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Sample records for 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid oxygenase

  1. Selectivity of substrate binding and ionization of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Luanloet, Thikumporn; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2015-08-01

    2-Methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid (MHPC) oxygenase (EC 1.14.12.4) from Pseudomonas sp. MA-1 is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes a hydroxylation and aromatic ring cleavage reaction. The functional roles of two residues, Tyr223 and Tyr82, located ~ 5 Å away from MHPC, were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis, along with ligand binding, product analysis and transient kinetic experiments. Mutation of Tyr223 resulted in enzyme variants that were impaired in their hydroxylation activity and had Kd values for substrate binding 5-10-fold greater than the wild-type enzyme. Because this residue is adjacent to the water molecule that is located next to the 3-hydroxy group of MHPC, the results indicate that the interaction between Tyr223, H2 O and the 3-hydroxyl group of MHPC are important for substrate binding and hydroxylation. By contrast, the Kd for substrate binding of Tyr82His and Tyr82Phe variants were similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. However, only ~ 40-50% of the substrate was hydroxylated in the reactions of both variants, whereas most of the substrate was hydroxylated in the wild-type enzyme reaction. In free solution, MHPC or 5-hydroxynicotinic acid exists in a mixture of monoanionic and tripolar ionic forms, whereas only the tripolar ionic form binds to the wild-type enzyme. The binding of tripolar ionic MHPC would allow efficient hydroxylation through an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. For the Tyr82His and Tyr82Phe variants, both forms of substrates can bind to the enzymes, indicating that the mutation at Tyr82 abolished the selectivity of the enzyme towards the tripolar ionic form. Transient kinetic studies indicated that the hydroxylation rate constants of both Tyr82 variants are approximately two- to 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Altogether, our findings suggest that Tyr82 is important for the binding selectivity of MHPC oxygenase towards the tripolar ionic species, whereas the

  2. Structure of the PLP Degradative Enzyme 2-Methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic Acid Oxygenase from Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and Its Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.; Cornell

    2009-06-12

    A vitamin B{sub 6} degradative pathway has recently been identified and characterized in Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099. One of the enzymes on this pathway, 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid oxygenase (MHPCO), is a flavin-dependent enzyme and catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid to form E-2-(acetamino-methylene)succinate. The gene for this enzyme has been cloned, and the corresponding protein has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The crystal structure of MHPCO has been solved to 2.1 {angstrom} using SAD phasing with and without the substrate MHPC bound. These crystal structures provide insight into the reaction mechanism and suggest roles for active site residues in the catalysis of a novel oxidative ring-opening reaction.

  3. Benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, a soluble oxygenase from tobacco, catalyzes salicylic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, J.; Shulaev, V.; Yalpani, N.

    1995-10-24

    Benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase (BA2H) catalyzes the biosynthesis of salicylic acid from benzoic acid. The enzyme has been partially purified and characterized as a soluble protein of 160 kDa. High-efficiency in vivo labeling of salicyclic acid with {sup 18}O{sub 2} suggested that BA2H is an oxygenase that specifically hydroxylates the ortho position of benzoic acid. The enzyme was strongly induced by either tobacco mosaic virus inoculation of benzoic acid infiltration of tobacco leaves and it was inhibited by CO and other inhibitors of cytochrome P450 hydroxylases. The BA2H activity was immunodepleted by antibodies raised against SU2, a soluble cytochrome P450 from Streptomyces griseolus. The anti-SU2 antibodies immunoprecipitated a radiolabeled polypeptide of around 160 kDa from the soluble protein extracts of L-[{sup 35}S]-methionine-fed tobacco leaves. Purified BA2H showed CO-difference spectra with a maximum at 457 nm. These data suggest that BA2H belongs to a novel class of soluble, high molecular weight cytochrome P450 enzymes. 21 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  5. Substrate diversity and expression of the 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid oxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Danganan, C E; Shankar, S; Ye, R W; Chakrabarty, A M

    1995-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses the chlorinated aromatic compound 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. The genes encoding the proteins involved in the first step (tftA and tftB [previously designated tftA1 and tftA2, respectively]) have been cloned and sequenced. The oxygenase, TftAB, is capable of converting not only 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid to 2,4,5-trichlorophenol but also a wide range of chlorinated aromatic phenoxyacetates to their corresponding phenolic derivatives, as shown by whole-cell and cell-free assays. The rate of substrate utilization by TftAB depends upon the extent of chlorination of the substrate, the positions of the chlorines, and the phenoxy group. These results indicate a mechanistic similarity between TftAB and the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, TfdA, from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134. The promoter of the oxygenase genes was localized by promoter-probe analysis, and the transcriptional start site was identified by primer extension. The beta-galactosidase activity of the construct containing the promoter region cloned upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene in the promoter-probe vector pKRZ-1 showed that this construct is constitutively expressed in Escherichia coli and in AC1100. The -35 and -10 regions of the oxygenase genes show significant sequence identity to typical Escherichia coli sigma 70 promoters. PMID:8534119

  6. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Galka, Marek M.; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Buhrow, Leann M.; Nelson, Ken M.; Switala, Jacek; Cutler, Adrian J.; Palmer, David R. J.; Loewen, Peter C.; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Loewen, Michele C.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+)-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+)-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) substrate. Functionally, (+)-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM), but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 μM). Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+)-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+)-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+)-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation. PMID:26197050

  7. 5-Aminolevulinic acid combined with ferrous iron enhances the expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yoshiaki; Fujino, Masayuki; Zhao, Mingyi; Ishii, Takuya; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Ito, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Abe, Fuminori; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Taketani, Shigeru; Nagahara, Yukitoshi; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-04-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is the naturally occurring metabolic precursor of heme. Heme negatively regulates the Maf recognition element (MARE) binding- and repressing-activity of the Bach1 transcription factor through its direct binding to Bach1. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the oxidative degradation of heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide. These metabolites of heme protect against apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. Monocytes and macrophages play a critical role in the initiation, maintenance and resolution of inflammation. Therefore, the regulation of inflammation in macrophages is an important target under various pathophysiological conditions. In order to address the question of what is responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of 5-ALA, the induction of HO-1 expression by 5-ALA and sodium ferrous citrate (SFC) was examined in macrophage cell line (RAW264 cells). HO-1 expression induced by 5-ALA combined with SFC (5-ALA/SFC) was partially inhibited by MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitor. The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was activated and translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to 5-ALA/SFC. Nrf2-specific siRNA reduced the HO-1 expression. In addition, 5-ALA/SFC increased the intracellular levels of heme in cells. The increased heme indicated that the inactivation of Bach1 by heme supports the upregulation of HO-1 expression. Taken together, our data suggest that the exposure of 5-ALA/SFC to RAW264 cells enhances the HO-1 expression via MAPK activation along with the negative regulation of Bach1.

  8. Oxygenase-Catalyzed Desymmetrization of N,N-Dialkyl-piperidine-4-carboxylic Acids**

    PubMed Central

    Rydzik, Anna M; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Kochan, Grazyna T; McDonough, Michael A; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    γ-Butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBOX) is a 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenase that catalyzes the final hydroxylation step in the biosynthesis of carnitine. BBOX was shown to catalyze the oxidative desymmetrization of achiral N,N-dialkyl piperidine-4-carboxylates to give products with two or three stereogenic centers. PMID:25164544

  9. Structure-Activity Relationships in the Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Fluorinated Derivatives: Effects on Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction and Antioxidant Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-09

    fluorinated derivatives: Effects on heme oxygenase-1 induction and antioxidant activities Xinyu Wang a,b, Salomon Stavchansky a, Sean M. Kerwin c, Phillip D...February 2010 Available online 9 March 2010 Keywords: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester Fluorinated derivative Cytoprotection Oxidative stress Human...acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as a cytoprotective agent, six catechol ring fluorinated CAPE derivatives were evaluated for their cytoprotective

  10. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2) paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter) induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway. PMID:21199573

  11. Production of natural fragrance aromatic acids by coexpression of trans-anethole oxygenase and p-anisaldehyde dehydrogenase genes of Pseudomonas putida JYR-1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongfei; Kurusarttra, Somwang; Ryu, Ji-Young; Kanaly, Robert A; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2012-12-05

    A gene encoding p-anisaldehyde dehydrogenase (PAADH), which catalyzes the oxidation of p-anisaldehyde to p-anisic acid, was identified to be clustered with the trans-anethole oxygenase (tao) gene in Pseudomonas putida JYR-1. Heterologously expressed PAADH in Escherichia coli catalyzed the oxidation of vanillin, veratraldehyde, and piperonal to the corresponding aromatic acids vanillic acid, veratric acid, and piperonylic acid, respectively. Coexpression of trans-anethole oxygenase (TAO) and PAADH in E. coli also resulted in the successful transformation of trans-anethole, isoeugenol, O-methyl isoeugenol, and isosafrole to p-anisic acid, vanillic acid, veratric acid, and piperonylic acid, respectively, which are compounds found in plants as secondary metabolites. Because of the relaxed substrate specificity and high transformation rates by coexpressed TAO and PAADH in E. coli , the engineered strain has potential to be applied in the fragrance industry.

  12. Arabidopsis JASMONATE-INDUCED OXYGENASES down-regulate plant immunity by hydroxylation and inactivation of the hormone jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Caarls, Lotte; Elberse, Joyce; Awwanah, Mo; Ludwig, Nora R; de Vries, Michel; Zeilmaker, Tieme; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Schuurink, Robert C; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2017-06-13

    The phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is vital in plant defense and development. Although biosynthesis of JA and activation of JA-responsive gene expression by the bioactive form JA-isoleucine have been well-studied, knowledge on JA metabolism is incomplete. In particular, the enzyme that hydroxylates JA to 12-OH-JA, an inactive form of JA that accumulates after wounding and pathogen attack, is unknown. Here, we report the identification of four paralogous 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent oxygenases in Arabidopsis thaliana as JA hydroxylases and show that they down-regulate JA-dependent responses. Because they are induced by JA we named them JASMONATE-INDUCED OXYGENASES (JOXs). Concurrent mutation of the four genes in a quadruple Arabidopsis mutant resulted in increased defense gene expression and increased resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and the caterpillar Mamestra brassicae In addition, root and shoot growth of the plants was inhibited. Metabolite analysis of leaves showed that loss of function of the four JOX enzymes resulted in overaccumulation of JA and in reduced turnover of JA into 12-OH-JA. Transformation of the quadruple mutant with each JOX gene strongly reduced JA levels, demonstrating that all four JOXs inactivate JA in plants. The in vitro catalysis of 12-OH-JA from JA by recombinant enzyme could be confirmed for three JOXs. The identification of the enzymes responsible for hydroxylation of JA reveals a missing step in JA metabolism, which is important for the inactivation of the hormone and subsequent down-regulation of JA-dependent defenses.

  13. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  14. α-Tocopherol protects renal cells from nicotine- or oleic acid-provoked oxidative stress via inducing heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Reed, Dustin K; Hall, Samuel; Arany, Istvan

    2015-03-01

    Smoking and obesity increases renal oxidative stress via nicotine (NIC) or free fatty acid such as oleic acid (OA) but decreases levels of the vitamin E-derivative α-tocopherol (TOC), which has shown to stimulate the antioxidant system such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Hence, we hypothesized that supplementation of TOC may protect renal proximal tubules from NIC- or OA-mediated oxidative stress by upregulating the HO-1 gene. NIC- or OA-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined in the presence or absence of various pharmacologic or genetic inhibitors that modulate HO-1 activation and enhancer elements in the HO-1 promoter such as the antioxidant response element (ARE) and the cAMP-response element (CRE) in renal proximal tubule cells (NRK52E). Activity of the HO-1 promoter, the ARE and the CRE was determined in luciferase assays. We found that pre- or posttreatment with TOC attenuated NIC- or OA-dependent ROS production that required HO-1 activation. TOC activated the HO-1 promoter via the CRE but not the ARE enhancer through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase A (PKA). Consequently, inhibitors of ERK, PKA, or CRE activation mitigated beneficial effects of TOC on NIC- or OA-mediated ROS production. Hence, vitamin E supplementation-via induction of the cytoprotective HO-1-may help to reduce renal oxidative stress imposed by smoking or obesity.

  15. Oxidation of tolualdehydes to toluic acids catalyzed by cytochrome P450-dependent aldehyde oxygenase in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Matsunaga, T; Yamamoto, I; Yashimura, H

    1995-02-01

    Mouse hepatic microsomal enzymes catalyzed the oxidation of o-, m-, and p-tolualdehydes, intermediate metabolites of xylene, to the corresponding toluic acids. Cofactor requirement for the catalytic activity indicates that the microsomes contain NAD- and NADPH-dependent enzymes for this reaction. GC/MS analyses of the carboxylic acids formed by incubation under oxygen-18 gas indicate that the mechanism for this oxidation is an oxygenation and a dehydrogenation for the NADPH- and NAD-dependent reaction. Vmax/Km (nmol/min/mg protein) ratios indicate that the NADPH-dependent activity is more pronounced than the NAD-dependent activity. These results suggest that the NADPH-dependent reaction is mainly responsible for the microsomal oxidation of tolualdehydes. The NADPH-dependent activity was significantly inhibited by SKF 525-A, disulfiram and menadione, inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (P450), suggesting the involvement of P450 in the reaction. In a reconstituted system, P450 MUT-2 (CYP2C29) purified from mouse hepatic microsomes catalyzed the oxidation of o-, m-, and p-tolualdehydes to the carboxylic acids, and the specific activities (nmol/min/nmol P450) were 1.44, 2.81, and 2.32, respectively. Rabbit antibody raised against P450 MUT-2 significantly inhibited the NADPH-dependent oxidation of tolualdehydes to toluic acids by 88% (o-), 63% (m-), and 62% (p-) using mouse hepatic microsomes. The present study demonstrated that a mouse hepatic microsomal aldehyde oxygenase, P450 MUT-2, catalyzed the most of oxidative activity of tolualdehydes to toluic acids in the microsomes.

  16. Ammonia-induced oxidative damage in neurons is prevented by resveratrol and lipoic acid with participation of heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Flores, Marianne Pires; Leite, Marina Concli; Quincozes-Santos, André; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia is a metabolite that, at high concentrations, is implicated in neurological disorders, such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which is associated with acute or chronic liver failure. Astrocytes are considered the primary target of ammonia toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) because glutamine synthetase (GS), responsible for ammonia metabolism in CNS, is an astrocytic enzyme. Thus, neuronal dysfunction has been associated as secondary to astrocytic impairment. However, we demonstrated that ammonia can induce direct effects on neuronal cells. The cell viability was decreased by ammonia in SH-SY5Y cells and cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, ammonia induced increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased GSH intracellular content, the main antioxidant in CNS. As ammonia neurotoxicity is strongly associated with oxidative stress, we also investigated the potential neuroprotective roles of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RSV) and lipoic acid (LA), against ammonia toxicity in cerebellar granule neurons. RSV and LA were able to prevent the oxidative damage induced by ammonia, maintaining the levels of ROS production and GSH close to basal values. Both antioxidants also decreased ROS production and increased GSH content under basal conditions (in the absence of ammonia). Moreover, we showed that heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), a protein associated with protection against stress conditions, is involved in the beneficial effects of RSV and LA in cerebellar granule neurons. Thus, this study reinforces the neuroprotective effects of RSV and LA. Although more studies in vivo are required, RSV and LA could represent interesting therapeutic strategies for the management of HE.

  17. Effects of aspirin & simvastatin and aspirin, simvastatin, & lipoic acid on heme oxygenase-1 in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Saw, Jessica J; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico F; Carlson, David A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) degrades heme and protects against oxidative stress. In vitro and animal models suggest that HO-1 is beneficial in several diseases (e.g., postoperative ileus, gastroparesis, acute pancreatitis, and colitis). However, the only drugs (i.e., hemin and heme arginate) which pharmacologically upregulate HO-1 in humans are expensive and can only be administered intravenously. Our aims were to compare the effects of placebo, aspirin, and simvastatin alone, and with α-lipoic acid, on HO-1 protein concentration and activity in humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of three oral regimens administered for 7 days, i.e., placebo; aspirin (325 mg twice daily) and simvastatin (40 mg twice daily); aspirin, simvastatin, and the sodium salt of R- α-lipoic acid (NaRLA, 600 mg three times daily) on markers of HO-1 activation (i.e., plasma HO-1 protein concentration and venous monocyte HO-1 protein activity) in 18 healthy subjects (14 females). Markers of HO-1 activation were evaluated at baseline, days 2, and 7. Baseline HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were similar among the three groups. Compared to placebo, aspirin and simvastatin combined, or together with NaRLA did not affect HO-1 protein concentration or activity at 2 or 7 days. HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were correlated on day 7 (r = 0.75, p = 0.0004) but not at baseline and on day 2. At therapeutic doses, aspirin, simvastatin, and α-lipoic acid do not increase plasma HO-1 protein concentration or venous monocyte HO-1 activity in healthy humans. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. EFFECTS OF ASPIRIN& SIMVASTATIN AND ASPIRIN, SIMVASTATIN & LIPOIC ACID ON HEME OXYGENASE-1 IN HEALTHY HUMAN SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Saw, Jessica; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Carlson, David; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) degrades heme and protects against oxidative stress. In vitro and animal models suggest that HO-1 is beneficial in several diseases (e.g., post-operative ileus, gastroparesis, acute pancreatitis, and colitis). However the only drugs (i.e., hemin and heme arginate) which pharmacologically up-regulate HO-1 in humans are expensive and can only be administered intravenously. Our aims were to compare the effects of placebo, aspirin and simvastatin alone, and with α-lipoic acid, on HO-1 protein concentration and activity in humans. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of 3 oral regimens administered for 7 days, ie, placebo; aspirin (325 mg twice daily) and simvastatin (40 mg twice daily); aspirin, simvastatin, and the sodium salt of R-α-lipoic acid (NaRLA, 600 mg three times daily) on markers of HO-1 activation (i.e., plasma HO-1 protein concentration and venous monocyte HO-1 protein activity) in 18 healthy subjects (14 females). Markers of HO-1 activation were evaluated at baseline, days 2 and 7. Key Results Baseline HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were similar amongst the three groups. Compared to placebo, aspirin and simvastatin combined, or together with NaRLA did not affect HO-1 protein concentration or activity at 2 or 7 days. HO-1 protein concentrations and activity were correlated on day 7 (r = 0.75, p = 0.0004) but not at baseline and on day 2. Conclusions At therapeutic doses, aspirin, simvastatin, and α-lipoic acid do not increase plasma HO-1 protein concentration or venous monocyte HO-1 activity in healthy humans. PMID:25093998

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect the Brain against Ischemic Injury by Activating Nrf2 and Upregulating Heme Oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Suping; Mao, Leilei; Leak, Rehana K.; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Wenting; Hu, Xiaoming; Sun, Baoliang; Cao, Guodong; Gao, Yanqin; Xu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a debilitating clinical disorder that affects millions of people, yet lacks effective neuroprotective treatments. Fish oil is known to exert beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying protective mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study tests the hypothesis that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) attenuate ischemic neuronal injury by activating nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulating heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in both in vitro and in vivo models. We observed that pretreatment of rat primary neurons with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) significantly reduced neuronal death following oxygen-glucose deprivation. This protection was associated with increased Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation. Inhibition of HO-1 activity with tin protoporphyrin IX attenuated the protective effects of DHA. Further studies showed that 4-hydroxy-2E-hexenal (4-HHE), an end-product of peroxidation of n-3 PUFAs, was a more potent Nrf2 inducer than 4-hydroxy-2E-nonenal derived from n-6 PUFAs. In an in vivo setting, transgenic mice overexpressing fatty acid metabolism-1, an enzyme that converts n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs, were remarkably resistant to focal cerebral ischemia compared with their wild-type littermates. Regular mice fed with a fish oil-enhanced diet also demonstrated significant resistance to ischemia compared with mice fed with a regular diet. As expected, the protection was associated with HO-1 upregulation, Nrf2 activation, and 4-HHE generation. Together, our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFAs are highly effective in protecting the brain, and that the protective mechanisms involve Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation by 4-HHE. Further investigation of n-3 PUFA neuroprotective mechanisms may accelerate the development of stroke therapies. PMID:24478369

  20. Applications of Stereospecifically-labeled Fatty Acids in Oxygenase and Desaturase Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Alan R.; Schneider, Claus; Hamberg, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Oxygenation and desaturation reactions are inherently associated with the abstraction of a hydrogen from the fatty acid substrate. Since the first published application in 1965, stereospecific placement of a labeled hydrogen isotope (deuterium or tritium) at the reacting carbons has proven a highly effective strategy for investigating the chemical mechanisms catalyzed by lipoxygenases, hemoprotein fatty acid dioxygenases including cyclooxygenases, cytochromes P450, and also the desaturases and isomerases. This review presents a synopsis of all published studies through 2010 on the synthesis and use of stereospecifically labeled fatty acids (70 references), and highlights some of the mechanistic insights gained by application of stereospecifically labeled fatty acids. PMID:21971646

  1. Crucial role of heme oxygenase-1 in the sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cell line Kasumi-1 to ursolic acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Fang, Qin; Li, Yan; Wang, Jishi; Sun, Jia; Zhang, Yaming; Hu, Xiuying; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shengshu

    2014-04-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), which has been used extensively as an antileukemic agent in traditional Chinese medicine, is safely edible if originating from food. We found that the apoptotic rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype M2 (AML-M2) cell line Kasumi-1 treated by UA was higher than those of other leukemia cell lines, but was not as high as that treated by arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C), suggesting that UA is an important chemotherapeutic agent to treat AML-M2. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme exerting potent cytoprotection, cell proliferation, and drug resistance. HO-1 in Kasumi-1 cells was upregulated by being treated with low-dose rather than high-dose UA. Inhibition of HO-1 by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) IX sensitized Kasumi-1 cells to UA, and the apoptotic rate was close to that induced by Ara-C (P<0.01). The sensitizing effect of ZnPP was associated with caspase activation, bcl-2 downregulation, and PARP activation. After silencing HO-1 by siRNA transfection with lentivirus, the cells' proliferation induced by UA was increased as it was by Ara-C. Furthermore, combining ZnPP with UA prolonged the survival of mice bearing the AML subtype M2 tumor with smaller volume of tumor and size of spleen. The results showed that the Kasumi-1 cell line was the most sensitive to UA, but the apoptotic effect was inferior to that treated by Ara-C because of HO-1 upregulation. AML-M2 can feasibly be treated by target-inhibiting HO-1 that enhances the antileukemia effects of UA in vitro and in vivo.

  2. EcdGHK are Three Tailoring Iron Oxygenases for Amino Acid Building Blocks of the Echinocandin Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Chiou, Grace; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi; Walsh, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    The echinocandins are a small group of fungal N-acylated cyclic hexapeptides that are fungicidal for candida strains and fungistatic for aspergilli by targeting cell wall 1,3-β-glucan synthases. The side chains of all six amino acid building blocks have hydroxyl groups, including the nonproteinogenic 4R,5R-dihydroxy-Orn1, 4R-OH-Pro3, 3S, 4S-dihydroxy-homoTyr4 and 3S-OH-4S-Me-Pro6. The echinocandin (ecd) gene cluster contains two predicted nonheme mononuclear iron oxygenase genes (ecdG,K) and one encoding a P450 type heme protein (ecdH). Deletion of the ecdH gene in the producing Emericella rugulosa generates an echinocandin scaffold (echinocandin D) lacking both hydroxyl groups on Orn1. Correspondingly, the ΔecdG strain failed to hydroxylate C3 of the homoTyr residue, and purified EcdG hydroxylated free L-homoTyr at C3. The ΔecdK strain failed to generate mature echinocandin unless supplemented with either 4R-Me-Pro or 3S-OH-4S-Me-Pro, indicating blockage of a step upstream of Me-Pro formation. Purified EcdK is a Leu 5-hydroxylase, acting iteratively at C5 to yield γ-Me-Glu-γ-semialdehyde in equilibrium with the cyclic imine product. Evaluation of deshydroxyechinocandin scaffolds in in vitro anticandidal assays revealed up to 3-fold loss of potency for the ΔecdG scaffolds, but a 3-fold gain of potency for the ΔecdH scaffold, in line with prior results on deoxyechinocandin homologs. PMID:23451921

  3. High-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid by a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase two-stage process.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-25

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor and fragrance compounds in foods and cosmetics. Recently, we demonstrated that vanillin could be produced from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol in a coenzyme-independent manner using the decarboxylase Fdc and the oxygenase Cso2. In this study, we investigated a new two-pot bioprocess for vanillin production using the whole-cell catalyst of Escherichia coli expressing Fdc in the first stage and that of E. coli expressing Cso2 in the second stage. We first optimized the second-step Cso2 reaction from 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin, a rate-determining step for the production of vanillin. Addition of FeCl2 to the cultivation medium enhanced the activity of the resulting E. coli cells expressing Cso2, an iron protein belonging to the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family. Furthermore, a butyl acetate-water biphasic system was effective in improving the production of vanillin. Under the optimized conditions, we attempted to produce vanillin from ferulic acid by a two-pot bioprocess on a flask scale. In the first stage, E. coli cells expressing Fdc rapidly decarboxylated ferulic acid and completely converted 75 mM of this substrate to 4-vinylguaiacol within 2 h at pH 9.0. After the first-stage reaction, cells were removed from the reaction mixture by centrifugation, and the pH of the resulting supernatant was adjusted to 10.5, the optimal pH for Cso2. This solution was subjected to the second-stage reaction. In the second stage, E. coli cells expressing Cso2 efficiently oxidized 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. The concentration of vanillin reached 52 mM (7.8 g L(-1)) in 24 h, which is the highest level attained to date for the biotechnological production of vanillin using recombinant cells.

  4. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver.

  5. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  6. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  7. The Protective Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Is Mediated by Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chieh; Lai, Yuan-Shu; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), occurring naturally in human food, is known to possess antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to exhibit a therapeutic effect in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of study was to test the hypothesis that the protection of ALA against lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) is mediated by HO-1. Pre- or posttreatment with ALA significantly inhibited LPS-induced histological alterations of ALI, lung tissue edema, and production of proinflammatory cytokine, cytokine inducible neutrophil chemoattractant-3, and nitrite/nitrate in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, the inflammatory responses including elevation of superoxide formation, myeloperoxidase activity, polymorphonuclear neutrophils infiltration, nitrotyrosine, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in lung tissues of LPS-instilled rats were also markedly reduced by ALA. Interestingly, treatment with ALA significantly increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression in lungs of ALI. However, blocking HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 inhibitor, markedly abolished these beneficial effects of ALA in LPS-induced ALI. These results suggest that the protection mechanism of ALA may be through HO-1 induction and in turn suppressing NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:23573137

  8. Haem oxygenase-1 is involved in salicylic acid-induced alleviation of oxidative stress due to cadmium stress in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiti; Li, Le; Gao, Zhaozhou; Wu, Honghong; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-09-01

    This work examines the involvement of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in salicylic acid (SA)-induced alleviation of oxidative stress as a result of cadmium (Cd) stress in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seedling roots. CdCl(2) exposure caused severe growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, which were potentiated by pre-treatment with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPPIX), a potent HO-1 inhibitor. Pre-treatment of plants with the HO-1 inducer haemin or SA, both of which could induce MsHO1 gene expression, significantly reduced the inhibition of growth and Cd accumulation. The alleviation effects were also evidenced by a decreased content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The antioxidant behaviour was confirmed by histochemical staining for the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Furthermore, haemin and SA pre-treatment modulated the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), or their corresponding transcripts. Significant enhancement of the ratios of reduced/oxidized homoglutathione (hGSH), ascorbic acid (ASA)/dehydroascorbate (DHA), and NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+), and expression of their metabolism genes was observed, consistent with a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) distribution in the root tips. These effects are specific for HO-1, since ZnPPIX blocked the above actions, and the aggravated effects triggered by SA plus ZnPPIX were differentially reversed when carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two catalytic by-products of HO-1, was added. Together, the results suggest that HO-1 is involved in the SA-induced alleviation of Cd-triggered oxidative stress by re-establishing redox homeostasis.

  9. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme. PMID:8550452

  10. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme.

  11. The effect of etretinate on the cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism in psoriatic skin.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E; Barr, R M; Brain, S D; Greaves, M W; Olins, L A; Mallet, A I

    1984-01-01

    Eight psoriatic patients were treated with etretinate (50 mg daily) for 6 weeks. Skin chamber exudates from involved and uninvolved skin were assayed for arachidonic acid, 12-HETE, PGE2 and for neutrophil chemokinetic activity co-chromatographing with leukotriene B4, before and at weekly intervals during therapy. Pre-treatment concentrations of arachidonic acid, 12-HETE and leukotriene B4-like chemokinetic activity but not of PGE2 were elevated in involved skin when compared to uninvolved skin. The concentrations of arachidonic acid and 12-HETE declined during therapy but changes in PGE2 were minimal. LTB4-like activity was detectable in involved skin both before and after etretinate treatment. Clinically, scaling and infiltration improved but erythema was still evident. PMID:6091710

  12. Cytoprotection of Human Endothelial Cells From Menadione Cytotoxicity by Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: The Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-08

    until the bands devel- oped. Quantitative analysis was performed with NIH Images (NIH, USA) on blots scanned into the computer. Following staining for...Le, T., 2001. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB, attenuates bacterial peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced colitis...279, 10677–10684. Zhao, B., Bowden, R.A., Stavchansky, S.A., Bowman, P.D., 2001. Human endothelial cell response to gram -negative lipopolysaccharide

  13. Lycopene and apo-10'-lycopenoic acid have differential mechanisms of protection against hepatic steatosis in β-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase knockout male mice.

    PubMed

    Ip, Blanche C; Liu, Chun; Lichtenstein, Alice H; von Lintig, Johannes; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is positively associated with obesity and cardiovascular disease risk. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid (APO10LA), a potential oxidation product of apo-10'-lycopenal that is generated endogenously by β-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2) cleavage of lycopene, inhibited hepatic steatosis in BCO2-expressing mice. The present study evaluated lycopene and APO10LA effects on hepatic steatosis in mice without BCO2 expression. Male and female BCO2-knockout (BCO2-KO) mice were fed a high saturated fat diet (HSFD) with or without APO10LA (10 mg/kg diet) or lycopene (100 mg/kg diet) for 12 wk. Lycopene or APO10LA supplementation reduced hepatic steatosis incidence (78% and 72%, respectively) and severity in BCO2-KO male mice. Female mice did not develop steatosis, had greater hepatic total cholesterol (3.06 vs. 2.31 mg/g tissue) and cholesteryl ester (1.58 vs. 0.86 mg/g tissue), but had lower plasma triglyceride (TG) (229 vs. 282 mg/dL) and cholesterol (97.1 vs. 119 mg/dL) than male mice. APO10LA-mitigated steatosis in males was associated with reduced hepatic total cholesterol (18%) and activated sirtuin 1 signaling, which resulted in reduced fatty acids (FAs) and TG synthesis markers [stearoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase protein, 71%; acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation, 79%; AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, 67%], and elevated cholesterol efflux genes (cytochrome P450 family 7A1, 65%; ATP-binding cassette transporter G5/8, 11%). These APO10LA-mediated effects were not mimicked by lycopene supplementation. Intriguingly, steatosis inhibition by lycopene induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α- and PPARγ-related genes in mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) that increases mitochondrial uncoupling [cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor, α subunit-like effector a, 55%; PR domain-containing 16, 47%; uncoupling protein 3 (Ucp3), 55%], FA β-oxidation (PPARα, 53%; very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, 38%), and

  14. Ferulic Acid Regulates the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 System and Counteracts Trimethyltin-Induced Neuronal Damage in the Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y

    PubMed Central

    Catino, Stefania; Paciello, Fabiola; Miceli, Fiorella; Rolesi, Rolando; Troiani, Diana; Calabrese, Vittorio; Santangelo, Rosaria; Mancuso, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, several lines of evidence have pointed out the efficacy of ferulic acid (FA) in counteracting oxidative stress elicited by β-amyloid or free radical initiators, based on the ability of this natural antioxidant to up-regulate the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and biliverdin reductase (BVR) system. However, scarce results can be found in literature regarding the cytoprotective effects of FA in case of damage caused by neurotoxicants. The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanisms through which FA exerts neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to the neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT). FA (1–10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased both basal and TMT (10 μM for 24 h)-induced HO-1 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by fostering the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional activator Nrf2. In particular, the co-treatment of FA (10 μM) with TMT was also responsible for the nuclear translocation of HO-1 in an attempt to further increase cell stress response in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to HO-1, FA (1–10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased the basal expression of BVR. The antioxidant and neuroprotective features of FA, through the increase of HO activity, were supported by the evidence that FA inhibited TMT (10 μM)-induced lipid peroxidation (evaluated by detecting 4-hydroxy-nonenal) and DNA fragmentation in SH-SY5Y cells and that this antioxidant effect was reversed by the HO inhibitor Zinc-protoporphyrin-IX (5 μM). Among the by-products of the HO/BVR system, carbon monoxide (CORM-2, 50 nM) and bilirubin (BR, 50 nM) significantly inhibited TMT-induced superoxide anion formation in SH-SY5Y cells. All together, these results corroborate the neuroprotective effect of FA through the up-regulation of the HO-1/BVR system, via carbon monoxide and BR formation, and provide the first evidence on the role of HO-1/Nrf2 axis in FA-related enhancement of cell stress response in human neurons. PMID:26779023

  15. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  16. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  17. Analysis of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a treatment plant of acid rock drainage from a Japanese pyrite mine by use of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Okabayashi, Ai; Kikumoto, Mei; Manchur, Mohammed Abul; Wakai, Satoshi; Kanao, Tadayoshi

    2010-03-01

    Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a treatment plant of acid rock drainage (ARD) from a pyrite mine in Yanahara, Okayama prefecture, Japan, were analyzed using the gene (cbbL) encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). Analyses of partial sequences of cbbL genes from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus strains revealed the diversity in their cbbL gene sequences. In contrast to the presence of two copies of form I cbbL genes (cbbL1 and cbbL2) in A. ferrooxidans genome, A. thiooxidans and A. caldus had a single copy of form I cbbL gene in their genomes. A phylogenetic analysis based on deduced amino acid sequences from cbbL genes detected in the ARD treatment plant and their close relatives revealed that 89% of the total clones were affiliated with A. ferrooxidans. Clones loosely affiliated with the cbbL from A. thiooxidans NB1-3 or Thiobacillus denitrificans was also detected in the treatment plant. cbbL gene sequences of iron- or sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from the ARD and the ARD treatment plant were not detected in the cbbL libraries from the treatment plant, suggesting the low frequencies of isolates in the samples.

  18. Relative roles of nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid in the contractile responses of rat renal arcuate arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X. C.; Richards, N. T.; Michael, J.; Johns, E.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase, cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase on the responses of renal arcuate arteries of Wistar rats, with and without endothelium, to noradrenaline, potassium chloride, endothelin-1, acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. 2. Noradrenaline, potassium chloride and endothelin-1 caused concentration-dependent contraction of the vessels. Indomethacin (14 microM) attenuated the contractile response to noradrenaline and to potassium chloride. The inhibitory effect of indomethacin persisted following endothelial removal. 3. Acetylcholine produced concentration-dependent relaxation of the vessels which was potentiated by indomethacin (14 microM). 4. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM) did not affect the contractile response to either noradrenaline or potassium chloride but abolished relaxation to acetylcholine. In addition, L-NAME abolished the affects of indomethacin on acetylcholine-induced relaxation and noradrenaline- and potassium chloride-induced contraction. 5. BWC755C attenuated noradrenaline and potassium chloride-induced contraction. This effect persisted in the presence of indomethacin. 6. In vessels pretreated with CHAPS, BW755C inhibited both noradrenaline and potassium chloride-induced contraction. In these vessels BW755C had no additional inhibitory effect to indomethacin on noradrenaline- and potassium-induced contraction. 7. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME (100 microM) attenuated the effect of BW755C on noradrenaline- and potassium-induced contraction. 8. BW755C alone did not affect endothelium-dependent relaxation as assessed by the response to acetylcholine. However, in the presence of indomethacin, BW755C inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation. 9. BW755C did not affect endothelium-independent relaxation as assessed by the response to sodium nitroprusside in vessels with or without endothelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8075854

  19. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-03

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor.

  20. Resveratrol analog piceatannol restores the palmitic acid-induced impairment of insulin signaling and production of endothelial nitric oxide via activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative heme oxygenase-1 in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, SUN-OH; SON, YONG; LEE, JU HWAN; CHEONG, YONG-KWAN; PARK, SEONG HOON; CHUNG, HUN-TAEG; PAE, HYUN-OCK

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the elevation of free fatty acids, including palmitic acid (PA), are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, which may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, characterized by the reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the preservation of NO bioavailability. Piceatannol (Pic), with similar chemical structure to resveratrol, is suggested to possess similar protective effects as resveratrol. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), stimulated with PA, were used to examine the endothelial protective effects of Pic. Pic increased the expression of HO-1 via nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 activation in the HUVECs, and decreased the PA-induced secretions of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the formation of reactive oxygen species ROS via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Notably, following inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphryin-IX, Pic did not prevent cytokine secretion, ROS formation, and NF-κB activation in the PA-stimulated HUVECs. PA attenuated insulin-mediated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to decreased glucose uptake, and phosphorylation of eNOS, leading to a reduction in the production of NO. Pic effectively mitigated the inhibitory effects of PA on the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and eNOS, which was not observed following inhibition of HO-1 activity. The results of the present study suggested that Pic may have the potential to prevent PA-induced impairment of insulin signaling and eNOS function, by inducing the expression of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, HO-1. PMID:25815690

  1. Resveratrol analog piceatannol restores the palmitic acid-induced impairment of insulin signaling and production of endothelial nitric oxide via activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative heme oxygenase-1 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Park, Seong Hoon; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the elevation of free fatty acids, including palmitic acid (PA), are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, which may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, characterized by the reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the preservation of NO bioavailability. Piceatannol (Pic), with similar chemical structure to resveratrol, is suggested to possess similar protective effects as resveratrol. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), stimulated with PA, were used to examine the endothelial protective effects of Pic. Pic increased the expression of HO-1 via nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 activation in the HUVECs, and decreased the PA-induced secretions of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the formation of reactive oxygen species ROS via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Notably, following inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphryin-IX, Pic did not prevent cytokine secretion, ROS formation, and NF-κB activation in the PA-stimulated HUVECs. PA attenuated insulin-mediated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to decreased glucose uptake, and phosphorylation of eNOS, leading to a reduction in the production of NO. Pic effectively mitigated the inhibitory effects of PA on the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and eNOS, which was not observed following inhibition of HO‑1 activity. The results of the present study suggested that Pic may have the potential to prevent PA-induced impairment of insulin signaling and eNOS function, by inducing the expression of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, HO-1.

  2. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. III. Isolation and properties.

    PubMed

    Ryan, F J; Tolbert, N E

    1975-06-10

    Similarities in properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase activities further substantiate the hypothesis that the same protein catalyzes both reactions. The Km (ribulose diphosphate) is 0.33 mM for the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase, when assayed in air with an oxygen electrode. Maximum activity is obtained with 10 to 35 mM MgCl2. Higher MgCl2 concentrations are inhibitory, but they shift the pH optimum from 9.3 or 9.4 to 8.7 or 9.0. MnCl2 is an effective cofactor of the oxygenase and some activity is obtained with CoCl2. Both the ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase activity of the purified protein from spinach leaves are slowly inactivated by storage at 0 degrees and reactivated in 10 min at 50 degrees, provided both 25 mM MgCl2 and 1 mM dithiothreitol are present. The sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme which react rapidly with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) are approximately 4 at pH 7.8 and 11 at pH 9.4. At both pH values ribulose diphosphate prevents two of these sulfhydryl groups from reacting with this reagent. About 50% inhibition of the oxygenase activity at pH 9.0 occurs with 50 mM bicarbonate in the presence of 3 mM ribulose diphosphate, and from variations in these parameters the inhibition is attributed to the CO2 species. The purified enzyme of acrylamide gels prevented the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium in the presence of the superoxide radical, but the enzyme in solution did not react as a superoxide dismutase.

  3. Characterization of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human cancer cells: the importance of enhanced BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Hannafon, Bethany N; Wolf, Roman F; Zhou, Jundong; Avery, Jori E; Wu, Jinchang; Lind, Stuart E; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-05-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cancer cells has never been characterized. This study examines DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human cancer cell model systems. DHA enhanced HO-1 gene expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 21 h of treatment. This induction of HO-1 expression was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft nude mouse model fed a fish-oil-enriched diet. The increase in HO-1 gene transcription induced by DHA was significantly attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. This was supported by direct measurement of lipid peroxide levels after DHA treatment. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs) that mediate the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription. Knockdown of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression compromised the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating the importance of the Nrf2 pathway in this event. However, the nuclear protein levels of Nrf2 remained unchanged upon DHA treatment. Further studies demonstrated that DHA reduces nuclear Bach1 protein expression by promoting its degradation and attenuates Bach1 binding to the AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter. In contrast, DHA enhanced Nrf2 binding to the AREs without affecting nuclear Nrf2 expression levels, indicating a new cellular mechanism that mediates DHA's induction of HO-1 gene transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human malignant cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostaglandins as negative regulators against lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and peptidoglycan-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide production through reactive oxygen species-dependent heme oxygenase 1 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Yang, Liang-Yo; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2012-11-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs) were reported to exert proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages, their action mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of PGs including PGJ2 (J2), Δ-PGJ2 (Δ), 15-deoxy-Δ PGJ2 (15d), PGE2 (E2), and PGF2α (F2α) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-, lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-, and peptidoglycan (PGN)-induced inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS)/NO production by RAW264.7 macrophages were investigated. First, we found that induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein occurred at a time earlier than that of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein, and the addition of the COX-2 inhibitor NS398 reduced HO-1 protein expression in LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. Incubation of RAW264.7 macrophages with the indicated PGs showed that J2, Δ, and 15d significantly induced HO-1 protein expression; however, E2 and F2α did not. Heme oxygenase 1 protein induced by J2, Δ, and 15d was inhibited by the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin (Act) D; the translational inhibitor, cycloheximide; and the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Increases in intracellular peroxide levels by J2, Δ, and 15d were detected via a 2',7'™-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) analysis, and they were prevented by the addition of NAC. In addition, J2, Δ, and 15d produced significant inhibition of LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-induced iNOS protein and NO production by RAW264.7 cells, in accordance with increased HO-1 protein expression. Reductions of LPS-, LTA-, and PGN-induced phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun protein, and activator protein 1 luciferase activity by J2, Δ, and 15d were identified, and the addition of the HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin, reversed the inhibitory effects of Δ and 15d on LPS- and LTA-induced iNOS/NO, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and c-Jun protein expressions by macrophages. Knockdown of HO-1 protein expression by HO-1 small interfering RNA blocked Δ and 15d inhibition of LPS- and LTA

  5. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of the genes encoding 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid oxygenase in Pseudomonas cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Danganan, C E; Ye, R W; Daubaras, D L; Xun, L; Chakrabarty, A M

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia AC1100 is able to use the chlorinated aromatic compound 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) as the sole source of carbon and energy. One of the early steps in this pathway is the conversion of 2,4,5-T to 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP). 2,4,5-TCP accumulates in the culture medium when AC1100 is grown in the presence of 2,4,5-T. A DNA region from the AC1100 genome has been subcloned as a 2.7-kb SstI-XbaI DNA fragment, which on transfer to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 allows the conversion of 2,4,5-T to 2,4,5-TCP. We have determined the directions of transcription of these genes as well as the complete nucleotide sequences of the genes and the number and sizes of the polypeptides synthesized by pulse-labeling experiments. This 2.7-kb DNA fragment encodes two polypeptides with calculated molecular masses of 51 and 18 kDa. Proteins of similar sizes were seen in the T7 pulse-labeling experiment in Escherichia coli. We have designated the genes for these proteins tftA1 (which encodes the 51-kDa protein) and tftA2 (which encodes the 18-kDa protein). TftA1 and TftA2 have strong amino acid sequence homology to BenA and BenB from the benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase system of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, as well as to XylX and XylY from the toluate 1,2-dioxygenase system of Pseudomonas putida. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain containing the 2.7-kb SstI-XbaI fragment was able to convert not only 2,4,5-T to 2,4,5-TCP but also 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to 2,4-dichlorophenol and phenoxyacetate to phenol. Images PMID:7527626

  6. Relationship between oxidative stress and heme oxygenase induction by copper sulfate.

    PubMed

    Ossola, J O; Groppa, M D; Tomaro, M L

    1997-01-15

    The effect of copper sulfate (CuSO4) on both hepatic oxidative stress and heme oxygenase induction was studied. A strong increase in in vivo rat liver chemiluminescence was observed 1 h after Cu(II) administration. To evaluate liver antioxidant enzymatic defenses, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were determined. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be significantly decreased 5 h after CuSO4 injection. In contrast, superoxide dismutase activity was increased. Heme oxygenase activity appeared 5 h after treatment, reaching a maximum value 18 h after CuSO4 administration. This induction was preceded by a decrease in the intrahepatic GSH pool and an increase in the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, both effects taking place a number of hours before induction of heme oxygenase. Administration of bilirubin, the end product of heme catabolism in mammals, and alpha-tocopherol, a widely employed antioxidant, completely prevented heme oxygenase induction as well as the decrease in hepatic GSH and the increase in chemiluminescence when administered 2 h before CuSO4 treatment. Under the same experimental conditions, beta-carotene showed a moderate preventive effect on both heme oxygenase induction and oxidative stress parameters. These data obtained with Cu(II) treatment are in agreement with our previous reports suggesting a correlation between heme oxygenase induction and oxidative stress.

  7. Crystal Structure of Dicamba Monooxygenase: A Rieske Nonheme Oxygenase that Catalyzes Oxidative Demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Razvan; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Weeks, Donald P.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-08-28

    Dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) is a widely used herbicide that is efficiently degraded by soil microbes. These microbes use a novel Rieske nonheme oxygenase, dicamba monooxygenase (DMO), to catalyze the oxidative demethylation of dicamba to 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid (DCSA) and formaldehyde. We have determined the crystal structures of DMO in the free state, bound to its substrate dicamba, and bound to the product DCSA at 2.10-1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The structures show that the DMO active site uses a combination of extensive hydrogen bonding and steric interactions to correctly orient chlorinated, ortho-substituted benzoic-acid-like substrates for catalysis. Unlike other Rieske aromatic oxygenases, DMO oxygenates the exocyclic methyl group, rather than the aromatic ring, of its substrate. This first crystal structure of a Rieske demethylase shows that the Rieske oxygenase structural scaffold can be co-opted to perform varied types of reactions on xenobiotic substrates.

  8. 7-Methoxy-(9H-β-Carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-Propenoic Acid, a β-Carboline Alkaloid From Eurycoma longifolia, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Activating the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Dang; Choo, Young-Yeon; Nguyen, Tien Dat; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Chau, Van Minh; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2016-03-01

    Eurycoma longifolia is an herbal medicinal plant popularly used in Southeast Asian countries. In the present study, we show that 7-methoxy-(9H-β-carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-propenoic acid (7-MCPA), a β-carboline alkaloid isolated from E. longifolia, exerted anti-inflammatory effects by activating the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. 7-MCPA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in RAW264.7 cells and rescued C57BL/6 mice from LPS-induced lethality in vivo. LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and IL-6 was also significantly suppressed by treatment of 7-MCPA in RAW264.7 cells. 7-MCPA induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased transcription of its target genes, such as HO-1. Treating RAW264.7 cells with 7-MCPA increased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation level of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); however, co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) blocked 7-MCPA-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, NAC or SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) blocked 7-MCPA-induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2, suggesting that 7-MCPA activated Nrf2 via a ROS-dependent p38 pathway. 7-MCPA induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression and knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA or SB203580 blocked 7-MCPA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. Inhibiting Nrf2 or HO-1 abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of 7-MCPA in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. We also demonstrated that 7-MCPA suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. These results provide the first evidence that 7-MCPA exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by modulating the Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways and may be a potential Nrf2 activator to prevent or treat inflammatory diseases.

  9. Heme oxygenase: evolution, structure, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Angela

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase has evolved to carry out the oxidative cleavage of heme, a reaction essential in physiological processes as diverse as iron reutilization and cellular signaling in mammals, synthesis of essential light-harvesting pigments in cyanobacteria and higher plants, and the acquisition of iron by bacterial pathogens. In all of these processes, heme oxygenase has evolved a similar structural and mechanistic scaffold to function within seemingly diverse physiological pathways. The heme oxygenase reaction is catalytically distinct from that of other hemoproteins such as the cytochromes P450, peroxidases, and catalases, but shares a hemoprotein scaffold that has evolved to generate a distinct activated oxygen species. In the following review we discuss the evolution of the structural and functional properties of heme oxygenase in light of the recent crystal structures of the mammalian and bacterial enzymes.

  10. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B. L.; King, Oliver N. F.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J.; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Bush, Jacob T.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M.; Rose, Nathan R.; Bagg, Eleanor A.; McDonough, Michael A.; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W.; Ng, Stanley S.; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E.; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N-oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement PMID:26682036

  11. Phycobilin biosynthesis: reductant requirements and product identification for heme oxygenase from Cyanidium caldarium.

    PubMed

    Rhie, G; Beale, S I

    1995-06-20

    Algal heme oxygenase is a soluble enzyme from Cyanidium caldarium that catalyzes the first committed step of phycobilin biosynthesis by converting protoheme to biliverdin IX alpha. Although the physiological substrate (protoheme) of algal heme oxygenase is identical to that of microsomal heme oxygenase, which catalyzes heme catabolism in animals, the two enzyme systems differ in several respects including the nature of the required reductants and solubility of the enzymes. Addition of the strong Fe3+ ion chelators, desferrioxamine and Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid), greatly increased the yield of solvent-extracted bilin product. The effect of the Fe3+ chelators was approximately equal whether they were added during or after the enzyme incubation. Postincubation treatment of the enzyme reaction mixture with strong acid also greatly increased the product yield. Addition of desferrioxamine to the reaction mixture after the incubation was terminated caused the appearance of an absorption spectrum, indicating an increase in the concentration of free bilin product. Acid and Fe3+ chelators are known to cause dissociation of Fe(III)-bilin complexes. These results indicate that the in vitro enzymic reaction product of algal heme oxygenase is a nonenzyme-bound Fe(III)-biliverdin IX alpha complex that is poorly extracted and/or quantitated unless it is first dissociated. Algal heme oxygenase required the simultaneous presence of both reduced ferredoxin and a second reductant such as ascorbate for activity. The requirement for L-ascorbate could be substituted by Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid) or D-ascorbate, but not by dehydroascorbate or dithiothreitol. Heme oxygenase was purified over 200-fold from C. caldarium by differential (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and serial column chromatography over reactive blue 2-Sepharose, DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-75, and ferredoxin-Sepharose.

  12. Crystallization of recombinant cyclo-oxygenase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Anna M.; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Gierse, James K.; Moreland, Kirby T.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Loduca, Jina Y.; Stallings, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The integral membrane protein, prostaglandin H 2 synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase (COX), catalyses the first step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) and is the target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms are known. The constitutive enzyme, COX-1, is present in most tissues and is responsible for the physiological production of PGs. The isoform responsible for the elevated production of PGs during inflammation is COX-2 which is induced specifically at inflammatory sites. Three-dimensional structures of inhibitor complexes of COX-2, and of site variants of COX-2 which mimic COX-1, provide insight into the structural basis for selective inhibition of COX-2. Additionally, structures of COX-2 mutants and complexes with the substrate can provide a clearer understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the reaction. A crystallization protocol has been developed for COX-2 which reproducibly yields diffraction quality crystals. Polyethyleneglycol 550 monomethylether (MMP550) and MgCl 2 were systematically varied and used in conjunction with the detergent β- D-octylglucopyranoside ( β-OG). As a result of many crystallization trials, we determined that the initial β-OG concentration should be held constant, allowing the salt concentration to modulate the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the detergent. Over 25 crystal structures have been solved using crystals generated from this system. Most crystals belong to the space group P2 12 12, with lattice constants of a=180, b=134, c=120 Å in a pseudo body-centered lattice.

  13. Heme Oxygenases in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam; Stocker, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Heme oxygenases are composed of two isozymes, Hmox1 and Hmox2, that catalyze the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous iron, and biliverdin, the latter of which is subsequently converted to bilirubin. While initially considered to be waste products, CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown over the last 20 years to modulate key cellular processes, such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as antioxidant defense. This shift in paradigm has led to the importance of heme oxygenases and their products in cell physiology now being well accepted. The identification of the two human cases thus far of heme oxygenase deficiency and the generation of mice deficient in Hmox1 or Hmox2 have reiterated a role for these enzymes in both normal cell function and disease pathogenesis, especially in the context of cardiovascular disease. This review covers the current knowledge on the function of both Hmox1 and Hmox2 at both a cellular and tissue level in the cardiovascular system. Initially, the roles of heme oxygenases in vascular health and the regulation of processes central to vascular diseases are outlined, followed by an evaluation of the role(s) of Hmox1 and Hmox2 in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, myocardial infarction, and angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of heme oxygenases and their products are examined in a cardiovascular disease context, with a focus on how the knowledge we have gained on these enzymes may be capitalized in future clinical studies.

  14. The roles of Jumonji-type oxygenases in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catrine; Tumber, Anthony; Che, KaHing; Cain, Peter; Nowak, Radoslaw; Gileadi, Carina; Oppermann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases constitute a phylogenetically conserved class of enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation reactions in humans by acting on various types of substrates, including metabolic intermediates, amino acid residues in different proteins and various types of nucleic acids. The discovery of jumonji (Jmj), the founding member of a class of Jmj-type chromatin-modifying enzymes and transcriptional regulators, has culminated in the discovery of several branches of histone lysine demethylases, with essential functions in regulating the epigenetic landscape of the chromatin environment. This work has now been considerably expanded into other aspects of epigenetic biology and includes the discovery of enzymatic steps required for methyl-cytosine demethylation, as well as modification of RNA and ribosomal proteins. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge on the human Jmj-type enzymes and their involvement in human pathological processes, including development, cancer, inflammation and metabolic diseases. PMID:24579949

  15. cDNA sequencing and expression analysis of Dicentrarchus labrax heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Prevot-D'Alvise, N; Pierre, S; Gaillard, S; Gouze, E; Gouze, J-N; Aubert, J; Richard, S; Grillasca, J-P

    2008-11-17

    The liver cDNA encoding heme oxygenase--1 (HO-1) was sequenced from European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) (accession number no. EF139130). The HO-1 cDNA was 1250 bp in nucleotide length and the open reading frame encoded 277 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the European sea bass had 75% and 50% identity with the amino acid sequences of tetraodontiformes (Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes) and human HO-1 proteins, respectively. A short hydrophobic transmembrane domain at the C--terminal region was found, and four histidine residues were highly conserved, including human his25 that is essential for HO catalytic activity. RT-PCR of mRNA from eight different European sea bass tissues revealed that, in a homeostatis state, the heme oxygenase--1 was abundant in the spleen and liver but not in the brain.

  16. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics.

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase in human blood platelets by carbamate insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Krug, H F; Hamm, U; Berndt, J

    1988-01-01

    Carbamates are a widely used class of insecticides and herbicides. They were tested for their ability to affect human blood platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets. (1) The herbicides of the carbamate type have no, or only little, influence up to a concentration of 100 microM; the carbamate insecticides, however, inhibit both aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in a dose- and time-dependent manner. (2) Carbaryl, the most effective compound, inhibits platelet aggregation and cyclo-oxygenase activity completely at 10 microM. The liberation of arachidonic acid from phospholipids and the lipoxygenase pathway are not affected, whereas the products of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway are drastically decreased. (3) By using [14C]carbaryl labelled in the carbamyl or in the ring moiety, it could be proved that the carbamyl residue binds covalently to platelet proteins. In contrast with acetylsalicylic acid, which acetylates only one protein, carbaryl carbamylates a multitude of platelet proteins. (4) One of the carbamylated proteins was found to be the platelet cyclo-oxygenase, indicating that carbaryl resembles in this respect acetylsalicylic acid, which is known to inhibit this enzyme specifically by acetylation. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3128272

  18. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  19. 3-Hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase activity is increased in the brains of Huntington disease victims.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarcz, R; Okuno, E; White, R J; Bird, E D; Whetsell, W O

    1988-01-01

    An excess of the tryptophan metabolite quinolinic acid in the brain has been hypothetically related to the pathogenesis of Huntington disease. Quinolinate's immediate biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase (EC 1.13.11.6), has now been detected in human brain tissue. The activity of 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase is increased in Huntington disease brains as compared to control brains. The increment is particularly pronounced in the striatum, which is known to exhibit the most prominent nerve-cell loss in Huntington disease. Thus, the Huntington disease brain has a disproportionately high capability to produce the endogenous "excitotoxin" quinolinic acid. This finding may be of relevance for clinical, neuropathologic, and biochemical features associated with Huntington disease. PMID:2967497

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of a higher plant heme oxygenase isoform-1 from Glycine max (soybean)--coordination structure of the heme complex and catabolism of heme.

    PubMed

    Gohya, Tomohiko; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T

    2006-12-01

    Heme oxygenase converts heme into biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In plants, as well as in cyanobacteria, heme oxygenase plays a particular role in the biosynthesis of photoreceptive pigments, such as phytochromobilins and phycobilins, supplying biliverdin IX(alpha) as a direct synthetic resource. In this study, a higher plant heme oxygenase, GmHO-1, of Glycine max (soybean), was prepared to evaluate the molecular features of its heme complex, the enzymatic activity, and the mechanism of heme conversion. The similarity in the amino acid sequence between GmHO-1 and heme oxygenases from other biological species is low, and GmHO-1 binds heme with 1 : 1 stoichiometry at His30; this position does not correspond to the proximal histidine of other heme oxygenases in their sequence alignments. The heme bound to GmHO-1, in the ferric high-spin state, exhibits an acid-base transition and is converted to biliverdin IX(alpha) in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, or ascorbate. During the heme conversion, an intermediate with an absorption maximum different from that of typical verdoheme-heme oxygenase or CO-verdoheme-heme oxygenase complexes was observed and was extracted as a bis-imidazole complex; it was identified as verdoheme. A myoglobin mutant, H64L, with high CO affinity trapped CO produced during the heme degradation. Thus, the mechanism of heme degradation by GmHO-1 appears to be similar to that of known heme oxygenases, despite the low sequence homology. The heme conversion by GmHO-1 is as fast as that by SynHO-1 in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, thereby suggesting that the latter is the physiologic electron-donating system.

