were generally well-tolerated and no significant vaccine-related adverse events were identified. A small number of subjects developed asymptomatic low titer antibodies to IL-12 or IL-15. Cellular immunogenicity following 3 and 4 vaccinations was poor, with response rates to gag of 4.9%/8.7% among vaccinees receiving gag DNA alone, 0%/11.5% among those receiving gag DNA+IL-15, and no responders among those receiving DNA+high dose (1500 ug) IL-12 DNA. However, after three doses, 44.4% (4/9) of vaccinees receiving gag DNA and intermediate dose (500 ug) of IL-12 DNA demonstrated a detectable cellular immune response. Conclusions/Significance This combination of HIV gag DNA with plasmid cytokine adjuvants was well tolerated. There were minimal responses to HIV gag DNA alone, and no apparent augmentation with either IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Despite the promise of DNA vaccines, newer formulations or methods of delivery will be required to increase their immunogenicity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00115960 NCT00111605 PMID:22242162

  13. Field expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1: The Ethiopian experience.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Girma, Mulu; Melaku, Zenebe; Mekonen, Teferi; Tanuri, Amilcar; Hailegiorgis, Bereket; Tegbaru, Belete; Mengistu, Yohannes; Ashenafi, Aytenew; Mamo, Wubshet; Abreha, Tesfay; Tibesso, Gudetta; Ramos, Artur; Ayana, Gonfa; Freeman, Richard; Nkengasong, John N; Zewdu, Solomon; Kebede, Yenew; Abebe, Almaz; Kenyon, Thomas A; Messele, Tsehaynesh

    2013-03-01

    Early diagnosis of infants infected with HIV (EID) and early initiation of treatment significantly reduces the rate of disease progression and mortality. One of the challenges to identification of HIV-1-infected infants is availability and/or access to quality molecular laboratory facilities which perform molecular virologic assays suitable for accurate identification of the HIV status of infants. We conducted a joint site assessment and designed laboratories for the expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing based on dried blood spot (DBS) for EID in six regions of Ethiopia. Training of appropriate laboratory technologists and development of required documentation including standard operating procedures (SOPs) was carried out. The impact of the expansion of EID laboratories was assessed by the number of tests performed as well as the turn-around time. DNA PCR for EID was introduced in 2008 in six regions. From April 2006 to April 2008, a total of 2848 infants had been tested centrally at the Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute (EHNRI) in Addis Ababa, and which was then the only laboratory with the capability to perform EID; 546 (19.2%) of the samples were positive. By November 2010, EHNRI and the six laboratories had tested an additional 16 985 HIV-exposed infants, of which 1915 (11.3%) were positive. The median turn-around time for test results was 14 days (range 14-21 days). Expansion of HIV DNA PCR testing facilities that can provide quality and reliable results is feasible in resource-limited settings. Regular supervision and monitoring for quality assurance of these laboratories is essential to maintain accuracy of testing.

  14. DNA vaccine molecular adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL enhance anti-gp120 immune response and increase HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S; Termini, James M; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C; Khan, Wasif N; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) specific for conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are believed to be essential for protection against multiple HIV-1 clades. However, vaccines capable of stimulating the production of bNAbs remain a major challenge. Given that polyreactivity and autoreactivity are considered important characteristics of anti-HIV bNAbs, we designed an HIV vaccine incorporating the molecular adjuvants BAFF (B cell activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) with the potential to facilitate the maturation of polyreactive and autoreactive B cells as well as to enhance the affinity and/or avidity of Env-specific antibodies. We designed recombinant DNA plasmids encoding soluble multitrimers of BAFF and APRIL using surfactant protein D as a scaffold, and we vaccinated mice with these molecular adjuvants using DNA and DNA-protein vaccination strategies. We found that immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, together with interleukin 12 (IL-12) and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140, induced neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 and tier 2 (vaccine strain) viruses. The APRIL-containing vaccine was particularly effective at generating tier 2 neutralizing antibodies following a protein boost. These BAFF and APRIL effects coincided with an enhanced germinal center (GC) reaction, increased anti-gp120 antibody-secreting cells, and increased anti-gp120 functional avidity. Notably, BAFF and APRIL did not cause indiscriminate B cell expansion or an increase in total IgG. We propose that BAFF and APRIL multitrimers are promising molecular adjuvants for vaccines designed to induce bNAbs against HIV-1. Recent identification of antibodies that neutralize most HIV-1 strains has revived hopes and efforts to create novel vaccines that can effectively stimulate HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. However, the multiple immune evasion properties of HIV have hampered these efforts. These include the instability of

  15. HIV-1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  16. HIV-DNA Given with or without Intradermal Electroporation Is Safe and Highly Immunogenic in Healthy Swedish HIV-1 DNA/MVA Vaccinees: A Phase I Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Hejdeman, Bo; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Tecleab, Teghesti; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia L.; Stout, Richard R.; Robb, Merlin L.; Shattock, Robin J.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared safety and immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) vaccination with and without electroporation (EP) in a phase I randomized placebo-controlled trial of an HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccine in healthy Swedish volunteers. Methods HIV-DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtypes A, B and C; Rev B; Gag A and B and RTmut B were given ID at weeks 0, 6 and 12 in a dose of 0.6 mg. Twenty-five volunteers received vaccine using a needle-free device (ZetaJet) with (n=16) or without (n=9) ID EP (Dermavax). Five volunteers were placebo recipients. Boosting with recombinant MVA-CMDR expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE (HIV-MVA) or placebo was performed at weeks 24 and 40. Nine of the vaccinees received a subtype C CN54 gp140 protein boost together with HIV-MVA. Results The ID/EP delivery was very well tolerated. After three HIV-DNA immunizations, no statistically significant difference was seen in the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to Gag between HIV-DNA ID/EP recipients (5/15, 33%) and HIV-DNA ID recipients (1/7, 14%, p=0.6158). The first HIV-MVA or HIV-MVA+gp140 vaccination increased the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to 18/19 (95%). CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cell responses to Gag or Env were demonstrable in 94% of vaccinees. A balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response was noted, with 78% and 71% responders, respectively. IFN-γ and IL-2 dominated the CD4+ T cell response to Gag and Env. The CD8+ response to Gag was broader with expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1β and/or CD107. No differences were seen between DNA vaccine groups. Binding antibodies were induced after the second HIV-MVA+/-gp140 in 93% of vaccinees to subtype C Env, with the highest titers among EP/gp140 recipients. Conclusion Intradermal electroporation of HIV-DNA was well tolerated. Strong cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses were elicited by the HIV-DNA prime and HIV-MVA boosting regimen, with or without intradermal electroporation use. Trial Registration International Standard

  17. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Oliver I; Emerman, Michael

    2016-09-13

    There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized. HIV-1 and HIV-2 belong to a family of viruses called lentiviruses that infect at least 40 primate species, including humans. Lentiviruses have been circulating in primates for at least 5 million years. In order to better fight HIV, we must understand the viral and host factors necessary for infection, adaptation, and transmission of these viruses. Using the natural variation of HIV-1, HIV-2, and related lentiviruses, we have investigated the role of the DNA damage response in the viral life cycle. We have found that the ability of lentiviruses to activate the DNA damage response is largely conserved. However, we also found that the SLX4 host factor is not required for this activation, as was

  18. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT.

  19. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  20. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  1. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Ros; Jongwe, Tsungai Ivai; Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  2. Quantification of Residual Germinal Center Activity and HIV-1 DNA and RNA Levels Using Fine Needle Biopsies of Lymph Nodes During Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hey-Nguyen, William J; Xu, Yin; Pearson, Chester F; Bailey, Michelle; Suzuki, Kazuo; Tantau, Robyn; Obeid, Solange; Milner, Brad; Field, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Bloch, Mark; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D; Zaunders, John J; Koelsch, Kersten K

    2017-03-13

    HIV-1 reservoirs are most often studied in peripheral blood (PB), but not all lymphocytes recirculate, particularly T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4(+) T cells, as well as germinal center (GC) B cells, in lymph nodes (LNs). Ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsies (FNBs) from inguinal LNs and PB samples were obtained from 10 healthy controls (HCs) and 21 HIV-1-infected subjects [11 antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive and 10 on ART]. Tfh cells and GC B cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. HIV-1 DNA and cell-associated (CA) RNA levels in LNs and PB were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. FNBs were obtained without adverse events. Tfh cells and GC B cells were highly elevated in ART-naive subjects, with a median GC B cell count >300-fold higher than HCs, but also remained higher in 4 out of the 10 subjects on ART. GC B cell counts and Tfh cell counts were highly correlated with each other, and also with activated T cells in LNs but not in blood. Levels of HIV-1 DNA and CA RNA viral burden in highly purified CD4(+) T cells from FNBs were significantly elevated compared with those in CD4(+) T cells from PB in the ART-naive group, but only trended toward an increase in the ART patients. FNBs enabled minimally invasive access to, and parallel measurement of residual activated T and B cells and viral burden within LNs in HIV-1-infected patients. These FNBs revealed significant GC activity that was not apparent from corresponding PB samples.

  3. Possible involvement of distinct phylogenetic clusters of HIV-1 variants in the discrepancies between coreceptor tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomohisa; Iketani, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kato, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The coreceptor tropism testing should be conducted prior to commencing a regimen containing a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV-1 infection. For aviremic patients on long antiretroviral therapy, proviral DNA is often used instead of viral RNA in genotypic tropism testing. However, the tropism predictions from RNA and DNA are sometimes different. We examined the cause of the discrepancies between HIV-1 tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the env C2V3C3 region was determined using pair samples of plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 50 HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals using population-based sequencing. The samples with discrepant tropism assessments between RNA and DNA were further analyzed using deep sequencing, followed by phylogenetic analysis. The tropism was assessed using the algorithm geno2pheno with a false-positive rate cutoff of 10 %. In population-based sequencing, five of 50 subjects showed discrepant tropism predictions between their RNA and DNA samples: four exhibited R5 tropism in RNA and X4 tropism in DNA, while one exhibited the opposite pattern. In the deep sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, three subjects had single clusters comprising of RNA- and DNA-derived sequences that were a mixture of R5 and X4 sequences. The other two subjects had two and three distinct phylogenetic clusters of sequences, respectively, each of which was dominated by R5 or X4 sequences; sequences of the R5-dominated cluster were mostly found in RNA, while sequences of the X4-dominated cluster were mostly in DNA. Some of HIV-1 tropism discrepancies between viral RNA and proviral DNA seem to be caused by phylogenetically distinct clusters which resides in plasma and cells in different frequencies. Our findings suggest that the tropism testing using PBMC DNA or deep sequencing may be required when the viral load is not suppressed or rebounds in the course of a CCR5 antagonist-containing regimen.

  4. Comparative evaluation of a triplex nucleic acid test for detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA, with the Procleix Tigris System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinglong; Zhai, Jianxin; Zeng, Jinfeng; Tian, Cong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is valuable for screening blood donors for occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and infection during the window period in countries where HBV is endemic, such as China. An "in-house" NAT (Triplex NAT) was developed for screening for HBV DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Using the Triplex NAT, a head-to-head comparative clinical evaluation was carried out against the most common commercial NAT used for blood screening in China: the Procleix Tigris System. A total of 33,025 specimens which were negative for Hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV antibody and HIV-1 antibody/antigen from potential blood donors were tested for HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA by both the in-house Triplex assay and the commercially available Procleix Tigris System. Eleven specimens were detected as HBV positive by both NATs. Twelve specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Procleix Ultrio assay and the discriminatory assays, and not the Triplex. Twenty-eight specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Triplex and not the Procleix Ultrio. This study, combined with other data obtained in China, suggest that at least 50% HBV surface antigen negative but DNA-positive blood donations would be undetected using the current commercial NATs because of their insufficient sensitivity and/or Mini-Pool formatting strategies.

  5. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT. PMID:23028129

  6. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  7. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  8. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  9. Uracil DNA glycosylase interacts with the p32 subunit of the replication protein A complex to modulate HIV-1 reverse transcription for optimal virus dissemination.

    PubMed

    Herate, Cecile; Vigne, Clarisse; Guenzel, Carolin A; Lambele, Marie; Rouyez, Marie-Christine; Benichou, Serge

    2016-04-12

    Through incorporation into virus particles, the HIV-1 Vpr protein participates in the early steps of the virus life cycle by influencing the reverse transcription process. We previously showed that this positive impact on reverse transcription was related to Vpr binding to the uracil DNA glycosylase 2 enzyme (UNG2), leading to enhancement of virus infectivity in established CD4-positive cell lines via a nonenzymatic mechanism. We report here that Vpr can form a trimolecular complex with UNG2 and the p32 subunit (RPA32) of the replication protein A (RPA) complex and we explore how these cellular proteins can influence virus replication and dissemination in the primary target cells of HIV-1, which express low levels of both proteins. Virus infectivity and replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), as well as the efficiency of the viral DNA synthesis, were significantly reduced when viruses were produced from cells depleted of endogenous UNG2 or RPA32. Moreover, viruses produced in macrophages failed to replicate efficiently in UNG2- and RPA32-depleted T lymphocytes. Reciprocally, viruses produced in UNG2-depleted T cells did not replicate efficiently in MDMs confirming the positive role of UNG2 for virus dissemination. Our data show the positive effect of UNG2 and RPA32 on the reverse transcription process leading to optimal virus replication and dissemination between the primary target cells of HIV-1.

  10. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  11. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  12. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized. PMID:27624129

  13. High degree of concordance between flow cytometry and geno2pheno methods for HIV-1 tropism determination in proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alex José Leite; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Abrahão, Marcos Herculano Nunes; Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; de Jesus Ferreira, Gilcivaldo; Coelho, Luana Portes; Ferreira, João Leandro; Jorge, Célia Regina Mayoral Pedroso; Netto, Eduardo Martins; Brites, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Use of CCR5 antagonists requires previous viral tropism determination. The available methods have high cost, are time-consuming, or require highly trained personnel, and sophisticated equipment. We compared a flow cytometry-based tropism assay with geno2pheno method to determine HIV-1 tropism in AIDS patients, in Bahia, Brazil. We tested peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 102 AIDS patients under antiretroviral therapy by using a cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay. Cellular membrane receptors were identified by using CXCR4, CCR5 and CD4 monoclonal antibodies, while detection of cytoplasmic mRNAs for gag and pol HIV regions was achieved by using a labeled probe. Genotypic identification of X4 and R5 tropic viruses was attempted by geno2pheno algorithm. There was a high degree of concordance between cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno algorithm in determination of HIV-1 tropism. Cytometry-based tropism assay demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity in comparison to geno2pheno, which was used as a gold-standard. One sample could not be amplified by geno2pheno method, but was classified as duotropic by cytometry-based tropism assay. We did not find any association between CD4+ count or plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and tropism results. The overall performances of cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay were almost identical in determination of HIV-1 tropism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5' thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3' guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA-protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. The Frequency of Cytidine Editing of Viral DNA Is Differentially Influenced by Vpx and Nucleosides during HIV-1 or SIVMAC Infection of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Barateau, Véronique; Wu, Nannan; Berger, Gregory; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Two cellular factors are currently known to modulate lentiviral infection specifically in myeloid cells: SAMHD1 and APOBEC3A (A3A). SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphohydrolase that interferes with viral infection mostly by limiting the intracellular concentrations of dNTPs, while A3A is a cytidine deaminase that has been described to edit incoming vDNA. The restrictive phenotype of myeloid cells can be alleviated through the direct degradation of SAMHD1 by the HIV-2/SIVSM Vpx protein or else, at least in the case of HIV-1, by the exogenous supplementation of nucleosides that artificially overcome the catabolic activity of SAMHD1 on dNTPs. Here, we have used Vpx and dNs to explore the relationship existing between vDNA cytidine deamination and SAMHD1 during HIV-1 or SIVMAC infection of primary dendritic cells. Our results reveal an interesting inverse correlation between conditions that promote efficient infection of DCs and the extent of vDNA editing that may reflect the different susceptibility of vDNA to cytoplasmic effectors during the infection of myeloid cells. PMID:26496699

  16. A Phase IIA Randomized Clinical Trial of a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Prime Followed by a Multiclade rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Boost in Healthy Adults (HVTN204)

    PubMed Central

    Churchyard, Gavin J.; Morgan, Cecilia; Adams, Elizabeth; Hural, John; Graham, Barney S.; Moodie, Zoe; Grove, Doug; Gray, Glenda; Bekker, Linda-Gail; McElrath, M. Juliana; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Goepfert, Paul; Kalams, Spyros; Baden, Lindsey R.; Lally, Michelle; Dolin, Raphael; Blattner, William; Kalichman, Artur; Figueroa, J. Peter; Pape, Jean; Schechter, Mauro; Defawe, Olivier; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Montefiori, David C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Corey, Lawrence; Keefer, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine regimen consisting of a 6-plasmid HIV-1 DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) boosted by a recombinant adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5) HIV-1 with matching inserts was evaluated in HIV-seronegative participants from South Africa, United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. Methods 480 participants were evenly randomized to receive either: DNA (4 mg IM by Biojector) at 0, 1 and 2 months, followed by rAd5 (1010 PU IM by needle/syringe) at 6 months; or placebo. Participants were monitored for reactogenicity and adverse events throughout the 12-month study. Peak and duration of HIV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated after the prime and boost. Results The vaccine was well tolerated and safe. T-cell responses, detected by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) ELISpot to global potential T-cell epitopes (PTEs) were observed in 70.8% (136/192) of vaccine recipients overall, most frequently to Gag (54.7%) and to Env (54.2%). In U.S. vaccine recipients T-cell responses were less frequent in Ad5 sero-positive versus sero-negative vaccine recipients (62.5% versus 85.7% respectively, p = 0.035). The frequency of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses detected by intracellular cytokine staining were similar (41.8% and 47.2% respectively) and most secreted ≥2 cytokines. The vaccine induced a high frequency (83.7%–94.6%) of binding antibody responses to consensus Group M, and Clades A, B and C gp140 Env oligomers. Antibody responses to Gag were elicited in 46% of vaccine recipients. Conclusion The vaccine regimen was well-tolerated and induced polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and multi-clade anti-Env binding antibodies. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00125970 PMID:21857901

  17. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5′ thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3′ guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA–protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. PMID:21227929

  18. Preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity of C-type HIV-1-based DNA and NYVAC vaccines in the Balb/C mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jens; Bieler, Kurt; Köstler, Josef; Frachette, Marie-Joelle; Jeffs, Simon; Vieira, Sueli; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter; Pantaleo, Guiseppe; Wolf, Hans; Wagner, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    As part of a European initiative (EuroVacc), we report the design, construction, and immunogenicity of two HIV-1 vaccine candidates based on a clade C virus strain (CN54) representing the current major epidemic in Asia and parts of Africa. Open reading frames encoding an artificial 160-kDa GagPolNef (GPN) polyprotein and the external glycoprotein gp120 were fully RNA and codon optimized. A DNA vaccine (DNA-GPN and DNA-gp120, referred to as DNA-C), and a replication-deficient vaccinia virus encoding both reading frames (NYVAC-C), were assessed regarding immunogenicity in Balb/C mice. The intramuscular administration of both plasmid DNA constructs, followed by two booster DNA immunizations, induced substantial T-cell responses against both antigens as well as Env-specific antibodies. Whereas low doses of NYVAC-C failed to induce specific CTL or antibodies, high doses generated cellular as well as humoral immune responses, but these did not reach the levels seen following DNA vaccination. The most potent immune responses were detectable using prime:boost protocols, regardless of whether DNA-C or NYVAC-C was used as the priming or boosting agent. These preclinical findings revealed the immunogenic response triggered by DNA-C and its enhancement by combining it with NYVAC-C, thus complementing the macaque preclinical and human phase I clinical studies of EuroVacc.

  19. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M; Hilburn, Silva; Demontis, Maria-Antonietta; Brighty, David W; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Taylor, Graham P; Martin, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT) usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of asymptomatic carriers (ACs) and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset. PMID:26985903

  20. Experiences of social harm and changes in sexual practices among volunteers who had completed a phase I/II HIV vaccine trial employing HIV-1 DNA priming and HIV-1 MVA boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tarimo, Edith A M; Munseri, Patricia; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Mhalu, Fred; Sandstrom, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Volunteers in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials are assumed to be at low risk of acquiring HIV infection and are expected to have normal lives in the community. However, during participation in the trials, volunteers may encounter social harm and changes in their sexual behaviours. The current study aimed to study persistence of social harm and changes in sexual practices over time among phase I/II HIV vaccine immunogenicity (HIVIS03) trial volunteers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A descriptive prospective cohort study was conducted among 33 out of 60 volunteers of HIVIS03 trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who had received three HIV-1 DNA injections boosted with two HIV-1 MVA doses. A structured interview was administered to collect data. Analysis was carried out using SPSS and McNemars' chi-square (χ2) was used to test the association within-subjects. Participants reported experiencing negative comments from their colleagues about the trial; but such comments were less severe during the second follow up visits (χ2 = 8.72; P<0.001). Most of the comments were associated with discrimination (χ2 = 26.72; P<0.001), stigma (χ2 = 6.06; P<0.05), and mistrust towards the HIV vaccine trial (χ2 = 4.9; P<0.05). Having a regular sexual partner other than spouse or cohabitant declined over the two follow-up periods (χ2 = 4.45; P<0.05). Participants in the phase I/II HIV vaccine trial were likely to face negative comments from relatives and colleagues after the end of the trial, but those comments decreased over time. In this study, the inherent sexual practice of having extra sexual partners other than spouse declined over time. Therefore, prolonged counselling and support appears important to minimize risky sexual behaviour among volunteers after participation in HIV Vaccine trials.

  1. Detection of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Women Following Administration of a Single Dose of Nevirapine: Comparison of Plasma RNA to Cellular DNA by Consensus Sequencing and by Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Kress, Catherine M.; Beck, Ingrid; Techapornroong, Malee; Wittayapraparat, Pakorn; Tansuphasawasdikul, Somboon; Jourdain, Gonzague; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Lallemant, Marc; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    A single dose of nevirapine (sdNVP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 increases the risk of failure of subsequent NVP-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially when initiated within 6 months of sdNVP administration, emphasizing the importance of understanding the decay of nevirapine-resistant mutants. Nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 genotypes (with the mutations K103N, Y181C, and/or G190A) from 21 women were evaluated 10 days and 6 weeks after sdNVP administration and at the initiation of ART. Resistance was assayed by consensus sequencing and by a more sensitive assay (oligonucleotide ligation assay [OLA]) using plasma-derived HIV-1 RNA and cell-associated HIV-1 DNA. OLA detected nevirapine resistance in more specimens than consensus sequencing did (63% versus 33%, P < 0.01). When resistance was detected only by OLA (n = 45), the median mutant concentration was 18%, compared to 61% when detected by both sequencing and OLA (n = 51) (P < 0.0001). The proportion of women whose nevirapine resistance was detected by OLA 10 days after sdNVP administration was higher when we tested their HIV-1 RNA (95%) than when we tested their HIV-1 DNA (88%), whereas at 6 weeks after sdNVP therapy, the proportion was greater with DNA (85%) than with RNA (67%) and remained higher with DNA (33%) than with RNA (11%) at the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (median, 45 weeks after sdNVP therapy). Fourteen women started NVP-ART more than 6 months after sdNVP therapy; resistance was detected by OLA in 14% of the women but only in their DNA. HIV-1 resistance to NVP following sdNVP therapy persists longer in cellular DNA than in plasma RNA, as determined by a sensitive assay using sufficient copies of virus, suggesting that DNA may be superior to RNA for detecting resistance at the initiation of ART. PMID:20181911

  2. Nedd4-Mediated Increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env Proteins and Immunity following DNA-Vaccination of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation. PMID:24614057

  3. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  4. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  5. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  6. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Johannes S.; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y.; Becerra, Juan C.; Anderson, Chase T. M.; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L.; Forthal, Donald N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Casazza, Joseph P.; Koup, Richard A.; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L.; Achenbach, Chad J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir. PMID:27500639

  7. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Gach, Johannes S; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y; Becerra, Juan C; Anderson, Chase T M; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L; Forthal, Donald N; Deeks, Steven G; Wilkin, Timothy J; Casazza, Joseph P; Koup, Richard A; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L; Achenbach, Chad J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  8. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  9. LTR real-time PCR for HIV-1 DNA quantitation in blood cells for early diagnosis in infants born to seropositive mothers treated in HAART area (ANRS CO 01).

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stéphane; Burgard, Marianne; Floch, Corinne; Toure, Kadidia; Allemon, Marie-Christine; Warszawski, Josiane; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 diagnosis in babies born to seropositive mothers is one of the challenges of HIV epidemics in children. A simple, rapid protocol was developed for quantifying HIV-1 DNA in whole blood samples and was used in the ANRS French pediatric cohort in conditions of prevention of mother-to-child transmission. A quantitative HIV-1 DNA protocol (LTR real-time PCR) requiring small blood volumes was developed. First, analytical reproducibility was evaluated on 172 samples. Results obtained on blood cell pellets and Ficoll-Hypaque separated mononuclear cells were compared in 48 adult HIV-1 samples. Second, the protocol was applied to HIV-1 diagnosis in infants in parallel with plasma HIV-RNA quantitation. This prospective study was performed in children born between May 2005 and April 2007 included in the ANRS cohort. The assay showed good reproducibility. The 95% detection cut-off value was 6 copies/PCR, that is, 40 copies/10(6) leukocytes. HIV-DNA levels in whole blood were highly correlated with those obtained after Ficoll-Hypaque separation (r = 0.900, P < 0.0001). A total of 3,002 specimens from 1,135 infants were tested. The specificity of HIV-DNA and HIV-RNA assays was 100%. HIV-1 infection was diagnosed in nine infants before age 60 days. HIV-DNA levels were low, underlining the need for sensitive assays when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been given. The performances of this HIV-DNA assay showed that it is adapted to early diagnosis in children. The results were equivalent to those of HIV-RNA assay. HIV-DNA may be used even in masked primary infection in newborns whose mothers have received HAART.

  10. Control of the HIV-1 DNA Reservoir Is Associated In Vivo and In Vitro with NKp46/NKp30 (CD335 CD337) Inducibility and Interferon Gamma Production by Transcriptionally Unique NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Marras, Francesco; Casabianca, Anna; Bozzano, Federica; Ascierto, Maria Libera; Orlandi, Chiara; Di Biagio, Antonio; Pontali, Emanuele; Dentone, Chiara; Orofino, Giancarlo; Nicolini, Laura; Taramasso, Lucia; Magnani, Mauro; Marincola, Francesco M; Wang, Ena; Moretta, Lorenzo; De Maria, Andrea

    2017-09-27

    The size of lentiviral DNA reservoirs reflects effectiveness of immune responses against lentiviruses. So far, abundant information has been gathered on the control of HIV-1 replication, Understanding of innate mechanisms contributing to containment of HIV-DNA reservoir, however, are only partly clarified and are relevant to guide interventions for reservoir containment or eradicationWe studied the contribution of Natural Killer (NK) cell functional features in HIV patients either controlling replication either spontaneously (HIC) or after progression and antiretroviral treatment (PP). An inverse correlation between HIV-DNA copy numbers (either total or integrated) in circulating CD4(+) cells and NK cell function were observed. Induced IFN-γ production and NKp46/NKp30 activating receptor-induced expression correlated inversely with reservoir size. The correlation was present not only when considering a homogeneous cohort of HIC patients, but also when PP patients were included in the analysis. Adaptive (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)) NK cell features were not associated with reservoir size. However a distinct set of 370 differentially expressed transcripts was found to underlie functional differences in NK cells controlling HIV-DNA reservoir size. In proof-of-principle in vitro experiments of CD4(+) cell infection with HIV-1, purified NK cells with the above functional/transcriptional features displayed a 10- and 30-fold higher ability to control HIV replication and DNA burden in vitro, respectively, compared to other NK cells.Thus, NK cells with a specific functional and transcriptional signature contribute to control of HIV reservoir in CD4(+) cells. Their selection, expansion and/or adoptive transfer may support strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection or to safely deescalate antiretroviral treatment.IMPORTANCE The most relevant feature of HIV-1 infection is represented by its DNA reservoir size in the body that guarantees lifelong infection and resumption of virus

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of DNA and MVA HIV-1 subtype C vaccine prime-boost regimens: a phase I randomised Trial in HIV-uninfected Indian volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mehendale, Sanjay; Thakar, Madhuri; Sahay, Seema; Kumar, Makesh; Shete, Ashwini; Sathyamurthi, Pattabiraman; Verma, Amita; Kurle, Swarali; Shrotri, Aparna; Gilmour, Jill; Goyal, Rajat; Dally, Len; Sayeed, Eddy; Zachariah, Devika; Ackland, James; Kochhar, Sonali; Cox, Josephine H; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Paranjape, Ramesh; Ramanathan, Vadakkuppatu Devasenapathi

    2013-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase I trial. The trial was conducted in 32 HIV-uninfected healthy volunteers to assess the safety and immunogenicity of prime-boost vaccination regimens with either 2 doses of ADVAX, a DNA vaccine containing Chinese HIV-1 subtype C env gp160, gag, pol and nef/tat genes, as a prime and 2 doses of TBC-M4, a recombinant MVA encoding Indian HIV-1 subtype C env gp160, gag, RT, rev, tat, and nef genes, as a boost in Group A or 3 doses of TBC-M4 alone in Group B participants. Out of 16 participants in each group, 12 received vaccine candidates and 4 received placebos. Both vaccine regimens were found to be generally safe and well tolerated. The breadth of anti-HIV binding antibodies and the titres of anti-HIV neutralizing antibodies were significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group B volunteers at 14 days post last vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were detected mainly against Tier-1 subtype B and C viruses. HIV-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were directed mostly to Env and Gag proteins. Although the IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were infrequent after ADVAX vaccinations, the response rate was significantly higher in group A after 1(st) and 2(nd) MVA doses as compared to the responses in group B volunteers. However, the priming effect was short lasting leading to no difference in the frequency, breadth and magnitude of IFN-γELISPOT responses between the groups at 3, 6 and 9 months post-last vaccination. Although DNA priming resulted in enhancement of immune responses after 1(st) MVA boosting, the overall DNA prime MVA boost was not found to be immunologically superior to homologous MVA boosting. Clinical Trial Registry CTRI/2009/091/000051.

  12. Maternal LAMP/p55gagHIV-1 DNA Immunization Induces In Utero Priming and a Long-Lasting Immune Response in Vaccinated Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Maciel, Milton; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Piubelli, Orlando Guerra; Orii, Noemia Mie; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2012-01-01

    Infants born to HIV-infected mothers are at high risk of becoming infected during gestation or the breastfeeding period. A search is thus warranted for vaccine formulations that will prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. The LAMP/gag DNA chimeric vaccine encodes the HIV-1 p55gag fused to the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) and has been shown to enhance anti-Gag antibody (Ab) and cellular immune responses in adult and neonatal mice; such a vaccine represents a new concept in antigen presentation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of LAMP/gag DNA immunization on neonates either before conception or during pregnancy. LAMP/gag immunization of BALB/c mice before conception by the intradermal route led to the transfer of anti-Gag IgG1 Ab through the placenta and via breastfeeding. Furthermore, there were an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cells in the spleens of neonates. When offspring were immunized with LAMP/gag DNA, the anti-Gag Ab response and the Gag-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells were decreased. Inhibition of anti-Gag Ab production and cellular responses were not observed six months after immunization, indicating that maternal immunization did not interfere with the long-lasting memory response in offspring. Injection of purified IgG in conjunction with LAMP/gag DNA immunization decreased humoral and cytotoxic T-cell responses. LAMP/gag DNA immunization by intradermal injection prior to conception promoted the transfer of Ab, leading to a diminished response to Gag without interfering with the development of anti-Gag T- and B-cell memory. Finally, we assessed responses after one intravenous injection of LAMP/gag DNA during the last five days of pregnancy. The intravenous injection led to in utero immunization. In conclusion, DNA vaccine enconding LAMP-1 with Gag and other HIV-1 antigens should be considered in the development of a protective vaccine for the maternal/fetal and newborn periods. PMID:22355381

  13. Effect of DNA modifications on DNA processing by HIV-1 integrase and inhibitor binding: role of DNA backbone flexibility and an open catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Allison A; Sayer, Jane M; Yagi, Haruhiko; Patil, Sachindra S; Debart, Françoise; Maier, Martin A; Corey, David R; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Burke, Terrence R; Marquez, Victor E; Jerina, Donald M; Pommier, Yves

    2006-10-27

    Integration of the viral cDNA into host chromosomes is required for viral replication. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase catalyzes two sequential reactions, 3'-processing (3'-P) and strand transfer (ST). The first integrase inhibitors are undergoing clinical trial, but interactions of inhibitors with integrase and DNA are not well understood in the absence of a co-crystal structure. To increase our understanding of integrase interactions with DNA, we examined integrase catalysis with oligonucleotides containing DNA backbone, base, and groove modifications placed at unique positions surrounding the 3'-processing site. 3'-Processing was blocked with substrates containing constrained sugars and alpha-anomeric residues, suggesting that integrase requires flexibility of the phosphodiester backbone at the 3'-P site. Of several benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide (BaP DE) adducts tested, only the adduct in the minor groove at the 3'-P site inhibited 3'-P, suggesting the importance of the minor groove contacts for 3'-P. ST occurred in the presence of bulky BaP DE DNA adducts attached to the end of the viral DNA suggesting opening of the active site for ST. Position-specific effects of these BaP DE DNA adducts were found for inhibition of integrase by diketo acids. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of DNA structure and specific contacts with the viral DNA processing site for inhibition by integrase inhibitors.

  14. Structural insights into the binding of small ligand molecules to a G-quadruplex DNA located in the HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Petar M

    2017-07-31

    Targeting guanine (G)-rich DNA sequences, folded into non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) structures, by small ligand molecules is a promising strategy for gene therapy of various diseases. There is experimental proposal that, among eight studied ligands, nitidine chloride - NC and a benzo phenanthridine derivative - BPD have the highest binding affinity for such a sequence (5'-T(1)G(2)G(3)C(4)C(5)T(6)G(7)G(8)G(9)C(10)G(11)G(12)G(13)A(14)C(15)T(16)G(17)G(18)G(19)-3') in the HIV-1 promoter, indicating that an anti-HIV-1 prodrug may regulate the expression of the promoter. Herein, this experimental indication is elaborated by using molecular docking simulations and by characterizing the modes of binding of the eight natural molecules to the particular G4. Moreover, the configurational entropy, as an upper bound of the true entropy contribution to the free energy in noncovalent binding, is employed to see into the structural changes experienced by the G4-DNA upon ligand binding. For various parts (complete structure, backbone, system of all bases, bases of G-tetrads) of the G4-DNA structure, a subtle molecular dynamics (MD) is exploited to determine the change of asymptotic (for infinitely long MD simulation) configurational entropy, being the thermodynamic consequence of DNA flexibility change upon complex formation. While NC increases rigidity of G4 (mainly through the system of all nucleobases), BPD increases flexibility of G4 (more than 50% stems from the sugar-phosphate backbone). These insights are further dissected and substantiated by considering the configurational entropy contributions at the level of individual base pairs making the two G-tetrads (G(2)G(7)G(13)G(17) and G(3)G(8)G(12)G(18)) and by exploring the estimates of the total intra-base pair and inter-base pair entropies. This work makes the structural origin of enhanced stability of G4-DNA more certain - useful information when attempting to design optimal G4-DNA binders.

  15. Multiplexed highly-accurate DNA sequencing of closely-related HIV-1 variants using continuous long reads from single molecule, real-time sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dilernia, Dario A; Chien, Jung-Ting; Monaco, Daniela C; Brown, Michael P S; Ende, Zachary; Deymier, Martin J; Yue, Ling; Paxinos, Ellen E; Allen, Susan; Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hunter, Eric

    2015-11-16

    Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing (Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA, USA) provides the longest continuous DNA sequencing reads currently available. However, the relatively high error rate in the raw read data requires novel analysis methods to deconvolute sequences derived from complex samples. Here, we present a workflow of novel computer algorithms able to reconstruct viral variant genomes present in mixtures with an accuracy of >QV50. This approach relies exclusively on Continuous Long Reads (CLR), which are the raw reads generated during SMRT Sequencing. We successfully implement this workflow for simultaneous sequencing of mixtures containing up to forty different >9 kb HIV-1 full genomes. This was achieved using a single SMRT Cell for each mixture and desktop computing power. This novel approach opens the possibility of solving complex sequencing tasks that currently lack a solution.

  16. Multiplexed highly-accurate DNA sequencing of closely-related HIV-1 variants using continuous long reads from single molecule, real-time sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dilernia, Dario A.; Chien, Jung-Ting; Monaco, Daniela C.; Brown, Michael P.S.; Ende, Zachary; Deymier, Martin J.; Yue, Ling; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Allen, Susan; Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hunter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing (Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA, USA) provides the longest continuous DNA sequencing reads currently available. However, the relatively high error rate in the raw read data requires novel analysis methods to deconvolute sequences derived from complex samples. Here, we present a workflow of novel computer algorithms able to reconstruct viral variant genomes present in mixtures with an accuracy of >QV50. This approach relies exclusively on Continuous Long Reads (CLR), which are the raw reads generated during SMRT Sequencing. We successfully implement this workflow for simultaneous sequencing of mixtures containing up to forty different >9 kb HIV-1 full genomes. This was achieved using a single SMRT Cell for each mixture and desktop computing power. This novel approach opens the possibility of solving complex sequencing tasks that currently lack a solution. PMID:26101252

  17. HIV-1 Prevention for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.; Coates, Thomas J.; Kurth, Ann; Mugo, Nelly R.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are in stable relationships with HIV-1-uninfected partners, and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples thus represent an important target population for HIV-1 prevention. Couple-based HIV-1 testing and counseling facilitates identification of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, counseling about risk reduction, and referrals to HIV-1 treatment, reproductive health services, and support services. Maximizing HIV-1 prevention for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples requires a combination of strategies, including counseling about condoms, sexual risk, fertility, contraception, and the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the HIV-1-infected partner; provision of clinical care and ART for the HIV-1-infected partner; antenatal care and services to prevent mother to child transmission for HIV-1- infected pregnant women; male circumcision for HIV-1-uninfected men; and, pending guidelines and demonstration projects, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1-uninfected partners. PMID:22415473

  18. Characterization of DNA binding property of the HIV-1 host factor and tumor suppressor protein Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5).

    PubMed

    Das, Supratik; Banerjee, Baisakhi; Hossain, Maidul; Thangamuniyandi, Muruganandan; Dasgupta, Saumya; Chongdar, Nipa; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Basu, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5) is a component of the hSWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The INI1 gene is either deleted or mutated in rhabdoid cancers like ATRT (Atypical terratoid and rhabdoid tumor). INI1 is also a host factor for HIV-1 replication. INI1 binds DNA non-specifically. However, the mechanism of DNA binding and its biological role are unknown. From agarose gel retardation assay (AGRA), Ni-NTA pull-down and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies we show that amino acids 105-183 of INI1 comprise the minimal DNA binding domain (DBD). The INI1 DBD is absent in plants and in yeast SNF5. It is present in Caenorhabditis elegans SNF5, Drosophila melanogaster homologue SNR1 and is a highly conserved domain in vertebrates. The DNA binding property of this domain in SNR1, that is only 58% identical to INI1/hSNF5, is conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of INI1 DBD and INI1 DBD:DNA complexes at different concentrations show that the DBD exists as a monomer at low protein concentration and two molecules of monomer binds one molecule of DNA. At high protein concentration, it exists as a dimer and binds two DNA molecules. Furthermore, isothermal calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrate that the DBD monomer binds DNA with a stoichiometry (N) of ∼0.5 and Kd  = 0.94 µM whereas the DBD dimer binds two DNA molecules sequentially with K'd1 = 222 µM and K'd2 = 1.16 µM. Monomeric DBD binding to DNA is enthalpy driven (ΔH = -29.9 KJ/mole). Dimeric DBD binding to DNA is sequential with the first binding event driven by positive entropy (ΔH'1 = 115.7 KJ/mole, TΔS'1 = 136.8 KJ/mole) and the second binding event driven by negative enthalpy (ΔH'2 = -106.3 KJ/mole, TΔS'2 = -75.7 KJ/mole). Our model for INI1 DBD binding to DNA provides new insights into the mechanism of DNA binding by INI1.

  19. Breast milk transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nduati, R; John, G

    1995-12-01

    Breast milk provides infants and children immunologic, nutritional, and child spacing benefits. Yet it also transmits some viruses, for example, HIV-1. The World Health Organization recommends that, in conditions with poor access to breast milk substitutes, HIV-positive women should still breast feed due to the nutritional and infectious risk of artificial feeding. It appears that breast fed infants experience a slower progression of AIDS and death. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 may occur during pregnancy, at delivery, or through breast milk. The HIV-1 transmission rate via breast milk from acutely infected women is estimated to be 29-36%. A meta-analysis of case reports and small case series of women with chronic HIV-1 infection indicated a breast feeding transmission rate of 14%. Studies suggest that the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk increases as duration of breast feeding increases. Infants with detectable HIV-1 DNA tend to have mothers whose absolute CD4 counts are less than 400 and have severe vitamin A deficiency. Breast milk has HIV-1 specific immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM). It appears that HIV-1 elicits a local immune response. Breast milk of HIV-1 positive mothers with non-infected children tends to still have IgM and IgA until 18 months. Potential risk factors for breast milk transmission of HIV-1 include cracked nipples and mastitis in the mother; oral thrush, malnutrition, inflammation of the lips, and mucosal compromise in the infant; and vigorous suction of the neonate and use of the wrong equipment for suctioning. Inhibiting factors of HIV-1 in breast milk are bovine and human lactoferrin and a membrane associated protein that attaches to the CD4 receptor and thus prevents attachment of the HIV antigen gp120 to the CD4 receptor on T-cells.

  20. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  1. The multimerization state of retroviral RNA is modulated by ammonium ions and affects HIV-1 full-length cDNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S; Häusl, G; Famulok, M; König, B

    1993-01-01

    Genomic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA fragments containing the dimer linkage structure (DLS) can be dimerized and multimerized in the presence of NH4+ and in the absence of any other cation and any viral or cellular protein. This effect strongly supports the notion that dimerization and multimerization of genomic RNA occurs via purine-quartet formation in quadruple helical RNA structures. The efficiency of RNA dimerization and multimerization in the presence of ammonium ions is about 400 fold increased as compared to alkali metal ions such as potassium. Dimerized retroviral RNA representing a pseudodiploid genome could account for genetic recombination within the virion and during reverse transcription. Application of a novel South-Northern-Blotting procedure with biotinylated RNA and digoxigenin-labelled cDNA in vitro reveals that efficient human- and bovine tRNA(Lys3) primed full-length cDNA-synthesis only takes place with a predominantly monomerized RNA template. Dimerization and multimerization of the RNA significantly reduces full-length cDNA-synthesis. This suggests that monomerization of the dimerized RNA, effected by deionization in vitro, is essential for efficient retroviral reverse transcription in vivo. Images PMID:8177734

  2. NMR characterization of a kissing complex formed between the TAR RNA element of HIV-1 and a DNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Collin, D.; van Heijenoort, C.; Boiziau, C.; Toulmé, J.-J.; Guittet, E.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the first structural analysis of an RNA–DNA complex consisting of an 18 nt RNA hairpin and a 20 nt DNA aptamer. The DNA molecule was previously selected, from a randomly synthesized library, against the transactivation response element (TAR) involved in transcriptional regulation of the HIV genome. The DNA aptamer used in the present study is an imperfect stem–loop with the sequence 5′-ACTCCCAT-3′, characteristic of the selected candidates, in the apical loop. This octameric motif contains five bases complementary to the TAR loop sequence 5′-CUGGGA-3′. The use of homo- and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy allowed assignment of the complex resonances and resolution of its secondary structure. Evidence is given for a kissing complex fold, which consists of a quasi-continuous helix formed by one stem of DNA, one stem of RNA and a central hybrid helix comprising 5 bp. Two out of helices residues of DNA and one of RNA connect the DNA–RNA loop–loop helix to the stem of either partner in the complex. In addition, two thymines of the DNA stem are engaged in a non-canonical T·T base pair. PMID:10954609

  3. Measurement of HIV-1 viral load for drug resistance surveillance using dried blood spots: literature review and modeling of contribution of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Neil T

    2014-01-01

    World Health Organization-recommended surveys of acquired HIV-1 drug resistance include assessment of HIV-1 viral load suppression to levels below 1,000 copies/ml and drug resistance-associated mutation patterns in subjects on antiretroviral therapy. Surveys are being conducted in regions of the world that cannot support the collection, storage, and shipping of frozen plasma. Therefore, dried blood spots are often the specimen type of choice for both genotyping and viral load measurement. Furthermore, viral load testing for individual patient management in these regions is being scaled-up in accordance with WHO 2013 Guidelines for Antiretroviral Treatment. Technical issues related to the adaptation of viral load assays to dried blood spots, especially with respect to sensitivity (limit of detection), specificity (cell-free RNA vs. cell-associated DNA or RNA), and assay method, affect the interpretation of a viral load result from dried blood spots. Amongst published studies of commercial assay performance with dried blood spots, the bioMérieux EasyQ® and Abbott RealTime assays tended to show high (> 90%) specificity and sensitivity; the Biocentric Generic or Roche TaqMan® assays tended to show high sensitivity but lower specificity, using a 1,000 copies/ml threshold. The relative contribution of cell-associated DNA or RNA to a viral load measurement is likely to vary between patients, depending on clinical parameters and treatment status. A model was developed that predicts that in patients on antiretroviral therapy with low plasma viral load, cellular DNA is the predominant source of non-plasma virus-derived nucleic acid in dried blood spots. The extent of viral load overestimation from dried blood spots becomes less important when plasma viral load is over about 5,000 copies/ml. To avoid misclassifying subjects with plasma viral load suppression, the World Health Organization-recommended threshold of 1,000 copies/ml can be applied only when an assay that can

  4. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  6. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  7. Genotypic Tropism Testing in HIV-1 Proviral DNA Can Provide Useful Information at Low-Level Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Fabeni, Lavinia; Berno, Giulia; Svicher, Valentina; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Gori, Caterina; Bertoli, Ada; Mussini, Cristina; Lichtner, Miriam; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Ammassari, Adriana; Pinnetti, Carmela; Cicalini, Stefania; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Andreoni, Massimo; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of performing genotypic tropism testing (GTT) with proviral DNA (pvDNA) even during suppressed viremia would facilitate the use of CCR5 inhibitors as part of switching, simplification, or intensification strategies. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the tropism concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA samples and to assess which factors could affect possible discrepancies between the two compartments. GTT was performed using both plasma RNA and pvDNA from 55 sample pairs from drug-experienced patients. Potential differences between the two compartments were evaluated by analyzing coreceptor usage and genetic variability. Paired samples were also stratified in three levels of viremia (<50, 51 to 500, and >500 copies/ml). Overall, Geno2Pheno comparisons of false-positive rates in the two compartments showed good correlation (r = 0.72). A high level of concordance in tropism predictions for the two compartments was found (46/55 sample pairs [83.6%]). Among the 9 sample pairs with discordant tropisms, a larger proportion of pvDNA samples harboring CXCR4/dual-mixed-tropic viruses was found, in comparison with plasma RNA samples (88.9% versus 11.1%; P = 0.0034). Discordant samples were characterized by greater genetic variability than were concordant samples. With stratification of the paired samples according to viremia levels, the prevalence of discordant samples decreased with increasing viremia (<50 copies/ml, 21.4%; 51 to 500 copies/ml, 15.4%; >500 copies/ml, 6.7%; P = 0.2). Our findings confirm that prediction of viral tropism using pvDNA is feasible even in low-level viremia and provides useful information for therapy optimization for patients with low or suppressed viremia. PMID:26135872

  8. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Susan P; Grunenberg, Nicole A; Sanchez, Brittany J; Seaton, Kelly E; Ferrari, Guido; Moody, M Anthony; Frahm, Nicole; Montefiori, David C; Hay, Christine M; Goepfert, Paul A; Baden, Lindsey R; Robinson, Harriet L; Yu, Xuesong; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana; Huang, Yunda; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2017-01-01

    A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg) followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M). Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env. Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination. All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%), the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%), and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response). The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF. This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960.

  9. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults

    PubMed Central

    Grunenberg, Nicole A.; Sanchez, Brittany J.; Seaton, Kelly E.; Ferrari, Guido; Moody, M. Anthony; Frahm, Nicole; Montefiori, David C.; Hay, Christine M.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Robinson, Harriet L.; Yu, Xuesong; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Huang, Yunda; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2017-01-01

    Background A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg) followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M). Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env. Methods Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination. Results All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%), the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%), and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response). The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF. Conclusion This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960 PMID:28727817

  10. [Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 strains by heteroduplex mobility assay].

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Su, L; Shao, J J

    1997-08-01

    DNA fragments of HIV-1 env gene were amplified by nested PCR from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 24 HIV-1 infected individuals. The PCR products were separated by melting and annealing with denatured PCR product prepared from reference plasimd of representative subtypes. Heteroduplex were then formed between the single-stranded DNA from the two sources and were analysed on polyacrylamide gels. The results from heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) were compared with HIV-1 subtype results determined by DNA sequencing. With advantages of high speed, low cost and high specificity, HMA is a reliable screening method for HIV-1 subtyping.