  1. Dicamba Monooxygenase: Structural Insights into a Dynamic Rieske Oxygenase that Catalyzes an Exocyclic Monooxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ordine, Robert L.; Rydel, Timothy J.; Storek, Michael J.; Sturman, Eric J.; Moshiri, Farhad; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Brown, Gregory R.; Eilers, Robert J.; Dart, Crystal; Qi, Youlin; Flasinski, Stanislaw; Franklin, Sonya J.

    2009-09-08

    Dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) O-demethylase (DMO) is the terminal Rieske oxygenase of a three-component system that includes a ferredoxin and a reductase. It catalyzes the NADH-dependent oxidative demethylation of the broad leaf herbicide dicamba. DMO represents the first crystal structure of a Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase that performs an exocyclic monooxygenation, incorporating O{sub 2} into a side-chain moiety and not a ring system. The structure reveals a 3-fold symmetric trimer ({alpha}{sub 3}) in the crystallographic asymmetric unit with similar arrangement of neighboring inter-subunit Rieske domain and non-heme iron site enabling electron transport consistent with other structurally characterized Rieske oxygenases. While the Rieske domain is similar, differences are observed in the catalytic domain, which is smaller in sequence length than those described previously, yet possessing an active-site cavity of larger volume when compared to oxygenases with larger substrates. Consistent with the amphipathic substrate, the active site is designed to interact with both the carboxylate and aromatic ring with both key polar and hydrophobic interactions observed. DMO structures were solved with and without substrate (dicamba), product (3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid), and either cobalt or iron in the non-heme iron site. The substitution of cobalt for iron revealed an uncommon mode of non-heme iron binding trapped by the non-catalytic Co{sup 2+}, which, we postulate, may be transiently present in the native enzyme during the catalytic cycle. Thus, we present four DMO structures with resolutions ranging from 1.95 to 2.2 {angstrom}, which, in sum, provide a snapshot of a dynamic enzyme where metal binding and substrate binding are coupled to observed structural changes in the non-heme iron and catalytic sites.

  2. Degradation of heme in gram-negative bacteria: the product of the hemO gene of Neisseriae is a heme oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Wilks, A; Stojiljkovic, I

    2000-12-01

    A full-length heme oxygenase gene from the gram-negative pathogen Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of the enzyme yielded soluble catalytically active protein and caused accumulation of biliverdin within the E. coli cells. The purified HemO forms a 1:1 complex with heme and has a heme protein spectrum similar to that previously reported for the purified heme oxygenase (HmuO) from the gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae and for eukaryotic heme oxygenases. The overall sequence identity between HemO and these heme oxygenases is, however, low. In the presence of ascorbate or the human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase system, the heme-HemO complex is converted to ferric-biliverdin IXalpha and carbon monoxide as the final products. Homologs of the hemO gene were identified and characterized in six commensal Neisseria isolates, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flava, Neisseria polysacchareae, Neisseria kochii, and Neisseria cinerea. All HemO orthologs shared between 95 and 98% identity in amino acid sequences with functionally important residues being completely conserved. This is the first heme oxygenase identified in a gram-negative pathogen. The identification of HemO as a heme oxygenase provides further evidence that oxidative cleavage of the heme is the mechanism by which some bacteria acquire iron for further use.

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  4. Nickel induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Reid, M.C.; Bibeau, L.M.; Linden, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Heme oxygenase activity was measured in tissues of rats killed after administration of NiCl/sub 2/ or Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity occurred 6 hr after NiCl/sub 2/ injection (0.25 mmol/kg sc), reached a maximum of five to six times the baseline activity at 17 hr, and remained significantly increased at 72 hr. Heme oxygenase activities were also increased in liver, lung, and brain at 17 hr after the NiCl/sub 2/ injection; heme oxygenase activities in spleen and intestinal mucosa were unchanged. The effects of NiCl/sub 2/ on heme oxygenase activities in kidney and liver were dose-related from 0.06 to 0.75 mmol/kg, sc. Three Ni chelators were administered (1 mmol/kg, im) prior to injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc); d-penicillamine partially prevented Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity; triethylenetetramine had no effect; sodium diethyldithiocarbamate enhanced the Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity (three times greater than NiCl/sub 2/ alone). Intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ (10 mg/rat) caused induction of renal heme oxygenase activity at 1 week but not at 2, 3, or 4 weeks; no correlation was observed between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and erythropoietin-mediated erythrocytosis. Hypoxia (10% O/sub 2/, 12 hr/day, 7 days) did not affect renal heme oxygenase activity. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity was observed in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs killed 17 hr after injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc). These studies established (a) the time course, dose-effect, organ selectivity, and species susceptibility relationships for Ni induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity, (b) the effects of Ni chelators, and (c) the lack of relationship between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and the erythrocytosis that develops after intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/.

  5. Reconstitution and characterization of aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase, a Rieske N-oxygenase that catalyzes unusual arylamine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungkul; Simurdiak, Michael; Zhao, Huimin

    2005-11-04

    Rieske oxygenases catalyze a wide variety of important oxidation reactions. Here we report the characterization of a novel Rieske N-oxygenase, aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase (PrnD) that catalyzes the unusual oxidation of an arylamine to an arylnitro group. PrnD from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf5 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the activity of the purified PrnD was reconstituted, which required in vitro assembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur cluster into the protein and the presence of NADPH, FMN, and an E. coli flavin reductase SsuE. Biochemical and bioinformatics studies indicated that the reconstituted PrnD contains a Rieske iron-sulfur cluster and a mononuclear iron center that are formed by residues Cys(69), Cys(88), His(71), His(91), Asp(323), His(186), and His(191), respectively. The enzyme showed a limited range of substrate specificity and catalyzed the conversion of aminopyrrolnitrin into pyrrolnitrin with K(m) = 191 microM and k(cat) = 6.8 min(-1). Isotope labeling experiments with (18)O(2) and H(2)(18)O suggested that the oxygen atoms in the pyrrolnitrin product are derived exclusively from molecular oxygen. In addition, it was found that the oxygenation of the arylamine substrates catalyzed by PrnD occurs at the enzyme active site and does not involve free radical chain reactions. By analogy to known examples of arylamine oxidation, a catalytic mechanism for the bioconversion of amino pyrrolnitrin into pyrrolnitrin was proposed. Our results should facilitate further mechanistic and crystallographic studies of this arylamine oxygenase and may provide a new enzymatic route for the synthesis of aromatic nitro compounds from their corresponding aromatic amines.

  6. Oxygenase-catalyzed ribosome hydroxylation occurs in prokaryotes and humans.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Wolf, Alexander; Feng, Tianshu; Ho, Chia-hua; Sekirnik, Rok; Zayer, Adam; Granatino, Nicolas; Cockman, Matthew E; Loenarz, Christoph; Loik, Nikita D; Hardy, Adam P; Claridge, Timothy D W; Hamed, Refaat B; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gong, Lingzhi; Robinson, Carol V; Trudgian, David C; Jiang, Miao; Mackeen, Mukram M; McCullagh, James S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Thalhammer, Armin; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yang, Ming; Liu-Yi, Phebee; Zhang, Zhihong; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion; Kessler, Benedikt M; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Preston, Gail M; Coleman, Mathew L; Schofield, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The finding that oxygenase-catalyzed protein hydroxylation regulates animal transcription raises questions as to whether the translation machinery and prokaryotic proteins are analogously modified. Escherichia coli ycfD is a growth-regulating 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase catalyzing arginyl hydroxylation of the ribosomal protein Rpl16. Human ycfD homologs, Myc-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53) and NO66, are also linked to growth and catalyze histidyl hydroxylation of Rpl27a and Rpl8, respectively. This work reveals new therapeutic possibilities via oxygenase inhibition and by targeting modified over unmodified ribosomes.

  7. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coursolle, Dan; Lian, Jiazhang; Shanklin, John; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-09-01

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg L(-1) long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg L(-1) titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.

  8. Artificial hydrogenases based on cobaloximes and heme oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchi, Marine; Veinberg, Elias; Field, Martin J.; Niklas, Jens; Matsui, Toshitaka; Tiede, David M.; Poluektov, Oleg G.; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-06

    The insertion of cobaloxime catalysts in the heme-binding pocket of heme oxygenase (HO) yields artificial hydrogenases active for H2 evolution in neutral aqueous solutions. These novel biohybrids have been purified and characterized by using UV/visible and EPR spectroscopy. These analyses revealed the presence of two distinct binding conformations, thereby providing the cobaloxime with hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments, respectively. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations found open and closed conformations of the binding pocket owing to mobile amino acid residues. HO-based biohybrids incorporating a {Co(dmgH)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime) catalytic center displayed up to threefold increased turnover numbers with respect to the cobaloxime alone or to analogous sperm whale myoglobin adducts. Here, this study thus provides a strong basis for further improvement of such biohybrids, using well-designed modifications of the second and outer coordination spheres, through site-directed mutagenesis of the host protein.

  9. Artificial hydrogenases based on cobaloximes and heme oxygenase

    DOE PAGES

    Bacchi, Marine; Veinberg, Elias; Field, Martin J.; ...

    2016-06-06

    The insertion of cobaloxime catalysts in the heme-binding pocket of heme oxygenase (HO) yields artificial hydrogenases active for H2 evolution in neutral aqueous solutions. These novel biohybrids have been purified and characterized by using UV/visible and EPR spectroscopy. These analyses revealed the presence of two distinct binding conformations, thereby providing the cobaloxime with hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments, respectively. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations found open and closed conformations of the binding pocket owing to mobile amino acid residues. HO-based biohybrids incorporating a {Co(dmgH)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime) catalytic center displayed up to threefold increased turnover numbers with respect to the cobaloximemore » alone or to analogous sperm whale myoglobin adducts. Here, this study thus provides a strong basis for further improvement of such biohybrids, using well-designed modifications of the second and outer coordination spheres, through site-directed mutagenesis of the host protein.« less

  10. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 encodes a carotenoid oxygenase mediating central and excentric cleavage of conventional and aromatic carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Scherzinger, Daniel; Scheffer, Erdmann; Bär, Cornelia; Ernst, Hansgeorg; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is assumed to lack carotenoids, which are widespread pigments fulfilling important functions as radical scavengers and as a source of apocarotenoids. In mammals, the synthesis of apocarotenoids, including retinoic acid, is initiated by the β-carotene cleavage oxygenases I and II catalyzing either a central or an excentric cleavage of β-carotene, respectively. The M. tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 codes for a putative carotenoid oxygenase conserved in other mycobacteria. In the present study, we investigated the corresponding enzyme, here named M. tuberculosis carotenoid cleavage oxygenase (MtCCO). Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, we show that MtCCO converts several carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro. Moreover, the identification of the products suggests that, in contrast to other carotenoid oxygenases, MtCCO cleaves the central C15-C15' and an excentric double bond at the C13-C14 position, leading to retinal (C(20)), β-apo-14'-carotenal (C(22)) and β-apo-13-carotenone (C(18)) from β-carotene, as well as the corresponding hydroxylated products from zeaxanthin and lutein. Moreover, the enzyme cleaves also 3,3'-dihydroxy-isorenieratene representing aromatic carotenoids synthesized by other mycobacteria. Quantification of the products from different substrates indicates that the preference for each of the cleavage positions is determined by the hydroxylation and the nature of the ionone ring. The data obtained in the present study reveal MtCCO to be a novel carotenoid oxygenase and indicate that M. tuberculosis may utilize carotenoids from host cells and interfere with their retinoid metabolism.

  11. OxDBase: a database of oxygenases involved in biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj K; Kumar, Manish; Chauhan, Archana; Raghava, Gajendra PS; Jain, Rakesh K

    2009-01-01

    Background Oxygenases belong to the oxidoreductive group of enzymes (E.C. Class 1), which oxidize the substrates by transferring oxygen from molecular oxygen (O2) and utilize FAD/NADH/NADPH as the co-substrate. Oxygenases can further be grouped into two categories i.e. monooxygenases and dioxygenases on the basis of number of oxygen atoms used for oxidation. They play a key role in the metabolism of organic compounds by increasing their reactivity or water solubility or bringing about cleavage of the aromatic ring. Findings We compiled a database of biodegradative oxygenases (OxDBase) which provides a compilation of the oxygenase data as sourced from primary literature in the form of web accessible database. There are two separate search engines for searching into the database i.e. mono and dioxygenases database respectively. Each enzyme entry contains its common name and synonym, reaction in which enzyme is involved, family and subfamily, structure and gene link and literature citation. The entries are also linked to several external database including BRENDA, KEGG, ENZYME and UM-BBD providing wide background information. At present the database contains information of over 235 oxygenases including both dioxygenases and monooxygenases. This database is freely available online at . Conclusion OxDBase is the first database that is dedicated only to oxygenases and provides comprehensive information about them. Due to the importance of the oxygenases in chemical synthesis of drug intermediates and oxidation of xenobiotic compounds, OxDBase database would be very useful tool in the field of synthetic chemistry as well as bioremediation. PMID:19405962

  12. Selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors: cardiovascular and gastrointestinal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J L; Muscará, M N

    2001-12-01

    The introduction of selective inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase-2 to the marketplace has been much anticipated for several years. It would appear that these compounds have lived up to the expectations of having reduced gastrointestinal toxicity and, at least for some indications, of efficacy similar to that of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that cyclo-oxygenase-2 plays a very important role in gastrointestinal mucosal defence, particularly in situations in which the mucosa is damaged or inflamed. Moreover, physiological roles for cyclo-oxygenase-2 both in the renal and cardiovascular systems are becoming better recognized. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 can lead to peripheral oedema and hypertension, and may promote thrombosis. Indeed, there is recent evidence of increased rates of myocardial infarction in arthritis patients taking a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor. Use of low-dose aspirin concurrently with use of a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor may provide some degree of protection against the potential cardiovascular toxicity of the latter but both laboratory and clinical studies suggest that the concomitant use of these two types of drugs results in gastrointestinal ulceration comparable to what is seen with conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. These recent results suggest that care must be exercised in the use of selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors by individuals who are at increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, and the use of low-dose aspirin by these patients may place them at increased risk of gastrointestinal complications.

  13. Structural requirements of flavonoids to induce heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Croft, K D; Zhang, D; Jiang, R; Ayer, A; Shengule, S; Payne, R J; Ward, N C; Stocker, R

    2017-09-29

    Population studies suggest cardiovascular health benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables rich in polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids. We reported previously that the flavonoid quercetin protects arteries from oxidant-induced endothelial dysfunction and attenuates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice, with induction of heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1) playing a critical role. The present study investigated the structural requirements of flavonoids to induce Hmox1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). We identified ortho-dihydroxyl groups and an α,β-unsaturated system attached to a catechol as the key structural requirements for Hmox1 induction. Active but not inactive flavonoids had a low oxidation potential and prevented ascorbate autoxidation, suggesting that Hmox1 inducers readily undergo oxidation and that oxidized, rather than reduced, flavonoids may be the biological inducer of Hmox1. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized stable derivatives of caffeic acid (3-(3,4-dihyroxyphenyl)-2-propenoic acid) containing either ortho-dihydroxy or ortho-dioxo groups. Compared with the dihydroxy compound, the quinone analog induced Hmox1 more potently in HAEC and also provided enhanced protection to arteries of wild type animals against oxidant-induced endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, the quinone analog failed to provide protection against oxidant-induced endothelial dysfunction in arteries of Hmox1(-/-) mice, establishing a key role for Hmox1 in vascular protection. These results suggest that oxidized forms of dietary polyphenols are the likely inducers of Hmox1 and may explain in part the protective cardiovascular effects of diets rich in these compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The oxygenase component of phenol hydroxylase from Acinetobacter radioresistens S13.

    PubMed

    Divari, Sara; Valetti, Francesca; Caposio, Patrizia; Pessione, Enrica; Cavaletto, Maria; Griva, Ersilia; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Giunta, Carlo

    2003-05-01

    Phenol hydroxylase (PH) from Acinetobacter radioresistens S13 represents an example of multicomponent aromatic ring monooxygenase made up of three moieties: a reductase (PHR), an oxygenase (PHO) and a regulative component (PHI). The function of the oxygenase component (PHO), here characterized for the first time, is to bind molecular oxygen and catalyse the mono-hydroxylation of substrates (phenol, and with less efficiency, chloro- and methyl-phenol and naphthol). PHO was purified from extracts of A. radioresistens S13 cells and shown to be a dimer of 206 kDa. Each monomer is composed by three subunits: alpha (54 kDa), beta (38 kDa) and gamma (11 kDa). The gene encoding PHO alpha (named mopN) was cloned and sequenced and the corresponding amino acid sequence matched with that of functionally related oxygenases. By structural alignment with the catalytic subunits of methane monooxygenase (MMO) and alkene monooxygenase, we propose that PHO alpha contains the enzyme active site, harbouring a dinuclear iron centre Fe-O-Fe, as also suggested by spectral analysis. Conserved hydrophobic amino acids known to define the substrate recognition pocket, are also present in the alpha-subunit. The prevalence of alpha-helices (99.6%) as studied by CD confirmed the hypothized structural homologies between PHO and MMO. Three parameters (optimum ionic strength, temperature and pH) that affect kinetics of the overall phenol hydroxylase reaction were further analyzed with a fixed optimal PHR/PHI/PHO ratio of 2/1/1. The highest level of activity was evaluated between 0.075 and 0.1 m of ionic strength, the temperature dependence showed a maximum of activity at 24 degrees C and finally the pH for optimal activity was determined to be 7.5.

  15. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  16. Signaling Function of Heme Oxygenase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Many reports have underscored the importance of the heme degradation pathway that is regulated by heme oxygenase (HO). This reaction releases bile pigments and carbon monoxide (CO), which are important antioxidant and signaling molecules. Thus, the reaction of HO-1 would have significant cytoprotective effects. Nevertheless, the importance of this protein goes beyond its enzymatic action. New evidence outlines significant effects of inactive forms of the HO-1 protein. Recent Advances: In fact, the role of the HO protein in cellular signaling, including transcription factor activation, binding to proteins, phosphorylation, and modulation of protein function, among others, has started being elucidated. The mechanism by which the inducible form of HO-1, in particular, can migrate to various cellular compartments to mediate important signaling or how and why it binds to key transcription factors and other proteins that are important in DNA repair is also described in several physiologic systems. Critical Issues: The signaling functions of HO-1 may have particular relevance in clinical circumstances, including cancer, as redistribution of HO-1 into the nuclear compartment is observed with cancer progression and metastasis. In addition, along with oxidative stress, the pleiotropic functions of HO-1 modulate antioxidant defense. In organ transplantation, HO and its byproducts suppress rejection at multiple levels and in sepsis-induced pulmonary dysfunction, inhaled CO or modulation of HO activity can change the course of the disease in animals. Future Directions: It is hoped that a more detailed understanding of the various signaling functions of HO will guide therapeutic approaches for complex diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1743–1753. PMID:24180238

  17. Safety assessment of dicamba mono-oxygenases that confer dicamba tolerance to various crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Glenn, Kevin C; Kessenich, Colton; Bell, Erin; Burzio, Luis A; Koch, Michael S; Li, Bin; Silvanovich, Andre

    2016-11-01

    Dicamba tolerant (DT) soybean, cotton and maize were developed through constitutive expression of dicamba mono-oxygenase (DMO) in chloroplasts. DMO expressed in three DT crops exhibit 91.6-97.1% amino acid sequence identity to wild type DMO. All DMO forms maintain the characteristics of Rieske oxygenases that have a history of safe use. Additionally, they are all functionally similar in vivo since the three DT crops are all tolerant to dicamba treatment. None of these DMO sequences were found to have similarity to any known allergens or toxins. Herein, to further understand the safety of these DMO variants, a weight of evidence approach was employed. Each purified DMO protein was found to be completely deactivated in vitro by heating at temperatures 55 °C and above, and all were completely digested within 30 s or 5 min by pepsin and pancreatin, respectively. Mice orally dosed with each of these DMO proteins showed no adverse effects as evidenced by analysis of body weight gain, food consumption and clinical observations. Therefore, the weight of evidence from all these protein safety studies support the conclusion that the various forms of DMO proteins introduced into DT soybean, cotton and maize are safe for food and feed consumption, and the small amino acid sequence differences outside the active site of DMO do not raise any additional safety concerns.

  18. Naphthalene dioxygenase: purification and properties of a terminal oxygenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Ensley, B D; Gibson, D T

    1983-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816 is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidized naphthalene to cis-(1R, 2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. The terminal oxygenase component B was purified to homogeneity by a three-step procedure that utilized ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified enzyme oxidized naphthalene only in the presence of NADH, oxygen, and partially purified preparations of components A and C. An estimated Mr of 158,000 was obtained by gel filtration. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed the presence of two subunits with molecular weights of ca. 55,000 and 20,000, indicative of an alpha 2 beta 2 quaternary structure. Absorption spectra of the oxidized enzyme showed maxima at 566 (shoulder), 462, and 344 nm, which were replaced by absorption maxima at 520 and 380 nm when the enzyme was reduced anaerobically by stoichiometric quantities of NADH in the presence of the other two components of the naphthalene dioxygenase system. Component B bound naphthalene. Enzyme-bound naphthalene was oxidized to product upon the addition of components A and C, NADH, and O2. These results, together with the detection of the presence of 6.0 g-atoms of iron and 4.0 g-atoms of acid-labile sulfur per mol of the purified enzyme, suggest that component B of the naphthalene dioxygenase system is an iron-sulfur protein which functions in the terminal step of naphthalene oxidation. PMID:6874638

  19. Chromosomal localization of the human heme oxygenase genes: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) maps to chromosome 22q12 and heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2) maps to chromosome 16p13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R.K.; Kutty, G.; Rodriguez, I.R.; Chader, G.J.; Wiggert, B. )

    1994-04-01

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, the precursor of the bile pigment bilirubin, and carbon monoxide, a putative neurotransmitter. The authors have employed polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine the chromosome localization of the genes coding for the two known heme oxygenase isozymes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), the inducible form, was localized to human chromosome 22q12, while heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2), the constitutive form, was localized to chromosome 16p13.3. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Expanding the alkane oxygenase toolbox: new enzymes and applications.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Funhoff, Enrico G

    2005-06-01

    As highly reduced hydrocarbons are abundant in the environment, enzymes that catalyze the terminal or subterminal oxygenation of alkanes are relatively easy to find. A number of these enzymes have been biochemically characterized in detail, because the potential of alkane hydroxylases to catalyze high added-value reactions is widely recognized. Nevertheless, the industrial application of these enzymes is restricted owing to the complex biochemistry, challenging process requirements, and the limited number of cloned and expressed enzymes. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches have started to yield more robust and versatile enzyme systems, broadening the alkane oxygenase portfolio. In addition, metagenomic approaches provide access to many novel alkane oxygenase sequences.

  1. Terephthalate 1,2-dioxygenase system from Comamonas testosteroni T-2: purification and some properties of the oxygenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Schläfli, H R; Weiss, M A; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1994-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni T-2, grown in terephthalate (TER)-salts medium, synthesizes inducible enzymes that convert TER to (1R,2S)-dihydroxy-3,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (DCD) and protocatechuate (PC). Anion-exchange chromatography of cell extracts yielded two sets of fractions, R and Z, that were necessary for oxygenation of TER to DCD; we termed this activity the TER dioxygenase system (TERDOS). An NAD(+)-dependent DCD dehydrogenase, which converted DCD to PC, overlapped all fractions R. No significant purification from fraction R, which contained an NADH-dependent reductase function(s) of TERDOS, was attained. Fraction Z, at the end of the gradient, contained essentially one protein, which was further purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. This component, Z, had the UV-visible spectrum and electron paramagnetic resonance characteristics of a Rieske [2Fe-2S] protein and was considered to be the oxygenase. M(r)s of about 126,000 for oxygenase Z under native conditions were observed. Oxygenase Z consisted of two subunits, alpha and beta, with M(r)s of 49,000 and 18,000, respectively, under denaturing conditions. We presume that this oxygenase has an alpha 2 beta 2 structure. The sequences of the N-terminal amino acids of each subunit were determined. The activity of the purified enzyme was enhanced about fivefold by addition of Fe2+. In the presence of O2, NADH, and fraction R, component Z catalyzed the stoichiometric transformation of TER to PC, with the intermediate formation of DCD. The reaction was confirmed as a dioxygenation when we observed incorporation of two oxygen atoms from 18O2 into PC. The substrate range of TERDOS appeared to be narrow; apart from TER, only 2,5-dicarboxypyridine and 1,4-dicarboxynaphthalene (of 11 compounds tested) were converted to a product. Images PMID:7961417

  2. Functional Analyses of Oxygenases in Jadomycin Biosynthesis and Identification of JadH as a Bifunctional Oxygenase/Dehydrase*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Hua; Wang, Chen-Chen; Greenwell, Lisa; Rix, Uwe; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Vining, Leo C.; Rohr, Jürgen; Yang, Ke-Qian

    2010-01-01

    A novel angucycline metabolite, 2,3-dehydro-UWM6, was identified in a jadH mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. Both UWM6 and 2,3-dehydro-UWM6 could be converted to jadomycin A or B by a ketosynthase a (jadA) mutant of S. venezuelae. These angucycline intermediates were also converted to jadomycin A by transformant of the heterologous host Streptomyces lividans expressing the jadFGH oxygenases in vivo and by its cell-free extracts in vitro; thus the three gene products JadFGH are implicated in catalysis of the post-polyketide synthase biosynthetic reactions converting UWM6 to jadomycin aglycone. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that JadH possesses dehydrase activity, not previously associated with polyketide-modifying oxygenase. Since the formation of aromatic polyketides often requires multiple dehydration steps, bifunctionality of oxygenases modifying aromatic polyketides may be a general phenomenon. PMID:15817470

  3. Functional analyses of oxygenases in jadomycin biosynthesis and identification of JadH as a bifunctional oxygenase/dehydrase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hua; Wang, Chen-Chen; Greenwell, Lisa; Rix, Uwe; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Vining, Leo C; Rohr, Jürgen; Yang, Ke-Qian

    2005-06-10

    A novel angucycline metabolite, 2,3-dehydro-UWM6, was identified in a jadH mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. Both UWM6 and 2,3-dehydro-UWM6 could be converted to jadomycin A or B by a ketosynthase alpha (jadA) mutant of S. venezuelae. These angucycline intermediates were also converted to jadomycin A by transformant of the heterologous host Streptomyces lividans expressing the jadFGH oxygenases in vivo and by its cell-free extracts in vitro; thus the three gene products JadFGH are implicated in catalysis of the post-polyketide synthase biosynthetic reactions converting UWM6 to jadomycin aglycone. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that JadH possesses dehydrase activity, not previously associated with polyketide-modifying oxygenase. Since the formation of aromatic polyketides often requires multiple dehydration steps, bifunctionality of oxygenases modifying aromatic polyketides may be a general phenomenon.

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1, Oxidation, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Jesus A.; Zhang, Min; Yin, Fen

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low-density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of HO, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This suggests that a potential intervention on HO-1 or its byproducts may need to take into account any potential alteration in the status of Nrf2 activation

  5. Purification and characterization of the thermostable ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the thermophilic purple bacterium Chromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Heda, G D; Madigan, M T

    1989-09-15

    The Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase has been purified and characterized from the thermophilic and obligately anaerobic purple sulfur bacterium, Chromatium tepidum. The enzyme is an L8S8 carboxylase with a molecular mass near 550 kDa. No evidence for a second form of the enzyme lacking small subunits was obtained. C. tepidum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was stable to heating to temperatures of 60 degrees C and could be readily purified in an active form at room temperature. Both carboxylase and oxygenase activities of this enzyme were Mg2+-dependent and carboxylase activity was sensitive to the effector 6-phosphogluconic acid. The Km for ribulose bisphosphate for the carboxylase activity of the C. tepidum enzyme was substantially higher than that observed in mesophilic Calvin cycle autotrophs. Amino acid composition and immunological analyses of C. tepidum and Chromatium vinosum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylases showed the enzymes to be highly related despite significant differences in heat stability. It is hypothesized that thermal stability of C. tepidum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is due to differences in primary structure affecting folding patterns in both the large and small subunits and is clearly not the result of any unique quaternary structure of the thermostable enzyme.

  6. Amelioration of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury During Resuscitation from Hemorrhage by Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a Conscious Mouse Model of Uncontrolled Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Direct Antioxidant Effect. 5. Experimental Biology 2010: Induction of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha (HIF1a) by Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester...oxygenase-1. E11rvpea11 Jmmwl of Pharmacology 2008: 591(1-3): 28-35. Induction of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha (HIFla.) by Caffeic Acid Ph en...senm1 in alpha Minimal Essential Medium. Passages 1-5 were used for these studies and subcult ivated into 96-well mulriplotes. CAPA was synthesized

  7. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  8. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  9. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 inhibits the monocyte transmigration induced by mildly oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Navab, M; Leitinger, N; Fogelman, A M; Lusis, A J

    1997-09-01

    Heme catabolic processes produce the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin, as well as the potent prooxidant free iron. Since these products have opposing effects on oxidative stress, it is not clear whether heme catabolism promotes or inhibits inflammatory processes, including atherosclerotic lesion formation. Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of heme catabolism. We used cocultures of human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells to examine the possible role of HO in early atherosclerosis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the inducible isoform of HO, was highly induced by mildly oxidized LDL, and augmented induction was observed with hemin pretreatment. This augmented HO-1 induction resulted in the reduction of monocyte chemotaxis in response to LDL oxidation. Conversely, inhibition of HO by a specific inhibitor, Sn-protoporphyrin IX, enhanced chemotaxis. Furthermore, pretreatment with biliverdin or bilirubin, the products of HO, reduced chemotaxis. Oxidized phospholipids in the mildly oxidized LDL appear to be responsible for HO-1 induction, since oxidized but not native arachidonic acid-containing phospholipids also induced HO-1. These results suggest that HO-1 induced by mildly oxidized LDL may protect against the induction of inflammatory responses in artery wall cells through the production of the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin.

  10. Post-translational modifications in the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Houtz, R L; Stults, J T; Mulligan, R M; Tolbert, N E

    1989-03-01

    Two adjacent N-terminal tryptic peptides of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39] from spinach, wheat, tobacco, and muskmelon were removed by limited tryptic proteolysis. Characterization by peptide sequencing, amino acid composition, and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that the N-terminal residue from the large subunit of the enzyme from each plant species was acetylated proline. The sequence of the penultimate N-terminal tryptic peptide from the large subunit of the spinach and wheat enzyme was consistent with previous primary structure determinations. However, the penultimate N-terminal peptide from the large subunit of both the tobacco and muskmelon enzymes, while identical, differed from the corresponding peptide from spinach and wheat by containing a trimethyllysyl residue at position 14. Thus, tryptic proteolysis occurred at lysine-18 rather than lysine-14 as with the spinach and wheat enzymes. A comparison of the DNA sequences for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase indicates that the N terminus has been post-translationally processed by removal of methionine-1 and serine-2 followed by acetylation of proline-3. In addition, for the enzyme from tobacco and muskmelon a third post-translational modification occurs at lysine-14 in the form of N epsilon-trimethylation.

  11. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  12. Functional characterization of diverse ring-hydroxylating oxygenases and induction of complex aromatic catabolic gene clusters in Sphingobium sp. PNB

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Pratick; Roy, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Ghosal, Debajyoti; Dutta, Tapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. PNB, like other sphingomonads, has multiple ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO) genes. Three different fosmid clones have been sequenced to identify the putative genes responsible for the degradation of various aromatics in this bacterial strain. Comparison of the map of the catabolic genes with that of different sphingomonads revealed a similar arrangement of gene clusters that harbors seven sets of RHO terminal components and a sole set of electron transport (ET) proteins. The presence of distinctly conserved amino acid residues in ferredoxin and in silico molecular docking analyses of ferredoxin with the well characterized terminal oxygenase components indicated the structural uniqueness of the ET component in sphingomonads. The predicted substrate specificities, derived from the phylogenetic relationship of each of the RHOs, were examined based on transformation of putative substrates and their structural homologs by the recombinant strains expressing each of the oxygenases and the sole set of available ET proteins. The RHO AhdA1bA2b was functionally characterized for the first time and was found to be capable of transforming ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, p-cymene and biphenyl, in addition to a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overexpression of aromatic catabolic genes in strain PNB, revealed by real-time PCR analyses, is a way forward to understand the complex regulation of degradative genes in sphingomonads. PMID:24918041

  13. Ribosomal oxygenases are structurally conserved from prokaryotes to humans.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Sekirnik, Rok; Brissett, Nigel C; Krojer, Tobias; Ho, Chia-Hua; Ng, Stanley S; Clifton, Ian J; Ge, Wei; Kershaw, Nadia J; Fox, Gavin C; Muniz, Joao R C; Vollmar, Melanie; Phillips, Claire; Pilka, Ewa S; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; von Delft, Frank; Oppermann, Udo; McDonough, Michael A; Doherty, Aidan J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-06-19

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases have important roles in the regulation of gene expression via demethylation of N-methylated chromatin components and in the hydroxylation of transcription factors and splicing factor proteins. Recently, 2OG-dependent oxygenases that catalyse hydroxylation of transfer RNA and ribosomal proteins have been shown to be important in translation relating to cellular growth, TH17-cell differentiation and translational accuracy. The finding that ribosomal oxygenases (ROXs) occur in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans raises questions as to their structural and evolutionary relationships. In Escherichia coli, YcfD catalyses arginine hydroxylation in the ribosomal protein L16; in humans, MYC-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53; also known as MINA) and nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) catalyse histidine hydroxylation in the ribosomal proteins RPL27A and RPL8, respectively. The functional assignments of ROXs open therapeutic possibilities via either ROX inhibition or targeting of differentially modified ribosomes. Despite differences in the residue and protein selectivities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ROXs, comparison of the crystal structures of E. coli YcfD and Rhodothermus marinus YcfD with those of human MINA53 and NO66 reveals highly conserved folds and novel dimerization modes defining a new structural subfamily of 2OG-dependent oxygenases. ROX structures with and without their substrates support their functional assignments as hydroxylases but not demethylases, and reveal how the subfamily has evolved to catalyse the hydroxylation of different residue side chains of ribosomal proteins. Comparison of ROX crystal structures with those of other JmjC-domain-containing hydroxylases, including the hypoxia-inducible factor asparaginyl hydroxylase FIH and histone N(ε)-methyl lysine demethylases, identifies branch points in 2OG-dependent oxygenase evolution and distinguishes between JmjC-containing hydroxylases and demethylases

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by dieldrin in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Sup; Kim, Dae-Joong; Son, Jin H; Chun, Hong Sung

    2005-04-04

    We investigated the transcriptional events and signaling pathways involved in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by dieldrin, an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease, in a dopaminergic neuronal cells (SN4741). Dieldrin exposure caused dose-dependent and time-dependent induction of heme oxygenase activity and HO-1 protein expression. Deletional and mutational analyses showed that the 5' distal enhancers, E1 and E2, mediate dieldrin-induced HO-1 gene transcription, and the AP-1 DNA binding sites in the E2 enhancer are critical for E2-mediated HO-1 gene activation. Furthermore, both the p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are utilized for HO-1 transcriptional activation by dieldrin. HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP IX reduced the expression of HO-1 but enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by dieldrin.

  15. Engineering Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenases for the Asymmetric Dihydroxylation of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Gally, Christine; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2015-10-26

    The asymmetric dihydroxylation of olefins is of special interest due to the facile transformation of the chiral diol products into valuable derivatives. Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases (ROs) represent promising biocatalysts for this reaction as they can be engineered to efficiently catalyze the selective mono- and dihydroxylation of various olefins. The introduction of a single point mutation improved selectivities (≥95 %) and conversions (>99 %) towards selected alkenes. By modifying the size of one active site amino acid side chain, we were able to modulate the regio- and stereoselectivity of these enzymes. For distinct substrates, mutants displayed altered regioselectivities or even favored opposite enantiomers compared to the wild-type ROs, offering a sustainable approach for the oxyfunctionalization of a wide variety of structurally different olefins.

  16. Comparative QSAR analysis of cyclo-oxygenase2 inhibiting drugs.

    PubMed

    Mohanapriya, Arumugam; Achuthan, Dayalan

    2012-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibiting drugs were subjected to comparative quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) analysis with an attempt to derive and to understand the relationship between the biological activity and molecular descriptors by multiple regression analysis. The different drugs that inhibit cyclo-oxygenase 2 enzyme were compared instead of subjecting one drug and its derivatives to QSAR analysis. The study was conducted to look for the common structural features between the drugs which confer to a good biological activity. Based on the regression analysis the following descriptors were finalized as the components fitting best in the regression equations: Ss, SCBO, RBN, nN, SIC0, IC1, and H-055. These descriptors belong to constitution (Ss, SCBO, RBN, nN), information indices (SIC0, IC1) and atom centered fragments (H-055) category. Based on these descriptors QSAR models were generated and evaluated for best structure-activity correlation. The model generated from constitution and information indices descriptors corresponds to the essential structural features of the drugs and are found to have significant correlation with COX2 inhibiting activity. This study shall help in rational drug design and synthesis of new selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors with predetermined affinity and activity.

  17. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression in sporadic colorectal carcinoma without lymph node involvement.

    PubMed

    Buecher, B; Heymann, M-F; Lièvre, A; Nguyen, J-M; Wilson, K; Bézieau, S; Mosnier, J-F; Galmiche, J-P; Blottière, H M

    2003-10-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression has been reported in most advanced human colorectal cancers. To assess the prevalence of cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression in non-advanced colorectal cancers, to investigate the correlation between cyclo-oxygenase-2 status and tumour clinicopathological features and molecular phenotype, and to determine the impact of cyclo-oxygenase-2 status on long-term clinical outcome. Sixty-one patients who had undergone surgery for colorectal cancer without lymph node involvement were evaluated retrospectively. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The tumour replication error phenotype was assessed by amplification of the two microsatellites, BAT-25 and BAT-26. Thirty-six tumours were classified as cyclo-oxygenase-2 positive and 25 as cyclo-oxygenase-2 negative. No correlation was found between cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression and clinicopathological features or molecular phenotype. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression was an independent predictor of a poor prognosis. Indeed, the relative risk of tumour recurrence or death for patients with cyclo-oxygenase-2-positive tumours was 2.13 times that of patients with cyclo-oxygenase-2-negative tumours (P=0.008; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-3.73). This difference remained significant when post-operative deaths were censored in the multivariate analysis (P=0.014). Cyclo-oxygenase-2 over-expression is not associated with tumour phenotype, but is indicative of a poorer clinical outcome in patients with non-advanced colorectal carcinoma.

  18. Cyclo-oxygenase-2: pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry and relevance to NSAID therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jane A; Warner, Timothy D

    1999-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase is expressed in cells in two distinct isoforms. Cyclo-oxygenase-1 is present constitutively whilst cyclo-oxygenase-2 is expressed primarily after inflammatory insult. The activity of cyclo-oxygenase-1 and -2 results in the production of a variety of potent biological mediators (the prostaglandins) that regulate homeostatic and disease processes. Inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase include the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) aspirin, ibuprofen and diclofenac. NSAIDs inhibit cyclo-oxygenase-2 at the site of inflammation, to produce their therapeutic benefits, as well as cyclo-oxygenase-1 in the gastric mucosa, which produces gastric damage. Most recently selective inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase-2 have been developed and introduced to man for the treatment of arthritis. Moreover, recent epidemiological evidence suggests that cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors may have important therapeutic relevance in the prevention of some cancers or even Alzheimer's disease. This review will discuss how the new advancements in NSAIDs research has led to the development of a new class of NSAIDs that has far reaching implications for the treatment of disease. PMID:10578123

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) from Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Tracy; Krol, Adam; Campanaro, Danielle; Malkowski, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The heme-containing membrane-associated fatty-acid α-dioxygenase pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) from O. sativa has been crystallized and a data set collected to 3.0 Å using a rotating-anode generator and R-AXIS IV detector. Pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) is a heme-containing membrane-associated protein found in monocotyledon and dicotyledon plants that utilizes molecular oxygen to convert polyunsaturated fatty acids into their corresponding 2R-hydroperoxides. PIOX is a member of a larger family of fatty-acid α-dioxygenases that includes the mammalian cyclooxygenase enzymes cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2). Single crystals of PIOX from rice (Oryza sativa) have been grown from MPD using recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently extracted utilizing decyl maltoside as the solubilizing detergent. Crystals diffract to 3.0 Å resolution using a rotating-anode generator and R-AXIS IV detector, and belong to space group P1. Based on the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function analyses, there are presumed to be four molecules in the asymmetric unit related by noncrystallographic 222 symmetry.

  20. Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenase database: a database of bacterial aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases in the management of bioremediation and biocatalysis of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Joydeep; Jana, Tanmoy; Saha, Sudipto; Dutta, Tapan K

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial Rieske-type aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases (RHOs) constitute a large family of enzymes, primarily involved in bioremediation of diverse aromatic compounds in the environment. In the present study, we have designed a manually curated database, Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenase database (RHObase), which provides comprehensive information on all biochemically characterized bacterial RHOs. It consists of ∼ 1000 entries including 196 oxygenase α-subunits, 153 oxygenase β-subunits, 92 ferredoxins and 110 reductases, distributed among 131 different bacterial strains implementing a total of 318 oxygenation reactions. For each protein, users can get detailed information about its structure and conserved domain(s) with motif signature. RHObase allows users to search a query, based on organism, oxygenase, substrate, or protein structure. In addition, this resource provides analysis tools to perform blast search against RHObase for prediction of putative substrate(s) for the query oxygenase and its phylogenetic affiliation. Furthermore, there is an integrated cheminformatics tool to search for structurally similar compound(s) in the database vis-a-vis RHO(s) capable of transforming those compound(s). Resources in the RHObase and multiple search/display options therein are intended to provide oxygenase-related requisite information to researchers, especially working in the field of environmental microbiology and biocatalysis to attain difficult chemistry of biotechnological importance.

  1. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  2. 4-Toluene sulfonate methyl-monooxygenase from Comamonas testosteroni T-2: purification and some properties of the oxygenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Locher, H H; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1991-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni T-2 synthesizes an inducible enzyme system that oxygenates 4-toluene sulfontate (TS) to 4-sulfobenzyl alcohol when grown in TS-salts medium. We purified this TS methyl-monooxygenase system (TSMOS) and found it to consist of two components. A monomeric, iron-sulfur flavoprotein (component B), which has been shown to act as a reductase in the 4-sulfobenzoate dioxygenase system of this organism (H. H. Locher, T. Leisinger, and A. M. Cook, Biochem. J. 274:833-842, 1991), carried electrons from NADH to component M, an oxygenase. This oxygenase had the UV-visible spectral characteristics of an iron-sulfur protein. Mrs of about 152,000 for the native oxygenase and of 43,000 under denaturing conditions indicated a homotri- or homotetrameric enzyme, whose N-terminal amino acids and amino acid composition were determined. The activity of the purified enzyme was enhanced about fivefold by the addition of Fe2+. In the presence of O2 and NADH, components B and M together catalyzed the stoichiometric transformation of TS or p-toluate to the corresponding alcohol. The reaction was confirmed as oxygenation of the methyl group by observation of an oxygen atom from 18O2 in carboxybenzyl alcohol. The substrate range of TSMOS included carboxylated analogs of TS (p- and m-toluates and 4-ethylbenzoate), whereas p-xylene, toluene, and p-cresol were not substrates. TSMOS also catalyzed demethylation; 4-methoxybenzoate was transformed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and formaldehyde. Images PMID:2050632

  3. Novel Three-Component Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase System Catalyzing the N-Dealkylation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Deng, Shi-Kai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2 degrade the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor via N-dealkylation. In this study, we report a three-component Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase (RHO) system catalyzing the N-dealkylation of these herbicides. The oxygenase component gene cndA is located in a transposable element that is highly conserved in the two strains. CndA shares 24 to 42% amino acid sequence identities with the oxygenase components of some RHOs that catalyze N- or O-demethylation. Two putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin genes and one glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene were retrieved from the genome of each strain. These genes were not located in the immediate vicinity of cndA. The four ferredoxins share 64 to 72% amino acid sequence identities to the ferredoxin component of dicamba O-demethylase (DMO), and the two reductases share 62 to 65% amino acid sequence identities to the reductase component of DMO. cndA, the four ferredoxin genes, and the two reductases genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The individual components or the components in pairs displayed no activity; the enzyme mixture showed N-dealkylase activities toward alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor only when CndA-His6 was combined with one of the four ferredoxins and one of the two reductases, suggesting that the enzyme consists of three components, a homo-oligomer oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase, and CndA has a low specificity for the electron transport component (ETC). The N-dealkylase utilizes NADH, but not NADPH, as the electron donor. PMID:24928877

  4. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene encoding the pyoverdin biosynthetic enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Visca, P; Ciervo, A; Orsi, N

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of L-ornithine (L-Orn), which represents an early step in the biosynthesis of the peptidic moiety of the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene bank of DNA from P. aeruginosa PAO1 (ATCC 15692) was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR3 and mobilized into the L-Orn N5-oxygenase-defective (pvdA) P. aeruginosa mutant PALS124. Screening for fluorescent transconjugants made it possible to identify the trans-complementing cosmid pPV4, which was able to restore pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity in the pvdA mutant PALS124. The 17-kb PAO1 DNA insert of pPV4 contained at least two genetic determinants involved in pyoverdin synthesis, i.e., pvdA and pvdC4, as shown by complementation analysis of a set of mutants blocked in different steps of the pyoverdin biosynthetic pathway. Deletion analysis, subcloning, and transposon mutagenesis enabled us to locate the pvdA gene in a minimum DNA fragment of 1.7 kb flanked by two SphI restriction sites. Complementation of the pvdA mutation was under stringent iron control; both pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity were undetectable in cells of the trans-complemented mutant which had been grown in the presence of 100 microM FeCl3. The entire nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene, from which the primary structure of the encoded polypeptide was deduced, was determined. The pvdA structural gene is 1,278 bp; the cloned DNA fragment contains at the 5' end of the gene a putative ribosome-binding site but apparently lacks known promoterlike sequences. The P. aeruginosa L-Orn N5-oxygenase gene codes for a 426-amino-acid peptide with a predicted molecular mass of 47.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.1. The enzyme shows approximately 50% homology with functional analogs, i.e., L-lysine N6-hydroxylase of aerobactin-producing Escherichia coli and L-Orn N5-oxygenase of ferrichrome-producing Ustilago maydis. The pvd

  5. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  6. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  7. The heme oxygenase system and its functions in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maines, M D

    2000-05-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) system was identified in the early 1970s as a distinct microsomal enzyme system that catalyzes formation of bile pigments (Maines and Kappas, 1974). Up to the early 1990s the system was considered only as a "molecular wrecking ball" (Lane, 1998) for degradation of the heme molecule and production of toxic waste products, CO and bile pigments. For those years, the HO system remained relatively unknown to the research community. In a rather short span of the past 10 years following the discovery of high levels of a second form of the enzyme, HO-2, in the brain, suggesting that "heme oxygenase in the brain has functions aside from heme degradation" (Sun et al., 1990); concomitant with finding that another toxic gas, NO, is a signal molecule for generation of cGMP (Ignarro et al., 1982), the system was propelled into main stream research. This propulsion was fueled by the realization of the multiple and diverse functions of heme degradation products. Heme oxygenase has now found relevance in all kinds of human pathophysiology ranging from stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and malaria to transplantation and immune response. As it turns out, its potential benefits are mesmerizing investigators in diverse fields (Lane, 1998). The most recent findings with HO-2 being a hemoprotein and potentially an intracellular "sink" for NO (McCoubrey et al., 1997a; Ding et al., 1999), together with the discovery of the third form of the enzyme, HO-3 (McCoubrey et al., 1997b), are likely to insure the widespread interest in the enzyme system in the coming years. The present review is intended to highlight molecular properties of HO isozymes and their likely functions in the brain. Extended reviews of the system are found in Maines (1992, 1997).

  8. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Further biochemical studies on aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase (PrnD).

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Lee, Jung-Kul; Moon, Hee-Jung; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-05-15

    Active site modeling of dimerization interface in combination with site-directed mutagenesis indicates that the electron in the PrnD Rieske oxygenase can be transferred by either of two pathways, one involving Asp183' and the other involving Asn180'. In addition, the overexpression of the isc operon involved in the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters increased the catalytic activity of PrnD in Escherichia coli by a factor of at least 4. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal inflammation: a short review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Kung, Hsiangfu; Lin, Marie Cm

    2011-10-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catalyzes heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A growing body of evidence indicates that HO-1 activation may play an important protective role in acute and chronic inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal inflammation studied to date. The ability to upregulate HO-1 by pharmacological means or using gene therapy may offer therapeutic strategies for gastrointestinal inflammation in the future.

  11. Heme Oxygenase 1 Mediates an Adaptive Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vile, G. F.; Basu-Modak, S.; Waltner, C.; Tyrrell, R. M.

    1994-03-01

    Oxidative stress of human skin fibroblasts by treatment with ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation has been shown to lead to an increase in levels of the heme catabolizing enzyme heme oxygenase 1 [heme, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase (α-methene-oxidizing, hydroxylating), EC 1.14.99.3] and the iron storage protein ferritin. Here we show that human skin fibroblasts, preirradiated with UVA, sustain less membrane damage during a subsequent exposure to UVA radiation than cells that had not been preirradiated. Pretreating cells with heme oxygenase 1 antisense oligonucleotide inhibited the irradiation-dependent induction of both the heme oxygenase 1 enzyme and ferritin and abolished the protective effect of preirradiation. Inhibition of the UVA preirradiation-dependent increase in ferritin, but not heme oxygenase, with desferrioxamine also abolished the protection. This identifies heme oxygenase 1 as a crucial enzymatic intermediate in an oxidant stress-inducible antioxidant defense mechanism, involving ferritin, in human skin fibroblasts.

  12. Dystrophic muscle improvement in zebrafish via increased heme oxygenase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Gasperini, Molly J.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Eran, Alal; Serafini, Peter R.; Alexander, Matthew S.; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Morris, Carl A.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of the dystrophin protein and has no effective treatment at present. Zebrafish provide a powerful in vivo tool for high-throughput therapeutic drug screening for the improvement of muscle phenotypes caused by dystrophin deficiency. Using the dystrophin-deficient zebrafish, sapje, we have screened a total of 2640 compounds with known modes of action from three drug libraries to identify modulators of the disease progression. Six compounds that target heme oxygenase signaling were found to rescue the abnormal muscle phenotype in sapje and sapje-like, while upregulating the inducible heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) at the protein level. Direct Hmox1 overexpression by injection of zebrafish Hmox1 mRNA into fertilized eggs was found to be sufficient for a dystrophin-independent restoration of normal muscle via an upregulation of cGMP levels. In addition, treatment of mdx5cv mice with the PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil, which was one of the six drugs impacting the Hmox1 pathway in zebrafish, significantly increased the expression of Hmox1 protein, thus making Hmox1 a novel target for the improvement of dystrophic symptoms. These results demonstrate the translational relevance of our zebrafish model to mammalian models and support the use of zebrafish to screen for new drugs to treat human DMD. The discovery of a small molecule and a specific therapeutic pathway that might mitigate DMD disease progression could lead to significant clinical implications. PMID:24234649

  13. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause.

    PubMed

    Pósa, Anikó; Szabó, Renáta; Csonka, Anett; Veszelka, Médea; Berkó, Anikó Magyariné; Baráth, Zoltán; Ménesi, Rudolf; Pávó, Imre; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; László, Ferenc; Kupai, Krisztina; Varga, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO) in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP) on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  15. Structural Investigations of the Ferredoxin and Terminal Oxygenase Components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro,D.; Brown, E.; Yu, C.; Parales, R.; Gibson, D.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-F{sub B1}). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-O{sub B1}), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene. Results: In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-O{sub B1} in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-F{sub B1} has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted. Conclusion: This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the iron

  16. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-03

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene synthase in yeast, led to formation of trans-nootkatol, cis-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. The novel enzyme was also found to catalyse a three step conversion of germacrene A to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, indicating its involvement in chicory sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Likewise, amorpha-4,11-diene was converted to artemisinic acid. Surprisingly, the chicory P450 has a different regio-specificity on (+)-valencene compared to germacrene A and amorpha-4,11-diene.

  17. PIOX, a new pathogen-induced oxygenase with homology to animal cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Sanz, A; Moreno, J I; Castresana, C

    1998-09-01

    Changes in gene expression induced in tobacco leaves by the harpin HrpN protein elicitor were examined, and a new cDNA, piox (for pathogen-induced oxygenase), with homology to genes encoding cyclooxygenase or prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PGHS), was identified. In addition to the amino acid identity determined, the protein encoded by piox is predicted to have a structural core similar to that of ovine PGHS-1. Moreover, studies of protein functionality demonstrate that the PIOX recombinant protein possesses at least one of the two enzymatic activities of PGHSs, that of catalyzing the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. piox transcripts accumulated after protein elicitor treatment or inoculation with bacteria. Expression of piox was induced in tissues responding to inoculation with both incompatible and compatible bacteria, but RNA and protein accumulation differed for both types of interactions. We show that expression of piox is rapidly induced in response to various cellular signals mediating plant responses to pathogen infection and that activation of piox expression is most likely related to the oxidative burst that takes place during the cell death processes examined. Cyclooxygenase catalyzes the first committed step in the formation of prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are lipid-derived signal molecules that mediate many cellular processes, including the immune response in vertebrates. The finding of tobacco PIOX suggests that more similarities than hitherto expected will be found between the lipid-based responses for plant and animal systems.

  18. Acute enteral glutamine infusion enhances heme oxygenase-1 expression in human duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Coëffier, Moïse; Le Pessot, Florence; Leplingard, Antony; Marion, Rachel; Lerebours, Eric; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    The heat shock protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), contributes to the protection of the intestine. Some experimental models suggest that induction of HO-1 by glutamine may contribute to the preservation of intestinal mucosa. The effect of an enteral infusion of glutamine for 6 h on HO-1 expression in duodenal mucosa was studied in healthy men and women and compared with an isonitrogenous mixture of amino acids. After enteral infusion, endoscopic duodenal biopsies were performed and either fixed in formalin for immunohistochemistry or frozen for HO-1 mRNA analysis by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Histologic examination revealed that HO-1 was constitutively expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and that glutamine increased the grade of HO-1 immunostaining (P acids: median (range) 156 (102-182) vs. 100 (68-179)%, P

  19. Kinetic Variance of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Isolated from Diverse Taxonomic Sources 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel Sherrill; Tomany, Michael John

    1984-01-01

    Two dual label methods were used to investigate kinetic variability of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39). In addition to using [1-14C,5-3H]RuBP (method 1), we describe here the detailed assay with 14CO2 and [5-3H]RuBP (method 2), which generates [3H,14C]3-phosphoglyceric acid and unlabeled (noncontaminating) phosphoglycolate; the carboxylase/oxygenase activity ratio (vc/vo) is calculated from 3H/14C ratios of substrates and products. vc/vo was found to be a linear function of [CO2]/[O2], constant over a 4-minute assay interval, and invariant of the degree of enzyme activity. Accurately measurable vc/vo ratios range from approximately 0.3 to 6. The Km and Vmax of both enzymes may be determined as a composite constant, VcKo/VoKc. By method 2, the directly compared, relative values at 40 micromolar CO2 and 1240 micromolar O2 were: Spinacia oleracea (74), Chlorella pyrenoidosa (31), Plectonema boryanum (32), and Rhodospirillum rubrum (8). With method 1, the values for S. oleracea and R. rubrum were 75, and 9, respectively. Under tight experimental controls, the absolute value for S. oleracea was 69 ± 3. PMID:16663680

  20. The site of general anaesthesia and cytochrome P450 oxygenases: similarities defined by straight chain and cyclic alcohols

    PubMed Central

    LaBella, F S; Chen, Q -M; Stein, D; Queen, G

    1997-01-01

    General anaesthetics disrupt normal cell receptivity and responsiveness while sparing vital respiratory processes. Ultimate elucidation of the molecular basis of general anaesthesia presumes the identification of one or more subcellular components with appropriate sensitivity to the entire array of anaesthetics.Previously, we showed the universal cellular enzymes, cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases, to be sensitive at relevant concentrations to all anaesthetics tested. The potential significance of P450 inhibition by anaesthetics resides in the contribution of this enzyme family, in conjunction with that of cyclo-oxygenases and lipoxygenases, to the generation from arachidonic acid of lipid second messengers, the eicosanoids.We have shown that P450 enzymes model the site of general anaesthesia in the tadpole with respect to (a) an absolute sensitivity to increasing chain-length series of flexible, straight chain primary and secondary alcohols and straight chain diols, (b) an absolute sensitivity to increasing molecular weight series of rigid cyclic alkanols and cyclic alkanemethanols, (c) the points of abrupt change and of reversal (cut-off) in the linear relationship between increasing anaesthetic potency with increasing carbon chain length, and (d) non-differentiation between secondary alkanol enantiomers. These findings reveal the P450 enzyme family as the most relevant biomolecular counterpart of the site of general anaesthesia, thus far identified. PMID:9134230

  1. Effects of Polyphenolic Derivatives on Heme Oxygenase-System in Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Pittala, Valeria; Vanella, Luca; Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Marrazzo, Agostino; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria

    2017-06-16

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effects of various naturally occurring polyphenols in the management of metabolic dysfunctions. This cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprises insulin resistance, increased levels of free fatty acids, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia and hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) along with DM-induced complications. Most of them are included in the well-known metabolic syndrome (MS). These metabolic dysfunctions in turn are tightly associated to a high risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. Although molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of metabolic dysfunctions and related complications are not yet clear, it is widely recognized that they are associated to oxidative stress and chronic low-grade of inflammatory levels. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic references through the use of SciFinder. The database is provided by a division of ACS (American Chemical Society) and guarantees access to the world's most extensive and authoritative source of references. The search has been performed by using "heme oxygenase-1" as research topic and a subsequent refinement has been done by using inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was evaluated on the basis of standard tools. From a careful review of the selected literature, of interest, the use of natural antioxidant polyphenols seems to be the ideal pharmacological treatment since they are endowed with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In particular, some polyphenols such as curcumin, quercetin, genistein, caffeic acid phenethyl ester are able to potently activate nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and related downstream expression of enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Indeed, an overexpression of HO-1 has demonstrated to play a beneficial role in metabolic diseases. The following review is intended to stimulate interest in the role of natural

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Ying; Wang, Guo-Guang; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Ping-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats. PMID:26798657

  4. Mechanism of action of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lane, M D; Miziorko, H M

    1978-01-01

    RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase appears to catalyze carboxylation and oxygenation by homologous mechanisms. A common binding site exists on the enzyme for the acceptor substrate, RuBP. A mechanism is proposed whereby RuBP is isomerized, and a carbanion is generated at C2. Then, either CO2 or O2 is added as an electrophile at C2 to form the corresponding 3-keto-2-carboxy-RBP or 3-keto-2-hydroperoxy-RBP adduct. Hydrolytic cleavage at the C2-C3 bonds of these intermediates by the enzyme is envisioned to produce 2 molecules of 3-phosphoglycerate in the carboxylation sequence and 1 molecule of phosphoglycolate and 1 molecule of 3-phosphoglycerate in the oxygenation sequence. Further work will be necessary to establish the validity of the proposed mechanism.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency: the first autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Oda, Yoshio; Yachie, Akihiro; Koizumi, Shoichi; Nakanishi, Isao

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the first autopsy case of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 deficiency. A 6-year-old boy who presented with growth retardation; anemia; leukocytosis; thrombocytosis; coagulation abnormality; elevated levels of haptoglobin, ferritin, and heme in serum; a low serum bilirubin concentration; and hyperlipidemia was diagnosed as HO-1 deficient by gene analysis several months before death. Autopsy showed amyloid deposits in the liver and adrenal glands and mesangioproliferative glomerular changes in kidneys, in addition to an irregular distribution of foamy macrophages with iron pigments. Fatty streaks and fibrous plaques were noted in the aorta. Compared with HO-1--targeted mice, the present case seems to more severely involve endothelial cells and the reticuloendothelial system, resulting in intravascular hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and amyloidosis with a short survival. This contrasts to the predominant iron metabolic disorders of HO-1--targeted mice with a long survival.