  11. Polymorphic substitution E157Q in HIV-1 integrase increases R263K-mediated dolutegravir resistance and decreases DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Anstett, Kaitlin; Cutillas, Vincent; Fusco, Robert; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    The E157Q substitution in HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a relatively common natural polymorphism associated with HIV resistance to IN strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Although R263K is the most common resistance substitution for the INSTI dolutegravir, an INSTI treatment-experienced individual recently failed dolutegravir-based therapy, with E157Q being the only resistance-associated change reported. Given that different resistance pathways can sometimes synergize to confer high levels of resistance to antiretroviral drugs, we studied the effects of E157Q in association with R263K. Because Glu157 is thought to lie within the binding site of HIV IN DNA binding inhibitors such as FZ41, we also evaluated DNA binding activity and resistance to IN inhibitors in the presence of E157Q. Purified recombinant IN proteins were assessed in cell-free assays for their strand transfer and DNA binding activities. NL4.3 viral stocks harbouring IN mutations were generated and characterized in the presence and absence of IN inhibitors in tissue culture. E157Q alone had little if any effect on the biochemical activity of IN, and partially restored the activity of R263K-containing IN. The E157Q/R263K double viral mutant displayed infectiousness in culture equivalent to WT, while increasing resistance to dolutegravir by 10-fold compared with lower-level resistance associated with R263K alone. None of the mutations tested showed significant resistance to either raltegravir or FZ41. This study shows that E157Q may act as a compensatory mutation for R263K. Since E157Q is a natural polymorphism present in 1%-10% of HIV-positive individuals, it may be of particular importance for patients receiving INSTI therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Polymorphic substitution E157Q in HIV-1 integrase increases R263K-mediated dolutegravir resistance and decreases DNA binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Anstett, Kaitlin; Cutillas, Vincent; Fusco, Robert; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The E157Q substitution in HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a relatively common natural polymorphism associated with HIV resistance to IN strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Although R263K is the most common resistance substitution for the INSTI dolutegravir, an INSTI treatment-experienced individual recently failed dolutegravir-based therapy, with E157Q being the only resistance-associated change reported. Given that different resistance pathways can sometimes synergize to confer high levels of resistance to antiretroviral drugs, we studied the effects of E157Q in association with R263K. Because Glu157 is thought to lie within the binding site of HIV IN DNA binding inhibitors such as FZ41, we also evaluated DNA binding activity and resistance to IN inhibitors in the presence of E157Q. Methods Purified recombinant IN proteins were assessed in cell-free assays for their strand transfer and DNA binding activities. NL4.3 viral stocks harbouring IN mutations were generated and characterized in the presence and absence of IN inhibitors in tissue culture. Results E157Q alone had little if any effect on the biochemical activity of IN, and partially restored the activity of R263K-containing IN. The E157Q/R263K double viral mutant displayed infectiousness in culture equivalent to WT, while increasing resistance to dolutegravir by 10-fold compared with lower-level resistance associated with R263K alone. None of the mutations tested showed significant resistance to either raltegravir or FZ41. Conclusions This study shows that E157Q may act as a compensatory mutation for R263K. Since E157Q is a natural polymorphism present in 1%–10% of HIV-positive individuals, it may be of particular importance for patients receiving INSTI therapy. PMID:27084918

  13. Uneven Genetic Robustness of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilson, Sam J.

    2014-01-01

    -amino-acid IN mutations that could mimic the types of mutations that naturally occur during HIV-1 infection. Previously, we measured the robustness of HIV-1 capsid in this manner and determined that it is extremely intolerant of mutation. In contrast to CA, HIV-1 IN proved relatively robust, with far fewer mutations causing lethal defects. However, when we subsequently mapped the lethal mutations onto a model of the structure of the multisubunit IN-viral DNA complex, we found the lethal mutations that caused virus morphogenesis defects tended to be highly localized at subunit interfaces. This discovery of vulnerable regions of HIV-1 IN could inform development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25339768

  14. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  15. Investigation by two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the interaction of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 with hairpin loop DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mely, Yves; Azoulay, Joel; Beltz, Herve; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Bernacchi, Serena; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-09-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses nucleic acid chaperone properties that are critical for the two strand transfer reactions required during reverse transcription. The first DNA strand transfer relies on the destabilization by NCp7 of double-stranded segments of the transactivation response element, TAR sequence, at the 3' end of the genomic RNA and the complementary sequence cTAR at the 3" terminus of the early product of reverse transcription. To characterize NCp7-mediated nucleic acid destabilization, we investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the interaction of a doubly-labelled cTAR sequence with NCp7. The conformational fluctuations observed in the absence of NCp7 were associated with the rapid opening and closing (fraying) of the double stranded terminal segment of cTAR. NCp7 destabilizes cTAR mainly through a large increase of the opening rate constant. Additionally, the various destabilizing structures (bulges, internal loop, mismatches) spread all over cTAR secondary structure were found to be critical for NCp7 chaperone activity. Taken together, our data enabled us to propose a molecular mechanism for the destabilizing activity of NCp7 on cTAR which is crucial for the formation of the cTAR-TAR complex during the first strand transfer reaction.

  16. Unexplained diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular diarrhoea, are common in non-treated HIV-1 infected individuals. Although various enteric pathogens have been implicated, the aetiology of diarrhoea remains unexplained in a large proportion of HIV-1 infected patients. Our aim is to identify the cause of diarrhoea for patients that remain negative in routine diagnostics. Methods In this study stool samples of 196 HIV-1 infected persons, including 29 persons with diarrhoea, were examined for enteropathogens and HIV-1. A search for unknown and unexpected viruses was performed using virus discovery cDNA-AFLP combined with Roche-454 sequencing (VIDISCA-454). Results HIV-1 RNA was detected in stool of 19 patients with diarrhoea (66%) compared to 75 patients (45%) without diarrhoea. In 19 of the 29 diarrhoea cases a known enteropathogen could be identified (66%). Next to these known causative agents, a range of recently identified viruses was identified via VIDISCA-454: cosavirus, Aichi virus, human gyrovirus, and non-A non-B hepatitis virus. Moreover, a novel virus was detected which was named immunodeficiency-associated stool virus (IASvirus). However, PCR based screening for these viruses showed that none of these novel viruses was associated with diarrhoea. Notably, among the 34% enteropathogen-negative cases, HIV-1 RNA shedding in stool was more frequently observed (80%) compared to enteropathogen-positive cases (47%), indicating that HIV-1 itself is the most likely candidate to be involved in diarrhoea. Conclusion Unexplained diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected patients is probably not caused by recently described or previously unknown pathogens, but it is more likely that HIV-1 itself plays a role in intestinal mucosal abnormalities which leads to diarrhoea. PMID:24410947

  17. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  18. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  19. Contribution of TLR4 and MyD88 for adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) activity in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Kimberly; Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Montminy-Paquette, Sara; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Lien, Egil

    2014-09-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are commonly formulated with an immune-stimulatory compound, or adjuvant, to boost immune responses to a particular antigen. Recent studies have shown that, through recognition of molecular motifs, receptors of the innate immune system are involved in the functions of adjuvants to generate and direct adaptive immune responses. However, it is not clear to which degree those receptors are also important when the adjuvant is used as part of a novel heterologous prime-boost immunization process in which the priming and boosting components are not the same type of vaccines. In the current study, we compared the immune responses elicited by a pentavalent HIV-1 DNA prime-protein boost vaccine in mice deficient in either Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) to wildtype mice. HIV gp120 protein administered in the boost phase was formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), QS-21, or Al(OH)3. Endpoint antibody titer, serum cytokine response and T-cell memory response were assessed. Neither TLR4 nor MyD88 deficiency had a significant effect on the immune response of mice given vaccine formulated with QS-21 or Al(OH)3. However, TLR4- and MyD88-deficiency decreased both the antibody and T-cell responses in mice administered HIV gp120 formulated with MPLA. These results further our understanding of the activation of TLR4 and MyD88 by MPLA in the context of a DNA prime/protein boost immunization strategy.

  20. Nevirapine-Resistant HIV-1 DNA in Breast Milk After Single-Dose Nevirapine With or Without Zidovudine for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Payant, Rachel; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Micek, Mark A.; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A.; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Among 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected women who received single-dose nevirapine (NVP), 17 (57%) had NVP-resistant HIV-1 detected in breast milk. NVP resistance in breast milk persisted for at least 8 months postpartum and was apparently transmitted to at least 1 infant. NVP resistance was detected less often in women who also received zidovudine. PMID:23687579

  1. A motif unique to the human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is important for nucleic acid binding, ATP hydrolysis, RNA/DNA unwinding and HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Garbelli, Anna; Beermann, Sandra; Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-05-12

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication.

  2. Preferential Targeting of Conserved Gag Regions after Vaccination with a Heterologous DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost HIV-1 Vaccine Regimen.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Asli; Podola, Lilli; Mann, Philipp; Missanga, Marco; Haule, Antelmo; Sudi, Lwitiho; Nilsson, Charlotta; Kaluwa, Bahati; Lueer, Cornelia; Mwakatima, Maria; Munseri, Patricia J; Maboko, Leonard; Robb, Merlin L; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Kijak, Gustavo; Marovich, Mary; McCormack, Sheena; Joseph, Sarah; Lyamuya, Eligius; Wahren, Britta; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Hoelscher, Michael; Bakari, Muhammad; Kroidl, Arne; Geldmacher, Christof

    2017-09-15

    Prime-boost vaccination strategies against HIV-1 often include multiple variants for a given immunogen for better coverage of the extensive viral diversity. To study the immunologic effects of this approach, we characterized breadth, phenotype, function, and specificity of Gag-specific T cells induced by a DNA-prime modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-boost vaccination strategy, which uses mismatched Gag immunogens in the TamoVac 01 phase IIa trial. Healthy Tanzanian volunteers received three injections of the DNA-SMI vaccine encoding a subtype B and AB-recombinant Gagp37 and two vaccinations with MVA-CMDR encoding subtype A Gagp55 Gag-specific T-cell responses were studied in 42 vaccinees using fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After the first MVA-CMDR boost, vaccine-induced gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ(+)) Gag-specific T-cell responses were dominated by CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.001 compared to CD8(+) T cells) that coexpressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) (66.4%) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (63.7%). A median of 3 antigenic regions were targeted with a higher-magnitude median response to Gagp24 regions, more conserved between prime and boost, compared to those of regions within Gagp15 (not primed) and Gagp17 (less conserved; P < 0.0001 for both). Four regions within Gagp24 each were targeted by 45% to 74% of vaccinees upon restimulation with DNA-SMI-Gag matched peptides. The response rate to individual antigenic regions correlated with the sequence homology between the MVA- and DNA Gag-encoded immunogens (P = 0.04, r(2) = 0.47). In summary, after the first MVA-CMDR boost, the sequence-mismatched DNA-prime MVA-boost vaccine strategy induced a Gag-specific T-cell response that was dominated by polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells and that targeted multiple antigenic regions within the conserved Gagp24 protein.IMPORTANCE Genetic diversity is a major challenge for the design of vaccines against variable viruses. While including multiple variants for a given

  3. Non-instrumented incubation of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara; Singhal, Mitra C; Cantera, Jason; Singleton, Jered; Labarre, Paul; Toyama, Anthony; Piepenburg, Olaf; Parker, Mathew; Wood, Robert; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs). However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS), diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25-43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100%) HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100%) reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose infant HIV-1 in

  4. Non-Instrumented Incubation of a Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for the Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Proviral HIV-1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara; Singhal, Mitra C.; Cantera, Jason; Singleton, Jered; Labarre, Paul; Toyama, Anthony; Piepenburg, Olaf; Parker, Mathew; Wood, Robert; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs). However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS), diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25–43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100%) HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100%) reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose infant HIV-1 in

  5. Nevirapine-Resistant HIV-1 DNA in Breast Milk After Single-Dose Nevirapine With or Without Zidovudine for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Payant, Rachel; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Micek, Mark A; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2012-09-01

    Among 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women who received single-dose nevirapine (NVP), 17 (57%) had NVP-resistant HIV-1 detected in breast milk. NVP resistance in breast milk persisted for at least 8 months postpartum and was apparently transmitted to at least 1 infant. NVP resistance was detected less often in women who also received zidovudine. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. DNA Mutagenic Activity and Capacity for HIV-1 Restriction of the Cytidine Deaminase APOBEC3G Depends on Whether DNA or RNA Binds to Tyrosine 315.

    PubMed

    Polevoda, Bogdan; Joseph, Rebecca; Friedman, Alan E; Bennett, Ryan P; Greiner, Rebecca; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Stewart, Ryan A; Smith, Harold C

    2017-04-05

    APOBEC3G (A3G) belongs to the AID/APOBEC protein family of cytidine deaminases (CDA) that bind to nucleic acids. A3G mutates the HIV genome by deamination of dC to dU, leading to accumulation of virus-inactivating mutations. Binding to cellular RNAs inhibits A3G binding to substrate single-stranded (ss) DNA and CDA activity. RNA and ssDNA bind to the same three A3G tryptic peptides (amino acids 181-194, 314-320, and 345-374) that form parts of a continuously exposed protein surface extending from the catalytic domain in the C-terminus of A3G to its N-terminus. We show here that the A3G tyrosines 181 and 315 directly cross-link ssDNA. Binding experiments showed that a Y315A mutation alone significantly reduced A3G binding to both ssDNA and RNA, whereas Y181A and Y182A mutations only moderately affected A3G nucleic acid binding. Consistent with these findings, the Y315A mutant exhibited little to no deaminase activity in an E. coli DNA mutator reporter, while Y181A and Y182A mutants retained ~50% of wild-type A3G activity. The Y315A mutant also showed a markedly reduced ability to assemble into viral particles and had reduced antiviral activity. In uninfected cells, the impaired RNA-binding capacity of Y315A was evident by a shift of A3G from high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes to low-molecular-mass complexes. We conclude that Y315 is essential for coordinating ssDNA interaction with or entry to the deaminase domain and hypothesize that RNA bound to Y315 may be sufficient to competitively inhibit ssDNA deaminase-dependent antiviral activity.

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for controlling HIV-1 infection and preventing AIDS progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or “sterile” cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including ZFNs, TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:25716921

  8. Nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 integration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Craigie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the viral replication cycle. The viral DNA, made by reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, forms part of a large nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC). The viral integrase protein is the enzyme within the PIC that is responsible for integrating the viral DNA into the host genome. Integrase is tightly associated with the viral DNA within the PIC as demonstrated by functional assays. Integrase protein catalyzes the key DNA cutting and joining steps of integration in vitro with DNA substrates that mimic the ends of the viral DNA. Under most in vitro assay conditions the stringency of the reaction is relaxed; most products result from “half-site” integration in which only one viral DNA end is integrated into one strand of target DNA rather than concerted integration of pairs of DNA as occurs with PICs and in vivo. Under these relaxed conditions catalysis appears to occur without formation of the highly stable nucleoprotein complexes that is characteristic of the association of integrase with viral DNA in the PIC. Here we describe methods for the assembly of nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 DNA integration from purified HIV-1 integrase and substrates that mimic the viral DNA ends. PMID:19232539

  9. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W.; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The ‘shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4+ T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  10. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3′-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme–DNA interactions in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3′-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and −1 bases, which flank the 3′-processing site, play a critical role for 3′-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3′-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3′-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the −1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3′-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3′-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  11. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  12. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. IMPORTANCE There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1

  13. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost.

    PubMed

    Hulot, Sandrine L; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V; Lifton, Michelle A; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L; Seaman, Michael S; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-06-01

    An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1 acquisition. This

  14. An autoreactive antibody from an SLE/HIV-1 individual broadly neutralizes HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Wiehe, Kevin; Grimm, Sebastian K.; Lynch, Rebecca; Yang, Guang; Kozink, Daniel M.; Perrin, Florence; Cooper, Abby J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Liu, Mengfei; McKee, Krisha; Parks, Robert J.; Eudailey, Joshua; Wang, Minyue; Clowse, Megan; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G.; Moody, M. Anthony; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Boyd, Scott D.; Gao, Feng; Kelsoe, Garnett; Verkoczy, Laurent; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kepler, Thomas B.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly HIV-1–neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) display one or more unusual traits, including a long heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3), polyreactivity, and high levels of somatic mutations. These shared characteristics suggest that BnAb development might be limited by immune tolerance controls. It has been postulated that HIV-1–infected individuals with autoimmune disease and defective immune tolerance mechanisms may produce BnAbs more readily than those without autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified an HIV-1–infected individual with SLE who exhibited controlled viral load (<5,000 copies/ml) in the absence of controlling HLA phenotypes and developed plasma HIV-1 neutralization breadth. We collected memory B cells from this individual and isolated a BnAb, CH98, that targets the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120). CH98 bound to human antigens including dsDNA, which is specifically associated with SLE. Anti-dsDNA reactivity was also present in the patient’s plasma. CH98 had a mutation frequency of 25% and 15% nt somatic mutations in the heavy and light chain variable domains, respectively, a long HCDR3, and a deletion in the light chain CDR1. The occurrence of anti-dsDNA reactivity by a HIV-1 CD4bs BnAb in an individual with SLE raises the possibility that some BnAbs and SLE-associated autoantibodies arise from similar pools of B cells. PMID:24614107

  15. HIV-1 vaccines: challenges and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure.

  16. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  17. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-Bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-08-16

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells.

  18. Maternal plasma and breastmilk viral loads are associated with HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses among HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Liu, A Y; Lohman-Payne, B; Chung, M H; Kiarie, J; Kinuthia, J; Slyker, J; Richardson, B; Lehman, D; Farquhar, C; John-Stewart, G

    2015-01-01

    Infants exposed to maternal HIV-1 provide an opportunity to assess correlates of HIV-1-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses and may be informative in the development of HIV-1 vaccines. HIV-1-infected women with CD4 counts 200–500 cells/mm3 were randomized to short-course zidovudine/nevirapine (ZDV/NVP) or highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) between 2003 and 2005. Maternal plasma and breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantified during the first 6–12 months postpartum. HIV-1 gag peptide-stimulated enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays were conducted in HIV-1-exposed, uninfected infants (EU), and correlates were determined using regression and generalized estimating equations. Among 47 EU infants, 21 (45%) had ≥1 positive ELISPOT result during follow-up. Infants had a median response magnitude of 177 HIV-1-specific spot-forming units (SFU)/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) [interquartile range (IQR) = 117–287] directed against 2 (IQR = 1–3) gag peptide pools. The prevalence and magnitude of responses did not differ by maternal anti-retroviral (ARV) randomization arm. Maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA levels during pregnancy (P = 0·009) and breastmilk HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 month (P = 0·02) were associated with a higher magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific ELISPOT responses at 1 month postpartum. During follow-up, concurrent breastmilk HIV-1 RNA and DNA (cell-free virus and cell-associated virus, respectively) each were associated positively with magnitude of infant HIV-1-specific responses (P = 0·01). Our data demonstrate the importance of antigenic exposure on the induction of infant HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses in the absence of infection. PMID:25652232

  19. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  20. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  1. A cooperative and specific DNA-binding mode of HIV-1 integrase depends on the nature of the metallic cofactor and involves the zinc-containing N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Kevin; Leh, Hervé; Henry, Etienne; Simon, Françoise; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Deprez, Eric

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase catalyzes the insertion of the viral genome into chromosomal DNA. We characterized the structural determinants of the 3′-processing reaction specificity—the first reaction of the integration process—at the DNA-binding level. We found that the integrase N-terminal domain, containing a pseudo zinc-finger motif, plays a key role, at least indirectly, in the formation of specific integrase–DNA contacts. This motif mediates a cooperative DNA binding of integrase that occurs only with the cognate/viral DNA sequence and the physiologically relevant Mg2+ cofactor. The DNA-binding was essentially non-cooperative with Mn2+ or using non-specific/random sequences, regardless of the metallic cofactor. 2,2′-Dithiobisbenzamide-1 induced zinc ejection from integrase by covalently targeting the zinc-finger motif, and significantly decreased the Hill coefficient of the Mg2+-mediated integrase–DNA interaction, without affecting the overall affinity. Concomitantly, 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 severely impaired 3′-processing (IC50 = 11–15 nM), suggesting that zinc ejection primarily perturbs the nature of the active integrase oligomer. A less specific and weaker catalytic effect of 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 is mediated by Cys 56 in the catalytic core and, notably, accounts for the weaker inhibition of the non-cooperative Mn2+-dependent 3′-processing. Our data show that the cooperative DNA-binding mode is strongly related to the sequence-specific DNA-binding, and depends on the simultaneous presence of the Mg2+ cofactor and the zinc effector. PMID:20164093

  2. Origin of HIV-1 in the chimpanzee Pan troglodytes troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, F; Bailes, E; Robertson, D L; Chen, Y; Rodenburg, C M; Michael, S F; Cummins, L B; Arthur, L O; Peeters, M; Shaw, G M; Sharp, P M; Hahn, B H

    1999-02-04

    The human AIDS viruses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) represent cross-species (zoonotic) infections. Although the primate reservoir of HIV-2 has been clearly identified as the sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys), the origin of HIV-1 remains uncertain. Viruses related to HIV-1 have been isolated from the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), but only three such SIVcpz infections have been documented, one of which involved a virus so divergent that it might represent a different primate lentiviral lineage. In a search for the HIV-1 reservoir, we have now sequenced the genome of a new SIVcpzstrain (SIVcpzUS) and have determined, by mitochondrial DNA analysis, the subspecies identity of all known SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees. We find that two chimpanzee subspecies in Africa, the central P. t. troglodytes and the eastern P. t. schweinfurthii, harbour SIVcpz and that their respective viruses form two highly divergent (but subspecies-specific) phylogenetic lineages. All HIV-1 strains known to infect man, including HIV-1 groups M, N and O, are closely related to just one of these SIVcpz lineages, that found in P. t. troglodytes. Moreover, we find that HIV-1 group N is a mosaic of SIVcpzUS- and HIV-1-related sequences, indicating an ancestral recombination event in a chimpanzee host. These results, together with the observation that the natural range of P. t. troglodytes coincides uniquely with areas of HIV-1 group M, N and O endemicity, indicate that P. t. troglodytes is the primary reservoir for HIV-1 and has been the source of at least three independent introductions of SIVcpz into the human population.

  3. Knockdown of MAP4 and DNAL1 produces a post-fusion and pre-nuclear translocation impairment in HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, Daniel E. Hope, Thomas J.

    2012-01-05

    DNAL1 and MAP4 are both microtubule-associated proteins. These proteins were identified as HIV-1 dependency factors in a screen with wild-type HIV-1. In this study we demonstrate that knockdown using DNAL1 and MAP4 siRNAs and shRNAs inhibits HIV-1 infection regardless of envelope. Using a fusion assay, we show that DNAL1 and MAP4 do not impact fusion. By assaying for late reverse transcripts and 2-LTR circles, we show that DNAL1 and MAP4 inhibit both by approximately 50%. These results demonstrate that DNAL1 and MAP4 impact reverse transcription but not nuclear translocation. DNAL1 and MAP4 knockdown cells do not display cytoskeletal defects. Together these experiments indicate that DNAL1 and MAP4 may exert their functions in the HIV life cycle at reverse transcription, prior to nuclear translocation.

  4. Knockdown of MAP4 and DNAL1 produces a post-fusion and pre-nuclear translocation impairment in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Daniel E; Hope, Thomas J

    2012-01-05

    DNAL1 and MAP4 are both microtubule-associated proteins. These proteins were identified as HIV-1 dependency factors in a screen with wild-type HIV-1. In this study we demonstrate that knockdown using DNAL1 and MAP4 siRNAs and shRNAs inhibits HIV-1 infection regardless of envelope. Using a fusion assay, we show that DNAL1 and MAP4 do not impact fusion. By assaying for late reverse transcripts and 2-LTR circles, we show that DNAL1 and MAP4 inhibit both by approximately 50%. These results demonstrate that DNAL1 and MAP4 impact reverse transcription but not nuclear translocation. DNAL1 and MAP4 knockdown cells do not display cytoskeletal defects. Together these experiments indicate that DNAL1 and MAP4 may exert their functions in the HIV life cycle at reverse transcription, prior to nuclear translocation.

  5. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  6. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Kamel; Kaminski, Rafal; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-06-01

    Current therapy for controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and preventing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells, which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or "sterile" cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS.