  6. Adaptive Responses to Tissue Injury: Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupam; Bolisetty, Subhashini

    2013-01-01

    Tissue injury may result as a consequence of a physical, chemical, or biological insult. Such injury recruits an adaptive response to restore homeostasis and protect against further injury. One of the most prompt protective and adaptive responses by all tissues is the robust activation of the highly inducible, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-apoptotic protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1, a microsomal enzyme, catalyzes the breakdown of pro-oxidant heme, which is released from heme proteins to equimolar quantities of iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. Biliverdin is converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. The beneficial effects of HO-1 expression are not merely due to heme degradation but are also attributed to the cytoprotective properties of the byproducts of the reaction. Manipulation of this enzymatic system in a myriad of disease models has provided substantial evidence to support its role as a cytoprotective enzyme and is therefore an emerging therapeutic molecule. PMID:23874015

  7. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  8. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  9. The dark and bright sides of an enzyme: a three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of Zophobas morio luciferase-like enzyme, inferences on the biological function and origin of oxygenase/luciferase activity.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Santos, C R; Kato, D I; Murakami, M T; Viviani, V R

    2016-05-11

    Beetle luciferases, the enzymes responsible for bioluminescence, are special cases of CoA-ligases which have acquired a novel oxygenase activity, offering elegant models to investigate the structural origin of novel catalytic functions in enzymes. What the original function of their ancestors was, and how the new oxygenase function emerged leading to bioluminescence remains unclear. To address these questions, we solved the crystal structure of a recently cloned Malpighian luciferase-like enzyme of unknown function from Zophobas morio mealworms, which displays weak luminescence with ATP and the xenobiotic firefly d-luciferin. The three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain showed the expected general fold of CoA-ligases, with a unique carboxylic substrate binding pocket, permitting the binding and CoA-thioesterification activity with a broad range of carboxylic substrates, including short-, medium-chain and aromatic acids, indicating a generalist function consistent with a xenobiotic-ligase. The thioesterification activity with l-luciferin, but not with the d-enantiomer, confirms that the oxygenase activity emerged from a stereoselective impediment of the thioesterification reaction with the latter, favoring the alternative chemiluminescence oxidative reaction. The structure and site-directed mutagenesis support the involvement of the main-chain amide carbonyl of the invariant glycine G323 as the catalytic base for luciferin C4 proton abstraction during the oxygenase activity in this enzyme and in beetle luciferases (G343).

  10. Targeted mass spectrometry for the analysis of nutritive modulation of catalase and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Zaenglein, Nina; Tucher, Joanna; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-03-18

    Comprehensive physiological food assessment requires recording of activity profiles. To elucidate the nutritive regulation of antioxidant enzymes, a generally applicable targeted MS method was established for the expression analysis of catalase and then adapted to heme oxygenase-1. Before tryptic digestion, target proteins were prefractionated by off-gel IEF of stimulated and control cell lysate. Targeted proteome analysis was achieved by LC coupled with scheduled selected reaction monitoring MS using 2 proteotypic peptides per protein and 3-4 transitions per peptide. Relative quantification was performed by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The assay showed good correlation with results by Western blot. Linearity, precision, and sensitivity were even improved (LC/SRM vs. Western blot: 3 vs. 1 orders of magnitude, RSD 3.7-13.7% vs. 18.4%, LOD 0.2 vs. 1.6μg/mL). The developed method indicated that coffee does not modulate catalase expression in macrophages (T7cat 103±22%, T17cat 103±16%, p>0.05 vs. control), but leads to a highly significant increase of heme oxygenase-1 expression (T15Ho-1 420±24%, T22Ho-1 364±37%, p<0.001 vs. control, p>0.05 T15Ho-1 vs. T22Ho-1). In regard to multiplex options of the method, targeted proteome analysis can be a valuable tool for the comprehensive analysis of cellular effects of food components. In the present study, targeted mass spectrometry was applied to determine the influence of food components on the expression of antioxidative enzymes. The results implicate that targeted proteomics may develop into a valuable tool in food science and nutrition to determine the physiological effects of nutrients. In contrast to conventional methods for expression analysis, targeted proteome analysis can be applied to monitor the effects of a food component on a broad range of cellular targets in parallel. Additionally, proteins or protein modifications can be addressed which elude immunochemical methods

  11. In-Cell Enzymology To Probe His-Heme Ligation in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sigala, Paul A; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2016-08-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a ubiquitous enzyme with key roles in inflammation, cell signaling, heme disposal, and iron acquisition. HO catalyzes the oxidative conversion of heme to biliverdin (BV) using a conserved histidine to coordinate the iron atom of bound heme. This His-heme interaction has been regarded as being essential for enzyme activity, because His-to-Ala mutants fail to convert heme to biliverdin in vitro. We probed a panel of proximal His mutants of cyanobacterial, human, and plant HO enzymes using a live-cell activity assay based on heterologous co-expression in Escherichia coli of each HO mutant and a fluorescent biliverdin biosensor. In contrast to in vitro studies with purified proteins, we observed that multiple HO mutants retained significant activity within the intracellular environment of bacteria. X-ray crystallographic structures of human HO1 H25R with bound heme and additional functional studies suggest that HO mutant activity inside these cells does not involve heme ligation by a proximal amino acid. Our study reveals unexpected plasticity in the active site binding interactions with heme that can support HO activity within cells, suggests important contributions by the surrounding active site environment to HO catalysis, and can guide efforts to understand the evolution and divergence of HO function.

  12. myo-Inositol Oxygenase is Required for Responses to Low Energy Conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Alford, Shannon R; Rangarajan, Padma; Williams, Phoebe; Gillaspy, Glenda E

    2012-01-01

    myo-Inositol is a precursor for cell wall components, is used as a backbone of myo-inositol trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and phosphatidylinositol phosphate signaling molecules, and is debated about whether it is also a precursor in an alternate ascorbic acid synthesis pathway. Plants control inositol homeostasis by regulation of key enzymes involved in myo-inositol synthesis and catabolism. Recent transcriptional profiling data indicate up-regulation of the myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX) genes under conditions in which energy or nutrients are limited. To test whether the MIOX genes are required for responses to low energy, we first examined MIOX2 and MIOX4 gene expression regulation by energy/nutrient conditions. We found that both MIOX2 and MIOX4 expression are suppressed by exogenous glucose addition in the shoot, but not in the root. Both genes were abundantly expressed during low energy/nutrient conditions. Loss-of-function mutants in MIOX genes contain alterations in myo-inositol levels and growth changes in the root. Miox2 mutants can be complemented with a MIOX2:green fluorescent protein fusion. Further we show here that MIOX2 is a cytoplasmic protein, while MIOX4 is present mostly in the cytoplasm, but also occasionally in the nucleus. Together, these data suggest that MIOX catabolism in the shoot may influence root growth responses during low energy/nutrient conditions.

  13. Crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of cumene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuesong; Fushinobu, Shinya; Fukuda, Eriko; Terada, Tohru; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimizu, Kentaro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Omori, Toshio; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2005-04-01

    The crystal structure of the terminal component of the cumene dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme system of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01 (CumDO) was determined at a resolution of 2.2 A by means of molecular replacement by using the crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 (NphDO). The ligation of the two catalytic centers of CumDO (i.e., the nonheme iron and Rieske [2Fe-2S] centers) and the bridging between them in neighboring catalytic subunits by hydrogen bonds through a single amino acid residue, Asp231, are similar to those of NphDO. An unidentified external ligand, possibly dioxygen, was bound at the active site nonheme iron. The entrance to the active site of CumDO is different from the entrance to the active site of NphDO, as the two loops forming the lid exhibit great deviation. On the basis of the complex structure of NphDO, a biphenyl substrate was modeled in the substrate-binding pocket of CumDO. The residues surrounding the modeled biphenyl molecule include residues that have already been shown to be important for its substrate specificity by a number of engineering studies of biphenyl dioxygenases.

  14. Mechanism of O2 Activation by α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Oxygenases Revisited. A Quantum Chemical Study.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Anna; Radoń, Mariusz; Borowski, Tomasz

    2016-03-03

    Four mechanisms previously proposed for dioxygen activation catalyzed by α-keto acid dependent oxygenases (α-KAO) were studied with dispersion-corrected DFT methods employing B3LYP and TPSSh functionals in combination with triple-ζ basis set (cc-pVTZ). The aim of this study was to revisit mechanisms suggested in the past decade and resolve remaining issues related to dioxygen activation. Mechanism A, which runs on the quintet potential energy surface (PES) and includes formation of an Fe(III)-superoxide radical anion complex, subsequent oxidative decarboxylation, and O-O bond cleavage, was found to be most likely. However, mechanism B taking place on the septet PES involves a rate limiting barrier comparable to the one found for mechanism A, and thus it cannot be excluded, though two other mechanisms (C and D) were ruled out. Mechanism C is a minor variation of mechanism A, whereas mechanism D proceeds through formation of a triplet Fe(IV)-alkyl peroxo bridged intermediate. The study covered also full optimization of relevant minimum energy crossing points (MECPs). The relative energy of critical intermediates was also studied with the CCSD(T) method in order to benchmark TPSSh and B3LYP functionals with respect to their credibility in predicting relative energies of septet and triplet spin states of the ternary enzyme-Fe-α-keto glutarate (α-KG)-O2 complex.

  15. Functional expression of human heme oxygenase-1 gene in renal structure of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alvin I; Quan, Shou; Yang, Liming; Synghal, Arika; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-05-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, regulates the levels and activity of cellular hemoprotein and HO activity. We examined the effect of delivery of the human HO-1 gene on cellular heme in renal tissue using a retroviral vector. We used a single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles in 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats; 25 were transduced with empty vector and 25 were transduced with the human HO-1 gene. Functional expression of human and rat HO-1 was measured after 2 and 4 weeks. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that human HO-1 mRNA was expressed as early as 2 weeks, with the highest levels in the kidney. Western blot analysis showed distribution of human HO-1 protein in rat kidney structures, predominantly in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle as well as in proximal tubules and preglomerular arterioles. These areas also demonstrated higher HO activity as measured by increased conversion of heme to bilirubin and carbon monoxide. Functional expression of the human HO-1 gene was associated with a decrease in blood pressure in 4- and 8-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats. Compared with nontransduced rats, human HO-1 gene overexpression in transduced rats was associated with a 35% decrease in urinary 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a potent vasoconstrictor and an inhibitor of tubular Na(+) transport, which may be related to the decrease in blood pressure.

  16. Isolation of the catalytically competent small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from spinach under an extremely alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Incharoensakdi, A; Takabe, T; Takabe, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-07-16

    A method for isolating the small subunit (B) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach leaf using an alkaline buffer (pH 11.2) in combination with sucrose gradient centrifugation is described. Although the yield of isolated subunit B (ca. 20%) was comparable to that previously described (ca. 25%) using the acid precipitation method [Andrews, T.J. and Lorimer, G.H. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260: 4632-4636], the isolated subunit B in this report suffered less denaturation (ca. 30%) as estimated from kinetic analysis of its reassembly with large subunit (A) derived from Aphanothece halophytica. Studies on the kinetic properties of the reassembled enzyme molecules suggested that spinach subunit B does not influence the affinity of the enzyme for substrate CO2. The catalytic core (A8) of spinach RuBisCO could not be isolated in the native form.

  17. The nature of L8 and L8S8 forms of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ruiz, J; McFadden, B A

    1987-04-01

    L8 and L8S8 forms of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) have been prepared from Chromatium vinosum by the extremely mild method of centrifugal fractionation. Only the L8S8 form is detectable in crude extracts of this organism. Both forms show immunological identify in double diffusion studies using antibody to L subunits of the L8S8 form. L subunits from both L8 and L8S8 enzymes are identical by the criteria of peptides observed after limited proteolysis and N-terminal sequence analysis. In addition, these subunits show regions of homology with L subunits from Rhodospirillum rubrum, Anacystis nidulans, and spinach. S subunits of the C. vinosum enzyme are completely homologous to those from A. nidulans and higher plants from the 18th through 25th residue, a stretch preceded in all cases by two basic amino acids.

  18. Protective effect of heme oxygenase induction in ethinylestradiol-induced cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Muchova, Lucie; Vanova, Katerina; Suk, Jakub; Micuda, Stanislav; Dolezelova, Eva; Fuksa, Leos; Cerny, Dalibor; Farghali, Hassan; Zelenkova, Miroslava; Lenicek, Martin; Wong, Ronald J; Vreman, Hendrik J; Vitek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-induced cholestasis is characterized by impaired hepatic uptake and biliary bile acids secretion because of changes in hepatocyte transporter expression. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), the inducible isozyme in heme catabolism, is mediated via the Bach1/Nrf2 pathway, and protects livers from toxic, oxidative and inflammatory insults. However, its role in cholestasis remains unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of HMOX1 induction by heme on ethinylestradiol-induced cholestasis and possible underlying mechanisms. Wistar rats were given ethinylestradiol (5 mg/kg s.c.) for 5 days. HMOX1 was induced by heme (15 μmol/kg i.p.) 24 hrs prior to ethinylestradiol. Serum cholestatic markers, hepatocyte and renal membrane transporter expression, and biliary and urinary bile acids excretion were quantified. Ethinylestradiol significantly increased cholestatic markers (P ≤ 0.01), decreased biliary bile acid excretion (39%, P = 0.01), down-regulated hepatocyte transporters (Ntcp/Oatp1b2/Oatp1a4/Mrp2, P ≤ 0.05), and up-regulated Mrp3 (348%, P ≤ 0.05). Heme pre-treatment normalized cholestatic markers, increased biliary bile acid excretion (167%, P ≤ 0.05) and up-regulated hepatocyte transporter expression. Moreover, heme induced Mrp3 expression in control (319%, P ≤ 0.05) and ethinylestradiol-treated rats (512%, P ≤ 0.05). In primary rat hepatocytes, Nrf2 silencing completely abolished heme-induced Mrp3 expression. Additionally, heme significantly increased urinary bile acid clearance via up-regulation (Mrp2/Mrp4) or down-regulation (Mrp3) of renal transporters (P ≤ 0.05). We conclude that HMOX1 induction by heme increases hepatocyte transporter expression, subsequently stimulating bile flow in cholestasis. Also, heme stimulates hepatic Mrp3 expression via a Nrf2-dependent mechanism. Bile acids transported by Mrp3 to the plasma are highly cleared into the urine, resulting in normal plasma bile acid levels. Thus, HMOX1

  19. The protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Aztatzi-Santillán, Emmanuel; Nares-López, Felipe Eduardo; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Aguilera, Penélope; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena

    2010-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of death and disability in industrialized countries, with no curative treatments to date. Identification of potential targets and elucidation of their physiological role under stress conditions may give support to the development of drugs and strategies to contend with this pathology. In the last years, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been considered by many groups as a potential target in ischemic damage. HO-1 is the enzyme responsible for the conversion of the heme group to billiverdin, carbon monoxide and iron; a highly regulated cytoprotective enzyme able to respond to numerous chemical or physical stressors, many of which decrease oxygen availability and generate oxidative stress. The disruption of HO-1 activity has been widely associated with a bad outcome in many disorders, and a protective role through its heme catabolism products has been observed in transplantation, cardiac ischemia, limb ischemia/reperfusion and different alterations that involve ischemia and reperfusion events. Here, we review recent reports supporting the protective role of HO-1 in cerebral ischemia. Results on the endogenous HO-1 response, overexpression of HO-1 and compounds that reduce ischemic damage through the induction of HO-1 in cerebral ischemia in in vivo and in vitro models are analyzed.

  20. Modulation of Antiviral Immunity by Heme Oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective enzyme expressed in most cell types in the organism. Under several stress stimuli, HO-1 expression and activity is up-regulated to catalyze the rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation into carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. Besides its effects on cell metabolism, HO-1 is also capable of modulating host innate and adaptive immune responses in response to sepsis, transplantation, and autoimmunity, and preventing oxidative damage associated with inflammation. In addition, recent studies have reported that HO-1 can exert a significant antiviral activity against a wide variety of viruses, including HIV, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, enterovirus 71, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, dengue virus, and Ebola virus, among others. Herein, we address the current understanding of the functional significance of HO-1 against a variety of viruses and its potential as a therapeutic strategy to prevent and control viral infections. Furthermore, we review the most important features of the immunoregulatory functions for this enzyme.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  2. Heme oxygenase-2 is neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, S.; Sampei, K.; Goto, S.; Alkayed, N. J.; Guastella, D.; Blackshaw, S.; Gallagher, M.; Traystman, R. J.; Hurn, P. D.; Koehler, R. C.; Snyder, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is believed to be a potent antioxidant enzyme in the nervous system; it degrades heme from heme-containing proteins, giving rise to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin, which is rapidly reduced to bilirubin. The first identified isoform of the enzyme, HO1, is an inducible heat-shock protein expressed in high levels in peripheral organs and barely detectable under normal conditions in the brain, whereas HO2 is constitutive and most highly concentrated in the brain. Interestingly, although HO2 is constitutively expressed, its activity can be modulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrated that bilirubin, formed from HO2, is neuroprotectant, as neurotoxicity is augmented in neuronal cultures from mice with targeted deletion of HO2 (HO2(-/-)) and reversed by low concentrations of bilirubin. We now show that neural damage following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion, a model of focal ischemia of vascular stroke, is substantially worsened in HO2(-/-) animals. By contrast, stroke damage is not significantly altered in HO1(-/-) mice, despite their greater debility. Neural damage following intracranial injections of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) is also accentuated in HO2(-/-) animals. These findings establish HO2 as an endogenous neuroprotective system in the brain whose pharmacologic manipulation may have therapeutic relevance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:10602774

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 in Kidney Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lever, Jeremie M; Boddu, Ravindra; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-07-20

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a considerable burden in healthcare. The heme oxygenase (HO) system plays an important role in regulating oxidative stress and is protective in a variety of human and animal models of kidney disease. Preclinical studies of the HO system have led to the development of several clinical trials targeting the enzyme or its products. Connection of HO, ferritin, and other proteins involved in iron regulation has provided important insight into mechanisms of damage in AKI. Also, HO-1 expression is important in the pathogenesis of hypertension, diabetic kidney disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease. Despite intriguing discoveries, no drugs targeting the HO system have been translated to the clinic. Meanwhile, treatments for AKI and CKD are urgently needed. Many factors have likely contributed to challenges in clinical translation, including variation in animal models, difficulties in obtaining human tissue, and complexity of the disease processes being studied. The HO system represents a promising avenue of investigation that may lead to targeted therapeutics. Tissue-specific gene modulation, widening the scope of animal studies, and continued clinical research will provide valuable insight into the role HO plays in kidney homeostasis and disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 165-183.

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-10-20

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression.We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells.In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression.

  6. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 promotes metastatic tumor colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Huei; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Chang, Po-Chiao; Chau, Lee-Young

    2015-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme degradation enzyme with antioxidant and immune-modulatory functions. HO-1 promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Whether HO-1 has an effect on cancer progression through stromal compartments is less clear. Here we show that the growth of tumor engrafted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice was not affected by host HO-1 expression. However, lung metastasis arisen from subcutaneous tumor or circulating tumor cells was significantly reduced in HO-1(+/-) mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. The reduced lung metastasis was also observed in B6 mice bearing HO-1(+/-) bone marrow as comparing to WT chimeras, indicating that HO-1 expression in hematopoietic cells impacts tumor colonization at the metastatic site. Further experiments demonstrated that the numbers of myeloid cells recruited to pulmonary premetastatic niches and metastatic loci were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice than in WT mice. Likewise, the extents of tumor cell extravasation and colonization at the metastatic loci in the early phase of metastasis were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that HO-1 impacted chemoattractant-induced myeloid cell migration by modulating p38 kinase signaling. Moreover, myeloid HO-1-induced expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-10 promoted tumor cell transendothelial migration and STAT3 activation in vitro. These data support a pathological role of myeloid HO-1 in metastasis and suggest a possibility of targeting myeloid HO-1 for cancer treatment.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Higashimura, Yasuki

    2014-12-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation and produces carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. HO-1, a stress-inducible protein, is induced by various oxidative and inflammatory signals. Consequently, HO-1 expression has been regarded as an adaptive cellular response against inflammatory response and oxidative injury. Although several transcriptional factors and signaling cascades are involved in HO-1 regulation, the two main pathways of Nrf2/Bach1 system and IL-10/HO-1 axis exist in monocyte/macrophage. Macrophages are broadly divisible into two groups: pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. More recently, several novel macrophage subsets have been identified including Mhem, Mox, and M4 macrophages. Of these, M2 macrophages, Mhem, and Mox are HO-1 highly expressing macrophages. HO-1 has been recognized as having major immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been demonstrated in HO-1 deficient mice and human cases of genetic HO-1 deficiency. However, the mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory actions of HO-1 remains poorly defined. This review specifically addresses macrophage polarization. The present current evidence indicates that HO-1 induction mediated by multiple pathways can drive the phenotypic shift to M2 macrophages and suggests that HO-1 induction in macrophages is a potential therapeutic approach to immunomodulation in widely diverse human diseases.

  8. The Copper Active Site of CBM33 Polysaccharide Oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme’s three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  9. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 against vascular insufficiency: roles of atherosclerotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), an enzyme essential for heme degradation, shows anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties via the production of bile pigments, carbon monoxide (CO) and ferritin induction under various pathophysiological conditions. A number of recent studies have shown biological effects of HO reaction in cardiovascular disorders. An inducible form of HO, HO-1, is induced by a variety of stresses such as oxidized lipoproteins, cytokines, hemodynamic changes, angiotensin II and nitric oxide (NO) in vascular wall. HO-1 induction seems to function as an adaptive response against these injurious stimuli. HO-1 induction in artery wall scavenges reactive oxygen species, which leads to the attenuation of monocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. HO-1 induction also reduces lipid peroxidation in plasma and artery wall. These properties of HO-1 suggest anti-atherogenic roles of this enzyme. In this review, roles of endothelial HO-1 expression and bilirubin in atherogenesis are also discussed. HO-1 also seems to play a significant role in restenosis after angioplasty, which is a major clinical problem associated with atherosclerosis. Recent progress in human HO-1 genetics supports these experimental results. This review aims to reaffirm current problems in the biological aspects of HO and suggest future research direction and clinical application.

  11. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Durante, William

    2011-06-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the metabolism of free heme into equimolar amounts of ferrous iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. Biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently been identified as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular inflammatory disease, including atherosclerosis. HO-1 represses inflammation by removing the pro-inflammatory molecule heme and by generating CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These HO-1 reaction products are capable of blocking innate and adaptive immune responses by modifying the activation, differentiation, maturation, and/or polarization of numerous immune cells, including endothelial cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and platelets. These cellular actions by CO and bile pigments result in diminished leukocyte recruitment and infiltration, and pro-inflammatory mediator production within atherosclerotic lesions. This review highlights the mechanisms by which HO-1 suppresses vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, and explores possible therapeutic modalities by which HO-1 and its reaction products can be employed to ameliorate vascular inflammatory disease.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from metabolism to molecular therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2009-09-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a ubiquitous inducible stress-response protein, serves a major metabolic function in heme turnover. HO activity cleaves heme to form biliverdin-IXalpha, carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Genetic experiments have revealed a central role for HO-1 in tissue homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, and in the pathogenesis of disease. Four decades of research have witnessed not only progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation and function of this illustrious enzyme, but also have opened remarkable translational applications for HO-1 and its reaction products. CO, once regarded as a metabolic waste, can act as an endogenous mediator of cellular signaling and vascular function. Exogenous application of CO by inhalation or pharmacologic delivery can confer cytoprotection in preclinical models of lung/vascular injury and disease, based on anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties. The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, end products of heme degradation, have also shown potential as therapeutics in vascular disease based on anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. Further translational and clinical trials research will unveil whether the HO-1 system or any of its reaction products can be successfully applied as molecular medicine in human disease.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 in inflammation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Ling; Ho, Yen-Chun; Lin, Chen-Yu; Yet, Shaw-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease accounts for 1 of every 2.9 deaths in the United States, thus the burden of the disease remains high. Given the high mortality and escalating healthcare cost for the disease, it is of urgent need to treat cardiovascular disease effectively. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the oxidation of heme to generate carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. These reaction products of HO-1 have potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative functions. Although HO-1 is expressed at low levels in most tissues under normal basal conditions, it is highly inducible in response to various pathophysiological stresses. Numerous studies have indicated that HO-1 induction is an adaptive defense mechanism to protect cells and tissues against injury in many disease settings. This review highlights the role of HO-1 in inflammation and several cardiovascular diseases—atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, graft survival after heart transplantation, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Given that inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with development of cardiovascular disease and that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, HO-1 is emerging as a great potential therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:22254194

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  16. The non-canonical functions of the heme oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vanella, Luca; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Tibullo, Daniele; Forte, Stefano; Zappalà, Agata; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-10-18

    Heme oxygenase (HO) isoforms catalyze the conversion of heme to carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin with a concurrent release of iron, which can drive the synthesis of ferritin for iron sequestration. Most of the studies so far were directed at evaluating the protective effect of these enzymes because of their ability to generate antioxidant and antiapoptotic molecules such as CO and bilirubin. Recent evidences are suggesting that HO may possess other important physiological functions, which are not related to its enzymatic activity and for which we would like to introduce for the first time the term "non canonical functions". Recent evidence suggest that both HO isoforms may form protein-protein interactions (i.e. cytochrome P450, adiponectin, CD91) thus serving as chaperone-like protein. In addition, truncated HO-1 isoform was localized in the nuclear compartment under certain experimental conditions (i.e. excitotoxicity, hypoxia) regulating the activity of important nuclear transcription factors (i.e. Nrf2) and DNA repair. In the present review, we discuss three potential signaling mechanisms that we refer to as the non-canonical functions of the HO isoforms: protein-protein interaction, intracellular compartmentalization, and extracellular secretion. The aim of the present review is to describe each of this mechanism and all the aspects warranting additional studies in order to unravel all the functions of the HO system.

  17. Isolation and characterization of the rat tryptophan oxygenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, W; Scherer, G; Danesch, U; Zentgraf, H; Matthias, P; Strange, C M; Röwekamp, W; Schütz, G

    1982-01-01

    Tryptophan oxygenase (TO, EC 1.13.1.12) from rat liver is subject to glucocorticoid and developmental control. To study the mechanism of regulation, TO mRNA sequences and the chromosomal TO gene were cloned. From a cDNA library prepared from rat liver poly(A)+ RNA enriched for TO mRNA, a recombinant plasmid containing TO cDNA sequences was identified by translation of hybrid-selected RNA and immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed against TO. This cDNA clone hybridizes to a mRNA 2000 bases long that is inducible by dexamethasone. With this clone as probe we isolated from a bacteriophage lambda rat DNA library genomic clones which together span a region of 32 kilobase pairs (kb). Heteroduplex analysis revealed that the gene extends over 19 kb and is interrupted by at least 11 introns. To characterize the presumptive control region the DNA sequence around the 5' end of the TO gene was determined. S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed two separate start sites for TO mRNA transcription within this region. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6327261

  18. Therapeutic roles of heme oxygenase-1 in metabolic diseases: curcumin and resveratrol analogues as possible inducers of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  19. Therapeutic Roles of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Metabolic Diseases: Curcumin and Resveratrol Analogues as Possible Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression. PMID:24101950

  20. Oxidative cyclizations in orthosomycin biosynthesis expand the known chemistry of an oxygenase superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; McCranie, Emilianne K.; Smith, Jarrod A.; Sarwar, Maruf; Mathieu, Jeannette L.; Gitschlag, Bryan L.; Du, Yu; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T. M.

    2015-08-03

    Orthosomycins are oligosaccharide antibiotics that include avilamycin, everninomicin, and hygromycin B and are hallmarked by a rigidifying interglycosidic spirocyclic ortho-δ-lactone (orthoester) linkage between at least one pair of carbohydrates. A subset of orthosomycins additionally contain a carbohydrate capped by a methylenedioxy bridge. The orthoester linkage is necessary for antibiotic activity but rarely observed in natural products. Orthoester linkage and methylenedioxy bridge biosynthesis require similar oxidative cyclizations adjacent to a sugar ring. In this paper, we have identified a conserved group of nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate–dependent oxygenases likely responsible for this chemistry. High-resolution crystal structures of the EvdO1 and EvdO2 oxygenases of everninomicin biosynthesis, the AviO1 oxygenase of avilamycin biosynthesis, and HygX of hygromycin B biosynthesis show how these enzymes accommodate large substrates, a challenge that requires a variation in metal coordination in HygX. Excitingly, the ternary complex of HygX with cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate and putative product hygromycin B identified an orientation of one glycosidic linkage of hygromycin B consistent with metal-catalyzed hydrogen atom abstraction from substrate. These structural results are complemented by gene disruption of the oxygenases evdO1 and evdMO1 from the everninomicin biosynthetic cluster, which demonstrate that functional oxygenase activity is critical for antibiotic production. Finally, our data therefore support a role for these enzymes in the production of key features of the orthosomycin antibiotics.

  1. RubisCO Early Oxygenase Activity: A Kinetic and Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ślesak, Ireneusz; Ślesak, Halina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2017-10-04

    RubisCO (D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) is Earth's main enzyme responsible for CO2 fixation via carboxylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) into organic matter. Besides the carboxylation reaction, RubisCO also catalyzes the oxygenation of RuBP by O2 , which is probably as old as its carboxylation properties. Based on molecular phylogeny, the occurrence of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-removing system and kinetic properties of different RubisCO forms, we postulated that RubisCO oxygenase activity appeared in local microoxic areas, yet before the appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here, in reviewing the literature, we present a novel hypothesis: the RubisCO early oxygenase activity hypothesis. This hypothesis may be compared with the exaptation hypothesis, according to which latent RubisCO oxygenase properties emerged later during the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere. The reconstruction of ancestral RubisCO forms using ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) techniques, as a promising way for testing of RubisCO early oxygenase activity hypothesis, is presented. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Alternative 5' untranslated regions are involved in expression regulation of human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marcel; Sponholz, Christoph; Slaba, Monique; Wissuwa, Bianka; Claus, Ralf A; Menzel, Uwe; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2071746 and a (GT)n microsatellite within the human gene encoding heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) are associated with incidence or outcome in a variety of diseases. Most of these associations involve either release of heme or oxidative stress. Both polymorphisms are localized in the promoter region, but previously reported correlations with heme oxygenase-1 expression remain not coherent. This ambiguity suggests a more complex organization of the 5' gene region which we sought to investigate more fully. We evaluated the 5' end of HMOX1 and found a novel first exon 1a placing the two previously reported polymorphisms in intronic or exonic positions within the 5' untranslated region respectively. Expression of exon 1a can be induced in HepG2 hepatoma cells by hemin and is a repressor of heme oxygenase-1 translation as shown by luciferase reporter assays. Moreover, minigene approaches revealed that the quantitative outcome of alternative splicing within the 5' untranslated region is affected by the (GT)n microsatellite. This data supporting an extended HMOX1 gene model and provide further insights into expression regulation of heme oxygenase-1. Alternative splicing within the HMOX1 5' untranslated region contributes to translational regulation and is a mechanistic feature involved in the interplay between genetic variations, heme oxygenase-1 expression and disease outcome.

  3. Oxidative cyclizations in orthosomycin biosynthesis expand the known chemistry of an oxygenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; McCranie, Emilianne K.; Smith, Jarrod A.; Sarwar, Maruf; Mathieu, Jeannette L.; Gitschlag, Bryan L.; Du, Yu; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Orthosomycins are oligosaccharide antibiotics that include avilamycin, everninomicin, and hygromycin B and are hallmarked by a rigidifying interglycosidic spirocyclic ortho-δ-lactone (orthoester) linkage between at least one pair of carbohydrates. A subset of orthosomycins additionally contain a carbohydrate capped by a methylenedioxy bridge. The orthoester linkage is necessary for antibiotic activity but rarely observed in natural products. Orthoester linkage and methylenedioxy bridge biosynthesis require similar oxidative cyclizations adjacent to a sugar ring. We have identified a conserved group of nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate–dependent oxygenases likely responsible for this chemistry. High-resolution crystal structures of the EvdO1 and EvdO2 oxygenases of everninomicin biosynthesis, the AviO1 oxygenase of avilamycin biosynthesis, and HygX of hygromycin B biosynthesis show how these enzymes accommodate large substrates, a challenge that requires a variation in metal coordination in HygX. Excitingly, the ternary complex of HygX with cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate and putative product hygromycin B identified an orientation of one glycosidic linkage of hygromycin B consistent with metal-catalyzed hydrogen atom abstraction from substrate. These structural results are complemented by gene disruption of the oxygenases evdO1 and evdMO1 from the everninomicin biosynthetic cluster, which demonstrate that functional oxygenase activity is critical for antibiotic production. Our data therefore support a role for these enzymes in the production of key features of the orthosomycin antibiotics. PMID:26240321

  4. Oxidative cyclizations in orthosomycin biosynthesis expand the known chemistry of an oxygenase superfamily

    DOE PAGES

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; McCranie, Emilianne K.; Smith, Jarrod A.; ...

    2015-08-03

    Orthosomycins are oligosaccharide antibiotics that include avilamycin, everninomicin, and hygromycin B and are hallmarked by a rigidifying interglycosidic spirocyclic ortho-δ-lactone (orthoester) linkage between at least one pair of carbohydrates. A subset of orthosomycins additionally contain a carbohydrate capped by a methylenedioxy bridge. The orthoester linkage is necessary for antibiotic activity but rarely observed in natural products. Orthoester linkage and methylenedioxy bridge biosynthesis require similar oxidative cyclizations adjacent to a sugar ring. In this paper, we have identified a conserved group of nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate–dependent oxygenases likely responsible for this chemistry. High-resolution crystal structures of the EvdO1 and EvdO2 oxygenases ofmore » everninomicin biosynthesis, the AviO1 oxygenase of avilamycin biosynthesis, and HygX of hygromycin B biosynthesis show how these enzymes accommodate large substrates, a challenge that requires a variation in metal coordination in HygX. Excitingly, the ternary complex of HygX with cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate and putative product hygromycin B identified an orientation of one glycosidic linkage of hygromycin B consistent with metal-catalyzed hydrogen atom abstraction from substrate. These structural results are complemented by gene disruption of the oxygenases evdO1 and evdMO1 from the everninomicin biosynthetic cluster, which demonstrate that functional oxygenase activity is critical for antibiotic production. Finally, our data therefore support a role for these enzymes in the production of key features of the orthosomycin antibiotics.« less

  5. Heme oxygenase-2 products activate IKCa: role of CO and iron in guinea pig portal vein smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Gagov, Hristo S; Itzev, Dimitar; Duridanova, Dessislava B

    2004-01-01

    Hemin (10 microM) and carbon monoxide (CO) increased iberiotoxin-blockable IKCa in portal vein smooth muscle cells. CO-induced IKCa activation was abolished by 10 microM ODQ, 10 microM cyclopiazonic acid and 1 microM KT5823. The hemin-induced effect on IKCa was abolished by pretreatment with Sn-protoporphyrin IX, a heme oxygenase inhibitor and Fe2+ chelator but was insensitive to inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). There was no effect of hemin on IKCa in the presence of 3 microM dithiotreitol into the bath or 3 mM glutathione into the pipette solution. Superoxide dismutase (1000 U/ml) or catalase (3000 U/ml) added into the pipette solution also abolished the effect of hemin on IKCa in this tissue. Additionally, 10 microM hemin could not influence IKCa in Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 30 microM SKF 95356. It was concluded that CO increases IKCa via its "conventional" signaling pathway, which involves soluble GC and PKG activation and subsequent stimulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump activity resulting in Ca2+-dependent activation of IKCa due to the accumulation of Ca2+ into the space near the plasma membrane. On the other hand, internally produced CO could not yield the same IKCa increase, while Fe2+ derived from heme oxygenase 2-dependent degradation of hemin in portal vein smooth muscle cells gives rise to reactive oxygen species namely hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Both radicals are responsible for the SKF 95356-sensitive non-selective cation channel activation, the Ca2+ influx and the subsequent increase of Ca2+ concentration near the plasma membrane that augments the KCa channel activity.

  6. The Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore biosynthetic gene sidA, encoding L-ornithine N5-oxygenase, is required for virulence.

    PubMed

    Hissen, Anna H T; Wan, Adrian N C; Warwas, Mark L; Pinto, Linda J; Moore, Margo M

    2005-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of invasive mold infection and is a serious problem in immunocompromised populations worldwide. We have previously shown that survival of A. fumigatus in serum may be related to secretion of siderophores. In this study, we identified and characterized the sidA gene of A. fumigatus, which encodes l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase, the first committed step in hydroxamate siderophore biosynthesis. A. fumigatus sidA codes for a protein of 501 amino acids with significant homology to other fungal l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenases. A stable DeltasidA strain was created by deletion of A. fumigatus sidA. This strain was unable to synthesize the siderophores N',N",N'''-triacetylfusarinine C (TAF) and ferricrocin. Growth of the DeltasidA strain was the same as that of the wild type in rich media; however, the DeltasidA strain was unable to grow in low-iron defined media or media containing 10% human serum unless supplemented with TAF or ferricrocin. No significant differences in ferric reduction activities were observed between the parental strain and the DeltasidA strain, indicating that blocking siderophore secretion did not result in upregulation of this pathway. Unlike the parental strain, the DeltasidA strain was unable to remove iron from human transferrin. A rescued strain (DeltasidA + sidA) was constructed; it produced siderophores and had the same growth as the wild type on iron-limited media. Unlike the wild-type and rescued strains, the DeltasidA strain was avirulent in a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, indicating that sidA is necessary for A. fumigatus virulence.

  7. The multiple functions of heme oxygenase-1 in the liver.

    PubMed

    Sass, G; Barikbin, R; Tiegs, G

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) are essential enzymes which degrade heme into carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin and free iron. Due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and, as recently described, anti-viral properties the inducible HO isoform HO-1 is an important molecule which could find its way into therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. Acute and chronic liver injuries including acute liver failure, alcoholic or viral hepatitis, chronic inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma are life threatening diseases and as a consequence might result in the necessity of liver transplantation. HO-1 as well as its reaction products of heme degradation has been linked to cytoprotection. HO-1 induction in rodent models of acute and chronic hepatic inflammation resulted in improvement of liver damage and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore HO-1 induction interfered with fibrosis progression in mice and partially resolved existing fibrosis. Likewise, HO-1 induction interfered with replication of hepatitis viruses B and C, which frequently are the reason for chronic hepatitis and subsequent tumor growth. Liver transplantation is limited by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is characterized by hypoxia and nutrient deficiency resulting in oxidative stress, apoptosis and immune activation. Induction of HO-1 and application predominantly of CO have been shown to interfere with I/R liver injury and to improve recipient and graft survival. On the other hand HO-1 has been shown to be over-expressed in various tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Due to its anti-apoptotic properties this bears the risk to promote tumor growth. Anti-apoptotic effects are predominantly mediated by CO. This review aims to summarize beneficial as well as detrimental effects of HO-1 and its products within the liver.

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Myeloid Cell Trafficking in AKI.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Kamal, Ahmed I; Boddu, Ravindra; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C; Rangarajan, Sunil; Chen, Bo; Curtis, Lisa M; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is mediated by a complex cascade of events, including the immune response, that occur secondary to injury to renal epithelial cells. We tested the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which is protective in ischemia-reperfusion injury, regulates trafficking of myeloid-derived immune cells in the kidney. Age-matched male wild-type (HO-1(+/+)), HO-1-knockout (HO-1(-/-)), and humanized HO-1-overexpressing (HBAC) mice underwent bilateral renal ischemia for 10 minutes. Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulted in significantly worse renal structure and function and increased mortality in HO-1(-/-) mice. In addition, there were more macrophages (CD45(+) CD11b(hi)F4/80(lo)) and neutrophils (CD45(+) CD11b(hi) MHCII(-) Gr-1(hi)) in HO-1(-/-) kidneys than in sham and HO-1(+/+) control kidneys subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. However, ischemic injury resulted in a significant decrease in the intrarenal resident dendritic cell (DC; CD45(+)MHCII(+)CD11b(lo)F4/80(hi)) population in HO-1(-/-) kidneys compared with controls. Syngeneic transplant experiments utilizing green fluorescent protein-positive HO-1(+/+) or HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys and green fluorescent protein-negative HO-1(+/+) recipients confirmed increased migration of the resident DC population from HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys, compared to HO-1(+/+) donor kidneys, to the peripheral lymphoid organs. This effect on renal DC migration was corroborated in myeloid-specific HO-1(-/-) mice subjected to bilateral ischemia. These mice also displayed impaired renal recovery and increased fibrosis at day 7 after injury. These results highlight an important role for HO-1 in orchestrating the trafficking of myeloid cells in AKI, which may represent a key pathway for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 promoter polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Yang, Wei; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Zhao, Hui; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K; Shaw, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    Spina bifida is the most common form of neural tube defects (NTDs). Etiologies of NTDs are multifactorial, and oxidative stress is believed to play a key role in NTD development. Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, has multiple protective properties including mediating antioxidant processes, making it an ideal candidate for study. The inducible HO isoform (HO-1) has two functional genetic polymorphisms: (GT)n dinucleotide repeats and A(-413)T SNP (rs2071746), both of which can affect its promoter activity. However, no study has investigated a possible association between HO-1 genetic polymorphisms and risk of NTDs. This case-control study included 152 spina bifida cases (all myelomeningoceles) and 148 non-malformed controls obtained from the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program reflecting births during 1990 to 1999. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and amplified fragment length polymorphisms/restriction fragment length polymorphisms using genomic DNA extracted from archived newborn blood spots. Genotype and haplotype frequencies of two HO-1 promoter polymorphisms between cases and controls were compared. For (GT)n dinucleotide repeat lengths and the A(-413)T SNP, no significant differences in allele frequencies or genotypes were found. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between the HO-1 polymorphisms (D': 0.833); however, haplotype analyses did not show increased risk of spina bifida overall or by race/ethnicity. Although, an association was not found between HO-1 polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida, we speculate that the combined effect of low HO-1 expression and exposures to known environmental oxidative stressors (low folate status or diabetes), may overwhelm antioxidant defenses and increase risk of NTDs and warrants further study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Serum heme oxygenase-1 levels in patients with primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse Nur; Laloglu, Esra; Ozkaya, Alev Lazoglu; Yilmaz, Emsal Pınar Topdagi

    2017-04-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea effects the life-quality of women negatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) activity together with malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in patients with primary dysmenorrhea. A total of 28 nulliparous women with the diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea and 26 healthy controls were included in this study. On the first day of menstruation, all patients underwent ultrasound examination to exclude pelvic pathology and the visual analogue scale was applied to patients. Patient's visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, age, body mass index (BMI), menstrual cycle length (day), length of bleeding (day) were recorded. In the same day, fasting blood samples were taken from each patient for biochemical analysis. Serum MDA, NO and HO1 levels were found to be higher in women with primary dysmenorrhea compared to healthy controls (p = 0.012, p = 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively). There were no correlation among serum levels of HO1, NO and MDA, age, BMI, cycle length, pain score and menses duration in both groups. In Pearson's correlation analysis, positive correlation was found between HO1 levels with the NO levels (r = 0.316, p < 0.05) and VAS scores (r = 0.520, p < 0.01). Also, positive correlation was found between MDA levels and VAS scores (r = 0.327, p < 0.05). Serum HO1, NO and MDA levels increase in patients with primary dysmenorrhea. Antioxidant support might be helpful to reduce pain severity in primary dysmenorrhea.

  11. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lanceta, Lilibeth; Mattingly, Jacob M; Li, Chi; Eaton, John W

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal) iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment). Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 and neurodegeneration: expanding frontiers of engagement.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Hyman M; Song, Wei; Zukor, Hillel; Hascalovici, Jacob R; Zeligman, David

    2009-07-01

    The heme oxygenases (HOs), responsible for the degradation of heme to biliverdin/bilirubin, free iron and CO, have been heavily implicated in mammalian CNS aging and disease. In normal brain, the expression of HO-2 is constitutive, abundant and fairly ubiquitous, whereas HO-1 mRNA and protein are confined to small populations of scattered neurons and neuroglia. In contradistinction to HO-2, the ho-1 gene (Hmox1) is exquisitely sensitive to induction by a wide range of pro-oxidant and other stressors. In Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment, immunoreactive HO-1 protein is over-expressed in neurons and astrocytes of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus relative to age-matched, cognitively intact controls and co-localizes to senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and corpora amylacea. In Parkinson disease, HO-1 is markedly over-expressed in astrocytes of the substantia nigra and decorates Lewy bodies in affected dopaminergic neurons. HMOX1 is also up-regulated in glial cells surrounding human cerebral infarcts, hemorrhages and contusions, within multiple sclerosis plaques, and in other degenerative and inflammatory human CNS disorders. Heme-derived free ferrous iron, CO, and biliverdin/bilirubin are biologically active substances that have been shown to either ameliorate or exacerbate neural injury contingent upon specific disease models employed, the intensity and duration of HO-1 expression and the nature of the prevailing redox microenvironment. In 'stressed' astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial sequestration of non-transferrin iron and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure amply documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other aging-related neurodegenerative disorders. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact cell survival and neuroplasticity in these conditions by modulating brain sterol metabolism and proteosomal degradation of neurotoxic protein aggregates.

  14. Neural roles for heme oxygenase: Contrasts to nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Barañano, David E.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2001-01-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) systems display notable similarities as well as differences. HO and NOS are both oxidative enzymes using NADPH as an electron donor. The constitutive forms of the enzyme are differentially activated, with calcium entry stimulating NOS by binding to calmodulin, whereas calcium entry activates protein kinase C to phosphorylate and activate HO2. Although both NO and carbon monoxide (CO) stimulate soluble guanylyl cyclase to form cGMP, NO also S-nitrosylates selected protein targets. Both involve constitutive and inducible biosynthetic enzymes. However, functions of the inducible forms are virtual opposites. Macrophage-inducible NOS generates NO to kill other cells, whereas HO1 generates bilirubin to exert antioxidant cytoprotective effects and also provides cytoprotection by facilitating iron extrusion from cells. The neuronal form of HO, HO2, is also cytoprotective. Normally, neural NO in the brain seems to exert some sort of behavioral inhibition. However, excess release of NO in response to glutamate's N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation leads to stroke damage. On the other hand, massive neuronal firing during a stroke presumably activates HO2, leading to neuroprotective actions of bilirubin. Loss of this neuroprotection after HO inhibition by mutant forms of amyloid precursor protein may mediate neurotoxicity in Familial Alzheimer's Disease. NO and CO both appear to be neurotransmitters in the brain and peripheral autonomic nervous system. They also are physiologic endothelial-derived relaxing factors for blood vessels. In the gastrointestinal pathway, NO and CO appear to function as coneurotransmitters, both stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase to cause smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:11572959

  15. Natural heme oxygenase-1 inducers in hepatobiliary function

    PubMed Central

    Volti, Giovanni Li; Sacerdoti, David; Giacomo, Claudia Di; Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Scacco, Antonio; Murabito, Paolo; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Gazzolo, Diego; Abella, Raul; Frigiola, Alessandro; Galvano, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological effects of natural antioxidants, their extracts or their major active components, have been reported in recent decades. Most of these compounds are characterized by a phenolic structure, similar to that of α-tocopherol, and present antioxidant properties that have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenols may increase the capacity of endogenous antioxidant defences and modulate the cellular redox state. Changes in the cellular redox state may have wide-ranging consequences for cellular growth and differentiation. The majority of in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far have attributed the protective effect of bioactive polyphenols to their chemical reactivity toward free radicals and their capacity to prevent the oxidation of important intracellular components. However, in recent years a possible novel aspect in the mode of action of these compounds has been suggested; that is, the ultimate stimulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is likely to account for the established and powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties of these polyphenols. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression by means of natural compounds contributes to protection against liver damage in various experimental models. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against various stressors in several pathological conditions. PMID:18985801

  16. Developmental expression of heme oxygenase in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Dennery, Phyllis A; Lee, Christen S; Ford, Berendera S; Weng, Yi-Hao; Yang, Guang; Rodgers, Pamela A

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of bilirubin, is expressed in the lung and may serve as an antioxidant. This enzyme results in the formation of antioxidant bile pigments and the degradation of pro-oxidant heme. We wanted to evaluate the differences in expression of HO-1, the inducible form, and HO-2, the constitutive isoenzyme, during lung maturation and document whether lung HO expression was similar to that of other antioxidant enzymes. Lung total HO activity and HO-1 and HO-2 proteins as well as HO-1 and HO-2 mRNA were evaluated in animals from 16 d of gestation (e(16.5)) to 2 mo of age. Heme content was also evaluated because heme is the substrate of the reaction. HO-1 mRNA was maximal at e(19.5) and e(20.5), whereas HO-2 mRNA was not changed throughout maturation. Lung HO-1 protein was highest on the first days of life and lowest in adults, whereas HO-2 protein was maximally expressed at postnatal d 5 and then declined to reach adult values. As to HO activity, there was a prenatal peak at e(20.5), a second lesser peak at d 5, and thereafter a decline to adult values. Lung heme content was inversely correlated with HO activity or protein as the highest heme values were seen in adults with the lowest HO activity. In response to hyperoxia, HO-1 mRNA was induced only in the adult lungs. A better understanding of the maturational regulation of lung HO will define a role for HO in newborns at risk for oxygen toxicity.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes the persistence of Leishmania chagasi infection

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Nívea F.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Quintela, Graziele C.; Andrade, Daniela; Abánades, Daniel R.; Melo, Enaldo V.; Silva, Angela M.; Brodyskn, Cláudia I.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Almeida, Roque P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Borges, Valéria M.

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains a major public health problem worldwide. This disease is highly associated with chronic inflammation and a lack of the cellular immune responses against Leishmania. It is important to identify major factors driving the successful establishment of the Leishmania infection in order to develop better tools for the disease control. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme triggered by cellular stress, and its role in VL has not been investigated. Herein, we evaluated the role of HO-1 in the infection by Leishmania infantum chagasi, the causative agent of VL cases in Brazil. We found that L. chagasi infection or lipophosphoglycan (LPG) isolated from promastigotes triggered HO-1 production by murine macrophages. Interestingly, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), a HO-1 inductor, increased the parasite burden in both mouse and human derived macrophages. Upon L. chagasi infection, macrophages from Hmox1 knockout mice presented significantly lower parasite loads when compared to those from wild type mice. Furthermore, upregulation of HO-1 by CoPP diminished the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species by infected murine macrophages and increased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression in human monocytes. Finally, patients with VL presented higher systemic concentrations of HO-1 than healthy individuals and this increase of HO-1 was reduced after antileishmanial treatment, suggesting that HO-1 is associated with disease susceptibility. Our data argue that HO-1 has a critical role in the L. chagasi infection and is strongly associated with the inflammatory imbalance during VL. Manipulation of HO-1 pathways during VL could serve as an adjunctive therapeutic approach. PMID:22461696

  18. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  19. Crystallization and characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from eight plant species.

    PubMed

    Johal, S; Bourque, D P; Smith, W W; Suh, S W; Eisenberg, D

    1980-09-25

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was isolated and crystallized from eight plant species. Crystals grew from either of two similar sets of crystallizing conditions: crystals of the enzyme from alfalfa, corn, cotton, potato, spinach, tobacco, and tomato grew from solutions containing phosphate and polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant, and those from potato, tobacco (both Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tabacum), and tomato grew from a mixture of ammonium sulfate and phosphate. Crystals of the enzyme from potato and both species of tobacco were large enough to characterize by x-ray diffraction and were found to have the Form III structure, previously reported for crystals of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from N. tabacum. For crystalline material from several species, both carboxylase and oxygenase activites have been assayed and copper and iron contents have been determined. The possible significance of the observed general conditions of crystallization of this enzyme is discussed.

  20. Suicidal inactivation and labelling of ammonia mono-oxygenase by acetylene.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Wood, P M

    1985-01-01

    Acetylene brings about a progressive inactivation of ammonia mono-oxygenase, the ammonia-oxidizing enzyme in Nitrosomonas europaea. High NH4+ ion concentrations were protective. The inactivation followed first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 1.5 min-1 at saturating concentrations of acetylene. If acetylene was added in the absence of O2, the cells remained active until O2 was re-introduced. A protective effect was also demonstrated with thiourea, a reversible non-competitive inhibitor of ammonia oxidation. Incubation of cells with [14C]acetylene was found to cause labelling of a single membrane polypeptide. This ran on dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with an Mr value of 28 000. It is concluded that acetylene is a suicide substrate for the mono-oxygenase. The labelling experiment provides the first identification of a constituent polypeptide of ammonia mono-oxygenase. Images Fig. 4. PMID:4004794

  1. Changing ribulose diphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity in ripening tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Bravdo, B A; Palgi, A; Lurie, S

    1977-08-01

    Tomato fruit (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill) from green, pink, and red stages were assayed for changes in the activity of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, changes in the levels of glycolate and respiratory gas exchange. The ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity decreased as the fruit ripened. By comparison, the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase activity increased during the transition from the green to the pink stage, and declined afterward. The changes in the endogenous glycolate levels and the respiratory gas exchange, as observed at different stages of ripening, resembled the changes in the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase activity. The utilization of glycolate in further metabolic activity may result in the formation of peroxidases required for the onset of ripening.

  2. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Pseudomonas oxalacticus.

    PubMed Central

    Lawlis, V B; Gordon, G L; McFadden, B A

    1979-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was purified by a rapid, facile procedure from formate-grown Pseudomonas oxalaticus. The electrophoretically homogeneous enzyme had specific activities of 1.9 mumol of CO2 fixed per min per mg of protein and 0.15 mumol of O2 consumed per min per mg of protein. The amino acid composition was similar to that of other bacterial sources of the enzyme. The molecular weights determined by sedimentation equilibrium and by gel filtration were 421,000 and 450,000, respectively. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis of enzyme purified under conditions which would limit proteolysis, two types of large (L) subunits and two types of small (S) subunits were observed with apparent molecular weights of 57,000, 55,000, 17,000 and 15,000. By densitometric scans at two different protein concentrations the stoichiometry of the total large to total small subunits was 1:1, implying an L6S6 structure. Electron micrographs of the enzyme revealed an unusual structure that was inconsistent with a cubical structure. The enzyme had an unusually high Km for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (220 microM) and was strongly inhibited by 6-phosphogluconate in the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase assay (Ki = 270 microM). One, 5, and 12 days after purification the enzyme was half-maximally activated at 0.13 microM, 0.23 mM, and 0.70 mM CO2, respectively, at saturating Mg2+. At saturating CO2, enzyme 1 day afer purification responded sigmoidally to Mg2+ and was half-maximally activated by 0.85 mM Mg2+ in the absence of 6-phosphogluconate (Hill coefficient, h = 2.0) and by 0.19 mM Mg2+ in the presence of mM 6-phosphogluconate (h = 1.7). Images PMID:457602

  3. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in the biogenesis of corpora amylacea.

    PubMed

    Sahlas, D J; Liberman, A; Schipper, H M

    2002-01-01

    Corpora amylacea (CA) are glycoproteinaceous inclusions that accumulate in the human brain during normal aging and to a greater extent in Alzheimer's disease. We previously demonstrated that, in cultured rat astroglia, cysteamine (CSH) upregulates heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and promotes the transformation of normal mitochondria into CA-like inclusions. In the current study, primary cultures of neonatal rat astroglia were exposed to 880 micro M CSH for three months in the presence or absence of dexamethasone, a suppressor of HO-1 gene transcription. Cells were double-labeled with periodic acid-Schiff reagent (PAS) and antisera against ubiquitin, HO-1, or a mitochondrial epitope. CA were quantified and their immunostaining characteristics analyzed using confocal microscopy. HO-1 immunofluorescence was more abundant in cultures exposed to CSH alone relative to untreated control cultures and cultures exposed to both CSH and dexamethasone. Mature CA appeared as large (5-50 microM), spherical or polygonal, intensely PAS-positive inclusions within glial cytoplasm or deposited extracellularly. The inclusions manifested intense rim and, less commonly, homogeneous or stippled patterns of immunoreactivity for ubiquitin, HO-1, and the mitochondrial marker. Monolayers exposed to CSH exhibited 660% more CA relative to untreated controls (P < 0.05). Numbers of CA in cultures exposed to CSH were diminished by co-administration of 50 microg/ml dexamethasone (P < 0.05 relative to CSH alone) or 100 microg/ml dexamethasone (P < 0.05 relative to CSH alone). Numbers of CA in cultures co-treated with CSH and 50 microg/ml dexamethasone or 100 microg/ml dexamethasone were not significantly different from untreated control values. Up-regulation of HO-1 may contribute to the formation of CA in aging astroglia.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a heme oxygenase-2 gene from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Jin, Qi-Jiang; Lin, Yu-Ting; Feng, Jian-Fei; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Zheng, Tian-Qing

    2011-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO, EC 1.14.99.3) catalyzes the oxidation of heme and performs vital roles in plant development and stress responses. Two HO isozymes exist in plants. Between these, HO-1 is an oxidative stress-response protein, and HO-2 usually exhibited constitutive expression. Although alfalfa HO-1 gene (MsHO1) has been investigated previously, HO2 is still poorly understood. In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of HO2 gene, MsHO2, from alfalfa (Medica sativa L.). The full-length cDNA of MsHO2 contains an ORF of 870 bp and encodes for 290 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 33.3 kDa. Similar to MsHO1, MsHO2 also appears to have an N-terminal transit peptide sequence for chloroplast import. Many conserved residues in plant HO were also conserved in MsHO2. However, unlike HO-1, the conserved histidine (His) required for heme-iron binding and HO activity was replaced by tyrosine (Tyr) in MsHO2. Further biochemical activity analysis of purified mature MsHO2 showed no HO activity, suggesting that MsHO2 may not be a true HO in nature. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed its maximum expression in the germinating seeds. Importantly, the expression levels of MsHO2 were up-regulated under sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and H(2)O(2) (especially) treatment, respectively.

  5. Effect of canine mesenchymal stromal cells overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, Yongsun; Rhew, Daeun; Kim, Ahyoung; Jo, Kwang Rae; Yoon, Yongseok; Choi, Kyeung Uk; Jung, Taeseong; Kim, Wan Hee; Kweon, Oh-Kyeong

    2017-09-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive enzyme that modulates the immune response and oxidative stress associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). This study aimed to investigate neuronal regeneration via transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) overexpressing HO-1. Canine MSCs overexpressing HO-1 were generated by using a lentivirus packaging protocol. Eight beagle dogs with experimentally-induced SCI were divided into GFP-labeled MSC (MSC-GFP) and HO-1-overexpressing MSC (MSC-HO-1) groups. MSCs (1 × 10(7) cells) were transplanted at 1 week after SCI. Spinal cords were harvested 8 weeks after transplantation, after which histopathological, immunofluorescence, and western blot analyses were performed. The MSC-HO-1 group showed significantly improved functional recovery at 7 weeks after transplantation. Histopathological results showed fibrotic changes and microglial cell infiltration were significantly decreased in the MSC-HO-1 group. Immunohistochemical (IHC) results showed significantly increased expression levels of HO-1 and neuronal markers in the MSC-HO-1 group. Western blot results showed significantly decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, cycloogygenase 2, phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and galactosylceramidase in the MSC-HO-1 group, while expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein, β3-tubulin, neurofilament medium, and neuronal nuclear antigen were similar to those observed in IHC results. Our results demonstrate that functional recovery after SCI can be promoted to a greater extent by transplantation of HO-1-overexpressing MSCs than by normal MSCs.

  6. Heme oxygenase is involved in cobalt chloride-induced lateral root development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Zhang, Bo; Cao, Ze-Yu; Ling, Teng-Fang; Shen, Wen-Biao

    2011-04-01

    In animals, heme oxygenase (HO), a rate-limiting enzyme responsible for carbon monoxide (CO) production, was regarded as a protective system maintaining cellular homeostasis. It was also established that metal ions are powerful HO-inducing agents and cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) was the first metal ion identified with an inducing property. Previous study suggests that CoCl(2) stimulates adventitious root formation in tomato and cucumber cuttings. In this test, we discover that both CoCl(2) and an inducer of HO-1, hemin, could lead to the promotion of lateral root development, as well as the induction of HO-1 protein expression, HO activity, or LeHO-1/2 transcripts, in lateral root initiation zone of tomato seedlings. The effect is specific for HO since the potent HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) blocked the above actions of CoCl(2), and the inhibitory effect was reversed partially when 50% CO aqueous solution was added. However, the addition of ascorbic acid (AsA), a well-known antioxidant, exhibited no obvious effect on lateral root formation. Molecular evidence further showed that CoCl(2)-induced the up-regulation of target genes responsible for lateral root formation, including LeCDKA1, LeCYCA2;1, and LeCYCA3;1, was suppressed differentially by ZnPPIX. And these decreases were reversed further by the addition of CO. All together, these results suggest a novel role for HO in the CoCl(2)-induced tomato lateral root formation.

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics of nabumetone. The dawn of selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition?

    PubMed

    Davies, N M

    1997-12-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the 2,6-disubstituted naphthyl-alkanone class. Nabumetone is metabolised to an active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-napthylacetic acid (6-MNA) which is a relatively selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor that has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Nabumetone and its metabolites bind extensively to plasma albumin. Nabumetone is eliminated following biotransformation to 6-MNA, which does not undergo enterohepatic circulation and the respective glucoroconjugated metabolites are excreted in urine. Substantial concentrations of 6-MNA are attained in synovial fluid, which is he proposed site of action in chronic inflammatory arthropathies. A smaller area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) is evident at steady state as compared with a single dose; this is possibly due to an increase in the volume of distribution and saturation of protein binding. Relationships between 6-MNA concentrations and the therapeutic and toxicological effects have yet to be elucidated for this NSAID. Renal failure significantly reduces 6-MNA elimination but steady-state concentrations of 6-MNA are not increased, possibly because of nonlinear protein binding. Elderly patients with osteoarthritis demonstrate decreased elimination and increased plasma concentrations of nabumetone as compared with young healthy volunteers. Rheumatic disease activity also influences 6-MNA plasma concentrations, as patients with more active disease and lower serum albumin concentrations demonstrate a lower area under the plasma concentration versus time curve. A reduced bioavailability of 6-MNA in patients with severe hepatic impairment is also evident. Dosage adjustment may be required in the elderly, patients with active rheumatic disease and those with hepatic impairment, but not in patients with mild-to-moderate renal failure.

  8. Human mesenchymal stromal cells suppress T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema R; Copland, Ian B; Garcia, Marco A; Metz, Richard; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells deploy immune suppressive properties amenable for use as cell therapy for inflammatory disorders. It is now recognized that mesenchymal stromal cells necessitate priming with an inflammatory milieu, in particular interferon-γ, to exert augmented immunosuppressive effects. It has been recently suggested that the heme-catabolizing enzyme heme oxygenase-1 is an essential component of the mesenchymal stromal cell-driven immune suppressive response. Because mesenchymal stromal cells upregulate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression on interferon-γ priming and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase requires heme as a cofactor for optimal catabolic function, we investigated the potential antagonism of heme oxygenase-1 activity on indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase and the impact on mesenchymal stromal cell immune plasticity. We herein sought to evaluate the molecular genetic effect of cytokine priming on human mesenchymal stromal cell heme oxygenase-1 expression and its functional role in differentially primed mesenchymal stromal cells. Contrary to previous reports, messenger RNA and protein analyses demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells derived from normal subjects (n = 6) do not express heme oxygenase-1 at steady state or after interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and/or transforming growth factor-β priming. Pharmacological inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 with the use of tin protoporphyrin did not significantly abrogate the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells to suppress T-cell proliferation in vitro. Overall, these results unequivocally demonstrate that under steady state and after cytokine priming, human mesenchymal stromal cells immunoregulate T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

  9. Intestinal Absorption of Hemoglobin Iron-Heme Cleavage by Mucosal Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffin, Steven B.; Woo, Choong H.; Roost, Kenneth T.; Price, David C.; Schmid, Rudi

    1974-01-01

    Hemoglobin and myoglobin are a major source of dietary iron in man. Heme, separated from these hemoproteins by intraluminal proteolysis, is absorbed intact by the intestinal mucosa. The absorbed heme is cleaved in the mucosal cell releasing inorganic iron. Although this mucosal heme-splitting activity initially was ascribed to xanthine oxidase, we investigated the possibility that it is catalyzed by microsomal heme oxygenase, an enzyme which converts heme to bilirubin, CO, and inorganic iron. Microsomes prepared from rat intestinal mucosa contain enzymatic activity similar to that of heme oxygenase in liver and spleen. The intestinal enzyme requires NADPH; is completely inhibited by 50% CO; and produces bilirubin IX-α, identified spectrophotometrically and chromatographically. Moreover, duodenal heme oxygenase was shown to release inorganic 55Fe from 55Fe-heme. Along the intestinal tract, enzyme activity was found to be highest in the duodenum where hemoglobin iron absorption is reported to be most active. Furthermore, when rats were made iron deficient, duodenal heme oxygenase activity and hemoglobin-iron absorption rose to a comparable extent. Upon iron repletion of iron-deficient animals, duodenal enzyme activity returned towards control values. In contrast to heme oxygenase, duodenal xanthine oxidase activity fell sharply in iron deficiency and rose towards base line upon iron repletion. Our findings suggest that mucosal heme oxygenase catalyzes the cleavage of heme absorbed in the intestinal mucosa and thus plays an important role in the absorption of hemoglobin iron. The mechanisms controlling this intestinal enzyme activity and the enzyme's role in the overall regulation of hemoglobin-iron absorption remain to be defined. PMID:4436436

  10. Reversible inactivation and characterization of purified inactivated form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tabita, F R

    1992-06-01

    Form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inactivated upon the addition of organic acids to photolithoautotrophically grown cultures. Activity recovers after the dissipation of the organic acid from the culture. The inactivation process depends on both the concentration of the organic compound and the nitrogen status of the cells. The inactivated RubisCO has been purified and was shown to exhibit mobility on both nondenaturing and sodium dodecyl sulfate gels different from that of the active enzyme prepared from cells not treated with organic acids. However, the Michaelis constants for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate and CO2 or O2 were not dramatically altered. Purified inactivated RubisCO could be activated in vitro by increasing the temperature or the levels of Mg(II), and this activation was accompanied by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of the protein. When foreign bacterial RubisCO genes were expressed in an R. sphaeroides host strain lacking the ability to synthesize endogenous RubisCO, only slight inactivation of RubisCO activity was attained.

  11. The potentiation of taurocholate-induced rat gastric erosions following parenteral administration of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of anti-inflammatory doses of aspirin, indomethacin, naproxen and flurbiprofen inhibited prostacyclin formation ex vivo in the luminally-perfused gastric mucosa of anaesthetized rats. These doses of anti-inflammatory compounds potentiated the formation of gastric mucosal erosions following 3 h luminal perfusion of the topical irritant, acidified sodium taurocholate (2 mM in 100 mM HCl). The increase in luminal acid-loss during gastric perfusion of acidified taurocholate was not significantly enhanced by these anti-inflammatory agents. A correlation was found between the increase in gastric erosion formation and the inhibition of mucosal prostacyclin formation ex vivo by intravenous injection of aspirin or ketoprofen during acid-taurocholate perfusion. BW755C, which failed to inhibit mucosal prostacyclin formation ex vivo, did not significantly augment acid-taurocholate induced gastric damage. The present findings support the potentiating interactions between topical irritation and inhibition of gastric cyclo-oxygenase in the genesis of the gastric lesions. PMID:6416343

  12. Electron flow to oxygen in higher plants and algae: rates and control of direct photoreduction (Mehler reaction) and rubisco oxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Badger, M R; von Caemmerer, S; Ruuska, S; Nakano, H

    2000-01-01

    Linear electron transport in chloroplasts produces a number of reduced components associated with photosystem I (PS I) that may subsequently participate in reactions that reduce O2. The two primary reactions that have been extensively studied are: first, the direct reduction of O2 to superoxide by reduced donors associated with PS I (the Mehler reaction), and second, the rubisco oxygenase (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase EC 4.1.1.39) reaction and associated peroxisomal and mitochondrial reactions of the photorespiratory pathway. This paper reviews a number of recent and past studies with higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria that have attempted to quantify O2 fluxes under various conditions and their contributions to a number of roles, including photon energy dissipation. In C3 and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, a Mehler O2 uptake reaction is unlikely to support a significant flow of electron transport (probably less than 10%). In addition, if it were present it would appear to scale with photosynthetic carbon oxidation cycle (PCO) and photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCR) activity This is supported by studies with antisense tobacco plants with reduced rubisco at low and high temperatures and high light, as well as studies with potatoes, grapes and madrone during water stress. The lack of significant Mehler in these plants directly argues for a strong control of Mehler reaction in the absence of ATP consumption by the PCR and PCO cycles. The difference between C3 and C4 plants is primarily that the level of light-dependent O2 uptake is generally much lower in C4 plants and is relatively insensitive to the external CO2 concentration. Such a major difference is readily attributed to the operation of the C4 CO2 concentrating mechanism. Algae show a range of light-dependent O2 uptake rates, similar to C4 plants. As in C4 plants, the O2 uptake appears to be largely insensitive to CO2, even in species that lack a CO2 concentrating

  13. Electron flow to oxygen in higher plants and algae: rates and control of direct photoreduction (Mehler reaction) and rubisco oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Badger, M R; von Caemmerer, S; Ruuska, S; Nakano, H

    2000-10-29

    Linear electron transport in chloroplasts produces a number of reduced components associated with photosystem I (PS I) that may subsequently participate in reactions that reduce O2. The two primary reactions that have been extensively studied are: first, the direct reduction of O2 to superoxide by reduced donors associated with PS I (the Mehler reaction), and second, the rubisco oxygenase (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase EC 4.1.1.39) reaction and associated peroxisomal and mitochondrial reactions of the photorespiratory pathway. This paper reviews a number of recent and past studies with higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria that have attempted to quantify O2 fluxes under various conditions and their contributions to a number of roles, including photon energy dissipation. In C3 and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, a Mehler O2 uptake reaction is unlikely to support a significant flow of electron transport (probably less than 10%). In addition, if it were present it would appear to scale with photosynthetic carbon oxidation cycle (PCO) and photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCR) activity This is supported by studies with antisense tobacco plants with reduced rubisco at low and high temperatures and high light, as well as studies with potatoes, grapes and madrone during water stress. The lack of significant Mehler in these plants directly argues for a strong control of Mehler reaction in the absence of ATP consumption by the PCR and PCO cycles. The difference between C3 and C4 plants is primarily that the level of light-dependent O2 uptake is generally much lower in C4 plants and is relatively insensitive to the external CO2 concentration. Such a major difference is readily attributed to the operation of the C4 CO2 concentrating mechanism. Algae show a range of light-dependent O2 uptake rates, similar to C4 plants. As in C4 plants, the O2 uptake appears to be largely insensitive to CO2, even in species that lack a CO2 concentrating

  14. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  15. A reporter ligand NMR screening method for 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Demetriades, Marina; Hardy, Adam P.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Smart, Tristan J.; Szöllössi, Andrea; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The human 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenases belong to a family of structurally related enzymes that play important roles in many biological processes. We report that competition-based NMR methods, using 2OG as a reporter ligand, can be used for quantitative and site-specific screening of ligand binding to 2OG oxygenases. The method was demonstrated using hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases and histone demethylases, and KD values were determined for inhibitors that compete with 2OG at the metal centre. This technique is also useful as a screening or validation tool for inhibitor discovery, as exemplified by work with protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC). PMID:23234607

  16. Comparison of selective and non selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors in experimental colitis exacerbation: role of leukotriene B4 and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Breganó, José Wander; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; El Kadri, Mirian Zebian; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida; Cecchini, Rubens; Dichi, Isaias

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are considered one of the most important causes of reactivation of inflammatory bowel disease. With regard to selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors, the results are controversial in experimental colitis as well as in human studies. The aim this study is to compare nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effects, selective and non selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors, in experimental colitis and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provoke colitis exacerbation. Six groups of rats: without colitis, with colitis, and colitis treated with celecoxib, ketoprofen, indometacin or diclofenac. Survival rates, hemoglobin, plasmatic albumin, colonic tissue of interleukin-1ß, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, prostaglandin E2, catalase, superoxide dismutase, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, chemiluminescence induced by tert-butil hydroperoxides, and tissue and plasmatic leukotriene B4 were determined. The groups treated with diclofenac or indometacin presented lower survival rates, hemoglobin and albumin, higher tissue and plasmatic leukotriene B4 and tissue superoxide dismutase than the group treated with celecoxib. Ketoprofen presented an intermediary behavior between diclofenac/indometacin and celecoxib, concerning to survival rate and albumin. The groups without colitis, with colitis and with colitis treated with celecoxib showed leukotriene B4 and superoxide dismutase lower levels than the groups treated with nonselective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors. Diclofenac and indometacin presented the highest degree of induced colitis exacerbation with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, celecoxib did not show colitis exacerbation, and ketoprofen presented an intermediary behavior between diclofenac/indometacin and celecoxib. These results suggest that leukotriene B4 and superoxide dismutase can be involved in the exacerbation of experimental colitis by nonselective

  17. Purification and sequence analysis of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol oxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Suen, W C; Spain, J C

    1996-01-01

    4-Methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) is an intermediate in the degradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT. In the presence of NADPH and oxygen, MNC monooxygenase catalyzes the removal of the nitro group from MNC to form 2-hydroxy-5-methylquinone. The gene (dntB) encoding MNC monooxygenase has been previously cloned and characterized. In order to examine the properties of MNC monooxygenase and to compare it with other enzymes, we sequenced the gene encoding the MNC monooxygenase and purified the enzyme from strain DNT. dntB was localized within a 2.2-kb ApaI DNA fragment. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1,644 bp with an N-terminal amino acid sequence identical to that of purified MNC monooxygenase from strain DNT. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequences with those of other genes showed that DntB contains the highly conserved ADP and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding motifs characteristic of flavoprotein hydroxylases. MNC monooxygenase was purified to homogeneity from strain DNT by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single protein with a molecular weight of 60,200, which is consistent with the size determined from the gene sequence. The native molecular weight determined by gel filtration was 65,000, which indicates that the native enzyme is a monomer. It used either NADH or NADPH as electron donors, and NADPH was the preferred cofactor. The purified enzyme contained 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein, which is also consistent with the detection of an FAD binding motif in the amino acid sequence of DntB. MNC monooxygenase has a narrow substrate specificity. MNC and 4-nitrocatechol are good substrates whereas 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, and 4-chlorocatechol were not. These studies suggest that MNC monooxygenase is a flavoprotein that shares some properties with

  18. Cyclo-oxygenase isozymes in mucosal ulcerogenic and functional responses following barrier disruption in rat stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takuya; Ukawa, Hideki; Yamakuni, Hisashi; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of selective and nonselective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors on various functional changes in the rat stomach induced by topical application of taurocholate (TC) and investigated the preferential role of COX isozymes in these responses. Rat stomachs mounted in ex vivo chambers were perfused with 50 mM HCl and transmucosal potential difference (p.d.), mucosal blood flow (GMBF), luminal acid loss and luminal levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured before, during and after exposure to 20 mM TC. Mucosal application of TC in control rats caused a reduction in p.d., followed by an increase of luminal acid loss and GMBF, and produced only minimal damage in the mucosa 2 h later. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), a nonselective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor, attenuated the gastric hyperaemic response caused by TC without affecting p.d. and acid loss, resulting in haemorrhagic lesions in the mucosa. In contrast, selective COX-2 inhibitors, such as NS-398 and nimesulide (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), had no effect on any of the responses induced by TC and did not cause gross damage in the mucosa. Luminal PGE2 levels were markedly increased during and after exposure to TC and this response was significantly inhibited by indomethacin but not by either NS-398 or nimesulide. The expression of COX-1-mRNA was consistently detected in the gastric mucosa before and after TC treatment, while a faint expression of COX-2-mRNA was detected only 2 h after TC treatment. Both NS-398 and nimesulide significantly suppressed carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, similar to indomethacin. These results confirmed a mediator role for prostaglandins in the gastric hyperaemic response following TC-induced barrier disruption, and suggest that COX-1 but not COX-2 is a key enzyme in maintaining ‘housekeeping' functions in the gastric mucosa under both normal and adverse conditions. PMID:9351500

  19. Heme oxygenase levels and metaflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Vanella, Luca; Castelli, Tommaso; Cimino, Sebastiano; Reale, Giulio; Urzì, Daniele; Li Volti, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Motta, Fabio; Caltabiano, Rosario; Puzzo, Lidia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between intra-prostatic levels of heme oxygenase (HO), metaflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue in patients with MetS and moderate-severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Between January 2012 and June 2013, 132 consecutive patients, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate for moderate-severe LUTS, secondary to clinical BPH, were enrolled. Prostate samples were investigated for the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate, according to the Irani score, and for HO-1 and HO-2 levels measurements. Patients were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) defined by the International Diabetes Federation. We observed that subjects with MetS exhibited greater Irani score (3.0 vs. 2.0; p < 0.05), Irani grade (2.0 vs. 1.0; p < 0.05) and lower value of HO-1 (4.55 vs. 6.01; p < 0.05) and HO-2 (0.81 vs. 2.66; p < 0.05). HO-1 (3.91 vs. 5.67; p < 0.05) and HO-2 (1.06 vs. 1.37; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in patients with high intra-prostatic inflammation (Irani score ≥4). At the multivariate logistic regression analysis, HO-1 reduction (OR 0.588; p < 0.01), waist circumference (OR 1.09; p < 0.01), triglycerides (OR 1.013; p < 0.05) and HDL (OR 0.750; p < 0.05) were independent predictors of high intra-prostatic inflammation. We also found that HO-1 reduction (OR 0.598; p < 0.01) and the presence of MetS (OR 34.846; p < 0.01) were associated with Irani score ≥4. MetS-induced inflammation may play a key role in BPH. In detail, prostate metaflammation is inversely related to intra-prostatic HO-1 levels, serum HDL and positively with triglycerides.

  20. Novel imidazole derivatives as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) inhibitors and their cytotoxic activity in human-derived cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Modica, Maria N; Marrazzo, Agostino; Siracusa, Maria A; Sorrenti, Valeria; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Parayath, Neha N; Greish, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a cytoprotective enzyme that can be overexpressed in some pathological conditions, including certain cancers. In this work, novel imidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized as inhibitors of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2). In these compounds the imidazole ring, crucial for the activity, is connected to a hydrophobic group, represented by aryloxy, benzothiazole, or benzoxazole moieties, by means of alkyl or thioalkyl chains of different length. Many of the tested compounds were potent and/or selective against one of the two isoforms of HO. Furthermore, most of the pentyl derivatives showed to be better inhibitors of HO-2 with respect to HO-1, revealing a critical role of the alkyl chain in discriminating between the two isoenzymes. Compounds which showed the better profile of HO inhibition were selected and tested to evaluate their cytotoxic properties in prostate and breast cancer cell lines (DU-145, PC3, LnCap, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7). In these assays, aryloxyalkyl derivatives resulted more cytotoxic than benzothiazolethioalkyl ones; in particular compound 31 was active against all the cell lines tested, confirming the anti-proliferative properties of HO inhibitors and their potential use in the treatment of specific cancers.

  1. Isolation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multi-functional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a...

  2. AN INTEGRATED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDY OF ARSENITE ACTION 2. HEME OXYGENASE INDUCTION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and its activity has a significant impact on intracellular heme pools. Rat studies indicate that HO induction is a sensitive, dose-dependent response to arsenite (AsIII) exposure in both liver and kidney. The o...

  3. Heme oxygenase effect on mesenchymal stem cells action on experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziza, M T; Atta, H M; Samer, H; Ahmed, H H; Rashed, L A; Sabry, D; Abdel Raouf, E R; Alkaffas, Marwa Abdul Latif

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) enzyme inducer and inhibitor on Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in Alzheimer disease. 70 female albino rats were divided equally into 7 groups as follows: group 1: healthy control; group 2: Aluminium chloride induced Alzheimer disease; group 3: induced Alzheimer rats that received intravenous injection of MSCs; group 4: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inducer cobalt protoporphyrin; group 5: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin; group 6: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inducer; group7: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inhibitor. Brain tissue was collected for HO-1, seladin-1 gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, heme oxygenase activity, cholesterol estimation and histopathological examination. MSCs decreased the plaque lesions, heme oxygenase induction with stem cells also decreased plaque lesions however there was hemorrhage in the brain. Both heme oxygenase inducer alone or with stem cells increased seladin-1 expression and decreased cholesterol level. MSCs alone or with HO-1 induction exert a therapeutic effect against the brain lesion in Alzheimer's disease possibly through decreasing the brain cholesterol level and increasing seladin-1 gene expression.

  4. Interaction of heme oxygenase-2 with nitric oxide donors. Is the oxygenase an intracellular 'sink' for NO?

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; McCoubrey, W K; Maines, M D

    1999-09-01

    Heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) is the constitutive cognate of the heat-shock protein-32 family of proteins. These proteins catalyze oxidative cleavage of heme to CO and biliverdin, and release Fe. HO-2 is a hemoprotein and binds heme at heme regulatory motifs (HRMs) with a conserved Cys-Pro pair; two copies of HRM are present in HO-2 (Cys264 and Cys281). The HO-2 HRMs are not present in HO-1 and are not involved in HO-2 catalytic activity. Optical CD, and spectral and activity analyses were used to examine reactivity of HO isozymes with NO species produced by NO donors. Purified Escherichia coli-expressed HO preparations, wild-type HO-2, Cys264/Cys281 --> Ala/Ala HO-2-mutant (HO-2-mut) and HO-1 preparations were used. A type II change (red shift) of the Soret band (405 nm --> 413-419 nm) was observed when wild-type HO-2 was treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), S-nitroglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) or 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1); the NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (HCB) prevented the shift. Only SIN-1, which produces peroxynitrite by generating both NO and superoxide anion, decreased the Soret region absorption and the pyridine hemochromogen spectrum of HO-2; superoxide dismutase (SOD) blocked the decrease. Binding of heme to HO-2 protein was required for shift and/or decrease in absorption of the Soret band. NO donors significantly inhibited HO-2 activity, with SNP being the most potent inhibitor (> 40%). Again, trapping NO with HCB blocked HO-2 inactivation. HO-1 and HO-2-mut were not inactivated by NO donors. CD data suggest that the decrease in HO-2 activity was not related to change by NO species of the secondary structure of HO-2. Western blot analysis suggests that NO donors did not cause HO-1 protein loss and Northern blot analysis of HeLa cells treated with SIN-1 and SNP indicates that, unlike HO-1 mRNA, which is remarkably responsive to the treatments, HO-2 mRNA levels were modestly increased ( approximately two to threefold

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  6. Effect of mutation of lysine-128 of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, G; Anralojc, P J; Madgwick, P J; Pitts, J E; Parry, M A

    1998-12-01

    The contribution of lysine-128 within the active site of Anacystis nidulans d-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) was investigated by the characterization of mutants in which lysine-128 was replaced with arginine, glycine, glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid. Mutated genes encoding the Rubisco large subunit were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resultant polypeptides assembled into active complexes. All of the mutant enzymes had a lower affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and lower rates of carboxylation. Substitution of lysine-128 with glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid decreased the specificity factor and led to the production of an additional monophosphate reaction product. We show that this product results from the loss of the phosphate from C-1 of RuBP, most probably by beta-elimination from the 2,3-enediolate derivative of RuBP. The results confirm that lysine-128 is important in determining the position of the essential epsilon-amino group of lysine-334 within the active site and in loop dynamics. This further demonstrates that residues remote from the active site can be manipulated to modify catalytic function.

  7. Sequence of a genomic DNA clone for the small subunit of ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, B J; Chui, C F

    1985-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a gene for the small subunit (SS) of ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase from Nicotiana tabacum. The tobacco gene is most closely related to the SS genes from the dicots soybean and pea, and less so to the monocots wheat and Lemna; the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is in all cases more closely conserved than is its chloroplast transit sequence. Unlike the genomic sequences of the two monocots, which have one intron, and the two other dicots, which have two introns, the tobacco gene has three introns. The third tobacco intron lies within a highly conserved region of the protein. Its position coincides with the boundary of a 12 amino acid insertion in the SS genes of higher plants, relative to those of blue green algae. The 5' flanking end of the gene carries 67 bp inverted repeats, which flank a series of eight direct repeats; the direct repeats themselves each carry inverted repeats. The 3' untranslated end of this gene differs by only 2 bp from that of an N. sylvestris SS gene. PMID:4000958

  8. Molecular characterization of the sor gene, which encodes the sulfur oxygenase/reductase of the thermoacidophilic Archaeum Desulfurolobus ambivalens.

    PubMed Central

    Kletzin, A

    1992-01-01

    A 5.8-kbp HindIII fragment containing the sor gene which encodes the aerobically induced sulfur oxygenase/reductase of the thermoacidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, and facultatively anaerobic archaeum Desulfurolobus ambivalens, was cloned in pUC18 by using an oligonucleotide derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence for identification (pSOR-1/17). The native enzyme is a 550,000-molecular-weight oligomer composed of single 40,000-molecular-weight subunits; this oligomer is capable of the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of sulfur (A. Kletzin, J. Bacteriol. 171:1638-1643, 1989). From the fragment, 3,025 bp that contained the entire sor gene were sequenced. The sor gene encoded a protein with 309 amino acid residues (molecular weight, 35,317). The transcript length was determined by Northern RNA hybridization to be 960 to 1,020 nucleotides, and the transcriptional start site was mapped by primer extension analysis. The transcript of the sor gene in aerobically grown cells was amplified 38- to 42-fold relative to that in anaerobically grown cells. An initial transcriptional characterization of three neighboring genes of unknown function is also reported. Images PMID:1522063

  9. Interaction between potyvirus P3 and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) of host plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Zhaopeng; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2011-08-01

    The P3 protein encoded by Shallot yellow stripe virus onion isolate (SYSV-O) interacted in the Yeast Two-hybrid (Y2H) system and in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays with the large subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) protein that is encoded by the rbcL gene of its onion host. Dissection analysis by Y2H showed that the main part of SYSV P3 (amino acids 1-390) and onion RbcL (amino acids 1-137) were responsible for the interaction. The P3 proteins encoded by Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), Soybean mosaic virus Pinellia isolate (SMV-P), and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) also interacted with RbcL, suggesting that a P3/RbcL interaction might exist generally for potyviruses. An interaction between P3 of these potyviruses and the small subunit of RubisCO (RbcS) was also demonstrated. Moreover, the P3N-PIPO protein encoded by a newly identified open reading frame embedded within the P3 cistron also interacted with both RbcL and RbcS. It is possible that the potyvirus P3 protein affects the normal functions of RubisCO which thus contributes to symptom development.

  10. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by nitrosative stress. A role for nitroxyl anion.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Patrick; Foresti, Roberta; Bains, Sandip K; Hoque, Martha; Green, Colin J; Motterlini, Roberto

    2002-10-25

    Nitric oxide and S-nitrosothiols modulate a variety of important physiological activities. In vascular cells, agents that release NO and donate nitrosonium cation (NO(+)), such as S-nitrosoglutathione, are potent inducers of the antioxidant protein heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) (Foresti, R., Clark, J. E., Green, C. J., and Motterlini, R. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 18411-18417; Motterlini, R., Foresti, R., Bassi, R., Calabrese, V., Clark, J. E., and Green, C. J. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 13613-13620). Here, we report that Angeli's salt (AS) (0.25-2 mm), a compound that releases nitroxyl anion (NO(-)) at physiological pH, induces HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, resulting in increased heme oxygenase activity in rat H9c2 cells. A time course analysis revealed that NO(-)-mediated HO-1 expression is transient and gradually disappears within 24 h, in accordance with the short half-life of AS at 37 degrees C (t(12) = 2.3 min). Interestingly, multiple additions of AS at lower concentrations (50 or 100 microm) over a period of time still promoted a significant increase in heme oxygenase activity. Experiments performed using a NO scavenger and the NO electrode confirmed that NO(-), not NO, is the species involved in HO-1 induction by AS; however, the effect on heme oxygenase activity can be amplified by accelerating the rate of NO(-) oxidation. N-Acetylcysteine almost completely abolished AS-mediated induction of HO-1, whereas a glutathione synthesis inhibitor (buthionine sulfoximine) significantly decreased heme oxygenase activation by AS, indicating that sulfydryl groups are crucial targets in the regulation of HO-1 expression by NO(-). We conclude that NO(-), in analogy with other reactive nitrogen species, is a potent inducer of heme oxygenase activity and HO-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that heme oxygenase can act both as a sensor to and target of redox-based mechanisms involving NO and extend our knowledge on

  11. Two mechanisms for platelet-mediated killing of tumour cells: one cyclo-oxygenase dependent and the other nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, M; Sagawa, T; Tominaga, A; Kodama, T; Hitsumoto, Y

    1996-01-01

    We have tried to identify the cytotoxic effectors in platelet-mediated tumour cell killing, using two tumour cell lines K562 (a chronic myelogenic leukaemic cell line) and LU99A (a lung cancer cell line), which are both sensitive to platelet cytotoxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and indomethacin, effectively inhibited the platelet-mediated killing of K562 cells, but not that of LU99A cells. In contrast, inhibitors of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway. NG-nitro-1-arginine (L-NA), haemoglobin and methylene blue, reduced the cytotoxic activity of platelets against LU99A, but not against K562. Synthetic analogues of platelet cyclo-oxygenase products thromboxane A2/ prostaglandin H2(TXA2/PGH2) exerted cytotoxicity against K562 cells but not against LU99A cells. Electron microscopic study showed that TXA2/PGH2 analogues induced bleb formation and disruption of the plasma membrane of K562 cells. K562 cells enhanced the production of TXA2 by platelets, as inferred from the accumulation of thromboxane B2 (TXB2), a spontaneous hydrolysis product of TXA2. LU99A cells had no such effects. These results indicate that platelets kill these two tumour cell lines through different mechanisms. In K562, the cyclooxygenase products TXA2/PGH2 possibly play a significant role but in LU99A the NO pathway seems to be involved. Images Figure 5 PMID:8911154

  12. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, M J

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMKMO) is a monomeric enzyme of molecular mass 60 kDa. It contains 1 mol of FAD/monomer as the prosthetic group. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with many other NADPH-dependent and FAD-containing (Type 1) BVMOs. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9 and 35 degrees C. MMKMO has a broad substrate specificity, catalysing the lactonization of a large number of monocyclic monoterpene ketones and substituted cyclohexanones. The natural substrates 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone were converted stoichiometrically into 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate (the spontaneous rearrangement product of the lactone formed by MMKMO), 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone respectively. The MMKMO-catalysed conversion of iso-dihydrocarvone showed an opposite regioselectivity to that of dihydrocarvone; in this case, 6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone was formed as the product. MMKMO converted all enantiomers of the natural substrates with almost equal efficiency. MMKMO is involved in the conversion of the monocyclic monoterpene ketone intermediates formed in the degradation pathways of all stereoisomers of three different monocyclic monoterpenes, i.e. limonene, (dihydro)carveol and menthol. PMID:10769172

  13. Pentaerithrityl tetranitrate improves angiotensin II induced vascular dysfunction via induction of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, Swenja; Wenzel, Philip; Schulz, Eberhard; Oelze, Matthias; Mang, Christian; Kamuf, Jens; Gori, Tommaso; Jansen, Thomas; Knorr, Maike; Karbach, Susanne; Hortmann, Marcus; Mäthner, Falk; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrate pentaerithrityl tetranitrate treatment is devoid of nitrate tolerance, which has been attributed to the induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1. With the present study we tested, whether chronic treatment with pentaerithrityl tetranitrate can improve angiotensin-II induced vascular oxidative stress and dysfunction. In contrast to isosorbide-5-mononitrate (75mg/kg/d/7d), treatment with pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (15mg/kg/d/7d) improved the impaired endothelial and smooth muscle function and normalized vascular and cardiac reactive oxygen species production (mitochondria, NADPH oxidase activity and uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase) as assessed by dihydroethidine staining, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and quantification of dihydroethidine oxidation products in angiotensin-II (1mg/kg/d/7d) treated rats. The antioxidant features of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate were recapitulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition to increase in heme oxygenase-1 protein expression, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate but not isosorbide-5-mononitrate normalized vascular reactive oxygen species formation, augmented aortic protein levels of the tetrahydrobiopterin-synthesizing enzymes GTP-cyclohydrolase-I and dihydrofolate reductase in angiotensin-II treated rats, thereby preventing endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. Knockout of heme oxygenase-1 completely abolished the beneficial effects of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate in angiotensin-II treated mice, whereas heme oxygenase-1 induction by hemin (25mg/kg) mimicked the effect of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate. Improvement of vascular function in this particular model of arterial hypertension by pentaerithrityl tetranitrate largely depends on the induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 and identifies pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, in contrast to isosorbide-5-mononitrate, as an organic nitrate being able to improve rather than to worsen endothelial function. PMID

  14. Structure of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme and enzymatic inactivation by mutation of the heme coordinating residue His-193

    SciTech Connect

    Suits,M.; Jaffer, N.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Heme oxygenases catalyze the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. For pathogenic microorganisms, heme uptake and degradation are critical mechanisms for iron acquisition that enable multiplication and survival within hosts they invade. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution. When compared with other heme oxygenases, ChuS has a unique fold, including structural repeats and a {beta}-sheet core. Not surprisingly, the mode of heme coordination by ChuS is also distinct, whereby heme is largely stabilized by residues from the C-terminal domain, assisted by a distant arginine from the N-terminal domain. Upon heme binding, there is no large conformational change beyond the fine tuning of a key histidine (His-193) residue. Most intriguingly, in contrast to other heme oxygenases, the propionic side chains of heme are orientated toward the protein core, exposing the {alpha}-meso carbon position where O{sub 2} is added during heme degradation. This unique orientation may facilitate presentation to an electron donor, explaining the significantly reduced concentration of ascorbic acid needed for the reaction. Based on the ChuS-heme structure, we converted the histidine residue responsible for axial coordination of the heme group to an asparagine residue (H193N), as well as converting a second histidine to an alanine residue (H73A) for comparison purposes. We employed spectral analysis and CO measurement by gas chromatography to analyze catalysis by ChuS, H193N, and H73A, demonstrating that His-193 is the key residue for the heme-degrading activity of ChuS.

  15. BnHO1, a haem oxygenase-1 gene from Brassica napus, is required for salinity and osmotic stress-induced lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zeyu; Geng, Beibei; Xu, Sheng; Xuan, Wei; Nie, Li; Shen, Wenbiao; Liang, Yongchao; Guan, Rongzhan

    2011-08-01

    In this report, a rapeseed (Brassica napus) haem oxygenase-1 gene BnHO1 was cloned and sequenced. It shared high homology with Arabidopsis HY1 proteins, and encodes a 32.6 kDa protein with a 54-amino-acid transit peptide, predicting the mature protein of 25.1 kDa. The mature BnHO1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits haem oxygenase (HO) activity. Furthermore, the application of lower doses of NaCl (10 mM) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) (2%) mimicked the inducible effects of naphthylacetic acid and the HO-1 inducer haemin on the up-regulation of BnHO1 and subsequent lateral root (LR) formation. Contrasting effects were observed when a higher dose of NaCl or PEG was applied. The above inducible and inhibitory responses were blocked significantly when the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) or haemin was applied, both of which were reversed by the application of carbon monoxide or ZnPPIX, respectively. Moreover, the addition of ZnPPIX at different time points during LR formation indicated that BnHO1 might be involved in the early stages of LR formation. The auxin response factor transcripts and the auxin content in seedling roots were clearly induced by lower doses of salinity or osmotic stress. However, treatment with the inhibitor of polar auxin transport N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid prevented the above inducible responses conferred by lower doses of NaCl and PEG, which were further rescued when the treatments were combined with haemin. Taken together, these results suggested a novel role of the rapeseed HO-1 gene in salinity and osmotic stress-induced LR formation, with a possible interaction with auxin signalling.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency leads to alteration of soluble guanylate cyclase redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allan W; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2010-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 knockout, H(mox)1(-/-), mice exhibit exacerbated vascular lesions after ischemia-reperfusion and mechanical injury. Surprisingly, we found no studies that reported contractile responses and sensitivity to vasorelaxants in H(mox)1(-/-) mice. The contractile responses [superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), from female H(mox)1(-/-) mice] exhibited increased sensitivity to phenylephrine (p < 0.001). Cumulative addition of acetylcholine relaxed SMA, with the residual contraction remaining 2 times higher in H(mox)1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001). Sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) and 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole [YC-1; acts directly on soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)] led to further relaxation, yet the residual contraction remained 2 to 3 times higher in H(mox)1(-/-) than H(mox)1(+/+) mice (p < 0.001). Branches from H(mox)1(-/-) mesenteric and renal arteries also showed reduced relaxation (p < 0.025). Relaxation of SMA was measured to 4-({(4-carboxybutyl) [2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4'-(trifluoromethyl) biphenyl-4-yl] methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770), which is a more effective activator of oxidized/heme-free sGC; and to 5-cyclopropyl-2-{1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272), a more effective stimulator of reduced sGC. H(mox)1(-/-) arteries were 15 times more sensitive to BAY 60-2770 (p < 0.025) than were H(mox)1(+/+) arteries. Pretreatment with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[3,4-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an oxidizer of sGC, predictably shifted the BAY 60-2770 response of H(mox)1(+/+) to the left (p < 0.01) and BAY 41-2272 response to the right (p < 0.01). ODQ had little effect on the responses of H(mox)1(-/-) arteries, indicating that much of sGC was oxidized/heme-free. Western analyses of sGC in SMA indicated that both α1 and β1 subunit levels were reduced to <50% of H(mox)1(+/+) level (p < 0.025). These findings support the hypothesis that the antioxidant function of H(mox)1 plays a

  17. Immunoexpression of constitutive and inducible cyclo-oxygenase isoforms in the rat foetal and maternal digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Szumiło, J; Gajjar, B; Dudka, J; Korobowicz, A; Patel, S; Nat, A; Nat, A S; Dworzański, W; Kwaśniewski, W

    2008-02-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX), which catalyses the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide and prostanoids, is widely expressed in mammalian organs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of the constitutive and inducible cyclo-oxygenase isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2 respectively) in the oesophagus, stomach and the small and large bowels of untreated rat dams and foetuses on gestational day 21. The localisation of the COX isoforms was similar in the maternal and foetal organs, although the intensity of the reaction for COX-2 was stronger in the foetuses. Cytoplasmic COX-1 immunostaining was found in myocytes of the muscularis propria, muscularis mucosae and the blood vessels. It was also positive in the endothelial cells, scattered stromal cells of the lamina propria and the ganglion cells of the nerve plexus in the bowels. Apart from the keratinised layer, a strong reaction was revealed in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oesophagus and forestomach. Negative or weakly positive staining was found in the mucus-secreting cells covering the surface, gastric pits and pyloric glands, as well as in the parietal cells and the chief cells. Weakly positive COX-1 immunostaining was observed in epithelial cells of the small intestine crypts, but in some cases enterocytes and goblet cells covering villi were also positive. In the colonic mucosa weak COX-1 staining was typical of the absorptive, and goblet cells. The COX-2 immunostaining was nuclear and/or cytoplasmic. An inconsistent positive reaction was seen in the muscle of the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propria and the blood vessels. Positive staining was also found in scattered stromal cells of the lamina propria and adventitia and the ganglion cells. Weak nuclear staining was found in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oesophagus and forestomach. Unlike the strong foetal reactivity in the epithelial cells of the glandular stomach, a negative or weakly positive reaction was

  18. Purification and characterization of sheep platelet cyclo-oxygenase. Acetylation by aspirin prevents haemin binding to the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Boopathy, R; Balasubramanian, A S

    1986-01-01

    Arachidonate cyclo-oxygenase (prostaglandin synthetase; prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase; EC 1.14.99.1) was purified from sheep platelets. The purification procedure involved hydrophobic column chromatography using either Ibuprofen-Sepharose, phenyl-Sepharose or arachidic acid-Sepharose as the first step followed by metal-chelate Sepharose and haemin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme (Mr approximately 65,000) was homogeneous as observed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The enzyme was a glycoprotein with mannose as the neutral sugar. Haemin or haemoglobin was essential for activity. The purified enzyme could bind haemin exhibiting a characteristic absorption maximum at 410 nm. The enzyme after metal-chelate column chromatography could undergo acetylation by [acetyl-3H]aspirin. The labelled acetylated enzyme could not bind to haemin-Sepharose, presumably due to acetylation of a serine residue involved in the binding to haemin. The acetylated enzyme also failed to show its characteristic absorption maximum at 410 nm when allowed to bind haemin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3101664

  19. Effect of Nd3+ ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hong, Fa-shui; Wu, Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang, Xue-guang; Hong, Cheng-jiao; Wu, Cheng; Gao, Feng-qing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Tao; Xie, Ya-ning; Xu, Jian-hua; Li, Zhong-rui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd(3+) treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89A, respectively.

  20. Diversity of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form I gene (rbcL) in natural phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, S L; Campbell, L; Paul, J H

    1997-01-01

    The phytoplankton of the world's oceans play an integral part in global carbon cycling and food webs by conversion of carbon dioxide into organic carbon. They accomplish this task through the action of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Here we have investigated the phylogenetic diversity in the form I rbcL locus in natural phytoplankton communities of the open ocean and representative clones of marine autotrophic picoplankton by mRNA or DNA amplification and sequencing of a 480 to 483 bp internal fragment of this gene. Five gene sequences were recovered from nucleic acids of natural phytoplankton communities of the Gulf of Mexico. The rbcL genes of two Prochlorococcus isolates and one Synechococcus strain (WH8007) were also sequenced. Sequences were aligned with the database of rbcL genes and subjected to both neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses. The five sequences from the natural phytoplankton community spanned nearly the entire diversity of characterized form I rbcL genes, with some sequences closely related to isolates such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus (forms IA and I) and prymnesiophyte algae (form ID), while other sequences were deeply rooted. Unexpectedly, the deep euphotic zone contained an organism that possesses a transcriptionally active rbcL gene closely related to that of a recently characterized manganese-oxidizing bacterium, suggesting that such chemoautotrophs may contribute to the diversity of carbon-fixing organisms in the marine euphotic zone. PMID:9293012

  1. ZmHO-1, a maize haem oxygenase-1 gene, plays a role in determining lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Huang, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li-Juan; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Chang-He; Sun, Ya; Shen, Wen-Biao; Xie, Gui-Shui

    2012-03-01

    Previous results revealed that haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system is involved in auxin-induced adventitious root formation. In this report, a cDNA for the gene ZmHO-1, encoding an HO-1 protein, was cloned from Zea mays seedlings. ZmHO-1 has a conserved HO signature sequence and shares highest homology with rice SE5 (OsHO-1) protein. We further discovered that N-1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA), haemin, and CO aqueous solution, led to the induction of ZmHO-1 expression as well as the thereafter promotion of lateral root development. These effects were specific for ZmHO-1 since the potent HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) differentially blocked the above actions. The addition of haemin and CO were able to reverse the auxin depletion-triggered inhibition of lateral root formation as well as the decreased ZmHO-1 transcripts. Molecular evidence showed that the haemin- or CO-mediated the modulation of target genes responsible for lateral root formation, including ZmCDK and ZmCKI2, could be blocked by ZnPPIX. Overexpression of ZmHO-1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants resulted in promotion of lateral root development as well as the modulation of cell cycle regulatory gene expressions. Overall, our results suggested that a maize HO-1 gene is required for the lateral root formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of a heme oxygenase of Clostridium tetani and its possible role in oxygen tolerance.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Bauer, Rosalie; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    In order to colonize mammalian wounds, the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani must presumably cope with temporary oxic conditions. Therefore, the recently decoded genome sequence was searched for genes which could confer oxygen tolerance. A few identified systems such as superoxide dismutases and peroxidases are probably responsible for this protection against toxic oxygen species. Another system was detected, a heme oxygenase which could have a role in establishing or maintaining an anoxic microenvironment in the process of wound colonization. The hemT gene encoding the heme oxygenase is expressed in C. tetani, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the enzyme converts heme to biliverdin under strict oxic conditions.

  3. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Gubernator, Beata; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Wildner, Guenter; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) can be divided into two branches: the "red-like type" of marine algae and the "green-like type" of cyanobacteria, green algae, and higher plants. We found that the "green-like type" rubisco from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus has an almost 2-fold higher specificity factor compared with rubiscos of mesophilic cyanobacteria, reaching the values of higher plants, and simultaneously revealing an improvement in enzyme thermostability. The difference in the activation energies at the transition stages between the oxygenase and carboxylase reactions for Thermosynechococcus elongatus rubisco is very close to that of Galdieria partita and significantly higher than that of spinach. This is the first characterization of a "green-like type" rubisco from thermophilic organism.

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence and mRNA-mapping of the large subunit gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Yang, R C; Dove, M; Seligy, V L; Lemieux, C; Turmel, M; Narang, S A

    1986-01-01

    Nucleotide (nt) sequence of the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the green alga, Chlamydomonas moewusii, and mapping of transcription ends was achieved by two new strategies. The deduced LS sequence of 475 amino acid residues was compared with similar genes from six other species; cyanobacteria, land plants and a related alga (C. reinhardtii). The most conserved regions are the three ribulose bisphosphate binding sites and the CO2 activator site. The nt sequence conservation outside the coding region is limited to only three segments within the 5'-flanking region: a region of tandem repeats, TATAA box and ribosome-binding site. Termination point of transcription is an 'A' residue 3' to the first of two 18-nt inverted repeats, which has the potential to form a stem-loop hairpin structure. The possible role of these potential regulatory features for transcription and translation, and similar structures in other LS genes is presented.

  5. Five palmitoylated polypeptides in the 50 KDa range are not recognized by an antibody against ribulose-biphosphate-carboxylase-oxygenase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Hours, M C; Trémolières, A

    1993-11-30

    After incubation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells with radioactive palmitic acid several labelled bands appeared after gel electrophoresis of delipidated protein extract. Among them, two bands (a major and a minor one) were detected in the 50 KDa range, which is the region where the LSU of the Rubisco (large sub-unit of the ribulose-biphosphate-carboxylase-oxygenase) was also found. Careful analyses by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis have shown that the five palmitate-labelled polypeptides detected in this region do not match with polypeptides immunoreacting with antibody against Rubisco. In addition, polypeptides labelled by palmitate cannot be immunoprecipitated with the same antibody further demonstrating that, in C. reinhardtii, the large sub-unit of Rubisco is not palmitoylated but unindentified proteins.

  6. Two quick methods for isolation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Jakob, R

    1988-01-01

    Methods are described which allow the isolation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (rubisco) in a very short time. Source of the material was highly impure commercial enzyme in the case of spinach rubisco or bacteria grown from a fermentor in the case of Alcaligenes eutrophus rubisco. Purity of the enzymes is demonstrated by gel electrophoreses. Enzyme isolated from fresh cells gave crystals of excellent diffraction, suitable for X-ray structure analyisis.

  7. Chemical and Physical Characterization of the Activation of Ribulosebiphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Donnelly, M. I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F. C.

    1983-08-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere.

  8. Length polymorphism in heme oxygenase-1 and risk of CKD among patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-11-01

    The length polymorphism of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in high-risk populations. Experimental data suggest that heme oxygenase-1 protects against kidney disease. However, the association between this polymorphism and long-term risk of CKD in high-risk patients is unknown. We analyzed the allelic frequencies of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter in 386 patients with coronary artery disease recruited from January 1999 to July 2001 and followed until August 31, 2012. The S allele represents short repeats (<27), and the L allele represents long repeats (≥27). The primary renal end points consisted of sustained serum creatinine doubling and/or ESRD requiring long-term RRT. The secondary end points were major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. At the end of study, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each L allele in the additive model were 1.99 (1.27 to 3.14; P=0.003) for the renal end points, 1.70 (1.27 to 2.27; P<0.001) for major adverse cardiovascular events, and 1.36 (1.04 to 1.79; P=0.03) for mortality. With cardiac events as time-dependent covariates, the adjusted hazard ratio for each L allele in the additive model was 1.91 (1.20 to 3.06; P=0.01) for the renal end points. In conclusion, a greater number of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with higher risk for CKD, cardiovascular events, and mortality among patients with coronary artery disease.

  9. Chemical and physical characterization of the activation of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere. 1 drawing.

  10. Regulation of haeme oxygenase-1 for treatment of neuroinflammation and brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Syapin, P J

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the CNS elicits a host defense reaction that utilizes astrocytes, microglia, neurons and oligodendrocytes. Neuroinflammation is a major host defense mechanism designed to restore normal structure and function after CNS insult, but like other forms of inflammation, chronic neuroinflammation may contribute to pathogenesis. The inducible haeme oxygenase isoform, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), is a phase 2 enzyme upregulated in response to electrophilic xenobiotics, oxidative stress, cellular injury and disease. There is emerging evidence that HO-1 expression helps mediate the resolution of inflammation, including neuroinflammation. Whether this is solely because of the catabolism of haeme or includes additional mechanisms is unclear. This review provides a brief background on the molecular biology and biochemistry of haeme oxygenases and the actions of haeme, bilirubin, iron and carbon monoxide in the CNS. It then presents our current state of knowledge regarding HO-1 expression in the CNS, regulation of HO-1 induction in neural cells and discusses the prospect of pharmacological manipulation of HO-1 as therapy for CNS disorders. Because of recognized species and cellular differences in HO-1 regulation, a major objective of this review is to draw attention to areas where gaps exist in the experimental record regarding regulation of HO-1 in neural cells. The results indicate the HO-1 system to be an important therapeutic target in CNS disorders, but our understanding of HO-1 expression in human neural cells is severely lacking. PMID:18794892

  11. Plasmatic hypercoagulation in patients with breast cancer: role of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Ley, Michele L B; Waer, Amy L; Alger, Patrick W; Matika, Ryan W; Steinbrenner, Evangelina B

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer is an important health threat to women worldwide, and is associated with a 9-14% incidence of thrombophilia. Of interest, patients with breast cancer have been noted to have an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide production via upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 activity. Given that it has been demonstrated that carbon monoxide enhances plasmatic coagulation in vitro and in vivo, we sought to determine whether patients with breast cancer had an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide and concurrent plasmatic hypercoagulability. Breast cancer patients who were not smokers scheduled to undergo partial or complete mastectomy (n = 18) had 15 ml of whole blood collected via an indwelling intravenous catheter and anticoagulated with sodium citrate. Whole blood was centrifuged and citrated plasma assessed with a thromboelastometric method to measure coagulation kinetics and the formation of carboxyhemefibrinogen. Breast cancer patients were determined to have an abnormally increased carboxyhemoglobin concentration of 2.5 ± 1.3%, indicative of heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. Breast cancer patient plasma on average clotted 73% more quickly and had 32% stronger thrombus strength than normal individual (n = 30) plasma. Further, 44% of breast cancer patients had plasma clot strength that exceeded the 95% confidence interval value observed in normal individuals, and 75% of this hypercoagulable subgroup had carboxyhemefibrinogen formation. Future investigation of the role played by heme oxygenase-1-derived carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of breast cancer-related thrombophilia is warranted.

  12. Rieske business: structure-function of Rieske non-heme oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S

    2005-12-09

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases (RO) catalyze stereo- and regiospecific reactions. Recently, an explosion of structural information on this class of enzymes has occurred in the literature. ROs are two/three component systems: a reductase component that obtains electrons from NAD(P)H, often a Rieske ferredoxin component that shuttles the electrons and an oxygenase component that performs catalysis. The oxygenase component structures have all shown to be of the alpha3 or alpha3beta3 types. The transfer of electrons happens from the Rieske center to the mononuclear iron of the neighboring subunit via a conserved aspartate, which is shown to be involved in gating electron transport. Molecular oxygen has been shown to bind side-on in naphthalene dioxygenase and a concerted mechanism of oxygen activation and hydroxylation of the ring has been proposed. The orientation of binding of the substrate to the enzyme is hypothesized to control the substrate selectivity and regio-specificity of product formation.

  13. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Induces a Heme Oxygenase Dependent Increase in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Khalil; Kandiah, Nalaayini; Chau, Jessie; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. PMID:23077634

  14. Heme-Oxygenases during Erythropoiesis in K562 and Human Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Liliane R.; Costa, Elaine S.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L.; Teodosio, Cristina; Bárcena, Paloma; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, heme can be degraded by heme-oxygenases (HO). Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is known to be the heme inducible isoform, whereas heme-oxygenase 2 (HO-2) is the constitutive enzyme. Here we investigated the presence of HO during erythroid differentiation in human bone marrow erythroid precursors and K562 cells. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were below limits of detection in K562 cells. Moreover, heme was unable to induce HO-1, at the protein and mRNA profiles. Surprisingly, HO-2 expression was inhibited upon incubation with heme. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these findings, we analyzed HO expression during normal erythropoiesis in human bone marrow. Erythroid precursors were characterized by lack of significant expression of HO-1 and by progressive reduction of HO-2 during differentiation. FLVCR expression, a recently described heme exporter found in erythroid precursors, was also analyzed. Interestingly, the disruption in the HO detoxification system was accompanied by a transient induction of FLVCR. It will be interesting to verify if the inhibition of HO expression, that we found, is preventing a futile cycle of concomitant heme synthesis and catabolism. We believe that a significant feature of erythropoiesis could be the replacement of heme breakdown by heme exportation, as a mechanism to prevent heme toxicity. PMID:21765894

  15. Rieske business: Structure-function of Rieske non-heme oxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, Daniel J.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S. . E-mail: s-ramaswamy@uiowa.edu

    2005-12-09

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases (RO) catalyze stereo- and regiospecific reactions. Recently, an explosion of structural information on this class of enzymes has occurred in the literature. ROs are two/three component systems: a reductase component that obtains electrons from NAD(P)H, often a Rieske ferredoxin component that shuttles the electrons and an oxygenase component that performs catalysis. The oxygenase component structures have all shown to be of the {alpha}{sub 3} or {alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3} types. The transfer of electrons happens from the Rieske center to the mononuclear iron of the neighboring subunit via a conserved aspartate, which is shown to be involved in gating electron transport. Molecular oxygen has been shown to bind side-on in naphthalene dioxygenase and a concerted mechanism of oxygen activation and hydroxylation of the ring has been proposed. The orientation of binding of the substrate to the enzyme is hypothesized to control the substrate selectivity and regio-specificity of product formation.