  8. HIV-1 integrase modulates the interaction of the HIV-1 cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Astiazaran, Paulina; Bueno, Murilo Td; Morales, Elisa; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Garcia-Rivera, Jose A; Llano, Manuel

    2011-04-21

    Chromatin binding plays a central role in the molecular mechanism of LEDGF/p75 in HIV-1 DNA integration. Conflicting results have been reported in regards to the relevance of the LEDGF/p75 chromatin binding element PWWP domain in its HIV-1 cofactor activity. Here we present evidence that re-expression of a LEDGF/p75 mutant lacking the PWWP domain (ΔPWWP) rescued HIV-1 infection in cells verified to express background levels of endogenous LEDGF/p75 that do not support efficient HIV-1 infection. The HIV-1 cofactor activity of LEDGF/p75 ΔPWWP was similar to that of LEDGF/p75 wild type (WT). A possible molecular explanation for the nonessential role of PWWP domain in the HIV-1 cofactor activity of LEDGF/p75 comes from the fact that coexpression of HIV-1 integrase significantly restored the impaired chromatin binding activity of LEDGF/p75 ΔPWWP. However, integrase failed to promote chromatin binding of a non-chromatin bound LEDGF/p75 mutant that lacks both the PWWP domain and the AT hook motifs (ΔPWWP/AT) and that exhibits negligible HIV-1 cofactor activity. The effect of integrase on the chromatin binding of LEDGF/p75 requires the direct interaction of these two proteins. An HIV-1 integrase mutant, unable to interact with LEDGF/p75, failed to enhance chromatin binding, whereas integrase wild type did not increase the chromatin binding strength of a LEDGF/p75 mutant lacking the integrase binding domain (ΔIBD). Our data reveal that the PWWP domain of LEDGF/p75 is not essential for its HIV-1 cofactor activity, possibly due to an integrase-mediated increase of the chromatin binding strength of this LEDGF/p75 mutant.

  9. Single-Cell Imaging of HIV-1 Provirus (SCIP)

    PubMed Central

    Di Primio, Cristina; Quercioli, Valentina; Allouch, Awatef; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Arosio, Daniele; Cereseto, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy provided tools for the investigation and the analysis of the viral replication steps in the cellular context. In the HIV field, the current visualization systems successfully achieve the fluorescent labeling of the viral envelope and proteins, but not the genome. Here, we developed a system able to visualize the proviral DNA of HIV-1 through immunofluorescence detection of repair foci for DNA double-strand breaks specifically induced in the viral genome by the heterologous expression of the I-SceI endonuclease. The system for Single-Cell Imaging of HIV-1 Provirus, named SCIP, provides the possibility to individually track integrated-viral DNA within the nuclei of infected cells. In particular, SCIP allowed us to perform a topological analysis of integrated viral DNA revealing that HIV-1 preferentially integrates in the chromatin localized at the periphery of the nuclei. PMID:23513220

  10. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of HIV-1 Preintegration Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Oztop, Ilker; Vandegraaff, Nick; Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the formation of a provirus, an integrated DNA copy of the viral RNA genome. The linear cDNA product of reverse transcription is the integration substrate and two different integrase activities, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer, are required for provirus formation. Integrase nicks the cDNA ends adjacent to phylogenetically-conserved CA dinucleotides during 3′ processing. After nuclear entry and locating a suitable chromatin acceptor site, integrase joins the recessed 3′-OHs to the 5′-phosphates of a double-stranded staggered cut in the DNA target. Integrase functions in the context of a large nucleoprotein complex, called the preintegration complex (PIC), and PICs are analyzed to determine levels of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities that occur during acute virus infection. Denatured cDNA end regions are monitored by indirect end-labeling to measure the extent of 3′ processing. Native PICs can efficiently integrate their viral cDNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro, and Southern blotting or nested PCR assays are used to quantify the resultant DNA strand transfer activity. This study details HIV-1 infection, PIC extraction, partial purification, and quantitative analyses of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities. PMID:19233280

  12. HIV-1 Subtypes and Recombinants in Northern Tanzania: Distribution of Viral Quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Kiwelu, Ireen E.; Novitsky, Vladimir; Margolin, Lauren; Baca, Jeannie; Manongi, Rachel; Sam, Noel; Shao, John; McLane, Mary F.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Essex, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the distribution and prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes, multiplicity of HIV-1 infection, and frequency of inter-subtype recombination among HIV-1-infected female bar and hotel workers in Moshi, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania, from 2004 to 2007. The HIV-1 viral sequences spanning the V1-C5 region of HIV-1 env gp120 were analyzed from 50 subjects by single genome amplification and sequencing (SGA/S) technique. A total of 1740 sequences were amplified and sequenced from the HIV-1 proviral DNA template. The median env sequences analyzed per subject per two time points was 38 (IQR 28–50) over one year of HIV infection. In a subset of 14 subjects, a total of 239 sequences were obtained from HIV-1 RNA template at the baseline visit. The most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes were A1 (56%) and C (30%), while HIV-1 subtype D and inter-subtype recombinant viruses were found in 6% and 8% of subjects respectively. Transmission of multiple HIV-1 variants was evident in 27% of the subjects infected with pure HIV-1 subtypes A1, C, or D. The HIV-1 inter-subtype recombinants were found in 8% including HIV-1 C/A, D/A, and complex mosaic recombinants. Multiple viral variants were found in two subjects infected with inter-subtype recombinants. One subject harbored quasispecies of both pure HIV-1 A1 and C/A recombinant. The other subject was infected with two complex mosaic inter-subtype recombinant variants belonging to subtype D. HIV-1 multiple infections and ongoing recombination contribute significantly to the genetic diversity of circulating HIV-1 in Tanzania and have important implications for vaccine design and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23118882

  13. Host SAMHD1 Protein Promotes HIV-1 Recombination in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Daly, Michele B.; Allan, Kevin C.; Kim, Baek

    2014-01-01

    Template switching can occur during the reverse transcription of HIV-1. Deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations have been biochemically shown to impact HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-mediated strand transfer. Lowering the dNTP concentrations promotes RT pausing and RNA template degradation by RNase H activity of the RT, subsequently leading to strand transfer. Terminally differentiated/nondividing macrophages, which serve as a key HIV-1 reservoir, contain extremely low dNTP concentrations (20–50 nm), which results from the cellular dNTP hydrolyzing sterile α motif and histidine aspartic domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) protein, when compared with activated CD4+ T cells (2–5 μm). In this study, we first observed that HIV-1 template switching efficiency was nearly doubled in human primary macrophages when compared with activated CD4+ T cells. Second, SAMHD1 degradation by viral protein X (Vpx), which elevates cellular dNTP concentrations, decreased HIV-1 template switching efficiency in macrophages to the levels comparable with CD4+ T cells. Third, differentiated SAMHD1 shRNA THP-1 cells have a 2-fold increase in HIV-1 template switching efficiency. Fourth, SAMHD1 degradation by Vpx did not alter HIV-1 template switching efficiency in activated CD4+ T cells. Finally, the HIV-1 V148I RT mutant that is defective in dNTP binding and has DNA synthesis delay promoted RT stand transfer when compared with wild type RT, particularly at low dNTP concentrations. Here, we report that SAMHD1 regulation of the dNTP concentrations influences HIV-1 template switching efficiency, particularly in macrophages. PMID:24352659

  14. Cytomegalovirus, and possibly Epstein-Barr virus, shedding in breast milk is associated with HIV-1 transmission by breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Johannes; Tuaillon, Edouard; Nagot, Nicolas; Danaviah, Siva; Peries, Marianne; Padayachee, Prevashinee; Foulongne, Vincent; Bland, Ruth; Rollins, Nigel; Newell, Marie-Louise; van de Perre, Philippe

    2015-01-14

    Postnatal HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) occurs in spite of antiretroviral therapy. Co-infections in breast milk with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are associated with increased HIV-1 shedding in this compartment. We investigated CMV levels and EBV detection in breast milk as potential risk factors for MTCT of HIV-1 via breastfeeding. Cell-free HIV-1 RNA, cell-associated HIV-1 DNA, CMV and EBV DNA were quantified in breast milk from 62 HIV-infected mothers and proven postnatal MTCT of HIV-1 via breastfeeding. Controls were 62 HIV-positive mothers with HIV-uninfected infants. Median (interquartile range) CMV DNA viral load was significantly higher in cases [88,044 (18,586-233,904)] than in controls [11,167 (3221-31,152)] copies/10 breast milk cells (P < 0.001). Breast milk CMV DNA level correlated positively with breast milk HIV-1 RNA level in cases and controls. EBV DNA was detectable in a higher proportion of breast milk samples of cases (37.1%) than controls (16.1%; P = 0.009). HIV-1 MTCT was strongly associated with HIV-1 RNA shedding in breast milk and plasma. In multivariable analysis, every 1 log10 increase in breast milk CMV DNA was associated with a significant 2.5-fold greater odds of MTCT of HIV-1, independent of breast milk and plasma HIV-1 levels; the nearly three-fold increased risk of HIV-1 MTCT with breast milk EBV DNA detection did not reach significance. We provide the first evidence of an independent association between CMV in breast milk, and postnatal MTCT of HIV-1. This association could fuel persistent shedding of HIV-1 in breast milk in women receiving antiretroviral therapy. EBV DNA detection in breast milk may also be associated with MTCT of HIV-1, but only marginally so.

  15. Eradicating HIV-1 infection: seeking to clear a persistent pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Archin, Nancie M.; Sung, Julia Marsh; Garrido, Carolina; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Margolis, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) blunts viraemia, which enables HIV-1-infected individuals to control infection and live long, productive lives. However, HIV-1 infection remains incurable owing to the persistence of a viral reservoir that harbours integrated provirus within host cellular DNA. This latent infection is unaffected by ART and hidden from the immune system. Recent studies have focused on the development of therapies to disrupt latency. These efforts unmasked residual viral genomes and highlighted the need to enable the clearance of latently infected cells, perhaps via old and new strategies that improve the HIV-1-specific immune response. In this Review, we explore new approaches to eradicate established HIV-1 infection and avoid the burden of lifelong ART. PMID:25402363

  16. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits HIV-1 Persistence in Children.

    PubMed

    Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Globally, 240,000 infants are newly infected with HIV-1 each year and 3.2 million children are living with the infection. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has reduced HIV-1-related disease and mortality in children but is not curative owing to the early generation of a latent reservoir of long-lived memory CD4(+) T cells bearing replication-competent HIV-1 provirus integrated into cellular DNA. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the establishment of HIV-1 persistence in children and how early initiation of cART in the setting of the developing infant immune system limits the formation of the long-lived latent CD4(+) cell reservoir that remains a barrier to remission or cure.

  17. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. An Integrated Overview of HIV-1 Latency

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Greene, Warner C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our understanding of HIV, a cure has not been realized for the more than 34 million infected with this virus. HIV is incurable because infected individuals harbor cells where the HIV provirus is integrated into the host’s DNA but is not actively replicating and thus is not inhibited by antiviral drugs. Similarly, these latent viruses are not detected by the immune system. In this review, we discuss HIV-1 latency and the mechanisms that allow this pathogenic retrovirus to hide and persist by exploiting the cellular vehicles of immunological memory. PMID:24243012

  19. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Sonya L.; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F.; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E.; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S.; Kwa, Suefen

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156 PMID

  20. MX2 is an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kane, Melissa; Yadav, Shalini S; Bitzegeio, Julia; Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Wilson, Sam J; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-10-24

    HIV-1 replication can be inhibited by type I interferon (IFN), and the expression of a number of gene products with anti-HIV-1 activity is induced by type I IFN. However, none of the known antiretroviral proteins can account for the ability of type I IFN to inhibit early, preintegration phases of the HIV-1 replication cycle in human cells. Here, by comparing gene expression profiles in cell lines that differ in their ability to support the inhibitory action of IFN-α at early steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, we identify myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. Expression of MX2 reduces permissiveness to a variety of lentiviruses, whereas depletion of MX2 using RNA interference reduces the anti-HIV-1 potency of IFN-α. HIV-1 reverse transcription proceeds normally in MX2-expressing cells, but 2-long terminal repeat circular forms of HIV-1 DNA are less abundant, suggesting that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import, or destabilizes nuclear HIV-1 DNA. Consistent with this notion, mutations in the HIV-1 capsid protein that are known, or suspected, to alter the nuclear import pathways used by HIV-1 confer resistance to MX2, whereas preventing cell division increases MX2 potency. Overall, these findings indicate that MX2 is an effector of the anti-HIV-1 activity of type-I IFN, and suggest that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 infection by inhibiting capsid-dependent nuclear import of subviral complexes.

  1. A zinc(II)-based two-dimensional MOF for sensitive and selective sensing of HIV-1 ds-DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Qing; Qiu, Gui-Hua; Liang, Zhen; Li, Min-Min; Sun, Bin; Qin, Liang; Yang, Shui-Ping; Chen, Wen-Hua; Chen, Jin-Xiang

    2016-05-30

    Coordination reaction of a known three-dimensional (3D) polymer precursor {Na3[Na9(Cbdcp)6(H2O)18]}n (A, Cbdcp = N-(4-carboxybenzyl)-(3,5-dicarboxyl)pyridinium) with Zn(NO3)2·6H2O in H2O or H2O/DMF at 100 °C and in the presence of aspirin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as modulators, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe) or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpea) as ancillary ligands afforded six novel Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), that is, {[Zn(Cbdcp)(H2O)3]·H2O}n (1, 1D zigzag chain), {[Zn(HCbdcp)2]·H2O}n (2, 2D sheet), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpe)1/2]·2H2O}n (3, 3D polymer), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpe)1/2]·2H2O}n (4, 2D network), {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpea)1/2]·2H2O}n (5, 3D polymer) and {[Zn(Cbdcp)(bpea)1/2]·2H2O}n (6, 2D network). Among them, compound 2 contains aromatic rings, positively charged pyridinium, Zn(2+) cation centers and carboxylic acid groups lined up on the 2D sheet structure with a certain extended surface exposure. The unique structure of 2 facilitates effective association with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) labeled probe single stranded DNA (probe ss-DNA, delineates as P-DNA) to yield a P-DNA@2 system, and leads to fluorescence quenching of FAM via a photoinduced electron transfer process. The P-DNA@2 system is effective and reliable for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 ds-DNA (HIV ds-DNA) sequences and capable of distinguishing complementary HIV ds-DNA from mismatched target sequences with the detection limit as low as 10 pM (S/N = 3).

  2. Viral loads in dual infection with HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Boriskin, Y.; Sharland, M.; Dalton, R.; duMont, G.; Booth, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—A one year study of the relation between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral loads in a cohort of children with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection.
DESIGN—Comparative analysis of viral load measurements for CMV and HIV-1 in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) of individual children in relation to age and clinical staging.
METHODS—Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure HIV-1 proviral DNA and CMV genomic DNA in PBLs of 56children.
RESULTS—The CMV load was highest in 0-2 year old HIV positive children with stage C disease (range, 1-7143 copies/100 ng DNA; median, 125) and was significantly lower in older children. Although higher in young children, HIV-1 viral load did not show the same marked reduction with age that is seen with CMV. Over a one year period, testing of serial samples for both viruses in a subgroup of children revealed a discordant relation between viral loads for CMV and HIV-1.
CONCLUSIONS—CMV viral load falls much faster than HIV viral load in dually infected children. Screening for clinical CMV disease is most likely to be of benefit in children under 2 years of age with stage C disease. In the few children studied, levels of CMV and HIV replication appear to be independent.

 PMID:10325727

  3. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  4. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  5. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) Exhibits Significantly Slower Dissociation than Raltegravir and Elvitegravir from Wild-Type and Integrase Inhibitor-Resistant HIV-1 Integrase-DNA Complexes▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, Kendra E.; Wang, Ruolan; DeAnda, Felix; Johns, Brian A.; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H.; Carter, H. Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations. DTG dissociates slowly from a wild-type IN-DNA complex at 37°C with an off-rate of 2.7 × 10−6 s−1 and a dissociative half-life (t1/2) of 71 h, significantly longer than the half-lives for RAL (8.8 h) and ELV (2.7 h). Prolonged binding (t1/2, at least 5 h) was observed for DTG with IN-DNA complexes containing E92, Y143, Q148, and N155 substitutions. The addition of a second substitution to either Q148 or N155 typically resulted in an increase in the off-rate compared to that with the single substitution. For all of the IN substitutions tested, the off-rate of DTG from IN-DNA complexes was significantly slower (from 5 to 40 times slower) than the off-rate of RAL or ELV. These data are consistent with the potential for DTG to have a higher genetic barrier to resistance, provide evidence that the INI off-rate may be an important component of the mechanism of INI resistance, and suggest that the slow dissociation of DTG may contribute to its distinctive resistance profile. PMID:21807982

  6. Cocaine modulates HIV-1 integration in primary CD4+ T cells: implications in HIV-1 pathogenesis in drug-abusing patients.

    PubMed

    Addai, Amma B; Pandhare, Jui; Paromov, Victor; Mantri, Chinmay K; Pratap, Siddharth; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that cocaine abuse worsens HIV-1 disease progression. Increased viral load has been suggested to play a key role for the accelerated HIV disease among cocaine-abusing patients. The goal of this study was to investigate whether cocaine enhances proviral DNA integration as a mechanism to increase viral load. We infected CD4(+) T cells that are the primary targets of HIV-1 in vivo and treated the cells with physiologically relevant concentrations of cocaine (1 µM-100 µM). Proviral DNA integration in the host genome was measured by nested qPCR. Our results illustrated that cocaine from 1 µM through 50 µM increased HIV-1 integration in CD4(+) T cells in a dose-dependent manner. As integration can be modulated by several early postentry steps of HIV-1 infection, we examined the direct effects of cocaine on viral integration by in vitro integration assays by use of HIV-1 PICs. Our data illustrated that cocaine directly increases viral DNA integration. Furthermore, our MS analysis showed that cocaine is able to enter CD4(+) T cells and localize to the nucleus-. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that cocaine can increase HIV-1 integration in CD4(+) T cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that increased HIV-1 integration is a novel mechanism by which cocaine enhances viral load and worsens disease progression in drug-abusing HIV-1 patients.

  7. Cocaine modulates HIV-1 integration in primary CD4+ T cells: implications in HIV-1 pathogenesis in drug-abusing patients

    PubMed Central

    Addai, Amma B.; Pandhare, Jui; Paromov, Victor; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Pratap, Siddharth; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that cocaine abuse worsens HIV-1 disease progression. Increased viral load has been suggested to play a key role for the accelerated HIV disease among cocaine-abusing patients. The goal of this study was to investigate whether cocaine enhances proviral DNA integration as a mechanism to increase viral load. We infected CD4+ T cells that are the primary targets of HIV-1 in vivo and treated the cells with physiologically relevant concentrations of cocaine (1 µM–100 µM). Proviral DNA integration in the host genome was measured by nested qPCR. Our results illustrated that cocaine from 1 µM through 50 µM increased HIV-1 integration in CD4+ T cells in a dose-dependent manner. As integration can be modulated by several early postentry steps of HIV-1 infection, we examined the direct effects of cocaine on viral integration by in vitro integration assays by use of HIV-1 PICs. Our data illustrated that cocaine directly increases viral DNA integration. Furthermore, our MS analysis showed that cocaine is able to enter CD4+ T cells and localize to the nucleus-. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that cocaine can increase HIV-1 integration in CD4+ T cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that increased HIV-1 integration is a novel mechanism by which cocaine enhances viral load and worsens disease progression in drug-abusing HIV-1 patients. PMID:25691383

  8. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-10-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8(+) T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses.

  9. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  10. Anti-HIV-1 activity of Trim 37.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Azah A; Tardif, Keith; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-04-01

    Trim 5α was the first member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins that was identified to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. The breadth of antiretroviral activity of TRIM family members is an active area of investigation. In this study, we demonstrate that human Trim 37 possesses anti-HIV-1 activity. This antiretroviral activity and the manner in which it was displayed were implicated by (1) decreased viral replication upon Trim 37 transient overexpression in virus-producing cells, (2) correlation of the reduction of viral infectivity with Trim 37 virion incorporation, (3) increased HIV-1 replication during siRNA depletion of Trim 37 expression, and (4) reduction in viral DNA synthesis upon Trim 37 transient overexpression. Our findings provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of the potent antiviral activity of human Trim 37, and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby Trim 37 interferes with viral DNA synthesis.

  11. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stimulating host immunity to control HIV-1 replication, and targeting latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Future efforts should aim to provide better understanding of how to reconstitute the CD4+ T cell compartment with genetically engineered cells, exert immune control over HIV-1 replication, and identify and eliminate all viral reservoirs. PMID:22867874

  12. Cryo-EM structures and atomic model of the HIV-1 strand transfer complex intasome.

    PubMed

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Li, Min; Yang, Renbin; Rebensburg, Stephanie V; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Jeon, Youngmin; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Craigie, Robert; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2017-01-06

    Like all retroviruses, HIV-1 irreversibly inserts a viral DNA (vDNA) copy of its RNA genome into host target DNA (tDNA). The intasome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex composed of viral integrase (IN) and the ends of linear vDNA, mediates integration. Productive integration into host chromatin results in the formation of the strand transfer complex (STC) containing catalytically joined vDNA and tDNA. HIV-1 intasomes have been refractory to high-resolution structural studies. We used a soluble IN fusion protein to facilitate structural studies, through which we present a high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the core tetrameric HIV-1 STC and a higher-order form that adopts carboxyl-terminal domain rearrangements. The distinct STC structures highlight how HIV-1 can use the common retroviral intasome core architecture to accommodate different IN domain modules for assembly.

  13. Epidemiological trends of HIV-1 infection in blood donors from Catalonia, Spain (2005-2014).

    PubMed

    Bes, Marta; Piron, Maria; Casamitjana, Natàlia; Gregori, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Ribera, Esteban; Quer, Josep; Puig, Lluís; Sauleda, Sílvia

    2017-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtype B is predominant in Spain. However, the recent arrival of immigrant populations has increased the prevalence of non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and transmitted drug-resistance mutations in blood donors from the Catalonian region (northeastern Spain). HIV-1-positive blood donors identified in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014 were included. Demographic variables and risk factors for HIV-1 acquisition were recorded. HIV-1 subtyping was carried out by HIV-1 DNA polymerase region sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining method. During the study period, 2.8 million blood donations were screened, and 214 HIV-1-positive donors were identified, yielding an overall prevalence of 7.7 per 100,000 donations (89% men; mean age, 34 ± 10 years). Most HIV-1-positive donors were native to Spain (81%), and 61% were regular blood donors. When risk factors were known, 62% reportedly were men who had sex with men. HIV-1 subtyping was possible in 176 HIV-1-positive individuals: 143 (81%) had HIV-1 subtype B, and 33 (19%) had non-B subtypes. Most HIV-1 non-B subtypes were circulating recombinant forms (n = 20; 61%). Factors associated with HIV-1 subtype B were male sex (p = 0.007) and men who had sex with men (p < 0.001). The overall prevalence of transmitted drug-resistance mutations was 14%. Non-B subtypes, circulating recombinant forms, and transmitted drug-resistance mutation sequences circulate among HIV-1-positive blood donors in Catalonia. Continuous local epidemiological surveillance is required to implement optimal prevention strategies for controlling transfusion-transmitted HIV and to improve health policies regarding HIV infection. © 2017 AABB.

  14. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  15. A universal real-time PCR assay for the quantification of group-M HIV-1 proviral load.

    PubMed

    Malnati, Mauro S; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Gatto, Francesca; Salvatori, Francesca; Cassina, Giulia; Rutigliano, Teresa; Volpi, Rosy; Lusso, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA is increasingly used to measure the HIV-1 cellular reservoirs, a helpful marker to evaluate the efficacy of antiretroviral therapeutic regimens in HIV-1-infected individuals. Furthermore, the proviral DNA load represents a specific marker for the early diagnosis of perinatal HIV-1 infection and might be predictive of HIV-1 disease progression independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and CD4(+) T-cell counts. The high degree of genetic variability of HIV-1 poses a serious challenge for the design of a universal quantitative assay capable of detecting all the genetic subtypes within the main (M) HIV-1 group with similar efficiency. Here, we describe a highly sensitive real-time PCR protocol that allows for the correct quantification of virtually all group-M HIV-1 strains with a higher degree of accuracy compared with other methods. The protocol involves three stages, namely DNA extraction/lysis, cellular DNA quantification and HIV-1 proviral load assessment. Owing to the robustness of the PCR design, this assay can be performed on crude cellular extracts, and therefore it may be suitable for the routine analysis of clinical samples even in developing countries. An accurate quantification of the HIV-1 proviral load can be achieved within 1 d from blood withdrawal.