  16. A nonsense mutation in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2) gene is tightly associated with accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Våge, Dag I; Boman, Inger A

    2010-02-02

    Sheep carcasses with yellow fat are sporadically observed at Norwegian slaughter houses. This phenomenon is known to be inherited as a recessive trait, and is caused by accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue. Two enzymes are known to be important in carotenoid degradation in mammals, and are therefore potential candidate genes for this trait. These are beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) and the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2). In the present study the coding region of the BCMO1 and the BCO2 gene were sequenced in yellow fat individuals and compared to the corresponding sequences from control animals with white fat. In the yellow fat individuals a nonsense mutation was found in BCO2 nucleotide position 196 (c.196C>T), introducing a stop codon in amino acid position 66. The full length protein consists of 575 amino acids. In spite of a very low frequency of this mutation in the Norwegian AI-ram population, 16 out of 18 yellow fat lambs were found to be homozygous for this mutation. In the present study a nonsense mutation (c.196C>T) in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2) gene is found to strongly associate with the yellow fat phenotype in sheep. The existence of individuals lacking this mutation, but still demonstrating yellow fat, suggests that additional mutations may cause a similar phenotype in this population. The results demonstrate a quantitatively important role for BCO2 in carotenoid degradation, which might indicate a broad enzyme specificity for carotenoids. Animals homozygous for the mutation are not reported to suffer from any negative health or development traits, pointing towards a minor role of BCO2 in vitamin A formation. Genotyping AI rams for c.196C>T can now be actively used in selection against the yellow fat trait.

  17. A nonsense mutation in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2) gene is tightly associated with accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue in sheep (Ovis aries)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sheep carcasses with yellow fat are sporadically observed at Norwegian slaughter houses. This phenomenon is known to be inherited as a recessive trait, and is caused by accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue. Two enzymes are known to be important in carotenoid degradation in mammals, and are therefore potential candidate genes for this trait. These are beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) and the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2). Results In the present study the coding region of the BCMO1 and the BCO2 gene were sequenced in yellow fat individuals and compared to the corresponding sequences from control animals with white fat. In the yellow fat individuals a nonsense mutation was found in BCO2 nucleotide position 196 (c.196C>T), introducing a stop codon in amino acid position 66. The full length protein consists of 575 amino acids. In spite of a very low frequency of this mutation in the Norwegian AI-ram population, 16 out of 18 yellow fat lambs were found to be homozygous for this mutation. Conclusion In the present study a nonsense mutation (c.196C>T) in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2) gene is found to strongly associate with the yellow fat phenotype in sheep. The existence of individuals lacking this mutation, but still demonstrating yellow fat, suggests that additional mutations may cause a similar phenotype in this population. The results demonstrate a quantitatively important role for BCO2 in carotenoid degradation, which might indicate a broad enzyme specificity for carotenoids. Animals homozygous for the mutation are not reported to suffer from any negative health or development traits, pointing towards a minor role of BCO2 in vitamin A formation. Genotyping AI rams for c.196C>T can now be actively used in selection against the yellow fat trait. PMID:20122251

  18. Identification and characterization of the flavin:NADH reductase (PrnF) involved in a novel two-component arylamine oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin

    2007-12-01

    Two-component oxygenases catalyze a wide variety of important oxidation reactions. Recently we characterized a novel arylamine N-oxygenase (PrnD), a new member of the two-component oxygenase family (J. Lee et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280:36719-36728, 2005). Although arylamine N-oxygenases are widespread in nature, aminopyrrolnitrin N-oxygenase (PrnD) represents the only biochemically and mechanistically characterized arylamine N-oxygenase to date. Here we report the use of bioinformatic and biochemical tools to identify and characterize the reductase component (PrnF) involved in the PrnD-catalyzed unusual arylamine oxidation. The prnF gene was identified via sequence analysis of the whole genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 and subsequently cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified PrnF protein catalyzes reduction of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) by NADH with a k(cat) of 65 s(-1) (K(m) = 3.2 muM for FAD and 43.1 muM for NADH) and supplies reduced FAD to the PrnD oxygenase component. Unlike other known reductases in two-component oxygenase systems, PrnF strictly requires NADH as an electron donor to reduce FAD and requires unusual protein-protein interaction with the PrnD component for the efficient transfer of reduced FAD. This PrnF enzyme represents the first cloned and characterized flavin reductase component in a novel two-component arylamine oxygenase system.

  19. Enzymatic heme oxygenase activity in soluble extracts of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidium caldarium.

    PubMed

    Beale, S I; Cornejo, J

    1984-12-01

    Extracts of the phycocyanin-containing unicellular red alga, Cyanidium caldarium, catalyzed enzymatic cleavage of the heme macrocycle to form the linear tetrapyrrole bilin structure. This is the key first step in the branch of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway leading to phycobilin photosynthetic accessory pigments. A mixed-function oxidase mechanism, similar to the biliverdin-forming reaction catalyzed by animal cell-derived microsomal heme oxygenase, was indicated by requirements for O2 and a reduced pyridine nucleotide. To avoid enzymatic conversion of the bilin product to phycocyanobilins and subsequent degradation during incubation, mesoheme IX was substituted for the normal physiological substrate, protoheme IX. Mesobiliverdin IX alpha was identified as the primary incubation product by comparative reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry. The enzymatic nature of the reaction was indicated by the requirement for cell extract, absence of activity in boiled cell extract, high specificity for NADPH as cosubstrate, formation of the physiologically relevant IX alpha bilin isomer, and over 75% inhibition by 1 microM Sn-protoporphyrin, which has been reported to be a competitive inhibitor of animal microsomal heme oxygenase. On the other hand, coupled oxidation of mesoheme, catalyzed by ascorbate plus pyridine or myoglobin, yielded a mixture of ring-opening mesobiliverdin IX isomers, was not inhibited by Sn-protoporphyrin, and could not use NADPH as the reductant. Unlike the animal microsomal heme oxygenase, the algal reaction appeared to be catalyzed by a soluble enzyme that was not sedimentable by centrifugation for 1 h at 200,000g. Although NADPH was the preferred reductant, small amounts of activity were obtained with NADH or ascorbate. A portion of the activity was retained after gel filtration of the cell extract to remove low-molecular-weight components. Considerable stimulation of activity, particularly in

  20. Involvement of tyrosine kinase in the induction of cyclo-oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase by endotoxin in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Akarasereenont, P; Mitchell, J A; Appleton, I; Thiemermann, C; Vane, J R

    1994-01-01

    1. Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are two enzymes which have distinct cytokine-inducible isoforms (COX-2 and iNOS). Many cytokine receptors have an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Here we have used the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erbstatin and genistein, to investigate the potential role of tyrosine kinase activation in the induction on COX-2 and iNOS caused by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) and J774.2 macrophages. 2. The main COX metabolites, 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) (for BAEC) and PGF2 alpha (for 774.2 macrophages) were measured by radioimmunossay: (i) accumulation of COX metabolites from endogenous arachidonic acid was measured at 24 h after addition of LPS (1 microgram ml-1); (ii) in experiments designed to measure 'COX activity', COX metabolites generated by BAEC or J774.2 macrophages activated with LPS were assayed (at 12 h after LPS administration) after incubation of the washed cells with exogenous arachidonic acid (30 microM for 15 min). Western blot analysis with a specific antibody to COX-2 was used to determine the expression of COX-2 protein caused by LPS in cell extracts. Accumulation of nitrite (measured by the Griess reaction) was used as an indicator of NO formation and, hence, iNOS activity. 3. Erbstatin (0.05 to 5 micrograms ml-1) or genistein (0.5 to 50 micrograms ml-1) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the accumulation of COX metabolites in the supernatant of BAEC or J774.2 macrophages activated with LPS. Erbstatin or genistein also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of 'COX activity' in both cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 PMID:7534189

  1. Presence of a structurally novel type ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, S; Maeda, N; Kishimoto, T; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    We have characterized the gene encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. The gene encoded a protein consisting of 444 amino acid residues, corresponding in size to the large subunit of previously reported Rubiscos. Rubisco of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-Rubisco) showed only 51.4% similarity with the large subunit of type I Rubisco from spinach and 47.3% with that of type II Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum, suggesting that the enzyme was not a member of either type. Active site residues identified from type I and type II Rubiscos were conserved. We expressed the gene in Escherichia coli, and we obtained a soluble protein with the expected molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence. Purification of the recombinant protein revealed that Pk-Rubisco was an L8 type homo-octamer. Pk-Rubisco showed highest specific activity of 19.8 x 10(3) nmol of CO2 fixed per min/mg, and a tau value of 310 at 90 degreesC, both higher than any previously characterized Rubisco. The optimum pH was 8.3, and the enzyme possessed extreme thermostability, with a half-life of 15 h at 80 degreesC. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the gene was transcribed in P. kodakaraensis KOD1. Furthermore, Western blot analysis with cell-free extract of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 clearly indicated the presence of Pk-Rubisco in the native host cells.

  2. The source and characteristics of chemiluminescence associated with the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by Mn(2+)-ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lilley, R M; Riesen, H; Andrews, T J

    1993-07-05

    We confirm the observation of Mogel and McFadden (Mogel, S.N., and McFadden, B. A. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 8333-8337) that ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) exhibits chemiluminescence while catalyzing its oxygenase reaction in the presence of Mn2+. However, our results with the spinach and Rhodospirillum rubrum enzymes differ markedly in the following respects. 1) Chemiluminescence intensity was directly proportional to enzyme concentration and behaved as if representing the rate of oxygenase catalysis. 2) The wavelength spectrum peaked at about 770 nm and extended beyond 810 nm. This seems inconsistent with chemiluminescence generated by simultaneous decay of pairs of singlet O2 molecules. It is consistent with manganese(II) luminescence and we discuss its possible sources. The time course of chemiluminescence (resolution, 0.25 s) was distinctively different for spinach and R. rubrum enzymes during the initial 5 s of catalysis, with the bacterial enzyme exhibiting a pronounced initial "burst." Chemiluminescence by the spinach enzyme responded to substrate concentrations in a manner consistent with known oxygenase properties, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten kinetics with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (Km 400 nM). Chemiluminescence required carbamylated enzyme with Mn2+ bound at the active site (activation energy, -57.1 KJ.mol-1). As an indicator of oxygenase activity, chemiluminescence represents an improvement over oxygen electrode measurements in response time and sensitivity by factors of at least 100.

  3. An active triple-catalytic hybrid enzyme engineered by linking cyclo-oxygenase isoform-1 to prostacyclin synthase that can constantly biosynthesize prostacyclin, the vascular protector.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ke-He; So, Shui-Ping; Cervantes, Vanessa; Wu, Hanjing; Wijaya, Cori; Jentzen, Rebecca R

    2008-12-01

    It remains a challenge to achieve the stable and long-term expression (in human cell lines) of a previously engineered hybrid enzyme [triple-catalytic (Trip-cat) enzyme-2; Ruan KH, Deng H & So SP (2006) Biochemistry45, 14003-14011], which links cyclo-oxygenase isoform-2 (COX-2) to prostacyclin (PGI(2)) synthase (PGIS) for the direct conversion of arachidonic acid into PGI(2) through the enzyme's Trip-cat functions. The stable upregulation of the biosynthesis of the vascular protector, PGI(2), in cells is an ideal model for the prevention and treatment of thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2))-mediated thrombosis and vasoconstriction, both of which cause stroke, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Here, we report another case of engineering of the Trip-cat enzyme, in which human cyclo-oxygenase isoform-1, which has a different C-terminal sequence from COX-2, was linked to PGI(2) synthase and called Trip-cat enzyme-1. Transient expression of recombinant Trip-cat enzyme-1 in HEK293 cells led to 3-5-fold higher expression capacity and better PGI(2)-synthesizing activity as compared to that of the previously engineered Trip-cat enzyme-2. Furthermore, an HEK293 cell line that can stably express the active new Trip-cat enzyme-1 and constantly synthesize the bioactive PGI(2) was established by a screening approach. In addition, the stable HEK293 cell line, with constant production of PGI(2), revealed strong antiplatelet aggregation properties through its unique dual functions (increasing PGI(2) production while decreasing TXA(2) production) in TXA(2) synthase-rich plasma. This study has optimized engineering of the active Trip-cat enzyme, allowing it to become the first to stably upregulate PGI(2) biosynthesis in a human cell line, which provides a basis for developing a PGI(2)-producing therapeutic cell line for use against vascular diseases.

  4. Function of cyclo-oxygenase-1 and cyclo-oxygenase-2 in the ductus arteriosus from foetal lamb: differential development and change by oxygen and endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Coceani, F; Ackerley, C; Seidlitz, E; Kelsey, L

    2001-01-01

    Prenatal patency of the ductus arteriosus is maintained mainly by prostaglandin(PG) E2. Here we have examined the relative importance of cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX1) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2) for PGE2 formation in the foetal lamb ductus (0.65 gestation onwards). Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold staining, COX1 appeared more abundant than COX2 in endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and this difference was greater before-term. Inside muscle cells, COX1 and COX2 immunoreactivity was located primarily in the perinuclear region. Endotoxin, given to the lamb in utero (∼0.1 μg kg−1), caused COX2 upregulation, while an opposite effect with disappearance of the enzyme followed endotoxin treatment in vitro (100 ng ml−1). COX1 immunoreactivity remained virtually unchanged with either treatment; however, this isoform as well as any induced COX2 migrated towards the outer cytoplasm. The COX2 inhibitor L-745,337 (1 – 10 μM) contracted the isolated ductus at term, the response being almost as high as that to indomethacin (dual COX1/COX2 inhibitor) over the same dose-range. Conversely, L-745,337 was relatively less effective in the premature. Pretreatment of the premature in vivo with endotoxin enhanced the contraction of the ductus to L-745,337, while in vitro endotoxin had a variable effect. The premature ductus exhibited a stronger contraction to L-745,337 following exposure to oxygen. On the other hand, the oxygen contraction, which is modest before-term, was enhanced by L-745,337. We conclude that COX1 and COX2 develop unevenly in the ductus. While both enzymes contribute to PGE2 formation at term, COX1 is the major isoform in the premature. COX2, however, may acquire greater importance before-term following physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. PMID:11156583

  5. In vitro activation of cyclo-oxygenase in the rabbit carotid body: effect of its blockade on [3H]catecholamine release.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Niño, A; Almaraz, L; González, C

    1994-01-01

    The release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from rabbit carotid bodies (CBs) incubated in basal conditions (PO2 approximately 132 mmHg; PCO2 approximately 33 mmHg; pH = 7.42) amounts to 94.4 +/- 10.1 pg (mg protein)-1 (10 min)-1 (mean +/- S.E.M.). Incubation of the CB in a hypoxic solution (PO2 approximately 46 mmHg) produced a significant 40% increase (P < 0.05) in the release of PGE2. Indomethacin (2 microM) prevented the hypoxia-induced release of PGE2. Sensory plus sympathetic denervation of the CB 4 days prior to the experiments did not modify either basal or low PO2-induced PGE2 release, indicating that intraglomic nerve endings are not significant sources for the PGE2 released. Incubation of the CB in an acidic-hypercapnic solution (PO2 approximately 132 mmHg; PCO2 approximately 132 mmHg; pH = 6.60) or in a high K(+)-containing solution (35 mM) was also effective in promoting an increase in the outflow of PGE2 from the organs. The release of [3H]catecholamines ([3H]CA) from the CB elicited by incubating the organs in low PO2 solutions (PO2 ranged between 66 and 13 mmHg) was potentiated by two inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 100 microM) and indomethacin (2 microM). The effect persisted after chronic denervation of the organ. The secretory response elicited by acidic stimuli was also augmented by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. Thus, [3H]CA release elicited by incubating the CBs in the acidic-hypercapnic solution increased by 300% in the presence of indomethacin (2 microM), and ASA (100 microM) more than doubled the release induced by dinitrophenol (100 microM), a protonophore that mimics an acidic stimulus. Indomethacin, but not ASA, moderately increased the high K(+)-evoked [3H]CA release. The effect of indomethacin on the release of [3H]CA elicited by acidic and hypoxic stimuli was reversed by PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner (0.3-300 nM). These results show that low PO2 and high PCO2-low pH, the natural stimuli to the CB, as well as high

  6. Mixed function oxygenases and xenobiotic detoxication/toxication systems in bivalve molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. N.; Livingstone, D. R.; Donkin, P.; Bayne, B. L.; Widdows, J.; Lowe, D. M.

    1980-03-01

    Components of a xenobiotic detoxication/toxication system involving mixed function oxygenases are present in Mytilus edulis. Our paper critically reviews the recent literature on this topic which reported the apparent absence of such a system in bivalve molluscs and attempts to reconcile this viewpoint with our own findings on NADPH neotetrazolium reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldrin epoxidation and other reports of the presence of mixed function oxygenases. New experimental data are presented which indicate that some elements of the detoxication/toxication system in M. edulis can be induced by aromatic hydrocarbons derived from crude oil. This includes a brief review of the results of long-term experiments in which mussels were exposed to low concentrations of the water accommodated fraction of North Sea crude oil (7.7-68 µg 1-1) in which general stress responses such as reduced physiological scope for growth, cytotoxic damage to lysosomal integrity and cellular damage are considered as characteristics of the general stress syndrome induced by the toxic action of the xenobiotics. In addition, induction in the blood cells of microsomal NADPH neotetrazolium reductase (associated with mixed function oxygenases) and the NADPH generating enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are considered to be specific biological responses to the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The consequences of this detoxication/toxication system for Mytilus edulis are discussed in terms of the formation of toxic electrophilic intermediate metabolites which are highly reactive and can combine with DNA, RNA and proteins with subsequent damage to these cellular constituents. Implications for neoplasms associated with the blood cells are also discussed. Finally, in view of the increased use of mussel species in pollutant monitoring programmes, the induction phenomenon which is associated with microsomal enzymes in the blood cells is considered as a possible tool for the

  7. Simultaneous Kinetic Analysis of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activities 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel S.; Young, Joseph D.

    1980-01-01

    An assay was developed for simultaneous kinetic analysis of the activities of the bifunctional plant enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [EC 4.1.1.39]. [1-14C,5-3H]Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was used as the labeled substrate. Tritium enrichment of the doubly labeled 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) product, common to both enzyme activities, may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios from the expression A/(B-A) where A and B represent the 3H/14C isotope ratios of doubly labeled RuBP and 3-PGA, and Vc and Vo represent the activities of carboxylase and oxygenase, respectively. Doubly labeled substrate was synthesized from [2-14C]glucose and [6-3H]glucose using the enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway coupled with phosphoribulokinase. The kinetic properties of a commercial preparation of fully activated spinach carboxylase were studied under approximated physiological conditions of 20% O2 (252 micromolar), 295 μl/l CO2 (10 micromolar), 25 C, and pH 8.19. The Vc/Vo ratio was, within experimental error, constant at 30 seconds and 1 minute. This double label assay method may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios for the Laing-Ogren-Hageman equation, Vc/Vo = (VcKo/VoKc) ([CO2]/[O2]) where Vc and Vo represent Vmax, and Kc and Ko represent Michaelis constants for the carboxylase and oxygenase activities, respectively. PMID:16661214

  8. Improvement of heme oxygenase-1-based heme sensor for quantifying free heme in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Taira, Junichi; Nakashima, Yukinori; Yoshihara, Shun; Koga, Shinya; Sueda, Shinji; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Toru; Tanioka, Nohito; Shimizu, Hiroko; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-15

    We recently reported a novel heme sensor using fluorescently labeled heme oxygenase-1; however, its inherent enzyme activity would be a potential obstacle in quantifying heme in biological samples. Here, we found that mutation of the catalytically important residue, Asp140, with histidine in the sensor not only diminished the heme degradation activity but also increased heme binding affinity. The sensor with a visible fluorophore was also found to be beneficial to avoid background emission from endogenous substance in biological samples. By using the improved heme sensor, we succeeded in quantifying free heme in rat hepatic samples for the first time.

  9. Probing the substrate specificity of aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase (PrnD) by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Ang, Ee-Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2006-09-01

    Molecular modeling and mutational analysis (site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis) were used to probe the molecular determinants of the substrate specificity of aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase (PrnD) from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. There are 17 putative substrate-contacting residues, and mutations at two of the positions, positions 312 and 277, could modulate the enzyme substrate specificity separately or in combination. Interestingly, several of the mutants obtained exhibited higher catalytic efficiency (approximately two- to sevenfold higher) with the physiological substrate aminopyrrolnitrin than the wild-type enzyme exhibited.

  10. Probing the Substrate Specificity of Aminopyrrolnitrin Oxygenase (PrnD) by Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Ang, Ee-Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2006-01-01

    Molecular modeling and mutational analysis (site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis) were used to probe the molecular determinants of the substrate specificity of aminopyrrolnitrin oxygenase (PrnD) from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. There are 17 putative substrate-contacting residues, and mutations at two of the positions, positions 312 and 277, could modulate the enzyme substrate specificity separately or in combination. Interestingly, several of the mutants obtained exhibited higher catalytic efficiency (approximately two- to sevenfold higher) with the physiological substrate aminopyrrolnitrin than the wild-type enzyme exhibited. PMID:16923884

  11. Isolation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from leaves.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Barta, Csengele; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a viable strategy for increasing plant productivity. Advances in biotechnology have made this goal more attainable by making it possible to modify Rubisco in planta. To properly evaluate the properties of Rubisco, it is necessary to isolate the enzyme in pure form. This chapter describes procedures for rapid and efficient purification of Rubisco from leaves of several species.

  12. Finding intermediates in the O2 activation pathways of non-heme iron oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, E G; Neibergall, M B; Chakrabarty, S; Lipscomb, J D

    2007-07-01

    Intermediates in the reaction cycle of an oxygenase are usually very informative with respect to the chemical mechanism of O 2 activation and insertion. However, detection of these intermediates is often complicated by their short lifetime and the regulatory mechanism of the enzyme designed to ensure specificity. Here, the methods used to detect the intermediates in an extradiol dioxygenase, a Rieske cis-dihydrodiol dioxygenase, and soluble methane monooxygenase are discussed. The methods include the use of alternative, chromophoric substrates, mutagenesis of active site catalytic residues, forced changes in substrate binding order, control of reaction rates using regulatory proteins, and initialization of catalysis in crystallo.

  13. Catalytic Mechanisms of Fe(II)- and 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Oxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salette; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear non-heme Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases comprise a large family of enzymes that utilize an Fe(IV)-oxo intermediate to initiate diverse oxidative transformations with important biological roles. Here, four of the major types of Fe(II)/2OG-dependent reactions are detailed: hydroxylation, halogenation, ring formation, and desaturation. In addition, an atypical epimerization reaction is described. Studies identifying several key intermediates in catalysis are concisely summarized, and the proposed mechanisms are explained. In addition, a variety of other transformations catalyzed by selected family members are briefly described to further highlight the chemical versatility of these enzymes. PMID:26152721

  14. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  15. Purification and characterization of the oxygenase component of biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400.

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, J D; Gibson, D T

    1995-01-01

    The iron-sulfur protein of biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (ISPBPH) was purified from Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400. The protein is composed of a 1:1 ratio of a large (alpha) subunit with an estimated molecular weight of 53,300 and a small (beta) subunit with an estimated molecular weight of 27,300. The native molecular weight was 209,000, indicating that the protein adopts an alpha 3 beta 3 native conformation. Measurements of iron and acid-labile sulfide gave 2 mol of each per mol of alpha beta heterodimer. The absorbance spectrum showed peaks at 325 and 450 nm with a broad shoulder at 550 nm. The spectrum was bleached upon reduction of the protein with NADPH in the presence of catalytic amounts of ferredoxinBPH and ferredoxinBPH oxidoreductase. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the reduced protein showed three signals at gx = 1.74, gy = 1.92, and gz = 2.01. These properties are characteristic of proteins that contain a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] center. Biphenyl was oxidized to cis-(2R,3S)-dihydroxy-1-phenylcyclohexa-4,6-diene by ISPBPH in the presence of ferredoxinBPH, ferredoxinBPH oxidoreductase, NADPH, and ferrous iron. Naphthalene was also oxidized to a cis-dihydrodiol, but only 3% was converted to product under the same conditions that gave 92% oxidation of biphenyl. Benzene, toluene, 2,5-dichlorotoluene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene were not oxidized. ISPBPH is proposed to be the terminal oxygenase component of biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase where substrate binding and oxidation occur via addition of molecular oxygen and two reducing equivalents. PMID:7592331

  16. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 contributes to the amelioration of aluminum-induced oxidative stress in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiti; Zhang, Jing; Xuan, Wei; Xie, Yanjie

    2013-10-15

    In this report, pharmacological, histochemical and molecular approaches were used to investigate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) up-regulation on the alleviation of aluminum (Al)-induced oxidative stress in Medicago sativa. Exposure of alfalfa to AlCl3 (0-100 μM) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of root elongation as well as the enhancement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content. 1 and 10 μM (in particular) Al(3+) increased alfalfa HO-1 transcript or its protein level, and HO activity in comparison with the decreased changes in 100 μM Al-treated samples. After recuperation, however, TBARS levels in 1 and 10 μM Al-treated alfalfa roots returned to control values, which were accompanied with the higher levels of HO activity. Subsequently, exogenous CO, a byproduct of HO-1, could substitute for the cytoprotective effects of the up-regulation of HO-1 in alfalfa plants upon Al stress, which was confirmed by the alleviation of TBARS and Al accumulation, as well as the histochemical analysis of lipid peroxidation and loss of plasma membrane integrity. Theses results indicated that endogenous CO generated via heme degradation by HO-1 could contribute in a critical manner to its protective effects. Additionally, the pretreatments of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and hemin, an inducer of HO-1, exhibited the similar cytoprotective roles in the alleviation of oxidative stress, both of which were impaired by the potent inhibitor of HO-1, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). However, the Al-induced inhibition of root elongation was not influenced by CO, BHT and hemin, respectively. Together, the present results showed up-regulation of HO-1 expression could act as a mechanism of cell protection against oxidative stress induced by Al treatment.

  17. Light intensity-dependent modulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis and photosynthesis by overexpression of chlorophyllide a oxygenase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Ajaya K; Pattanayak, Gopal K; Pandey, Shiv S; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Reddy, Vanga S; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2012-05-01

    Chlorophyll b is synthesized by the oxidation of a methyl group on the B ring of a tetrapyrrole molecule to a formyl group by chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO). The full-length CAO from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was overexpressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that grows well at light intensities much higher than those tolerated by Arabidopsis. This resulted in an increased synthesis of glutamate semialdehyde, 5-aminolevulinic acid, magnesium-porphyrins, and chlorophylls. Overexpression of CAO resulted in increased chlorophyll b synthesis and a decreased chlorophyll a/b ratio in low light-grown as well as high light-grown tobacco plants; this effect, however, was more pronounced in high light. The increased potential of the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase activity and chlorophyll biosynthesis compensated for the usual loss of chlorophylls in high light. Increased chlorophyll b synthesis in CAO-overexpressed plants was accompanied not only by an increased abundance of light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins but also of other proteins of the electron transport chain, which led to an increase in the capture of light as well as enhanced (40%-80%) electron transport rates of photosystems I and II at both limiting and saturating light intensities. Although the quantum yield of carbon dioxide fixation remained unchanged, the light-saturated photosynthetic carbon assimilation, starch content, and dry matter accumulation increased in CAO-overexpressed plants grown in both low- and high-light regimes. These results demonstrate that controlled up-regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis comodulates the expression of several thylakoid membrane proteins that increase both the antenna size and the electron transport rates and enhance carbon dioxide assimilation, starch content, and dry matter accumulation.

  18. Piceatannol attenuates homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage via heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2017-04-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-induced cellular dysfunction and apoptosis as important factors to a variety of diseases. In endothelial cells (ECs), the sulfur-containing amino acid homocysteine (Hcy) causes EC apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through induction of ER stress. Here, we have investigated whether piceatannol (Pic), a resveratrol analog, could protect ECs against Hcy-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and ER stress, with specific emphasis on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In human ECs, we determined the effects of Hcy and Pic on annexin V positivity, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression, X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) mRNA slicing, and ROS-sensitive dihydroethidium (DHE) oxidation. Hcy increased annexin V-positive cells, DHE oxidation, GRP78 and CHOP expression and Xbp-1 mRNA splicing, indicating that Hcy induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and ER stress. Pretreatment of ECs with Pic significantly inhibited Hcy-induced apoptosis, ROS generation and ER stress. Pic also increased HO-1 expression via activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Interestingly, the inhibitory effects of Pic on Hcy-induced apoptosis, ROS generation and ER stress were abolished by down-regulation of HO-1 expression, while mimicked by treatment of ECs with the HO-1 inducer hemin. Overall, these results suggest that Pic may protect ECs against Hcy-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and ER stress via Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a heme oxygenase1 gene from sunflower and its expression profiles in salinity acclimation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-06-01

    Heme oxygenase1 (HO1) is involved in protecting plants from environmental stimuli. In this study, a sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) HO1 gene (HaHO1) was cloned and sequenced. It was confirmed that HaHO1 encodes a precursor protein of 32.93 kDa with an N-terminal plastid transit peptide which was validated by subcellular localization. The amino acid sequence of HaHO1 shared high homology with other plant HO1s. The predicted three-dimensional structure showed a high degree of structural conservation as compared to the known HO1 crystal structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that HaHO1 clearly grouped with the plant HO1-like sequences. Moreover, the purified recombinant mature HaHO1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits HO activity. Thus, it was concluded that HaHO1 encodes a functional HO1 in sunflower. Additionally, HaHO1 gene was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues, and induced differentially during different growth stages after germination, and could be differentially induced by several stresses and hemin treatment. For example, a pretreatment with a low concentration of NaCl (25 mM) could lead to the induction of HaHO1 gene expression and thereafter a salinity acclamatory response. Above cytoprotective effect could be impaired by the potent HO1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), which was further rescued by the addition of 50% carbon monoxide aqueous solution (in particular) or bilirubin, two catalytic by-products of HO1, respectively. Similarly, a HO1 inducer, hemin, could mimic the salinity acclamatory response. Together, these findings strongly suggested that the up-regulation of HaHO1 might be required for the observed salinity acclimation in sunflower plants.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute murine colitis by regulating Th17/Treg cell balance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liya; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Xia, Zhenwei

    2014-09-26

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by nonspecific inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent investigations suggest that activation of Th17 cells and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Treg) is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a protein with a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory function, which exerts significantly protective roles in various T cell-mediated diseases. In this study, we aim to explore the immunological regulation of HO-1 in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of experimental murine colitis. BALB/c mice were administered 4% dextran sulfate sodium orally; some mice were intraperitoneally pretreated with HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor stannum protoporphyrin IX. The results show that hemin enhances the colonic expression of HO-1 and significantly ameliorates the symptoms of colitis with improved histological changes, accompanied by a decreased proportion of Th17 cells and increased number of Tregs in mesenteric lymph node and spleen. Moreover, induction of HO-1 down-regulates retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt expression and IL-17A levels, while promoting Treg-related forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression and IL-10 levels in colon. Further study in vitro revealed that up-regulated HO-1 switched the naive T cells to Tregs when cultured under a Th17-inducing environment, which involved in IL-6R blockade. Therefore, HO-1 may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in the murine model of acute experimental colitis via regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in IBD.

  1. Covalent modification of a highly reactive and essential lysine residue of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, M E

    1993-10-01

    Chemical modification of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase with water-soluble N-hydroxysuccinimide esters was used to identify a reactive lysyl residue that is essential for activity. Incubation of Rubisco activase with sulfosuccinimidyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetate (AMCA-sulfo-NHS) or sulfosuccinimidyl-acetate (sulfo-NHS-acetate) caused progressive inactivation of ATPase activity and concomitant loss of the ability to activate Rubisco. AMCA-sulfo-NHS was the more potent inactivator of Rubisco activase, exhibiting a second-order rate constant for inactivation of 239 M-1 s-1 compared to 21 M-1 s-1 for sulfo-NHS-acetate. Inactivation of enzyme activity by AMCA-sulfo-NHS correlated with the incorporation of 1.9 mol of AMCA per mol of 42-kD Rubisco activase monomer. ADP, a competitive inhibitor of Rubisco activase, afforded considerable protection against inactivation of Rubisco activase and decreased the amount of AMCA incorporated into the Rubisco activase monomer. Sequence analysis of the major labeled peptide from AMCA-sulfo-NHS-modified enzyme showed that the primary site of modification was lysine-247 (K247) in the tetrapeptide methionine-glutamic acid-lysine-phenylalanine. Upon complete inactivation of ATPase activity, modification of K247 accounted for 1 mol of AMCA incorporated per mol of Rubisco activase monomer. Photoaffinity labeling of AMCA-sulfo-NHS- and sulfo-NHS-acetate-modified Rubisco activase with ATP analogs derivatized on either the adenine base or on the gamma-phosphate showed that K247 is not essential for the binding of adenine nucleotides per se. Instead, the data indicated that the essentiality of K247 is probably due to an involvement of this highly reactive, species-invariant residue in an obligatory interaction that occurs between the protein and the nucleotide phosphate during catalysis.

  2. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  3. Neuroprotective actions of pterostilbene on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Song, Tingting; Yang, Lin; Wang, Xueying; Yang, Changhong; Jiang, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage causes acute mortality and morbidity in newborns and long-term neurological disorders in the survivors. Pterostilbene (PTE) is a natural compound possessing various biological and pharmacological activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of PTE on neonatal HI brain damagein P7 rat model and to explore the possible mechanisms. Neonatal HI brain damage was induced in rat pups (P7). Prior to the induction of HI injury, PTE was injected with or without zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). ZnPP was used to test whether abnormal changes of HO-1 expression were involved in the effect of PTE. The results showed that PTE exhibited excellent neuroprotective effects against neonatal HI brain injury, as evidenced by the decrease of brain infarct volume, brain edema, neurological score, and improvement in motor coordination motor deficit and working memory deficit. PTE pretreatment decreased the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and key transcription factor p65 NF-κB, and reduced the number of TUNEL-stained neurons, indicating the inhibition of inflammation and programmed cell death. Moreover, PTE pretreatment decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, increased superoxide dismutase activity and decreased reactive oxygen species level, indicating that PTE played an important antioxidant role. Furthermore, ZnPP was able to inhibit PTE-induced suppression of oxidative stress, programmed cell death, inflammation and brain damage. In conclusion, PTE pretreatment prevented HI-induced brain injury in newborns through HO-1-mediated reduction of oxidative stress, programmed cell death, and inflammation, and final improvement of histological and functional injury. Overall, the data that obtained in rat model provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of neonatal HI brain injury and may be translational to human

  4. Phylogenetic Diversity of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Large-Subunit Genes from Deep-Sea Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Elsaied, Hosam; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, E.C. 4.1.1.39) large-subunit genes of deep-sea microorganisms was analyzed. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from seven samples, including samples from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and various deep-sea habitats around Japan. The kinds of samples were hydrothermal vent water and chimney fragment; reducing sediments from a bathyal seep, a hadal seep, and a presumed seep; and symbiont-bearing tissues of the vent mussel, Bathymodiolus sp., and the seep vestimentiferan tubeworm, Lamellibrachia sp. The RuBisCO genes that encode both form I and form II large subunits (cbbL and cbbM) were amplified by PCR from the seven deep-sea sample DNA populations, cloned, and sequenced. From each sample, 50 cbbL clones and 50 cbbM clones, if amplified, were recovered and sequenced to group them into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). A total of 29 OTUs were recorded from the 300 total cbbL clones, and a total of 24 OTUs were recorded from the 250 total cbbM clones. All the current OTUs have the characteristic RuBisCO amino acid motif sequences that exist in other RuBisCOs. The recorded OTUs were related to different RuBisCO groups of proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, and eukarya. The diversity of the RuBisCO genes may be correlated with certain characteristics of the microbial habitats. The RuBisCO sequences from the symbiont-bearing tissues showed a phylogenetic relationship with those from the ambient bacteria. Also, the RuBisCO sequences of known species of thiobacilli and those from widely distributed marine habitats were closely related to each other. This suggests that the Thiobacillus-related RuBisCO may be distributed globally and contribute to the primary production in the deep sea. PMID:11282630

  5. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.; Tabita, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which rubulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) was determined. It appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were a chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO{sub 2}-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea, Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1, and Olisthodiscus luteus. Although many more samplings at diverse sites must be accomplished, the discovery of distinctly different sequences of rbcL mRNA at different water depths suggests that there is a stratification of active CO{sub 2}-fixing organisms in western Lake Erie. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Diversity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large-subunit genes from groundwater and aquifer microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Alfreider, A; Vogt, C; Hoffmann, D; Babel, W

    2003-05-01

    To test our hypothesis that microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation plays an important role in subsurface systems of two large groundwater remediation projects, several anaerobic/microaerobic aquifer and groundwater samples were taken and used to investigate the distribution and phylogenetic diversity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large-subunit genes. Two primer sets were designed for amplifying partial-subunit genes of RubisCO forms I and II from the DNA, directly extracted from the samples. PCR products were used to construct five clone libraries with putative RubisCO form I sequences, and two libraries of DNA amplified by form II primers. Selected clones were screened for variation by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and a total of 28 clone inserts were sequenced and further analyzed. The phylogenies constructed from amino acid sequences derived from the partial RubisCO large-subunit sequences showed a distinct pattern. Diverse sequences affiliated to the cluster of green-like type IA RubisCO sequences were found, representing various obligate and facultative chemolithoautotrophic Proteobacteria, whereas type II RubisCO sequences detected were most closely related to those of thiobacilli species. An isolate obtained from aquifer enrichment culture, which has been provisionally named Halothiobacillus sp. RA13 on the basis of its 16S rDNA sequence, was found to contain both types of RubisCO genes, i.e., forms I and II. Physiological and ecological considerations are discussed in the context of additional microbial data and physicochemical properties.

  7. Impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst in children with sickle cell disease is associated with heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ceri; Orf, Katharine; Horvath, Erzsebet; Levin, Michael; De La Fuente, Josu; Chakravorty, Subarna; Cunnington, Aubrey J

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for invasive bacterial infections, and splenic dysfunction is believed to be the main underlying cause. We have previously shown that the liberation of heme in acute hemolysis can induce heme oxygenase-1 during granulopoiesis, impairing the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a bactericidal oxidative burst, and increasing susceptibility to bacterial infection. We hypothesized that this may also occur with the chronic hemolysis of sickle cell disease, potentially contributing to susceptibility to infections. We found that neutrophil oxidative burst activity was significantly lower in treatment-naïve children with sickle cell disease compared to age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched controls, whilst degranulation was similar. The defect in neutrophil oxidative burst was quantitatively related to both systemic heme oxygenase-1 activity (assessed by carboxyhemoglobin concentration) and neutrophil mobilization. A distinct population of heme oxygenase-1-expressing cells was present in the bone marrow of children with sickle cell disease, but not in healthy children, with a surface marker profile consistent with neutrophil progenitors (CD49d(Hi) CD24(Lo) CD15(Int) CD16(Int) CD11b(+/-)). Incubation of promyelocytic HL-60 cells with the heme oxygenase-1 substrate and inducer, hemin, demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 induction during neutrophilic differentiation could reduce oxidative burst capacity. These findings indicate that impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst activity in sickle cell disease is associated with hemolysis and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Neutrophil dysfunction might contribute to risk of infection in sickle cell disease, and measurement of neutrophil oxidative burst might be used to identify patients at greatest risk of infection, who might benefit from enhanced prophylaxis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Species-Dependent Variation in the Interaction of Substrate-Bound Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) and Rubisco Activase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Yuan; Snyder, Gordon W.; Esau, Brian D.; Portis, Archie R.; Ogren, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Purified spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase supported 50 to 100% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from spinach, barley, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), soybean (Glycine max L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.), Arabidopsis thaliana, maize (Zea mays L.), and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii but supported only 10 to 35% activation of Rubisco from three Solanaceae species, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), petunia (Petunia hybrida L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Conversely, purified tobacco and petunia Rubisco activase catalyzed 75 to 100% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from the three Solanacee species but only 10 to 25% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from the other species. Thus, the interaction between substrate-bound Rubisco and Rubisco activase is species dependent. The species dependence observed is consistent with phylogenetic relationships previously derived from plant morphological characteristics and from nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons of the two Rubisco subunits. Species dependence in the Rubisco-Rubisco activase interaction and the absence of major anomalies in the deduced amino acid sequence of tobacco Rubisco activase compared to sequences in non-Solanaceae species suggest that Rubisco and Rubisco activase may have coevolved such that amino acid changes that have arisen by evolutionary divergence in one of these enzymes through spontaneous mutation or selection pressure have led to compensatory changes in the other enzyme. PMID:16653209

  9. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  10. Hemophagocytic macrophages constitute a major compartment of heme oxygenase expression in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J; Schaer, Christian A; Schoedon, Gabriele; Imhof, Alexander; Kurrer, Michael O

    2006-01-01

    Schaer DJ, Schaer CA, Schoedon G, Imhof A, Kurrer MO. Hemophagocytic macrophages constitute a major compartment of heme oxygenase expression in sepsis. Objectives: Uncontrolled macrophage activation with hemophagocytosis is a distinctive feature of hemophagocytic syndromes (HPS). We examined whether lympho-histiocytic infiltration of the bone marrow and liver, as well as hemo-/erythrophagocytosis also occurs during sepsis and whether this process could account for the increased production of anti-inflammatory heme-oxygenase (HO-1) products observed during sepsis. Methods: Hemophagocytosis and expression of CD163, HO-1, ferritin as well as CD8 and granzyme-B were examined in post-mortem bone marrow samples from 28 patients with sepsis and from eight control patients. Results: Comparison of samples from non-septic patients with samples from patients with fatal sepsis revealed that the latter group displayed dense lympho-histiocytic bone marrow infiltration with CD163+/HO-1+/ferritin+ macrophages as well as with CD8+ and granzyme-B+ T-cells. Hemophagocytosis with prominent phagocytosis of erythroid cells was readily apparent in septic patients, implying that this process is a likely stimulus for the up-regulation of macrophage HO-1 expression. Conclusions: Lympho-histiocytic activation with hemophagocytosis is a shared pathophysiologic mechanism in HPS and sepsis. Furthermore, the association of hemophagocytosis with an increase in HO-1 expression may indicate a novel role for this apparently futile process as a negative regulator of inflammation. PMID:17044836

  11. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular rubber-degrading enzyme rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to high resolution. Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  12. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  13. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  14. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Frank A D T G; Scharstuhl, Alwin; Tyrrell, Rex M; Von den Hoff, Johannes W; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Russel, Frans G M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2010-12-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special emphasis on the heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system and the versatile effector molecules that are formed after HO-mediated heme degradation. Excessive scar formation following wounding is thought to relate to prolonged oxidative and inflammatory stress in the skin. Evidence is accumulating that the heme-HO system forms a novel and important target in the control of wound healing. Heme-protein derived heme can act as a potent oxidative and inflammatory stress inducer, and excess levels of heme may thus contribute to delayed resolution of oxidative and inflammatory insults in the skin. This emphasizes the need for a timely reduction of the levels of heme. Heme-binding proteins, heme transporters, and the heme degrading protein, HO, form therefore a necessary defense. Deficiencies in these defense proteins or a disturbed redox status, as in diabetic patients, may render individuals more prone to heme-induced deleterious effects. A better understanding of the heme-heme oxygenase system as target during wound healing may result in novel strategies to reduce scar formation.

  15. Induction of heme oxygenase: A general response to oxidant stress in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Luscher, P.; Tyrrell, R.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA is strongly stimulated by treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or the sulfhydryl reagent sodium arsenite. Since this will result in a transient reduction in the prooxidant state of cells, the phenomenon may represent an important inducible antioxidant defense mechanism. To examine the generality of the response, we have measured the accumulation of the specific mRNA in a variety of human and mammalian cell types after inducing treatments. Induction by sodium arsenite is observed in all additional human cell types tested. This includes primary epidermal keratinocytes and lung and colon fibroblasts as well as established cell lines such as HeLa, TK6 lymphoblastoid, and transformed fetal keratinocytes. Strong induction of heme oxygenase mRNA is also observed following sodium arsenite treatment of cell lines of rat, hamster, mouse, monkey, and marsupial origin. The agents which lead to induction in cultured human skin fibroblasts fall into two categories: (a) those which are oxidants or can generate active intermediates (ultraviolet A radiation, hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate); (b) agents which are known to interact with or modify cellular glutathione levels (buthionine sulfoximine, sodium arsenite, iodoacetamide, diamide, and cadmium chloride). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that induction of the enzyme is a general response to oxidant stress in mammalian cells and are consistent with the possibility that the cellular redox state plays a key role.

  16. Direct inhibitions of the activities of steroidogenic cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenase systems by anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, T; Ichikawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of anticonvulsants on the activities of cytochromes P-450(17alpha,lyase) (CYP17), P-450arom (CYP19), P-450C21 (CYP21), P-450SCC (CYP11A1), and P-450(11beta) (CYP11B1) mono-oxygenase systems were studied using rat testicular microsomes, human placental microsomes, bovine adrenocortical microsomes, bovine adrenocortical mitochondria and purified cytochrome P-450(11beta). Phenytoin, clonazepam and carbamazepine inhibited the steroidogenesis catalysed by these cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenase systems and the Ki values for each anticonvulsant were determined. Neither hydantoin nor sodium valproate inhibited the activities of steroidogenic cytochromes P-450. When the activities of cytochromes P-450arom and P-450C21 were measured in the presence of anticonvulsants, the Ki values (0.15 mM) for phenytoin were close to the plasma concentration of phenytoin under therapeutic conditions. Phenytoin, clonazepam and carbamazepine directly inhibited the monooxygenase activities of cytochromes P-450, because they did not affect the activities of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, NADPH-adrenoferredoxin reductase and adrenoferredoxin.

  17. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism is associated with genetic variation in heme oxygenase-1 in Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Christopher J.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Ellingsen, Dorothy; Trau, Heidi; Ghaji, Nafisa; Hooper, W. Craig; Austin, Harland

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) affects as many as 1 in 1000 individuals in the United States. Although Blacks are disproportionately affected by VTE, few genetic risk factors have been identified in this population. The inducible heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene encodes a key cytoprotective enzyme with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticoagulant activity acting in the vascular system. A (GT)n microsatellite located in the promoter of the HMOX1 gene influences the level of response. Methods and Results Using the Genetic Attributes and Thrombosis Epidemiology (GATE) study, we examined the association between HMOX1 repeat length and VTE events in 883 Black and 927 White patients and matched controls. We found no association between HMOX1 genotypes and VTE in Whites. However, in Black patients, carrying two long (L) alleles (≥34 repeats) was significantly associated with provoked (odds ratio (OR) 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19–2.90) or recurrent (OR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.77–5.53) VTE events. Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time an association between genetic variation in HMOX1, and VTE in Blacks. Our results support a key role for the heme oxygenase system in protecting patients at increased risk for thrombosis and suggest a potential mechanism for targeted screening and intervention. PMID:22959128

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse myo-inositol oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter M. Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Dickson, James M.; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Loomes, Kerry M.; Baker, Edward N.

    2006-08-01

    Mouse myo-inositol oxygenase, a key enzyme involved in inositol catabolism, has been expressed, purified and crystallized in a form suitable for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX) catalyzes the novel oxidative cleavage of myo-inositol (MI) and its epimer d-chiro inositol (DCI) to d-glucuronate. MIOX utilizes an Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup III} binuclear iron centre for the dioxygen-dependent cleavage of the C1—C6 bond in MI. Despite its key role in inositol metabolism, the structural basis of its unique four-electron oxidation mechanism and its substrate specificity remain unknown. In order to answer these questions and to facilitate the use of this key enzyme for the development of new therapeutic strategies for diabetes, the mouse enzyme has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized from 4.4 M sodium formate. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.87, b = 77.26, c = 84.84 Å, and diffract to 2.8 Å resolution.

  19. Non-enzymatic chemistry enables 2-hydroxyglutarate-mediated activation of 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Rydzik, Anna M.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Kawamura, Akane; McCullagh, James S. O.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Flashman, Emily; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate in cells results from mutations to isocitrate dehydrogenase that correlate with cancer. A recent study reports that (R)-, but not (S)-2-hydroxyglutarate, acts as a co-substrate for the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases via enzyme-catalysed oxidation to 2-oxoglutarate. Here we investigate the mechanism of 2-hydroxyglutarate-enabled activation of 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases, including prolyl hydroxylase domain 2, the most important human prolyl hydroxylase isoform. We observe that 2-hydroxyglutarate-enabled catalysis by prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 is not enantiomer-specific and is stimulated by ferrous/ferric ion and reducing agents including L-ascorbate. The results reveal that 2-hydroxyglutarate is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate non-enzymatically, likely via iron-mediated Fenton-chemistry, at levels supporting in vitro catalysis by 2-oxoglutarate oxygenases. Succinic semialdehyde and succinate are also identified as products of 2-hydroxyglutarate oxidation. Overall, the results rationalize the reported effects of 2-hydroxyglutarate on catalysis by prolyl hydroxylases in vitro and suggest that non-enzymatic 2-hydroxyglutarate oxidation may be of biological interest. PMID:24594748

  20. Role of oxygenases in pisatin biosynthesis and in the fungal degradation of maackiain

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.E.; Weiner, E.J.; Matthews, P.S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    1987-02-01

    Some isolates of the plant pathogen Nectria haematococca detoxify the isoflavonoid phytoalexin (-)maackiain by hydroxylation at carbon 6a. Precursor feeding studies strongly suggest that the penultimate step in (+)pisatin biosynthesis by Pisum sativum is 6a-hydroxylation of (+)maackiain. They have used /sup 18/O labeling to test the involvement of oxygenases in these two reactions. When fungal metabolism of maackiain took place under /sup 18/O/sub 2/, the product was labeled with 99% efficiency; no label was incorporated by metabolism in H/sub 2//sup 18/O. Pisatin synthesized by pea pods in the presence of /sup 18/O/sub 2/ or H/sub 2//sup 18/O was a mixture of molecules containing up to three labeled oxygen atoms. Primary mass spectra of such mixtures were complex but were greatly simplified by tandem MS. This analysis indicated that the 6a oxygen of pisatin was derived from H/sub 2/O and not from O/sub 2/. Labeling patterns for the other five oxygen atoms were consistent with the proposed pathway for biosynthesis of pisatin and related isoflavonoids. They conclude that the fungal hydroxylation of maackiain is catalyzed by an oxygenase, but the biosynthetic route to the 6a hydroxyl of pisatin is unknown.

  1. The function and catalysis of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases involved in plant flavonoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ai-Xia; Han, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Yi-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-01-15

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and acetate metabolism. They fulfil a variety of functions in plants and have health benefits for humans. During the synthesis of the tricyclic flavonoid natural products in plants, oxidative modifications to the central C ring are catalyzed by four of FeII and 2-oxoglutarate dependent (2-ODD) oxygenases, namely flavone synthase I (FNS I), flavonol synthase (FLS), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and flavanone 3β-hydroxylase (FHT). FNS I, FLS and ANS are involved in desaturation of C2-C3 of flavonoids and FHT in hydroxylation of C3. FNS I, which is restricted to the Apiaceae species and in rice, is predicted to have evolved from FHT by duplication. Due to their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, FLS and ANS, which interact with the α surface of the substrate, belong to a group of dioxygenases having a broad substrate specificity, while FNS I and FHT are more selective, and interact with the naringenin β surface. Here, we summarize recent findings regarding the function of the four 2-ODD oxygenases and the relationship between their catalytic activity, their polypeptide sequence and their tertiary structure.

  2. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  3. Time-resolved Studies of IsdG Protein Identify Molecular Signposts along the Non-canonical Heme Oxygenase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Bennett R.; Kant, Ravi; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Celis, Arianna I.; Machovina, Melodie M.; Skaar, Eric P.; Bothner, Brian; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    IsdGs are heme monooxygenases that break open the tetrapyrrole, releasing the iron, and thereby allowing bacteria expressing this protein to use heme as a nutritional iron source. Little is currently known about the mechanism by which IsdGs degrade heme, although the products differ from those generated by canonical heme oxygenases. A synthesis of time-resolved techniques, including in proteo mass spectrometry and conventional and stopped-flow UV/visible spectroscopy, was used in conjunction with analytical methods to define the reaction steps mediated by IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus and their time scales. An apparent meso-hydroxyheme (forming with k = 0.6 min−1, pH 7.4, 10 mm ascorbate, 10 μm IsdG-heme, 22 °C) was identified as a likely common intermediate with the canonical heme oxygenases. Unlike heme oxygenases, this intermediate does not form with added H2O2 nor does it convert to verdoheme and CO. Rather, the next observable intermediates (k = 0.16 min−1) were a set of formyloxobilin isomers, similar to the mycobilin products of the IsdG homolog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MhuD). These converted in separate fast and slow phases to β-/δ-staphylobilin isomers and formaldehyde (CH2O). Controlled release of this unusual C1 product may support IsdG's dual role as both an oxygenase and a sensor of heme availability in S. aureus. PMID:26534961

  4. Imposing function down a (cupin)-barrel: secondary structure and metal stereochemistry in the αKG-dependent oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Hangasky, John A.; Taabazuing, Cornelius Y.; Valliere, Meaghan A.; Knapp, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Fe(II)/αketoglutarate (αKG) dependent oxygenases catalyze a diverse range of reactions significant in biological processes such as antibiotic biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, oxygen sensing, and DNA and RNA repair. Although functionally diverse, the eight-stranded β-barrel (cupin) and HX(D/E)XnH facial triad motifs are conserved in this super-family of enzymes. Crystal structure analysis of 25 αKG oxygenases reveals two stereoisomers of the Fe cofactor, Anti and Clock, which differ in the relative position of the exchangeable ligand position and the primary substrate. Herein, we discuss the relationship between the chemical mechanism and the secondary coordination sphere of the αKG oxygenases, within the constraints of the stereochemistry of the Fe cofactor. Sequence analysis of the cupin barrel indicates that a small subset of positions constitute the second coordination sphere, which has significant ramifications for the structure of the ferryl intermediate. The competence of both Anti and Clock stereoisomers of Fe points to a ferryl intermediate that is 5 coordinate. The small number of conserved close contacts within the active sites of αKG oxygenases can be extended to chemically related enzymes, such as the αKG-dependent halogenases SyrB2 and CytC3, and the non-αKG dependent dioxygenases isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) and cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). PMID:23446356

  5. Expression of rat heme oxygenase in Escherichia coli as a catalytically active, full-length form that binds to bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Sato, M; Yoshida, T

    1991-11-15

    A plasmid, pKK-RHO, was constructed by incorporating the coding sequence of a cDNA for rat heme oxygenase into the expression vector pKK233-2. Escherichia coli strain XL1-blue transformed with pKK-RHO produced a catalytically active, full-length heme oxygenase. The 32-kDa native enzyme expressed, was localized in the bacterial membranes, possibly due to the spontaneous membrane-binding properties of a hydrophobic segment in its C-terminal region. During cultivation, a few degraded forms of heme oxygenase that had lost their membrane-associative properties appeared. Probably, some bacterial proteases cut the native heme oxygenase at sites near its C-terminus and so release hydrophilic peptides of heme oxygenase from the membranes. A 30-kDa polypeptide, one of the degraded forms of heme oxygenase, retained ability to accept electrons from NADPH--cytochrome P450 reductase and also activity for catalyzing breakdown of heme to biliverdin. The cultured cells were pale green. From them we extracted green pigment(s), of which the absorption spectrum closely resembled that of biliverdin, suggesting that a large amount of the endogenous heme of E. coli was actually degraded to biliverdin by the expressed heme oxygenase.

  6. Hydrogen-rich water regulates cucumber adventitious root development in a heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Zhang, Wei; Qi, Fang; Cui, Weiti; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen gas (H2) is an endogenous gaseous molecule in plants. Although its reputation is as a "biologically inert gas", recent results suggested that H2 has therapeutic antioxidant properties in animals and plays fundamental roles in plant responses to environmental stresses. However, whether H2 regulates root morphological patterns is largely unknown. In this report, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize H2 physiological roles and possible signaling transduction pathways in the promotion of adventitious root (AR) formation in cucumber explants. Our results showed that a 50% concentration of HRW was able to mimic the effect of hemin, an inducer of a carbon monoxide (CO) synthetic enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in restoring AR formation in comparison with the inhibition effect conferred by auxin-depletion treatment alone. It was further shown that the inducible effect of HRW could be further blocked by the co-treatment with N-1-naphthylphtalamic acid (NPA; an auxin transport inhibitor). The HRW-induced response, at least partially, was HO-1-dependent. This conclusion was supported by the fact that the exposure of cucumber explants to HRW up-regulates cucumber HO-1 gene expression and its protein levels. HRW-mediated induction of representative target genes related to auxin signaling and AR formation, such as CsDNAJ-1, CsCDPK1/5, CsCDC6, CsAUX22B-like, and CsAUX22D-like, and thereafter AR formation (particularly in the AR length) was differentially sensitive to the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). Above blocking actions were clearly reversed by CO, further confirming that the above response was HO-1/CO-specific. However, the addition of a well-known antioxidant, ascorbic acid (AsA), failed to influence AR formation triggered by HRW, thus ruling out the involvement of redox homeostasis in this process. Together, these results indicated that HRW-induced adventitious rooting is, at least partially, correlated with the HO-1/CO

  7. Hemolytic capability and expression of a putative haem oxygenase-encoding gene by blood isolates of Candida tropicalis are influenced by iron deprivation and the presence of hemoglobin and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    França, Emanuele Julio Galvão; Furlaneto-Maia, Luciana; Furlaneto, Márcia Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Although hemolytic activity is known to be a putative virulence factor contributing to candidal pathogenesis, its production by Candida tropicalis, a species closely related to Candida albicans, is poor understood. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the hemolytic activity and the expression level of a putative haem oxygenase encoding gene by blood isolates of C. tropicalis following growth in iron deprivation, and in the presence of hemoglobin and erythrocytes. The lowest values of hemolytic activity were observed in cell-free culture supernatants of isolates growing in iron-restricted medium (RPMI medium and RPMI medium supplemented with iron chelator bathophenanthrolindisulphonic acid). Hemolysis was increased in the presence of either hemoglobin or erythrocytes. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the putative haem oxygenase encoding gene (CtHMX1), potentially related with iron uptake, was up-regulated (p < 0.001) following growth in iron deprivation and in the presence of hemoglobin; CtHMX1 was repressed in the presence of human erythrocytes (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that hemoglobin had positive effect in the production of hemolytic factor and gene expression related to iron uptake in C. tropicalis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enzyme Specificity of 2-Nitrotoluene 2,3-Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain JS42 Is Determined by the C-Terminal Region of the α Subunit of the Oxygenase Component

    PubMed Central

    Parales, Juanito V.; Parales, Rebecca E.; Resnick, Sol M.; Gibson, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Biotransformations with recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the genes encoding 2-nitrotoluene 2,3-dioxygenase (2NTDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42 demonstrated that 2NTDO catalyzes the dihydroxylation and/or monohydroxylation of a wide range of aromatic compounds. Extremely high nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence identity exists between the components from 2NTDO and the corresponding components from 2,4-dinitrotoluene dioxygenase (2,4-DNTDO) from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT (formerly Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT). However, comparisons of the substrates oxidized by these dioxygenases show that they differ in substrate specificity, regiospecificity, and the enantiomeric composition of their oxidation products. Hybrid dioxygenases were constructed with the genes encoding 2NTDO and 2,4-DNTDO. Biotransformation experiments with these hybrid dioxygenases showed that the C-terminal region of the large subunit of the oxygenase component (ISPα) was responsible for the enzyme specificity differences observed between 2NTDO and 2,4-DNTDO. The small subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPβ) was shown to play no role in determining the specificities of these dioxygenases. PMID:9495758

  9. Crystal structure of a substrate complex of myo-inositol oxygenase, a di-iron oxygenase with a key role in inositol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter M; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Dickson, James M J; Cooper, Garth J S; Loomes, Kerry M; Baker, Edward N

    2006-10-10

    Altered metabolism of the inositol sugars myo-inositol (MI) and d-chiro-inositol is implicated in diabetic complications. In animals, catabolism of MI and D-chiro-inositol depends on the enzyme MI oxygenase (MIOX), which catalyzes the first committed step of the glucuronate-xylulose pathway, and is found almost exclusively in the kidneys. The crystal structure of MIOX, in complex with MI, has been determined by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction methods and refined at 2.0-A resolution (R=0.206, Rfree=0.253). The structure reveals a monomeric, single-domain protein with a mostly helical fold that is distantly related to the diverse HD domain superfamily. Five helices form the structural core and provide six ligands (four His and two Asp) for the di-iron center, in which the two iron atoms are bridged by a putative hydroxide ion and one of the Asp ligands, Asp-124. A key loop forms a lid over the MI substrate, which is coordinated in bidentate mode to one iron atom. It is proposed that this mode of iron coordination, and interaction with a key Lys residue, activate MI for bond cleavage. The structure also reveals the basis of substrate specificity and suggests routes for the development of specific MIOX inhibitors.

  10. A signature of the oxygenase intermediate in catalysis by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase as provided by a site-directed mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Hartman, F C

    1995-05-19

    An uncharacterized minor transient product, observed in our earlier studies of substrate turnover by the E48Q mutant of Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Lee, E. H., Harpel, M. R., Chen, Y.-R., and Hartman, F. C. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 26583-26591), becomes a major product when it is trapped and stabilized with borate as an additive to the reaction mixture. Chemical characterization establishes this novel product as D-glycero-2,3-pentodiulose 1,5-bisphosphate, thereby demonstrating oxidation of the C-3 hydroxyl of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate to a carbonyl. As the formation of the novel oxidation product is oxygen-dependent and generates hydrogen peroxide, its precursor must be a peroxy derivative of ribulose bisphosphate. Thus, discovery of the dicarbonyl bisphosphate lends direct support to the long standing, but heretofore unproven, postulate that the normal pathway for oxidative cleavage of ribulose bisphosphate by the wild-type enzyme entails a peroxy intermediate. Our results also suggest that stabilization of the peroxy intermediate by the wild-type enzyme promotes carbon-carbon scission as opposed to elimination of hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Nonsteroid drug selectivities for cyclo-oxygenase-1 rather than cyclo-oxygenase-2 are associated with human gastrointestinal toxicity: A full in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Timothy D.; Giuliano, Francesco; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bukasa, Antoaneta; Mitchell, Jane A.; Vane, John R.

    1999-01-01

    The beneficial actions of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) can be associated with inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 whereas their harmful side effects are associated with inhibition of COX-1. Here we report data from two related assay systems, the human whole blood assay and a modified human whole blood assay (using human A549 cells as a source of COX-2). This assay we refer to as the William Harvey Modified Assay. Our aim was to make meaningful comparisons of both classical NSAIDs and newer COX-2-selective compounds. These comparisons of the actions of >40 NSAIDs and novel COX-2-selective agents, including celecoxib, rofecoxib and diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrate a distribution of compound selectivities toward COX-1 that aligns with the risk of serious gastrointestinal complications. In conclusion, this full in vitro analysis of COX-1/2 selectivities in human tissues clearly supports the theory that inhibition of COX-1 underlies the gastrointestinal toxicity of NSAIDs in man. PMID:10377455

  12. Isotetrandrine ameliorates tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lidong; Ci, Xinxin; Lv, Hongming; Wang, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine, a naturally occurring plant alkaloid found in Mahonia of Berberidaceae, possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties, but the antioxidative activity and mechanism action remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidative effect and mechanism of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. We found that 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine suppressed cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species generation, and glutathione depletion. Additionally, our study confirmed that 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 expression and nuclear translocation of factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Specifically, the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 induced by 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine was associated with Nrf2 negative regulatory protein Keap1 inactivation and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase. Preincubation with thiol-reducing agents reduced 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression, and treatment with either extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors attenuated the levels of 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine-induced Nrf2 activation and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Furthermore, the cytoprotective effect of 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine was abolished by heme oxygenase-1, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors. These results indicated that the 1R, 1′S-isotetrandrine ameliorated tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by the dissociation of Nrf2 from Nrf2-Keap1 complex via extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and Keap1 inactivation. PMID:27190261

  13. A Sulfur Oxygenase from the Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus with Atypically Low Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, Patrick; Pöll, Uwe; Braun, Johannes; Klingl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sequence comparisons showed that the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus Arh 1 (TpSOR) is branching deeply within dendrograms of these proteins (29 to 34% identity). A synthetic gene encoding TpSOR expressed in Escherichia coli resulted in a protein 14.7 ± 0.9 nm in diameter and an apparent molecular mass of 556 kDa. Sulfite and thiosulfate were formed from elemental sulfur in a temperature range of 10 to 98°C (optimum temperature ≈ 80°C) and a pH range of 6 to 11.5 (optimum pH ≈ 9; 308 ± 78 U/mg of protein). Sulfide formation had a maximum specific activity of 0.03 U/mg, or <1% of the corresponding activity of other SORs. Hence, reductase activity seems not to be an integral part of the reaction mechanism. TpSOR was most active at NaCl or glycine betaine concentrations of 0 to 1 M, although 0.2% of the maximal activity was detected even at 5 M NaCl and 4 M betaine. The melting point of TpSOR was close to 80°C, when monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy or differential scanning fluorimetry; however, the denaturation kinetics were slow: 55% of the residual activity remained after 25 min of incubation at 80°C. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the active-site residue Cys44 is essential for activity, whereas alanine mutants of the two other conserved cysteines retained about 0.5% residual activity. A model of the sulfur metabolism in T. paradoxus is discussed. IMPORTANCE Sulfur oxygenase reductases (SORs) are the only enzymes catalyzing an oxygen-dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur and/or polysulfides to sulfite, thiosulfate, and hydrogen sulfide. SORs are known from mesophilic and extremophilic archaea and bacteria. All SORs seem to form highly thermostable 24-subunit hollow spheres. They carry a low-potential mononuclear nonheme iron in the active site and an indispensable cysteine; however, their exact reaction mechanisms are unknown. Typically, the reductase

  14. Potential therapeutic applications of aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farah, A. E.; Rosenberg, F.

    1980-01-01

    1 The ubiquitous actions of the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors are described. 2 These include the inhibitory effect on prostaglandin synthesis and the direct effect of aspirin on lymphocytes and their ability to produce lymphokines. 3 Aspirin reduces some types of platelet aggregation possibly involving inhibition of the precursors of thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin. 4 The therapeutic implications in relation to transient ischaemic attacks, coronary artery disease and reno-allograft rejection are discussed. 5 The beneficial and adverse effects on the gastro-intestinal tract are described. 6 The effects of aspirin-like drugs on the genito-urinary tract are described with particular reference to their adverse effects on labour and their therapeutic effect on dysmenorrhoea. PMID:6776977

  15. Regio and Stereodivergent Antibiotic Oxidative Carbocyclizations Catalyzed by Rieske Oxygenase-Like Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Paulina K.; Barry, Sarah M.; Odulate, Olanipekun M.; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W.; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically-powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in Nature. Here we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalyzed by non-heme iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective manmade C-H activation catalysts. PMID:21505498

  16. Regio- and stereodivergent antibiotic oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Paulina K; Barry, Sarah M; Odulate, Olanipekun M; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in nature. Here, we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio- and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by non-haem iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio- and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective man-made C-H activation catalysts.

  17. Nrf2-dependent induction of innate host defense via heme oxygenase-1 inhibits Zika virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hanxia; Falgout, Barry; Takeda, Kazuyo; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    We identified primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as vulnerable target cells for Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We demonstrate dramatic effects of hemin, the natural inducer of the heme catabolic enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in the reduction of ZIKV replication in vitro. Both LLC-MK2 monkey kidney cells and primary MDM exhibited hemin-induced HO-1 expression with major reductions of > 90% in ZIKV replication, with little toxicity to infected cells. Silencing expression of HO-1 or its upstream regulatory gene, nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), attenuated hemin-induced suppression of ZIKV infection, suggesting an important role for induction of these intracellular mediators in retarding ZIKV replication. The inverse correlation between hemin-induced HO-1 levels and ZIKV replication provides a potentially useful therapeutic modality based on stimulation of an innate cellular response against Zika virus infection. PMID:28068513

  18. Amyloid precursor proteins inhibit heme oxygenase activity and augment neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Doré, S; Ferris, C D; Tomita, T; Sawa, A; Wolosker, H; Borchelt, D R; Iwatsubo, T; Kim, S H; Thinakaran, G; Sisodia, S S; Snyder, S H

    2000-11-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates the beta-amyloid peptide, postulated to participate in the neurotoxicity of Alzheimer's disease. We report that APP and APLP bind to heme oxygenase (HO), an enzyme whose product, bilirubin, is antioxidant and neuroprotective. The binding of APP inhibits HO activity, and APP with mutations linked to the familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides substantially greater inhibition of HO activity than wild-type APP. Cortical cultures from transgenic mice expressing Swedish mutant APP have greatly reduced bilirubin levels, establishing that mutant APP inhibits HO activity in vivo. Oxidative neurotoxicity is markedly greater in cerebral cortical cultures from APP Swedish mutant transgenic mice than wild-type cultures. These findings indicate that augmented neurotoxicity caused by APP-HO interactions may contribute to neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Use of Isotopes and Isotope Effects for Investigations of Diiron Oxygenase Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Komor, Anna J; Lipscomb, John D

    2017-01-01

    Isotope effects of four broad and overlapping categories have been applied to the study of the mechanisms of chemical reaction and regulation of nonheme diiron cluster-containing oxygenases. The categories are: (a) mass properties that allow substrate-to-product conversions to be tracked, (b) atomic properties that allow specialized spectroscopies, (c) mass properties that impact primarily vibrational spectroscopies, and (d) bond dissociation energy shifts that permit dynamic isotope effect studies of many types. The application of these categories of isotope effects is illustrated using the soluble methane monooxygenase system and CmlI, which catalyzes the multistep arylamine to arylnitro conversion in the biosynthetic pathway for chloramphenicol. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevention of Barrier Disruption by Heme Oxygenase-1 in Intestinal Bleeding Model.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Reiko; Akagi, Masaaki; Hatori, Yuta; Inouye, Sachiye

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of free heme, the local level of which was increased by bleeding, on the intestinal barrier function, using human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Our results show that the addition of hemin to the culture medium markedly disrupted the barrier function, which was significantly improved by glutamine supplementation. Although hemin treatment caused the increased expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inhibition of HO activity resulted in the aggravation of hemin-induced barrier dysfunction. Up-regulation of HO-1 by pretreatment with a low concentration of hemin almost completely prevented hemin-induced barrier dysfunction. Taken together, these observations indicate that an abnormally high level of intracellular free heme causes barrier dysfunction, probably through the modulation of proteins forming tight junctions.

  1. A heme oxygenase-1 transducer model of degenerative and developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Hyman M; Song, Wei

    2015-03-09

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In "stressed" astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  2. Heme Oxygenase 1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Pedro; Agúndez, José A G; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J

    2015-06-01

    Several reports suggested a role of heme oxygenase genes 1 and 2 (HMOX1 and HMOX2) in modifying the risk to develop Parkinson disease (PD). Because essential tremor (ET) and PD share phenotypical and, probably, etiologic factors of the similarities, we analyzed whether such genes are related with the risk to develop ET. We analyzed the distribution of allelic and genotype frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 single nucleotide polymorphisms, as well as the presence of copy number variations of these genes in 202 subjects with familial ET and 747 healthy controls. Allelic frequencies of rs2071746T and rs1051308G were significantly lower in ET patients than in controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 and HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphisms and the risk to develop ET in the Spanish population.

  3. FIRST-IN-HUMAN STUDY DEMONSTRATING PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVATION OF HEME OXYGENASE-1 IN HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Kulkarni, Anuja; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Camilleri, Michael; Lempke, Mary; Brunn, Gregory J.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2010-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) degrades heme and protects against oxidative stress, but has not been pharmacologically induced in humans. In this randomized study (10 healthy volunteers), hemin (3 mg/kg. i.v in 25% albumin) increased plasma HO-1 protein concentration by 4–5 fold and HO-1 activity by ~15 fold over baseline at 24 and 48 h (placebo − 56.41 ± 6.31 [baseline], 77.44 ± 10.62 [48h] versus hemin − 71.70 ± 9.20 [baseline], 1192.20 ± 333.30 [48h]) in 4 of 5 subjects compared to albumin (p ≤ 0.03), thereby overcoming a fundamental challenge to HO-1 research in humans. PMID:19956091

  4. Bilirubin, formed by activation of heme oxygenase-2, protects neurons against oxidative stress injury

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Sylvain; Takahashi, Masaaki; Ferris, Christopher D.; Hester, Lynda D.; Guastella, Daniel; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1999-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin, which is immediately reduced to bilirubin (BR). Two HO active isozymes exist: HO1, an inducible heat shock protein, and HO2, which is constitutive and highly concentrated in neurons. We demonstrate a neuroprotective role for BR formed from HO2. Neurotoxicity elicited by hydrogen peroxide in hippocampal and cortical neuronal cultures is prevented by the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) via stimulation of protein kinase C. We observe phosphorylation of HO2 through the protein kinase C pathway with enhancement of HO2 catalytic activity and accumulation of BR in neuronal cultures. The neuroprotective effects of PMA are prevented by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX and in cultures from mice with deletion of HO2 gene. Moreover, BR, an antioxidant, is neuroprotective at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:10051662

  5. Heme Oxygenase 1 as a Therapeutic Target in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-04-01

    A common clinical condition, acute kidney injury (AKI) significantly influences morbidity and mortality, particularly in critically ill patients. The pathophysiology of AKI is complex and involves multiple pathways, including inflammation, autophagy, cell-cycle progression, and oxidative stress. Recent evidence suggests that a single insult to the kidney significantly enhances the propensity to develop chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the generation of effective therapies against AKI is timely. In this context, the cytoprotective effects of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in animal models of AKI are well documented. HO-1 modulates oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation and regulates the progression of cell cycle via direct and indirect mechanisms. These beneficial effects of HO-1 induction during AKI are mediated in part by the by-products of the HO reaction (iron, carbon monoxide, and bile pigments). This review highlights recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of HO-1-mediated cytoprotection and discusses the translational potential of HO-1 induction in AKI.

  6. Species Variation in the Predawn Inhibition of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Servaites, Jerome C.; Parry, Martin A. J.; Gutteridge, Steven; Keys, Alfred J.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was measured in extracts of leaves collected before dawn (predawn activity, pa) and at midday (midday activity, ma). Twenty-three of the 37 species examined showed a pa/ma ratio (≤0.75, while only Capsicum frutescens, Cucumis sativa, Glycine max, Nicotiana tabacum, Vigna unguiculata, and 3 Solanum species showed a pa/ma ratio ≤0.5. Phaseolus vulgaris consistently showed a pa/ma ratio of ≤0.1. Activities and pa/ma ratios of the same species grown in the United States and the United Kingdom were very similar. Gel filtration of extracts before assay had no effect on the observed activities and the pa/ma ratios. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in a number of species the enzyme is partially inhibited following the night period by the presence of a tight-binding inhibitor. PMID:16665155

  7. Heme oxygenase 2: endothelial and neuronal localization and role in endothelium-dependent relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Zakhary, R; Gaine, S P; Dinerman, J L; Ruat, M; Flavahan, N A; Snyder, S H

    1996-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), which synthesizes carbon monoxide (CO), has been localized by immunohistochemistry to endothelial cells and adventitial nerves of blood vessels. HO-2 is also localized to neurons in autonomic ganglia, including the petrosal, superior cervical, and nodose ganglia, as well as ganglia in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. Enzyme studies demonstrated that tin protoporphyrin-9 is a selective inhibitor of HO with approximately 10-fold selectivity for HO over endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin 9 reverses the component of endothelial-derived relaxation of porcine distal pulmonary arteries not reversed by an inhibitor of NOS. Thus, CO, like NO, may have endothelial-derived relaxing activity. The similarity of NOS and HO-2 localizations and functions in blood vessels and the autonomic nervous system implies complementary and possibly coordinated physiologic roles for these two mediators. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8570637

  8. Use of mixed-function oxygenases to monitor contaminant exposure in wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Hoffman, D.J.; Marn, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This overview examines the utility of mixed-function oxygenase (MFO) enzymes as a bioeffects monitor for wildlife (amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) in view of their widespread use as indicators of contaminant exposure in aquatic invertebrates and fish. Phylogenetic trends in MFO activity, toxicological implications of induction and the relationship between contaminant exposure and MFO activity are discussed. Field studies using avian embryos and hatchlings suggest that MFO induction has utility for documenting contaminant exposure; however, findings in adult birds and mammals are equivocal. Age, sex and season are sources of variation that require consideration when undertaking field trials. Further understanding of MFO inducibility among species and application of recently developed analytical techniques including quantification of specific cytochrome P-450 isozymes are warranted.

  9. Regio- and stereodivergent antibiotic oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydor, Paulina K.; Barry, Sarah M.; Odulate, Olanipekun M.; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W.; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L.

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in nature. Here, we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio- and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by non-haem iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio- and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective man-made C-H activation catalysts.

  10. Nrf2-dependent induction of innate host defense via heme oxygenase-1 inhibits Zika virus replication.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hanxia; Falgout, Barry; Takeda, Kazuyo; Yamada, Kenneth M; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-03-01

    We identified primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as vulnerable target cells for Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We demonstrate dramatic effects of hemin, the natural inducer of the heme catabolic enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in the reduction of ZIKV replication in vitro. Both LLC-MK2 monkey kidney cells and primary MDM exhibited hemin-induced HO-1 expression with major reductions of >90% in ZIKV replication, with little toxicity to infected cells. Silencing expression of HO-1 or its upstream regulatory gene, nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), attenuated hemin-induced suppression of ZIKV infection, suggesting an important role for induction of these intracellular mediators in retarding ZIKV replication. The inverse correlation between hemin-induced HO-1 levels and ZIKV replication provides a potentially useful therapeutic modality based on stimulation of an innate cellular response against Zika virus infection.

  11. Cloning and characterization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) cDNA from green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran; Chi, Vu Thi Quynh; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Hishamuddin; Noroozi, Mostafa; Napis, Suhaimi

    2011-11-01

    An initial study on gene cloning and characterization of unicellular green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus was carried out to isolate and characterize the full-length cDNA of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) as a first step towards elucidating the structure of A. convolutus RbcS gene. The full-length of A. convolutus RbcS cDNA (AcRbcS) contained 28 bp of 5' untranslated region (UTR), 225 bp of 3' non-coding region, and an open reading frame of 165 amino acids consisting of a chloroplast transit peptide with 24 amino acids and a mature protein of 141 amino acids. The amino acid sequence has high identity to those of other green algae RbcS genes. The AcRbcS contained a few conserved domains including protein kinase C phosphorylation site, tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and N-myristoylation sites. The AcRbcS was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and a ~21 kDa of anticipated protein band was observed on SDS-PAGE. From the phylogenetic analysis of RbcS protein sequences, it was found that the RbcS of A. convolutus has closer genetic relationship with green microalgae species compared to those of green seaweed and green macroalgae species. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that the AcRbcS is a member of a small multigene family comprising of two to six members in A. convolutus genome. Under different illumination conditions, RT-PCR analysis showed that AcRbcS transcription was reduced in the dark, and drastically recovered in the light condition. Results presented in this paper established a good foundation for further study on the photosynthetic process of A. convolutus and other green algae species where little information is known on Rubisco small subunit.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Weaver, Eric A.; May, Shannon M.; Croatt, Anthony J.; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.; Barry, Michael A.; Nath, Karl A.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness.—Cummins, N. W., Weaver, E. A., May, S. M., Croatt, A. J., Foreman, O., Kennedy, R. B., Poland, G. A., Barry, M. A., Nath, K. A., Badley, A. D. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice. PMID:22490782

  13. Substrate Specificity of Purified Recombinant Chicken β-Carotene 9',10'-Oxygenase (BCO2).

    PubMed

    Dela Seña, Carlo; Sun, Jian; Narayanasamy, Sureshbabu; Riedl, Kenneth M; Yuan, Yan; Curley, Robert W; Schwartz, Steven J; Harrison, Earl H

    2016-07-08

    Provitamin A carotenoids are oxidatively cleaved by β-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase (BCO1) at the central 15-15' double bond to form retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). Another carotenoid oxygenase, β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at the 9'-10' bond to yield an ionone and an apo-10'-carotenoid. Previously published substrate specificity studies of BCO2 were conducted using crude lysates from bacteria or insect cells expressing recombinant BCO2. Our attempts to obtain active recombinant human BCO2 expressed in Escherichia coli were unsuccessful. We have expressed recombinant chicken BCO2 in the strain E. coli BL21-Gold (DE3) and purified the enzyme by cobalt ion affinity chromatography. Like BCO1, purified recombinant chicken BCO2 catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the provitamin A carotenoids β-carotene, α-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin. Its catalytic activity with β-carotene as substrate is at least 10-fold lower than that of BCO1. In further contrast to BCO1, purified recombinant chicken BCO2 also catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of 9-cis-β-carotene and the non-provitamin A carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein, and is inactive with all-trans-lycopene and β-apocarotenoids. Apo-10'-carotenoids were detected as enzymatic products by HPLC, and the identities were confirmed by LC-MS. Small amounts of 3-hydroxy-β-apo-8'-carotenal were also consistently detected in BCO2-β-cryptoxanthin reaction mixtures. With the exception of this activity with β-cryptoxanthin, BCO2 cleaves specifically at the 9'-10' bond to produce apo-10'-carotenoids. BCO2 has been shown to function in preventing the excessive accumulation of carotenoids, and its broad substrate specificity is consistent with this. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Granuloma Development and Protects Against Dissemination of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Regev, Doron; Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Zolak, Jason; Montes-Worboys, Ana; Oliva, Ocatvio; Guroji, Purushotum; Saini, Vikram; Steyn, Adrie JC; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena. B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections occur in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts and are an increasingly recognized cause of morbidity and mortality. The hallmark of pulmonary mycobacterial infections is the formation of granuloma in the lung. Our study focuses on the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme, in the regulation of granuloma development and maturation following infection with Mycobacterium avium. We examined the role of HO-1 in regulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), two molecules involved in monocyte-macrophage cell trafficking after infection. We showed that RAW 264.7 mouse monocytes exposed to M. avium expressed HO-1 and MCP-1. Inhibition of heme oxygenase by zinc protoporphyrin-IX led to inhibition of MCP-1 and increased expression of CCR2, its cognate receptor. HO-1-/- mice did not develop organized granuloma in their lungs, had higher lung colony forming unit of M. avium when infected with intratracheal M. avium, and had loose collections of inflammatory cells in the lung parenchyma. Mycobacteria were found only inside defined granulomas but not outside granuloma in the lungs of HO-1+/+ mice. In HO-1-/- mice, mycobacteria were also found in the liver and spleen and showed increased mortality. Peripheral blood monocytes isolated from GFP+ mice and given intravenously to HO-1+/+ mice localized into tight granulomas, while in HO-1-/- mice they remained diffusely scattered in areas of parenchymal inflammation. Higher MCP-1 levels were found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of M. avium infected HO-1-/- mice and CCR2 expression was higher in HO-1-/- alveolar macrophages when compared to HO-1+/+ mice. CCR2 expression localized to granuloma in HO-1+/+ mice but not in the HO-1-/- mice. These findings strongly suggest that HO-1 plays a protective role in the control of M. avium infection. PMID:22964851

  15. Unusual ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of anoxic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Watson, G M; Yu, J P; Tabita, F R

    1999-03-01

    The predominant pool of organic matter on earth is derived from the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas, catalyzed primarily by the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). By virtue of its capacity to use molecular oxygen as an alternative and competing gaseous substrate, the catalytic efficiency of RubisCO and the enzyme's ability to assimilate CO2 may be severely limited, with consequent environmental and agricultural effects. Recent genomic sequencing projects, however, have identified putative RubisCO genes from anoxic Archaea. In the present study, these potential RubisCO sequences, from Methanococcus jannaschii and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, were analyzed in order to ascertain whether such sequences might encode functional proteins. We also report the isolation and properties of recombinant RubisCO using sequences obtained from the obligately anaerobic hyperthermophilic methanogen M. jannaschii. This is the first description of an archaeal RubisCO sequence; this study also represents the initial characterization of a RubisCO molecule that has evolved in the absence of molecular oxygen. The enzyme was shown to be a homodimer whose deduced sequence, along with other recently obtained archaeal RubisCO sequences, differs substantially from those of known RubisCO molecules. The recombinant M. jannaschii enzyme has a somewhat low, but reasonable kcat, however, unlike previously isolated RubisCO molecules, this enzyme is very oxygen sensitive yet it is stable to hyperthermal temperatures and catalyzes the formation of the expected carboxylation product. Despite inhibition by oxygen, this unusual RubisCO still catalyzes a weak yet demonstrable oxygenase activity, with perhaps the lowest capacity for CO2/O2 discrimination ever encountered for any RubisCO.

  16. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2−/− and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2−/− mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2−/− macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2−/− mice. These findings indicate that HO-2–deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2−/− cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.—Bellner, L., Marrazzo, G., van Rooijen, N., Dunn, M. W., Abraham, N. G., Schwartzman, M. L. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing. PMID:25342128

  17. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P < 0.05) and protein levels in blue-shelled chickens compared with brown-shelled chickens. At the functional level, blue-shelled chickens also showed 1.40-fold (P < 0.05) higher HO activity than brown-shelled chickens. To explore the reasons for the differential expression of HMOX1, an association study of 6 SNP capturing the majority of HMOX1 variants with the blue egg coloration was performed. Results showed no significant association between SNP and the blue egg coloration in HMOX1 (P > 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  18. The risk of coronary thrombosis with cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors does not vary with polymorphisms in two regions of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Patricia; Lincz, Lisa F; Attia, John; McElduff, Patrick; Bissett, Linda; Peel, Roseanne; Stokes, Barrie; Hancock, Stephen; Henderson, Kim; Seldon, Michael; Henry, David

    2011-10-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene modify the adverse cardiovascular effects of COX-2 inhibitors. A case control study was conducted in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia. Cases (n= 460) were hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Controls (n= 640) were recruited from the electoral rolls. Structured interviews gathered information on variables including recent ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Targeted genotyping of rs 20417(G > C) and rs5275 (T > C) polymorphisms was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction using allele-specific probes. Ingestion of any NSAID in the week prior to interview was associated with an elevated risk for ACS: adjusted odds ratio 1.8 (1.2, 2.5). The rs 20417 and rs 5275 polymorphisms were not singly associated with risk for ACS: adjusted odds ratios 1.1 (0.80, 1.5) and 1.2 (0.88, 1.5), respectively. Individually, the polymorphisms did not modify the risk of ACS with the drugs. When analyses were conducted by haplotype, the adjusted odds ratio with celecoxib or rofecoxib in individuals who had one or two copies of the 'low risk' haplotype (no GT) was 1.2 (0.29, 5.0), compared with 2.1 (1.1, 4.0) with the 'high risk' haplotype (one or two copies of GT). We found little evidence of a gene/drug interaction. We found a statistically non-significant trend toward a lower risk of coronary events with NSAIDs in the presence of the 'low risk' haplotype. Even if confirmed, the clinical utility of the finding would be limited as this haplotype is carried by a minority of the population. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Substrate Specificity of Purified Recombinant Human β-Carotene 15,15′-Oxygenase (BCO1)*

    PubMed Central

    dela Seña, Carlo; Narayanasamy, Sureshbabu; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Curley, Robert W.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Harrison, Earl H.

    2013-01-01

    Humans cannot synthesize vitamin A and thus must obtain it from their diet. β-Carotene 15,15′-oxygenase (BCO1) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of provitamin A carotenoids at the central 15–15′ double bond to yield retinal (vitamin A). In this work, we quantitatively describe the substrate specificity of purified recombinant human BCO1 in terms of catalytic efficiency values (kcat/Km). The full-length open reading frame of human BCO1 was cloned into the pET-28b expression vector with a C-terminal polyhistidine tag, and the protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21-Gold(DE3). The enzyme was purified using cobalt ion affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme preparation catalyzed the oxidative cleavage of β-carotene with a Vmax = 197.2 nmol retinal/mg BCO1 × h, Km = 17.2 μm and catalytic efficiency kcat/Km = 6098 m−1 min−1. The enzyme also catalyzed the oxidative cleavage of α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, and β-apo-8′-carotenal to yield retinal. The catalytic efficiency values of these substrates are lower than that of β-carotene. Surprisingly, BCO1 catalyzed the oxidative cleavage of lycopene to yield acycloretinal with a catalytic efficiency similar to that of β-carotene. The shorter β-apocarotenals (β-apo-10′-carotenal, β-apo-12′-carotenal, β-apo-14′-carotenal) do not show Michaelis-Menten behavior under the conditions tested. We did not detect any activity with lutein, zeaxanthin, and 9-cis-β-carotene. Our results show that BCO1 favors full-length provitamin A carotenoids as substrates, with the notable exception of lycopene. Lycopene has previously been reported to be unreactive with BCO1, and our findings warrant a fresh look at acycloretinal and its alcohol and acid forms as metabolites of lycopene in future studies. PMID:24187135

  20. Synthesis of chlorophyll b: Localization of chlorophyllide a oxygenase and discovery of a stable radical in the catalytic subunit

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; LoBrutto, Russell; Brune, Daniel C; Brusslan, Judy; Yamasato, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background Assembly of stable light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in the chloroplast of green algae and plants requires synthesis of chlorophyll (Chl) b, a reaction that involves oxygenation of the 7-methyl group of Chl a to a formyl group. This reaction uses molecular oxygen and is catalyzed by chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO). The amino acid sequence of CAO predicts mononuclear iron and Rieske iron-sulfur centers in the protein. The mechanism of synthesis of Chl b and localization of this reaction in the chloroplast are essential steps toward understanding LHC assembly. Results Fluorescence of a CAO-GFP fusion protein, transiently expressed in young pea leaves, was found at the periphery of mature chloroplasts and on thylakoid membranes by confocal fluorescence microscopy. However, when membranes from partially degreened cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cw15 were resolved on sucrose gradients, full-length CAO was detected by immunoblot analysis only on the chloroplast envelope inner membrane. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of CAO included a resonance at g = 4.3, assigned to the predicted mononuclear iron center. Instead of a spectrum of the predicted Rieske iron-sulfur center, a nearly symmetrical, approximately 100 Gauss peak-to-trough signal was observed at g = 2.057, with a sensitivity to temperature characteristic of an iron-sulfur center. A remarkably stable radical in the protein was revealed by an isotropic, 9 Gauss peak-to-trough signal at g = 2.0042. Fragmentation of the protein after incorporation of 125I- identified a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr-422 in Chlamydomonas and Tyr-518 in Arabidopsis) as the radical species. The radical was quenched by chlorophyll a, an indication that it may be involved in the enzymatic reaction. Conclusion CAO was found on the chloroplast envelope and thylakoid membranes in mature chloroplasts but only on the envelope inner membrane in dark-grown C. reinhardtii cells. Such localization provides further

  1. Synthesis of chlorophyll b: localization of chlorophyllide a oxygenase and discovery of a stable radical in the catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Laura L; LoBrutto, Russell; Brune, Daniel C; Brusslan, Judy; Yamasato, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2004-04-15

    Assembly of stable light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in the chloroplast of green algae and plants requires synthesis of chlorophyll (Chl) b, a reaction that involves oxygenation of the 7-methyl group of Chl a to a formyl group. This reaction uses molecular oxygen and is catalyzed by chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO). The amino acid sequence of CAO predicts mononuclear iron and Rieske iron-sulfur centers in the protein. The mechanism of synthesis of Chl b and localization of this reaction in the chloroplast are essential steps toward understanding LHC assembly. Fluorescence of a CAO-GFP fusion protein, transiently expressed in young pea leaves, was found at the periphery of mature chloroplasts and on thylakoid membranes by confocal fluorescence microscopy. However, when membranes from partially degreened cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cw15 were resolved on sucrose gradients, full-length CAO was detected by immunoblot analysis only on the chloroplast envelope inner membrane. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of CAO included a resonance at g = 4.3, assigned to the predicted mononuclear iron center. Instead of a spectrum of the predicted Rieske iron-sulfur center, a nearly symmetrical, approximately 100 Gauss peak-to-trough signal was observed at g = 2.057, with a sensitivity to temperature characteristic of an iron-sulfur center. A remarkably stable radical in the protein was revealed by an isotropic, 9 Gauss peak-to-trough signal at g = 2.0042. Fragmentation of the protein after incorporation of 125I- identified a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr-422 in Chlamydomonas and Tyr-518 in Arabidopsis) as the radical species. The radical was quenched by chlorophyll a, an indication that it may be involved in the enzymatic reaction. CAO was found on the chloroplast envelope and thylakoid membranes in mature chloroplasts but only on the envelope inner membrane in dark-grown C. reinhardtii cells. Such localization provides further support for the envelope membranes

  2. Rebamipide suppresses collagen-induced arthritis through reciprocal regulation of th17/treg cell differentiation and heme oxygenase 1 induction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Su-Jin; Park, Jin-Sil; Woo, Yun-Ju; Lim, Mi-Ae; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Weon Sun; Park, Sang-Hi; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La; Min, Jun-Ki

    2014-04-01

    Rebamipide, a gastroprotective agent, has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen radicals. Increased oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We undertook this study to investigate the impact of rebamipide on the development of arthritis and the pathophysiologic mechanisms by which rebamipide attenuates arthritis severity in a murine model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in DBA/1J mice. Anti-type II collagen antibody titers and interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of transcription factors was analyzed by immunostaining and Western blotting. Frequencies of IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Rebamipide reduced the clinical arthritis score and severity of histologic inflammation and cartilage destruction in a dose-dependent manner. The joints isolated from rebamipide-treated mice with CIA showed decreased expression of nitrotyrosine, an oxidative stress marker. Rebamipide-treated mice showed lower circulating levels of type II collagen-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a. Whereas the number of Th17 cells in spleens was decreased in rebamipide-treated mice with CIA, a significant increase in the number of Treg cells in spleens was observed. In vitro, rebamipide inhibited Th17 cell differentiation through STAT-3/retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γt and reciprocally induced Treg cell differentiation through FoxP3. Rebamipide increased Nrf2 nuclear activities in murine CD4+ T cells and LBRM-33 murine T lymphoma cells. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the spleens was markedly increased in rebamipide-treated mice. The inhibitory effects of rebamipide on joint inflammation are associated with recovery from an imbalance between Th17 cells and Treg cells and with activation of an Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of

  3. The use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to concentrate inducers of fish hepatic mixed function oxygenase (MFO): Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrott, Joanne L.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are sampling and concentrating devices comprised of a thin polyethylene membrane containing a small quantity of triolein. They have previously been used to sample air, water and sediments and have concentrated fish tainting compounds from pulp mill effluents. The ability to induce mixed function oxygenases (MFOs) is a property of a variety of organic effluents, but the compound(s) responsible for induction have not been identified. We wanted to see if SPMDs would accumulate the MFO-inducing chemical(s) from pulp mill effluents and oil refinery effluents. Dialysates of effluent-exposed SPMDs induced ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in a fish (Poeciliopsis lucida) hepatoma cell line, PLHC-1. In pulp mill effluents and oil sands mining and refining wastewaters, potencies varied greatly, from a few to thousands of pg TCDD-EQ/g SPMD. Low levels of inducers were seen in four pulp mills on the Athabasca R., and higher levels at one New Brunswick bleached sulphite and two Ontario bleached kraft pulp mills. The highest levels of MFO inducers were in SPMDs deployed for 14 days in wastewater from an oil sands upgrading facility, as well as SPMDs deployed at two sites on Athabasca River tributaries in the oil sands area. This suggests that natural erosion and weathering, as well as industrial processing of the oil sands, can release potent MFO inducers. Background (reference) induction by SPMD extracts ranged from non-detectable (<1) to 20 pg TCDD-EQ/g SPMD. Reactive clean-up of one of the bleached kraft mill effluent-exposed SPMD extracts on a sulfuric acid/silica gel column resulted in loss of the inducer(s), which suggested a polyaromatic hydrocarbon-type of inducing chemical(s), rather than a dioxin or furan inducer. SPMD deployments proved useful in the detection of inducers within the pulp mill process streams as extracts of SPMDs exposed to untreated bleached sulphite effluent were ten to twenty times as potent as those

  4. Effects of heme oxygenase-1-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on microcirculation and energy metabolism following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Shen, Zhong-Yang; Wang, Rao-Rao; Yin, Ming-Li; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Wu, Bin; Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) on the microcirculation and energy metabolism of hepatic sinusoids following reduced-size liver transplantation (RLT) in a rat model. METHODS BMMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro using an adherent method, and then transduced with HO-1-bearing recombinant adenovirus to construct HO-1/BMMSCs. A rat acute rejection model following 50% RLT was established using a two-cuff technique. Recipients were divided into three groups based on the treatment received: normal saline (NS), BMMSCs and HO-1/BMMSCs. Liver function was examined at six time points. The levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The portal vein pressure (PVP) was detected by Power Lab ML880. The expressions of ET-1, iNOS, eNOS, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) protein in the transplanted liver were detected using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. ATPase in the transplanted liver was detected by chemical colorimetry, and the ultrastructural changes were observed under a transmission electron microscope. RESULTS HO-1/BMMSCs could alleviate the pathological changes and rejection activity index of the transplanted liver, and improve the liver function of rats following 50% RLT, with statistically significant differences compared with those of the NS group and BMMSCs group (P < 0.05). In term of the microcirculation of hepatic sinusoids: The PVP on POD7 decreased significantly in the HO-1/BMMSCs and BMMSCs groups compared with that of the NS group (P < 0.01); HO-1/BMMSCs could inhibit the expressions of ET-1 and iNOS, increase the expressions of eNOS and inhibit amounts of NO production, and maintain the equilibrium of ET-1/NO (P < 0.05); and HO-1/BMMSCs increased the expression of vWF in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial

  5. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  6. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  7. A comparison of the substrate and electron-donor specificities of the methane mono-oxygenases from three strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D I; Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium has the same broad substrate specificity as the analogous enzyme from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath); the enzyme from Methylomonas methanica is more specific. 2. Contrary to previous reports, NAD(P)H and not ascorbate is the required electron donor for the enzyme from Methylosinus trichosporium. 3. It is concluded that these three bacteria contain similar methane mono-oxygenases. PMID:106847

  8. The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, K; Fujita, H; Fukuda, Y; Kappas, A; Sassa, S

    1993-01-01

    The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of mRNAs for haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70), the two heat-shock proteins, was examined in human HepG2 and Hep3B hepatoma cells. SnCl2, but not Sn-protoporphyrin, was found to be a potent inducer of both haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs. In contrast, CoCl2, ZnCl2 and FeCl2 caused little induction of haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs, whereas the porphyrin complexes of these metals strongly induced haem oxygenase mRNA, without influencing the level of hsp70 mRNA. The induction process was largely transcriptional, as judged by the inhibition of induction by actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide, and by increased transcription demonstrated by nuclear run-off analysis. Since CoCl2 is a potent inducer of haem oxygenase in vivo in animals, the possibility of the biosynthesis of Co-protoporphyrin was examined in human hepatoma cells by incubating them with CoCl2 and protoporphyrin, or delta-aminolaevulinate (ALA), the precursor of protoporphyrin. Both types of treatment led to a potent induction of haem oxygenase mRNA. Co-protoporphyrin formation was also spectrally demonstrated in cells incubated with the metal and ALA. The results of this study indicate that certain metals, e.g. SnCl2, may directly induce haem oxygenase mRNA, whereas with other elements, incorporation of the metal into the porphyrin macrocycle is necessary for induction. Therefore CoCl2, like haemin, may activate the haem oxygenase gene via a haem-responsive transcription factor, whereas SnCl2 may exert its effect via a metal-responsive transcription factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8384446

  9. Structural Features in the KshA Terminal Oxygenase Protein That Determine Substrate Preference of 3-Ketosteroid 9α-Hydroxylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Petrusma, Mirjan; van der Geize, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rieske nonheme monooxygenase 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase (KSH) enzymes play a central role in bacterial steroid catabolism. KSH is a two-component iron-sulfur-containing enzyme, with KshA representing the terminal oxygenase component and KshB the reductase component. We previously reported that the KshA1 and KshA5 homologues of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269 have clearly different substrate preferences. KshA protein sequence alignments and three-dimensional crystal structure information for KshAH37Rv of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv served to identify a variable region of 58 amino acids organized in a β sheet that is part of the so-called helix-grip fold of the predicted KshA substrate binding pocket. Exchange of the β sheets between KshA1 and KshA5 resulted in active chimeric enzymes with substrate preferences clearly resembling those of the donor enzymes. Exchange of smaller parts of the KshA1 and KshA5 β-sheet regions revealed that a highly variable loop region located at the entrance of the active site strongly contributes to KSH substrate preference. This loop region may be subject to conformational changes, thereby affecting binding of different substrates in the active site. This study provides novel insights into KshA structure-function relationships and shows that KSH monooxygenase enzymes are amenable to protein engineering for the development of biocatalysts with improved substrate specificities. PMID:22020644

  10. Serum Heme Oxygenase-1 and BMP-7 Are Potential Biomarkers for Bone Metabolism in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tong-ling; Chen, Jin; Tong, Yan-li; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Liu, Yi; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to play a regulatory role in osteoclastogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways induce osteoblastic differentiation and bone remodeling. Aims. To identify serum levels of HO-1, BMP-7, and Runt related-transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate the relationships between HO-1, BMP-7, Runx2, and other common biomarkers for bone metabolism. Results. Serum levels of HO-1 and BMP-7 were revealed to be significantly higher in patients with RA or AS than in healthy controls (p < 0.01). In RA group, HO-1 was positively correlated with BMP-7, Runx2, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRAP-5b) (p < 0.05, resp.), BMP-7 was positively correlated with Runx2 and TRAP-5b (p < 0.05, resp.), and Runx2 was negatively correlated with N-terminal midfragment of osteocalcin (NMID) (p < 0.05). In AS group, we observed identical correlation between HO-1 and BMP-7, but opposite correlations between BMP-7 and TRAP-5b and between Runx2 and NMID, when comparing with the RA cohort. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that HO-1 and BMP-7 are potential biomarkers for bone metabolism in patients with RA and AS. The different correlations between the bone markers point to distinct differences in bone remodeling pathways in the two types of arthritis. PMID:27314037

  11. Cobalt Alleviates GA-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Wheat Aleurone Layers via the Regulation of H2O2 Production and Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25405743

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of a cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, CsHO1, which is involved in adventitious root formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Yue; Cao, Ze-Yu; Shen, Wen-Biao; Cui, Jin

    2011-10-15

    Our previous work showed that in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), auxin rapidly induces heme oxygenase (HO) activity and the product of HO action, carbon monoxide (CO), then triggers the signal transduction events leading to adventitious root formation. In this study, the cucumber HO-1 gene (named as CsHO1) was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns and encodes a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. Further results show that CsHO1 shares a high homology with plant HO-1 proteins and codes a 33.3 kDa protein with a 65-amino transit peptide, predicting a mature protein of 26.1 kDa. The mature CsHO1 was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a fusion protein, which exhibits HO activity. The CsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Related biochemical analyses of mature CsHO1, including Vmax, Km, Topt and pHopt, were also investigated. CsHO1 mRNA was found in germinating seeds, roots, stem, and especially in leaf tissues. Several well-known adventitious root inducers, including auxin, ABA, hemin, nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), CaCl(2), and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), differentially up-regulate CsHO1 transcripts and corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that CsHO1 may be involved in cucumber adventitious rooting.

  13. Ethyl linoleate from garlic attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Seetharaman, Rajasekar; Ko, Min Jung; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Kwak, Jung Ho; Lee, Sang Joon; Bae, Yoe Sik; Choi, Young Whan

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, an essential fatty acid, ethyl linoleate (ELA), was isolated from the cloves of Allium sativum, and its structure was elucidated by NMR and GC-MS analyses. In vitro systems were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ELA. Our results indicate that ELA down-regulates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and thereby reduces nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescent microscopy and western blot analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by impaired translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and inhibition of phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases. Furthermore, ELA exerted its anti-inflammatory activity by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, as determined by HO-1 small interfering (Si) RNA system. Si RNA-mediated knock-down of HO-1 abrogated the inhibitory effects of ELA on the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in LPS-induced macrophages. These findings indicate the potential therapeutic use of ELA as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  14. Cobalt alleviates GA-induced programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers via the regulation of H2O2 production and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-11-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  15. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of wild-type and mutant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yen, A; Haas, E J; Selbo, K M; Ross 2nd, C R; Spreitzer, R J; Stezowski, J J

    1998-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is the key enzyme for photosynthesis. The wild-type and mutant (amino-acid substitutions in the catalytically important loop 6 region) enzymes from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, were crystallized. Wild-type, single-mutant (V331A) and two double-mutant (V331A/T342I and V331A/G344S) proteins were activated with cofactors CO2 and Mg2+, complexed with the substrate analog 2'-carboxyarabinitol-1,5-bisphosphate, and crystallized in apparently isomorphous forms. Unit-cell determinations have been completed for three of the enzymes. They display orthorhombic symmetry with similar cell parameters: wild type a = 130.4, b = 203. 3, c = 208.5 A; single mutant (V331A) a = 128.0, b = 203.0, c = 207. 0A; and double mutant (V331A/T342I) a = 130.0, b = 202.1, c = 209.7 A. Crystals of the wild-type and single-mutant (V331A) enzymes diffracted to approximately 2.8 A. A small crystal of the double-mutant (V331A/T342I) enzyme diffracted to approximately 6 A. A partial data set (68% complete) of the wild-type protein has been collected at room temperature to about 3.5 A.

  16. Site-specific mutations in a loop region of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase that influence substrate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, S; Rhoades, D F; Herrmann, C

    1993-04-15

    Amino acids composing a flexible loop (loop 6) of the eight-stranded barrel domain of the L-subunit of Synechococcus ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) involved in reaction intermediate stabilization have been modified by site-specific mutagenesis. Changes at positions both distant and within the active site affect overall catalysis and substrate partitioning. Most significantly, replacement of the active site Lys (Lys-334) with Arg at the apex of the loop almost completely suppressed the carboxylase activity of the enzyme relative to oxygenation, with only a modest reduction in overall catalysis. Val-331 and Thr-342, more distant from the active site but with interacting side chains, were changed to larger and smaller residues with differential effects on both turnover and substrate partitioning. Substitution of the loop with the sequence found in more efficient carboxylases only increased partitioning marginally when accompanied by alterations in the C-terminal tail of the L-subunit that interacts with the loop. Generally, modifications to the loop composition also affected enediol formation, the first step of catalysis, suggesting that the geometry and hence flexibility of this segment affect more than just stabilization of the intermediates immediately following reaction with CO2 or O2.

  17. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene. PMID:220953

  18. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-03-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene.

  19. S-nitrosylated proteins of a medicinal CAM plant Kalanchoe pinnata- ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity targeted for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Abat, Jasmeet K; Mattoo, Autar K; Deswal, Renu

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that affects a myriad of processes in plants. However, the mechanistic details are limited. NO post-translationally modifies proteins by S-nitrosylation of cysteines. The soluble S-nitrosoproteome of a medicinal, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Kalanchoe pinnata, was purified using the biotin switch technique. Nineteen targets were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, including proteins associated with carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, the cytoskeleton, stress and photosynthesis. Some were similar to those previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, but kinesin-like protein, glycolate oxidase, putative UDP glucose 4-epimerase and putative DNA topoisomerase II had not been identified as targets previously for any organism. In vitro and in vivo nitrosylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), one of the targets, was confirmed by immunoblotting. Rubisco plays a central role in photosynthesis, and the effect of S-nitrosylation on its enzymatic activity was determined using NaH14CO3. The NO-releasing compound S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited its activity in a dose-dependent manner suggesting Rubisco inactivation by nitrosylation for the first time.

  20. Cadmium-induced heme oxygenase-1 gene expression is associated with the depletion of glutathione in the roots of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiti; Fu, Guangqing; Wu, Honghong; Shen, Wenbiao

    2011-02-01

    Following previous findings that cadmium (Cd) induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in alfalfa seedling roots, we now show that the decreased glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, induction of HO-1 gene expression and its protein level by Cd was mimicked by a GSH depletor diethylmaleate (DEM). Meanwhile, above Cd- or DEM-induced decreased GSH content followed by HO-1 up-regulation could be strengthened or reversed differentially by the application of a selective inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis L: -buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), or exogenous GSH and AsA, respectively. The antioxidative behavior of HO-1 induction was further confirmed by histochemical staining for the detection of loss of membrane integrity in a short period of treatment time. Additionally, the induction of HO-1 transcript was inhibited by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) or protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CX, especially). In contrast, the level of HO-2 transcript did not change upon various treatments. Together, above results suggested that Cd-induced up-regulation of HO-1 gene expression is associated with GSH depletion, which is at least existing transcriptional regulation level, thus leading to enhanced antioxidative capability transiently.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, MsHO1, which is pro-oxidants-regulated.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Han, Bin; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Wang, Ren

    2011-07-01

    It has been documented that plant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; EC 1.14.99.3) is both development- and stress-regulated, thus it plays a vital role in light signalling and stress responses. In this study, an alfalfa (Medica sativa L.) HO-1 gene MsHO1 was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns within genomic DNA sequence and encodes a polypeptide with 283 amino acids. MsHO1 had a conserved HO signature sequence and showed high similarity to other HOs in plants, especially HO-1 isoform. The MsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Further biochemical activity analysis of mature MsHO1, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, showed that the Vmax was 48.78 nmol biliverdin-IXα (BV) h⁻¹ nmol⁻¹ protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 2.33 μM, and the optimum Tm and pH were 37 °C and 7.2, respectively. Results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot showed that the expressions of MsHO1 were higher in alfalfa stems and leaves than those in germinating seeds and roots. Importantly, MsHO1 gene expression and protein level were induced significantly by some pro-oxidant compounds, including hemin and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). In conclusion, MsHO1 may play an important role in oxidative responses.

  2. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  3. Bacterial Cyanide Oxygenase Is a Suite of Enzymes Catalyzing the Scavenging and Adventitious Utilization of Cyanide as a Nitrogenous Growth Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Ruby F.; Kunz, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Cyanide oxygenase (CNO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 catalyzes the pterin-dependent oxygenolytic cleavage of cyanide (CN) to formic acid and ammonia. CNO was resolved into four protein components (P1 to P4), each of which along with a source of pterin cofactor was obligately required for CNO activity. Component P1 was characterized as a multimeric 230-kDa flavoprotein exhibiting the properties of a peroxide-forming NADH oxidase (oxidoreductase) (Nox). P2 consisted of a 49.7-kDa homodimer that showed 100% amino acid identity at its N terminus to NADH peroxidase (Npx) from Enterococcus faecalis. Enzyme assays further confirmed the identities of both Nox and Npx enzymes (specific activity, 1 U/mg). P3 was characterized as a large oligomeric protein (∼300 kDa) that exhibited cyanide dihydratase (CynD) activity (specific activity, 100 U/mg). Two polypeptides of 38 kDa and 43 kDa were each detected in the isolated enzyme, the former believed to confer catalytic activity based on its similar size to other CynD enzymes. The amino acid sequence of an internal peptide of the 43-kDa protein was 100% identical to bacterial elongation factor Tu, suggesting a role as a possible chaperone in the assembly of CynD or a multienzyme CNO complex. The remaining P4 component consisted of a 28.9-kDa homodimer and was identified as carbonic anhydrase (specific activity, 2,000 U/mg). While the function of participating pterin and the roles of Nox, Npx, CynD, and CA in the CNO-catalyzed scavenging of CN remain to be determined, this is the first report describing the collective involvement of these four enzymes in the metabolic detoxification and utilization of CN as a bacterial nitrogenous growth substrate. PMID:16159773

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of tetracenomycin A2 oxygenase: a flavoprotein hydroxylase involved in polyketide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Beynon, J; Rafanan, E R; Shen, B; Fisher, A J

    2000-12-01

    The tcm operon in Streptomyces glaucescens encodes a group of enzymes involved in the synthesis of the polyketide tetracenomycin (Tcm) C that exhibits both antitumor and antibiotic activities. Here, the crystallization and preliminary data characterization of the tcmG gene product, Tcm A2 oxygenase, which catalyzes the triple hydroxylation of Tcm A2 to form Tcm C, are reported. Tcm A2 oxygenase crystallizes in two different space groups, both with six monomers per asymmetric unit, resulting in large unit-cell parameters. Synchrotron data have been collected from both the hexagonal and tetragonal crystal forms to 4.5 and 4.2 A, respectively. The self-rotation function searches in both space groups suggest the monomers assemble into a complex with D(3) symmetry.

  5. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, impacts leaf senescence and indirectly affects grain yield and quality in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lichao; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Rao, Yuchun; Chen, Long; Wang, Yuqiong; Tu, Zhengjun; Hu, Jiang; Ren, Deyong; Zhang, Guangheng; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zeng, Dali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) b is a ubiquitous accessory pigment in land plants, green algae, and prochlorophytes. This pigment is synthesized from Chl a by chlorophyllide a oxygenase and plays a key role in adaptation to various environments. This study characterizes a rice mutant, pale green leaf (pgl), and isolates the gene PGL by using a map-based cloning approach. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, is mainly expressed in the chlorenchyma and activated in the light-dependent Chl synthesis process. Compared with wild-type plants, pgl exhibits a lower Chl content with a reduced and disorderly thylakoid ultrastructure, which decreases the photosynthesis rate and results in reduced grain yield and quality. In addition, pgl exhibits premature senescence in both natural and dark-induced conditions and more severe Chl degradation and reactive oxygen species accumulation than does the wild-type. Moreover, pgl is sensitive to heat stress. PMID:26709310

  6. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, impacts leaf senescence and indirectly affects grain yield and quality in rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lichao; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Rao, Yuchun; Chen, Long; Wang, Yuqiong; Tu, Zhengjun; Hu, Jiang; Ren, Deyong; Zhang, Guangheng; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zeng, Dali

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) b is a ubiquitous accessory pigment in land plants, green algae, and prochlorophytes. This pigment is synthesized from Chl a by chlorophyllide a oxygenase and plays a key role in adaptation to various environments. This study characterizes a rice mutant, pale green leaf (pgl), and isolates the gene PGL by using a map-based cloning approach. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, is mainly expressed in the chlorenchyma and activated in the light-dependent Chl synthesis process. Compared with wild-type plants, pgl exhibits a lower Chl content with a reduced and disorderly thylakoid ultrastructure, which decreases the photosynthesis rate and results in reduced grain yield and quality. In addition, pgl exhibits premature senescence in both natural and dark-induced conditions and more severe Chl degradation and reactive oxygen species accumulation than does the wild-type. Moreover, pgl is sensitive to heat stress.