  16. Specificity and 6-Month Durability of Immune Responses Induced by DNA and Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccines Expressing HIV-1 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Goepfert, Paul A.; Elizaga, Marnie L.; Seaton, Kelly; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Sato, Alicia; Hural, John; DeRosa, Stephen C.; Kalams, Spyros A.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Keefer, Michael C.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Lama, Javier R.; Sanchez, Jorge; Mulligan, Mark J.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Hammer, Scott M.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Pensiero, Michael; Butler, Chris; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Donastorg, Yeycy; Qin, Li; Lawrence, Dale; Cardinali, Massimo; Bae, Jin; Holt, Renée; Redinger, Huguette; Johannessen, Jan; Broder, Gail; Moody-White, Jerri; McKay, Butch; Calazans, Gabriela; Bentley, Carter; Kakinami, Lisa; Skibinski, Katie; Estep, Scharla; Tseng, Jenny; Swenson, Molly; Madenwald, Tamra; Overton, Edgar Turner; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Rouphael, Nadine; Whitaker, Jennifer; Hay, C Mhorag; Bunce, Catherine A; Gonzales, Pedro; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Dolin, Raphael; Mayer, Ken; Walsh, Steven; Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clade B DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccines producing virus-like particles displaying trimeric membrane-bound envelope glycoprotein (Env) were tested in a phase 2a trial in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–uninfected adults for safety, immunogenicity, and 6-month durability of immune responses. Methods. A total of 299 individuals received 2 doses of JS7 DNA vaccine and 2 doses of MVA/HIV62B at 0, 2, 4, and 6 months, respectively (the DDMM regimen); 3 doses of MVA/HIV62B at 0, 2, and 6 months (the MMM regimen); or placebo injections. Results. At peak response, 93.2% of the DDMM group and 98.4% of the MMM group had binding antibodies for Env. These binding antibodies were more frequent and of higher magnitude for the transmembrane subunit (gp41) than the receptor-binding subunit (gp120) of Env. For both regimens, response rates were higher for CD4+ T cells (66.4% in the DDMM group and 43.1% in the MMM group) than for CD8+ T cells (21.8% in the DDMM group and 14.9% in the MMM group). Responding CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were biased toward Gag, and >70% produced 2 or 3 of the 4 cytokines evaluated (ie, interferon γ, interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor α, and granzyme B). Six months after vaccination, the magnitudes of antibodies and T-cell responses had decreased by <3-fold. Conclusions. DDMM and MMM vaccinations with virus-like particle–expressing immunogens elicited durable antibody and T-cell responses. PMID:24403557

  17. Specificity and 6-month durability of immune responses induced by DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara vaccines expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Paul A; Elizaga, Marnie L; Seaton, Kelly; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Sato, Alicia; Hural, John; DeRosa, Stephen C; Kalams, Spyros A; McElrath, M Juliana; Keefer, Michael C; Baden, Lindsey R; Lama, Javier R; Sanchez, Jorge; Mulligan, Mark J; Buchbinder, Susan P; Hammer, Scott M; Koblin, Beryl A; Pensiero, Michael; Butler, Chris; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L

    2014-07-01

    Clade B DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccines producing virus-like particles displaying trimeric membrane-bound envelope glycoprotein (Env) were tested in a phase 2a trial in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected adults for safety, immunogenicity, and 6-month durability of immune responses. A total of 299 individuals received 2 doses of JS7 DNA vaccine and 2 doses of MVA/HIV62B at 0, 2, 4, and 6 months, respectively (the DDMM regimen); 3 doses of MVA/HIV62B at 0, 2, and 6 months (the MMM regimen); or placebo injections. At peak response, 93.2% of the DDMM group and 98.4% of the MMM group had binding antibodies for Env. These binding antibodies were more frequent and of higher magnitude for the transmembrane subunit (gp41) than the receptor-binding subunit (gp120) of Env. For both regimens, response rates were higher for CD4(+) T cells (66.4% in the DDMM group and 43.1% in the MMM group) than for CD8(+) T cells (21.8% in the DDMM group and 14.9% in the MMM group). Responding CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were biased toward Gag, and >70% produced 2 or 3 of the 4 cytokines evaluated (ie, interferon γ, interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor α, and granzyme B). Six months after vaccination, the magnitudes of antibodies and T-cell responses had decreased by <3-fold. DDMM and MMM vaccinations with virus-like particle-expressing immunogens elicited durable antibody and T-cell responses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Inhibition of Acute-, Latent-, and Chronic-Phase Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication by a Bistriazoloacridone Analog That Selectively Inhibits HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Jim A.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Derse, David; Hollingshead, Melinda; Williamson, Karen; Palamone, Carla; Osterling, M. Clayton; Hill, Shawn A.; Graham, Lisa; Schaeffer, Catherine A.; Bu, Ming; Huang, Mingjun; Cholody, Wieslaw M.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Rice, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Nanomolar concentrations of temacrazine (1,4-bis[3-(6-oxo-6H-v-triazolo[4,5,1-de]acridin-5-yl)amino-propyl]piperazine) were discovered to inhibit acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections and suppress the production of virus from chronically and latently infected cells containing integrated proviral DNA. This bistriazoloacridone derivative exerted its mechanism of antiviral action through selective inhibition of HIV-1 transcription during the postintegrative phase of virus replication. Mechanistic studies revealed that temacrazine blocked HIV-1 RNA formation without interference with the transcription of cellular genes or with events associated with the HIV-1 Tat and Rev regulatory proteins. Although temacrazine inhibited the in vitro 3′ processing and strand transfer activities of HIV-1 integrase, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 50 nM, no evidence of an inhibitory effect on the intracellular integration of proviral DNA into the cellular genome during the early phase of infection could be detected. Furthermore, temacrazine did not interfere with virus attachment or fusion to host cells or the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or protease, and the compound was not directly virucidal. Demonstration of in vivo anti-HIV-1 activity by temacrazine identifies bistriazoloacridones as a new class of pharmaceuticals that selectively blocks HIV-1 transcription. PMID:9517921

  19. Impact of recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering on structure-based drug design: case studies of HIV-1 and HCMV proteases.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chen-Chen

    2002-03-01

    Structure-based drug design is an organized, multidisciplinary endeavor undertaken by scientists from many different scientific fields. The success of structure-based drug design was only made possible by advances in structure biology that provides the three-dimensional structure of the drug design target with which small molecular chemical ligands interact. Visualization of the conformation and interactions of a small molecule ligand bound to the protein target in the co-crystal structure of the protein:ligand complex enables the design of new chemical compounds with improved binding affinity and specificity. With the advances in molecular biology, lab automation, and computational science, genomic data have now become available for the human genome, as well as various other organisms. The pharmaceutical industry is currently putting forth tremendous effort in the area of functional genomics and structural genomics in attempts to decipher functions and structures of protein encoded by genes, with the ultimate goal of identifying novel targets for drug discovery and development. This chapter discusses the significant impact made by recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering on structural biology and, more specifically, on structure-based drug design.

  20. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Jeeninga, Rienk E; Westerhout, Ellen M; van Gerven, Marja L; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox)-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus. PMID:18439275

  1. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  2. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J.; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  3. Novel Approaches to Inhibiting HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. PMID:19782103

  4. Rational Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Productive replication of Vif-chimeric HIV-1 in feline cells.

    PubMed

    Stern, Melissa A; Hu, Chunling; Saenz, Dyana T; Fadel, Hind J; Sims, Olivia; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2010-07-01

    Nonprimate animal models of HIV-1 infection are prevented by missing cellular cofactors and by antiviral actions of species-specific host defense factors. These blocks are profound in rodents but may be less abundant in certain Carnivora. Here, we enabled productive, spreading replication and passage of HIV-1 in feline cells. Feline fibroblasts, T-cell lines, and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells supported early and late HIV-1 life cycle phases in a manner equivalent to that of human cells, except that produced virions had low infectivity. Stable expression of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in HIV-1 entry receptor-complemented feline (CrFK) cells enabled robust spreading HIV-1 replication. FIV Vif colocalized with feline APOBEC3 (fA3) proteins, targeted them for degradation, and prevented G-->A hypermutation of the HIV-1 cDNA by fA3CH and fA3H. HIV-1 Vif was inactive against fA3s as expected and even paradoxically augmented restriction in some assays. In an interesting contrast, simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac Vif had substantial anti-fA3 activities, which were complete against fA3CH and partial against fA3H. Moreover, both primate lentiviral Vifs colocalized with fA3s and could be pulled down from cell lysates by fA3CH. HIV-1 molecular clones that encode FIV Vif or SIVmac Vif (HIV-1(VF) and HIV-1(VS)) were then constructed. These viruses replicated productively in HIV-1 receptor-expressing CrFK cells and could be passaged serially to uninfected cells. Thus, with the exception of entry receptors, the cat genome can supply the dependency factors needed by HIV-1, and a main restriction can be countered by vif chimerism. The results raise the possibility that the domestic cat could yield an animal model of HIV-1 infection.

  7. A novel mechanism for inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Skillman, A Geoffrey; Maurer, Karl W; Roe, Diana C; Stauber, Margaret J; Eargle, Dolan; Ewing, Todd J A; Muscate, Angelika; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Medaglia, Maxine V; Fisher, Robert J; Arnold, Edward; Gao, Hong Qiang; Buckheit, Robert; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Kuntz, Irwin D; Kenyon, George L

    2002-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is an important medical problem. Although combination drug regimens have produced dramatic decreases in viral load, current therapies do not provide a cure for HIV infection. We have used structure-based design and combinatorial medicinal chemistry to identify potent and selective HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that may work by a mechanism distinct from that of current HIV drugs. The most potent of these compounds (compound 4, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(4-cinnamylphenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-[(4-cinnamylphenyl)azo], disodium salt) has an IC(50) of 90 nM for inhibition of polymerase chain extension, a K(d) of 40 nM for inhibition of DNA-RT binding, and an IC(50) of 25-100 nM for inhibition of RNaseH cleavage. The parent compound (1) was as effective against 10 nucleoside and non-nucleoside resistant HIV-1 RT mutants as it was against the wild-type enzyme. Compound 4 inhibited HIV-1 RT and murine leukemia virus (MLV) RT, but it did not inhibit T(4) DNA polymerase, T(7) DNA polymerase, or the Klenow fragment at concentrations up to 200 nM. Finally, compound 4 protected cells from HIV-1 infection at a concentration more than 40 times lower than the concentration at which it caused cellular toxicity.

  8. APOBEC4 Enhances the Replication of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Henning; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Mühlebach, Michael D.; Schumann, Gerald G.; König, Renate; Cichutek, Klaus; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC4 (A4) is a member of the AID/APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases. In this study we found a high mRNA expression of A4 in human testis. In contrast, there were only low levels of A4 mRNA detectable in 293T, HeLa, Jurkat or A3.01 cells. Ectopic expression of A4 in HeLa cells resulted in mostly cytoplasmic localization of the protein. To test whether A4 has antiviral activity similar to that of proteins of the APOBEC3 (A3) subfamily, A4 was co-expressed in 293T cells with wild type HIV-1 and HIV-1 luciferase reporter viruses. We found that A4 did not inhibit the replication of HIV-1 but instead enhanced the production of HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner and seemed to act on the viral LTR. A4 did not show detectable cytidine deamination activity in vitro and weakly interacted with single-stranded DNA. The presence of A4 in virus producer cells enhanced HIV-1 replication by transiently transfected A4 or stably expressed A4 in HIV-susceptible cells. APOBEC4 was capable of similarly enhancing transcription from a broad spectrum of promoters, regardless of whether they were viral or mammalian. We hypothesize that A4 may have a natural role in modulating host promoters or endogenous LTR promoters. PMID:27249646

  9. Specific Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64-mediated Guide RNA Targeting the HIV-1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haiyan; Jiang, Zhengtao; Lu, Panpan; Ma, Li; Li, Chuan; Pan, Hanyu; Fu, Zheng; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Deng, Junxiao; Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Jianhua; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 escapes antiretroviral agents by integrating into the host DNA and forming a latent transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus. Transcriptional activation is prerequisite for reactivation and the eradication of latent HIV-1 proviruses. dCas9-SunTag-VP64 transcriptional system has been reported that it can robustly activate the expression of an endogenous gene using a single guide RNA (sgRNA). Here, we systematically investigated the potential of dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNAs for reactivating latent HIV-1. We found dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 targeted from -164 to -146 or -124 to -106 bp upstream of the transcription start sites of HIV-1 could induce high expression of luciferase reporter gene after screening of sgRNAs targeting different regions of the HIV-1 promoter. Further, we confirmed that dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 can effectively reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription in several latently infected human T-cell lines. Moreover, we confirmed that the reactivation of latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNA occurred through specific binding to the HIV-1 LTR promoter without genotoxicity and global T-cell activation. Taken together, our data demonstrated dCas9-SunTag-VP64 system can effectively and specifically reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription, suggesting that this strategy could offer a novel approach to anti-HIV-1 latency.

  10. Stable co-occupancy of transcription factors and histones at the HIV-1 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, D J; Workman, J L

    1997-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms yielding DNase I-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) at gene regulatory regions, we have initiated a biochemical analysis of transcription factor binding and nucleosome remodeling with a region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) that harbors constitutive DHSs in vivo. In vitro reconstitution of an HIV-1 5' LTR fragment into nucleosome core particles demonstrates that Sp1, NF-kappaB1, LEF-1, ETS-1 and USF can gain access to their binding sites in HIV-1 nucleosomal DNA. The factor-bound mononucleosomes resist histone displacement from the DNA by the chromatin remodeling activity, SW1-SNF, or the histone chaperone, nucleoplasmin, suggesting that the binding of these factors to nucleosomal HIV-1 sequences forms a stable complex that includes the underlying histones. However, when the HIV-1 5' LTR fragment is incorporated into a nucleosomal array, Sp1 and NF-kappaB1 binding produce regions of enhanced DNase I sensitivity specifically at the HIV-1 nucleosome. These regions resemble the observed in vivo DHSs, yet the HIV-1 nucleosome remains intact even in the presence of nucleoplasmin. Thus, the constitutive DHSs identified at the HIV-1 enhancer in native chromatin may reflect the presence of a ternary complex composed of transcriptional activators, histones and DNA. PMID:9171359

  11. Shedding of HIV-1 subtype E in semen and cervico-vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sutthent, R; Chaisilwattana, P; Roongpisuthipong, A; Wirachsilp, P; Samrangsarp, K; Chaiyakul, P; Puthavathana, P; Wasi, C

    1997-06-01

    The uneven expansion of HIV-1 subtypes in each transmitted group raises the possibility that some viruses have less/more potential by qualitative/quantitative for heterosexual transmission compared to others. In Thailand, HIV-1 subtype E is mainly spread via heterosexual route and accounts for about 95 per cent of the infected cases. To determine whether high sexual infectivity of HIV-1 subtype E is due to the presence of a virus in genital fluid, we conducted a study to characterize shedding of HIV-1 in seminal and cervico-vaginal fluids of 30 HIV-1 subtype E infected Thai couples by PCR and virus isolation methods. All subjects had no HIV-associated diseases and other sexually transmitted diseases. HIV-1 subtype E DNA was detected in 22/30 (77.33%) of cervico-vaginal and also 22/30 (77.33%) of seminal fluid samples. The isolation rate of HIV-1 from semen and cervico-vaginal secretion was 36.67 per cent and 16.67 per cent, respectively. Number of HIV-1 subtype E DNA copies in the blood is reversely correlated with the number of blood CD4+ T cells, while that in genital fluid was not related to CD4+ T cell count. An increase in shedding of HIV- DNA subtype E in female genital tract compared to other HIV subtypes reported by other investigators might be one reason to explain the rapid spread of subtype E by heterosexual transmission in Thailand.

  12. The HIV-1 Rev/RRE system is required for HIV-1 5' UTR cis elements to augment encapsidation of heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Adam S; van Praag, Henriette; Santistevan, Nicholas; Ma, Hong; Kafri, Tal

    2011-06-24

    The process of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) encapsidation is governed by a number of viral encoded components, most notably the Gag protein and gRNA cis elements in the canonical packaging signal (ψ). Also implicated in encapsidation are cis determinants in the R, U5, and PBS (primer binding site) from the 5' untranslated region (UTR). Although conventionally associated with nuclear export of HIV-1 RNA, there is a burgeoning role for the Rev/RRE in the encapsidation process. Pleiotropic effects exhibited by these cis and trans viral components may confound the ability to examine their independent, and combined, impact on encapsidation of RNA into HIV-1 viral particles in their innate viral context. We systematically reconstructed the HIV-1 packaging system in the context of a heterologous murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector RNA to elucidate a mechanism in which the Rev/RRE system is central to achieving efficient and specific encapsidation into HIV-1 viral particles. We show for the first time that the Rev/RRE system can augment RNA encapsidation independent of all cis elements from the 5' UTR (R, U5, PBS, and ψ). Incorporation of all the 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance RNA encapsidation in the absence of the Rev/RRE system. In fact, we demonstrate that the Rev/RRE system is required for specific and efficient encapsidation commonly associated with the canonical packaging signal. The mechanism of Rev/RRE-mediated encapsidation is not a general phenomenon, since the combination of the Rev/RRE system and 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance encapsidation into MLV-derived viral particles. Lastly, we show that heterologous MLV RNAs conform to transduction properties commonly associated with HIV-1 viral particles, including in vivo transduction of non-dividing cells (i.e. mouse neurons); however, the cDNA forms are episomes predominantly in the 1-LTR circle form. Premised on encapsidation of a heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles, our findings define a functional

  13. The HIV-1 Rev/RRE system is required for HIV-1 5' UTR cis elements to augment encapsidation of heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The process of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) encapsidation is governed by a number of viral encoded components, most notably the Gag protein and gRNA cis elements in the canonical packaging signal (ψ). Also implicated in encapsidation are cis determinants in the R, U5, and PBS (primer binding site) from the 5' untranslated region (UTR). Although conventionally associated with nuclear export of HIV-1 RNA, there is a burgeoning role for the Rev/RRE in the encapsidation process. Pleiotropic effects exhibited by these cis and trans viral components may confound the ability to examine their independent, and combined, impact on encapsidation of RNA into HIV-1 viral particles in their innate viral context. We systematically reconstructed the HIV-1 packaging system in the context of a heterologous murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector RNA to elucidate a mechanism in which the Rev/RRE system is central to achieving efficient and specific encapsidation into HIV-1 viral particles. Results We show for the first time that the Rev/RRE system can augment RNA encapsidation independent of all cis elements from the 5' UTR (R, U5, PBS, and ψ). Incorporation of all the 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance RNA encapsidation in the absence of the Rev/RRE system. In fact, we demonstrate that the Rev/RRE system is required for specific and efficient encapsidation commonly associated with the canonical packaging signal. The mechanism of Rev/RRE-mediated encapsidation is not a general phenomenon, since the combination of the Rev/RRE system and 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance encapsidation into MLV-derived viral particles. Lastly, we show that heterologous MLV RNAs conform to transduction properties commonly associated with HIV-1 viral particles, including in vivo transduction of non-dividing cells (i.e. mouse neurons); however, the cDNA forms are episomes predominantly in the 1-LTR circle form. Conclusions Premised on encapsidation of a heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

  14. Absence of Detectable HIV-1 Viremia after Treatment Cessation in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Deborah; Gay, Hannah; Ziemniak, Carrie; Chen, Ya Hui; Piatak, Michael; Chun, Tae-Wook; Strain, Matthew; Richman, Douglas; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An infant born to a woman with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection began receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) 30 hours after birth owing to high-risk exposure. ART was continued when detection of HIV-1 DNA and RNA on repeat testing met the standard diagnostic criteria for infection. After therapy was discontinued (when the child was 18 months of age), levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA, proviral DNA in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells, and HIV-1 antibodies, as assessed by means of clinical assays, remained undetectable in the child through 30 months of age. This case suggests that very early ART in infants may alter the establishment and long-term persistence of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24152233

  15. Absence of detectable HIV-1 viremia after treatment cessation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Deborah; Gay, Hannah; Ziemniak, Carrie; Chen, Ya Hui; Piatak, Michael; Chun, Tae-Wook; Strain, Matthew; Richman, Douglas; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2013-11-07

    An infant born to a woman with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection began receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) 30 hours after birth owing to high-risk exposure. ART was continued when detection of HIV-1 DNA and RNA on repeat testing met the standard diagnostic criteria for infection. After therapy was discontinued (when the child was 18 months of age), levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA, proviral DNA in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells, and HIV-1 antibodies, as assessed by means of clinical assays, remained undetectable in the child through 30 months of age. This case suggests that very early ART in infants may alter the establishment and long-term persistence of HIV-1 infection.

  16. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Armas Cayarga, Anny; Perea Hernández, Yenitse; González González, Yaimé J.; Dueñas Carrera, Santiago; González Pérez, Idania; Robaina Álvarez, René

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC) by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results) in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (r = 0.925) was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux) for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (N = 14). HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load. PMID:21766036

  17. Clustered epitopes within the Gag-Pol fusion protein DNA vaccine enhance immune responses and protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol antigens.

    PubMed

    Bolesta, Elizabeth; Gzyl, Jaroslaw; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Kmieciak, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Kaneko, Yutaro; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; Kozbor, Danuta

    2005-02-20

    We have generated a codon-optimized hGagp17p24-Polp51 plasmid DNA expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pol fusion protein that consists of clusters of highly conserved cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes presented by multiple MHC class I alleles. In the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct, the ribosomal frameshift site had been deleted together with the potentially immunosuppressive Gag nucleocapsid (p15) as well as Pol protease (p10) and integrase (p31). Analyses of the magnitude and breadth of cellular responses demonstrated that immunization of HLA-A2/K(b) transgenic mice with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct induced 2- to 5-fold higher CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag p17-, p24-, and Pol reverse transcriptase (RT)-specific CTL epitopes than the full-length hGag-PolDeltaFsDeltaPr counterpart. The increases were correlated with higher protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVVs) expressing gag and pol gene products. Consistent with the profile of Gag- and Pol-specific CD8+ T cell responses, an elevated level of type 1 cytokine production was noted in p24- and RT-stimulated splenocyte cultures established from hGagp17p24-Polp51-immunized mice compared to responses induced with the hGag-PolDeltaFsDeltaPr vaccine. Sera of mice immunized with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 vaccine also exhibited an increased titer of p24- and RT-specific IgG2 antibody responses. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting the breadth of Gag- and Pol-specific immune responses.

  18. The Kidney as a Reservoir for HIV-1 after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Viard, Jean-Paul; Anglicheau, Dany; Bienaimé, Frank; Muorah, Mordi; Galmiche, Louise; Gribouval, Olivier; Noël, Laure-Helene; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Martinez, Frank; Sberro-Soussan, Rebecca; Scemla, Anne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Friedlander, Gérard; Antignac, Corinne; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Terzi, Fabiola; Rouzioux, Christine; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the recent publication of data showing favorable outcomes for patients with HIV-1 and ESRD, kidney transplantation has become a therapeutic option in this population. However, reports have documented unexplained reduced allograft survival in these patients. We hypothesized that the unrecognized infection of the transplanted kidney by HIV-1 can compromise long-term allograft function. Using electron microscopy and molecular biology, we examined protocol renal transplant biopsies from 19 recipients with HIV-1 who did not have detectable levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA at transplantation. We found that HIV-1 infected the kidney allograft in 68% of these patients. Notably, HIV-1 infection was detected in either podocytes predominately (38% of recipients) or tubular cells only (62% of recipients). Podocyte infection associated with podocyte apoptosis and loss of differentiation markers as well as a faster decline in allograft function compared with tubular cell infection. In allografts with tubular cell infection, epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules frequently contained abnormal mitochondria, and both patients who developed features of subclinical acute cellular rejection had allografts with tubular cell infection. Finally, we provide a novel noninvasive test for determining HIV-1 infection of the kidney allograft by measuring HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels in patients’ urine. In conclusion, HIV-1 can infect kidney allografts after transplantation despite undetectable viremia, and this infection might influence graft outcome. PMID:24309185

  19. The kidney as a reservoir for HIV-1 after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Guillaume; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Viard, Jean-Paul; Anglicheau, Dany; Bienaimé, Frank; Muorah, Mordi; Galmiche, Louise; Gribouval, Olivier; Noël, Laure-Helene; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Martinez, Frank; Sberro-Soussan, Rebecca; Scemla, Anne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Friedlander, Gérard; Antignac, Corinne; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Terzi, Fabiola; Rouzioux, Christine; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    Since the recent publication of data showing favorable outcomes for patients with HIV-1 and ESRD, kidney transplantation has become a therapeutic option in this population. However, reports have documented unexplained reduced allograft survival in these patients. We hypothesized that the unrecognized infection of the transplanted kidney by HIV-1 can compromise long-term allograft function. Using electron microscopy and molecular biology, we examined protocol renal transplant biopsies from 19 recipients with HIV-1 who did not have detectable levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA at transplantation. We found that HIV-1 infected the kidney allograft in 68% of these patients. Notably, HIV-1 infection was detected in either podocytes predominately (38% of recipients) or tubular cells only (62% of recipients). Podocyte infection associated with podocyte apoptosis and loss of differentiation markers as well as a faster decline in allograft function compared with tubular cell infection. In allografts with tubular cell infection, epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules frequently contained abnormal mitochondria, and both patients who developed features of subclinical acute cellular rejection had allografts with tubular cell infection. Finally, we provide a novel noninvasive test for determining HIV-1 infection of the kidney allograft by measuring HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels in patients' urine. In conclusion, HIV-1 can infect kidney allografts after transplantation despite undetectable viremia, and this infection might influence graft outcome.

  20. Low recombination activity of R region located at both ends of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Jankowska, Anna; Alejska, Magdalena; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Although two strand transfer events are indispensable for the synthesis of double-stranded DNA and establishing HIV-1 infection, the molecular basis of these phenomena is still unclear. The first obligatory template switching event occurs just at the beginning of the virus replication cycle and involves two copies of the 97-nucleotide long R region, located one each at the both ends of the HIV-1 genome (HIV-1 R). Thus, one can expect that the molecular mechanism of this process is similar to the mechanism of homologous recombination which operates in RNA viruses. To verify the above-mentioned hypothesis, we attempted to assess the recombination activity of HIV-1 R. To this end, we tested in vitro, how effectively it induces template switching by HIV-1 RT in comparison with another well-characterized sequence supporting frequent homologous crossovers in an unrelated virus (R region derived from Brome mosaic virus--BMV R). We also examined if the RNA sequences neighboring HIV-1 R influence its recombination activity. Finally, we tested if HIV-1 R could cause BMV polymerase complex to switch between RNA templates in vivo. Overall, our results have revealed a relatively low recombination activity of HIV-1 R as compared to BMV R. This observation suggests that different factors modulate the efficiency of the first obligatory strand transfer in HIV-1 and the homology-driven recombination in RNA viruses.

  1. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding.

  2. Chromatin structure implicated in activation of HIV-1 gene expression by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M. )

    1990-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of different DNA-damaging agents on HIV-1 gene expression. We find that agents that produce bulky DNA lesions, similar to those induced by ultraviolet light (UV), all dramatically increase HIV-1 gene expression, whereas agents that produce primarily base damage and DNA breakage, such as ionizing radiation, have little or no effect. We show that these effects are independent of DNA synthesis per se and do not require DNA nucleotide excision repair. The drug novobiocin effectively prevents the UV activation process, consistent with the idea that a change in DNA chromatin structure may be required. We suggest that a transient decondensation of chromatin structure, an early step in DNA nucleotide excision repair but not in base excision repair, may be the triggering mechanism. The decondensation may allow the transcriptional machinery better access to the HIV-1 promoter region, thereby increasing gene expression.

  3. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  4. Willingness of Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to use antiretroviral based HIV-1 prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Celum, Connie; Kurth, Ann; Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have demonstrated efficacy as new HIV-1 prevention approaches for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Methods Among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples participating in a clinical trial of PrEP, we conducted a cross-sectional study and used descriptive statistical methods to explore couples' willingness to use antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. The study was conducted prior to July 2011, when studies among heterosexual populations reported that ART and PrEP reduced HIV-1 risk. Results For 181 couples in which the HIV-1 infected partner had a CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and had not yet initiated ART (and thus did not qualify for ART under Kenyan guidelines), 60.2% of HIV-1 infected partners (69.4% of men and 57.9% of women) were willing to use early ART (at CD4 ≥350 cells/μL) for HIV-1 prevention. Among HIV-1 uninfected partners, 92.7% (93.8% of men and 86.1% of women) reported willingness to use PrEP. When given a hypothetical choice of early ART or PrEP for HIV-1 prevention, 52.5% of HIV-1 infected participants would prefer to initiate ART early and 56.9% of HIV-1 uninfected participants would prefer to use PrEP. Conclusions Nearly 40% of Kenyan HIV-1 infected individuals in known HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships reported reservations about early ART initiation for HIV-1 prevention. PrEP interest in this PrEP-experienced population was high. Strategies to achieve high uptake and sustained adherence to ART and PrEP for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples will require responding to couples' preferences for prevention strategies. PMID:22595872

  5. Development of Methods for Coordinate Measurement of Total Cell-Associated and Integrated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) DNA Forms in Routine Clinical Samples: Levels Are Not Associated with Clinical Parameters, but Low Levels of Integrated HIV-1 DNA May Be Prognostic for Continued Successful Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. M.; Cheney, K. M.; Coolen, C.; Davis, A.; Shaw, D.; Ferguson, W.; Chang, G.; Higgins, G.; Burrell, C.; Li, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have adapted our established Alu PCR assay for proviral DNA and PCR for total cellular DNA to a real-time PCR format and applied these to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive specimens collected for routine determination of the plasma viral load (pVL). In a cohort of five patients, measurements of integrated viral load (iVL) and cell-associated viral load (cVL) in CD4+ cells isolated by a single positive selection step were not indicative of HIV DNA levels in the circulation, and further analysis was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In a cohort of 46 samples total cVL was quantitated in most samples, but iVL could be quantitated in only 47.8%, since in 26% iVL was undetectable and in 21.7% the results were invalid due to high levels of unintegrated HIV DNA. There was no correlation of cVL or iVL with pVL, CD4 count, or duration of successful antiretroviral treatment. Out of 26 patients with undetectable pVL, 4 patients failed therapy within the subsequent 12 months and had higher than average iVL, but this was not the case for cVL. Among nine patients with long-term undetectable pVL, no consistent decline in cVL or iVL was seen with time, and changes in cVL and iVL within a patient could be concordant or discordant. These results show that cVL and iVL can be coordinately measured in PBMC from clinical samples but do not correlate with pVL, CD4 counts, or length of suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Interestingly, a high iVL (but not a high cVL) in patients with undetectable pVL was associated with subsequent treatment failure. PMID:17314225

  6. The HIV-1 epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puren, A J

    2002-01-01

    The first reported cases of HIV-1 infection in South Africa occurred in 1982. Two distinct HIV-1 epidemic patterns were recognized. Initially the infection was prevalent in white males who had sex with males. The HIV-1 clade B was associated with this group. By 1989, the second epidemic was recognized primarily in the black population. Infections in this case were mainly heterosexual in origin. The HIV-1 clade involved was mainly C. The national HIV-1 sero-prevalence in antenatal attendees was less than 1% in 1990 and by 1994 this figure had risen to 7.5%. The most recent antenatal surveillance for HIV-1 sero-prevalence in 1999 revealed the following. The national prevalence rate for 1999 was 22.4% compared with the 1998 rate of 22.8%. The data highlighted the profound effect the epidemic had and will have on the disease burden in South Africa and by extension on the social and economic fronts. This view was emphasised by the impact HIV-1 infection had on tuberculosis. For example, sentinel surveys have attributed 44% of tuberculosis cases to HIV-1 infection. Moreover, the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections will certainly exacerbate the HIV-1 epidemic.

  7. HIV-1 and HIV-2 LTR nucleotide sequences: assessment of the alignment by N-block presentation, "retroviral signatures" of overrepeated oligonucleotides, and a probable important role of scrambled stepwise duplications/deletions in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Laprevotte, I; Pupin, M; Coward, E; Didier, G; Terzian, C; Devauchelle, C; Hénaut, A

    2001-07-01

    Previous analyses of retroviral nucleotide sequences, suggest a so-called "scrambled duplicative stepwise molecular evolution" (many sectors with successive duplications/deletions of short and longer motifs) that could have stemmed from one or several starter tandemly repeated short sequence(s). In the present report, we tested this hypothesis by focusing on the long terminal repeats (LTRs) (and flanking sequences) of 24 human and 3 simian immunodeficiency viruses. By using a calculation strategy applicable to short sequences, we found consensus overrepresented motifs (often containing CTG or CAG) that were congruent with the previously defined "retroviral signature." We also show many local repetition patterns that are significant when compared with simply shuffled sequences. First- and second-order Markov chain analyses demonstrate that a major portion of the overrepresented oligonucleotides can be predicted from the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences, but by no means can biological mechanisms be deduced from these results: some of the listed local repetitions remain significant against dinucleotide-conserving shuffled sequences; together with previous results, this suggests that interspersed and/or local mononucleotide and oligonucleotide repetitions could have biased the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences. We searched for suggestive evolutionary patterns by scrutinizing a reliable multiple alignment of the 27 sequences. A manually constructed alignment based on homology blocks was in good agreement with the polypeptide alignment in the coding sectors and has been exhaustively assessed by using a multiplied alphabet obtained by the promising mathematical strategy called the N-block presentation (taking into account the environment of each nucleotide in a sequence). Sector by sector, we hypothesize many successive duplication/deletion scenarios that fit our previous evolutionary hypotheses. This suggests an important duplication/deletion role for the reverse transcriptase, particularly in inducing stuttering cryptic simplicity patterns.

  8. Prospective strategies for targeting HIV-1 integrase function

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Integration is a key step in the HIV-1 life cycle in which the ends of linear viral DNA are covalently joined with host chromosomal DNA. Integrase is the highly conserved and essential viral protein that performs two catalytically related reactions that ultimately lead to the insertion of the viral genome into that of the host cell. The only chemotherapeutic agents against integrase currently available for HIV-1 infected individuals are those that interrupt strand transfer, the second step of catalysis. Accordingly, this article outlines possible future strategies targeting the first catalytic step, 3′ processing, as well as other nonenzymatic, yet indispensible, functions thought to be coordinated by integrase. Importantly, the interruption of irremediable recombination between viral and host DNAs represents the last step after viral entry at which an otherwise irreversible infection can be prevented. PMID:21359091

  9. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  10. Cytopathic Mechanisms of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely investigated since its discovery in 1983 as the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). With relatively few proteins made by the virus, it is able to accomplish many tasks, with each protein serving multiple functions. The Envelope glycoprotein, composed of the two noncovalently linked subunits, SU (surface glycoprotein) and TM (transmembrane glycoprotein) is largely responsible for host cell recognition and entry respectively. While the roles of the N-terminal residues of TM is well established as a fusion pore and anchor for Env into cell membranes, the role of the C-terminus of the protein is not well understood and is fiercely debated. This review gathers information on TM in an attempt to shed some light on the functional regions of this protein. PMID:17945027

  11. Cytopathic mechanisms of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Costin, Joshua M

    2007-10-18

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely investigated since its discovery in 1983 as the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). With relatively few proteins made by the virus, it is able to accomplish many tasks, with each protein serving multiple functions. The Envelope glycoprotein, composed of the two noncovalently linked subunits, SU (surface glycoprotein) and TM (transmembrane glycoprotein) is largely responsible for host cell recognition and entry respectively. While the roles of the N-terminal residues of TM is well established as a fusion pore and anchor for Env into cell membranes, the role of the C-terminus of the protein is not well understood and is fiercely debated. This review gathers information on TM in an attempt to shed some light on the functional regions of this protein.

  12. HERV-K–specific T cells eliminate diverse HIV-1/2 and SIV primary isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Brad; Garrison, Keith E.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Aidarus, Nasra; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; John, Vivek M.; Zhan, Wei; Faruk, Nabil F.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; Priumboom-Brees, Ingrid M.; Goodwin, David A.; Chen, Lianchun; Rieger, Melanie; Muscat-King, Sophie; Loudon, Peter T.; Stanley, Cole; Holditch, Sara J.; Wong, Jessica C.; Clayton, Kiera; Duan, Erick; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Sacha, Jonah B.; Brockman, Mark A.; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HIV-1 represents a major challenge in vaccine development. In this study, we establish a rationale for eliminating HIV-1–infected cells by targeting cellular immune responses against stable human endogenous retroviral (HERV) antigens. HERV DNA sequences in the human genome represent the remnants of ancient infectious retroviruses. We show that the infection of CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 resulted in transcription of the HML-2 lineage of HERV type K [HERV-K(HML-2)] and the expression of Gag and Env proteins. HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cells obtained from HIV-1–infected human subjects responded to HIV-1–infected cells in a Vif-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with the proposed mode of action, a HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cell clone exhibited comprehensive elimination of cells infected with a panel of globally diverse HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates in vitro. We identified a second T cell response that exhibited cross-reactivity between homologous HIV-1-Pol and HERV-K(HML-2)-Pol determinants, raising the possibility that homology between HIV-1 and HERVs plays a role in shaping, and perhaps enhancing, the T cell response to HIV-1. This justifies the consideration of HERV-K(HML-2)–specific and cross-reactive T cell responses in the natural control of HIV-1 infection and for exploring HERV-K(HML-2)–targeted HIV-1 vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:23143309

  13. HIV-1 Vpr—a still “enigmatic multitasker”

    PubMed Central

    Guenzel, Carolin A.; Hérate, Cécile; Benichou, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Like other HIV-1 auxiliary proteins, Vpr is conserved within all the human (HIV-1, HIV-2) and simian (SIV) immunodeficiency viruses. However, Vpr and homologous HIV-2, and SIV Vpx are the only viral auxiliary proteins specifically incorporated into virus particles through direct interaction with the Gag precursor, indicating that this presence in the core of the mature virions is mainly required for optimal establishment of the early steps of the virus life cycle in the newly infected cell. In spite of its small size, a plethora of effects and functions have been attributed to Vpr, including induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, modulation of the fidelity of reverse transcription, nuclear import of viral DNA in macrophages and other non-dividing cells, and transcriptional modulation of viral and host cell genes. Even if some more recent studies identified a few cellular targets that HIV-1 Vpr may utilize in order to perform its different tasks, the real role and functions of Vpr during the course of natural infection are still enigmatic. In this review, we will summarize the main reported functions of HIV-1 Vpr and their significance in the context of the viral life cycle. PMID:24744753

  14. Is the central nervous system a reservoir of HIV-1?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Roche, Michael; Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review To summarize the evidence in the literature that supports the CNS as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and to prioritise future research efforts. Recent findings HIV-1 DNA has been detected in brain tissue of patients with undetectable viral load or neurocognitive disorders, and is associated with long-lived cells such as astrocytes and microglia. In neurocognitively normal patients, HIV-1 can be found at high frequency in these cells (4% of astrocytes and 20% of macrophages). CNS cells have unique molecular mechanisms to suppress viral replication and induce latency, which include increased expression of dominant negative transcription factors and suppressive epigenetic factors. There is also evidence of continued inflammation in patients lacking a CNS viral load, suggesting the production and activity of viral neurotoxins (for example Tat). Summary Together, these findings provide evidence that the CNS can potentially act as a viral reservoir of HIV-1. However, the majority of these studies were performed in historical cohorts (absence of cART or presence of viral load) which do not reflect modern day patients (cART-treated and undetectable viral load). Future studies will need to examine patient samples with these characteristics to conclusively determine if the CNS represents a relevant and important viral reservoir. PMID:25203642

  15. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  16. Epigenetic analysis of HIV-1 proviral genomes from infected individuals: predominance of unmethylated CpG's.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefanie; Weiser, Barbara; Kemal, Kimdar S; Burger, Harold; Ramirez, Christina M; Korn, Klaus; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-01-20

    Efforts to cure HIV-1 infections aim at eliminating proviral DNA. Integrated DNA from various viruses often becomes methylated de novo and transcriptionally inactivated. We therefore investigated CpG methylation profiles of 55 of 94 CpG's (58.5%) in HIV-1 proviral genomes including ten CpG's in each LTR and additional CpG's in portions of gag, env, nef, rev, and tat genes. We analyzed 33 DNA samples from PBMC's of 23 subjects representing a broad spectrum of HIV-1 disease. In 22 of 23 HIV-1-infected individuals, there were only unmethylated CpG's regardless of infection status. In one long term nonprogressor, however, methylation of proviral DNA varied between 0 and 75% over an 11-year period although the CD4+ counts remained stable. Hence levels of proviral DNA methylation can fluctuate. The preponderance of unmethylated CpG's suggests that proviral methylation is not a major factor in regulating HIV-1 proviral activity in PBMC's. Unmethylated CpG's may play a role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Absence of XMRV in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of ARV-Treatment Naïve HIV-1 Infected and HIV-1/HCV Coinfected Individuals and Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Karen J.; Vey, Elana; Arduino, Roberto C.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) has been found in the prostatic tissue of prostate cancer patients and in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients. However, numerous studies have found little to no trace of XMRV in different human cohorts. Based on evidence suggesting common transmission routes between XMRV and HIV-1, HIV-1 infected individuals may represent a high-risk group for XMRV infection and spread. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 179 HIV-1 infected treatment naïve patients, 86 of which were coinfected with HCV, and 54 healthy blood donors. DNA was screened for XMRV provirus with two sensitive, published PCR assays targeting XMRV gag and env and one sensitive, published nested PCR assay targeting env. Detection of XMRV was confirmed by DNA sequencing. One of the 179 HIV-1 infected patients tested positive for gag by non-nested PCR whereas the two other assays did not detect XMRV in any specimen. All healthy blood donors were negative for XMRV proviral sequences. Sera from 23 HIV-1 infected patients (15 HCV+) and 12 healthy donors were screened for the presence of XMRV-reactive antibodies by Western blot. Thirteen sera (57%) from HIV-1+ patients and 6 sera (50%) from healthy donors showed reactivity to XMRV-infected cell lysate. Conclusions/Significance The virtual absence of XMRV in PBMCs suggests that XMRV is not associated with HIV-1 infected or HIV-1/HCV coinfected patients, or blood donors. Although we noted isolated incidents of serum reactivity to XMRV, we are unable to verify the antibodies as XMRV specific. PMID:22348082

  18. HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected Senegalese individuals with low CD4+ cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Raugi, Dana N.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Sow, Papa S.; Toure, Macoumba; Sall, Fatima; Gaye, Awa; N’doye, Ibra; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dual infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2, which is not uncommon in West Africa, has implications for transmission, progression, and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Few studies have examined viral dynamics in this setting. Our objective was to directly compare HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads and to examine whether this relationship is associated with CD4+ cell count. Study design This is a retrospective analysis of data from observational cohort studies. Methods We compared HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads from 65 dually infected, ART-naive Senegalese individuals. Participants provided blood, oral fluid, and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) or semen samples for virologic and immunologic testing. We assessed relationships between HIV-1 and HIV-2 levels using linear regression with generalized estimating equations to account for multiple study visits. Results After adjusting for CD4+ cell count, age, sex, and commercial sex work, HIV-1 RNA levels were significantly higher than HIV-2 levels in semen, CVL, and oral fluids. Despite similar peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA levels among individuals with CD4+ cell counts above 500 cells/µl, individuals with CD4+ cell counts below 500 cells/µl had higher HIV-1 and lower HIV-2 DNA levels. Individuals with high CD4+ cell counts had higher mean HIV-1 plasma RNA viral loads than HIV-2, with HIV-1 levels significantly higher and HIV-2 levels trending toward lower mean viral loads among individuals with low CD4+ cell counts. Conclusion Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that with disease progression, HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected individuals. This finding helps explain differences in prevalence and outcomes between HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-dual infection. PMID:23665777

  19. USP7 deubiquitinase controls HIV-1 production by stabilizing Tat protein.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Raja, Rameez; Farooqui, Sabihur Rahman; Ahmad, Shaista; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2017-05-04

    Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are key regulators of complex cellular processes. HIV-1 Tat is synthesized early after infection and is mainly responsible for enhancing viral production. Here, we report that one of the DUBs, USP7, stabilized the HIV-1 Tat protein through its deubiquitination. Treatment with either a general DUB inhibitor (PR-619) or USP7-specific inhibitor (P5091) resulted in Tat protein degradation. The USP7-specific inhibitor reduced virus production in a latently infected T-lymphocytic cell line J1.1, which produces large amounts of HIV-1 upon stimulation. A potent increase in Tat-mediated HIV-1 production was observed with USP7 in a dose-dependent manner. As expected, deletion of the USP7 gene using the CRISPR-Cas9 method reduced the Tat protein and supported less virus production. Interestingly, the levels of endogenous USP7 increased after HIV-1 infection in human T-cells (MOLT-3) and in mammalian cells transfected with HIV-1 proviral DNA. Thus, HIV-1 Tat is stabilized by the host cell deubiquitinase USP7, leading to enhanced viral production, and HIV-1 in turn up-regulates the USP7 protein level. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure. Methods. We used longitudinal predictors of HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to score HIV-1 exposure and define HESN clusters with persistently high, low, and decreasing risk trajectories. The model was validated in an independent cohort of serodiscordant couples. We describe a statistical tool that can be applied to other HESN cohorts to identify individuals with high exposure to HIV-1. Results. HIV-1 exposure was best quantified by frequency of unprotected sex with, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels among, and presence of genital ulcer disease among HIV-1–infected partners and by age, pregnancy status, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus, and male circumcision status among HESN participants. Overall, 14% of HESN individuals persistently had high HIV-1 exposure and exhibited a declining incidence of HIV-1 infection over time. Conclusions. A minority of HESN individuals from HIV-1–discordant couples had persistent high HIV-1 exposure over time. Decreasing incidence of infection in this group suggests these individuals were selected for resistance to HIV-1 and may be most appropriate for identifying biological correlates of natural host resistance to HIV-1 infection. PMID:22926009

  1. Antiretroviral-Free HIV-1 Remission and Viral Rebound Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Marty, Francisco M.; Sirignano, Michael N.; Keating, Sheila; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Robles, Yvonne P.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Li, Jonathan Z.; Heisey, Andrea; Hill, Alison L.; Busch, Michael P.; Armand, Philippe; Soiffer, Robert J.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unknown if the reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs observed following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with susceptible donor cells is sufficient to achieve sustained HIV-1 remission. Objective To characterize HIV-1 reservoirs in blood and tissues, and to perform analytical antiretroviral treatment interruptions to determine the potential for allogeneic HSCT to lead to sustained antiretroviral-free HIV-1 remission. Design Characterization of HIV-1 reservoirs and immunity before and after antiretroviral interruption. Setting Tertiary care center. Patients Two HIV-infected men with undetectable HIV-1 following allogeneic HSCT for hematologic malignancies. Measurements Quantification of HIV-1 in various tissues after HSCT and the duration of antiretroviral-free HIV-1 remission after treatment interruption. Results No HIV-1 was detected from peripheral blood or rectal mucosa prior to analytical treatment interruption. Plasma HIV-1 RNA and cell-associated HIV-1 DNA remained undetectable until 12 to 32 weeks after antiretroviral cessation. Both patients experienced rebound viremia with the development of acute retroviral syndrome within one to two weeks of the most recent negative viral load measurement. One patient developed new efavirenz resistance after re-initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Re-initiation of active therapy led to viral decay and resolution of symptoms in both patients. Limitations The study was limited to 2 patients. Conclusions Allogeneic HSCT may lead to loss of detectable HIV-1 from blood and gut tissue and variable periods of antiretroviral-free HIV-1 remission, but viral rebound can occur despite a minimum 3-log10 reduction in reservoir size. Long-lived tissue reservoirs may have contributed to viral persistence. Defining the nature and half-life of such reservoirs is essential in order to achieve durable antiretroviral-free HIV-1 remission. PMID:25047577

  2. Abrogation of contaminating RNA activity in HIV-1 Gag VLPs.

    PubMed

    Valley-Omar, Ziyaad; Meyers, Ann E; Shephard, Enid G; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P

    2011-10-06

    HIV-1 Gag virus like particles (VLPs) used as candidate vaccines are regarded as inert particles as they contain no replicative nucleic acid, although they do encapsidate cellular RNAs. During HIV-1 Gag VLP production in baculovirus-based expression systems, VLPs incorporate the baculovirus Gp64 envelope glycoprotein, which facilitates their entry into mammalian cells. This suggests that HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced using this system facilitate uptake and subsequent expression of encapsidated RNA in mammalian cells - an unfavourable characteristic for a vaccine. HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating reporter chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) RNA, were made in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. The presence of Gp64 on the VLPs was verified by western blotting and RT-PCR used to detect and quantitate encapsidated CAT RNA. VLP samples were heated to inactivate CAT RNA. Unheated and heated VLPs incubated with selected mammalian cell lines and cell lysates tested for the presence of CAT protein by ELISA. Mice were inoculated with heated and unheated VLPs using a DNA prime VLP boost regimen. HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced had significantly high levels of Gp64 (~1650 Gp64 molecules/VLP) on their surfaces. The amount of encapsidated CAT RNA/μg Gag VLPs ranged between 0.1 to 7 ng. CAT protein was detected in 3 of the 4 mammalian cell lines incubated with VLPs. Incubation with heated VLPs resulted in BHK-21 and HeLa cell lysates showing reduced CAT protein levels compared with unheated VLPs and HEK-293 cells. Mice inoculated with a DNA prime VLP boost regimen developed Gag CD8 and CD4 T cell responses to GagCAT VLPs which also boosted a primary DNA response. Heating VLPs did not abrogate these immune responses but enhanced the Gag CD4 T cell responses by two-fold. Baculovirus-produced HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating CAT RNA were taken up by selected mammalian cell lines. The presence of CAT protein indicates that encapsidated RNA was expressed in the mammalian cells. Heat

  3. HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; McNatt, Matthew W; Bitzegeio, Julia; Raymond, Alice; Rodriguez, Anthony; Schmidt, Fabian; Mac Trubey, C; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-06-20

    Primate lentiviruses exhibit narrow host tropism, reducing the occurrence of zoonoses but also impairing the development of optimal animal models of AIDS. To delineate the factors limiting cross-species HIV-1 transmission, we passaged a modified HIV-1 in pigtailed macaques that were transiently depleted of CD8(+) cells during acute infection. During adaptation over four passages in macaques, HIV-1 acquired the ability to antagonize the macaque restriction factor tetherin, replicated at progressively higher levels, and ultimately caused marked CD4(+) T cell depletion and AIDS-defining conditions. Transient treatment with an antibody to CD8 during acute HIV-1 infection caused rapid progression to AIDS, whereas untreated animals exhibited an elite controller phenotype. Thus, an adapted HIV-1 can cause AIDS in macaques, and stark differences in outcome can be determined by immunological perturbations during early infection.