  7. Hydroxylamine and hydrazine bind directly to the heme iron of the heme-heme oxygenase-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sugishima, Masakazu; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Palmer, Graham; Noguchi, Masato

    2004-07-01

    We investigated whether or not hydroxylamine (HA) and hydrazine (HZ) interact with heme bound to heme oxygenase-1. Anaerobic addition of either HA or HZ to the ferric heme-enzyme complex produced a low-spin heme species. Titration studies at different pHs revealed that the neutral form of each of HA and HZ selectively binds to the heme with dissociation constants of 9.8 and 1.8 mM, respectively. Electron spin resonance analysis suggested that the nitrogen atom of each amine is coordinated to the ferric heme iron. With a concentrated solution of the heme-enzyme complex, however, another species of HA binding appeared, in which the oxygen atom of HA is coordinated to the iron. This species showed an unusual low-spin signal which is similar to that of the ferric hydroperoxide species in the heme oxygenase reaction.

  8. Dark induction of haem oxygenase messenger RNA by haematoporphyrin derivative and zinc phthalocyanine; agents for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bressoud, D; Jomini, V; Tyrrell, R M

    1992-07-30

    Haematoporphyrin derivative is one of the main drugs currently used in clinical trials involving photodynamic therapy of cancer, and zinc phthalocyanine is being considered as one of several possible alternatives. We show that incubation of cultured human fibroblasts populations with either of the two drugs will lead to a sharp increase in the accumulation of the messenger RNA corresponding to haem oxygenase. Only cells incubated with haematoporphyrin derivative show additional enhancement of expression of this specific gene on exposure to red light. Since haem oxygenase induction appears to be a specific stress response that may be involved in cellular defence, such observations should be confirmed under conditions which would allow the clinical implications to be fully evaluated.

  9. Structural and mutational analyses of the Leptospira interrogans virulence-related heme oxygenase provide insights into its catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Anabel; Klinke, Sebastián; Otero, Lisandro H.; Rivera, Mario; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.

    2017-01-01

    Heme oxygenase from Leptospira interrogans is an important virulence factor. During catalysis, redox equivalents are provided to this enzyme by the plastidic-type ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase also found in L. interrogans. This process may have evolved to aid this bacterial pathogen to obtain heme-iron from their host and enable successful colonization. Herein we report the crystal structure of the heme oxygenase-heme complex at 1.73 Å resolution. The structure reveals several distinctive features related to its function. A hydrogen bonded network of structural water molecules that extends from the catalytic site to the protein surface was cleared observed. A depression on the surface appears to be the H+ network entrance from the aqueous environment to the catalytic site for O2 activation, a key step in the heme oxygenase reaction. We have performed a mutational analysis of the F157, located at the above-mentioned depression. The mutant enzymes were unable to carry out the complete degradation of heme to biliverdin since the reaction was arrested at the verdoheme stage. We also observed that the stability of the oxyferrous complex, the efficiency of heme hydroxylation and the subsequent conversion to verdoheme was adversely affected. These findings underscore a long-range communication between the outer fringes of the hydrogen-bonded network of structural waters and the heme active site during catalysis. Finally, by analyzing the crystal structures of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and heme oxygenase, we propose a model for the productive association of these proteins. PMID:28771589

  10. Caffeine junkie: an unprecedented glutathione S-transferase-dependent oxygenase required for caffeine degradation by Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    PubMed

    Summers, Ryan M; Seffernick, Jennifer L; Quandt, Erik M; Yu, Chi Li; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Subramanian, Mani V

    2013-09-01

    Caffeine and other N-methylated xanthines are natural products found in many foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, it is not surprising that bacteria have evolved to live on caffeine as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The caffeine degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida CBB5 utilizes an unprecedented glutathione-S-transferase-dependent Rieske oxygenase for demethylation of 7-methylxanthine to xanthine, the final step in caffeine N-demethylation. The gene coding this function is unusual, in that the iron-sulfur and non-heme iron domains that compose the normally functional Rieske oxygenase (RO) are encoded by separate proteins. The non-heme iron domain is located in the monooxygenase, ndmC, while the Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain is fused to the RO reductase gene, ndmD. This fusion, however, does not interfere with the interaction of the reductase with N1- and N3-demethylase RO oxygenases, which are involved in the initial reactions of caffeine degradation. We demonstrate that the N7-demethylation reaction absolutely requires a unique, tightly bound protein complex composed of NdmC, NdmD, and NdmE, a novel glutathione-S-transferase (GST). NdmE is proposed to function as a noncatalytic subunit that serves a structural role in the complexation of the oxygenase (NdmC) and Rieske domains (NdmD). Genome analyses found this gene organization of a split RO and GST gene cluster to occur more broadly, implying a larger function for RO-GST protein partners.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of Saururus chinensis aerial parts in murine macrophages via induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xue; Kim, Inhye; Jeong, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Mi; Kang, Se Chan

    2016-02-01

    Saururus chinensis (Lour.) Baill. is a perennial plant distributed throughout Northeast Asia and its roots have been widely used as a traditional medicine for hepatitis, asthma, pneumonia, and gonorrhea. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of an extract of S. chinensis of the aerial parts (rather than the root), and the signaling pathway responsible for this effect in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. The subfraction 4 (SCF4) from the n-hexane layer of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of S. chinensis exhibited the highest nitrite-inhibitory activity. SCF4 significantly inhibited the production of nitrite and the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators via heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. SCF4 caused significant phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt, which subsequently induced the nuclear translocation of p-p65 nuclear factor-κB and Nrf2. SCF4 also suppressed the phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (p-STAT1). The heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin attenuated the inhibitory effect of SCF4 on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitrite production and expression of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and p-STAT1. We identified sauchinone as the active compound in S. chinensis extract and SCF4. Sauchinone was shown to significantly inhibit nitrite production and inflammatory mediators expression via heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. These results suggest that S. chinensis extract, SCF4, and its active compound, sauchinone, could be used as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  12. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min; Ye, Jing-xue; Si, Jian-yong; Xu, Hui-bo; Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hong-wei; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoid that exhibits antioxidative properties, exerts myocardial protection effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of luteolin on myocardial injury protection and its possible mechanisms, a myocardial injury model was established with intragastric administration of 4 mg/kg isoproterenol (ISO) to male Sprague–Dawley rats (200–220 g) daily for 2 days. We found that pretreatment of luteolin (160, 80 and 40 mg/kg, i.g., respectively) daily for 15 days can prevent ISO-induced myocardial damage, including decrease of serum cardiac enzymes, improvement electrocardiography and heart vacuolation. Luteolin also improved the free radical scavenging and antioxidant potential, suggesting one possible mechanism of luteolin-induced cardio-protection is mediated by blocking the oxidative stress. To clarify the mechanisms, we performed the in vitro study by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cytotoxicty model in H9c2 cells. We found that luteolin pretreatment prevented apoptosis, increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to the antioxidant response element, providing an adaptive survival response against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-derived oxidative cytotoxicity. The addition of Znpp, a selective HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reduced the cytoprotective ability of luteolin, indicating the vital role of HO-1 on these effects. Luteolin also activated Akt and ERK, whereas the addition of LY294002 and U0126, the pharmacologic inhibitors of PI3K and ERK, attenuated luteolin-induced HO-1 expression and cytoprotective effect. Taken together, the above findings suggest that luteolin protects against myocardial injury and enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the activation of Akt and ERK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction. -- Highlights: ► Luteolin prevents isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage.

  13. Heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion attenuates oxidative stress in neurons exposed to extracellular hemin

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Raymond F; Chen, Jing; Benvenisti-Zarom, Luna

    2004-01-01

    Background Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas and is a potent oxidant. Growing evidence suggests that it contributes to delayed injury to surrounding tissue, and that this process is affected by the heme oxygenase enzymes. In a prior study, heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to hemin. The present study tested the effect of HO-2 gene deletion on protein oxidation, reactive oxygen species formation, and cell viability after mixed cortical neuron/astrocyte cultures were incubated with neurotoxic concentrations of hemin. Results Continuous exposure of wild-type cultures to 1–10 μM hemin for 14 h produced concentration-dependent neuronal death, as detected by both LDH release and fluorescence intensity after propidium iodide staining, with an EC50 of 1–2 μM; astrocytes were not injured by these low hemin concentrations. Cell death was consistently reduced by at least 60% in knockout cultures. Exposure to hemin for 4 hours, a time point that preceded cell lysis, increased protein oxidation in wild-type cultures, as detected by staining of immunoblots for protein carbonyl groups. At 10 μM hemin, carbonylation was increased 2.3-fold compared with control sister cultures subjected to medium exchanges only; this effect was reduced by about two-thirds in knockout cultures. Cellular reactive oxygen species, detected by fluorescence intensity after dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) staining, was markedly increased by hemin in wild-type cultures and was localized to neuronal cell bodies and processes. In contrast, DHR fluorescence intensity in knockout cultures did not differ from that of sham-washed controls. Neuronal death in wild-type cultures was almost completely prevented by the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline; deferoxamine had a weaker but significant effect. Conclusions These results suggest that HO-2 gene deletion protects neurons in mixed neuron-astrocyte cultures

  14. Rubber oxygenase and latex clearing protein cleave rubber to different products and use different cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Birke, Jakob; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    Two types of enzyme for oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) are known. One is rubber oxygenase (RoxA) that is secreted by Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y and a few other Gram-negative rubber-degrading bacteria during growth on polyisoprene. RoxA was studied in the past, and the recently solved structure showed a structural relationship to bacterial cytochrome c peroxidases (J. Seidel et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110:13833-13838, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1305560110). The other enzyme is latex-clearing protein (Lcp) that is secreted by rubber-degrading actinomycetes, but Lcp has not yet been purified. Here, we expressed Lcp of Streptomyces sp. strain K30 in a ΔroxA background of Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y and purified native (untagged) Lcp. The specific activities of Lcp and RoxA were 0.70 and 0.48 U/mg, respectively. Lcp differed from RoxA in the absence of heme groups and other characteristics. Notably, Lcp degraded polyisoprene via endo-type cleavage to tetra-C20 and higher oligo-isoprenoids with aldehyde and keto end groups, whereas RoxA used an exo-type cleavage mechanism to give the main end product 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyltrideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD). RoxA was able to cleave isolated Lcp-derived oligo-isoprenoid molecules to ODTD. Inhibitor studies, spectroscopic investigations and metal analysis gave no indication for the presence of iron, other metals, or cofactors in Lcp. Our results suggest that Lcp could be a member of the growing group of cofactor-independent oxygenases and differs in the cleavage mechanism from heme-dependent RoxA. In conclusion, RoxA and Lcp represent two different answers to the same biochemical problem, the cleavage of polyisoprene, a polymer that has carbon-carbon double bonds as the only functional groups for enzymatic attack.

  15. Rubber Oxygenase and Latex Clearing Protein Cleave Rubber to Different Products and Use Different Cleavage Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Birke, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Two types of enzyme for oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) are known. One is rubber oxygenase (RoxA) that is secreted by Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y and a few other Gram-negative rubber-degrading bacteria during growth on polyisoprene. RoxA was studied in the past, and the recently solved structure showed a structural relationship to bacterial cytochrome c peroxidases (J. Seidel et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110:13833–13838, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1305560110). The other enzyme is latex-clearing protein (Lcp) that is secreted by rubber-degrading actinomycetes, but Lcp has not yet been purified. Here, we expressed Lcp of Streptomyces sp. strain K30 in a ΔroxA background of Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y and purified native (untagged) Lcp. The specific activities of Lcp and RoxA were 0.70 and 0.48 U/mg, respectively. Lcp differed from RoxA in the absence of heme groups and other characteristics. Notably, Lcp degraded polyisoprene via endo-type cleavage to tetra-C20 and higher oligo-isoprenoids with aldehyde and keto end groups, whereas RoxA used an exo-type cleavage mechanism to give the main end product 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyltrideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD). RoxA was able to cleave isolated Lcp-derived oligo-isoprenoid molecules to ODTD. Inhibitor studies, spectroscopic investigations and metal analysis gave no indication for the presence of iron, other metals, or cofactors in Lcp. Our results suggest that Lcp could be a member of the growing group of cofactor-independent oxygenases and differs in the cleavage mechanism from heme-dependent RoxA. In conclusion, RoxA and Lcp represent two different answers to the same biochemical problem, the cleavage of polyisoprene, a polymer that has carbon-carbon double bonds as the only functional groups for enzymatic attack. PMID:24907333

  16. Dual control mechanism for heme oxygenase: tin(IV)-protoporphyrin potently inhibits enzyme activity while markedly increasing content of enzyme protein in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, M K; Kappas, A

    1987-01-01

    Tin(IV)-protoporphyrin (Sn-protoporphyrin) potently inhibits heme degradation to bile pigments in vitro and in vivo, a property that confers upon this synthetic compound the ability to suppress a variety of experimentally induced and naturally occurring forms of jaundice in animals and humans. Utilizing rat liver heme oxygenase purified to homogeneity together with appropriate immunoquantitation techniques, we have demonstrated that Sn-protoporphyrin possesses the additional property of potently inducing the synthesis of heme oxygenase protein in liver cells while, concurrently, completely inhibiting the activity of the newly formed enzyme. Substitution of tin for the central iron atom of heme thus leads to the formation of a synthetic heme analogue that regulates heme oxygenase by a dual mechanism, which involves competitive inhibition of the enzyme for the natural substrate heme and simultaneous enhancement of new enzyme synthesis. Cobaltic(III)-protoporphyrin (Co-protoporphyrin) also inhibits heme oxygenase activity in vitro, but unlike Sn-protoporphyrin it greatly enhances the activity of the enzyme in the whole animal. Co-protoporphyrin also acts as an in vivo inhibitor of heme oxygenase; however, its inducing effect on heme oxygenase synthesis is so pronounced as to prevail in vivo over its inhibitory effect on the enzyme. These studies show that certain synthetic heme analogues possess the ability to simultaneously inhibit as well as induce the enzyme heme oxygenase in liver. The net balance between these two actions, as reflected in the rate of heme oxidation activity in the whole animal, appears to be influenced by the nature of the central metal atom of the synthetic metalloporphyrin. Images PMID:3470805

  17. Expressed genes for plant-type ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, which possesses two complete sets of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Viale, A M; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Two sets of genes for the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were detected in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium vinosum by hybridization analysis with RuBisCO gene probes, cloned by using the lambda Fix vector, and designated rbcL-rbcS and rbcA-rbcB. rbcL and rbcA encode the large subunits, and rbcS and rbcB encode the small subunits. rbcL-rbcS was the same as that reported previously (A. M. Viale, H. Kobayashi, T. Takabe, and T. Akazawa, FEBS Lett. 192:283-288, 1985). A DNA fragment bearing rbcA-rbcB was subcloned in plasmid vectors and sequenced. We found that rbcB was located 177 base pairs downstream of the rbcA coding region, and both genes were preceded by plausible procaryotic ribosome-binding sites. rbcA and rbcD encoded polypeptides of 472 and 118 amino acids, respectively. Edman degradation analysis of the subunits of RuBisCO isolated from C. vinosum showed that rbcA-rbcB encoded the enzyme present in this bacterium. The large- and small-subunit polypeptides were posttranslationally processed to remove 2 and 1 amino acid residues from their N-termini, respectively. Among hetero-oligomeric RuBisCOs, the C. vinosum large subunit exhibited higher homology to that from cyanobacteria, eucaryotic algae, and higher plants (71.6 to 74.2%) than to that from the chemolithotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus (56.6%). A similar situation has been observed for the C. vinosum small subunit, although the homology among small subunits from different organisms was lower than that among the large subunits. Images PMID:2708310

  18. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Taraxacum coreanum protects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through heme oxygenase-1 expression in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chi-Su; Ko, Wonmin; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Jongsu; Choi, Moonbum; Beom, Jin Seon; An, Ren-Bo; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2017-02-22

    Taraxacum coreanum Nakai is a dandelion that is native to Korea, and is widely used as an edible and medicinal herb. The present study revealed the neuroprotective effect of this plant against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells. Ethanolic extracts from the aerial (TCAE) and the root parts (TCRE) of T. coreanum were prepared. Both extracts were demonstrated, by high performance liquid chromatography, to contain caffeic acid and ferulic acid as representative constituents. TCAE and TCRE significantly increased cell viability against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment of HT22 cells with the extracts induced increased expression of the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), compared with untreated cells, in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 enzymatic activity, compared with untreated cells, was also demonstrated following treatment with TCAE and TCRE. In addition, western blot analysis of the nuclear fractions of both TCAE and TCRE-treated HT22 cells revealed increased levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2 like 2 (Nrf2) compared with untreated cells, and decreased Nrf2 levels in the cytoplasmic fraction compared with untreated cells. The present study suggested that the neuroprotective effect of T. coreanum is associated with induction of HO-1 expression and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. Therefore, T. coreanum exhibits a promising function in prevention of neurodegeneration. Further studies will be required for the isolation and the full characterization of its active substances.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 overexpression increases liver injury after bile duct ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    Froh, Matthias; Conzelmann, Lars; Walbrun, Peter; Netter, Susanne; Wiest, Reiner; Wheeler, Michael-D; Lehnert, Mark; Uesugi, Takehiko; Scholmerich, Jurgen; Thurman, Ronald G

    2007-07-07

    To investigate the effects of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) against oxidant-induced injury caused by bile duct ligation (BDL). Either cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a HO-1 inducer, or saline were injected intraperitoneally in male SD-rats. Three days later, BDL or sham-operations were performed. Rats were sacrificed 3 wk after BDL and livers were harvested for histology. Fibrosis was evaluated by sirius red staining and image analysis. Alpha-smooth muscular actin, which indicates activation of stellate cells, was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and cytokine and collagen-Ialpha (Col-Ialpha) mRNA expression was detected using RNase protection assays. Serum alanine transaminase increased 8-fold above normal levels one day after BDL. Surprisingly, enzyme release was not reduced in rats receiving CoPP. Liver fibrosis was evaluated 3 wk after BDL and the sirius red-positive area was found to be increased to about 7.8%. However, in CoPP pretreated rats sirius red-positive areas were increased to about 11.7% after BDL. Collagen-Ialpha and TGF-beta mRNA increased significantly by BDL. Again, this effect was increased by HO-1 overexpression. Hepatic fibrosis due to BDL is not reduced by the HO-1 inducer CoPP. In contrast, HO-1 overexpression increases liver injury in rats under conditions of experimental chronic cholestasis.

  1. ATF4-dependent induction of heme oxygenase 1 prevents anoikis and promotes metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Sayers, Carly M.; Verginadis, Ioannis I.; Lehman, Stacey L.; Cheng, Yi; Cerniglia, George J.; Tuttle, Stephen W.; Feldman, Michael D.; Zhang, Paul J.L.; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) is a critical mediator of cancer cell survival, and targeting the ISR inhibits tumor progression. Here, we have shown that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a master transcriptional effector of the ISR, protects transformed cells against anoikis — a specialized form of apoptosis — following matrix detachment and also contributes to tumor metastatic properties. Upon loss of attachment, ATF4 activated a coordinated program of cytoprotective autophagy and antioxidant responses, including induced expression of the major antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). HO-1 upregulation was the result of simultaneous activation of ATF4 and the transcription factor NRF2, which converged on the HO1 promoter. Increased levels of HO-1 ameliorated oxidative stress and cell death. ATF4-deficient human fibrosarcoma cells were unable to colonize the lungs in a murine model, and reconstitution of ATF4 or HO-1 expression in ATF4-deficient cells blocked anoikis and rescued tumor lung colonization. HO-1 expression was higher in human primary and metastatic tumors compared with noncancerous tissue. Moreover, HO-1 expression correlated with reduced overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma. These results establish HO-1 as a mediator of ATF4-dependent anoikis resistance and tumor metastasis and suggest ATF4 and HO-1 as potential targets for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors. PMID:26011642

  2. Protozoan ALKBH8 oxygenases display both DNA repair and tRNA modification activities.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn; Davydova, Erna; Puścian, Alicja; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Krokan, Hans E; Klungland, Arne; Tudek, Barbara; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø

    2014-01-01

    The ALKBH family of Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases comprises enzymes that display sequence homology to AlkB from E. coli, a DNA repair enzyme that uses an oxidative mechanism to dealkylate methyl and etheno adducts on the nucleobases. Humans have nine different ALKBH proteins, ALKBH1-8 and FTO. Mammalian and plant ALKBH8 are tRNA hydroxylases targeting 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-modified uridine (mcm5U) at the wobble position of tRNAGly(UCC). In contrast, the genomes of some bacteria encode a protein with strong sequence homology to ALKBH8, and robust DNA repair activity was previously demonstrated for one such protein. To further explore this apparent functional duality of the ALKBH8 proteins, we have here enzymatically characterized a panel of such proteins, originating from bacteria, protozoa and mimivirus. All the enzymes showed DNA repair activity in vitro, but, interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function different from that of their eukaryotic counterparts. The present study provides new insights on the function and evolution of the ALKBH8 family of proteins.

  3. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2014-12-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  4. Heme oxygenase 1 defects lead to reduced chlorophyll in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lixia; Yang, Zonghui; Zeng, Xinhua; Gao, Jie; Liu, Jie; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We previously described a Brassica napus chlorophyll-deficient mutant (ygl) with yellow-green seedling leaves and mapped the related gene, BnaC.YGL, to a 0.35 cM region. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this chlorophyll defect are still unknown. In this study, the BnaC07.HO1 gene (equivalent to BnaC.YGL) was isolated by the candidate gene approach, and its function was confirmed by genetic complementation. Comparative sequencing analysis suggested that BnaC07.HO1 was lost in the mutant, while a long noncoding-RNA was inserted into the promoter of the homologous gene BnaA07.HO1. This insert was widely present in B. napus cultivars and down-regulated BnaA07.HO1 expression. BnaC07.HO1 was highly expressed in the seedling leaves and encoded heme oxygenase 1, which was localized in the chloroplast. Biochemical analysis showed that BnaC07.HO1 can catalyze heme conversion to form biliverdin IXα. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the loss of BnaC07.HO1 impaired tetrapyrrole metabolism, especially chlorophyll biosynthesis. According, the levels of chlorophyll intermediates were reduced in the ygl mutant. In addition, gene expression in multiple pathways was affected in ygl. These findings provide molecular evidences for the basis of the yellow-green leaf phenotype and further insights into the crucial role of HO1 in B. napus.

  5. Long-term effect of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction in glomerular immune injury.

    PubMed

    Datta, Prasun K; Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2006-03-01

    In a rat model of macrophage-dependent glomerular immune injury induced by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM), the authors assessed the anti-proteinuric effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction. Rats received anti-GBM antibody alone, anti-GBM antibody and treatment with the HO-1 inducer, hemin, or non-immune serum (controls). Urine protein, creatinine, and nitrite/nitrate excretion were measured on days 5, 7, and 14 after administration of the anti-GBM antibody. In hemin-treated animals with anti-GBM antibody-induced immune injury, HO-1 immunolocalized in macrophages infiltrating glomeruli and in tubular epithelial cells. In these animals, proteinuria was decreased. There was also a decrease in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels without a change in serum creatinine or systemic blood pressure. The observations establish the anti-proteinuric effect of hemin induction. This effect could be mechanistically linked to blunting of the ability of infiltrating macrophages to cause injury or to changes in tubular handling of filtered protein.

  6. The mononuclear phagocyte system in homeostasis and disease: a role for heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2014-04-10

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potential therapeutic target in many diseases, especially those mediated by oxidative stress and inflammation. HO-1 expression appears to regulate the homeostatic activity and distribution of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) in lymphoid tissue under physiological conditions. It also regulates the ability of MP to modulate the inflammatory response to tissue injury. The induction of HO-1 within MP-particularly macrophages and dendritic cells-modulates the effector functions that they acquire after activation. These effector functions include cytokine production, surface receptor expression, maturation state, and polarization toward a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype. The importance of HO-1 in MP is emphasized by their expression of specific receptors that primarily function to ingest heme-containing substrate and deliver it to HO-1. MP are the first immunological responders to tissue damage. They critically affect the outcome of injury to many organ systems, yet few therapies are currently available to specifically target MP during disease pathogenesis. Elucidation of the role of HO-1 expression in MP may help to direct broadly applicable therapies to clinical use that are based on the immunomodulatory capabilities of HO-1. Unraveling the complexities of HO-1 expression specifically within MP will more completely define how HO-1 provides cytoprotection in vivo. The use of models in which HO-1 expression is specifically modulated in bone marrow-derived cells will allow for a more complete characterization of its immunoregulatory properties.

  7. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:18259065

  8. The Intracellular Localization of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Borkhsenious, Olga N.; Mason, Catherine B.; Moroney, James V.

    1998-01-01

    The pyrenoid is a proteinaceous structure found in the chloroplast of most unicellular algae. Various studies indicate that ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is present in the pyrenoid, although the fraction of Rubisco localized there remains controversial. Estimates of the amount of Rubisco in the pyrenoid of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii range from 5% to nearly 100%. Using immunolocalization, the amount of Rubisco localized to the pyrenoid or to the chloroplast stroma was estimated for C. reinhardtii cells grown under different conditions. It was observed that the amount of Rubisco in the pyrenoid varied with growth condition; about 40% was in the pyrenoid when the cells were grown under elevated CO2 and about 90% with ambient CO2. In addition, it is likely that pyrenoidal Rubisco is active in CO2 fixation because in vitro activity measurements showed that most of the Rubisco must be active to account for CO2-fixation rates observed in whole cells. These results are consistent with the idea that the pyrenoid is the site of CO2 fixation in C. reinhardtii and other unicellular algae containing CO2-concentrating mechanisms. PMID:9536077

  9. Methyl jasmonate-induced lateral root formation in rice: the role of heme oxygenase and calcium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yun Yen; Chao, Yun-Yang; Kao, Ching Huei

    2013-01-01

    Lateral roots (LRs) play important roles in increasing the absorptive capacity of roots as well as to anchor the plant in the soil. Therefore, understanding the regulation of LR development is of agronomic importance. In this study, we examined the effect of methyl jasmonate (MJ) on LR formation in rice. Treatment with MJ induced LR formation and heme oxygenase (HO) activity. As well, MJ could induce OsHO1 mRNA expression. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (the specific inhibitor of HO) and hemoglobin [the carbon monoxide/nitric oxide (NO) scavenger] reduced LR formation, HO activity and OsHO1 expression. LR formation and HO activity induced by MJ was reduced by the specific NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-oxide. The effects of Ca(2+) chelators, Ca(2+)-channel inhibitors, and calmodulin (CaM) antagonists on LR formation induced by MJ were also examined. All these inhibitors were effective in reducing the action of MJ. However, Ca(2+) chelators and Ca(2+) channel inhibitors induced HO activity when combining with MJ further. It is concluded that Ca(2+) may regulate MJ action mainly through CaM-dependent mechanism.

  10. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  11. Deltamethrin inhibits osteoclast differentiation via regulation of heme oxygenase-1 and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Eiko; Fumimoto, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Fukuma, Yutaka; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2012-09-01

    Deltamethrin is a widely used pyrethroid pesticide. Although the cytotoxicity of deltamethrin has been reported, especially in neuronal cells, there is no information concerning the effects of deltamethrin on osteoclasts (OCLs). In this study, we showed that deltamethrin inhibited OCL differentiation in vitro. The effects of deltamethrin on OCL differentiation by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) were investigated in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) or the murine monocytic cell line RAW-D. Treatment with deltamethrin inhibited OCL formation and bone resorption and up-regulated expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-oxidative stress enzyme. Deltamethrin also decreased the protein levels of nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), which is a master regulator for OCL differentiation, and concomitantly reduced the expression levels of Src and cathepsin K, which are transcriptionally regulated by NFATc1. The effects of deltamethrin on intracellular signaling during the OCL differentiation of BMMs indicated that deltamethrin-treated OCLs displayed impaired phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Jun N-terminal kinase, and Akt, and slightly delayed phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha (IκBα) compared with untreated OCLs. Thus, deltamethrin possibly affects bone metabolism by inhibiting OCL differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carnitine metabolism to trimethylamine by an unusual Rieske-type oxygenase from human microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yijun; Jameson, Eleanor; Crosatti, Marialuisa; Schäfer, Hendrik; Rajakumar, Kumar; Bugg, Timothy D H; Chen, Yin

    2014-03-18

    Dietary intake of L-carnitine can promote cardiovascular diseases in humans through microbial production of trimethylamine (TMA) and its subsequent oxidation to trimethylamine N-oxide by hepatic flavin-containing monooxygenases. Although our microbiota are responsible for TMA formation from carnitine, the underpinning molecular and biochemical mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using bioinformatics approaches, we first identified a two-component Rieske-type oxygenase/reductase (CntAB) and associated gene cluster proposed to be involved in carnitine metabolism in representative genomes of the human microbiota. CntA belongs to a group of previously uncharacterized Rieske-type proteins and has an unusual "bridging" glutamate but not the aspartate residue, which is believed to facilitate intersubunit electron transfer between the Rieske center and the catalytic mononuclear iron center. Using Acinetobacter baumannii as the model, we then demonstrate that cntAB is essential in carnitine degradation to TMA. Heterologous overexpression of cntAB enables Escherichia coli to produce TMA, confirming that these genes are sufficient in TMA formation. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have confirmed that this unusual "bridging glutamate" residue in CntA is essential in catalysis and neither mutant (E205D, E205A) is able to produce TMA. Taken together, the data in our study reveal the molecular and biochemical mechanisms underpinning carnitine metabolism to TMA in human microbiota and assign the role of this novel group of Rieske-type proteins in microbial carnitine metabolism.

  13. Oat avenanthramides induce heme oxygenase-1 expression via Nrf2-mediated signaling in HK-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Junsheng; Zhu, Yingdong; Yerke, Aaron; Wise, Mitchell L; Johnson, Jodee; Chu, YiFang; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown that avenanthramides (AVAs), unique compounds found in oats, are strong antioxidants, though the mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether AVAs affect heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through the activation of Nrf2 translocation. We investigated the effects AVA 2c, 2f, and 2p on HK-2 cells, and found that AVAs could significantly increase HO-1 expression in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that AVA-induced HO-1 expression is mediated by Nrf2 translocation. The addition of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), but not specific inhibitors of p38 (SB202190), PI3K (LY294002), and MEK1 (PD098059) attenuated AVA-induced HO-1 expression, demonstrating an important role for reactive oxygen species, but not PI3K or MAPK activation, in activating the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, hydrogenation of the double bond of the functional α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group of AVAs eliminated their effects on HO-1 expression, suggesting that this group is crucial for the antioxidant activity of AVAs. Our results suggest a novel mechanism whereby AVAs exert an antioxidant function on human health. Further investigation of these markers in human is warranted to explore the beneficial health effects of whole grain oat intake. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dimethyl sulfoxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in cardiomyocytes via heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Man, Wang; Ming, Ding; Fang, Du; Chao, Liang; Jing, Cang

    2014-06-01

    The antioxidant property of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was formerly attributed to its direct effects. Our former study showed that DMSO is able to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in endothelial cells, which is a potent antioxidant enzyme. In this study, we hypothesized that the antioxidant effects of DMSO in cardiomyocytes are mediated or partially mediated by increased HO-1 expression. Therefore, we investigated whether DMSO exerts protective effects against H2 O2 -induced oxidative damage in cardiomyocytes, and whether HO-1 is involved in DMSO-imparted protective effects, and we also explore the underlying mechanism of DMSO-induced HO-1 expression. Our study demonstrated that DMSO pretreatment showed a cytoprotective effect against H2 O2 -induced oxidative damage (impaired cell viability, increased apopototic cells rate and caspase-3 level, and increased release of LDH and CK) and this process is partially mediated by HO-1 upregulation. Furthermore, our data showed that the activation of p38 MAPK and Nrf2 translocation are involved in the HO-1 upregulation induced by DMSO. This study reports for the first time that the cytoprotective effect of DMSO in cardiomyocytes is partially mediated by HO-1, which may further explain the mechanisms by which DMSO exerts cardioprotection on H2 O2 injury. J. Cell. Biochem. 115: 1159-1165, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Critical role of 5-lipoxygenase and heme oxygenase-1 in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brogliato, Ariane R; Moor, Andrea N; Kesl, Shannon L; Guilherme, Rafael F; Georgii, Janaína L; Peters-Golden, Marc; Canetti, Claudio; Gould, Lisa J; Benjamim, Claudia F

    2014-05-01

    Lipid mediators derived from 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism can activate both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, but their role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study we show that 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice exhibited faster wound healing than wild-type (WT) animals, and exhibited upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, HO-1 inhibition in 5-LO(-/-) mice abolished the beneficial effect observed. Despite the fact that 5-LO(-/-) mice exhibited faster healing, in in vitro assays both migration and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were inhibited by the 5-LO pharmacologic inhibitor AA861. No changes were observed in the expression of fibronectin, transforming growth factor (I and III), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Interestingly, AA861 treatment significantly decreased ROS formation by stimulated fibroblasts. Similar to 5-LO(-/-) mice, induction of HO-1, but not superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2), was also observed in response to 5-LO (AA861) or 5-LO activating protein (MK886) inhibitors. HO-1 induction was independent of nuclear factor (erythroid derived-2) like2 (Nrf-2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) products, or lipoxin action. Taken together, our results show that 5-LO disruption improves wound healing and alters fibroblast function by an antioxidant mechanism based on HO-1 induction. Overexpression of HO-1 in wounds may facilitate early wound resolution.

  16. The Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase from the Mesophilic Bacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus Is a Highly Active Thermozyme

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Andreas; Botelho, Hugo M.; Kindinger, Florian; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2012-01-01

    A biochemical, biophysical, and phylogenetic study of the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) from the mesophilic gammaproteobacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus (HnSOR) was performed in order to determine the structural and biochemical properties of the enzyme. SOR proteins from 14 predominantly chemolithoautotrophic bacterial and archaeal species are currently available in public databases. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that they form a coherent protein family. The HnSOR purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous gene expression had a temperature range of activity of 10 to 99°C with an optimum at 80°C (42 U/mg protein). Sulfite, thiosulfate, and hydrogen sulfide were formed at various stoichiometries in a range between pH 5.4 and 11 (optimum pH 8.4). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the HnSOR adopts secondary and quaternary structures similar to those of the 24-subunit enzyme from the hyperthermophile Acidianus ambivalens (AaSOR). The melting point of the HnSOR was ≈20°C lower than that of the AaSOR, when analyzed with CD-monitored thermal unfolding. Homology modeling showed that the secondary structure elements of single subunits are conserved. Subtle changes in the pores of the outer shell and increased flexibility might contribute to activity at low temperature. We concluded that the thermostability was the result of a rigid protein core together with the stabilizing effect of the 24-subunit hollow sphere. PMID:22139503

  17. Resveratrol attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in lymphoma nude mice by heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Song, Zhi-ping; Gui, Dong-mei; Hu, Wei; Chen, Yue-guang; Zhang, Da-dong

    2012-12-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) has been used in a variety of human malignancies for decades, in particular of lymphoma. But increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis has been implicated in its cardiotoxicity. Resveratrol (RES) generates cardiovascular protective effects by heme oxygenase-1(HO-1)-mediated mechanism. The present study was designed to determine whether RES protected cardiomyocyte against apoptosis through induction of HO-1 in lymphoma nude mouse in vivo. After being developed into lymphoma model, 40 male Balb/c nude mice were randomized to one of the following four treatments (10 mice per group): control, DOX, DOX + RES and DOX + RES + HO-1 inhibitor (zinc protoporphyrin IX, ZnPP). The results showed that DOX injection markedly decreased the body weight, the heart weight and the ratio of heart weight to body weight, but inversely increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the level of serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Moreover, DOX injection attenuated HO-1 expression and enzymatic activity as well as increased P53 expression, modulated Bcl-2/Bax expression and enhanced caspase 3 activity. These cardiotoxic effects of DOX were ameliorated by its combination with RES. However, the protective effects of RES were reversed by the addition of ZnPP. Taken together, it is concluded that HO-1 plays a core role for protective action of RES in DOX-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in lymphoma nude mice.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Angelica gigas via Heme Oxygenase (HO)-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon Hyeong; Kwon, Jung Eun; Cho, Youngmi; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-06-15

    Angelica gigas (AG) is effective against various medical conditions such as bacterial infection, inflammation, and cancer. It contains a number of coumarin compounds and the group of interest is the pyranocoumarin, which comprises decursin and decursinol angelate. This group has an effect on controlling inflammation, which is caused by excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Heme oxygenases (HOs), particularly HO-1, play a role in regulating the production of NO. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AG by measuring HO-1 expression. Treatments with CH2Cl2 layer and Angelica gigas extract (AGE) showed the highest NO inhibition effects. Decursin, decursinol angelate, and nodakenin were isolated from the CH2Cl2 layer of AGE. Decursin also demonstrated the highest anti-oxidative effect among the coumarins. Although decursin had the best NO inhibition and anti-oxidative effects, the effects of AGE treatment far surpassed that of decursin. This is owing to the combination effect of the coumarins present within AGE, which is a solvent extract of AG. The expression of HO-1 is an effective indicator of the anti-inflammatory effects of AG. Based on the results of the coumarin compounds, HO-1 expression was found to be dose dependent and specific to decursin.

  19. Characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Euglena gracilis Z.

    PubMed

    Yokota, A; Harada, A; Kitaoka, S

    1989-03-01

    An improved method was devised to purify ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) with high specific activity (2.1 mumol of CO2 fixed/mg protein/min) from Euglena gracilis Z. The purified enzyme stored at -80 degrees C required treatment with dithiothreitol for full activity. The dithiothreitol-treated RuBisCO was activated by 12 mM NaHCO3 and 20 mM MgCl2, and the activated state was stable at least for 60 min in the presence of 4 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate. The form of inorganic carbon fixed by the Euglena enzyme was CO2, as for the plant enzymes. The carboxylase reaction proceeded linearly with time for at least 8 min. The optimum pH for this reaction was 7.8 to 8.0. The carboxylase activity increased with increasing temperature up to 50 degrees C. The activation energy for the carboxylation reaction was 10.0 kcal/mol. The Michaelis constants of Euglena RuBisCO were 30.9 microM for CO2, 560 microM for O2, and 10.5 microM for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Mathematical comparison between the photosynthesis rate predicted from these enzymatic properties and the observed rate suggested that there is no CO2-concentrating mechanism in E. gracilis.

  20. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  1. Heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide in the female reproductive system: an overlooked signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Němeček, David; Dvořáková, Markéta; Sedmíková, Markéta

    2017-01-01

    For a long time, carbon monoxide (CO) was known for its toxic effect on organisms. But there are still many things left to discover on that molecule. CO is formed directly in the body by the enzymatic activity of heme oxygenase (HO). CO plays an important role in many physiological processes, such as cell protections (against various stress factors), and the regulation of metabolic processes. Recent research proves that CO also operates in the female reproductive system. At the centre of interest is the importance of CO for gestation. During the gestation period, CO is an important element affecting the proper function of the feto-placental unit and generally affects fetal survivability rates. Gestation is one of the most important processes of successful reproduction, although there are more relevant processes that need to be researched. While already proven that CO influences steroidogenesis and the corpus luteum survivability rate, our knowledge concerning the function and importance of CO in the reproductive system is still relatively limited. As an example, our knowledge of CO function in an oocyte, the most important cell for reproduction, is almost non-existent. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge concerning the function of CO in the female reproductive system.

  2. Modulation of antigen processing by haem-oxygenase 1. Implications on inflammation and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Carreño, Leandro J; Espinoza, Janyra A; Mackern-Oberti, Juan Pablo; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel M; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-09-01

    Haem-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme responsible for the degradation of haem that can suppress inflammation, through the production of carbon monoxide (CO). It has been shown in several experimental models that genetic and pharmacological induction of HO-1, as well as non-toxic administration of CO, can reduce inflammatory diseases, such as endotoxic shock, type 1 diabetes and graft rejection. Recently, it was shown that the HO-1/CO system can alter the function of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and reduce T-cell priming, which can be beneficial during immune-driven inflammatory diseases. The molecular mechanisms by which the HO-1 and CO reduce both APC- and T-cell-driven immunity are just beginning to be elucidated. In this article we discuss recent findings related to the immune regulatory capacity of HO-1 and CO at the level of recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and T-cell priming by APCs. Finally, we propose a possible regulatory role for HO-1 and CO over the recently described mitochondria-dependent immunity. These concepts could contribute to the design of new therapeutic tools for inflammation-based diseases.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Angelica gigas via Heme Oxygenase (HO)-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Joon Hyeong; Kwon, Jung Eun; Cho, Youngmi; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-01-01

    Angelica gigas (AG) is effective against various medical conditions such as bacterial infection, inflammation, and cancer. It contains a number of coumarin compounds and the group of interest is the pyranocoumarin, which comprises decursin and decursinol angelate. This group has an effect on controlling inflammation, which is caused by excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Heme oxygenases (HOs), particularly HO-1, play a role in regulating the production of NO. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AG by measuring HO-1 expression. Treatments with CH2Cl2 layer and Angelica gigas extract (AGE) showed the highest NO inhibition effects. Decursin, decursinol angelate, and nodakenin were isolated from the CH2Cl2 layer of AGE. Decursin also demonstrated the highest anti-oxidative effect among the coumarins. Although decursin had the best NO inhibition and anti-oxidative effects, the effects of AGE treatment far surpassed that of decursin. This is owing to the combination effect of the coumarins present within AGE, which is a solvent extract of AG. The expression of HO-1 is an effective indicator of the anti-inflammatory effects of AG. Based on the results of the coumarin compounds, HO-1 expression was found to be dose dependent and specific to decursin. PMID:26083119

  4. Alkyl peroxides reveal the ring opening mechanism of verdoheme catalyzed by heme oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Omori, Kohei; Jin, Hiromichi; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2008-04-02

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes heme catabolism through three successive oxygenation steps where the substrate heme itself activates O2. Although a rate-determining step of the HO catalysis is considered as third oxygenation, the verdoheme degradation mechanism has been the least understood in the HO catalysis. In order to discriminate three possible pathways proposed for the verdoheme ring-opening, we have examined reactions of the verdoheme-HO-1 complex with alkyl peroxides, namely MeOOH. Under reducing conditions, the MeOOH reaction afforded two novel products whose absorption spectra are similar to but slightly different from that of biliverdin. HPLC, ESI-MS, and NMR analysis show that these products are 1- and 19-methoxy-deoxy-biliverdins. The addition of a methoxy group at one end of the linear tetrapyrrole unambiguously indicates transient formation of the Fe-OOMe intermediate and rearrangement of its terminal methoxy group to the alpha-pyrrole carbon. The corresponding OH transfer of the Fe-OOH species is highly probable in the H2O2-dependent verdoheme degradation and is likely to be the case in the O2-dependent reaction catalyzed by HO as well.

  5. Role of oxidative stress and heme oxygenase activity in morphine-induced glomerular epithelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaimita; Manjappa, Nagarathna; Bhat, Rajani; Mehrotra, Pavni; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Singhal, Pravin C

    2003-11-01

    Opiate addiction has been reported to contribute to the progression of renal injury. In addition, opiate addiction is a major risk factor for the development of human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of morphine, an active metabolite of heroin, on glomerular epithelial cell (GEC) growth and the involved molecular mechanism. At lower concentrations, morphine promoted GEC proliferation; however, at higher concentrations, morphine triggered apoptosis. Antioxidants inhibited morphine-induced proliferation as well as apoptosis. Similarly, free radical scavengers prevented morphine-induced GEC proliferation and apoptosis. Because proliferative and proapoptotic effects of morphine were inhibited by free radical scavengers as well as antioxidants, it appears that these effects of morphine are mediated through oxidative stress. Hemin, an inducer of heme oxygenase (HO) activity, inhibited GEC proliferation and promoted GEC apoptosis under basal and morphine-stimulated conditions. On the other hand, zinc protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, promoted GEC proliferation and inhibited GEC apoptosis under basal as well as morphine-stimulated conditions. These findings suggest that HO activity is directly related to GEC apoptosis and inversely related to GEC proliferation. Morphine, de novo, had bimodal effects on HO activity: lower concentrations increased and higher concentrations decreased HO activity. It appears that HO activity may be modifying morphine-induced GEC growth.

  6. Heme Oxygenase Database (HemeOxDB) and QSAR Analysis of Isoform 1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Amata, Emanuele; Marrazzo, Agostino; Dichiara, Maria; Modica, Maria N; Salerno, Loredana; Prezzavento, Orazio; Nastasi, Giovanni; Rescifina, Antonio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Pittalà, Valeria

    2017-07-14

    Due to increasing interest in the field of heme oxygenases (HOs), we built a ligand database called HemeOxDB that includes the entire set of known HO-1 and HO-2 inhibitors, resulting in more than 400 compounds. The HemeOxDB is available online at http://www.researchdsf.unict.it/hemeoxdb/, and having a robust search engine allows end users to build complex queries, sort tabulated results, and generate color-coded two- and three-dimensional graphs. This database will grow to be a tool for the design of potent and selective HO-1 or HO-2 inhibitors. We were also interested in virtually searching for alternative inhibitors, and, for the first time in the field of HOs, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was built using half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) values of the whole set of known HO-1 inhibitors, taken from the HemeOxDB and employing the Monte Carlo technique. The statistical quality suggested that the model is robust and possesses desirable predictive potential. The screening of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, external to our dataset, suggested new predicted inhibitors, opening the way for replacing imidazole groups. The HemeOxDB and the QSAR model reported herein may help in prospectively identifying or repurposing new drugs with optimal structural attributes for HO enzyme inhibition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population.

  8. Mangiferin regulates cognitive deficits and heme oxygenase-1 induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanyan; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Chengjie; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Yi; Wu, Jian; Wen, Xiangru; Liang, Chen; Ma, Kai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Xunbao; Shao, Xiaoping; Sun, Yafeng; Du, Yang; Song, Yuanjian

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to cognitive deficits. Mangiferin, a natural glucoxilxanthone, is known to possess various biological activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mangiferin on LPS-induced cognitive deficits and explore the underlying mechanisms. Brain injury was induced in mice via intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg) for five consecutive days. Mangiferin was orally pretreatmented (50mg/kg) for seven days and then treatmented (50mg/kg) for five days after LPS injection. The Morris water maze was used to detect changes in cognitive function. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting were respectively performed to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that mangiferin can ameliorate cognitive deficits. Moreover, mangiferin decreased LPS-induced IL-6 production and increase HO-1 in the hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that mangiferin attenuates LPS-induced cognitive deficits, which may be potentially linked to modulating HO-1 in the hippocampus.

  9. Capsaicin Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Renal Injury through Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Subin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy agents. However, its use is limited due to its toxicity in normal tissues, including the kidney and ear. In particular, nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme metabolism, has been implicated in a various cellular processes, such as inflammatory injury and anti-oxidant/oxidant homeostasis. Capsaicin is reported to have therapeutic potential in cisplatin-induced renal failures. However, the mechanisms underlying its protective effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that administration of capsaicin ameliorates cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction by assessing the levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) as well as tissue histology. In addition, capsaicin treatment attenuates the expression of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress markers for renal damage. We also found that capsaicin induces HO-1 expression in kidney tissues and HK-2 cells. Notably, the protective effects of capsaicin were completely abrogated by treatment with either the HO inhibitor ZnPP IX or HO-1 knockdown in HK-2 cells. These results suggest that capsaicin has protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction through induction of HO-1 as well as inhibition oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24642709

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency accompanies neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Alexander J.; Kovacsics, Colleen E.; Cross, Stephanie A.; Vance, Patricia J.; Kolson, Lorraine L.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible, detoxifying enzyme that is critical for limiting oxidative stress, inflammation, and cellular injury within the CNS and other tissues. Here, we demonstrate a deficiency of HO-1 expression in the brains of HIV-infected individuals. This HO-1 deficiency correlated with cognitive dysfunction, HIV replication in the CNS, and neuroimmune activation. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in HIV-infected macrophages, a primary CNS HIV reservoir along with microglia, demonstrated a decrease in HO-1 as HIV replication increased. HO-1 deficiency correlated with increased culture supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity, suggesting a link among HIV infection, macrophage HO-1 deficiency, and neurodegeneration. HO-1 siRNA knockdown and HO enzymatic inhibition in HIV-infected macrophages increased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. In contrast, increasing HO-1 expression through siRNA derepression or with nonselective pharmacologic inducers, including the CNS-penetrating drug dimethyl fumarate (DMF), decreased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. Furthermore, IFN-γ, which is increased in CNS HIV infection, reduced HO-1 expression in cultured human astrocytes and macrophages. These findings indicate that HO-1 is a protective host factor against HIV-mediated neurodegeneration and suggest that HO-1 deficiency contributes to this degeneration. Furthermore, these results suggest that HO-1 induction in the CNS of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy could potentially protect against neurodegeneration and associated cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25202977

  11. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  12. Cobalt chloride-induced lateral root formation in rice: the role of heme oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yun Yen; Chao, Yun-Yang; Kao, Ching Huei

    2013-08-15

    Lateral roots (LRs) perform the essential tasks of providing water, nutrients, and physical support to plants. Therefore, understanding the regulation of LR development is of agronomic importance. Recent findings suggest that heme oxygenase (HO) plays an important role in LR development. In this study, we examined the effect of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on LR formation and HO expression in rice. Treatment with CoCl2 induced LR formation and HO activity. We further observed that CoCl2 could induce the expression of OsHO1 but not OsHO2. CoCl2-increased HO activity occurred before LR formation. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX, the specific inhibitor of HO) and hemoglobin (the carbon monoxide/nitric oxide scavenger) reduced LR formation, HO activity, and OsHO1 expression. Application of biliverdin, a product of HO-catalyzed reaction, to CoCl2-treated rice seedlings reversed the ZnPPIX-inhibited LR formation and ZnPPIX-decreased HO activity. CoCl2 had no effect on H2O2 content and nitric oxide production. Moreover, application of ascorbate, a H2O2 scavenger, failed to affect CoCl2-promoted LR formation and HO activity. It is concluded that HO is required for CoCl2-promoted LR formation in rice.

  13. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  14. Solvent isotope effects on alkane formation by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Matthew W; Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-09-02

    The reaction catalyzed by cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase is of interest both because of its potential application to the production of biofuels and because of the highly unusual nature of the deformylation reaction it catalyzes. Whereas the proton in the product alkane derives ultimately from the solvent, the identity of the proton donor in the active site remains unclear. To investigate the proton transfer step, solvent isotope effect (SIE) studies were undertaken. The rate of alkane formation was found to be maximal at pH 6.8 and to be the same in D2O or H2O within experimental error, implying that proton transfer is not a kinetically significant step. However, when the ratio of protium to deuterium in the product alkane was measured as a function of the mole fraction of D2O, a (D2O)SIEobs of 2.19 ± 0.02 was observed. The SIE was invariant with the mole fraction of D2O, indicating the involvement of a single protic site in the reaction. We interpret this SIE as most likely arising from a reactant state equilibrium isotope effect on a proton donor with an inverse fractionation factor, for which Φ = 0.45. These observations are consistent with an iron-bound water molecule being the proton donor to the alkane in the reaction.

  15. Carotenoid-oxygenases: Key Players for Carotenoid Function and Homeostasis in Mammalian Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Glenn P.; Amengual, Jaume; Palczewski, Grzegorz; Babino, Darwin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Humans depend on a dietary intake of lipids to maintain optimal health. Among various classes of dietary lipids, the physiological importance of carotenoids is still controversially discussed. On one hand, it is well established that carotenoids such as β,β-carotene are a major source for vitamin A that plays critical roles for vision and many aspects of cell physiology. On the other hand, large clinical trials have failed to show clear health benefits of carotenoids supplementation and even suggest adverse health effects in individuals at risk of disease. In recent years, key molecular players for carotenoid metabolism have been identified, including an evolutionarily well conserved family of carotenoid-oxygenases. Studies in knockout mouse models for these enzymes revealed that carotenoid metabolism is a highly regulated process and that this regulation already takes place at the level of intestinal absorption. These studies also provided evidence that of β,β-carotene conversion can influence retinoid-dependent processes in the mouse embryo and in adult tissues. Moreover, these analyses provide an explanation for adverse health effects of carotenoids by showing that a pathological accumulation of these compounds can induce oxidative stress in mitochondria and cell signaling pathways related to disease. Advancing knowledge about carotenoid metabolism will contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical and physiological roles of these important micronutrients in health and disease. PMID:21569862

  16. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  17. Effects of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression and Cutaneous Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Rheden, René E. M.; Vermeij, Eline A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Carels, Carine E.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2017-01-01

    Skin wounds may lead to scar formation and impaired functionality. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) can induce the anti-inflammatory enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and protect against tissue injury. We aim to improve cutaneous wound repair by RIPC treatment via induction of HO-1. RIPC was applied to HO-1-luc transgenic mice and HO-1 promoter activity and mRNA expression in skin and several other organs were determined in real-time. In parallel, RIPC was applied directly or 24h prior to excisional wounding in mice to investigate the early and late protective effects of RIPC on cutaneous wound repair, respectively. HO-1 promoter activity was significantly induced on the dorsal side and locally in the kidneys following RIPC treatment. Next, we investigated the origin of this RIPC-induced HO-1 promoter activity and demonstrated increased mRNA in the ligated muscle, heart and kidneys, but not in the skin. RIPC did not change HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in the wound 7 days after cutaneous injury. Both early and late RIPC did not accelerate wound closure nor affect collagen deposition. RIPC induces HO-1 expression in several organs, but not the skin, and did not improve excisional wound repair, suggesting that the skin is insensitive to RIPC-mediated protection. PMID:28218659

  18. Small Oligomers of Ribulose-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Activase Are Required for Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keown, Jeremy R.; Griffin, Michael D. W.; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Pearce, F. Grant

    2013-01-01

    Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remove tight binding inhibitors from Rubisco, thus playing a key role in regulating photosynthesis in plants. Although several structures have recently added much needed structural information for different Rubisco activase enzymes, the arrangement of these subunits in solution remains unclear. In this study, we use a variety of techniques to show that Rubisco activase forms a wide range of structures in solution, ranging from monomers to much higher order species, and that the distribution of these species is highly dependent on protein concentration. The data support a model in which Rubisco activase forms an open spiraling structure rather than a closed hexameric structure. At protein concentrations of 1 μm, corresponding to the maximal activity of the enzyme, Rubisco activase has an oligomeric state of 2–4 subunits. We propose a model in which Rubisco activase requires at least 1 neighboring subunit for hydrolysis of ATP. PMID:23720775

  19. Association of functional heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism with renal transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A E; McNamee, P T; Middleton, D; Heggarty, S; Patterson, C C; Maxwell, A P

    2007-04-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective molecule and increased expression in experimental transplant models correlates with reduced graft injury. A functional dinucleotide repeat (GT)(n) polymorphism, within the HO-1 promoter, regulates gene expression; a short number of repeats (S-allele <25) increases transcription. The role of this HO-1 gene promoter polymorphism on renal transplant outcomes was assessed. DNA from 707 donor/recipient pairs (n = 1414) of first deceased donor renal transplants (99% Caucasian) was genotyped. Graft survival was not significantly impacted by carriage of an S-allele by the donor (hazard ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.71-1.11; p = 0.28) or recipient (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% CI 0.95-1.48; p = 0.13). Similarly neither donor nor recipient genotype influenced recipient survival (hazard ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.67-1.18; p = 0.41, and hazard ratio 1.22, 95% CI 0.93-1.62; p = 0.16). The hazard ratios changed only minimally in multivariate analysis including significant survival factors. Genotype did not alter the incidence of acute rejection or chronic allograft nephropathy. There is no evidence of a protective effect for the S-allele of the HO-1 gene promoter polymorphism on graft or recipient survival in clinical renal transplantation.

  20. Structure of the processive rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Julian; Schmitt, Georg; Hoffmann, Maren; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) is one of only two known enzymes able to catalyze the oxidative cleavage of latex for biodegradation. RoxA acts as a processive dioxygenase to yield the predominant product 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD), a tri-isoprene unit. Here we present a structural analysis of RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y at a resolution of 1.8 Å. The enzyme is a 75-kDa diheme c-type cytochrome with an unusually low degree of secondary structure. Analysis of the heme group arrangement and peptide chain topology of RoxA confirmed a distant kinship with diheme peroxidases of the CcpA family, but the proteins are functionally distinct, and the extracellular RoxA has evolved to have twice the molecular mass by successively accumulating extensions of peripheral loops. RoxA incorporates both oxygen atoms of its cosubstrate dioxygen into the rubber cleavage product ODTD, and we show that RoxA is isolated with O2 stably bound to the active site heme iron. Activation and cleavage of O2 require binding of polyisoprene, and thus the substrate needs to use hydrophobic access channels to reach the deeply buried active site of RoxA. The location and nature of these channels support a processive mechanism of latex cleavage. PMID:23922395

  1. Suppression of inflammatory cell trafficking and alveolar simplification by the heme oxygenase-1 product carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, Anuli C.; Bentley, J. Kelley; Popova, Antonia P.; Malas, Omar; Alghanem, Husam; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a lung disease of prematurely born infants, is characterized in part by arrested development of pulmonary alveolae. We hypothesized that heme oxygenase (HO-1) and its byproduct carbon monoxide (CO), which are thought to be cytoprotective against redox stress, mitigate lung injury and alveolar simplification in hyperoxia-exposed neonatal mice, a model of BPD. Three-day-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to air or hyperoxia (FiO2, 75%) in the presence or absence of inhaled CO (250 ppm for 1 h twice daily) for 21 days. Hyperoxic exposure increased mean linear intercept, a measure of alveolar simplification, whereas CO treatment attenuated hypoalveolarization, yielding a normal-appearing lung. Conversely, HO-1-null mice showed exaggerated hyperoxia-induced hypoalveolarization. CO also inhibited hyperoxia-induced pulmonary accumulation of F4/80+, CD11c+, and CD11b+ monocytes and Gr-1+ neutrophils. Furthermore, CO attenuated lung mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including the monocyte chemoattractant CCL2 in vivo, and decreased hyperoxia-induced type I alveolar epithelial cell CCL2 production in vitro. Hyperoxia-exposed CCL2-null mice, like CO-treated mice, showed attenuated alveolar simplification and lung infiltration of CD11b+ monocytes, consistent with the notion that CO blocks lung epithelial cell cytokine production. We conclude that, in hyperoxia-exposed neonatal mice, inhalation of CO suppresses inflammation and alveolar simplification. PMID:24532288

  2. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E; Hanafy, Khalid A

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

  3. Heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 confers host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2013-07-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (M) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1(-/-)) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1(+/+)) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1(-/-) mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1(-/-) versus Hmox1(+/+) SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected M, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type M in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in M, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

  4. Tussilagone inhibits dendritic cell functions via induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yunsoo; Ryu, Hwa Sun; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Ji Sung; Yun, Jieun; Kang, Jong Soon; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Sesquiterpenoid tussilagone (TUS) has a variety of pharmacological activities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of TUS on dendritic cell (DC) functions and the underlying mechanisms. TUS inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of DCs, as shown by decrease in surface molecule expression, cytokine production, cell migration, and allo-T cell activation. In addition, TUS inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB, MAPKs, and IRF-3 signalings in DCs, although it did not directly affect kinase activities of IRAK1/4, TAK1, and IKK, which suggests that TUS might indirectly inhibit TLR signaling in DCs. As a critical mechanism, we showed that TUS activated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which degrades heme to immunosuppressive products, such as carbon monoxide and bilirubin. HO-1 inhibitor reversed the inhibitory activity of TUS in DCs. In conclusion, this study suggests that TUS inhibits DC function through the induction of HO-1.

  5. Wild-type macrophages reverse disease in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre, Wade; Weitzel, R Patrick; Eckhaus, Michael A; Tisdale, John F; Yachie, Akihiro; Rouault, Tracey A

    2014-08-28

    Loss-of-function mutation in the heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) gene causes a rare and lethal disease in children, characterized by severe anemia and intravascular hemolysis, with damage to endothelia and kidneys. Previously, we found that macrophages engaged in recycling of red cells were depleted from the tissues of Hmox1(-/-) mice, which resulted in intravascular hemolysis and severe damage to the endothelial system, kidneys, and other organs. Here, we report that subablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a curative effect for disease in Hmox1(-/-) animals as a result of restoration of heme recycling by repopulation of the tissues with wild-type macrophages. Although engraftment was transient, BMT reversed anemia, normalized blood chemistries and iron metabolism parameters, and prevented renal damage. The largest proportion of donor-derived cells was observed in the livers of transplanted animals. These cells, identified as Kupffer cells with high levels of Hmox1 expression, persisted months after transient engraftment of the donor bone marrow and were responsible for the full restoration of heme-recycling ability in Hmox1(-/-) mice and reversing Hmox1-deficient phenotype. Our findings suggest that BMT or the development of specific cell therapies to repopulate patients' tissues with wild-type or reengineered macrophages represent promising approaches for HMOX1 deficiency treatment in humans.

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Calleja, Patricia; Pisa, Diana; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Torrecillas, Dolores; García-Albea, Esteban; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier

    2016-02-12

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, and experimental data suggest a possible role of oxidative stress in the ethiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis(MS). Heme-oxygenases(HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, and HMOX1 is overexpressed in the brain and spinal cord of MS patients and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE). We analyzed whether common polymorphisms affecting the HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop MS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations(CNVs) of these genes in 292 subjects MS and 533 healthy controls, using TaqMan assays. The frequencies of HMOX2 rs1051308AA genotype and HMOX2 rs1051308A and HMOX1 rs2071746A alleles were higher in MS patients than in controls, although only that of the SNP HMOX2 rs1051308 in men remained as significant after correction for multiple comparisons. None of the studied polymorphisms was related to the age at disease onset or with the MS phenotype. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphism and the risk to develop MS in Spanish Caucasian men and a trend towards association between the HMOX1 rs2071746A and MS risk.

  7. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 as a target for TGF-β in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a multifunctional regulatory cytokine that is implicated in a variety of kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy and chronic transplant rejection, where it promotes stimulation of the extracellular matrix deposition, cell proliferation, and migration. TGF-β exerts its biological functions largely via its downstream complex signaling molecules, Smad proteins. Paradoxically, TGF-β also is essential for normal homeostasis and suppression of inflammation through mechanisms that are yet to be fully elucidated. One feasible mechanism by which TGF-β may exert its beneficial properties is through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Induction of this redox-sensitive enzyme is known to be cytoprotective through its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties in different conditions including several kidney diseases. In this overview, recent advances in our understanding of the role of TGF-β in kidney disease, its molecular regulation of HO-1 expression, and the potential role of HO-1 induction as a therapeutic modality in TGF-β-mediated kidney diseases are highlighted.

  9. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer disease: Is heme oxygenase-1 an Achille's heel?

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance, clinically defined as the inability of insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization, has been found to be associated with the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Indeed, postmortem AD brain shows all the signs of insulin resistance including: (i) reduced brain insulin receptor (IR) sensitivity, (ii) hypophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and downstream second messengers such as IRS-1, and (iii) attenuated insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression. However, the exact mechanisms driving insulin resistance have not been completely elucidated. Quite recently, the levels of the peripheral inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO-1), a well-known protein up-regulated during cell stress response, were proposed to be among the strongest positive predictors of metabolic disease, including insulin resistance. Because our group previously reported on levels, activation state and oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications of HO-1 in AD brain and our ongoing studies to better elucidate the role of HO-1 in insulin resistance-associated AD pathology, the aim of this review is to provide reader with a critical analysis on new aspects of the interplay between HO-1 and insulin resistance and on how the available lines of evidence could be useful for further comprehension of processes in AD brain.

  10. Specific expression of heme oxygenase-1 by myeloid cells modulates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Maxime; Thierry, Antoine; Delbauve, Sandrine; Preyat, Nicolas; Soares, Miguel P; Roumeguère, Thierry; Leo, Oberdan; Flamand, Véronique; Le Moine, Alain; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-15

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major risk factor for delayed graft function in renal transplantation. Compelling evidence exists that the stress-responsive enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediates protection against IRI. However, the role of myeloid HO-1 during IRI remains poorly characterized. Mice with myeloid-restricted deletion of HO-1 (HO-1(M-KO)), littermate (LT), and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to renal IRI or sham procedures and sacrificed after 24 hours or 7 days. In comparison to LT, HO-1(M-KO) exhibited significant renal histological damage, pro-inflammatory responses and oxidative stress 24 hours after reperfusion. HO-1(M-KO) mice also displayed impaired tubular repair and increased renal fibrosis 7 days after IRI. In WT mice, HO-1 induction with hemin specifically upregulated HO-1 within the CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) subset of the renal myeloid cells. Prior administration of hemin to renal IRI was associated with significant increase of the renal HO-1(+) CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) myeloid cells in comparison to control mice. In contrast, this hemin-mediated protection was abolished in HO-1(M-KO) mice. In conclusion, myeloid HO-1 appears as a critical protective pathway against renal IRI and could be an interesting therapeutic target in renal transplantation.

  11. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  12. Role of heme oxygenase in inflammation, insulin-signalling, diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are chronic conditions associated with elevated oxidative/inflammatory activities with a continuum of tissue insults leading to more severe cardiometabolic and renal complications including myocardial infarction and end-stage-renal damage. A common denominator of these chronic conditions is the enhanced the levels of cytokines like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL-6), IL-1beta and resistin, which in turn activates the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-kappaB pathways, creating a vicious cycle that exacerbates insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and related complications. Emerging evidence indicates that heme oxygenase (HO) inducers are endowed with potent anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing effects besides their ability to suppress immune/inflammatory response. Importantly, the HO system abates inflammation through several mechanisms including the suppression of macrophage-infiltration and abrogation of oxidative/inflammatory transcription factors like NF-kappaB, JNK and activating protein-1. This review highlights the mechanisms by which the HO system potentiates insulin signalling, with particular emphasis on HO-mediated suppression of oxidative and inflammatory insults. The HO system could be explored in the search for novel remedies against cardiometabolic diseases and their complications.

  13. Expression of cyclo-oxygenase types-1 and -2 in human myometrium throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Slater, D M; Dennes, W J; Campa, J S; Poston, L; Bennett, P R

    1999-09-01

    Human labour is associated with increased prostaglandin synthesis within the uterus. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of the two isoforms of the central prostaglandin synthetic enzyme, cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) in human myometrium throughout pregnancy and to test the hypothesis that COX in the myometrium may play a role in labour onset. Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 at the mRNA level was analysed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and at the protein level using Western blotting. No significant changes of COX-1 RNA or protein expression were observed either with gestational age or labour. COX-2 mRNA and protein expression increased at term with significant up-regulation occurring prior to the onset of labour (P < 0.005). These data would suggest that up-regulation of COX-2, rather than COX-1, mediates increased prostaglandin synthesis in human myometrium at term. The increased COX-2 expression observed preceded labour onset, suggesting that COX-2 has a role in labour onset, rather than its presence merely a consequence of labour.

  14. Expression of cyclo-oxygenase types-1 and -2 in human fetal membranes throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Slater, D; Dennes, W; Sawdy, R; Allport, V; Bennett, P

    1999-04-01

    Human labour is associated with increased prostaglandin synthesis within the fetal membranes. We have studied the expression of the two isoforms of the central prostaglandin synthetic enzyme, cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2), in human fetal membranes throughout pregnancy, at mRNA, protein and activity levels. COX-1 mRNA expression was low in human amnion and chorion-decidua and did not change with gestational age. COX-2 mRNA expression in fetal membranes increased with gestational age, with significant up-regulation prior to the onset of labour and in association with labour. Protein concentrations of COX-1 did not change, whilst concentrations of COX-2 increased from the first to the third trimester. COX activity increased with gestational age and in association with labour, although prostaglandin production in fetal membranes collected after labour was reduced, suggesting reduced substrate supply. These data suggest that it is up-regulation of COX-2, rather than of COX-1, which mediates increased prostaglandin synthesis within the fetal membranes at term. Much of the increase in COX-2 expression precedes the onset of labour, suggesting that it is a cause, rather than a consequence, of labour.

  15. Interactions Between the Circadian Clock and Heme Oxygenase in the Retina of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Damulewicz, Milena; Loboda, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2017-09-01

    The Drosophila retina has an autonomous peripheral circadian clock in which the expression of the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO) is under circadian control with the ho mRNA peaking at the beginning of the day and in the middle of the night. The function of HO in the retina is unknown, but we observed that it regulates the circadian clock and protects photoreceptors against DNA damage. The decline in HO level increases and decreases the expression of the canonical clock genes period (per) and Clock (Clk), respectively. The opposite result was observed after increasing HO expression. Among three products of HO activity-carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous ions, and biliverdin-the latter has no effect on per and Clk expressions, but CO exerts the same effect as the increase of ho expression. This suggests that HO action on the clock is mediated by CO, which may affect Clk expression during the day and the level of per expression. While ho expression is not stimulated by nitric oxide (NO), NO has the same effect on the clock as HO, increasing Clk expression and decreasing the expression of per.

  16. Heme Oxygenase Activity Correlates with Serum Indices of Iron Homeostasis in Healthy Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Schreinemachers, Dina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirmed such participation of HO in iron homeostasis of humans. Carbon monoxide produced through HO activity will bind to hemoglobin in circulating erythrocytes, and therefore, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) can be used as an index of HO activity. Using the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we tested the postulate that HO activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers. The investigation included 844 lifetime nonsmokers (586 females) 18 years of age and older in the study population. Significant correlations were demonstrated between COHb and several indices of iron homeostasis including serum levels of both ferritin and iron and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. There was no significant association between COHb and hemoglobin, the largest repository of heme in the human body, which functions as the substrate for HO. We conclude that HO activity contributes to human iron homeostasis with significant correlations between COHb and serum ferritin and iron levels and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. PMID:27199547

  17. Bariatric patients have plasmatic hypercoagulability and systemic upregulation of heme oxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Galvani, Carlos A; Boyle, Patrick K; Steinbrenner, Evangelina B; Matika, Ryan W

    2015-03-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with significant thrombophilia. Of interest, adipocytes obtained from obese patients have increased heme oxygenase (Hmox) activity, the endogenous enzyme responsible for carbon monoxide (CO) production. Given that CO enhances plasmatic coagulation, we determined whether morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery had an increase in endogenous CO and plasmatic hypercoagulability. CO was determined by noninvasive pulse oximetry measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). A thrombelastographic method to assess plasma coagulation kinetics and formation of carboxyhemefibrinogen (COHF) was utilized. Nonsmoking bariatric patients (n = 20, BMI 47 ± 8 kg/m, mean ± SD) had abnormally increased COHb concentrations of 2.7 ± 1.9%, indicative of Hmox upregulation. When coagulation kinetics of these bariatric patients were compared with values obtained from normal individuals' (n = 30) plasma, 70% (95% confidence interval 45.7-88.1%) had abnormally great velocity of clot formation, abnormally large clot strength, and COHF formation. Future investigation of Hmox-derived CO in the pathogenesis of obesity-related thrombophilia is warranted.

  18. Epigallocatechin activates haem oxygenase-1 expression via protein kinase Cδ and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Ogborne, Richard M.; Rushworth, Stuart A.; O’Connell, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    The Nrf2/anti-oxidant response element (ARE) pathway plays an important role in regulating cellular anti-oxidants, including haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Various kinases have been implicated in the pathways leading to Nrf2 activation. Here, we investigated the effect of epigallocatechin (EGC) on ARE-mediated gene expression in human monocytic cells. EGC time and dose dependently increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression but had minimal effect on expression of other ARE-regulated genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione cysteine ligase and ferritin. siRNA knock down of Nrf2 significantly inhibited EGC-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC by Ro-31-8220 dose dependently decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway inhibitors had no significant effect. EGC stimulated phosphorylation of PKCαβ and δ in THP-1 cells. PKCδ inhibition significantly decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas PKCα- and β-specific inhibitors had no significant effect. These results demonstrate for the first time that EGC-induced HO-1 expression occurs via PKCδ and Nrf2. PMID:18586007

  19. The Oxygenase CAO-1 of Neurospora crassa Is a Resveratrol Cleavage Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Sánchez, Violeta; F. Estrada, Alejandro; Limón, M. Carmen; Al-Babili, Salim

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the ascomycete Neurospora crassa encodes CAO-1 and CAO-2, two members of the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family that target double bonds in different substrates. Previous studies demonstrated the role of CAO-2 in cleaving the C40 carotene torulene, a key step in the synthesis of the C35 apocarotenoid pigment neurosporaxanthin. In this work, we investigated the activity of CAO-1, assuming that it may provide retinal, the chromophore of the NOP-1 rhodopsin, by cleaving β-carotene. For this purpose, we tested CAO-1 activity with carotenoid substrates that were, however, not converted. In contrast and consistent with its sequence similarity to family members that act on stilbenes, CAO-1 cleaved the interphenyl Cα-Cβ double bond of resveratrol and its derivative piceatannol. CAO-1 did not convert five other similar stilbenes, indicating a requirement for a minimal number of unmodified hydroxyl groups in the stilbene background. Confirming its biological function in converting stilbenes, adding resveratrol led to a pronounced increase in cao-1 mRNA levels, while light, a key regulator of carotenoid metabolism, did not alter them. Targeted Δcao-1 mutants were not impaired by the presence of resveratrol, a phytoalexin active against different fungi, which did not significantly affect the growth and development of wild-type Neurospora. However, under partial sorbose toxicity, the Δcao-1 colonies exhibited faster radial growth than control strains in the presence of resveratrol, suggesting a moderate toxic effect of resveratrol cleavage products. PMID:23893079

  20. Heme Oxygenase, Inflammation, and Fibrosis: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly?

    PubMed Central

    Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Immenschuh, Stephan; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2012-01-01

    Upon injury, prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress may cause pathological wound healing and fibrosis, leading to formation of excessive scar tissue. Fibrogenesis can occur in most organs and tissues and may ultimately lead to organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms of pathological wound healing still remain unclear, and are considered to be multifactorial, but so far, no efficient anti-fibrotic therapies exist. Extra- and intracellular levels of free heme may be increased in a variety of pathological conditions due to release from hemoproteins. Free heme possesses pro-inflammatory and oxidative properties, and may act as a danger signal. Effects of free heme may be counteracted by heme-binding proteins or by heme degradation. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO) that exists as two isoforms: inducible HO-1 and constitutively expressed HO-2. HO generates the effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron/ferritin. HO deficiency in mouse and man leads to exaggerated inflammation following mild insults, and accumulating epidemiological and preclinical studies support the widely recognized notion of the cytoprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects of the activity of the HO system and its effector molecules. In this review, we address the potential effects of targeted HO-1 induction or administration of HO-effector molecules as therapeutic targets in fibrotic conditions to counteract inflammatory and oxidative insults. This is exemplified by various clinically relevant conditions, such as hypertrophic scarring, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, and chronic graft rejection in transplantation. PMID:22586396

  1. Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of high integrity and catalytic activity from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Servaites, J C

    1985-04-01

    Crystalline tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) was prepared using a procedure which protected the enzyme from hydrolysis by endogenous proteases. Leaves were extracted in a buffered medium containing casein, leupeptin, and high concentrations of MgSO4 and NaHCO3. After filtration through ion-exchange resin to remove contaminants, the enzyme was concentrated by precipitation with polyethylene glycol and crystal formation was induced by low-salt dialysis. The crystalline enzyme had a measured specific activity of 1.7 mumol CO2 mg protein-1 min-1, and about 93% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Crystalline enzyme prepared in the absence of casein exhibited an activity which was only one-third of this rate and only about 70% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Casein-extracted enzyme was resolved into distinct bands corresponding to the large (55,000) and small (14,000) subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit of enzyme prepared according to the latter procedure was found to be composed of five different polypeptides of slightly decreasing molecular weight. Only about one-third of the large subunits were of the 55,000 molecular weight type. No differences between the two preparations were observed in the Km (CO2) and apparent Km (ribulose bisphosphate).

  2. Interaction of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase with 2-carboxyhexitol 1,6-bisphosphates.

    PubMed

    Roach, D J; Gollnick, P D; McFadden, B A

    1983-04-01

    2-C-Carboxy-D-glucitol 1,6-bisphosphate (CGBP) and 2-C-carboxy-D-mannitol 1,6-bisphosphate (CMBP) have been synthesized, isolated, and the structures of these compounds and the derived lactones elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and periodate oxidation. Both carboxyhexitol bisphosphates, which are homologs of the transition state analog 2-C-carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate, exhibit competitive inhibiton of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.9) isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea), with respect to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. CMBP was a more potent inhibitor (100-fold) displaying an inhibition constant (Ki at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C) of 1-2 microM with enzymes from spinach, barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Chromatium vinosum. In contrast the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme was inhibited about 40-fold more weakly (Ki = 53 microM at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C). Both CGBP and CMBP potentiated activation of RuBP carboxylase from spinach and R. rubrum.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 is dispensable for the anti-inflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Hegde, Pushpa; Das, Mrinmoy; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Canale, Fernando; Muñoz, Marcos; Sharma, Varun K.; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) is used in the therapy of various autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The mechanisms by which IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects are not completely understood. IVIG interacts with numerous components of the immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, T and B cells and modulate their functions. Recent studies have reported that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory response in several pathologies. Several therapeutic agents exert anti-inflammatory effects via induction of HO-1. Therefore, we aimed at exploring if anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG are mediated via HO-1 pathway. Confirming the previous reports, we report that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects on innate cells as shown by the inhibitory effects on IL-6 and nitric oxide production and confers protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. However, these effects were not associated with an induction of HO-1 either in innate cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages or in the kidneys and liver of IVIG-treated EAE mice. Also, inhibition of endogenous HO-1 did not modify anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG. These results thus indicate that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects independent of HO-1 pathway. PMID:26796539

  4. The effects of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors on bile-injured and normal equine colon.

    PubMed

    Campbell, N B; Jones, S L; Blikslager, A T

    2002-07-01

    A potential adverse effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]) in horses is colitis. In addition, we have previously shown an important role for COX-produced prostanoids in recovery of ischaemic-injured equine jejunum. It was hypothesised that the nonselective COX inhibitor flunixin would retard repair of bile-injured colon by preventing production of reparative prostaglandins, whereas the selective COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac would not inhibit repair as a result of continued COX-1 activity. Segments of the pelvic flexure were exposed to 1.5 mmol/l deoxycholate for 30 min, after which they were recovered for 4 h in Ussing chambers. Contrary to the proposed hypothesis, recovery of bile-injured colonic mucosa was not affected by flunixin or etodolac, despite significantly depressed prostanoid production. However, treatment of control tissue with flunixin led to increases in mucosal permeability, whereas treatment with etodolac had no significant effect. Therefore, although recovery from bile-induced colonic injury maybe independent of COX-elaborated prostanoids, treatment of control tissues with nonselective COX inhibitors may lead to marked increases in permeability. Alternatively, selective inhibition of COX-2 may reduce the incidence of adverse effects in horses requiring NSAID therapy.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 overexpression increases liver injury after bile duct ligation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Froh, Matthias; Conzelmann, Lars; Walbrun, Peter; Netter, Susanne; Wiest, Reiner; Wheeler, Michael D; Lehnert, Mark; Uesugi, Takehiko; Scholmerich, Jurgen; Thurman, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) against oxidant-induced injury caused by bile duct ligation (BDL). METHODS: Either cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a HO-1 inducer, or saline were injected intraperitoneally in male SD-rats. Three days later, BDL or sham-operations were performed. Rats were sacrificed 3 wk after BDL and livers were harvested for histology. Fibrosis was evaluated by sirius red staining and image analysis. Alpha-smooth muscular actin, which indicates activation of stellate cells, was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and cytokine and collagen-Iα (Col-Iα) mRNA expression was detected using RNase protection assays. RESULTS: Serum alanine transaminase increased 8-fold above normal levels one day after BDL. Surprisingly, enzyme release was not reduced in rats receiving CoPP. Liver fibrosis was evaluated 3 wk after BDL and the sirius red-positive area was found to be increased to about 7.8%. However, in CoPP pretreated rats sirius red-positive areas were increased to about 11.7% after BDL. Collagen-Iα and TGF-β mRNA increased significantly by BDL. Again, this effect was increased by HO-1 overexpression. CONCLUSION: Hepatic fibrosis due to BDL is not reduced by the HO-1 inducer CoPP. In contrast, HO-1 overexpression increases liver injury in rats under conditions of experimental chronic cholestasis. PMID:17659695

  6. In vivo regulation of the heme oxygenase-1 gene in humanized transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Traylor, Amie M.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Hull, Travis D.; George, James F.; Mikhail, Fady M.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in heme degradation producing equimolar amounts of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. Induction of HO-1 is a beneficial response to tissue injury in diverse animal models of diseases including acute kidney injury. In vitro analysis has shown that the human HO-1 gene is transcriptionally regulated by changes in chromatin conformation but whether such control occurs in vivo is not known. To enable such analysis, we generated transgenic mice, harboring an 87-kb bacterial artificial chromosome expressing human HO-1 mRNA and protein and bred these mice with HO-1 knockout mice to generate humanized BAC transgenic mice. This successfully rescued the phenotype of the knockout mice including reduced birth rates, tissue iron overload, splenomegaly, anemia, leukocytosis, dendritic cell abnormalities and survival after acute kidney injury induced by rhabdomyolysis or cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Transcription factors such as USF1/2, JunB, Sp1, and CTCF were found to associate with regulatory regions of the human HO-1 gene in the kidney following rhabdomyolysis. Chromosome Conformation Capture and ChIP-loop assays confirmed this in the formation of chromatin looping in vivo. Thus, these bacterial artificial chromosome humanized HO-1 mice are a valuable model to study the human HO-1 gene providing insight to the in vivo architecture of the gene in acute kidney injury and other diseases. PMID:22495295

  7. Fenofibrate Increases Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression and Astrocyte Proliferation While Limits Neuronal Injury During Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Yu, Min; Ma, Yue; Wang, Ruoping; Liu, Wei; Xia, Wei; Guan, Aili; Xing, Conghui; Lu, Fei; Ji, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha (PPARα) is a therapy target in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, anti-inflammatory effects of PPARα in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remain unknown. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of fenofibrate, a ligand of PPARα, in ICH rat model. We found that engagement of fenofibrate increased nissl body and astrocytes, and reduced the neuronal damage, which was observed in paraffin section of ICH rat brain. Fenofibrate also promoted the proliferation of astrocytes that were isolated from adult rat brain. Fenofibrate significantly upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) at protein and mRNA levels in human glioblastoma LN-18 cells and rat brain astrocytes respectively, but nuclear factor kappalight- chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) was downregulated after fenofibrate treatment. Results showed that fenofibrate-induced upregulation of HO-1 expression were inhibited after LN-18 cells were transfected with 50nM small interfering RNA (siRNAs) for 48 hours to knockdown PPARα. Further studies in rat astrocytes confirmed the rescue effects of PPARα silence against fenofibrate induced upregulation of HO-1 expression. Our data indicated that fenofibrate benefits neuronal protection through increasing HO-1 expression level and decreasing NFκB expression in PPARα-dependent manner. In conclusion, PPARα and HO-1 may function as significant targets to protect the brain during ICH.

  8. Hormonal Fluctuations during the Estrous Cycle Modulate Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in the Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Zenclussen, Maria Laura; Casalis, Pablo Ariel; Jensen, Federico; Woidacki, Katja; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) (Hmox1) locus in mice results in intrauterine lethality. The expression of the heme catabolizing enzyme encoded by this gene, namely HO-1, is required to successfully support reproductive events. We have previously observed that HO-1 acts at several key events in reproduction ensuring pregnancy. HO-1 defines ovulation, positively influences implantation and placentation, and ensures fetal growth and survival. Here, we embarked on a study aimed to determine whether hormonal changes during the estrous cycle in the mouse define HO-1 expression that may influence receptivity. We analyzed the serum levels of progesterone and estrogen by ELISA and HO-1 mRNA expression in uterus by real time RT-PCR at the metestrus, proestrus, estrus, and diestrus phases of the estrous cycle. Further, we studied the HO-1 protein expression by western blot upon hormone addition to cultured uterine AN3 cells. We observed that HO-1 variations in uterine tissue correlated to changes in hormonal levels at different phases of the estrus cycle. In vitro, HO-1 protein levels in AN3 cells augmented after the addition of physiological concentrations of progesterone and estradiol, which confirmed our in vivo observations. Our data suggest an important role for hormones in HO-1 regulation in uterus during receptivity, a process known to have a significant impact in receptivity and later on blastocyst implantation. PMID:24659985

  9. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from basic science to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Alam, Jawed; Choi, Augustine M K

    2006-04-01

    The heme oxygenases, which consist of constitutive and inducible isozymes (HO-1, HO-2), catalyze the rate-limiting step in the metabolic conversion of heme to the bile pigments (i.e., biliverdin and bilirubin) and thus constitute a major intracellular source of iron and carbon monoxide (CO). In recent years, endogenously produced CO has been shown to possess intriguing signaling properties affecting numerous critical cellular functions including but not limited to inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptotic cell death. The era of gaseous molecules in biomedical research and human diseases initiated with the discovery that the endothelial cell-derived relaxing factor was identical to the gaseous molecule nitric oxide (NO). The discovery that endogenously produced gaseous molecules such as NO and now CO can impart potent physiological and biological effector functions truly represented a paradigm shift and unraveled new avenues of intense investigations. This review covers the molecular and biochemical characterization of HOs, with a discussion on the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene regulation that mediate the induction of HO-1 by environmental stress. Furthermore, the current understanding of the functional significance of HO shall be discussed from the perspective of each of the metabolic by-products, with a special emphasis on CO. Finally, this presentation aspires to lay a foundation for potential future clinical applications of these systems.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1: a provenance for cytoprotective pathways in the kidney and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Nath, K A

    2006-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme, converting heme to biliverdin, during which iron is released and carbon monoxide (CO) is emitted; biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. At least two isozymes possess HO activity: HO-1 represents the isozyme induced by diverse stressors, including ischemia, nephrotoxins, cytokines, endotoxin, oxidants, and vasoactive substances; HO-2 is the constitutive, glucocorticoid-inducible isozyme. HO-1 is upregulated in the kidney in assorted conditions and diseases. Interest in HO is driven by the capacity of this system to protect the kidney against injury, a capacity likely reflecting, at least in part, the cytoprotective properties of its products: in relatively low concentrations, CO exerts vasorelaxant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects while bile pigments are antioxidant and anti-inflammatory metabolites. This article reviews the HO system and the extent to which it influences the function of the healthy kidney; it summarizes conditions and stimuli that elicit HO-1 in the kidney; and it explores the significance of renal expression of HO-1 as induced by ischemia, nephrotoxins, nephritides, transplantation, angiotensin II, and experimental diabetes. This review also points out the tissue specificity of the HO system, and the capacity of HO-1 to induce renal injury in certain settings. Studies of HO in other tissues are discussed insofar as they aid in elucidating the physiologic and pathophysiologic significance of the HO system in the kidney.

  11. [Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide in the physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jamroz, Anna; Borkowska, Ewelina

    2004-03-03

    Heme oxygenase (HO) degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous ions, and the bile pigment biliverdin, which is subsequently reduced to the other important bile pigment, bilirubin, by biliverdin reductase. Fe2+ liberated from the heme molecule upregulates ferritin production, and bile pigments are potent endogenous antioxidants. The HO enzyme exists in three isophorms: HO-1 is expressed at low levels under physiological conditions, but is induced by numerous factors, including oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, an elevated level of substrate, and hypoxia. HO-2 is a constitutive enzyme involved in the baseline production of CO in the cardiovascular and nervous systems, whereas HO-3 is also ubiquitously expressed, but possesses low catalytic activity. Like nitric oxide, CO activates soluble guanylate cyclase and elevates cGMP in target tissues, which dilates blood vessels. It also does this by directly activating potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, CO inhibits platelet aggregation and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, inhibits apoptosis, and stimulates angiogenesis. Both deficiency, and excess of HO-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. Induction of HO-1 attenuates atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Pharmacological and genetic induction of HO-1 as well as the delivery of exogenous CO are promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Amplifying the fluorescence of bilirubin enables the real-time detection of heme oxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Klemz, Roman; Mashreghi, Mir-Farzin; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Kotsch, Katja

    2009-01-15

    Heme oxygenases (HO) are the rate-limiting enzymes in the degradation of heme to equimolar amounts of antioxidant bile pigments, the signaling molecule carbon monoxide, and ferric iron. The inducible form HO-1 confers protection on cells and tissues that mediates beneficial effects in many diseases. Consequently, measurement of the enzymatic activity is vital in the investigation of the regulatory role of HO. Here we report that the fluorescence characteristics of bilirubin in complex with serum albumin can be used for the real-time detection of HO activity in enzymatic kinetics measurements. We characterized the enzymatic activity of a truncated human HO-1 and measured the HO activity for various cell types and organs, in either the basal naive or the HO-1-induced state. The bilirubin-dependent increase in fluorescence over time monitored by this assay facilitates a very fast, sensitive, and reliable measurement of HO activity. Our approach offers the basis for a highly sensitive high-throughput screening, which provides, inter alia, the opportunity to discover new therapeutic HO-1-inducing agents.

  13. The role of heme oxygenase-1 in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akitaka; Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Nakajima, Shoko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    We have determined the serum levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in 56 patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) and compared these with serum HO-1 levels in healthy controls and patients with other pediatric rheumatic diseases. Serum HO-1 levels were measured by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum HO-1 level in s-JIA patients during the active phase was 123.6 +/- 13.83 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA), Kawasaki disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or mixed connective tissue disease (P < 0.0005). The serum levels of HO-1, cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with s-JIA were also assessed at both the active and inactive phases. The serum HO-1 level in patients with s-JIA in the active phase was found to be significantly greater than that in patients with the disease in the inactive phase (P < 0.0001). An assessment of the relationships between serum HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters or cytokines in patients with s-JIA did not reveal any strong correlations. These results suggest that the serum level of HO-1 may be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis of s-JIA. Further study will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of HO-1 production and to clarify the role of HO-1 in the disease process.

  14. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of heme oxygenases by azole-based antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Robert T; Dercho, Ryan A; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Brien, James F; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2006-10-01

    Ketoconazole (KTZ) and other azole antifungal agents are known to have a variety of actions beyond the inhibition of sterol synthesis in fungi. These drugs share structural features with a series of novel heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors designed in our laboratory. Accordingly, we hypothesized that therapeutically used azole-based antifungal drugs are effective HO inhibitors. Using gas chromatography to quantify carbon monoxide formation in vitro and in vivo, we have shown that azole-containing antifungal drugs are potent HO inhibitors. Terconazole, sulconazole, and KTZ were the most potent drugs with IC(50) values of 0.41 +/- 0.01, 1.1 +/- 0.4, and 0.3 +/- 0.1 microM for rat spleen microsomal HO activity, respectively. Kinetic characterization revealed that KTZ was a noncompetitive HO inhibitor. In the presence of KTZ (2.5 and 10 microM), K(m) values for both rat spleen and brain microsomal HO were not altered; however, a significant decrease in the catalytic capacity (V(max)) was observed (P < 0.005). KTZ was also found to weakly inhibit nitric-oxide synthase with an IC(50) of 177 +/- 2 microM but had no effect on the enzymatic activity of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. Because these drugs were effective within the concentration range observed in humans, it is possible that inhibition of HO may play a role in some of the pharmacological actions of these antimycotic drugs.

  15. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneoka, Hidenori; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  16. An Oxygenase-Independent Cholesterol Catabolic Pathway Operates under Oxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Lin, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Wen; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most ubiquitous compounds in nature. The 9,10-seco-pathway for the aerobic degradation of cholesterol was established thirty years ago. This pathway is characterized by the extensive use of oxygen and oxygenases for substrate activation and ring fission. The classical pathway was the only catabolic pathway adopted by all studies on cholesterol-degrading bacteria. Sterolibacterium denitrificans can degrade cholesterol regardless of the presence of oxygen. Here, we aerobically grew the model organism with 13C-labeled cholesterol, and substrate consumption and intermediate production were monitored over time. Based on the detected 13C-labeled intermediates, this study proposes an alternative cholesterol catabolic pathway. This alternative pathway differs from the classical 9,10-seco-pathway in numerous important aspects. First, substrate activation proceeds through anaerobic C-25 hydroxylation and subsequent isomerization to form 26-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one. Second, after the side chain degradation, the resulting androgen intermediate is activated by adding water to the C-1/C-2 double bond. Third, the cleavage of the core ring structure starts at the A-ring via a hydrolytic mechanism. The 18O-incorporation experiments confirmed that water is the sole oxygen donor in this catabolic pathway. PMID:23826110

  17. Carbon Monoxide Generated by Heme Oxygenase 1 Suppresses Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Sophie; Otterbein, Leo E.; Anrather, Josef; Tobiasch, Edda; Bach, Fritz H.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Soares, Miguel P.

    2000-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inhibits apoptosis by regulating cellular prooxidant iron. We now show that there is an additional mechanism by which HO-1 inhibits apoptosis, namely by generating the gaseous molecule carbon monoxide (CO). Overexpression of HO-1, or induction of HO-1 expression by heme, protects endothelial cells (ECs) from apoptosis. When HO-1 enzymatic activity is blocked by tin protoporphyrin (SnPPIX) or the action of CO is inhibited by hemoglobin (Hb), HO-1 no longer prevents EC apoptosis while these reagents do not affect the antiapoptotic action of bcl-2. Exposure of ECs to exogenous CO, under inhibition of HO-1 activity by SnPPIX, substitutes HO-1 in preventing EC apoptosis. The mechanism of action of HO-1/CO is dependent on the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling transduction pathway. Expression of HO-1 or exposure of ECs to exogenous CO enhanced p38 MAPK activation by TNF-α. Specific inhibition of p38 MAPK activation by the pyridinyl imidazol SB203580 or through overexpression of a p38 MAPK dominant negative mutant abrogated the antiapoptotic effect of HO-1. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the antiapoptotic effect of HO-1 in ECs is mediated by CO and more specifically via the activation of p38 MAPK by CO. PMID:11015442

  18. Haem arginate infusion stimulates haem oxygenase-1 expression in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Doberer, D; Haschemi, A; Andreas, M; Zapf, T-C; Clive, B; Jeitler, M; Heinzl, H; Wagner, O; Wolzt, M; Bilban, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Haem oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible protein that plays a major protective role in conditions such as ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation. In this study, we have investigated the role of haem arginate (HA) in human male subjects in the modulation of HO-1 expression and its correlation with the GT length polymorphism (GTn) in the promoter of the HO-1 gene. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In a dose-escalation, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, seven healthy male subjects with a homozygous short (S/S) and eight with a long (L/L) GTn genotype received intravenous HA. HO-1 protein expression and mRNA levels in peripheral blood monocytes, bilirubin, haptoglobin, haemopexin and haem levels were analysed over a 48 h observation period. KEY RESULTS We found that the baseline mRNA levels of HO-1 were higher in L/L subjects, while protein levels were higher in S/S subjects. HA induced a dose-dependent increase in the baseline corrected area under the curve values of HO-1 mRNA and protein over 48 h. The response of HO-1 mRNA was more pronounced in L/L subjects but the protein level was similar across the groups. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION HA is an effective inducer of HO-1 in humans irrespective of the GTn genotype. The potential therapeutic application of HA needs to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:20718734

  19. The recipient's heme oxygenase-1 promoter region polymorphism is associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Freystaetter, Kathrin; Andreas, Martin; Bilban, Martin; Perkmann, Thomas; Kaider, Alexandra; Masetti, Marco; Kocher, Alfred; Wolzt, Michael; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2017-02-10

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyses the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. The promoter region contains a highly polymorphic (GT)n repeat, where shorter (GT)n repeat sequences are linked to higher transcriptional activity, which was shown to correlate with a cytoprotective effect. Higher HO-1 levels may protect from cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Cardiac allograft recipients transplanted between 1988 and 2012 were analyzed for the HO-1 (GT)n repeat polymorphism using PCR and DNA fragment analysis with capillary electrophoresis. A relation to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was analyzed using Cox regression including common risk factors for CAV and the occurrence of rejection episodes as explanatory variables. A total of 344 patients were analyzed, of which 127 patients were positive for CAV (36.9%). In our multivariable Cox regression analysis, the short homozygous HO-1 (GT)n genotype with <27 repeats (S/S) revealed a higher risk for CAV (P = 0.032). Donor age (P = 0.001) and donor weight (P = 0.005) were significant predictors for CAV. A potential risk for CAV was associated with rejection episodes (P = 0.058) and history of smoking (P = 0.06). The recipient HO-1 (GT)n genotype may contribute to CAV development. This finding has to be evaluated in larger series including studies targeting the underlying disease mechanism.

  20. Predictive utility of cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression by colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobo Prabhu, Kristel C; Vu, Lan; Chan, Simon K; Phang, Terry; Gown, Allen; Jones, Steven J; Wiseman, Sam M

    2014-05-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme expressed in areas of inflammation, is a target of interest for colorectal cancer therapy. Currently, the predictive significance of COX-2 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Tissue microarrays were constructed using 118 colon cancer and 85 rectal cancer specimens; 44 synchronous metastatic colon cancer and 22 rectal cancer lymph nodes were also evaluated. COX-2 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Univariate analysis was used to determine the predictive significance of clinicopathologic variables. Overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival were the main outcomes examined. COX-2 was found to be expressed in 93% of colon cancers and 87% of rectal cancers. Decreased COX-2 expression was related to decreased disease-specific survival (P = .016) and decreased disease-free survival (P = .019) in the rectal cancer cohort but not in the colon cancer cohort. COX-2 expression has predictive utility for management of rectal but not colon cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Soyasaponin Bb Protects Rat Hepatocytes from Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Lijie, Zhu; Ranran, Fu; Xiuying, Liu; Yutang, He; Bo, Wang; Tao, Ma

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been known that oxidative stress induced by alcohol played a crucial role in the formation of alcoholic liver disease. Although the formation mechanisms underlying liver injury induced by alcohol still remained largely unknown, it has been considered that oxidative stress played a core role in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte damage. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soyasaponin Bb (Ss-Bb) on oxidative stress in alcohol-induced rat hepatocyte injury. Results: It has been shown that the administration of Ss-Bb could significantly restore antioxidant activity in BRL 3A cells. Moreover, the impaired liver function and morphology changes resulting from ethanol exposure were improved by Ss-Bb treatment. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) indicated a critical role of HO-1 in mediating the protective role. Finally, we found that pretreatment with Ss-Bb to ethanol exposure cells increased the expression level of HO-1. Conclusion: It was suggested that Ss-Bb may protect against alcohol-induced hepatocyte injury through ameliorating oxidative stress, and the induction of HO-1 was an important protective mechanism. SUMMARY Effects of soyasaponin Bb was investigated on oxidative stress in rat hepatocytesCell viability and antioxidant capacities were evaluated to determine the effectsThe expression level of HO-1 was measured to reveal the proptective mechanisms PMID:27867273

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulation in the Brain: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Kolson, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a highly inducible and ubiquitous cellular enzyme that subserves cytoprotective responses to toxic insults, including inflammation and oxidative stress. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, HO-1 expression is increased, presumably reflecting an endogenous neuroprotective response against ongoing cellular injury. In contrast, we have found that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the brain, which is also associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, HO-1 expression is decreased, likely reflecting a unique role for HO-1 deficiency in neurodegeneration pathways activated by HIV infection. We have also shown that HO-1 expression is significantly suppressed by HIV replication in cultured macrophages which represent the primary cellular reservoir for HIV in the brain. HO-1 deficiency is associated with release of neurotoxic levels of glutamate from both HIV-infected and immune-activated macrophages; this glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity is suppressed by pharmacological induction of HO-1 expression in the macrophages. Thus, HO-1 induction could be a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection against HIV infection and other neuroinflammatory brain diseases. Here, we review various stimuli and signaling pathways regulating HO-1 expression in macrophages, which could promote neuronal survival through HO-1-modulation of endogenous antioxidant and immune modulatory pathways, thus limiting the oxidative stress that can promote HIV disease progression in the CNS. The use of pharmacological inducers of endogenous HO-1 expression as potential adjunctive neuroprotective therapeutics in HIV infection is also discussed. PMID:24862327

  3. Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Efficiently Catabolizes Heme in the Absence of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) uses molecular oxygen and electrons from NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase to convert heme to CO, ferrous iron, and biliverdin (BV). Enzymatic studies with the purified 30-kDa form of HO-1 routinely use a coupled assay containing biliverdin reductase (BVR), which converts BV to bilirubin (BR). BVR is believed to be required for optimal HO-1 activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether HO-1 activity could be monitored directly by following BV generation or iron release (using the ferrous iron chelator, ferrozine) in the absence of BVR. Using assays for each of the three end products, we found that HO-1 activity was stimulated in the presence of catalase and comparable rates were measured with each assay. Absorbance scans revealed characteristic spectra for BR, BV, and/or the ferrozine-iron complex. The optimal conditions were slightly different for the direct and coupled assays. BSA activated the coupled but inhibited the direct assays, and the assays had different pH optima. By measuring the activity of BVR directly using BV as a substrate, these differences were attributed to different enzymatic properties of BVR and HO-1. Thus, BVR is not needed to measure the activity of HO-1 when catalase is present. In fact, the factors affecting catalysis by HO-1 are better understood using the direct assays because the coupled assay can be influenced by properties of BVR. PMID:20679134

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Counteracts Contrast Media-Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chao-Fu; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Peyton, Kelly J.; Durante, William

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of contrast-induced acute kidney injury, which is a major adverse event following coronary angiography. In this study, we evaluated the effect of contrast media (CM) on human EC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, and determined if heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) influences the biological actions of CM. We found that three distinct CM, including high-osmolar (diatrizoate), low-osmolar (iopamidol), and iso-osmolar (iodixanol), stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA. The induction of HO-1 was associated with an increase in NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS). CM also stimulated HO-1 promoter activity and this was prevented by mutating the antioxidant responsive element or by overexpressing dominant-negative Nrf2. In addition, the CM-mediated induction of HO-1 and activation of Nrf2 was abolished by acetylcysteine. Finally, CM inhibited the proliferation and migration of ECs and stimulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and the adhesion of monocytes on ECs. Inhibition or silencing of HO-1 exacerbated the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of CM but had no effect on the anti-migratory effect. Thus, induction of HO-1 via the ROS-Nrf2 pathway counteracts the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of CM. Therapeutic approaches targeting HO-1 may provide a novel approach in preventing CM-induced endothelial and organ dysfunction. PMID:24239896

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency exacerbates angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm in mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yen-Chun; Wu, Meng-Ling; Gung, Pei-Yu; Chen, Chung-Huang; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yet, Shaw-Fang

    2016-10-18

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a chronic but often fatal disease in elderly population. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response protein with antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. HO-1 has been shown to protect against atherogenesis and arterial intimal thickening. Emerging evidences suggest that AAA and arterial occlusive disease have distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Thus, in this study we investigated the role of HO-1 in angiotensin II-induced AAA formation in HO-1+/+apoE-/- and HO-1-/-apoE-/- mice. We found that complete loss of HO-1 increased AAA incidence and rupture rate, and drastically increased aneurysmal area and severity, accompanied with severe elastin degradation and medial degeneration. Interestingly, we often observed not only AAA but also thoracic aortic aneurysm in HO-1-/-apoE-/- mice. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species levels, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) loss, macrophage infiltration, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were markedly enhanced in the aneurysmal aortic wall in HO-1-/-apoE-/- mice. In addition, HO-1-/-apoE-/- VSMCs were more susceptible to oxidant-induced cell death and macrophages from HO-1-/-apoE-/- mice had aggravated responses to angiotensin II with substantial increases in inflammatory cytokine productions and MMP9 activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate the essential roles of HO-1 in suppressing the pathogenesis of AAA. Targeting HO-1 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for AAA.

  6. Role of Heme Oxygenase in Inflammation, Insulin-Signalling, Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are chronic conditions associated with elevated oxidative/inflammatory activities with a continuum of tissue insults leading to more severe cardiometabolic and renal complications including myocardial infarction and end-stage-renal damage. A common denominator of these chronic conditions is the enhanced the levels of cytokines like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL-6), IL-1β and resistin, which in turn activates the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-κB pathways, creating a vicious cycle that exacerbates insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and related complications. Emerging evidence indicates that heme oxygenase (HO) inducers are endowed with potent anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing effects besides their ability to suppress immune/inflammatory response. Importantly, the HO system abates inflammation through several mechanisms including the suppression of macrophage-infiltration and abrogation of oxidative/inflammatory transcription factors like NF-κB, JNK and activating protein-1. This review highlights the mechanisms by which the HO system potentiates insulin signalling, with particular emphasis on HO-mediated suppression of oxidative and inflammatory insults. The HO system could be explored in the search for novel remedies against cardiometabolic diseases and their complications. PMID:20508722

  7. Brain sterol dys-regulation in sporadic AD and MCI: Relationship to heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Hascalovici, Jacob R.; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Holcroft, Christina A.; Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Bennett, David A.; Schipper, Hyman M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the impact of aging and Alzheimer disease (AD) on brain cholesterol (CH), CH precursors and oxysterol homeostasis. Altered CH metabolism and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are characteristic of AD-affected neural tissues. We recently determined that HO-1 over-expression suppresses total CH levels by augmenting liver X receptor-mediated CH efflux and enhances oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. Lipids and proteins were extracted from post-mortem human frontal cortex derived from subjects with sporadic AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and no cognitive impairment (NCI; n=17 per group) enrolled in the Religious Orders Study, an ongoing clinical-pathologic study of aging and AD. ELISA was used to quantify human HO-1 protein expression from brain tissue and GC-MS to quantify total CH, CH precursors and relevant oxysterols. The relationships of sterol/oxysterol levels to HO-1 protein expression and clinical/demographic variables were determined by multivariable regression and non-parametric statistical analyses. Decreased CH, increased oxysterol and increased CH precursors concentrations in the cortex correlated significantly with HO-1 levels in MCI and AD, but not NCI. Specific oxysterols correlated with disease state, increasing neuropathological burden, neuropsychological impairment and age. A model featuring compensated and de-compensated states of altered sterol homeostasis in MCI and AD are presented based on the current data set and our earlier in vitro work. PMID:19522732

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Light-dependent regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis in chlorophyllide a oxygenase overexpressing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Biswal, Ajaya K; Reddy, Vanga S; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2005-01-14

    Chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) that converts chlorophyllide a to chlorophyllide b was overexpressed in tobacco to increase chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis and alter the Chl a/b ratio. Transgenic plants along with their wild-type cultivars were grown in low and high light intensities. In low light there was 20% increase in chlorophyll b contents in transgenic plants, which resulted in 16% reduction in the Chl a/b ratio. In high light, total Chl contents were 31% higher in transgenic plants than those of wild type. The increase in Chl a was 19% and that of Chl b was 72% leading to 31% decline of Chl a/b ratio. The increase in Chl b contents was accompanied by enhanced CAO expression that was highly pronounced in low light. As compared to low light, in high light Lhcb1 and Chl a/b transcripts abundance was significantly increased in transgenic plants suggesting a close relationship between Chl b synthesis and cab gene expression. However, there was a small increase in expression of LHCII proteins, which did not correspond to 72% increase in Chl b content in transgenic line, implying that LHCPII has the ability to bind more Chl b molecules.

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 as a Target for TGF-β in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a multifunctional regulatory cytokine that is implicated in a variety of kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy and chronic transplant rejection where it promotes stimulation of the extracellular matrix deposition, cell proliferation and migration. TGF-β exerts its biological functions largely via its downstream complex signaling molecules, Smad proteins. Paradoxically, TGF-β is also essential for normal homeostasis and suppression of inflammation through mechanisms that are yet to be fully elucidated. One feasible mechanism by which TGF-β may exert its beneficial properties is through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Induction of this redox sensitive enzyme is known to be cytoprotective through its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in different conditions including several kidney diseases. In this overview, recent advances in our understanding of the role of TGF-β in kidney disease, its molecular regulation of HO-1 expression and the potential role of HO-1 induction as a therapeutic modality in TGF-β mediated kidney diseases are highlighted. PMID:22835459

  11. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice’s brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  12. The influence of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors on the cardiovascular effects of hydralazine in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Garcia-Marquez, F

    1985-01-01

    In order to explore the postulated role of prostaglandins in the vasodilator effects of hydralazine, blood pressure and heart rate responses to the drug were determined in anesthetized and conscious rats with and without pretreatment with indomethacin or aspirin. Changes in rectal temperature were also measured. In control animals, hydralazine produced an almost immediate fall in blood pressure and a slowly developing tachycardia which bore no temporal relation with the hypotension. These effects were accompanied by a moderate increase in temperature. Pretreatment with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the blood pressure response, but completely blocked and in some cases reversed the tachycardia. The hyperthermic response was also reversed. These results can be taken as evidence for a role of prostaglandins in the tachycardia and hyperthermia, but not in the hypotension elicited by hydralazine in rats. In the absence of direct measurements of prostaglandin synthesis and release, however, no firm support for this possibility is offered by the present findings and alternative explanations are considered.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls. The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population. PMID:26313808

  14. Heme Oxygenase 1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Pedro; Agúndez, José A.G.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several reports suggested a role of heme oxygenase genes 1 and 2 (HMOX1 and HMOX2) in modifying the risk to develop Parkinson disease (PD). Because essential tremor (ET) and PD share phenotypical and, probably, etiologic factors of the similarities, we analyzed whether such genes are related with the risk to develop ET. We analyzed the distribution of allelic and genotype frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 single nucleotide polymorphisms, as well as the presence of copy number variations of these genes in 202 subjects with familial ET and 747 healthy controls. Allelic frequencies of rs2071746T and rs1051308G were significantly lower in ET patients than in controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 and HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphisms and the risk to develop ET in the Spanish population. PMID:26091465

  15. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-04-21

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP(+)- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP(+) or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD.

  16. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  17. The Haptoglobin-CD163-Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway for Hemoglobin Scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Jens Haugbølle; Moestrup, Søren K.

    2013-01-01

    The haptoglobin- (Hp-) CD163-heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is an efficient captor-receptor-enzyme system to circumvent the hemoglobin (Hb)/heme-induced toxicity during physiological and pathological hemolyses. In this pathway, Hb tightly binds to Hp leading to CD163-mediated uptake of the complex in macrophages followed by lysosomal Hp-Hb breakdown and HO-1-catalyzed conversion of heme into the metabolites carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. The plasma concentration of Hp is a limiting factor as evident during accelerated hemolysis, where the Hp depletion may cause serious Hb-induced toxicity and put pressure on backup protecting systems such as the hemopexin-CD91-HO pathway. The Hp-CD163-HO-1 pathway proteins are regulated by the acute phase mediator interleukin-6 (IL-6), but other regulatory factors indicate that this upregulation is a counteracting anti-inflammatory response during inflammation. The heme metabolites including bilirubin converted from biliverdin have overall an anti-inflammatory effect and thus reinforce the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the Hp-CD163-HO-1 pathway. Future studies of animal models of inflammation should further define the importance of the pathway in the anti-inflammatory response. PMID:23781295

  18. New Insights into Intracellular Locations and Functions of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Louise L.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Ni, Jun; Hamid, Hafizah A.; Parish, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) plays a critical role in the protection of cells, and the inducible enzyme is implicated in a spectrum of human diseases. The increasing prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic morbidities, for which current treatment approaches are not optimal, emphasizes the necessity to better understand key players such as HMOX1 that may be therapeutic targets. Recent Advances: HMOX1 is a dynamic protein that can undergo post-translational and structural modifications which modulate HMOX1 function. Moreover, trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to other cellular compartments, including the nucleus, highlights that HMOX1 may play roles other than the catabolism of heme. Critical Issues: The ability of HMOX1 to be induced by a variety of stressors, in an equally wide variety of tissues and cell types, represents an obstacle for the therapeutic exploitation of the enzyme. Any capacity to modulate HMOX1 in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases should be tempered with an appreciation that HMOX1 may have an impact on cancer. Moreover, the potential for heme catabolism end products, such as carbon monoxide, to amplify the HMOX1 stress response should be considered. Future Directions: A more complete understanding of HMOX1 modifications and the properties that they impart is necessary. Delineating these parameters will provide a clearer picture of the opportunities to modulate HMOX1 in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20: 1723–1742. PMID:24180287

  19. Heme-oxygenase-1 implications in cell morphology and the adhesive behavior of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Valacco, Pia; Paez, Alejandra; Elguero, Belen; Toscani, Martin; Jaworski, Felipe; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Cotignola, Javier; Marti, Marcelo; Binaghi, Maria; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Although previous studies in PCa have focused on cell adherens junctions (AJs), key players in metastasis, they have left the molecular mechanisms unexplored. Inflammation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in the regulation of cell adhesion and the integrity of the epithelium. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative and inflammatory damage. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 is implicated in the adhesive and morphological properties of tumor cells. Genes differentially regulated by HO-1 were enriched for cell motility and adhesion biological processes. HO-1 induction, increased E-cadherin and β-catenin levels. Immunofluorescence analyses showed a striking remodeling of E-cadherin/β-catenin based AJs under HO-1 modulation. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin coincided with a markedly change in cell morphology. To further our analysis we sought to identify HO-1 binding proteins that might participate in the regulation of cell morphology. A proteomics approach identified Muskelin, as a novel HO-1 partner, strongly implicated in cell morphology regulation. These results define a novel role for HO-1 in modulating the architecture of cell-cell interactions, favoring a less aggressive phenotype and further supporting its anti-tumoral function in PCa. PMID:24961479

  20. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor, nabumetone, inhibits proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vural, Filiz; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsan, Güner Hayri; Ateş, Halil; Demirkan, Fatih; Pişkin, Ozden; Undar, Bülent

    2005-05-01

    The anti-tumor effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors has been documented in several studies. COX2 inhibitors have attracted more attention because of the fewer side-effects and the more prominent anti-tumor effects. However, experience with these drugs in hematological malignancies is limited. In our study, a potent COX2 inhibitor, nabumetone (NBT), was investigated for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in K-562 and Meg-01 chronic myeloid leukemia blastic cell lines as a single agent or in combination with adriamycin (ADR) and interferon alpha (IFN-a). In these cell lines, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation was observed with NBT. We observed no significant apoptotic effect of NBT. However, NBT potentiated the apoptotic effect of ADR in the K-562 cell line. Bcl-2 expression was reduced by NBT (11% vs. 2%). The combination of NBT with IFN did not have any significant effect on the K-562 cell line. We suggest that NBT inhibits proliferation and potentiates the apoptotic effect of ADR in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

  1. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy.

  2. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  3. Green tea extract attenuates MNU-induced photoreceptor cell apoptosis via suppression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Tsubura, Airo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of green tea extract (GTE) on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced photoreceptor cell apoptosis were examined, and the possible mechanisms of action of GTE were assessed. Alterations in the retinal morphological architecture were determined by hematoxylin-eosin staining, vimentin immunoreactivity, and photoreceptor cell apoptosis (TUNEL labeling). Expression of oxidant marker, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, mRNA levels in outer nuclear cells was assessed by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Sprague-Dawley rats were given 40 mg/kg MNU at 7 weeks of age in the absence and presence of 250 mg/kg GTE treatment (once daily from 3 days prior to MNU for a maximum 10 days). Although photoreceptor cell degeneration began 24 hr after MNU, the morphological effects of GTE at the time point were not definitive. However, GTE lowered TUNEL labeling and HO-1 mRNA expression. At 7 days after MNU, photoreceptor damage was attenuated by GTE treatment. Therefore, the ability of GTE to reduce MNU-induced photoreceptor cell apoptosis may be due to its antioxidant properties.

  4. Substrate promiscuity of RdCCD1, a carotenoid cleavage oxygenase from Rosa damascena.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Schrader, Jens; Sandmann, Gerhard; Schmidt, Holger; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-03-01

    Several of the key flavor compounds in rose essential oil are C(13)-norisoprenoids, such as beta-damascenone, beta-damascone, and beta-ionone which are derived from carotenoid degradation. To search for genes putatively responsible for the cleavage of carotenoids, cloning of carotenoid cleavage (di-)oxygenase (CCD) genes from Rosa damascena was carried out by a degenerate primer approach and yielded a full-length cDNA (RdCCD1). The RdCCD1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with a multitude of carotenoid substrates. The RdCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9-10 and 9'-10' positions to produce a C(14) dialdehyde and two C(13) products, which vary depending on the carotenoid substrates. RdCCD1 could also cleave lycopene at the 5-6 and 5'-6' positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. Expression of RdCCD1 was studied by real-time PCR in different tissues of rose. The RdCCD1 transcript was present predominantly in rose flower, where high levels of volatile C(13)-norisoprenoi