  4. Characterizing HIV-1 Splicing by Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Emery, Ann; Zhou, Shuntai; Pollom, Elizabeth; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2017-03-15

    Full-length human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA serves as the genome or as an mRNA, or this RNA undergoes splicing using four donors and 10 acceptors to create over 50 physiologically relevant transcripts in two size classes (1.8 kb and 4 kb). We developed an assay using Primer ID-tagged deep sequencing to quantify HIV-1 splicing. Using the lab strain NL4-3, we found that A5 (env/nef) is the most commonly used acceptor (about 50%) and A3 (tat) the least used (about 3%). Two small exons are made when a splice to acceptor A1 or A2 is followed by activation of donor D2 or D3, and the high-level use of D2 and D3 dramatically reduces the amount of vif and vpr transcripts. We observed distinct patterns of temperature sensitivity of splicing to acceptors A1 and A2. In addition, disruption of a conserved structure proximal to A1 caused a 10-fold reduction in all transcripts that utilized A1. Analysis of a panel of subtype B transmitted/founder viruses showed that splicing patterns are conserved, but with surprising variability of usage. A subtype C isolate was similar, while a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolate showed significant differences. We also observed transsplicing from a downstream donor on one transcript to an upstream acceptor on a different transcript, which we detected in 0.3% of 1.8-kb RNA reads. There were several examples of splicing suppression when the env intron was retained in the 4-kb size class. These results demonstrate the utility of this assay and identify new examples of HIV-1 splicing regulation. IMPORTANCE During HIV-1 replication, over 50 conserved spliced RNA variants are generated. The splicing assay described here uses new developments in deep-sequencing technology combined with Primer ID-tagged cDNA primers to efficiently quantify HIV-1 splicing at a depth that allows even low-frequency splice variants to be monitored. We have used this assay to examine several features of HIV-1 splicing and to identify new examples of

  5. HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) Proviral Reservoirs Decay Continuously Under Sustained Virologic Control in HIV-1–Infected Children Who Received Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luzuriaga, Katherine; Tabak, Barbara; Garber, Manuel; Chen, Ya Hui; Ziemniak, Carrie; McManus, Margaret M.; Murray, Danielle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality. Methods. Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection, <2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1–specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1–infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth. Results. Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1–specific immune responses. Conclusions. Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:24850788

  6. Amplified fluorescent sensing of DNA using luminescent carbon dots and AuNPs/GO as a sensing platform: A novel coupling of FRET and DNA hybridization for homogeneous HIV-1 gene detection at femtomolar level.

    PubMed

    Qaddare, Somaye Hamd; Salimi, Abdollah

    2017-03-15

    The demand for simple, sensitive, affordable, and selective DNA biosensors is willing, due to the important role of DNA detection in the areas of disease diagnostics, environment monitoring and food safety. The presented work is devoted to the fabrication of an ultrasensitive homogeneous biosensor for the detection of DNA sequences related to HIV based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET) between carbon dots(CDs) and AuNPs as nanoquenchers. CDs as fluorophore with average size 3-4nm were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of histidine. In this respect, the hybridization was occurring between the assemblies of fluorescence CDs functionalized 5-amino-labeled oligonucleotides as capture probe and label free oligonucleotides as detection probe. Due to strong fluorescence and good biocompatibility of CDs, the capture probe was covalently conjugated to CDs. In the presence of the target probe, the association between capture probe-CDs and detection probe is stronger than that between capture probe-CDs and AuNPs, leading to the release of the capture probe-CDs from AuNPs, resulting in the recovery of the fluorescence of CDs. This oligonucleotides detection probe was observed to detect target oligonucleotides specifically and sensitively in a linear range from 50.0fM to 1.0nM with a detection limit of 15fM. Furthermore, the sensitivity of this FRET strategy amplified using AuNPs/graphene oxide nanocomposite as quencher. The Sensor response indicates only the complementary sequence showing an obvious change signal in comparison to non-complementary and two bases mismatched sequences. Moreover, satisfactory results from determination of HIV DNA target in human serum were obtained showing great potential of the proposed method for real sample analysis. The proposed biosensor with highly biocompatibility and nontoxicity, can be developed for detection of other DNA biomarkers.

  7. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor.

  8. A mutant Tat protein inhibits infection of human cells by strains from diverse HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rustanti, Lina; Jin, Hongping; Lor, Mary; Lin, Min Hsuan; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David

    2017-03-14

    Nullbasic is a mutant HIV-1 Tat protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication via three independent mechanisms that disrupts 1) reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a DNA copy, 2) HIV-1 Rev protein function required for viral mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and 3) HIV-1 mRNA transcription by RNA Polymerase II. The Nullbasic protein is derived from the subtype B strain HIV-1BH10 and has only been tested against other HIV-1 subtype B strains. However, subtype B strains only account for ~10% of HIV-1 infections globally and HIV-1 Tat sequences vary between subtypes especially for subtype C, which is responsible for ~50% HIV-1 infection worldwide. These differences could influence the ability of Tat to interact with RNA and cellular proteins and thus could affect the antiviral activity of Nullbasic. Therefore, Nullbasic was tested against representative HIV-1 strains from subtypes C, D and A/D recombinant to determine if it can inhibit their replication. Nullbasic was delivered to human cells using a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retroviral system. We evaluated Nullbasic-mCherry (NB-mCh) fusion protein activity against the HIV-1 strains in TZM-bl cell lines for inhibition of transactivation and virus replication. We also examined antiviral activity of Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein against the same strains in primary CD4(+) T cells. The Nullbasic expression was monitored by western blot and flow cytometry. The effects of Nullbasic on primary CD4(+) T cells cytotoxicity, proliferation and apoptosis were also examined. The results show that Nullbasic inhibits Tat-mediated transactivation and virus replication of all the HIV-1 strains tested in TZM-bl cells. Importantly, Nullbasic inhibits replication of the HIV-1 strains in primary CD4(+) T cells without affecting cell proliferation, cytotoxicity or level of apoptotic cells. A SIN-based γ-retroviral vector used to express Nullbasic fusion proteins improved protein expression

  9. HIV-1 Tropism Testing in Subjects Achieving Undetectable HIV-1 RNA: Diagnostic Accuracy, Viral Evolution and Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Pou, Christian; Codoñer, Francisco M.; Thielen, Alexander; Bellido, Rocío; Pérez-Álvarez, Susana; Cabrera, Cecilia; Dalmau, Judith; Curriu, Marta; Lie, Yolanda; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Puig, Jordi; Martínez-Picado, Javier; Blanco, Julià; Coakley, Eoin; Däumer, Martin; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Background Technically, HIV-1 tropism can be evaluated in plasma or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). However, only tropism testing of plasma HIV-1 has been validated as a tool to predict virological response to CCR5 antagonists in clinical trials. The preferable tropism testing strategy in subjects with undetectable HIV-1 viremia, in whom plasma tropism testing is not feasible, remains uncertain. Methods & Results We designed a proof-of-concept study including 30 chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who achieved HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL during at least 2 years after first-line ART initiation. First, we determined the diagnostic accuracy of 454 and population sequencing of gp120 V3-loops in plasma and PBMCs, as well as of MT-2 assays before ART initiation. The Enhanced Sensitivity Trofile Assay (ESTA) was used as the technical reference standard. 454 sequencing of plasma viruses provided the highest agreement with ESTA. The accuracy of 454 sequencing decreased in PBMCs due to reduced specificity. Population sequencing in plasma and PBMCs was slightly less accurate than plasma 454 sequencing, being less sensitive but more specific. MT-2 assays had low sensitivity but 100% specificity. Then, we used optimized 454 sequence data to investigate viral evolution in PBMCs during viremia suppression and only found evolution of R5 viruses in one subject. No de novo CXCR4-using HIV-1 production was observed over time. Finally, Slatkin-Maddison tests suggested that plasma and cell-associated V3 forms were sometimes compartmentalized. Conclusions The absence of tropism shifts during viremia suppression suggests that, when available, testing of stored plasma samples is generally safe and informative, provided that HIV-1 suppression is maintained. Tropism testing in PBMCs may not necessarily produce equivalent biological results to plasma, because the structure of viral populations and the diagnostic performance of tropism assays may sometimes vary between compartments

  10. Successful Isolation of Infectious and High Titer Human Monocyte-Derived HIV-1 from Two Subjects with Discontinued Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; Ivanov, Sergei B.; Pan, Charlotte; Dolores, Jazel; Dann, Gregory C.; Zhou, Michael; Forte, Dominic; Yang, Zihuan; Holte, Sarah; Corey, Lawrence; Zhu, Tuofu

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 DNA in blood monocytes is considered a viral source of various HIV-1 infected tissue macrophages, which is also known as “Trojan horse” hypothesis. However, whether these DNA can produce virions has been an open question for years, due to the inability of isolating high titer and infectious HIV-1 directly from monocytes. Results In this study, we demonstrated successful isolation of two strains of M-HIV-1 (1690 M and 1175 M) from two out of four study subjects, together with their in vivo controls, HIV-1 isolated from CD4+ T-cells (T-HIV-1), 1690 T and 1175 T. All M- and T- HIV-1 isolates were detected CCR5-tropic. Both M- HIV-1 exhibited higher levels of replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) than the two T- HIV-1. Consistent with our previous reports on the subject 1175 with late infection, compartmentalized env C2-V3-C3 sequences were identified between 1175 M and 1175 T. In contrast, 1690 M and 1690 T, which were isolated from subject 1690 with relatively earlier infection, showed homogenous env C2-V3-C3 sequences. However, multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor resistance-associated variations were detected in the Gag-Pol region of 1690 M, but not of 1690 T. By further measuring HIV DNA intracellular copy numbers post-MDM infection, 1690 M was found to have significantly higher DNA synthesis efficiency than 1690 T in macrophages, indicating a higher RT activity, which was confirmed by AZT inhibitory assays. Conclusions These results suggested that the M- and T- HIV-1 are compartmentalized in the two study subjects, respectively. Therefore, we demonstrated that under in vitro conditions, HIV-1 infected human monocytes can productively release live viruses while differentiating into macrophages. PMID:23741458

  11. Levels of HIV-1 persistence on antiretroviral therapy are not associated with markers of inflammation or activation

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Ronald J.; Macatangay, Bernard J.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Mellors, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces levels of HIV-1 and immune activation but both can persist despite clinically effective ART. The relationships among pre-ART and on-ART levels of HIV-1 and activation are incompletely understood, in part because prior studies have been small or cross-sectional. To address these limitations, we evaluated measures of HIV-1 persistence, inflammation, T cell activation and T cell cycling in a longitudinal cohort of 101 participants who initiated ART and had well-documented sustained suppression of plasma viremia for a median of 7 years. During the first 4 years following ART initiation, HIV-1 DNA declined by 15-fold (93%) whereas cell-associated HIV-1 RNA (CA-RNA) fell 525-fold (>99%). Thereafter, HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline slowly (5% per year) with a half-life of 13 years. Participants who had higher HIV-1 DNA and CA-RNA before starting treatment had higher levels while on ART, despite suppression of plasma viremia for many years. Markers of inflammation and T cell activation were associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels before ART was initiated but there were no consistent associations between these markers and HIV-1 DNA or CA-RNA during long-term ART, suggesting that HIV-1 persistence is not driving or driven by inflammation or activation. Higher levels of inflammation, T cell activation and cycling before ART were associated with higher levels during ART, indicating that immunologic events that occurred well before ART initiation had long-lasting effects despite sustained virologic suppression. These findings should stimulate studies of viral and host factors that affect virologic, inflammatory and immunologic set points prior to ART initiation and should inform the design of strategies to reduce HIV-1 reservoirs and dampen immune activation that persists despite ART. PMID:28426825

  12. Viral Determinants of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are important target cells for HIV-1 infection that play significant roles in the maintenance of viral reservoirs and other aspects of pathogenesis. Understanding the determinants of HIV-1 tropism for macrophages will inform HIV-1 control and eradication strategies. Tropism for macrophages is both qualitative (infection or not) and quantitative (replication capacity). For example many R5 HIV-1 isolates cannot infect macrophages, but for those that can the macrophage replication capacity can vary by up to 1000-fold. Some X4 viruses are also capable of replication in macrophages, indicating that cellular tropism is partially independent of co-receptor preference. Preliminary data obtained with a small number of transmitted/founder viruses indicate inefficient macrophage infection, whereas isolates from later in disease are more frequently tropic for macrophages. Thus tropism may evolve over time, and more macrophage tropic viruses may be implicated in the pathogenesis of advanced HIV-1 infection. Compartmentalization of macrophage-tropic brain-derived envelope glycoproteins (Envs), and non-macrophage tropic non-neural tissue-derived Envs points to adaptation of HIV-1 quasi-species in distinct tissue microenvironments. Mutations within and adjacent to the Env-CD4 binding site have been identified that determine macrophage tropism at the entry level, but post-entry molecular determinants of macrophage replication capacity involving HIV-1 accessory proteins need further definition. PMID:22163344

  13. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  14. Lessons from HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Michael, Nelson L

    2016-11-01

    Only four HIV-1 vaccine concepts have been tested in six efficacy trials with no product licensed to date. Several scientific and programmatic lessons can be learned from these studies generating new hypotheses and guiding future steps. RV144 [ALVAC-HIV (canarypox vector) and AIDSVAX B/E (bivalent gp120 HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE)] remains the only efficacy trial that demonstrated a modest vaccine efficacy, which led to the identification of immune correlates of risk. Progress on subtype-specific, ALVAC (canarypox vector) and gp120 vaccine prime-boost approaches has been slow, but we are finally close to the launch of an efficacy study in Africa in 2016. The quest of a globally effective HIV-1 vaccine has led to the development of new approaches. Efficacy studies of combinations of Adenovirus type 26 (Ad26)/Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/gp140 vaccines with mosaic designs will enter efficacy studies mid-2017 and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-vectored vaccines begin Phase I studies at the same time. Future HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials face practical challenges as effective nonvaccine prevention programs are projected to decrease HIV-1 incidence. An HIV-1 vaccine is urgently needed. Increased industry involvement, mobilization of resources, expansion of a robust pipeline of new concepts, and robust preclinical challenge studies will be essential to accelerate efficacy testing of next generation HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  16. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  17. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Endsley, Mark A.; Somasunderam, Anoma D.; Li, Guangyu; Oezguen, Numan; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Murray, James L.; Rubin, Donald H.; Hodge, Thomas W.; and others

    2014-04-15

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes.

  18. Women's barriers to HIV-1 testing and disclosure: challenges for HIV-1 voluntary counselling and testing.

    PubMed

    Maman, S; Mbwambo, J; Hogan, N M; Kilonzo, G P; Sweat, M

    2001-10-01

    In view of the ever-increasing HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, the expansion of HIV-1 voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) as an integral part of prevention strategies and medical research is both a reality and an urgent need. As the availability of HIV-1 VCT grows two limitations need to be addressed, namely: low rates of HIV-1 serostatus disclosure to sexual partners and negative outcomes of serostatus disclosure. Results from a study among men, women and couples at an HIV-1 VCT clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania are presented. The individual, relational and environmental factors that influence the decision to test for HIV-1 and to share test results with partners are described. The most salient barriers to HIV-1 testing and serostatus disclosure described by women include fear of partners' reaction, decision-making and communication patterns between partners, and partners' attitudes towards HIV-1 testing. Perception of personal risk for HIV-1 is the major factor driving women to overcome barriers to HIV-1 testing. The implications of findings for the promotion of HIV-1 VCT programmes, the implementation of partner notification policies and the development of post-test support services are discussed.

  19. Development of prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Torben; Sattentau, Quentin J; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-07-17

    The focus of most current HIV-1 vaccine development is on antibody-based approaches. This is because certain antibody responses correlated with protection from HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 phase III trial, and because a series of potent and broad spectrum neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from infected individuals. Taken together, these two findings suggest ways forward to develop a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. However, understanding of the correlates of protection from disease in HIV-1 and other infections strongly suggests that we should not ignore CTL-based research. Here we review recent progress in the field and highlight the challenges implicit in HIV-1 vaccine design and some potential solutions.

  20. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    PubMed

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cross-subtype detection of HIV-1 using reverse transcription and recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A; Siverson, Joshua B; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10-30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7%) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV.

  2. Cross-subtype Detection of HIV-1 Using Reverse Transcription and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A.; Siverson, Joshua B.; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S.

    2016-01-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10 to 30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7 %) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV. PMID:26821087

  3. Elimination of HIV-1 Genomes from Human T-lymphoid Cells by CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Fischer, Tracy; Tedaldi, Ellen; Napoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Yonggang; Karn, Jonathan; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    We employed an RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 DNA editing system to precisely remove the entire HIV-1 genome spanning between 5′ and 3′ LTRs of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA copies from latently infected human CD4+ T-cells. Comprehensive assessment of whole-genome sequencing of HIV-1 eradicated cells ruled out any off-target effects by our CRISPR/Cas9 technology that might compromise the integrity of the host genome and further showed no effect on several cell health indices including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis. Persistent co-expression of Cas9 and the specific targeting guide RNAs in HIV-1-eradicated T-cells protected them against new infection by HIV-1. Lentivirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 significantly diminished HIV-1 replication in infected primary CD4+ T-cell cultures and drastically reduced viral load in ex vivo culture of CD4+ T-cells obtained from HIV-1 infected patients. Thus, gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 may provide a new therapeutic path for eliminating HIV-1 DNA from CD4+ T-cells and potentially serve as a novel and effective platform toward curing AIDS. PMID:26939770

  4. Elimination of HIV-1 Genomes from Human T-lymphoid Cells by CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Fischer, Tracy; Tedaldi, Ellen; Napoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Yonggang; Karn, Jonathan; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-03-04

    We employed an RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 DNA editing system to precisely remove the entire HIV-1 genome spanning between 5' and 3' LTRs of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA copies from latently infected human CD4+ T-cells. Comprehensive assessment of whole-genome sequencing of HIV-1 eradicated cells ruled out any off-target effects by our CRISPR/Cas9 technology that might compromise the integrity of the host genome and further showed no effect on several cell health indices including viability, cell cycle and apoptosis. Persistent co-expression of Cas9 and the specific targeting guide RNAs in HIV-1-eradicated T-cells protected them against new infection by HIV-1. Lentivirus-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 significantly diminished HIV-1 replication in infected primary CD4+ T-cell cultures and drastically reduced viral load in ex vivo culture of CD4+ T-cells obtained from HIV-1 infected patients. Thus, gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 may provide a new therapeutic path for eliminating HIV-1 DNA from CD4+ T-cells and potentially serve as a novel and effective platform toward curing AIDS.

  5. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2013-01-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV-1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point. PMID:22973853

  6. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2012-10-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV- 1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point.

  7. Suppression of APOBEC3-mediated restriction of HIV-1 by Vif

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuqing; Baig, Tayyba T.; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 restriction factors are a family of deoxycytidine deaminases that are able to suppress replication of viruses with a single-stranded DNA intermediate by inducing mutagenesis and functional inactivation of the virus. Of the seven human APOBEC3 enzymes, only APOBEC3-D, -F, -G, and -H appear relevant to restriction of HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and will be the focus of this review. The restriction of HIV-1 occurs most potently in the absence of HIV-1 Vif that induces polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 enzymes through the proteasome pathway. To restrict HIV-1, APOBEC3 enzymes must be encapsidated into budding virions. Upon infection of the target cell during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA into (-)DNA, APOBEC3 enzymes deaminate cytosines to form uracils in single-stranded (-)DNA regions. Upon replication of the (-)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite to the uracils thereby inducing C/G to T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. APOBEC3G is the most studied APOBEC3 enzyme and it is known that Vif attempts to thwart APOBEC3 function not only by inducing its proteasomal degradation but also by several degradation-independent mechanisms, such as inhibiting APOBEC3G virion encapsidation, mRNA translation, and for those APOBEC3G molecules that still become virion encapsidated, Vif can inhibit APOBEC3G mutagenic activity. Although most Vif variants can induce efficient degradation of APOBEC3-D, -F, and -G, there appears to be differential sensitivity to Vif-mediated degradation for APOBEC3H. This review examines APOBEC3-mediated HIV restriction mechanisms, how Vif acts as a substrate receptor for a Cullin5 ubiquitin ligase complex to induce degradation of APOBEC3s, and the determinants and functional consequences of the APOBEC3 and Vif interaction from a biological and biochemical perspective. PMID:25206352

  8. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  9. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex differences in HIV-1-mediated immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Susanne; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    The article reviews our current knowledge regarding the role of sex and sex hormones in regulating innate immune responses to viral infections, which may account for the described sex differences in immunity to HIV-1. Prominent sex differences exist in various infectious and autoimmune diseases. Biological mechanisms underlying these differences include the modulation of immunological pathways by sex hormones and gene dosage effects of immunomodulatory genes encoded by the X chromosome. During HIV-1 infections, women have been shown to present with lower viral load levels in primary infection, although their progression to AIDS is faster in comparison with men when accounting for viral load levels in chronic infection. HIV-1-infected women furthermore tend to have higher levels of immune activation and interferon-stimulated gene expression in comparison with men for the same viral load, which has been associated to innate sensing of HIV-1 by Toll-like receptor 7 and the consequent interferon-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Improvement in understanding the mechanisms associated with sex differences in HIV-1-mediated immunopathology will be critical to take sex differences into consideration when designing experimental and clinical studies in HIV-1-infected populations.

  11. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  12. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  13. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  14. Impact of aciclovir on genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA in HSV-2/HIV-1 co-infected women: a randomised placebo-controlled trial in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Delany, Sinéad; Mlaba, Nonkululeko; Clayton, Tim; Akpomiemie, Godspower; Capovilla, Alexio; Legoff, Jerome; Belec, Laurent; Stevens, Wendy; Rees, Helen; Mayaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) may enhance HIV-1 transmission and disease progression. Methods We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of aciclovir 400mg BD for 3 months in 300 HSV-2/HIV-1 co-infected women not yet on HAART. Participants were evaluated pre-randomisation and at monthly visits for 3 months. Primary outcomes were the detection and quantity of genital HIV-1 RNA at the month 3 (M3) visit. Analyses were also undertaken using data from all visits. The treatment effects on plasma HIV-1 RNA, CD4+ count and genital HSV-2 DNA were also assessed. Results At M3 fewer women has detectable genital HIV in the aciclovir group compared to placebo, but this was not significant (61/132 [46%] vs.71/137 [52%], risk ratio [RR] 0.89, 95%CI 0.70 to 1.14, p=0.36). There was also little difference in quantity of HIV-1 RNA among shedders (+0.13 log10 copies/mL, 95%CI −0.14 to 0.39) at M3. However, aciclovir significantly decreased the frequency of HIV-1 shedding over all visits (adjusted odds-ratio 0.57, 95%CI 0.36 to 0.89). Significant reductions in M3 plasma HIV-1 RNA (−0.34 log10 copies/mL 95%CI 0.15 to 0.54), genital HSV-2 DNA (8% vs. 20%, RR 0.37, 95%CI 0.19 to 0.73) and genital ulceration (8% vs. 18%, RR 0.43, 95%CI 0.22 to 0.84) were observed in the aciclovir group. Conclusion HSV-2 suppressive therapy, by reducing HIV-1 plasma viral load and altering the pattern of genital HIV-1 shedding, may contribute to the reduction in sexual transmission of HIV-1 and may delay the requirement for HAART initiation. PMID:19155993

  15. The use of HIV-1 integration site analysis information in clinical studies aiming at HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kiselinova, Maja; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms for the establishment and the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir remain to be completely defined. HIV-1 infection is characterised by the integration of the reverse transcribed proviral DNA into the host's genome. This integrated proviral DNA can remain replication silent, but a small part of it is fully competent to restart viral replication when treatment is interrupted. Hence, this replication-competent provirus is the cause of viral rebound and is called the viral reservoir. The exact site of proviral integration within the host's cellular chromosome may affect the transcriptional activity of HIV. Thanks to recent technological advances, HIV-1 integration site analysis has been used to assess HIV-1 reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals. Analysis of HIV-1 integration sites in infected individuals undergoing suppressive ART led to identification of expanded clonal cell populations, indicating that clonal proliferation of the proviral reservoir may contribute to the long-term persistence of viral reservoirs. Here we describe the findings of several clinical studies, where a comprehensive HIV-1 integration site analysis was performed.

  16. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  17. Diversion of HIV-1 Vaccine-induced Immunity by gp41-Microbiota Cross-reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M.; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, Julie; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    A HIV-1 DNA prime-recombinant Adenovirus Type 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells was to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were non-neutralizing, and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next generation sequencing of an IGHV repertoire prior to vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally-related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. PMID:26229114

  18. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  19. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  20. Design of cell-permeable stapled peptides as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ya-Qiu; Huang, Shao-Xu; Zawahir, Zahrah; Xu, Zhong-Liang; Li, Huiyuan; Sanchez, Tino W; Zhi, Ying; De Houwer, Stephanie; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-07-11

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host genome, involving several interactions with the viral and cellular proteins. We have previously identified peptide IN inhibitors derived from the α-helical regions along the dimeric interface of HIV-1 IN. Herein, we show that appropriate hydrocarbon stapling of these peptides to stabilize their helical structure remarkably improves the cell permeability, thus allowing inhibition of the HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Furthermore, the stabilized peptides inhibit the interaction of IN with the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75. Cellular uptake of the stapled peptide was confirmed in four different cell lines using a fluorescein-labeled analogue. Given their enhanced potency and cell permeability, these stapled peptides can serve as not only lead IN inhibitors but also prototypical biochemical probes or "nanoneedles" for the elucidation of HIV-1 IN dimerization and host cofactor interactions within their native cellular environment.

  1. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Francesco R.; Sobolewski, Michele D.; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M.; Watters, Sarah A.; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T.; Halvas, Elias K.; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J.; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W.; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E.; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A.; Rehm, Catherine A.; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F.; Kearney, Mary F.; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Mellors, John W.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4+T cells. Some of these CD4+T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4+ T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1–infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4+T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1. PMID:26858442

  2. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  3. Therapeutic targets for HIV-1 infection in the host proteome

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S; Maddukuri, Anil; Teslovich, Tanya M; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Agbottah, Emmanuel; Dadgar, Shabnam; Kehn, Kylene; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Pumfery, Anne; Stephan, Dietrich A; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2005-01-01

    Background Despite the success of HAART, patients often stop treatment due to the inception of side effects. Furthermore, viral resistance often develops, making one or more of the drugs ineffective. Identification of novel targets for therapy that may not develop resistance is sorely needed. Therefore, to identify cellular proteins that may be up-regulated in HIV infection and play a role in infection, we analyzed the effects of Tat on cellular gene expression during various phases of the cell cycle. Results SOM and k-means clustering analyses revealed a dramatic alteration in transcriptional activity at the G1/S checkpoint. Tat regulates the expression of a variety of gene ontologies, including DNA-binding proteins, receptors, and membrane proteins. Using siRNA to knock down expression of several gene targets, we show that an Oct1/2 binding protein, an HIV Rev binding protein, cyclin A, and PPGB, a cathepsin that binds NA, are important for viral replication following induction from latency and de novo infection of PBMCs. Conclusion Based on exhaustive and stringent data analysis, we have compiled a list of gene products that may serve as potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Several genes have been established as important for HIV-1 infection and replication, including Pou2AF1 (OBF-1), complement factor H related 3, CD4 receptor, ICAM-1, NA, and cyclin A1. There were also several genes whose role in relation to HIV-1 infection have not been established and may also be novel and efficacious therapeutic targets and thus necessitate further study. Importantly, targeting certain cellular protein kinases, receptors, membrane proteins, and/or cytokines/chemokines may result in adverse effects. If there is the presence of two or more proteins with similar functions, where only one protein is critical for HIV-1 transcription, and thus, targeted, we may decrease the chance of developing treatments with negative side effects. PMID:15780141

  4. Dried blood spots for the diagnosis and quantitation of HIV-1: stability studies and evaluation of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of infant HIV-1 infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Leelawiwat, W; Young, N L; Chaowanachan, T; Ou, C Y; Culnane, M; Vanprapa, N; Waranawat, N; Wasinrapee, P; Mock, P A; Tappero, J; McNicholl, J M

    2009-02-01

    Molecular methods for HIV-1 infection using dried blood-spot (DBS) for HIV-1 CRF01_AE subtypes have not been fully optimized. In this study assays for HIV-1 diagnosis or quantitation were evaluated using infant DBS from Thailand. Paired DBS and whole blood samples from 56 HIV-1 CRF01_AE or B'-infected infants were tested for infant diagnosis using modified Amplicor DNA PCR and NucliSens RNA NASBA and an in-house real-time PCR assay. The Amplicor Monitor viral load (VL) assay, with modifications for DBS, was also evaluated. DBS VL were hematocrit corrected. Stability studies were done on DBS stored at -70 degrees C to 37 degrees C for up to 1 year. The DBS diagnostic assays were 96-100% sensitive and 100% specific for HIV-1 diagnosis. DBS HIV-1 VL were highly correlated with plasma VL when corrected using the actual or an assumed hematocrit factor (r(c)=0.88 or 0.93, respectively). HIV-1 DNA in DBS appeared to be more stable than RNA and could be detected after up to 9 months at most temperatures. DBS VL could be consistently determined when stored frozen. These results show that DBS can be used accurately instead of whole blood for the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and VL quantitation, particularly if samples are appropriately stored.

  5. The Productive Entry Pathway of HIV-1 in Macrophages Is Dependent on Endocytosis through Lipid Rafts Containing CD4

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Moore, Michael D.; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages constitute an important reservoir of HIV-1 infection, yet HIV-1 entry into these cells is poorly understood due to the difficulty in genetically manipulating primary macrophages. We developed an effective genetic approach to manipulate the sub-cellular distribution of CD4 in macrophages, and investigated how this affects the HIV-1 entry pathway. Pluripotent Stem Cells (PSC) were transduced with lentiviral vectors designed to manipulate CD4 location and were then differentiated into genetically modified macrophages. HIV-1 infection of these cells was assessed by performing assays that measure critical steps of the HIV-1 lifecycle (fusion, reverse transcription, and expression from HIV-1 integrants). Expression of LCK (which tethers CD4 to the surface of T cells, but is not normally expressed in macrophages) in PSC-macrophages effectively tethered CD4 at the cell surface, reducing its normal endocytic recycling route, and increasing surface CD4 expression 3-fold. This led to a significant increase in HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcription, but productive HIV-1 infection efficiency (as determined by reporter expression from DNA integrants) was unaffected. This implies that surface-tethering of CD4 sequesters HIV-1 into a pathway that is unproductive in macrophages. Secondly, to investigate the importance of lipid rafts (as detergent resistant membranes - DRM) in HIV-1 infection, we generated genetically modified PSC-macrophages that express CD4 mutants known to be excluded from DRM. These macrophages were significantly less able to support HIV-1 fusion, reverse-transcription and integration than engineered controls. Overall, these results support a model in which productive infection by HIV-1 in macrophages occurs via a CD4-raft-dependent endocytic uptake pathway. PMID:24465876

  6. HIV-1 concentrations in human breast milk before and after weaning.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Louise; Kim, Hae-Young; Walter, Jan; Thea, Donald M; Sinkala, Moses; Mwiya, Mwiya; Kankasa, Chipepo; Decker, Don; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2013-04-17

    Concentrations of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in mucosal compartments influence the risk of sexual transmission and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. Breast milk production is physiologically regulated such that supply is a function of infant demand, but whether demand also influences HIV-1 dynamics in breast milk is unknown. We tested whether minor and major changes in feeding frequency influence breast milk viral concentrations in 958 HIV-1-infected women and their infants followed, for 24 months during a trial in Lusaka, Zambia. Women were randomized to wean abruptly at 4 months or to continue breast-feeding for a duration of their own choosing. Two weeks after breast-feeding cessation (4.5 months), HIV-1 concentrations in breast milk were substantially higher (median RNA, 2708 copies/ml; DNA, 14 copies/ml) than if breast-feeding continued (median RNA, <50 copies/ml; DNA, <1 copy/ml; P < 0.0001). Among those continuing breast-feeding, HIV-1 concentrations in milk were higher if breast-feeding was nonexclusive (median RNA, 293 copies/ml; DNA, 2 copies/ml; P = 0.0006). Elevated milk viral concentrations after stopping breast-feeding explained higher than expected rates of late postnatal HIV transmission in those who weaned early. Changes in the frequency of breast-feeding peri-weaning and with nonexclusive breast-feeding influenced milk viral concentrations. This may explain the reduced risk of HIV-1 transmission associated with exclusive breast-feeding and why early weaning does not achieve the magnitude of HIV prevention predicted by models. Our results support continuation of maternal antiretroviral drug interventions over the full duration of time when any breast milk exposures may occur after planned weaning.

  7. Molecular and pathologic insights from latent HIV-1 infection in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Smith, David; Adame, Anthony; Everall, Ian; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald; Cherner, Mariana; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether HIV latency in the CNS might have adverse molecular, pathologic, and clinical consequences. Methods: This was a case-control comparison of HIV-1 seropositive (HIV+) patients with clinical and neuropathologic examination. Based on the levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24 in the brain, cases were classified as controls, latent HIV CNS infection, and HIV encephalitis (HIVE). Analysis of epigenetic markers including BCL11B, neurodegeneration, and neuroinflammation was performed utilizing immunoblot, confocal microscopy, immunochemistry/image analysis, and qPCR. Detailed antemortem neurocognitive data were available for 23 out of the 32 cases. Results: HIV+ controls (n = 12) had no detectable HIV-1 DNA, RNA, or p24 in the CNS; latent HIV+ cases (n = 10) showed high levels of HIV-1 DNA but no HIV RNA or p24; and HIVE cases (n = 10) had high levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24. Compared to HIV+ controls, the HIV+ latent cases displayed moderate cognitive impairment with neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory alterations, although to a lesser extent than HIVE cases. Remarkably, HIV+ latent cases showed higher levels of BCL11B and other chromatin modifiers involved in silencing. Increased BCL11B was associated with deregulation of proinflammatory genes like interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor–α, and CD74. Conclusion: Persistence of latent HIV-1 infection in the CNS was associated with increased levels of chromatin modifiers, including BCL11B. Alteration of these epigenetic factors might result in abnormal transcriptomes, leading to inflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurocognitive impairment. BCL11B and other epigenetic factors involved in silencing might represent potential targets for HIV-1 involvement of the CNS. PMID:23486877

  8. HIV-1 concentrations in human breast milk before and after weaning

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Kim, Hae-Young; Walter, Jan; Thea, Donald M.; Sinkala, Moses; Mwiya, Mwiya; Kankasa, Chipepo; Decker, Don; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in mucosal compartments influence the risk of sexual transmission and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. Breast milk production is physiologically regulated such that supply is a function of infant demand but whether demand also influences HIV-1 dynamics in breast milk is unknown. We tested whether minor and major changes in feeding frequency influence breast milk viral concentrations in 958 HIV-1-infected women, who were followed with their infants for 24 months as part of a trial in Lusaka, Zambia. Women were randomized to wean abruptly at 4 months or to continue breastfeeding for a duration of their own choosing. Two weeks after breastfeeding cessation i.e. weaning (4.5 months) HIV-1 concentrations in breast milk were substantially higher (median RNA 2,708 copies/ml and DNA 14 copies/ml) than if breastfeeding continued (median RNA <50 copies/ml and DNA <1 copy/ml, p<0.0001). Among those continuing breastfeeding, HIV-1 concentrations in milk were higher if breastfeeding was non-exclusive (median RNA 293 copies/ml and DNA 2 copies/ml, p=0.0006). Elevated milk viral concentrations after stopping breastfeeding explained higher than expected rates of late postnatal HIV transmission in those who weaned early. Changes in the frequency of breastfeeding peri-weaning and with non-exclusive breastfeeding influenced milk viral concentrations. This may explain the reduced risk of HIV-1 transmission associated with exclusive breastfeeding and may explain why early weaning does not achieve the magnitude of HIV prevention predicted by models. Our results support continuation of maternal antiretroviral drug interventions over the full duration of time when any breast milk exposures are likely to occur after planned weaning. PMID:23596203

  9. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  10. Evaluation of performance across the dynamic range of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay as compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 using serial dilutions of 39 group M and O viruses.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Priscilla; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; de Mendoza, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent; Devare, Sushil G; Hackett, John

    2007-04-01

    Performance of the Abbott m2000 instrument system and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay was evaluated using a panel of 37 group M (subtypes A-D, F, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG and unique recombinant forms) and 2 group O virus isolates. Testing was performed on 273 sample dilutions and compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA) and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 (Monitor v1.5) test results. RealTime HIV-1, bDNA, and Monitor v1.5 tests quantified 87%, 78%, and 81% of samples, respectively. RealTime HIV-1 detected an additional 31 samples at < 40 copies/mL. For group M, RealTime HIV-1 dilution profiles and viral loads were highly correlated with bDNA and Monitor v1.5 values; 87% and 89% of values were within 0.5 log(10) copies/mL. In contrast, the group O viruses were not detected by Monitor v1.5 and were substantially underquantified by approximately 2 log(10) copies/mL in bDNA relative to the RealTime HIV-1 assay. Sequence analysis revealed that RealTime HIV-1 primer/probe binding sites are highly conserved and exhibit fewer nucleotide mismatches relative to Monitor v1.5. The automated m2000 system and RealTime HIV-1 assay offer the advantages of efficient sample processing and throughput with reduced "hands-on" time while providing improved sensitivity, expanded dynamic range and reliable quantification of genetically diverse HIV-1 strains.

  11. Functional screening of guide RNAs targeting the regulatory and structural HIV-1 viral genome for a cure of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Fan; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui; Zhang, Yonggang

    2016-05-15

    There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that lead to a permanent cure for HIV-1/AIDS. We previously reported that four guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) effectively eradicated the entire HIV-1 genome. In this study, we sought to identify the best gRNAs targeting HIV-1 LTR and viral structural region and optimize gRNA pairing that can efficiently eradicate the HIV-1 genome. Highly specific gRNAs were designed using bioinformatics tools, and their capacity of guiding CRISPR-associated system 9 to cleave HIV-1 proviral DNA was evaluated using high-throughput HIV-1 luciferase reporter assay and rapid Direct-PCR genotyping. The target seed sequences for each gRNA were cloned into lentiviral vectors. HEK293T cells were cotransfected with a pEcoHIV-NL4-3-firefly-luciferase reporter vector (1 : 20) over lentiviral vectors carrying CRISPR-associated system 9 and single gRNA or various combinations of gRNAs. The EcoHIV DNA cleaving efficiency was evaluated by Direct-PCR genotyping, and the EcoHIV transcription/replication activity was examined by a luciferase reporter assay. Most of the designed gRNAs are effective to eliminate the predicted HIV-1 genome sequence between the selected two target sites. This is evidenced by the presence of PCR genotypic deletion/insertion and the decrease of luciferase reporter activity. In particular, a combination of viral structural gRNAs with LTR gRNAs provided a higher efficiency of genome eradication and an easier approach for PCR genotyping. Our screening strategy can specifically and effectively identify gRNAs targeting HIV-1 LTR and structural region to excise proviral HIV-1 from the host genome.

  12. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Breast Milk are Associated with HIV-1 Shedding but Not With Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Shetty, Avinash K.; Seidel, Kristy D.; Qin, Xuan; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S.; Katzenstein, David A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast milk HIV-1 load is associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis, and both milk viral load and mastitis are associated with increased mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1 (MTCT) through breastfeeding. Bacterial infections may cause clinical mastitis, but whether other co-pathogens common in HIV-1 infection are associated with subclinical mastitis or HIV-1 shedding is unknown. Design A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected breastfeeding women in Zimbabwe was performed to examine the relationship between a wide range of breast co-infections, mastitis, and HIV-1 shedding. Methods Breast milk was cultured for bacteria and fungi, and tested by PCR for mycobacteria, mycoplasmas, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, HHV-8, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Symptoms of clinical mastitis were documented, and subclinical mastitis was identified by breast milk sodium concentration (Na+) and leukocyte counts. Results Co-infections of milk were not associated with clinical or subclinical mastitis in the 217 women studied. Detection of HIV-1 RNA, but not DNA, in breast milk was associated with CMV concentration (OR 1.8, p=0.002) and detection of EBV (OR 3.8, p=0.0003), but not other co-infections in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Co-infection of breast milk with bacteria, fungi or herpes viruses was not associated with mastitis. The associations between shedding of CMV and EBV with HIV-1 in milk suggest a local interaction between herpes virus infection and HIV-1 independent of mastitis. CMV and EBV infections may impact HIV-1 shedding in breast milk and the risk of MTCT. PMID:18614868

  13. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in breast milk are associated with HIV-1 shedding but not with mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Shetty, Avinash K; Seidel, Kristy D; Qin, Xuan; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2008-07-31

    Breast milk HIV-1 load is associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis, and both milk viral load and mastitis are associated with increased mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1 through breastfeeding. Bacterial infections may cause clinical mastitis, but whether other copathogens common in HIV-1 infection are associated with subclinical mastitis or HIV-1 shedding is unknown. A cross-sectional study of HIV-1-infected breastfeeding women in Zimbabwe was performed to examine the relationship between a wide range of breast coinfections, mastitis, and HIV-1 shedding. Breast milk was cultured for bacteria and fungi and tested by PCR for mycobacteria, mycoplasmas, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, HHV-8, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Symptoms of clinical mastitis were documented and subclinical mastitis was identified by breast milk sodium concentration (Na) and leukocyte counts. Coinfections of milk were not associated with clinical or subclinical mastitis in the 217 women studied. Detection of HIV-1 RNA, but not DNA, in breast milk was associated with cytomegalovirus concentration (odds ratio = 1.8, P = 0.002) and detection of Epstein-Barr virus (odds ratio = 3.8, P = 0.0003) but not other coinfections in multivariate analysis. Coinfection of breast milk with bacteria, fungi, or herpes viruses was not associated with mastitis. The associations between shedding of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with HIV-1 in milk suggest a local interaction between herpes virus infection and HIV-1 independent of mastitis. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections may impact HIV-1 shedding in breast milk and the risk of MTCT.

  14. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  15. Evidence that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, an early sensor of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), is involved in HIV-1 post-integration repair by recruiting the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase in a process similar to, but distinct from, cellular DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, Johanna A; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Kou-Juey; Williams, Kevin Jon; Daniel, René

    2008-01-22

    Retroviral transduction involves integrase-dependent linkage of viral and host DNA that leaves an intermediate that requires post-integration repair (PIR). We and others proposed that PIR hijacks the host cell double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair pathways. Nevertheless, the geometry of retroviral DNA integration differs considerably from that of DSB repair and so the precise role of host-cell mechanisms in PIR remains unclear. In the current study, we found that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 protein (NBS1), an early sensor of DSBs, associates with HIV-1 DNA, recruits the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, promotes stable retroviral transduction, mediates efficient integration of viral DNA and blocks integrase-dependent apoptosis that can arise from unrepaired viral-host DNA linkages. Moreover, we demonstrate that the ATM kinase, recruited by NBS1, is itself required for efficient retroviral transduction. Surprisingly, recruitment of the ATR kinase, which in the context of DSB requires both NBS1 and ATM, proceeds independently of these two proteins. A model is proposed emphasizing similarities and differences between PIR and DSB repair. Differences between the pathways may eventually allow strategies to block PIR while still allowing DSB repair.

  16. Establishment and Reversal of HIV-1 Latency in Naive and Central Memory CD4+ T Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zerbato, Jennifer M.; Serrao, Erik; Lenzi, Gina; Kim, Baek; Ambrose, Zandrea; Watkins, Simon C.; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The latent HIV-1 reservoir primarily resides in resting CD4+ T cells which are a heterogeneous population composed of both naive (TN) and memory cells. In HIV-1-infected individuals, viral DNA has been detected in both naive and memory CD4+ T cell subsets although the frequency of HIV-1 DNA is typically higher in memory cells, particularly in the central memory (TCM) cell subset. TN and TCM cells are distinct cell populations distinguished by many phenotypic and physiological differences. In this study, we used a primary cell model of HIV-1 latency that utilizes direct infection of highly purified TN and TCM cells to address differences in the establishment and reversal of HIV-1 latency. Consistent with what is seen in vivo, we found that HIV-1 infected TN cells less efficiently than TCM cells. However, when the infected TN cells were treated with latency-reversing agents, including anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies, phorbol myristate acetate/phytohemagglutinin, and prostratin, as much (if not more) extracellular virion-associated HIV-1 RNA was produced per infected TN cell as per infected TCM cell. There were no major differences in the genomic distribution of HIV-1 integration sites between TN and TCM cells that accounted for these observed differences. We observed decay of the latent HIV-1 cells in both T cell subsets after exposure to each of the latency-reversing agents. Collectively, these data highlight significant differences in the establishment and reversal of HIV-1 latency in TN and TCM CD4+ T cells and suggest that each subset should be independently studied in preclinical and clinical studies. IMPORTANCE The latent HIV-1 reservoir is frequently described as residing within resting memory CD4+ T cells. This is largely due to the consistent finding that memory CD4+ T cells, specifically the central (TCM) and transitional memory compartments, harbor the highest levels of HIV-1 DNA in individuals on suppressive therapy. This has yielded little research

  17. Designed transcription activator-like effector proteins efficiently induced the expression of latent HIV-1 in latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Pengfei; Fu, Zheng; Ji, Haiyan; Qu, Xiying; Zeng, Hanxian; Zhu, Xiaoli; Deng, Junxiao; Lu, Panpan; Zha, Shijun; Song, Zhishuo; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    HIV latency is the foremost barrier to clearing HIV infection from patients. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 represents a promising strategy to deplete these viral reservoirs. Here, we report a novel approach to reactivate latent HIV-1 provirus using artificially designed transcription activator-like effector (TALE) fusion proteins containing a DNA-binding domain specifically targeting the HIV-1 promoter and the herpes simplex virus-based transcriptional activator VP64 domain. We engineered four TALE genes (TALE1-4) encoding TALE proteins, each specifically targeting different 20-bp DNA sequences within the HIV-1 promoter, and we constructed four TALE-VP64 expression vectors corresponding to TALE1-4. We found that TALE1-VP64 effectively reactivated HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected C11 and A10.6 cells. We further confirmed that TALE1-VP64 reactivated latent HIV-1 via specific binding to the HIV-LTR promoter. Moreover, we also found that TALE1-VP64 did not affect cell proliferation or cell cycle distribution. Taken together, our data demonstrated that TALE1-VP64 can specifically and effectively reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription, suggesting that this strategy may provide a novel approach for anti-HIV-1 latency therapy in the future.

  18. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  19. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  20. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  1. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  2. Macrophage polarization and HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Cassetta, Luca; Alfano, Massimo; Poli, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Polarization of MP into classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2a, M2b, and M2c) macrophages is critical in mediating an effective immune response against invading pathogens. However, several pathogens use these activation pathways to facilitate dissemination and pathogenesis. Viruses generally induce an M1-like phenotype during the acute phase of infection. In addition to promoting the development of Th1 responses and IFN production, M1 macrophages often produce cytokines that drive viral replication and tissue damage. As shown for HIV-1, polarization can also alter macrophage susceptibility to infection. In vitro polarization into M1 cells prevents HIV-1 infection, and M2a polarization inhibits viral replication at a post-integration level. M2a cells also express high levels of C-type lectins that can facilitate macrophage-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in mucosal membranes and unlike DCs, do not usually migrate to distal tissues. As a result, macrophages are likely to contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis in mucosal rather than lymphatic tissues. In vivo polarization of MP is likely to span a spectrum of activation phenotypes that may change the permissivity to and alter the outcome of HIV-1 and other viral infections.

  3. Modulation of HIV-1 immunity by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the role of adjuvants in eliciting desirable antibody responses against HIV-1 with particular emphasis on both historical context and recent developments. Recent findings Increased understanding of the role of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors in recruiting and directing the immune system has increased the variety of adjuvant formulations being tested in animal models and humans. Across all vaccine platforms, adjuvant formulations have been shown to enhance desirable immune responses such as higher antibody titers and increased functional activity. Although no vaccine formulation has yet succeeded in eliciting broad neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, the ability of adjuvants to direct the immune response to immunogens suggests they will be critically important in any successful HIV-1 vaccine. Summary The parallel development of adjuvants along with better HIV-1 immunogens will be needed for a successful AIDS vaccine. Additional comparative testing will be required to determine the optimal adjuvant and immunogen regimen that can elicit antibody responses capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24670321

  4. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Mohammad; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Sawaya, Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well as attenuated forms of HAD and CNS opportunistic disorders. HIV-associated cognitive impairment correlates with the increased presence in the CNS of activated, though not necessarily HIV-1-infected, microglia and CNS macrophages. This suggests that indirect mechanisms of neuronal injury and loss/death occur in HIV/AIDS as a basis for dementia since neurons are not themselves productively infected by HIV-1. In this review, we discussed the symptoms and causes leading to HAD. Outcome from this review will provide new information regarding mechanisms of neuronal loss in AIDS patients. PMID:16712719

  5. Acyclovir and Transmission of HIV-1 from Persons Infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2

    PubMed Central

    Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Wang, Richard S.; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Mullins, James I.; Hughes, James P.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James A.; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Stevens, Wendy; Campbell, Mary S.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William L.H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, ≥250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. RESULTS A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P = 0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log10 copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2–positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir

  6. Acyclovir and transmission of HIV-1 from persons infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2.